Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the Philadelphia Museum of Art"

See other formats


< 2 

I E 
_.^ 

< ^^ 

g < 

O Q. 

^ I- 

Ul Z 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



THE SIXTEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LISTOF MEMBERS 



For the Year ending December 31, 1891 



MEMORIAL HALL 

Fairmount Park, Philadelphia 

1892. 



OFFICERS FOR 1892 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 

TREASURER, SECRETARY AND CURATOR, 

CHARLES D. CLARK. DALTON DORR 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS 

Tjie Governor of the State. The Mayor of the City 

BY APPOINTMENT 

Thomas Cochran, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Theodore C. Search, Appointed by Select Council. 

F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

S. G. Thompson, Appointed by the Commissionet-s of Fairmoimt Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

To serve for three years : 

John T. Morris, Charles E. Dana, 

Stuart Wood, Isaac Norris, M. D. 

To serve for tioo years : 

Charles D. Clark, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr. 

To serve for one year : 

John Struthers, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, Thomas Hockley. 

(2) 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



(For the Eeport see page 21.) 





chairman, 


MRS. 


E. D. 


GILLESPIE. 


SECRETARY, 




treasurer, 


MRS. F. R. SHELTON. 




MRS. CRAWFORD ARNOLD 


Mrs. Matthew Baird, 




Mrs. S. M. Hyneman, 


Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 




Mrs. Charles B. Keen, 


Mrs. Wm. Burnham, 




Mrs. J. Geo. Klemm, 


"Mrs. C. Howard Clark, Jr., 




Mrs. Craige Lippincott, 


Miss Mary Cohen, 




Mrs. DeCourcy May, 


Mrs. Geo. K. Crozer, 




Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 


Mrs. Roland G. Curtin, 




Mrs. Byron P. Moulton, 


Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 




Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Mrs. W. H. Eisenbrey, 




Mrs. John Sanders, 


Mrs. Horace B. Hare, 




Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 


Mrs. John Harrison, 




Mrs. W. Hinckle Smith, 


Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 




Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 


Mrs. G. C. Hererton, 




Mrs. Francis Howard Williams, 


Mrs. Thomas Hockley, 




Mrs. Howard Wood, 




Miss Zell. 



(3) 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



This report is for the year ending December '31st, 1891. 

The financial condition of the Institution shows a gratifying im- 
provement. This is partially indicated by the report of the Treasurer 
for the fiscal year, which ends May 31st. The receipts from all 
sources were $33,363.80, and the expenditures $32,785.30. Of the 
latter, $10,408.36 was expended on the maintenance of the Museum, 
and $16,822.87 on the maintenance of the School. The endowment 
fund has been increased during the year by the bequest of George S. 
Pepper, ^19,050; Five Life Memberships, $500; Associate Committee 
of Women to be held as the nucleus of a fund for the erection of a 
new building, $4,500 ; and $1,000 from Mrs. William Weightman, 
Jr., to found what is to be known as the William Weightman, Jr., 
Scholarship. Notification has been received from the executors of the 
will of Joseph Neumann, deceased, of a legacy of $5,000 bequeathed 
to the Institution after the death of his wife and daughter, and an 
additional legacy of one-tenth of the residue of the estate, after the 
death of his wife and daughter, provided the latter dies without child 
or children surviving. 

On the 15th of June, Governor Pattison signed the bill mailing 
an appropriation for the use of the School for the current two years, 
thus enabling this department of the Institution to keep open and 
to offer for new appointments those State Scholarships which would 
otherwise have lapsed through want of funds. In this connection the 
thanks of the Trustees are again due to the Associate Committee of 
Women for theil: admirable and successful work on behalf of the 
School. 

(5) 



The plan begun last year of obtaining architectural casts to be 
placed in the Rotunda of Memorial Hall, has been continued this year 
by purchasing a cast of the XVth Century Doorway, by Benedetto da 
Majano, in the Palazzo Vecchio, of Florence, and by placing orders 
for castings of the Stairway of the Pisano Pulpit in the Cathedral of 
Siena, and for castings of the beautiful bronze doors in the Capitol at 
Washington, by the late Randolph Rogers. The other collections in 
the Museum have received numerous additions by gift and loan. Nota- 
ble among the former are the valuable collection of Greek and Roman 
antique lamps, vases, and votive figures given by Mrs. John Harrison, 
and the marble statue of the Indian god, Parasnuth, given by Mr. 
John T. Morris. The interest and value of Dr. Robert H. Lamborn's 
loan collection of Mexican pictures have been greatly enhanced by the 
publication by Dr. Lamborn of an Essay on Mexican Painting and 
Painters, showing the development of the Spanish school of painting 
in Mexico, and thus directing attention to an important era in the 
art history of the New World. 

Another valuable addition to the Museum is the loan to it by the 
Rittenhouse Club of the Theodore Starr bequest of Arundel pictures. 
This is a very complete set of the publications of that Society, and it 
is the intention of the Trustees to exhibit these pictures in connection 
with those already belonging to the Museum or coming to it as a sub- 
scriber. 

Last fall a new roof was constructed over the east wing of Memo- 
rial Hall by the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. It is understood 
that the west wing will be similarly repaired this spring. When all the 
contemplated repairs are completed it will be possible to make a re- 
arrangement of the collections by which they will be seen to much 
much better advantage than at present. 

The admissions to the Museum for the year were 292,409. Of 
these 151,689 were Sunday visitors. 

At the last annual meeting of the Corporation, the Trustees were 
requested to proceed at once to provide additional quarters for the 
School, for a term of three years, in the Muhr building (if found suit- 
able for the purpose). The disposition of the building 1336 Spring 
Garden Street was left to the discretion of the Trustees. Pursuant to 
this resolution, the question of school location was again carefully 
considered, and the Muhr building not being found altogether suitable 
for the purpose, an arrangement was finally consummated by which a 



portion of the building Nos. 1303-7 Buttonwood Street was rented. 
During the summer vacation all the looms, machinery, etc., of the 
Textile School were removed to these new quarters. At the same time 
extensive alterations for the convenience of the teachers and scholars 
of the Art School were made in the old school building. The Art 
School now occupies all of the old school, and the Textile School 
three floors of the Buttonwood Street building. For the first time in 
a number of years, there is something like adequate accommodation 
provided for both departments, and it is confidently believed that the 
latter is the most complete and best equipped Textile School in the 
country. 

The total registration in the whole School at the first of the year 
was 315 as "against 289 for 1890. Subtracting duplicate registers, the 
actual number of individual students was 282 as against 267 ; a gain 
of 15. 

The cost of transferring the Textile School to its new quarters 
and setting up looms, machinery, etc., amounts to about $2,250, 
toward which contributions have been made as follows : Erben, Search 
& Co., Wm. Wood & Co., Thomas Dolan & Co., John Bromley & 
Sons, Rowland, Croft, Son& Co., George C. Hetzel & Co., Wm. H. 
Grundy & Co., George D. Bromley, each $250. 

Since the Schools have been moved to larger quarters, the manu- 
facturers of Philadelphia have taken hold and formed an Advisory 
Committee for the purpose of giving the most complete practical direc- 
tion to the Textile Department. This Committee now consists of: 
T. C. Search, Wm. Wood, Thomas Dolan, John Bromley, Rowland 
Croft, George P. Retzel, Wm. R. Grundy, and James Doak, Jr. 

Again it becomes our painful duty to record in our report the 
death of another of the members of this Board, Mr. Renry C. Gibson. 
Mr. Gibson was one of the original incorporators of the Institution 
in 1876, and a member of the first Board of Trustees. Re was re- 
elected annually ; and during this long connection with the Institution 
he manifested his interest in its progress by numerous liberal subscrip- 
tions toward its maintenance. 

Following are the reports of the Curator of the Museum and the 
Principal of the School. 



THE MUSEUM. 

There was a slight falling off in the number of visitors to the 
Museum this year over last year. The total was 292,409. Last year 
it was 312,322. This decrease maybe partly accounted for by the 
number of inclement Sundays and holidays, and by the closing of the 
East Gallery, the Moore, and Lamborn rooms while the new roof over 
the East Wing was constructing. 

The plaster cast of the Siena Pulpit, mentioned in the last re- 
port, which is the first of the collection of architectural casts for the 
Rotunda, was put in place eatly in the year. During the summer, the 
second purchase for this collection, a cast of the Doorway by Bene- 
detto da Majano, in the Hall of Lilies, in the Palazzo Vecchio of 
Florence, was received and erected. 

Through the kind interest and influence of a friend of the Museum 
in Italy, the government authorities have granted us permission to have 
a casting made of the staircase of the Pulpit in the Siena Cathedral. 
This staircase, although a later addition, is in admirable harmony with 
the original work of Pisano. The order for the casting has been given 
and the work is now under way. We are also indebted to Mr. John 
Struthers, one of our Trustees, now in Europe, for obtaining for us 
from the Museum in Munich castings of the models made by the late 
Randolph Rogers for the bronze doors in the Capitol at Washing- 
ton. Mr. Struthers has made a generous contribution toward the sum 
necessary to make the purchase. 

Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore and Mrs. John W. Field, to whom the 
Museum has been so largely indebted in the past, have made valuable 
additions to their former gifts. Mrs. John Harrison is another gen- 
erous donor. Altogether, the total number of gifts received is 139. 

The most important loan is that made by the Rittenhouse Club of 
the Theodore Starr collection of chromo-lithographic prints published 
by the Arundel Society, some 150 in all. The Museum is now a 
subscribing member of this Society, and it is the intention of the 
Committee to have the Starr collection framed and exhibited with the 
Museum series. 

Early in the year four glass money-boxes with printed cards at- 
tached, inviting visitors to contribute to the purchase fund of the Mu- 
seum, were placed in the galleries. The contributions received in 
this way have so far amounted to $177.05. 




DOCRWAY, 
By Benedetto da Majano in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence. 



Gifts of objects were made by — 
E. S. Cook : 

Bronze Figure of Harpocrates. 
Dr. E. S. Vanderslice : 

Spanish Glass Vase. 
W. L. Oakford : 

Eleven pieces of old English China; two "Tucker" Pitchers; a pair of 
Chinese Embroidered Slippers. 
Dr. William Pepper : 

Four pieces of Oriental pottrey brought from the East by Dr. Peters. 
Miss Elizabeth Schaffer: 

Embroidered Linen Sampler. 
Mrs. John W. Field : 

A collection of 43 objects including examples of English Furniture, choice Por- 
celains and Bronzes, Florentine Iron Work, American Mosaic Glass, European Laces, 
etc. 
John T. Morris: 

Marble Idol, the Indian God Parasnuth. 
WM I. Steel: 

Old American Carbine. 
Mrs. John Harrison : 

Thirty pieces of Greek and Roman Antique Pottery, consisting of Vases, Bowls, 
Lamps, Toys, and Votive Figures. 
Atkinson & Myhlertz: 

Thirty-nine samples of Italian Marbles. 

Loans were made by — 

Mrs. Bloomfield- Moore, Miss Eva M. Tappan, John Struthers, E. Stanley Hart, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., Miss M. J. Lewis, Charles Schoneman, W. K. Felton, 
Rittenhouse Club. 

Dalton Dorr, Curator of Miiseiun. 



lO 




Dagger, with Sheath of Silver, in 
the collection at Memorial Hall. 
From a Pen-and-ink Drawing by 
Fanny C. L. Smith, a pupil in the 
School. 



THE SCHOOL 

The satisfactory progress in the work of the School which has 
been noted in all the later reports has suffered no interruption. The 
Textile School has quite outgrown the accommodations provided for 
it at 1336 Spring Garden Street, before the end of last year, and dur- 
ing the summer of 1891 it was transferred to rooms leased for the 
purpose at 1303-5-7 Buttonwood Street, and the School of Chemistry 
and Dyeing was transferred to the same building, thus uniting the two 
Schools, which had been separated before. Considerable additions to 
the equipment of both these Schools was made at the time of this re- 
moval, eight new looms being added to the weaving department and 
a dye-house with very complete appointments : zinc floor, copper- 
lined tanks, and steam connections being constructed as an adjunct 
to the Laboratory. 



II 

A large room has been rented for the purpose of being fitted with 
carding and spinning machinery, all of which is expected to be in 
place and ready for occupancy and use at the beginning of the next 
school year. 

It is at once gratifying and disappointing to note that the in- 
creased accommodations which were thus provided were promptly 
filled at the very beginning of the school year, so that a considerable 
number of applicants had again (for the same thing happened last 
year) to be denied admission. 

Nine (9) applicants for admission to the Textile Class, some of 
whom came from a considerable distance, one from Boston, one from 
Chicago, and one from Japan, had to be turned away altogether, while 
several others could only be provided with partial or substituted 
courses instead of the full courses which they desired to pursue. 

This experience emphasizes anew and with increased force the 
need of a permanent building in which the different departments of 
this Institution can be united, and each provided with much more ade- 
quate facilities than has ever been the case hitherto. 

That the School, in spite of the limitations and disadvantages under 
which it has worked, has made so distinct an impression and gained 
for its methods such encouraging recognition is certainly sufficient 
demonstration of its usefulness, and proof that confidence in its per- 
manence and almost indefinite development will not be misplaced. 

The ill health of Mr. Posselt necessitated his giving up the di- 
\ rection of the Textile School early in the year, and Mr. France, who 
had been connected with the School almost from the day of its 
establishment, and had rendered it the most valuable and untiring 
service, was appointed to succeed him as Head-Master of this De- 
partment. 

The regular work of this School is supplemented this year by lec- 
tures on Mill Economy and Construction ; The Selection of Raw Ma- 
terials, and related subjects by gentlemen of large experience, and the 
course is sure to prove a valuable and attractive addition to the work 
of the class-room, the laboratory, and the weave room. Among those 
who have already consented to lecture in this way are : 

T. C. Search, on Mill Economy, two Lectures. 

S. N. D. North, Secretary of National Association of Woolen 
Manufacturers, on Progress of Woolen Manufacture, one Lecture. 



12 

Francis W. Whiting, architect, on Mill Construction, two 
Lectures. 

Charles H. Harding, on Selection of Wool for Manufacturing 
Purposes, two Lectures. 

It is gratifying to note that the School attracts each year a class 
of students which is not only larger than that of the preceding year, 
but better prepared to profit by the instruction afforded. It is gratifying 
because it furnishes evidence of a very genuine appreciation of the 
work of the School among those it is expressly designed to serve and 
to whom it is capable of being of the most use, those, namely, who 
while destined for, and ambitious to succeed in, industrial pursuits, 
bring to the study of technical subjects minds already well trained in 
preparatory schools. 

A Class in Stained Glass Work was organized at the beginning of 
the current school year with Miss Mara L. Holt as instructor, and one 
of the rooms of the building at 1336 Spring Garden Street was as- 
signed to the use of this Department. 

At the time of the removal of the Textile School during the past 
summer, quite extensive alterations and improvements to this building 
were made. The partitions and closets separating the front and back 
rooms on the west side of the second and third floors were removed, 
thus making one large room on each floor out of what was before two 
chambers and four closets. 

The entire second floor of the main building as thus remodelled 
has been assigned to the Painting Class, under Mr. Stratton, while the 
Drawing Classes, under Mr. Lachenmeyer, have been located on the 
third floor. 

The Modelling Class, under Miss Slater, has been removed to the 
first floor of the annex, formerly occupied by the power looms, and 
the classes in Applied Design, under Miss Goodwin and Mr. Rosenz- 
wey, occupy the second floor of the same building, one of those which 
were formerly filled with hand looms. 

The Carving Class, under Mr. Simons, now occupies the second 
floor of the back part of the main building, the part which con- 
nects it with the annex, and the third floor has been assigned to 
the class in Stained Glass Work already mentioned. 

The office has been removed to the large room on the first 
floor formerly occupied by the Modelling Class, and the Library is 



13 

also installed in the same room, while the former office is oc- 
cupied as a room for the sale of supplies. 

The Lecture -room has been enlarged by the removal of the par- 
tition which separated it from the former Textile class-room, and the 
halls and stairways, as well as the rooms in which the changes above 
noted were made, have been renovated throughout. 

Gifts of machinery and materials for the use of the Textile School 
have been made by the following firms: Geo. C. Hetzel & Co., 
Chester ; Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia ; The Fairmount 
Machine Co., Philadelphia. 

One hundred and six volumes and pamphlets were added to the 
School Library during the year, of which twenty-seven were purchased, 
twelve by the School and fifteen by funds derived from other sources. 

Seventy-nine volumes were given by Dr. Wm. H. Egle, State Libra- 
rian ; Messrs. T. A. Randall & Co., Dr. Lindahl, Prof. Orton, J. R 
Proctor, E. T. Dumble, Chas. Houdley, G. A. Bethune, State Geolo- 
gist of Minnesota; T. C. Search, TJic Dry Goods Economist, E. A. 
Posselt, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, Bureau of Education, Washington, 
Geo. Thomas, and Stuart Wood. 

A prize of $io, which was offered by the Associate Committee 
of Women for a design for a programme to be used at the ball given 
at the Academy of Music, on the evening of December 9th, 1891, was 
awarded to Miss Eva F. Bowman. 

The usual closing exercises were held in Memorial Hall, May 
29th, 1 89 1. Addresses were made by the President, by G. Harry 
Davis, Esq., by Mr. Frank P. Bennett, and by Mrs. E. D. Gillespie. 

An exhibition of students' work was made at the same time and 
place, which remained open during the summer. 

Six appointments to State scholarships have been made by the 
Governor during the year, viz.: For Bedford, Elk, Lancaster, North- 
umberland, Schuylkill, and Wyoming Counties. Twelve holders of 
these appointments are at present registered in the School. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Educa- 
tion were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination conducted by 
the Principal, each grammar school Principal being authorized to send 
candidates. 

Five appointments to these free scholarships are made each year, 
each appointment being made for three years. Of the fifteen appointees 
registered in the last three years twelve are still in the School. 



The following certificates and prizes were awarded at the closing 
exercises at the end of the school year, May 29th, 1891 : 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize — Eva F. Bowman. 

(A set of instruments and materials of the value of $25.00 offered by the President 
for the best full set of drawings executed by students in the course of Industrial 
Drawing. ) 

Honorable mention to Myrtie E. Nye and Carrie V. Harkness. 

RiPKA Prize. — Mary Victoria Galler, 

(A color outfit given by Messrs. Ripka & Co. for the best design for decoration in 
color.) 

Honorable mention to Helen Augusta Fox. 

Richards Prize, P^irst. — Portfolio of Etchings. Elizabeth M. Hallowell. 

Richards Prize, Second. — An Etching. Sarah J. Harvey. 

(Given for the best work in pen and ink by Mr. F. DeBourg Richards.) 

Wilson & Fenimore Prize, First. — $15.00. Anna Kane May. 

Wilson & Fenimore Prize, Second. — $10.00. Susan Rogers Egbert. 

(Given by the firm of that name for designs for wall paper.) 

The above prizes were awarded by an Artists' Committee consisting of Messrs. 
Thomas Hovenden, Chas. E. Dana, and John J. Boyle. 

The following prizes were awarded by the Associate Committee of 
Women : 

Maddock Prize, First. — $20.00. Helen Augusta Fox. 

Maddock Prize, Second. — $10.00. Florence C. Fetherston. 

(Given by Mr. Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for designs for a covered 
vegetable dish in decorated china.) 

Associate Committee of Women Prizes, First. — $20.00 for general excellence 
of First Year's Work. Myrtie E. Nye. 

Honorable mention to Eva F. Bowman and Carrie V. Harkness. 

Prize of $10.00 for excellence of work in modelling. Debbie D. Weisel. 

Honorable mention to Mary H. Hogan. 

Prize of $10.00 for Design for Oil Cloth. Isabel B. Purdy. 

Honorable mention to Louis Shultz. 

Prize of $io.oo for Design for Carpet. Anna Laura Kelley. 

Honorable mention to Howard M. Wilkinson. 

Certificates, Industrial Drawing. — Wm. H. Bates, Frank Berner, Eva F. 
Bowman, Wm. F. Gray, Carrie V. Harkness, Myrtie E. Nye, Lawrence Seckel, Wm. 
Wolfersberger. 

Applied Design. — Susan R. Egbert, Helen A. Fox, T. Neilson Geiger, Annette 
I. Kiehl, Anna Kane May, Louis Shultz, Howard M. Wilkinson, Sara Mercer, 

Diplomas. — Mary H. Hogan, Anna Laura Kelley, Paul Lachenmeyer, Janet B. 
MacAlister, Maud Maginniss, Lucy P. Maclntire, Cora Warren, D. D. Weisel. 



15 



TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

FiNCKEL Prize. — ^25.00. John W. Zellers. 

(Given by Mr. M. L. Finckel of the Germantown Hosiery Mills for the best work 
by a graduate of the full textile course of three years.) 

Special School Prize. — $25.00. Charles J. Van Gunten. 

American Wool Reporter Prizes, offered by Mr. Frank P Bennett, proprietor 
of the American Wool Reporter^ of Boston, Mass. — $30.00 for the best work by a pupil 
who has completed a two years' course of study in this department, awarded to 
Bradley C. Algeo. 

$20.00 for the best work produced by a pupil who has completed the first year's 
course of study in the same department, awarded to Frank Wood. 

Special School Prize.— $20,00. Channing Smith. 

Diplomas. — Charles J. Van Gunten, John Wm. Zellers. 

Second Year's Certificates. — Bradley C. Algeo, Albert Coupe. 

First Year's Certificates. — Wm. S. Appleyard, Henry L. Blum, John Crowther, 
Harry C. Graf, Martin Marks, Channing Smith, John Stubbs, George J. Walenta, 
Frank Wood, Wm. Raymer Weeden. 

Certificatks Awarded on the Completion of the Two Years' Evening 
Course. — Robert D. Adam, John Blountz, Jnhn W. Campbell, James W. Crawford, 
Thomas O'Toole, David C. Patchell, Joseph F. Resstle, Wm. Rich. 

Appended are lists of the students registered since December 31st, 
1890, showing their occupations and the localities from which they 
have come : 



Accountant, i^ 

Architects, 14 

Artists, 6 

Barber, i 

Beamer, I 

Bookbinder, I 

Bookkeepers, 6 

Brakeman, I 

Cabinetmaker, I 

Card Stamper, I 

Carvers, 4 

Clerks, 8 

Cloth Manufacturers, lo 

Compositor, I 

Dentist, I 

Designers, 52 

Draughtsmen, 10 

Dressmakers, 2 

Dyers, 10 

Engravers 8 

Foremen in Factories, 2 

Galvanized Iron- Worker, I 

Loom Fixers, 4 

Machinists, 2 



Marble-Worker, I 

Milliner, I 

Modellers, 2 

Painters, lo 

Paper Hanger, I 

Penman, I 

Physicians, 5 

Printer, I 

Salesmen, 3 

Saw-Maker, i 

Spinners, 6 

Stained Glass- Worker, I 

Stenographer, i 

Students, 86 

Superintendents, 4 

Tailor, i 

Teachers, 28 

Warper, i 

Watch Case Makers, i 

Weavers, n 

Wholesale Dry Goods Dealer, . . I 

Total, 315 



i6 

PVom Connecticut, 5 

Delaware, 3 

Massachusetts, 12 

Michigan, i 

Mississippi, i 

New Jersey, 12 

New York, 3 

Ohio, I 

Rhode Island, i 

Pennsylvania, 276 



Total, 



315 



L. W. Miller, Principal of School. 

























* 


* 


* 




^(. 




f 


1 


00 


00 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


" TO 




vg" 


s 


TO 

va 


~ 


TO 


i? 


TO 


2* 


TO 


g> 


:3 


U 


^ 
































> 


►^ 


P 

3 


,^ 


^ 


f 


CU 


Ov 


en 


^ 


JO 


to 


4^ 








M 


B 


3 
3 








U) 


en 


i) 


"k3 


'lO 


en 


To 


Ov 


o\ 


eo 




c 


E 


«o 


V) 


00 


O 











TO 


VI 




4>- 






p 


o 





00 


m 




eo 


-^ 


'- 




W 


V! 


Ov 


VO 


VO 


s 


■3 






























JJ 


p 
































!i v<; 

~ rr 


































- 


Jo 


o 


TO 


en 


J3V 


K> 




OJ 




to 








i" 




1 


i 


"m 


Cn 


vb 






is 


M 




;^ 


"on 


VI 


eo 


"bo 


1 


o 


s 


VI 


^ 


V) 


s 


1^ 


Ov 


'{J 


"1 


eo 


b; 


>o 


12 


§§ 


> 


p 

9 






























o W 
































o' 


1 














» 
















































3 






„ 


„ 


^ 




„ 


„ 








M 










i 


-< 


p 




f- 




Ov 








Ov 














s. 
































5- 


00 




(X> 


V] 




Ov 




^ 


VO 


en 


en 




" 










oo 


OS 


en 


en 


TO 


U) 


8^ 


VO 


TO 






ov 


13- 











u> 


00 


VO 


W 


Ov 













eo 




p:* 


3- 






























=r 


rt 
































f» 


3 
































~ *n 


C 
































n 


3 




en 


00 


M 


K3 


8 


</> 


:^ 


w 


^ 


W 


^ 






M 


3 


? 


> 

13 


i. 


's 


f 


i 


i 


VO 
TO 


S' 


3 


1 


1 


Sv 


i 


VO 
VO 
V4 


i 


3 

s 

w 


o 

►»> 
■< 

k; 

o 


2. 


































t 


<I 


'^ 


.8 


V4 


10 
VI 


;p 


^TO 


00 


w 


ov 


„ 


„ 


^ 


1 




S 
































S' 








i) 


O 


i 


"to 


en 


W 


ov 


TO 


Ov 


i 




VO 


o 


p 


'g 


in 


*. 


•S. 


,2^ 


t 


8^ 


g^ 


^ 


O 


g' 


8 


s 


8 


«< 






























n 


3 
































o 


3 
































- 3 


s 






























































T) 


































»5 


o' 




K3 




























3 




<.4 




a> 


_N 


VI 




en 


VO 


TO 


w 












v< 




c 


"bo 


iji 


w 


U) 


u> 




en 




"ov 


Zj 


To 


*. 


Ov 


"To 




0. 


3 


tn 


Ln 


s 


4^ 





VO 


^ 


eo 


M 


VO 


VO 


TO 


VO 


M 


n 




n 




o\ 


w 






VO 






OV 


VO 


Ov 




I 


§■ 


































P 
































5 
- P 


3 






























































? 


>i 




Ln 


^ 


to 


eo 


10 


K) 


)0 


^ 


„ 


>, 


to 








F 


^ 


<__, 


O 


00 








vp 


Ov 




IP 


Ov 


*- 












































^ 





4^ 








4>. 


4>. 


en 


i 


^ 


Ov 


Ov 


Ov 




;i 


«|r 


^J 


en 




v) 


VO 


Ov 


to 


eo 


VO 




Ov 


VO 


en 




^ 


VI 




Ul 


« 










VO 


M 


eo 




Ov 




■ 
































cr 


































>< 




































U 


-*>. 


en 


w 


_j^ 


W 


M 


to 


to 


„ 


„ 








„ 


f 


> 


^o\ 







ON 








IP 


en 
















c 
































"13 


OQ 




o 


en 








o\ 




vb 


8; 




TO 


TO 






n 


C 


o 


o\ 







TO 


4^ 






Ov 


U) 


TO 


4>- 


ov 






^ 


*. 


w 


TO 


Ov 


TO 


M 


(0 




en 


TO 




TO 




*• 


3 
ft] 


rY 
































































S 


































3 


Cfl 


































n 


4^ 








•«>■ 


M 


W 


(0 


eo 












w 


w 


•O 












TO 




TO 


jD 


VO 












































X 


() 


w 


VO 


>o* 




Ov 


8 




VD 






vj 


ov 






ov 


3* 


3 






en 




VI 


VO 


Ov 


eo 


eo 


en 


en 




00 




•^ 




° 


O 




4^ 


V) 


*- 


en 





4>- 






Ov 


eo 


2 


? 






























— ' 


3 




10 


K) 


„ 


M 


w 


M 


►0 


K> 


„ 


to 


„ 








to 


n 

o 


o 






_o\ 


J> 


p 


en 




O 


en 


)p 


^ 






M 


VO 


3 




































o 




\D 






OJ 


■^ 


vj 


vb 




"to 


TO 


TO 





To "O 


o 


*. 


Ln 


^ 


eo 


vj 


O 






ijy 


ov 


vg^ 


Ov 


U) 


VO 


Ov 


p 


2' 


-•>■ 






o\ 









o 




to 


O 


bo 


to 


3 


« 






























*<! 


■ 


































































« 




































o 
































U 


^ 


» 


IH 


„ 


„ 


^ 


„ 


^ 


„ 


H 


M 


,^ 


>, 












o 


> 




00 




w 


4>. 





JD 


o 


Ul 


p 










j» 




•< 


z 




































tjl 


^ 








"cy. 




V) 


"b 






^ 




TO 






3 


a 


*s 


W 


o\ 


TO 


eo 


eo 


TO 


VO 


eo 


TO 






eo 


vg^ 






o 


00 













TO 


VO 


4» 


-^. 


VO 




to 




o* 


H 


































n 


o 


































•1 


> 






































































r 


































o 








































o 


i^ 


;p 


w 




eo 


vj 




iJ\ 


Ov 


Ov 




















































"o 




VI 






■*M 


To 


en 




'to 


vb 






4>- 






3 




^ 




VI 


^ 




VO 






en 


TO 


VO 


VO 




■fc. 


TO 




M 


VO 





a. 




VO 


Ov 


VO 


ov 


►0 




4>- 


eo 


TO 


Ov 


OJ 




1 








































































I 


^ 


•H 


V) 


K> 


V) 


w 


TO 


TO 


Ov 


a 


eo 




„ 


^ 


VO l 


^ 


H 






o 


TO 




o\ 


W 


W 


TO 


en 


TO 


o 


en 






q 




1 






is 


1 




OV 


\ 


<b 


'to 


§ 


vb 




i 


% 


t ■ 


^ 


r 


)« 




































00 





































l8 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

May jisty i8go, to May jist, i8gi. 



ENDOWMENT FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 



Bequest of George S. Pepper, $19.05° 00 

Mortgage paid off, 10,000 00 

Associate Committee of Women, the income to be used for 
the School, and the principal to be held as the nu- 
cleus for a new school building, 4>500 00 

Five Life Memberships, 500 00 

Weightman Scholarships paid last year, and now invested, . 1,000 00 

$35,050 00 

INVESTED. 

New Lindell Hotel Bonds, received from estate of Geo. S. 

Pepper, $15,000 00 

$9,000 Lehigh Valley R. R. 4^ per cent, bonds, 9,22500 

Mortgage 1939 Vine Street, 5.ooo 00 

" on the School Building, 1336 Spring Garden ; paid 

off and held as part of Endowment Fund, 4,000 00 

Middlesex Banking Co. Debenture, for Weightman Scholar- 
ship, = 1,000 00 

Balance uninvested, 825 00 

$35,050 00 



TEMPLE FUND. 

Balance on hand June 1st, 1890, $3,313 46 

Income, • 2,710 21 

$6,023 67 

PAYMENTS. 

Printing Report of Pottery Exhibition, $92 H 

Contribution towards purchase of Siena Pulpit, 787 31 

Scholarships — three years 3,ooo 00 

Balance on hand, 2,144 25 

$6,023 67 



19 

GENERAL FUND. 

RECEIPTS. 

Annual Subscriptions, J^2,030 oo 

Income Endowment Fund, 3, 210 62 

" " " for 1890, not reported in that 

year, 34° 42 

Donations for Sundry purposes, 330 00 

" from Temple fund for the Siena Pulpit, .... 787 31 

State Appropriation, 10,000 00 

Scholarship Temple Fund for three years, 3, 000 00 

Tuition Fees : Art School, 2,534 00 

" *' Textile School, 2,563 00 

5,097 00 

Park Commission, 8,568 45 

$33,3^3 80 

PAYMENTS. 

Balance due Treasurer, $1,079 99 

" " T. C. Search, 595 50 

1,675 49 

Expenses of Museum, 10,408 36 

Purchase of Siena Pulpit, 987 31 

Expenses of Art School, 9,663 75 

'' " Textile School, 7,159 12 

16,822 87 

General Expenses, Commissions, Salary, Printing, etc., . . 1,891 27 
Investment for Weightman Scholarship, received last year, 

and used for current expenses, 1,000 00 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, 462 82 

" " " T. C. Search, 115 68 

: 578 50 

$33,3^3 80 

Balance of General Fund, $462 82 

" " Endowment Fund, 825 00 

" " Temple Fund, 2,144 25 

1^3,432 07 



STUART WOOD, Treasurer. 



Compared with the vouchers and found correct. 

Crawford Ai 
July 6th, 1891. T. P. Chandler 



Crawford Arnold, | Committee. 



20 



SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT. 

June jst^ i8gi, to December jist, i8gi. 



ENDOWMENT FUND. 



Balance on hand June 1st, ^^825 00 

Mortgage paid off, 1,400 00 

Balance Endowment Fund, $2,225 00 

GENERAL FUND. 

Balance on hand June 1st, $S1^ 5° 

Income Endowment Fund, 2,551 50 

Annual Subscriptions, 545 00 

Special Donations for Plaster Casts, 921 18 

" " U. S. Potters' Association, 300 00 

" " for Prizes, 45 00 

Park Commission, 5>356 61 

State Appropriation, 7,500 00 

Tuition Fees, • .... 5,352 50 

Sale of Catalogues, etc., 172 55 

Sundries, 57 28 

$23,380 12 

PAYMENTS. 

Maintenance Museum, . . $6,676 70 

Plaster Casts purchased from Special Fund, 1,029 93 

Maintenance School, 12,291 31 

General Expenses, 571 94 

$20,569 88 

Balance on hand, $2,810 24 

TEMPLE FUND. 

Balance on hand June 1st, 1891, $2,144 25 

Income, i>938 65 

4,082 90 

Expenditures. 

Contributions for Plaster Casts, 751 45 

Balance on hand, %ZyZZ^ 45 



21 



REPORT 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE FOR 1891. 



Our work for the past year has been both encouraging and dis- 
heartening. 

The increased number of pupils in our School enables us to re- 
joice, but the knowledge that there are other young people knocking 
at the door and waiting for admission, when there is no room, brings 
disappointment. 

The profits of an entertainment given under the auspices of our 
Committee were intended to procure larger accommodations for our 
scholars, but although changes for the better have been made in the 
School proper, and another building secured for the Textile School, 
more room is asked for. 

The public of our State is not yet aroused to the share which be- 
longs to it in this great educational work, namely, the pecuniary 
assistance which can easily be given by many of the thousands who 
find here their homes and their fortunes. We hope before the close of 
the year 1892 that our subscription list may be greatly lengthened. 

As an educational factor our Institution stands without a peer in 
this country, and the Textile branch is superior in its advantages to 
any in our own land and has few equals in the old world. 

Our pupils (young women and men) leave us to find positions of 
honor and usefulness, and their places are readily filled, often by the 
youth of many of the States of our Union. 

The Museum, attracts many visitors, and its exhibits are being 
gradually added to by valuable objects. 

The noble generosity of one citizen gives Philadelphia a school 
somewhat like our own, but one school is not enough for an ever- 
increasing population. The Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art — the offspring of the Exhibition of 1876 — needs 



22 

increased enthusiasm and generous pride on the part of this commu- 
nity. To secure this must be the work of the Trustees and their Asso- 
ciate Committee of Women. 

If we would have our young people honest and true they must be 
taught that all work is honorable, and those who are gifted with artis- 
tic talent must be taught to use their talents for the good of the coun- 
try in which they live. 

On the people of this community (of whom those interested in 
carrying on this work form a very minute part) rests the heavy respon- 
sibility of encouraging and cultivating the talents which lie within 
our grasp, that they may not lie buried, to the shame of those who 
will not lend a helping hand. 

By order of the Committee, 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

Chairman. 



goo 



00 

CD 









tH n y 

wS en 



SgHgg- 



o iT- 



^'6 - 



c 
3 



o ,^ ;^ 
^ w • 



o a. 



trt . — . 



r p 3 
'p Cfq 



3.^ 



§ 2 ^ o o 

- :3 <T o a. 
2 rt'o. 



o . 
o 



3 fl) C o 
go-. 



4i>- 

00 
VO 



O U> K» 

O M t^ O 

o ^ o o 

O .f»- o o 



M On O O 00 to a\ 
O VO O O t-n O On 

888888§= 



p Vi^ 



III! 

B 8 ^s- 



> • 



- - - o 
ft) X p S" 

S"T3 C-. P 

O s s » 
>-"':^ o 

2 2 * uj 



55 3 2' 



I: 






O- • 



00 



00 o ^^ w 
NO O ^ "^ 



M M VO 
O tn O 

w On<^ 



U» O A O *-l VO O 






o ^ 



> 3 



-0 

D 
D 

< 



24 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 
LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 

ANNUAL Members and Subscribers. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their name and 
address to the Secretary. Blank Forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
the third page of the cover. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly 
acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership, One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 

" All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and from 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Laws. 



PATRONS. 

Baird, John ^Drexel, F. A. 
*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs, *Gibson, Henry C. 
Childs, George W. Houston, H. H. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Lea, Henry C. 
Drexel, A. J. Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 



* Deceased. 



Whitney, A. & Sons. 



25 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 

Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. 

Baily, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 

Baker, John R. 

Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*Bartol, B. H. 

Bartol, H. W. 
*Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 

Biddle, Chapman 

Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 

Biddle, Clement 
*Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, M;ss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 

Bone, C. & H. 

Bowen & Fox 

Brown, Alexander 

Bumham, George 

Bumham, Parry, Williams & Co 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
^Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 

Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
*Chew, Samuel 
*Claghom, James L. 

Claghom, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence H. 



^Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edw. H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 

Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 

Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 

Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, I. Lewis 

Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 

Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 

Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co, 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 

Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 



* Deceased. 



26 



Gibson, Miss R. 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
*Graff, Frederic 

Graff, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 

Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
"^Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 

Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 

Hockley, William Stevenson 

Horstmann, F. O. 

Horstmann, W. H., & vSons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 

Hughes, John O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
*Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
"^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, Miss E. B. 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Knight, Edw. C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Teighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R.,& Co. 
^Lovering, Joseph S. 

Levering, Joseph S., Jr. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 



Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughn 

Merrick, Miss L. W, 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 
*Milliken, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
*Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 
*Newbold, Charles 
^Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, Jr. 

Page, Joseph F. 

Patterson, Joseph 
*Pepper, George S. 
^Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, William, M. D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
^Phillips, Henry M. 
^Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
*Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
^Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
^Roberts, Jacob, M. D. 

Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
*Rogers, W. D. 
*Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P. 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D., Jr., & Bro. 
*Seibert, Henry 



Deceased. 



Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 

Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic K. 

Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 

Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 

Spencer, Charles 

Steel, Edward T. 

Steel, E. T., & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
*Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 



* Deceased 



Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
*Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 

Warner, Redwood F. 

Weightman, Miss Annie W. 

Weightman, Miss Mary L. 

Weightman, Jr., Mrs. William 
*Welsh, Samuel 

Wemwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William, & Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 

Wright, James A. 
*Wright, John W. 

Wurts, Charles Stewart, M. D. 



28 



Annual Members (for 1891) who have subscribed not less than 
ten dollars. 



Allison, William C, $10 00 

Arnold, Mrs. Crawford, ... 10 <X) 

Baker, Alfred G., 10 00 

Bement, Clarence S., 10 00 

Biddle, Cadwalader, 10 00 

Biddle, Mrs. Chapman, 10 00 

Borie, Mrs. Henry, 10 00 

Brazier, Joseph H., 10 00 

Brown, Alexander, 10 00 

Brown, Miss Martha M., . . . , 10 00 

Brown, T. Wistar 10 00 

Buehler, Mrs. William G., . . . 10 00 

Cadwalader, Mrs. John, lo 00 

Caldwell, J. E., & Co., 10 00 

Chandler, T. P., Jr., 10 cx) 

Clark, Miss Frances, 10 00 

Cochran, Travis, lo 00 

Cochran, Mrs. Travis, 10 00 

Coleman, Miss Anne C, . . . . 10 cx) 

Coles, Edward, 10 00 

Coxe, Alexander B., lo 00 

Coxe, Eckley B., lo 00 

Cramp, Charles H., 10 00 

Cramp, Henry W., 10 00 

Cummins, Daniel B., 10 00 

Da Costa, Dr. J. M., 10 00 

Daniell, Miss, 10 00 

Denniston, Mrs. E. E., 10 00 

Dickson, Samuel, • 10 00 

Dulles, J. Heatley, 10 00 

Durant, Mrs. F. C, 10 CX) 

Eisenbrey, Mrs. W. H., . . . . 10 00 
Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., . . . . 10 00 

Galloway, William, lo 00 

Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., 10 00 

Gillingham, Joseph E., 10 00 

Graff, Miss Henrietta, lo 00 

Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, 10 cx) 

Guillou, Victor, 10 CX) 

Hamilton, W. C, 10 00 

Hance Bros. & White, 10 00 

Hare, Mrs. Horace B., lo cx) 

Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, . . . . 10 00 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, lo 00 

Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . . . , 10 00 

Hippie, Frank K., lo 00 

Hutchinson, Miss, 10 00 

Irwin, Miss Agnes, ... . . . . lo (X) 

Jack, Dr. Loviis, 10 cx> 

Jayne, Mrs. David, 10 00 

Jayne, Dr. Horace lo 00 

Jenks, Mrs. William F., . . . . lo cx) 

Keen, Mrs. Charles B., lo 00 

Keen, W. W., M. D., 10 00 



Keith, Sidney W., ^10 00 

Kennedy, Elias D. 10 00 

Leonard, James B., 10 00 

Lewis, Miss Bertha, 10 00 

Lewis, Edward, 10 00 

Lewis, Enoch, 10 00 

Lewis, Dr. F. W., 25 00 

Lewis, Robert M., lo cx) 

Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, . . . . 10 00 
Lippincott, Mrs. J. Dundas, . . . 10 00 
Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, . . . . 10 00 
Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G., . . . lo cx) 
Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S., . . . . 10 00 

Mackellar, Thomas, lo 00 

Magee, Miss Anna, 10 00 

Magee, Miss Eliza J., 10 00 

Magee, Miss Fannie, 10 00 

Magee, Horace, 10 00 

Mason, Frederick T., 10 00 

May, Mrs. De Courcy, . . . . lo cx) 

Mifflin, Mrs. James, 10 cx) 

Moulton, Mrs. Byron P., . . . . lO 00 

Neall, Dr. Daniel, 10 cX) 

Neall, Frank L., 10 00 

Newhall, George M., lo cx) 

Pancoast, Albert, lo 00 

Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, 10 00 

Paul, Dr. James W., 10 00 

Paul, Miss M. W., lo 00 

Pepper, David, 10 00 

Pepper, Mrs. David, lo 00 

Pepper, Mrs. William Piatt, . . 10 cx) 

Piatt, Franklin, lo 00 

Poulterer, Mrs. William, . . . . lO 00 
Powers, Mrs. Thomas H., . , . 10 00 
Preston, Mrs. George R., . . . . 10 00 

Price, J. Sergeant, 10 00 

Ritchie, Craig D., . 10 cx) 

Roberts, Miss E. C, .... 10 00 

Roberts, Miss F. A., 10 00 

Roberts, Mrs. George B., . . . . 10 00 

Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, 10 cx) 

Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, 10 00 

Rosengarten, J. G., 10 00 

Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin, . . . . 10 00 

Sanders, Mrs. John, 10 00 

Shober, Mrs. Samuel L. , . . . . 10 00 

Smedley, Samuel L., 10 00 

Smith, Mrs. Aubrey H., . . . . 10 00 
Smith, Miss Christiana B., . . . lo 00 

Smith, Edward Brinton, lo 00 

Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, 10 00 

Stevenson, Miss Anna P., . . .1000 
Stille, Dr. Charles J., 10 00 



29 



Stitt, Mrs. Seth B., $io oo 

Struthers, John, . lo oo 

Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . . . .1000 

Townsend, Henry C, lo 00 

Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, . . 10 cx) 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . - . . 10 00 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, . .* . 10 cx) 



Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, .... ^10 00 

Wilson, Joseph M., lo 00 

Wister, Mrs. Casper, 10 00 

Wood, Mrs. Howard, 10 00 

Wood, Miss Juliana, 10 00 

Wright, Mrs. R. K., 10 00 

Wyeth, Stuart, 10 00 



Annual Members (for 1891) who have subscribed not less than 
five dollars. 



Ashhurst,R. L., $5 00 

Ashhurst, Mrs. R. L., 5 00 

Barry, Miss A. E,, 5 00 

Barry, Miss M. C, 5 00 

Bartol, Mrs. C. C, • 5 00 

Bartol, Henry G., Jr., 5 00 

Biddle, Mrs. R. M., 5 00 

Caldwell, Mrs. J. Albert, 5 00 

Chapman, Mrs. Henry C, . . . . 5 CXD 

Clark, Mrs. G. Howard, 5 00 

Cohen, Miss Mary M., 5 00 

Colton, S. W., 5 00 

Cresswell, Miss Lizzie, 5 00 

Crew, J. Lewis, 5 00 

Dana, Charles E., 5 00 

Dearden, Mrs. R. R., 5 00 

De Haven, Mrs,, 5 co 

D'Invilliers, Mrs. Charles, .... 5 00 

Dissel, Charle>, 5 00 

Dissel, Mrs. Charles, 5 00 

Dixon, Mrs. G. D., 5 00 

Duane, Russell, 5 00 

DuPont, Mrs. L., 5 00 

Durant, Miss Ethel, 5 00 

Eisenbrey, Miss Edith, .... 5 00 
Eisenbrey, Miss Sarah H , . . . . 5 00 
Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C, , . . . 5 00 
Harrison, Miss Maud L., . . . . 5 00 
Harrison, John, 5 00 



Harrison, Mrs. John, ^5 00 

Howell, Miss Bella, 5 00 

Howell, Mrs. William, 5 00 

Huebner, Miss Julia, 5 00 

Keen, Frank H., 5 00 

McFadden, Mrs. George H., ... 5 00 

McGlensey, Miss, 5 00 

Miller, William J., 5 00 

Morwitz, Joseph, Jr., 5 00 

Nichols, W. J., 5 00 

Norris, Miss Clara G., 5 00 

Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . . . • 5 00 
Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . . . . 5 00 
Fepper, Miss Alice Marion, . . . 5 00 

Pepper, Miss Emily, 5 00 

Pepper, Mrs. John W., 5 00 

Pepper, Miss Martha Otis, .... 5 00 
Roberts, Miss Augusta Meade, . . 5 00 

Roberts, Mrs. G. W. B., 5 00 

Roberts, Thomas, 5 00 

Roberts, Thomas, Jr., 5 00 

Rogers, Miss Mary, 5 00 

Sharp, Mrs. Isaac, 5 00 

Simpson, Mrs. William, 5 00 

Walker, Mrs. R. J. C, 5 00 

Williams, F. Howard, 5 00 

Woods, Dr. D. Flavel, 5 00 

Wright, Joseph, 5 00 

Zell, Miss 5 00 



Mr. Rich. L. Ashhurst, Donation $10 00 

Miss Blanchard, for Museum loo 00 




-i < 

< =! 

I I 
Q. 
_l 

< ^~ 
QC < 
O CL 

^ O 
< 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



THE SEVENTEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF T&E 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



For the Year ending December 31, 1892. 



MEMORIAL HALL 

Fairmount Park, Philadelphia 

1893. 



OFFICERS FOR 1893 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 

TREASURER, SECRETARY AND DIRECTOR 

CHARLES D. CLARK. DALTON DORR. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS 

The Governor of the State. The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT 

Thomas Cochran, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

S. G. Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fair77iount Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

To serve for three years : 

John Struthers, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, F. W. Lewis, M. D., 

C. M. Weygandt. 

To serve for two years : 

John T. Morris, Charles E. Dana, 

Stuart Wood, Isaac Norris, M. D. 

Theo. C. Search. 

To serve for one year : 
Charles D. Clark, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr., 

Alfred C. Lambdin, M. D. 

(2) 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



(For the Report see page 22.) 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, 

MRS. JOHN SANDERS. 



SECRETARY, 

MISS FANNY S. MAGEE. 



TREASURER, 

MRS. CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 



Mrs. Matthew Baird, 


Mrs. S. M. Hyneman, 


Mrs. Charles D. Barney, 


Mrs. Charles B. Keen, 


Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 


Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 


Miss Mary Cohen, 


Mrs. Byron P. Moulton, 


Miss Margaret L. Corltes, 


Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 


Mrs. George K. Crozer, 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Mrs, Roland G. Curtin, 


Mrs. Harry Rogers, 


Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 


Mrs. F. R. Shelton, 


Mrs. George Dallas Dixon, 


Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 


Mrs. W. H. Eisenbrey, 


Mrs. J. Frailey Smith, 


Mrs. R. B. Ellison, 


Mrs. W. Hinckle Smith, 


Mrs. Frank I. Gowen, 


Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 


Mrs. John Harrison, 


Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 


Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 


Mrs. Howard Wood, 


Mrs. G. C. Heberton, 


Miss Zell. 



(3) 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



The Seventeenth Annual Report of the Trustees. 



This report is for the year ending December 31st, 1892. 

The receipts from all sources during the year ending May 3isty 
1892, were $36,263.69. The expenditures were $36,341.11, of which 
for maintenance of School was $21,538.30; for maintenance of 
Museum, $11,685.71. For purchase of objects of art for Museum, 
$3,117.10. 

The Endowment Fund was increased during the year $500 from 
the Associate Committee of Women, the income to be used for main- 
tenance of the School. 

Mrs. Frederick Graff has formed a Scholarship of $500, the in- 
come to be used for an annual Architectural Prize, to be called " The 
Frederick Graff Architectural Prize Fund." 

The balance in the hands of the Centennial Commission, re- 
ported to be about- $13,000, has been awarded to the Institution, but 
has not yet been paid. 

In January Mr. Stuart Wood resigned the Treasurership, and Mr. 
Charles D. Clark was elected in his place. 

At the last annual meeting Mr. Theo. C. Search was elected to 
the vacancy on the Board occasioned by the death of Mr. Henry C. 
Gibson, and Mr. John T. Morris was nominated for appointment by 
Select Council in the place of Mr. Search. It was subsequently 
learned that Mr. Search had already received his re-appointment to 
the Board from Select Council, and the Board, in February, elected 
Mr. Morris to Mr. Gibson's place. 

In February, the members of the Corporation voted to increase 
the number of Elective Trustees from twelve to fifteen. At a subse- 

(5) 



quent meeting of the Board, one of the vacancies thus created was 
filled by the election of Mr. C. N. Weygandt for the remainder of the 
year. It was deemed expedient not to make the other elections at 
that time, thus leaving the question of election to the annual meeting 
of the Corporation. 

Various circumstances have conspired to make the consideration 
of plans to unite the Museum and Schools by erecting a building for 
their common occupancy in some central locality the most prominent 
subject before the Board. One friend of the Institution offered to 
contribute ^100,000 toward the purchase of the Deaf and Dumb 
Asylum property at Broad and Pine Streets, and another offered 
$10,000 for the same purpose; but even with these most generous 
proffers of assistance, the Board were divided on the questions of the 
desirability of the location, and the expediency of negotiating a pur- 
chase at the price asked for it. Other locations north of Market 
Street have been considered, though without coming to any definite 
conclusion, as yet. 

Meanwhile, as will be seen from the report of the Principal, Jie 
needs of the School for increased accommodation were manifesting 
themselves in many ways ; but chiefly in the way that is the most try- 
ing of all, the necessity of refusing admission to applicants because 
there was no room to accommodate them. 

On the other hand, the occupation of one of the large galleries 
in Memorial Hall by the Park Commissioners for the exhibition of 
the Wilstach Collection required the removal of a large number of 
exhibits to another portion of the building, which has necessarily 
crowded the cases together, detracting somewhat from the desired 
effect. This request, coming from the Park Commissioners, called 
together the two bodies in conference. A committee, appointed by 
our Trustees, met the Park Commissioners, and, after hearing their 
explanation of the required use of the Gallery, our exhibits were 
changed. The committee representing the Pennsylvania Museum and 
School of Industrial Art were satisfied at the result of the conference, 
the Park Commissioners promising to pay the cost incurred by the 
removal of the objects from one part of the building to the other. 
As lessees of the building, we feel assured of continued consideration 
from the Commissioners. 

The growth of the Museum collections during the year has been 
very gratifying. A nearly complete series of the publications of the 



7 

Arundel Society has been obtained, and the prints have been framed 
for exhibition on the walls of the North Corridor. 

A department of American Pottery and Porcelain has been estab- 
lished under the Honorary Curatorship of Mr. Edwin AtLee Barber, 
whose fine collection of specimens illustrating the beginning of the 
pottery industry in this country has been secured for the Museum 
through the generosity of Mr. John T. Morris. 

Another Trustee, Mr. John Struthers, while abroad last spring 
secured for us a fine collection of old Nuremburg wrought-iron work. 
This collection and the plaster copy of the bronze doors in the Capi- 
tol at Washington, by Randolph Rogers, which was also obtained by 
Mr. Struthers while abroad, have been received and put in place dur- 
ing the year. The cast of the stairway of the pulpit in the Cathe- 
dral of Siena, obtained for us by the late Miss Anne Hampton 
Brewster, and the first copy of this beautiful work that has ever been 
permitted to be made has also been received and erected against the 
pulpit in the Rotunda. 

I We have also been favored in the way of loans. Dr. F. W. Lewis 
and Dr. Robert H. Lamborn making extensive additions to their col- 
lections, and new contributions having been received from Mr. Clar- 
ence B. Moore, the Philadelphia Library Company, and others. 

The work of repairs to Memorial Hall, which was begun last year, 
was resumed this summer and continued throughout the fall. This 
necessitated the closing of one-half the building and accounts, in a 
measure, for the falling off in the number of visitors mentioned in the 
report of the Director of the Museum. 

One of the rooms on the north side of the building has been 
made ready as a studio for students of the School, to provide a place 
where objects from the cases in the exhibition-rooms may be brought 
for them to use as models, or for purposes of study. 

In every respect, except in the one all-important need of in- 
creased and better accommodations, the School has prospered and 
grown in importance. An evening school of decorative painting has 
been established. The teaching force has augmented and strengthened. 
Numerous valuable gifts of machinery have been received for the 
Textile School. Considerable additions have been made to the 
Library. 

One sad event, affecting both Museum and School alike, was the 
death, in March last, of Mr. Thomas Hockley, one of the most active 



8 

and efficient members of the Board, and one of the most earnest and 
devoted friends of the Institution. The loss of his energetic example 
and wise counsel will long be felt by all of us. 

To the Associate Committee of Women our thanks are again due 
for their sincere and active interest in all that pertains to the welfare 
and progress of the Institution, and their unflagging efforts to promote 
its prosperity. 

Following are the reports of the Director of the Museum and the 
Principal of the School. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The number of visitors to the Museum for the twelve months of 
this report was 281,473. This number is less by 11,000 than that of 
the previous year, and some 30,000 less than that of the year 1890. 
The decrease of last year was accounted for by the fact that one-half 
of the building was closed to the public while the new roof over the 
east wing was constructing. A like reason may be given for the 
decrease of this year, since, for upward of six months, the roofers, in 
continuation of their work, have had possession of the western half 
of the building. It is interesting to note that, on an average, the 
number of visitors on the Sundays is greater than the sum of the 
numbers of visitors on all the other days of the week. On a pleasant 
Sunday afternoon in summer, the throng entering the building be- 
tween half- past two and half- past four passes in at the rate of 1,200 
an hour. 

In my last report mention was made of the success of the efforts 
of a friend of the Museum living abroad to obtain permission of the 
church authorities to have a cast taken of the stairway of the pulpit in 
the Siena Cathedral — a permission which was never before given to 
any one. This friend was Miss Anne Hampton Brewster, formerly of 
Philadelphia, whose lamented death at her home in Siena occurred 
March 31st, 1892, only a few days after all of the several parts of the 
casting had been completed. This beautiful work has since been re- 
ceived at the Museum. It has been set up and attached to the pulpit 
after the manner of the original in Siena. 

Another important work mentioned in my last report — the copy 
of the Columbus Doors designed by Randolph Rogers for the National 
Capitol, obtained by Mr. John Struthers from the National Museum in 



Munich, where the original model is preserved — has been received and 
set up in the Rotunda. 

To Mr. Struthers the Museum is also indebted for a collection of 
some 470 pieces of Nuremburg wrought-iron, chiefly of Fifteenth 
Century workmanship, which he had the rare good fortune to secure 
through the aid of the Director of the National Museum in IMunich. 

Perhaps the most important work of the year has been the estab- 
lishment of the Department of American Pottery and Porcelain. The 
valuable historical collection of Mr. E. A. Barber was purchased and 
presented to the ^luseum by Mr. John T. Morris as a nucleus for other 
collections, and Mr. Barber kindly consented to act as Honorary 
Curator of the Department and assist with his advice and influence in 
its development. 

Numerous additions have already been made to the original col- 
lection, and there is every reason to believe that many others will be 
received when the plan of the Museum is better known. 

I am gratified to be able to report that the Museum now has an 
almost complete set of the publications of the Arundel Society. Only 
one engraving — the Sf. T/iomas of Fra x\ngelico — and five outline 
heads from the St Sebastian being required to perfect the entire series. 
The north corridor of the building will be used for the permanent 
exhibition of these pictures. The value of these carefully executed 
publications to the art student — especially to the student of early 
Christian art — is so generally recognized that the decision of the 
Museum Committee to place the whole series on view and accessible 
to every one will doubtless be gratefully appreciated. 

The appropriation of the west gallery of Memorial Hall by the 
Commissioners of Fairmount Park to be fitted up for the exhibition of 
the Wilstach bequest of pictures has necessitated a re-arrangement 
and concentration of the Museum collections in the east gallery and 
the other rooms remaining for our use. 

Although we may be somewhat inconveniently crowded for a time 
under this new arrangement, it will undoubtedly attract many more 
visitors to Memorial Hall than heretofore, and we may therefore 
reasonably hope to be benefited by the increased attention that will 
be given to our own collections. 

During the year gifts were received from — 
Crawford Arnold : 

Alabaster Model of Buildings at Pisa. 



lO 

Dr. John T. Sharpless (heirs of) : 

Eight pieces : Gilt Bronze Statuettes, Etruscan Vases, Ancient Egyptian Vases, 
Swiss Carvings, Collection of specimens of Italian Marbles. 

Mrs. Emily T. Eckert (bequest) : 

Three Framed Plaques, two Marble Statuettes and Pedestals, one Bronze 
Statuette and Pedestal. 

Miss Lydia F. Itter : 
Old-fashioned Piano. 

John T. Morris : 

Bohemian Glass Vase, Japanese Cast Iron Tea-pot, the Barber Collection of 
American Pottery and Porcelain — over 300 pieces. 

Edward Lycett : 

Four Frames of Persian Lustre Tiles, nine pieces American Porcelain and 
Earthenware. 

Trabue Van Culin : 
Two Chinese Coins. 

Miss Juliana Wood: 

Two Chromo- Lithographs, Arundel Society Pub. ; Silver Medal, Danish ; Silver 
Bouquet Holder, Florentine ; Silver Clasp, Roman. 

Dr. E. S. Vanderslice : 

Japanese Wood Carving, " Opium Smokers." 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

Plaster Copy of Assyrian Bas-relief, " Wounded Lyoness." 

Trent Tile Company: 

Specimens of their Manufactures. 

American Encaustic Tile Company : 
Specimens of their Manufactures. 

Providential Tile Works : 

Specimens of their Manufactures. 

E. A. Barber: 

Six Terra Cotta Tobacco Pipes. 

Miss Carolien Maurer : 
Old German Prayer Book. 

Eugene Ingold: 

American Tin Medal. 

Miss Mary Marriott : 

Porcelain Vase — Tucker Manufacture. 

Mrs. L. B. S. Spang (bequest) : 
Large Hall Clock. 



II 

Wm. Lindsay : 

Five -dollar State Bank Note of 1 858. 
W. H. Hollar : 

Two large Bank Locks ; 1 836. 
John Struthers : 

Six pieces of Antique German Wrought Iron, one Antique German Brass 
Escutcheon. 

Loans were made by — 

The Rittenhouse Club, Dr. R. H. Lamborn, Dr, Isaac Norris, John T. Morris, 
Mrs. Wm. S. Stewart, The Franklin Institute, Miss M. D. Woodnutt, Simon A. Stern, 
Miss Agnes B. Williams, Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, Dr. F. W. Lewis, Dr. Owen J. 
Wister, Miss Annie D. Henszey, The Philadelphia Library, Clarence B. Moore. 

Contributions to the Library were received from — 

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston ; Cincinnati Museum Association ; Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of the Fine Arts ; Maryland Institute ; Philadelphia School of Design 
for Women ; I. Edwards Clarke ; Dr. Isaac Norris. 

DALTON DORR, 
Director of the Museum. 




Bronze Grill, Designed by Louis Shultz, a Pupil in the School. 

THE SCHOOL. 

As has been noted in several former reports, the full quota of pu- 
pils that could be accommodated in several Departments of the School 
was reached some time ago, so that the increase in the attendance, 
which still continues as about the same rate as that which has been 
recorded in former years, is mainly due to the admission of special 



12 

Students or to the organization of new classes whose occupancy of the 
rooms during certain hours when they would otherwise be unused has 
made possible a substantial increase in the total registration, although 
the number of those who have been denied admission for lack of room 
is considerably greater than it has ever been before. More than forty 
applicants have had to be turned away from the Textile School and 
the School of Chemistry and Dyeing, some of whom came from re- 
mote States but most of whom were Philadelphians. 

The complaint that has sometimes been made that the work of the 
School seemed to be more fully understood abroad than at home can, 
therefore, hardly be urged again. We are obliged to register appli- 
cants in the order in which their applications are received, and, as is 
usually the case, those who live in the city itself are pretty sure to be 
the very ones to neglect this duty and come too late. 

But it is not only by the number of pupils who are turned away 
that the limitations of our facilities are to be measured. Generous and 
important as the additions to our equipment have been, we might have 
received more if there had been any room for them. 

The building on Buttonwood Street to which the Textile School 
was removed last year is in just about as crowded a condition as were 
the rooms on Spring Garden Street which were vacated by its removal, 
and a great deal of machinery which we really need and which the 
liberality of manufacturers would readily supply, as well as a great 
many casts and other objects for the Art School which it would not be 
difficult to provide, and from the want of which we continually suffer, 
the School is deprived of simply and solely for want of room. 

The following changes and additions have been made in the teach- 
ing force : 

Mr. Charles E. Dana has for more than a year given regular instruc- 
tion in Water Color Painting, and too much cannot be said in praise 
not only of this instruction itself, which has attracted a considerable 
class of special students in addition to those in regular attendance, but 
of the beneficial results to the School of Mr. Dana's untiring service 
in its interest of which this work in teaching is only one of many mani- 
festations. 

In the untimely death of Mr. Edmund A. Stewardson, Professor 
of Sculpture, the School has suffered a loss to which it is hard for us 
to be reconciled. He had not only inspired all who came in contact 
with him with that confidence in his professional ability which gave 



7; 

1 m 

3J C 

is 
|s 

o z 
X 

< 

X 

< 




13 

authority to his slightest word of advice or criticism, but he had en- 
deared himself to us all by qualities of mind and heart that were rare 
indeed. 

His place in the School has been taken by Mr. Henry Plasschaert, 
a native of Belgium, and an artist of much ability as well as of un- 
doubted gifts as a teacher. His training and experience have been 
such as to give to the work of the School still more of an industrial 
character than has been the case hitherto by emphasizing in a some- 
what stricter sense the decorative aim which underlies the studies pur- 
sued. 

Through the co-operation of the Philadelphia Association of Mas- 
ter Painters and Decorators, which has appointed a permanent advi- 
sory committee to assist us, an Evening School of Decorative Painting 
was established on the ist of October. 

Mr. Nicola D'Ascenzo, a decorator of much ability and who had 
been educated in our own School, was appointed instructor, and room 
was found for the new class to begin its work in the building on But- 
tonwood Street. The class proved to be very popular, and twenty- 
nine pupils were enrolled soon after the announcement, so that the 
need of larger quarters is now more urgent in the case of this class 
than of that of any other in the School. 

A special evening class in Architectural Drawing and Design was 
organized at the same time, under Mr. Julian Millard. The class now 
numbers twenty-eight students. 

A prize of $25, offered by Mrs. Frederic Graff, and known as the 
Frederic Graff Prize for Architectural Design, is to be awarded annu- 
ally hereafter to the pupils of this class. 

Another special prize of $25, competition for which is open to 
the School at large, has been offered by Mrs. John Harrison for draw- 
ings in pen and ink. This is to be known as the Henry Perry Leland 
Prize. 

Mr. Paul Rosenzwey, who for eight years taught the evening 
class in Applied Design, resigned last September on account of ill 
health, and Mr. W. Laird Turner, a former pupil of the School, and 
a practical designer of many years' experience, was appointed in his 
place. 

Early in the year it was found necessary to secure an additional 
teacher in the Textile School, one whose experience and ability 
should be such as would enable him to assume the direction of the 



14 

mechanical work in this department, especially the adjustment and 
operation of the power looms. 

Such a man was found in Mr. Roebuck, and in him the School 
has acquired a most valuable addition to its corps of instructors. 

The following occasional lectures have been given at the School 
during the year : 

February 19th. — " The Homes of Queen Elizabeth's Courtiers," 
By Mr. H. Bloomfield Bare. 

March 4th. — " The Architecture of Imperial Rome," 
By Mr. Frank Miles Day. 

March 1 8th. — "Athens and its Memories," 
By Mr. Walter Price. 

Following are the gifts of machinery which have been made ta 
the Textile School, with the names of the donors : 

Narrow cotton loom and a Jacquard machine, presented by the 
George W. Stafford Co., Providence, R. I. 

Drop- box motion, fancy loom, from the Whitin Machine Co., 
Whitinsville, Mass. 

An upholstery loom and a heavy worsted loom from the Knowles 
Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Harness loom, from the Fairmount Machine Co., Philadelphia. 

Silk loom and two Jacquard machines, by Messrs. Schaum & 
Uhlinger, Philadelphia. 

Shearing machine, from the Parks & Woolson Machine Co., 
Springfield, Vt. 

Fulling and washing machine, presented by the James Hunter 
Machine Co., North Adams, Mass. 

Shuttles, by R. Sergeson, Philadelphia. 

Yarns, presented by Messrs. Erben, Search & Co., Philadelphia; 
M. T. Stevens & Son, North Andover, Mass. 

Dye stuffs presented by E. Sehlbach & Co., William Pickhardt 
& Knuttroff, W. J. Matheson & Co., Banning & Bissell, Samuel Na- 
thans and O. S. Tanney & Co., Schultze, Berge, Koechl & Movius, 
Sykes & Street, Browning Bros. 

A gift of all the colors that will probably be required by the 
School of Painting during the current school year was made by Messrs, 
Harrison Brothers & Co. A generous gift of colors has also been 



15 

made by the firm of John Lucas & Co., for the use not only of the 
School of Painting, but of the Classes in Applied Design. 

One hundred and ninety-eight volumes and pamphlets were added 
to the School Library during the year, of which twenty- five were pur- 
chased, nineteen by the School and six from funds derived from other 
sources. 

One hundred and seventy-three volumes were given by Mr. John 
Struthers, Mrs. Frederic Graff, M. Vachon, W. H. Holmes, the 
Academy of the Fine Arts, Dr. William N. Egle, State Librarian ; 
Eugene A. Smith, State Geologist of Alabama ; Jewelers' Weekly 
Publishing Company ; John C. Smock, State Geologist of New- 
Jersey. 




Chair and Table in Mahogany, Designed and Executed by Pupils of the School. 

The Commencement Exercises were held in Warner's Hall, June 
9th, 1892. Addresses were made by the President, by Colonel Charles 
H. Banes, by Mrs. Gillespie, and by Mr. T. C. Search. 

An exhibition of Students' Work was held at the same time at 
the Class Rooms, 1336 Spring Garden Street and 1303 Button wood 
Street, which remained open for several days. 

Six appointments to State Scholarships have been made by the 
Governor during the year — viz., for Bucks, Monroe, Pike, Philadel- 
phia, Union, and York Counties. Eleven holders of these appoint- 
ments are at present registered in the School. 



i6 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public 
Education were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination con- 
ducted by the Principal, each Grammar School Principal being au- 
thorized to send candidates. 

Five appointments to these free scholarships are made each year, 
each appointment being made for three years. Of the fifteen ap- 
pointees registered in the last three years thirteen are still in the 
School. 

The following certificates and prizes were awarded at the Com- 
mencement Exercises at the end of the school year, June 9th, 1892 : 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize, for Best Set of First Year's Works. — George Wallace 
Penfield. 

Honorable mention to Isabel M. Jacobs for designing only, and to William E. 
Granzow for rendering. 

Wilson & Fenimore Prize. — First, $15, William Comfort. 

" " " Second, $10, Anita M. Ketchum. 

(Given by Messrs. Wilson & Fenimore, of Bristol, Pa., for the best design for 
wall paper.) 

RiPKA Prize. — Helen Augusta Fox. 

Honorable mention to Annette I. Kiehl. 

(Given by Messrs. Ripka & Co., of Philadelphia, for the best work in which the 
figure has been introduced.) 

Richards First Prize. — Mary L. Price. 

Richards Second Prize. — Edwin G. Lutz. 

(Given by Mr. F. De Bourg Richards for the best work in pen and ink.) 

The above prizes were awarded by an artist committee consisting of Messrs. 
Charles E. Dana^ Clifford P. Grayson, and Edmund A. Stewardson. 

Awarded by Associate Committee of Women : 

Maddock First Prize, $20. — Leigh Richmond Miner. 

" Second Prize, $10. — Meyer Dantzig. 

Honorable mention to Isabel M. Jacobs. 

(Given by Mr. Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for the best design for an 
ewer.) 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

First, ^20 for General Excellence of First Year's Work. — William E. 
Granzow. 

Honorable mention to Sally G. Yarnall. 

Second, $10 for Oil-Cloth Design. — Leigh Richmond Miner. 

Honorable mention to Nettie Redman. 

Third, $\o for Carpet and Border. — William H. Bates. 




DOORWAY, 
By Benedetto da Majano in the Palazzo Vecchio, Florence. 



17 

Honorable mention to Clara L. Miller. 

Fourth, $io for Modelling. — Helen Augusta Fox for panel for fireplace. 

Honorable mention to Susan Rogers Egbert for caryatid. 

Certificates, Class A. — Maria Purdon Allen, Anne H. Brinton, Delia Bryl- 
awski, Lucy Clay, Frances Louise Farrand, William E. Granzow, Elise V. Guillou, 
Isabel M. Jacobs, Emma Leeds Lipp, Bertha V. Lufkin, Edwin G. Lutz, Leigh 
Richmond Miner, George Wallace Penfield, Grace Hutchinson Pollock, Sallie Garrett 
Yamall. 

Class B.— Wm. H. Bates, Clara L. Miller, Wm. Wolfersberger. 

Certificate Teachers' Course. — Mabel Church. 

Diplomas. — Susan Rogers Egbert, Helen Augusta Fox, Thomas Neilson Geiger, 
Annette Irene Kiehl, Louis Shultz. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

American Wool Reporter First Prize, $30. — John Stubbs. 

An equal prize to George J. Walenta. 

Honorable mention to J. W. Campbell. 

American Wool Reporter Second Prize, $20. — Frank E. Painter. 

'An equal prize to Albert W. Slocum. 

Honorable mention to F. E. Hoye, George P. Newell, and Harry Althoen. 

Certificates First Year's Course. — Frank W. Adams, Harry Altheon, Wm. 
Axford, Ervin S. Dunn, Wm. K. Greer, Francis E. Hoye, James E. McGuire, 
Sigmurid Muhlhauser, George P. Newell, Frank E. Painter, Albert W. Slocum, Moses 
Tyler Stevens, Jr., Wm. A. Wetherbee. 

Second Year's Course. — Wm. S. A^jpleyard, Henry L. Blum, John W. 
Campbell, John Crowther, Martin Marks, John 'Stubbs, George J. Walenta. 

DlPLOMA.^Bradley Canfield Algeo. 

Certificates Awarded on the Completion of the Two Years' Evening 
Course. — Jacob Munz, Benjamin F. Powell, James Speirs, Fred Weihenmayer, 
Wm! j; Weihenmayer, Daniel Wolfender. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND DYEING. 

Certificates, Day Class.— Thomas Aylward. 

Certificates, Evening Class. — John L. Andrews, Harry Brewin, Daniel 
Dawson, Gottlieb Hess, Thomas Jamison, Edward L. Lotte, David C. Patchell. 

Appended are lists of the students registered since December 
31st, 1 89 1, showing their occupations and the localities from which 
they come : 



Architects, 27 

Artists, 4 

Attorney, i 

Barber, I 

Beamers, 2 

Book-binder I 



Book-keepers, 2 

Cabinet Makers, 3 

Carder and Spinner, I 

Carpenters, 2 

Carvers, 4 

Clerks, 9 



i8 



Designers, 51 

Draughtsmen, 13 

Drawers-in, 2 

Dyers, 7 

Decorators, 2 

Engravers, 3 

Foremen, 3 

Harness Maker, i 

Housework, i 

Illustrators, 2 

Journalist, I 

Kindergartner, I 

Lathing, I 

Lithographers, 4 

Loom Bosses, 3 

Loom Fixer, i 

Manufacturers, 9 



Mechanical Engineer, i 

Modellers, 3 

Painters, 27 

Paper Hanger, i 

Pattern Maker, i 

Physician, i 

Salesmen, 5 

Stained Glass Workers, 6 

Students, 106 

Teachers, 26 

Truss Maker, i 

Twister, 1 

Warper, i 

Weavers, 22 

Wool Sorter, i 

365 



From Canada, 2 

Connecticut, 4 

Delaware, 3 

Georgia, I 

Illinois, I 

Iowa, I 

Maine, . . . . • . • • .' I 

Massachusetts, 8 

Michigan, I 

Mississippi, 2 

New Jersey, 1 8 

New York, 3 

Ohio, . 2 

Oregon I 

Pennsylvania, 314 

Rhode Island, 2 

Virginia, I 

365 
L. W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



^ 
























* 


* 


s 




ft 




oo 


1 


?? 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


S:- 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


00 


00 


; 








"S 


OO 


TO 


TO 




TO 




TO 


CO 


TO 


OO 








OO 




» 







VO 


TO 


VI 


Ov 




-t' 


OJ 









O 


TO 


VO 


































> 


•^ 


<— . 




5" 


^ 


f 


OJ 


o\ 




4>. 


JO 














c 


2 


3 
































w 




K3 












^ 


"to 




l/v 




Os 


Ov 






3 


c 


O 


VO 


■^ 


TO 














TO 








VI 




5 


P 


o 


VO 


o 


TO 






OJ 


*■ 


" 




OJ 


VO 


Os 


VO 


VI 


u> 


S 
































to 


p 


































? 


^ 




































^ 


_^ 


- 


_o 


TO 


i" 


_Ov 


to 




OJ 




to 








f 




5- 


? i 
i i 


"o 


o 


"io 




is 


"oo 




vb 


"to 


V) 


~ 


"bv 


VJ 


OJ 


"to 


o 


> 


o 


8 


VI 


1^ 


:j 


g 


f 


S^ 


"iJ 


^ 


'i^ 


o- 


VO 




TO 
TO 


1 


































"r^ t 


































a5 

c 




































































§■ 


^ 








































^ 


u> 


^f' 


VI 


ON 








_Os 


s° 




4>. 






to 


^. 




g 




































o 


^00 




"to 


^ 




Ov 






VI 















3" 


p 




^ 


00 


o\ 


Ln 


Ul 


TO 


OJ 


OS 


VO 


TO 


to 




OS 


ET 






a\ 




o 


u> 


TO 


VO 


OJ 


OS 








to 






Ov 




i" 


3 
C 

3 


3* 
































i 




K 


to 


M 


to 


to 


to 


„ 


„ 


u 




„ 










S" 




K. 




00 


to 


-<>- 





<-a 


J-l 


OJ 


VO 


00 


\. 






« 


ft 


> 


% 


4>- 


^ 


> 


1 


% 


VO 


g' 


D3 


^ 


^ 


5 


•Ss 


VJ 


8 


3 

n 


o 


•o 





(^ 




*. 





00 




VO 


\o 


VO 


ov 


TO 






a 






































2. 


~ 
































_ w 


o 
-I 


































3" 






w 


CiJ 


,J 


10 


(0 


(0 


^ 


„ 


„ 


^ 


„ 








si 


«1 




^ 




VJ 


o 


VO 


vj 


VI 


VO 


OO 


»°° 




Os 












^ 
































5" 








vb 





"to 


"bo 






"cs 


00 


"bv 


:s 




VJ 


o 


% 


VO 






w 





Ov 




ov 


Ov 


VO 







8 


3 




P 




U) 


^ 


o\ 


•^^ 


OJ 


4". 


OS 


to 


(0 




" 





n 


§ 


*< 
































o 


3 


































_ 3 


2 


































3 
*T3 




^ 


K3 


CO 


OJ 


►3 


OJ 


to 


„ 


^ 


„ 


„ 


„ 








3 


1 




OS 




Ov 




vj 






^ 


J» 


OJ 












>< 




































5 


c 


ON 


OO 




OJ 


U) 






Ol 


Cn 


OS 


OJ 




■b. 


OS 






TO 




tn 


O 


4- 





VO 


O 


OJ 


K> 


so 


VJ 


TO 


o 


M 


ft 




3 




^ 


o\ 








OJ 




VO 


W 




OS 




OS 




i. 


3- 


n 
































P 


































3 


g. 


































~ to 


































ft 






j^ 


Ut 


^ 


U) 


^3 


to 


(0 


to 


M 


„ 


^ 


to 








p. 


ft 
1 




tn 





00 








vp 


OS 


_to 


VO 


OS 












i_i 


































c 


~J 















^ 


i- 




"bv 


VJ 


Ov 


OS 


Ov 






O 




t/1 




vj 


VO 


OS 




OJ 









OS 


VO 






ft 


"^ 


^ 


v> 


tn 


m 


VO 


*■ 




V) 




VO 


v5 


to 






Ov 




































D- 




































^ 






































































5" 




LO 


OJ 


j^ 


in 


UJ 


-^ 


OJ 


kj 


to 


M 


M 


M 








M 


ft 


r 




o\ 


Cn 





o\ 




<J\ 


OJ 


VO 


Ln 












V) 


? 








» 






- 




















^J 




"m 


tn 


'to 


*. 




o\ 




i) 


Ov 


VJ 


TO 


TO 






m 


<o 


o 


0\ 







TO 


^ 






OS 


OS 




TO 


4^ 


OS 


4>- 




c 


a\ 


VI 


4^ 


W 


TO 


OS 


TO 


" 


to 




in 


TO 




TO 






i 


































p 




































s 
ft 

3 




































Ol 


*■ 


■»>. 


U) 


Ij 


W 


4>. 


K 


OJ 


to 


OJ 


„ 


„ 








OJ 




ft 








-0- 


i" 


VI 


TO 




TO 


O 


y 










-0- 


































n 

B 


00 


U) 


VO 


^g' 




"os 


I 




vb 






VI 


OS 






Os 


3* 


^ 






Ol 


X 


VI 


VO 


Ov 


v^ 


OJ 


in 






TO 




0\ 


•^ 




o 





U\ 






■K 







■!>• 


in 


in 


Os 




? 


































S* 


ft 


































1' 




w 


M 






to 




10 


to 


to 




to 










U 




o 


K> 




U) 


^Os 


JJv 


O 









Ol 


)P 










VO 


3 


o 






































to 





^ 


vb 




Cn 


OJ 


*. 


VI 


<3 




K 




TO 


o 


S, "^ 


1 


W 


*■ 


Ol 


^ 


OJ 


V) 


8 






Ln 


OS 


OS 




OJ 


VJ 


Ov 


p 


OJ 


-»■ 


w 


Ol 


o\ 


M 


w 







VO 


M 


O 


OO 


M 


3 
































^ 


"I 






































































< 




































> 


- 


W 


5> 


H 


to 

00 


M 


o 


_o 


_0 


ul 


_p 


M 










5J 


o 

< 


% 







































ss 


^ 


tn 


Ot 


tn 


"o\ 




^ 






to 






TO 


VI 




ft 





^ 


>o 




Ov 


TO 






TO 






TO 


•«>• 




OJ 


vg^ 




3 










TO 


M 






tn 


o 


TO 


VO 


■(^ 




VO 


TO 


to 




H 




































s 






































































> 




Hi 
































t) 




^ 


o 


j3\ 


VO 


00 


^ 


OO 


vj 


J> 




jOv 


Ov 








in 






























-_ 
















Cn 


"o 


U) 








"to 


"Vo 






"to 


so 






-^ 










o\ 


*. 






VO 




VO 




, 10 




TO 


VJ 


V) 


in 




TO 




3 ■ 






VO 





Ov 




VO 


Ov 


VO 


OS 


to 






OJ 


TO 


OS 


OJ 




M 








































































« 


<s 


v8 


W 


to 


8s 


vj 


w 


Qo 


00 


1 
vb 


OV 


OJ 




^ 


rt 


VO I 


^ 


r 






V 


' to 


TO 
4v 


VO 


Ov 
TO 




OJ 


VO 

'to 


Ol 

in 


TO 
vb 


-P 


i" 


in 

OJ « 


•J 




^ 


vS 


to 




vj 


^ 


VO 




OS 






OJ 




"ov 






-J 


© 


u. 






o3 




OS 


o 




OJ 








OS 


TO 




to 


r 


« 






































A 





































20 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

Report of Treasurer for year ending May ^ist^ i8g2. 
GENERAL FUND. 

Balance on hand, June 1st, 1 89 1, j^462 82 

State appropriation, ^10,000 00 

Tuition fees, 6,166 50 

Income Special Fund for the use of the School contributed 

by the Committee of Women, 362 50 

Income W. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship, 60 cxd 

Scholarships from Temple Fund, i,cxx) 00 

Donations for Prizes, 45 ^^ 

Donation from Potters' Association to meet expenses in- 
curred, 300 00 

Sundries, 9^ 37 

Total receipts on account of School, • ^18,030 37 

Receipts on account maintenance Memorial Hall. 

Park Commission, 9>I94 9^ 

Sales of photographs, etc., 221 88 

Total receipts on account of Museiun, 9j4i6 86 

Income endowment fund, 3>8o7 36 

Annual Members, Ij785 00 

Donations for Museum exhibits. 

H. C. Lea, ;^20 00 

Wilson Eyre, lo 00 

Miss A. Blanchard, 100 00 

John Struthers, 350 00 

Temple Fund, 2,717 10 

3,197 10 

Total Receipts, . . . 1^^36,69951 

PAYMENTS. 

General expenses, salaries, etc., 1,629 34 

Maintenance Art School, 20,723 63 

Maintenance Memorial Hall, 10,871 04 

Museum exhibits pxurchased, 3>II7 'O 

36,341 II 

Balance on hand, • $358 40 



21 

ENDOWMENT FUNDS. 

Balance on hand June 1st, 1 89 1, ^825 00 

Investment paid off, 10,000 00 

Associate Committee of Women, for nucleus of a School 

Building Fund, 2,500 00 

Frederic Graff Architectural Scholarship : Annual Prize Fvmd, 500 00 

$13,825 00 

INVESTMENTS. 

$i2,ODO Reading Railroad 5 fo Loan, "Stamped 5 ^" . . . 12,344 73 
Frederick Graff Scholarship, Mortgage Trust Co. 5 fo De- 
benture, ....... 500 00 

$12,844 73 

Balance Uninvested Principal, $980 27 

TEMPLE FUND. """^ 

Balance on hand, June 1st, 1891, 2,144 25 

Income, 2,620 26 

^4,764 51 
PAYMENTS. 

Scholarships, 1,000 00 

Library, 10 27 

Museum Exhibit, 2,717 10 

3,727 37 

Balance on hand, $1,037 14 

Of which Balance, 

Income, $94.8 83 

Principal, 88 31 

$£,037 14 
Examined and found correct. 

CHARLES D. CLARK, 

Treasttrer. 



November 8th, 1892. T 



CRAWFORD ARNOLD,) ^. ^ 

' \ Finance Committee. 
T. P. CHANDLER, Jr., / 



22 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The report of the Treasurer of this Committee, gives the account 
of the receipts and expenditures during the past year. Its largest 
appropriation (^2,500) was sent to the Board of Trustees as the nu- 
cleus of a fund to be sucured for larger buildings for the School. 

Each member of the Committee feels that the moment for adding 
to this Fund has now arrived, and is ready to co-operate with the 
Trustees in carrying out any plans for this purpose which may be 
deemed advisable. 

The report of the honored Principal of the School is most encour- 
aging, telling us, as it does, that there are three hundred and thirty- 
one individual students enrolled, but the fact that forty-two applicants 
have been refused admission to the School on account of want of room 
determines the Committee to use every means in its power to remedy 
this, the only defect, in a School which, in some branches, stands 
alone and above all similar Institutions in the country ; this fact is at- 
tested to by the number of pupils who are with us from other States of 
our Union. 

Some changes have occurred in our Committee through the res- 
ignation of members from domestic causes over which they had no 
control, but many of those who have thus left us stand ready to lend 
a helping hand in our work when occasion offers, while there are those 
who gladly fill the places thus made vacant, and do battle for an Insti- 
tution of which every soul in this Commonwealth should be proud. 

The loss by death of one of our Trustees (Mr. Thomas Hockley) 
who held the interests of the Institution close to his heart, has been a 
source of deep pain to us, and through his death came an additional 
sorrow through the removal of his wife, one of the most active mem- 
bers of our Committe, to another State. 
By order of the Committee, 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

Chairman. 



►Tjtd 



•^ "^ " -^ o 00 

o" tn i^ A O 



i^> 



55 "d" 






O m 

i^ o 

p 2. 

CO 
C 3 



M U> Ln -p^ 

M O ^ O CX> 
HH O O O vo 



Cn O O O O O OJ 
O O O O O O ^ 












> K 

> Z 

S5 



5 3 G-. 
0^3 

2 ►*> p 

O 2 3 
P^>p 

orq 



^ ^ ^ 3 »-dG O 



o 3- 






§• 



en M M (-n 


mS 


K) M ^ (^ (^ K) O 
VO aN<-a O t^ O 


8^ 



^888888 88 



R > 

O C/5 



1 


P 


n 


r-t- 


G- 


CD 


r/5 


o 




O 


p' 


3 

3 


> 




•-t 


^ 




a> 



'V 

P 

C/3 
< 

3 



24 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 

Annual Members and Subscribers, 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their name and 
address to the Secretary. Blank Forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
the third page of the cover. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly 
acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership, One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 

" All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise' specifically given) and from- 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Laws. 



PATRONS. 

Baird, John *Drexel, F. A. 

^Barton, Mrs. Susan R. Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. *Gibson, Henry C. 

Childs, George W. Houston, H. H. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Lea, Henry C, 

Drexel, A. J. Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

Whitney. A. & Sons. 

♦Deceased. 



25 

LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 

Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. 

Baily, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 

Baker, John R. 

Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*Bartol, B. H. 

Bartol, H. W. 
*Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Biddle, Chapman 

Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 

Biddle, Clement 
*Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
^Borie, C & H. 

Bowen & Fox 

Brown, Alexander 

Bumham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
^Caldwell J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 

Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
■*Chew, Samuel 
*Claghom, James L. 

Claghom, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence H. 



*Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edw. H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 

Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
*Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 

Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, I. Lewis 
■^^Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
^Disston, Albert H. 

Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 

Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufactvuing Co. 

*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 

Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 



* Deceased. 



26 



Gibson, Miss R. 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
*Graff, Frederic 
Graff, Mrs. Frederic 
Green, Stephen 
Hagstoz & Thorpe 
Harrison, A. C. 
Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Harrison, Thomas S. 
^Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
^Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
^Hockley, Thomas 
Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
Hockley, William Stevenson 
Horstmann, F. O. 
Horstmann, W. H., & Sons 
Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
Hughes, John O. 
Hunter, James & John 
lungerich & Smith 
■^James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
*Jones, Jacob 
Jones, Washington 
Justice, Bateman & Co. 
^Justice, Miss Cecilia 
Justice, Miss E. B. 
Justice, William W. 
Justice, Mrs. William W. 
Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
^Knight, Edw. C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 
Lewis, Richard A. 
Little, Amos R. 
Little, Amos R., & Co. 
*Lovering, Joseph S. 
Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 
MacVeagh, Wayne 



*Massey, William 

Merrick, Miss E. H. j,^ 

Merrick, J. Vaughn 

Merrick, Miss L. W. 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 
*Millikin, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
^Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 
*Newbold, Charles 
■^Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, Jr. 

Page, Joseph F. 
■^Patterson, Jbseph 
*Pepper, George S. 
*Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, WilHam, M. D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
^Phillips, Henry M. 
■^Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Chatles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 

^Randolph, Evan 
Randolph & Jenks 

*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 

^Roberts, Jacob, M. D. 
Rogers, C. H. 
Rogers, Fainnan 

^Rogers, W. D. 

■^Santee, Charles 
Scott, James P. 

*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D., & Co. 



* Deceased. 



27 



*Seibert, Henry- 
Sellers, Coleman 
^Sharpless, Charles S. 

Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 

Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 

Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 

Spencer, Charles 
*Steel, Edward T. 

Steel, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
"^Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 
: Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 



Townsend, Mrs. H.. C. 

Tyler, George F. 
■^Vaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 

* Wagner, Mrs. T. 
Warden, W. G. 
Warner, Redwood F. 
Weightman, Miss Annie W. 
Weightman, Miss Mary L. 
Weightman, Jr., Mrs. William 

*Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 

* White, Samuel S. 
Williams, Edward H. 
Wood, Stuart 
Wood, William, & Co. 
Wright, Edward N. 
Wright, James A. 

*Wright, John W. 
Wurts, Charles Stewart, M. D. 



Deceased. 



28 



Annual members (for 1892) who have subscribed not less than 
ten dollars. 

Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D., ... ^10 00 

King, Mrs. Rufus (Cincinnati), . 10 00 

Leonard, James B., 10 00 

Lewis, Miss Bertha, 10 00 

Lewis, Edward, 10 oa 

Lewis, Enoch, 10 00 

Lewis, Dr. F. W., 10 oa 

Lewis, Robert M., 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, .... 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. J. Dundas, . . 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, .... 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G., . . 10 00 

Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S., . . . 10 00 

Mackellar, Thomas, ...... 10 00 

Magee, Miss Anna, 10 cx> 

Magee, Miss Eliza J., 10 00 

Magee, Miss Fanny S., . . . . lo 00 

Magee, Horace, 10 00 

Mason, Frederick T., 10 00 

May, Mrs. De Courcy, .... 10 00 

Moulton, Mrs. Byron P., . . . . 10 oa 

Neall, Dr. Daniel, 10 oa 

Neall, Frank L., 10 oa 

Newhall, George M., 10 00 

Pancoast, Albert, 10 oa 

Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, .... 10 00 

Paul, Dr. James W., 10 oa 

Paul, Miss M. W., lo oa 

Pepper, David, 10 00 

Pepper, Mrs. David, 10 OO 

Pepper, Mrs. William Piatt, . . 10 oa 

Piatt, Franklin, 10 00 

Poulterer, Mrs. William, ... 10 oo 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H., . . . 10 oa 

Preston, Mrs. George R., ... 10 00 

Price, J. Sergeant, lo oa 

Ritchie, Craig D., 10 oa 

Roberts, Miss E. C, 10 oa 

Roberts, Miss F. A., 10 oo 

Roberts, Mrs. George B., ... 10 oo 

Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, .... 10 oo 

Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, lo oo 

Rosengarten, J. G., lO oo 

Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin, ... lo oo 

Sanders, Mrs. John, lo oo 

Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., . . . 10 oa 

Smedley, Samuel L , lo 00 

Smith, Mrs. Aubrey H., . . . . lo oo 

Smith, Miss Christiana B., . . . 10 oo 

Smith, Edward Brinton, .... lO oo 

Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, 10 oo 

Stevenson, Miss Anna P., . . . lo oo 

Stille, Dr. Charles J., 10 oa 

Stitt, Mrs. Seth B., 10 00 



Arnold, Mrs. Crawford, . . 


. ;^io 00 


*Baker, Alfred G., 


. 10 00 


Barney, Mrs. CD...... 


. 10 00 


Bement, Clarence S., . . . 


. 10 00 


Biddle, Cadwalader, . . . . 


. 10 oo 


Biddle, Mrs. Chapman, . . . 


. 10 oo 


Brazier, Joseph H., . . . . 


. 10 00 


Brown, Alexander, , . . . 


. lo 00 


Brown, Miss Martha M., . . 


. 10 00 


Brown, T. Wistar 


. 10 00 


Buehler, Mrs. William G., . 


. 10 00 


Burnham, Mrs. William, . . 


. 10 00 


Cadwalader, Mrs. John, . . 


. lo 00 


Caldwell, J. E., & Co., . . . 


. 10 00 


Chandler, T. P., Jr., . . . . 


. 10 00 


Clark, Miss Frances, . . . . 


. 10 00 


Cochran, Travis, 


. 10 00 


Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . . . 


. 10 00 


Coleman, Miss Anne C, . . 


. 10 00 


Coles, Edward, 


. 10 oo 


Coxe, Alexander B., . . . , 


. lo 00 


Coxe, Eckley B., 


. 10 00 


Cramp, Charles H., . . . . 


. 10 00 


Cramp, Henry W., .... 


. 10 00 


*Cummins, Daniel B., . . . . 


. 10 oo 


Curtin, Mrs. Roland G., . 


. 10 00 


Da Costa, Dr. J. M., . . . . 


. lo 00 


Daniell, Miss, 


. 10 00 


Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . . . 


. 10 00 


Dickson, Samuel, 


. 10 00 


Dulles, J. Heatley, . . . . 


. lo 00 


Durant, Mrs. F. C, . . . . 


. 10 oo 


Eisenbrey, Mrs. W. H., . . 


. 10 oo 


Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., . . 


. 10 00 


Galloway, William, . . . 


. 10 00 


Gillespie, Mrs. E. D 


. 10 00 


Gillingham, Joseph E., . . 


. 10 00 


Graff, Miss Henrietta, . . 


. lo oo 


Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . . 


. 10 oo 


Guillou, Victor, 


. 10 00 


Hamilton, W. C, . . . . 


. 10 00 


Hance Bros. & White, . . 


. lO oo 


Hare, Mrs. Horace B., . . 


. 10 00 


Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, . 


. 10 oo 


Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . . 


. 10 00 


Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . 


. lo 00 


Hippie, Frank K., . . . . 


. 10 00 


Hutchinson, Miss, .... 


. 10 oo 


Jack, Dr. Louis, 


. . 10 00 


Jayne, Mrs. David,. . . . 


. . 10 00 


Jayne, Dr. Horace, . . . 


. . 10 00 


Jenks, Mrs. William F., . 


. . la 00 


Keen, W. W., M.D., . . 


. . lo 00 


Keith, Sidney W., . . . . 


. . la 00 



29 



Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . . . 
Townsend, Henry C, . . . . 
Weigh tm an, Mrs. John Farr, . 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . . . 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, . . 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, . . , 



lO 


oo 


lO 


oo 


lO 


oo 


lO 


oo 


lO 


oo 


lO 


oo 



Wilson, Joseph M., $io oo 

Wister, Mrs. Casper, lo oo 

Wood, Mrs. Howard, ..... lo oo 

Wood, Miss Juliana, lo oo 

Wright, Mrs. R. K., lo oo 

Wyeth, Stuart, lo oo 



Annual Members (for 1892) who have subscribed not less than 
five dollars. 



Ashhurst, R. L., ... 
Ashhurst, Mrs. R. L., . 
Barry, Miss A. E., . . . 
Barry, Miss M. C, . . 
Bartol, Mrs. C. C, . . . 
Bartol, Henry G., . . . 
Caldwell, Mrs. J. Albert, 
Carter, Mrs. Wm. T., . . 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . 
Clark, Miss Amie Hamptc 
Cohen, Miss Mary M., . 
Colton, S. W., .... 

Corlies, Miss, 

Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth 
Crew, J. Lewis, .... 
Dana, Charles E., . . . 
Day, Frank Miles, . . 
De Haven, Mrs. Holstien, 
D'Invilliers, Mrs. Charles, 
Dissel, Charles, . . . 
Dissel, Mrs. Charles, 
Dixon, Mrs. G. D., . 
Duane, Russell, . . . 
Du Pont, Mrs. L., . . 
Durant, Miss Ethel, . 
Eisenbrey, Miss Edith, 
Eisenbrey, Miss Sarah H. 
Eyre, Wilson, Jr., . 
Garden, Morton, . 
Gilpin, Mrs. Washington, 
Graff, James, .... 
Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C 
Harrison, Miss Maud L, 
Harrison, John, . . . 
Harrison, Mrs. John, 
Howell, Miss Isabel T., 



^5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 CK) 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



Howell, Mrs. William, $5 00 

Hyneman, Mrs. S. M., 5 00 

Keen, Mrs. Charles B., .... 5 00 

Keen, Frank H., 5 00 

Keen, Walter Budd, 5 00 

McFadden, Mrs. George H., . . 5 00 

McGlensey, Miss, 5 00 

McMurtrie, Miss, 5 00 

Miller, William J., 5 00 

Morwitz, Joseph, Jr., 5 00 

Nichols, W. J., 5 00 

Norris, Miss Clara G., 5 00 

Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . . , . 5 00 

Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . . . . 5 00 

Pepper, Miss Alice Marion, ... 5 00 

Pepper, Miss Emily, 5 00 

Pepper, Mrs. John W., 5 00 

Pepper, Miss Martha Otis, ... 5 00 

Randolph, Miss Anna, 5 00 

Randolph, Miss Elizabeth J., . . 5 00 

Randolph, Mrs. Evan, 5 00 

Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood, . . 5 00 

Rexamer, G. W., .... • . . 5 00 

Roberts, Thomas, 5 °*^ 

Roberts, Thomas, Jr., 5 00 

Rogers, Miss Mary, 5 00 

Sharp, Mrs. Isaac, 5 00 

Simpson, Mrs. William, .... 5 00 

Smith, Harrison Hoxie, .... 5 °*^ 

Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, .... 5 00 

Walker, Mrs. R. J. C, 5 00 

Williams, F. Howard, 5 ^^ 

Winpenny, Mrs. Bolton, .... 5 00 

Woods, Dr. D. Flavel, 5 00 

Wright, Joseph, 5 00 

Zell, Miss, 5 00 



30 



DONATIONS. 

^ Associate Committee of Women, ^2,500 00 

2 John T. Morris, 5CX) 00 

3 Mrs. Frederic Graft, 500 00 

* William Piatt Pepper, Executor, 200 00 

5 John Struthers, 200 00 

® Miss Anna Blanchard, 100 00 

1 For nucleus of building fund or other purposes connected with the school. 

2 For collection of American pottery. 

3 To found the Frederic Graff Architectural Prize Fund. 
* For purchase of plaster casts for the Museum. 

6 For purchase of antique wrought-iron collection. 
« For purchase of objects of art for the Museum. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witness,. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain \here insert 
a description of the property] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses,. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE EIGHTEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



For the Year ending December 31, 1893. 



PHILADELPHIA, 

1894. 



OFFICERS FOR 1894, 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT, 

WM. WEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 



TREASURER, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. 



SECRETARY, 

DALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, 

DALTON DORR. 



PRINCIPAL OF T"E SCHOOL, 

LESLIE W. MILLER. 



ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

RICHARD CADBURY. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS, 

The Governor of the State, The Mayor of the Cify, 

BY APPOINTMENT, 

Thomas Cochran, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Chart.es H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

S. G. Thompson, Appointed by the Cotnmissioners of Fairmount Park, 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

To serve for three years : 

Robert K. McNeely, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr., 

Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D. 

To serve for tzvo years : 
A. C. Harrison, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt. 



To serve for one year : 
John T. Morris, Charles H. Cramp, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

Theo, C. Search. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1894; 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

William Platt Pepper, Chairman; Stuart Wood, T. C. Search, William 
Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, R. K. McNeely, A. C. Harri- 
son, C. H. Cramp, J. S. Jenks, C. H. Harding, T. P. Chandler, Jr. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 

ART. 

John T. Morris, Chairman ; Samuel Gustine Thompson, Robert W. Von- 
KOH, Charles Grafly, Walter Cope. 

MUSEUM. 

k, C. Lambdin, M.D., Chairman; J. T. Morris, J. S, Jenks, A. C. Harrison, 
T. P. Chandler, Jr., Dalton Dorr, ex officio^ Mrs. Jno. Harrison, Mrs. Wm. 
Weightman, Jr., Mrs. Geo. K. Crozer, Mrs. F. R. Shelton, Miss M. L. Cor- 
mes, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

INSTRUCTION. 

T. C. Search, Chairman; Wm. Wood, J. S. Jenks, R. K. McNeely, C. H. 
Harding, Mrs. Thos. Roberts, Mrs. T. A. Riley, Mrs. C. W. Bergner, Mrs. 
H. Wood, Miss McMurtrie, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 

C. N. Weygandt, Chairman; Stuart Wood, J. S. Jenks, T. C. Search, T. 
P. Chandler, Jr. 



The President is ex officio a member of all Committees, 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



TO THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Seport see page 36.) 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 



VICE-PRESIDENT. 

MRS. JOHN SANDERS. 



SECRETARY, 

MISS FANNIE S. MAGEE. 



TREASURER, 

MRS. BYRON P. MOULTON. 



Mrs. Matthew Baird, 
Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 
Mrs. C. William Bergner, 
Miss Anna Blanchard, 
Miss Mary Cohen, 
Miss Margaret L. Corlies, 
Mrs. George K. Crozer, 
Mrs. Roland G. Curtin, 
Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 
Mrs. F. C Durant, 
Mrs. R. B. Ellison, 
Mrs. Frank I. Govven, 
Mrs. John Harrison, 



Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 
Mrs. Richard Henry Lee, 
Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 
Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Mrs. Harry Rogers, 
Mrs. F. R. Shelton, 
Mrs. \Vm. Weightman, Jr., 
Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 
Mrs. Howard Wood. 
Mrs. J. W. Wright, 
Miss Zell. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, 

Organized as a Museum of Industrial Arts, has grown far beyond the limits set 
for it at first. The pictures and statuary in the Bloomfield-Moore collection and the 
food-products in the collection of British India indicate its present scope. Its divi- 
sion into departments, under the supervision of specialists, has been undertaken. 
Those already organized, comprise: 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY, 

Edwin Atlee Barber, Bonorajy Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS, 
F. D. Langenheim, Honora7y Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY, 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honoraiy Curator. 



Dalton Dorr, Director of the Museutn. 

M. D. WooDNUTT, H. M. Wilder, Assistants. 

William Lindsay, Superintendent. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, 

Comprises in its organization the following departments : 

School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 

School of Decorative Painting. 

School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 

School of Applied Design. 

School of Wood Carving. 

School of Decorative Sculpture. 

School of Architectural Design. 

School of Mural Decoration. 

School of Normal Art Instruction. 

School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF OF THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 

L. W. Miller, Principal. 

Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 

Bradley C. Algeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in Textile 

Design and Mechanical Drawing. 
Charles X. Harris, Professor of Drawing. 
Charles E. Dana, Professor of Water-Color Painting. 
Henry Plasschaert, Professor of Sculpture. 
CONYERS B. FiNCKEL, Professor of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
Myrtle D. Goodwin, Instructor in Design Applied to Textiles. 
Florence C. Fetherston, Instructor in Design Applied to Printed Fabrics. 
William Laird Turner, Instructor in Applied Design, Evening Class. 
Mary Ellen Slater, Instructor in Modeling. 
Amory C. Simons, Instructor in Wood Carving. 
William Roebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Related Branches. 
Nicola D'Ascenzo, Instructor in Mural Decoration, 

Julian Millard, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Architectural Design. 
Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 
Elizabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Pen and Ink Drawing. 
A. M. Grillon, Instructor in French. 
Madame A. M. Grillon, Instructor in German. 
Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Design. 
Paul Lachenmeyer, Instructor in Drawing, Evening Class. 
Raymond Walters, Assistant in Drawing. 

Thomas B. Ridington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 
Norman E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Roberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand Loom Department. 
Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building. 
Leonora J. C. Boeck, Secretary. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 

THE EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



This report is for the year ending December 31st, 1893. 

The receipts from all sources during the fiscal year ending May 
31st, 1893, were ^281,764.36. The expenditures were ^271,650.60, 
of which, for maintenance of School, was $23,416.72 ; for mainten- 
ance of Museum, $11,851.81 ; and for purchase of objects of art for 
the Museum, $3341.68. 

There has been no increase of the Endowment Fund during 1893. 

The balance in the hands of the Centennial Board of Finance 
amounted to $12,541.73, and by order of the Supreme Court of the 
United States the same was paid into the treasury of our Institution in 
September, 1893, upon a bond being given for $20,000, signed by our 
President and duly attested by the Secretary with the seal of the cor- 
poration attached, making ourselves liable to pay any legal claims 
which might be hereafter presented by individual shareholders. This 
action was taken mainly at the suggestion of the Hon. Frederick 
Fraley, the President of the Centennial Board of Finance, and to him 
the thanks of this Institution are due. 

Mr. Edward Longstreth, elected at the annual meeting in Janu- 
ary, 1893, declined to serve, and Dr. Alfred C. Lambdin was elected 
in his place. Dr. Francis W. Lewis resigned his position as a Trustee 
in May, 1893. Mr. Charles D. Clark resigned as Treasurer and Trustee 
on September 8th, 1893, owing to press of private business matters of 
his own, and his resignation was accepted with regret and thanks for 
his valuable services. Mr. Richard Cadbury was appointed Treasurer 
pro tern. 

The greatest event in the history of our institution has happened 
since our last annual meeting. The property formerly belonging to 
the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb at Broad and Pine Streets, 
two hundred feet by four hundred feet, with its large buildings front- 



ing on four streets, has become ours by purchase, and now we have, 
for the first time, plenty of room for the development of our Indus- 
trial Art School in all its many departments. This most fortunate 
event was made possible by the generous offer of Mr. William Weight- 
man, who gave the sum of ^100,000 contingent upon a like sum being 
raised by the Trustees and the Associate Committee of Women. Of 
this sum nearly one half was raised by the steady and heroic efforts of 
the Associate Committee of Women, who worked with us and for the 
institution in the most indefatigable way with this brilliant result./ To 
every one who gave or collected even a single dollar for the good 
cause of Industrial Art Education our hearty thanks are now offered, 
and every man and woman in this community is asked not to be 
weary in well doing, but to remember that much money is still needed 
to reduce the mortgage on our property, and to meet the largely in- 
creased expenses of our School, which is so thorough and so pros- 
perous. 

Our $100,000 was collected by great efforts, and the struggle to 
secure it, in the face of an opposition by a syndicate of capitalists 
who wanted to buy the property to tear down the buildings and erect 
a double row of dwelling-houses on that site, was most spirited and 
prolonged. The Syndicate withdrew at last, very gracefully, and we 
bought the property. The deed was signed for it on May 12th, 1893, 
the amount of the purchase money being $540,050, of which sum 
$350,000 remains on mortgage. Had not the' great financial depres- 
sion in all business matters come just as the money was being col- 
lected, there is very little doubt but that we could have paid a larger 
sum in cash and made a much smaller mortgage, for public interest 
was aroused and all intelligent people saw the importance of securing 
these unique buildings in that central position for educational uses. 
The State of Pennsylvania, in its legislature, showed its approval of 
our plan, and had our bill asking for an appropriation of $100,000 
for buildi?igs been brought forward sooner there is no doubt we should 
have secured State aid. The interest on our mortgage annually 
amounts to $15,700, payable semi-annually on the 26th days of April 
and October" of $7850. Our first interest payment was promptly 
made on October 26th. 

During the summer alterations were made in several ;parts of the 
buildings to adapt them more completely to our needs in the various 
departments of the School work, and on September loth, 1893, the 
classes were opened in the new School Buildings. Vast as these build- 



II 

ings are, it is a source of amazement to all who are familiar with them 
to find out that we could readily occupy nearly the whole of two 
entire floors all around from Broad Street to Fifteenth Street — a fact 
which shows how very much cramped for room we had been in our 
old quarters, and makes us wonder how we managed to do what was 
done. 

The School property at 1336 Spring Garden Street was sold in 
December, 1893, for an advance on what was paid for it, and the un- 
expired lease of the large four-story factory building at Thirteenth and 
Buttonwood Streets was made over to a firm (in June, 1893) ^^'^''O took 
it off our hands. 

The cash paid for the property, the alteration of the buildings 
and the installation expenses exceed the amount contributed by about 
$3000, or a little over that sum, and it will require a further sum of 
about $1000 to complete the expenditures incurred by removal to 
Broad and Pine Streets. 

The cost of the running expenses of the School has been very 
greatly increased, and, including the amount of the interest on our 
mortgage (^15,700), it is not an excessive estimate to say that $25,000 
will be needed annually for the proper maintenance of our School. 

The central position of our School Buildings is so convenient of 
access that it is our wish to collect about us, as an important part of 
our work, all that is in any way recognized as belonging to education 
in any of its various branches. What has been already done in this 
way will be mentioned in the report of the Principal of the Industrial 
Art School. 

The use of a number of rooms (not now used by us) at the western 
end of our building have been granted to Mr. Henry Hobart Brown, 
for the older classes of the DeLancey School for Boys, during tem- 
porary changes in his present school-rooms. 

At the Museum the large Western Gallery has been appropriated 
by the Commissioners of Fairmount Park, and the Wilstach Gallery 
of Paintings has been placed there in a number of rooms well arranged 
for their proper display. This caused temporary inconvenience in 
rearranging our own collections which were in the West Gallery, but 
it has drawn to Memorial Hall a larger number of visitors than ever 
before, and it will be an increasing source of attraction as the public 
get to know it is there. 

Two of our most active Trustees, Dr. Isaac Norris and Mr. T. P. 
Chandler, Jr., have gone abroad for a year, and have asked that their 



12 

places be filled in the Board of Trustees during their absence, fully 
intending to resume their work on their return home. Mr. John 
Struthers reluctantly resigned as a Trustee in November last on 
account of ill health. 

The Associate Committee of Women have lost by death one of 
their most active and valued members, and it will be a long time 
before we can all get accustomed to missing the cheering presence of 
Mrs. Crawford Arnold from our meetings and in the active work of 
the Institution. 

Following are the Reports of the Director of the Museum and the 
Principal of the School. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The number of visitors to Memorial Hall in 1893 ^^'^^ 379j2 77, 
an excess of 67,000 over the highest record of previous years. This 
marked increase in the number of visitors was, doubtless, due to the 
desire to see the Wilstach collection of pictures which was opened to 
the public on the ist of July. This noble bequest to the city occupies 
the West Gallery of Memorial Hall. The Gallery is partitioned off 
into suites of rooms, and separated from the parts of the building 
remaining in the occupancy of the Museum by an ornamental iron 
screen and curtains. The administration of the bequest and the care 
and arrangement of the pictures are entirely in the hands of the Com- 
missioners of Fairmount Park. 

The rearrangement of the Museum incident to the removal of its 
collections from what is now '^ The Wilstach Gallery,'' necessitated 
an entirely new plan of grouping the exhibits. As this plan contem- 
plates using the rotunda after the repairs to the dome, now in progress, 
are completed, what has been done thus far is only in the nature of a 
temporary expedient. So soon as the rotunda is opened the rearrange- 
ment will be made. 

The year has been fruitful of gifts and loans, and the generosity 
of two friends of the Museum, in advancing money for the purpose, 
enabled us to make numerous valuable purchases at the World's Fair. 
The various objects are enumerated in the tabulated list accompanying 
this report. 

One of the most important works of the year was the fitting up of 
the Southwest Pavilion for the reception of the Greek and Roman 
antiquities belonging or loaned to the Museum — the Vaux, the Lam- 



13 

born and some minor collections. The fine Hammer Collection of 
antiquities, which comes to us on approval for purchase, has been 
installed here. The manuscript for a catalogue of this last-named 
collection has been written and will be printed as soon as possible. 

The Department of American Pottery and Porcelain which was 
established last year, with Mr. Edwin AtLee Barber as Honorary 
Curator, has secured for us the co-operative interest of leading manu- 
facturers of artistic pottery in various parts of the country, as well as 
a series of examples illustrating the history of the pottery industry in 
this country which is unrivalled anywhere. An illustrated catalogue 
of this collection has been prepared by Mr. Barber, and he also makes 
frequent reference to it in his book recently published: History of 
Pottery a?id Porcelain in the United States. 

Pursuing the plan of enlisting the assistance of specialists in the 
work of the Museum, Mr. F. D. Langenheim was invited to become 
Honorary Curator of the Department of Numismatics. He accepted 
the office and under his direction the work of classifying and arrang- 
ing the collection of coins has made rapid progress. A portion of the 
collection of the Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, together with 
a collection belonging to the Library Company of Philadelphia, were 
placed with the Museum when it was organized. Altogether there are 
some six thousand coins in the Museum collections. All of these were 
catalogued last year. One very full series of copper electrotypes of 
the Greek and Roman coins in the British Museum which was given 
to our Museum some twelve years ago, has been carefully studied, and 
wherever the original is a gold or silver coin the replica has been 
electrotyped in gold or silver. 

Another Curatorship which was established during the year was 
that of the Department of Textiles, including Embroidery and Lace. 
This office was offered to and accepted by Mrs. John Harrison, one of 
the Associate Committee of Women. To Mrs. Harrison's personal 
efforts we owe the highly interesting Loan Exhibition of Lace which 
was opened in the school building on December 27th. It is worthy of 
note that this admirably arranged and instructive exhibition is the first 
of the kind ever held in Philadelphia. 

I beg to be permitted to express my personal sense of the good 
fortune of the Museum in having enlisted in this department the active 
interest of a lady whose expert knowledge and interest in the work 
will make her advice and assistance so valuable. 

During the year the few prints necessary to make the series of 



^4 

publications of the Arundel Society complete have been obtained. 
This interesting series is framed and exhibited in its entirety in the 
north corridor. 

Following is a list of purchases made by and for the Museum : 

Two Columbian half dollars. 

Two Columbian quarter dollars. 

Japanese Kaga or litter. 

Three Japanese Temple figures ; gold lacquered. 

One Japanese Koro, or bowl and cover; enamel on metal. 

Fifty-three pieces American pottery, including examples of old potteries in 
Montgomery County, Pa.; Southern Porcelain Co., of Kaolin, S. C; Tucker &. 
Hemphill, Philadelphia. Potteries in Lennington, Vt., Trenton and Gloucester, N. J. 

Eight oil paintings from Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore's sale :— 

•' Glacier of the Corner Grat and the Matterhorn at Sunset ;" by Gabriel Loppe. 

" The Black Vein in the Mer de Glace," by Gabriel Loppe. 

" Marguerite," by James Bertrand. 

"Ophelia," by James Bertrand. 

" Lake Geneva in a Storm," by F. Diday. 

"On the Roof at Naples," by Oswald Achenbach. 

"Spanish Dancers," by Guido Bach 

"Return of the Fisherman," by William Crawford. 

Two chromo-lithographs; Arundel Society subscription. 

Three pieces fictile ivory ; Arundel Society reproduction. 

One lithograph, head of St. Thomas; Arundel Society publication. 

Five outline heads from martyrdom of St. Sebastian ; Arundel Society publication. 

One Centennial Souvenir Plate ; a view of Memorial Hall. 
Purchases at the Columbian Fair : — 

Wrought-iron Rose ; German. 

Pokal or Ewer ; Bavarian. 

Six Porcelain Plates ; Chinese. 

Elton-ware Vase ; English. , 

Pair Porcelain Vases ; French. 

Cloisonne Vase; Japanese. 

Four Earthenware Vases ; Spanish. 

Two Earthenware Plaques ; Spanish. 

Japanese Booth. 

Siamese Pagoda. 

Three Musical Instruments, Tambourine^ Ober and Drum ; Siamese. 

Rattan Basket ; Siamese. 

Model of a house on posts ; Siamese. 

Model of a house on bamboos ; Siamese. 

Model of a house on pontoons; Siamese. 

Five Embossed Silver Plaques, by Carl Waschmann, of Vienna ; Austrian. 

Wrought iron Bell ; Austria. 

Lot Broken Pottery ; India. 



15 

Terra-Cotta Model of the Kutb Minar; India. 

Jeypore Lamp ; India. 

Ivory Table ; India. 

Koran Stand ; India. 

Cashmere Papier-Mache Vase; India. 

Cashmere Copper Tray ; India. 

Poona Brass Bowl; India. 

Porcelain Vase ; Royal Copenhagen. 

Marble Idol, Painted, "Tiger God" (Nur>ingh); India. 

Gifts were received from — 
Miss M. T. Dwight: 

Chocolate Pitcher, decorated by her from Original Design. 

Messrs. Stuart Wood and John T. Morris : 

Pair of Dancing Figures (Ainos), lacquered wood carving, Japanese. 

Mr J. Marx Etting: 

Four Pieces India China; two Pieces Brass Work ; five Clay Figures, India. 

Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore: 

Silver and Enameled Finger Ring. 
Ivory Crucifix. 

Mr. John T. Morris : 

Japanese Jar and Cover. 

Two Rook wood Pitchers. 

Tucker China Tea Set of 42 pieces ; two Tucker Pitchers. 

Three Carved Alabaster Screens ; from Columbian Fair. 

Seven Pieces Pottery, " " 

Large Stoneware Jar, Cover and Stand ; American Salt Glaze, made by Mrs. S. 
S. Frackelton, Milwaukee, Wis. 

(This was the first article sold in the Women's Building at the Columbian Fair.) 
Miss Lydia T. Morris: 

Marble Street Temple, with Figure, India; from Columbian Fair. 

Mrs, John Harrison : 

Burmese reclining Buddah, wood, gilded ; from World's Fair. 
" Figure, kneeling, " " 

Mr. E. a. Barber : 

Specimens of American Pottery, consisting of Tiles, Pipes, Vases, Jars, Dishes, 
Plates, etc. 

Dr. F. W. Lewis: 

One Hundred and Thirty-six Pieces Chinese and Japanese Porcelain, Earthen- 
ware, Ivories, Enamels, etc. 

One Grseco-Roman Vase. 
Mr. Stuart Wood : 

Japanese Vases, Clocks, Daimio's Coat. 



i6 

Estate of Dr. John T. Sharpless (bequest): 
Eight Clay Figures and Busts, 

Mr. William Platt Pepper : 

Decorated Cream Pitcher, English. 
Horn Spoon from Alaska. 

Anonymous : 

One Group and Three Figures, Clay, Spanish. 
Mr. W. W. Taylor, President Rookwood Pottery : 

Fifteen Specimens of Rookwood Faience. 
Mr. Frank Huntington, former President Cincinnati Art Pottery. 

Three Specimens of Ware made at the Cincinnati Art Pottery, 
Mr. Clarence B, Moore: 

Oil Painting by Count Geo. von Rosen, 

Esquimaux Harpoon, 
Miss H. Krockhauss; 

Dish, Blue and White, English ; View of Old Capitol at Washington. 

Steel Reticule. 
Dr. Marcus Benjamin: 

Clay Pipe, Head of '' Dick Deadeye." 
Steubenville Pottery Co, : 

Two Specimens of their Manufacture. 
LoNHUDA Pottery Co. : 

Two Specimens of their Manufacture, 
Mr. a. C, Brenchley: 

English Sword, 1803. 

Saore from Field of Gettysburg. 
Miss M. Louise McLaughlin : 

Three Large Vases of Cincinnati Faience, decorated by her. 

Mr. H. E Loomes: 

Indian Moccasins, made by Cheyenne Indians. 

Col. J. P. Nicholson: 

Bronze Medal Commemorating Fiftieth Anniversary of the Connection of Col. 
M. Richards Muckle with the Philadelphia Public Ledger, 
Messrs, Armbruster Bros., Frankfort-on-the-Main : 

Wrought-Iron Scroll. 
Edwin Bennett Pottery Co. : 

Framed Picture of Original Factory. 

Numerous Specimens of their Manufacture. 

Loans were made by — 
Dr. Robt. H. Lamborn: 

One hundred and Forty-two Pieces, consisting of Ivories, Bronzes, Wood Carv- 
ings. Lamps, etc. 



17 

Miss H. A. Zell: 

Toby Mug, made at Bennington, Vt. 

•Dr. Isaac Norris: 

Two Cases, containing Thirty-six Models of Famous Diamonds and Precious 
Stones. 
Mrs. Lena Morris Kempton: 

Sideboard, formerly the property of Robert Morris, the Financier, and Three 
Knife Cases. 
Jno. C. Trautwine, Jr. : 

Console Table, Carved Ivory Fan, once the property of Susan, Daughter of 
William Bradford, First Colonial Printer, and Fourteen Pieces Porcelain and Earth- 
enware. 
E. C. Hammer: 

Collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities, numbering 1301 pieces, also 91 1 
Greek and Roman Coins. 
Mrs. W. Hinckle Smith: 

Large Sevres Vase, Stone Base and Brass Tray. 

Three Alhambra Models, Framed. 

E. A. Barber : 

Parian Bust of Henry Clay and Grotesque Parian Medallion, made by Chas. 
Cartlidge, Greenpoint, N. Y. 

G. B. Sibley: 

Cow Creamer and Earthenware Picture Frame, made at Bennington, Vt. 
Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, for the Bloomfield-Moore Collection : 

Three Large Oil Paintings, one on Wood, "Adoration of the Magi," by Be- 
nozzo Gozzoli ; one on Canvas, by Zurbaran ; Forty-two Pieces, comprising Ivories, 
Enamels, Silver, Majolica, etc. 

Two Large Pieces Tapestry. 

Accessions to the Library. 
By purchase — 
Four Volumes on Numismatics, viz. : 

Historia Numorum, by Barclay V. Head. 
Coins of the Ancients, by Barclay V. Head. 

" " Illus., by Barclay V. Head. 

Roman Coins, by S. W. Stevenson. 
Two Pamphlets on Lace. 

By gift from — 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, St, Louis Mercantile Library Associ- 
ation, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Pennsylvania University, Ohio Mechanics' 
Institute, Spring Garden Institute, Mining and Mechanical Institute of Luzerne, 
Pa., National Academy of Design, N. Y. 

DALTON DORR, 

Director of the Museum. 




Design by Florence C. Fetherston, a pupil in the School. 



THE SCHOOL. 

The all important change in the affairs of the School, as it is the 
most important move that has been made by this Corporation, has, of 
course been the acquisition of this magnificent property at Broad and 
Pine streets. 

The expansion of the work of the School that was made possible 
by the acquisition of this spacious building has been promptly effected 
and is indicated not only by the increased attendance of pupils, but 
in the greatly increased equipment which has been needed and 
which was really presented to us long ago but which we were de- 
barred from receiving for want of room. 

The tabulated record appended to this report shows an actual 
gain in the registration of the pupils of rather more than ten per 
cent. This is most encouraging in a year that has witnessed so great 
a falling off in other schools and when it is remembered that a con- 
siderable number of those who are actually registered in the School 
are known to have been prevented from attending by the hard times. 

It is gratifying indeed to note the extent of the progress and ex- 
pansion which has been witnessed, and to change the note by which 



19 

these reports have been dominated for so long from a plea for more 
room and enlarged facilities to the story of results accomplished and 
ends attained. 

No American School is now quartered so advantageously as ours 
with accommodations at once so ample and so centrally located, as 
none has even begun to rival us in the educational work which is dis- 
tinctly our own. 

By this is meant not merely the work of the Textile School but 
the emphasis of an industrial purpose in all the work of all the classes 
of the Art School, The work in drawing, painting, and modelling is 
made as different as possible from that of a mere academy and its ap- 
plication to industry emphasized contmually and persistently by being 
associated with work in design and a study of the conditions under 
which designs have to be executed if they are executed at all. That 
this represents the true point of view for the great mass of students 
and for serving ihe real interests of a great industrial community like 
ours is no longer doubted except by the very few who affect to despise 
anything so commonplace as the actual doing of the world's work. 
Most people have at last come to see and to feel, that the Art which 
it is profitable for most of us to study and to encourage, is that w^hich 
expresses itself in glorifying common things and in informing the 
work of myriads of workers rather than standing for the attainment of 
the very few. 

The credit of promoting this idea, not only in Philadelphia but in 
the country at large, belongs unquestionably to this Institution and the 
growth of confidence and esteem which is accorded to this School is 
the measure of recognition which this idea has gained. 

In accordance with the spirit and purpose which has always been 
characteristic of this Institution, several Associations, whose objects are 
more or less directly associated with our own, have been invited to 
occupy the building at such times and in such manner as should be 
convenient for both parties. 

The T. Square Club an association of architects, numbering among 
its members many of the most artistic designers in Philadelphia, was 
invited to fit up one of the rooms on the second floor of the north 
wing as a club headquarters. 

This has been done and a very attractive suite of rooms for meet- 
ings, exhibitions, and receptions is the result. In return for the use 
of these rooms the Club agrees to exercise through an advisory com- 
mittee of its members an active supervision of the work of two of our 



20 

classes, namely, the School of Architectural Design and the School of 
Mural Decoration, as well as to give at least five illustrated lectures 
each year on subjects directly related to the work of the School. 

The advisory committee appointed by the club to act during the 
current school year, consists of Mr. Wilson Eyre, Jr., Mr. John 
Stewardson, and Mr. Thomas M. Kellogg and the lectures which are 
already provided for this season are as follows : 

January 24th, Greek and Roman Ornament by Prof. Warren P. 
Laird. 

February 7th, Gothic Ornament, by Mr. Walter Cope. 
\ March 7th, Applied Ornament^ by Mr. John Stewardson. 
4 March 28th, Wall Decoration, by Mr. Edgar V. Seeler. 

April 2d, Stained Glass and Mosaic, by Prof. Wm. H. Gray. 
In a similar spirit and with the purpose of promoting another art 
which, if less obviously related to the main work of our schools, is 
really quite as important and one whose promotion is quite as legiti- 
mate a work as we can undertake, three of the musical societies which 
promise to accomplish most for this form of culture, have been in- 
vited to hold their meetings and rehearsals here. These are the Sym- 
phony Society of Philadelphia, The Mendelssohn Club and the Manu- 
script Society. The first of these is an orchestra of fifty pieces and 
the second a chorus of about one hundred voices, both under the leader- 
ship of Mr. W. W. Gilchrist, which is sufficient guarantee of the high 
artistic aims of the organizations. The Manuscript Society is devoted 
to the encouragement of musical composition and at its meetings only 
original work is produced. So that these meetings really bear to music 
the relation that the exhibitions at the Academy of Fine Arts and the 
Art Club bear to painting and sculpture. Much admirable work has 
been done in this way and the Society is certainly to be accorded 
the very first place among the agencies at work in the service of musical 
culture in Philadelphia. 

These three societies, like the T. Square Club, are with us not as 
tenants but as co-workers in a common cause. They do not pay 
any rent but they have fitted up at their own expense the rooms which 
they use, and contribute their share toward the payment of our bills for 
heat and light and janitor service. 

The alterations to the auditorium which have been made by the 
Musical Societies were quite extensive and have transformed into a 
really beautiful room what was before one of the most unattractive 
places in the building. This work in the auditorium and the rooms 




BRa\D Street. 



occupied by the T. Square Club is of course only a small part of the 
renovation that was necessary, almost every room in the building 
having to be more or less remodelled. Offices and administration 
rooms have been fitted up in both wings and the large rooms, a hun- 
dred feet in length in some cases, of which the interior mainly con- 
sisted when we acquired it, have, in the Art School which occupies 
the north wing, been divided into alcoves each one of which makes a 
good sized studio by itself. In the Art School there are nine studios 
for drawing and painting, each one being either a room by itself or a 
large and well lighted alcove capable of being arranged in such a way 
as to give a distinct character to the work carried on in it. There is 
also a modelling room ninety feet long, one nearly as large for casting 
and plaster work, one for wood work and carving, one for metal work. 
A large room divided into three alcoves devoted to the classes in De- 
signing and in Mural Decorations, a suite of rooms devoted to the 
Library, besides the Office, the Reception Room, a Supply Room and 
private rooms for the different instructors. 




In the Textile School, which occupies the south wing, there are, 
besides the offices and administration rooms, the general exhibition 
room of the school, the power weaving-room, ii8 feet in length and 
furnished with twenty power looms of the latest and most improved 
design ; a suite of rooms on the first floor, and rooms loo feet long 
on both the second and third floors fully furnished with hand looms, 



23 

fifty in number ; a suite of rooms completely equipped as a chemical 
laboratory, with thirty-three desks ; a lecture room, a designing 
room, a textile library and a yarn room. In the basement is a com- 
plete dye-house, with copper-lined tanks and steam pipes for boiling ; 
a dyeing room, and a large rooQi furnished with machinery and appli- 
ances for finishing, including a shearing machine and a fulling mill. 

The work of renovating has also been made the means of giving 
profitable instruction, as the decoration has largely been done by the 
students. The Library has been decorated with considerable elabor- 
ateness in the Renaissance style from designs, and to some extent by 
the hands, of the students of the class in Mural Decoration, who 
have thus been enabled to acquire much valuable experience in laying 
out work on a large scale, as well as superintending and assisting in 
their execution on the actual walls and ceilings. 

, The organization of the different departments, and the instruc- 
tors in charge of them, are substantially the same as they were last 
year, except that Mr. Charles X. Harris, an artist who won distinction 
as a pupil of Cabanel in Paris, and was known as one of the best 
draughtsmen in America, has been appointed Professor of Figure 
Drawing. 

Mr. Harris came over from New York once a week during the 
last three months of the school year ending last June, but moved to 
Philadelphia in season to begin the current school year on a different 
basis, and now devotes three days in each week to the work of the 
school. 

Miss Goodwin, who has been giving a good deal of time to the work 
of the Textile School for several years, has now been transferred to 
to this department altogether ; and Miss Fetherston now has charge 
of the Department of Applied Design. 

A Department of Modern Languages has been added, since the 
the removal to this building, under Professor A. M. Grillon, teacher 
of French, and Madame Grillon, teacher of German. 

Too much praise cannot be given to the teachers, one and all, 
whose devoted service has brought the School to its present state of 
efficiency, and who have performed the great amount of extra labor 
caused by removal to the new building. They have worked for its 
interests, in season and out of season, with a disregard of hours or the 
terms of any formal engagement that is beyond praise. The service 
they have rendered is one which no one has a right to command or 
even to expect, and the proudest part of our record is the story of 



24 

the unselfish labors of this band of teachers and of the way that some- 
thing of the spirit that it represents is communicated to those who 
come under its influence. 

The School has been the recipient of many valuable gifts, among 
them a large show case from the World's Columbian Exposition, the 
gift of Messrs. Erben, Search & Co. and Wm. Wood & Co., whose 
combined exhibits it contained at Chicago. It is forty feet in length 
and admirably furnishes the exhibition room of the School. 

The following gifts of machinery have been made to the Textile 

School : 

Improved ingrain carpet loom, presented by the Knowles Loom 
Works of Worcester, Mass. 

Improved Jacquard loom, presented by the Knowles Loom 
Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Improved thirty harness silk loom, presented by the Knowjes 
Loom Works of Worcester, Mass. 

Six by one box gingham loom, presented by the Crompton 
Loom Works of Worcester, Mass. 

Heavy worsted and woolen loom, presented by the Crompton 
Loom Works of Worcester, Mass. 

Improved ingrain carpet loom, presented by the Crompton 
Loom Works of Worcester, Mass. 

Shuttles, presented by R. Sergeson & Co., Philadelphia. 

Six-breadth ribbon loom, presented by Schaum & Uhlinger, of 
Philadelphia. 

One hundred pounds of woolen yarns, presented by the Char- 
lottesville Woolen Mill, of Charlottesville, Va. 

Three hundred pounds of assorted woolen yarns, presented by 
the Assabet Manufacturing Company, of Maynard, Mass. 

Jacquard twine of considerable value, presented by C. Moore & 
Co., of Philadelphia. 

Portable forge, presented by Day Brothers, of Philadelphia. 

Automatic boiler oil injector, presented by Joseph Smith & Co., 
of Philadelphia. 

Schaum & Uhlinger 1200 hooks Jacquard machine, presented by 
Hamill & Booth, of Paterson, N. J. 

Freight bill of $38 on three looms, prepaid by the Crompton 
Loom Works. 

Valuable collection of samples of textiles covering the styles since 



25 

the year 1887, formerly the property of Scheppers Brothers of this 
city, presented by Mr. T. C. Search. 

Collection of samples of silks, worsted and woolens, purchased in 
France, presented by Mr. T. C. Search. 

World's Fair exhibit, presented by Erben, Search & Co. 

Valuable and extensive collection of raw cotton, cotton yarns 
and cotton fabrics, presented by the Russian Commissioners to the 
World's Fair. 

Cotton yarn, presented by the Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., of 
Chester, Pa. 

Materials presented to the School of Chemistry and Dyeing : 
Dyestuffs, by Sykes & Street, Pickhardt & Kuttroff, W. J. Matheson 
& Co., E. Sehlback & Co. ; soaps, by Warren Soap Company, I. L. 
Craigin & Co. ; chemicals, by O. S. Janney & Co., J. M. Sharpless & 
Co. ; Conyers Button & Co., apparatus for use in the dyehouse. 

Thirty-two volumes and pamphlets have been added to the 
Library during the year, of which seven were purchased — two by the 
School and five from funds derived from other sources. 

Twenty-five volumes were given by Dr. W. N. Egle, State 
Librarian ; Messrs. Howe, Balche & Co., The Builders' Exchange, 
The Trades League, J. C. Smock, State Geologist of New Jersey ; 
Mr. J. S. Lord, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Mr. Wm. Piatt Pepper, 
Mr. S. R. Koehler and Mr. L. W. Miller. 

The Commencement Exercises were held in the new School 
Building, Broad and Pine Streets, on the evening of June 8th, 1893, 
and were followed by a garden party in the Central Court, under the 
auspices of the Industrial Art Society, an organization of the students 
of the School. 

Addresses were made by the President, by Dr. Wm. Pepper, Dr. 
Edw. Brooks, Mr. Theodore C. Search, Mr. P. J. Brankin and by the 
the Principal. 

An exhibition of students' work, one of the largest ever made, in 
spite of the fact that so much work had been sent to Chicago, was 
held at the same time and place. 

Seven appointments to State Scholarships have been made by the 
Governor during the year, viz., for Armstrong, Chester, Clarion, 
Clearfield, Delaware, Lancaster and Mercer Counties. Fifteen holders 
of these appointments are at present registered in the School. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public 



26 

Education were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination con- 
ducted by the Principal, each grammar school principal being author- 
ized to send candidates. 

Five appointments to these free scholarships are made each year, 
each appointment being for three years. Of the fifteen appointees 
registered in the last three years eleven are still in the School. 

The following certificates and prizes were awarded at the Com- 
mencement Exercises at the end of the school year, June 8th, 1893 : 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize, for Best Set of First Year's Works. — Madeleine 
Larned. 

Honorable mention to Anne Smyth Bowman and Sarah Atkinson. 

RiPKA Prize. — Emma Leeds Lipp. 

(Given by Messrs. Ripka & Co., for work in color.) 

Weber Prize. — Charles Frederic Ramsey. 

(Given by Messrs. Weber & Co., of Philadelphia, for work in Design.) 

Richards First Prize. — Anne Smyth Bowman. 

Richards Second Prize. — Eli.se V. Guillou. 

(Given by Mr. F. DeBourg Richards for work in pen and ink.) 

Henry Perry Leland Prize. — Carl J. Anderson. 

(Given by Mrs. John Harrison for work in pen and ink.) 

Miller Lock Prize. — Carl J. Anderson. 

(Given by the Miller Lock Co., for design for an escutcheon.) 

Frederic Graff Prize. — Charles Ziegler. 

For work in Architectural Design : competed for by students in the evening 
class only. 

The following prizes were awarded by the Associate Committee 
of Women : 

Maddock First Prize, $20. — Ethel L. Bunting. 

Maddock Second Prize, ^10.— Grace Dennison. 

Honorable mention to J, Ernest Dean and Isabel M. Jacobs. 

(Given by Mr. Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for design for a jardiniere.) 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN PRIZES. 

Awarded for work in Applied Design : 

First, $20 for General Excellence of First Year's Work. — Fred. 
Kimball. 

Second, $10 for OilClcth Design. — Lilly Lewis. 



27 

Third, $io for Carpet, for Design Only— Rene Wolfersberger. 

Fourth, $io for Modeling. — Emilio Marenzana. 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer First Prize, $20, for Wall Paper.— 
Joseph H. Shinn, Jr. 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer Second Prize, $10, for Printing.— Effie 
Ives. 

Certificates, Class A.— Carl J. Anderson, Sarah II. Atkinson, Alice Bar- 
bour, Anne Smyth Bowman, Michael Gaffney, Agnes Gendell, Fred Kimball, Made- 
leine Larned, Charles Frederic Ramsey, Ethel Ruff Ramsey, Harry W. Sharadin, 
Adeline May Thumlert, Andrew Paul Watt, Matilda French Whitall. 

Class B.— Anne H. Brinton, Isabel M. Jacobs, Grace Hutchinson Pollock, 
Adeline May Thumlert, Sallie Garrett Yardell. 

Applied Design.— Delia Brylawsky, \Vm. Comfort, Carrie Dr>-foos, Emma 
Leeds Lipps, Olivia Cadwalader Pennock, Wm. Smiley. 

Teacher's Certificate.— Sarah A. Taylor. 

Diploma. — Anne Katharine May. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

American Wool Reporter Prize, $30.— Francis F. Hoye. 
American Wool Reporter Prize, $20. — Wm. Cotton Damon. 
Honorable mention to Jacob Munz, Harry White, Frank Casey and J. H. 
Sayles. 

FiNCKEL Prize, $25, divided between George J. Walenta and John Crow- 

ther. 

Certificates First Year's Course.— Charles Brombach, Frank Casey, John 
Lewis Cochran, Jr., John W, Connelly, Wm. Cotton Damon, Thomas L Flower, J. 
Loring Glover, Jr., Frank O. Goodspeed, Mark B. Halfpenny, Frederic George 
Hendley, Caston Gilbert Jacobs, Harland J. Maynard, Charles Edgar McHaffie, 
Edward L. Ollson, James Harris Sayles, Maurice King W^ashburn, Lester Everett 
Weaver, John A, Wood. 

Certificates Second Year's Course.— Henry Althoen, William Kirk Greer, 
Francis Edward Hoye, Jacob Munz, Moses Tyler Stevens, Jr., W^m. A. W^etherbee, 
Harry White. 

Diplomas. — John Crowther, George J. ^Valenta. 

Certificates Awarded on the Completion of the Two Years' Even- 
ing Course.— Edward Bains, Edward Currie, Samuel H. Downs, Wm. D. Humes, 
Joseph R. Lees, Horace Linton, John McCormick, Stanford K. Runyan, Charles A. 
Schlotterer, Albert Haseltine Smith. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND DYEING. 

Certificates, Evening Class.— Ernest A. Beechey, W. E. Chipman, Edward 
Thomas Fearon, Caston Gilbert Jacobs, James F. McMahon, Edward Prag, William 
Simpson, Walter Thompson, Howard F. Topham. 



28 

Appended are lists of students registered since December, 31st, 
1892, showing their occupations and the localities from which they 
come : 



Architects, 
Artists, . 
Bookbinders, 








3 
3 

I 


Jobbers, 
Lithographers, 
Loom Fixers, 


Bricklayers, . 
Cabinet-makers, 








I 
2 


Manufacturers, 
Modellers, 


Carpenters, . 
Carvers, 








3 
8 


Milliners, 
Office Boys, . 


Civil Engineers, 

Clerks, 

Cloth Examiners, 








I 
14 


Painters, 
Paper Hangers, 
Photographers, 


College Settlement 
Contractors, . 
Cutters, 








. 2 

. I 

I 


Plumbers, 

Printers, 

Roofers, 


Decorators, . 

Designers, 

Draughtsmen, 

Dressmakers, 

Druggists, . 

Dyers, 








. 3 
. 49 

• 13 

I 
. I 

• 5 


Salesmen, 

Stained Glass, 

Sculptors, 

Students, 

Teachers, 

Watchmakers, 


Engravers, 
Finishers, 








. 4 
• 3 


Weavers, 
Woollens, 


Glaziers, 








. 2 




Illustrators . 








. 2 





I 

4 

10 

6 

7 

I 
17 

3 

4 

I 
I 
I 
8 

5 
2 

13 + 

57 

13 

3 

404 



From Connecticut, . . I 

" Delaware, 2 

" Georgia, . i 

" Indiana, ............ i 

" Iowa, ............. I 

" Massachusetts, 6 

" Michigan, I 

*' Missouri, ............ 2 

" New Jersey, 21 

" New Hampshire, i 

" New York, 5 

" Ohio, 3 

" Pennsylvania, ......... . . 356 

" Rhode Island, 3 

404 
LESLIE W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



CO 



CO 

cr 
O 

02 

> 



UJ 

DQ 






< 

z 

ID 

o 



1^ 


00 


I 




0\ 


o 


€ 


s 


i 


5J, 


i 




5 


1 


r^ 


f^ 


K 


r^ 


o. 


H? 


O 

H 


oo 


^ 


K 


\o 


€ 


^ 


1 


s- 


1 


■1 


H, 


§^ 


<s 






















VO 


ON 




f 


o 


'^ 


^ 


? 


00 


'^^ 


lO 




o\ 


N 


« 






y^ 


t-~ 






m 


s 


lO 




"" 




VO 


MD 


in 


'^ 


t^ 


ro 


':^ 


ro 


o\ 


^ 





t^ 


» ! 


i: 


CO 


1 


OS 


f 


^ 





1. 


^ 


V? 


i 


^ 


K 


f 


^ 


1 


M 


CO 








J^ 





Y^ 





o 


O 


"^ 


cT 


" 


00 


" 


s 


g 



^ 



Tl- Tl- 0\ 



E ^ ^ ^ 



!? vH' 



H CO 

>n o 



in O ^ 
en CO o 

Tf ON M 



O VO 

■* in 






3° 



ANNUAL REPORT OF TREASURER. 

(For Year ending May 31, 1893.) 
ENDOWMENT FUND. 



Balance on hand, June i, 1892, 

Two Life Memberships, .... 

Investments paid off: 

Bonds Stillwater and St. Paul Railroad, 

Bonds International Navigation Co., . 

Bonds New Lindell Hotel Co., . 

Bonds Lehigh Valley Railroad Co., 

Reading 5 per cent. Loan, , 

Mortgage Woodstock vStreet, on account. 



Total, 





$980 27 




200 00 


$3,420 CO 




5,000 00 




15,000 00 




9.193 75 




11,850 00 




1,700 00 


46,163 75 




347,344 02 



Mortgages, 1 703-1 708 Rittenhouse Street, 4>^ per cent., . $9,000 00 
Ground rents, 2712-18 N. Fifteenth St., 5 per cent., . . 8,800 00 
St. Louis Merchants' Bridge Co. bonds, $3000 at io2>^, . 3,075 00 
Subscribed to purchase of Broad and Pine Street property, 
on account of the fund to be received from the Centen- 
nial Board of Finance, to be repaid when the money is re- 
ceived from them, 11,00000 

Special fund from the Associate Committee of Women, 

transferred from Investment to Maintenance of School, . 2,ooo 00 
Special fund from the Associate Committee of Women, 
transferred to fund for purchase of property at Broad 
and Pine. Both transfers made by their direction, . . 5,000 00 

Total payments, $38,87 5 00 

Balance of Endowment Fund, $8,469 02 



TEMPLE FUND, PRINCIPAL. 

Balance on hand 

Borrowed from Income, to make investment. 

Purchased Debenture Bond of Mortgage Trust Co., . 



$38 

II 


31 

69 


$50 
50 


00 
00 



31 



TEMPLE FUND INCOME. 



Balance on hand, 
Income, 



Payments : 

On account, Scholarships 1S92-1893, . 
Advanced to Principal account, . 
Museum exhibit, .... 



Balance on hand. 



$8So 00 

II 69 

2,836 70 



$948 83 
2,797 94 

^3.746 77 



3,728 39 
^18 38 



FUND FOR PURCHASE OF PROPERTY AT BROAD AND PINE. 
Subscriptions, $194,923 95 



Payments, 
Balance on hand, 



192,669 35 
$2,254 60 



FUND FOR PURCHASE OF OBJECTS OF ART AT THE COLUMBIAN 

EXHIBITION. 
Contributions, ........ 



GENERAL FUND. 
Balance on hand, May 31, 1892, 



RECEIPTS. 





$305 00 




$358 40 


3io,cxx) 00 




7,868 00 




880 00 




60 00 




39 10 




2,000 00 




25 00 





Maintenance of School : 
State appropriation, 
Tuition fees. 
Temple scholarships, . 
Weightman scholarship, 
Dividend Spring Garden Bank, 
Associate Committee of Women, 
Graff Architectural Prize Fund, 



Maintenance of Museum: 

City Warrants, 9,i88 98 

From contribution boxes and sale of photos, . . 114 77 

Donations for purchase of objects of Art for the Museum : 

Temple Fund, 2,836 70 

John T. Morris, for Collection of American Pottery, . 500 00 

William Piatt Pepper, Exr., for Rogers Door, etc., . 200 00 

John Struthers, 26 09 

Annual contributions, . . . . . 

Endowment Fund Income, ....... 



20,872 10 



9,303 75 



3,652 79 

890 00 

4,204 35 



Total, 



$39,191 39 



32 



PAYMENTS. 




General expenses, .... 


. 


^1,496 10 


Maintenance of School, 


. 


23,416 72 


Maintenance of Museum, . 




11,851 81 


Purchases for Museum Exhibits : 






Picture frames and show-cases, 


. ^815 16 




Library, 


. . 35 88 




Engravings and photographs, 


680 06 




Plaster casts, .... 


. . 755 58 




Pottery, 


. 1,055 00 





3,341 68 



Balance, overdrawn, 



^40,106 31 
5914 92 



BALANCES. 
Endowment Fund, ^8,469 02 



Broad and Pine Fund, 
Temple Fund, . 
Columbian Exhibiiion Fund, 



Less General Fund overdrawn, 



2,254 60 

18 38 

305 00 

11,047 00 
914 92 

$10,132 08 



33 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 



(For Seven Months, Ending December 31, 1893 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 
Balance on hand June I, .... 



Loans paid ofif, 



$8,469 02 
15,300 00 



INVESTMENTS. 



6000 Reading Stamped 5 per cents., 
Mortgage on 1336 Spring Garden Street, 



Balance uninvested, 



Balance on hand June i, 



BROAD AND PINE FUND. 



$5,251 54 
10,000 00 



$2,254 60 



$23,769 02 



15.251 54 

$8,517 48 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 






Philip C. Garrett, 


$100 00 






Mrs. Thomas Hockley, 




100 00 






Dr. Roland G. Curtin, .... 




50 00 






Hugh De Haven, 




5 00 






Henry Hobart Brown, . 




500 00 






Miss Julia A. Myers, . 




10 00 






Murta & Appleton, 




25 00 






Clarence B. Moore, 




300 00 






Balance from Centennial Board of Finance, 


1,209 17 






Net proceeds of sale 1336 Spring Garden, . 


9J2S 55 










$12,024 72 











$14,279 32 


Expenditure for Installation, etc., 


. 






17,544 39 



Balance overdrawn, 



$3,265 07 



TEMPLE FUND. 



Balance June i. 
Income, 



Contribution to Museum, .... $1,282 29 
Balance Scholarship '92, '93, 



Balance on hand, 





$18 38 






1,892 50 


$1,910 88 


^,282 29 




120 00 




1,402 29 
$508 59 







34 

CENTENNIAL BOARD OF FINANCE. 

Amount received, $12,541 73 

Loan returned, $11,00000 

Sundry payments, 109 95 

Amount to Broad and Pine Fund, . . 1,209 17 

12,319 12 

Balance on hand, ^222 61 

SALE OF 1336 SPRING GARDEN STREET. 

2d Mortgage, $10,000 00 

Cash, 4,000 00 

Insurance Policy, 34 50 

$14,034 50 

Mortgage taken by Endowment Fund : 

Expenses of sale, 258 95 

Carried to Broad and Pine Fund, . . 9,725 55 
Endowment Fund paid off, . . . 4,000 00 

13,984 50 

Balance held to pay insurance to secure mort- 
gage held by Endowment Fund, . . $50 00 

FUND FOR PURCHASES AT CHICAGO. 
Balanreonhand June I, .... $30500 

Loan to Fund, to be repaid from income of 

Temple Fund when it becomes available,. 2,350 00 

Contributions to purchase Lace Exhibit : 

Mrs. John Harrison, .... 100 00 

Associate Committee of Women, . . 100 00 

$2,855 00 

Expenditures on account of this Fund, . . 2,958 69 

Balance overdrawn, $103 69 

GENERAL FUND. 

State Appropriation, $7,5oo 00 

Tuition Fees, 7.225 50 

Balance of Scholarship, 1892-1893, Temple 

Fund, »20 00 

Return Insurance Premiums, . , . 27 30 

City Appropriation, 6,314 99 

Endowment Fund Income, .... $i,449 4^ 
Less accrued interest on bond purchase, . 103 46 

1,346 02 

Annual Contributions, . 960 00 

Museum Exhibit Contribution from Temple 

Fund, I '282 29 

$24,776 10 



35 



Balance overdrawn June I, 
Maintenance of Museum, 
Maintenance of School, 
General Expenses, 
Museum Exhibit, . 

Balance overdrawn. 



$914 42 

8,449 36 

[6,556 65 

591 51 

1.533 78 



$28,046 22 
^3,270 12 



BALANCES. 



Endowment Fund, 
Temple Fund, 

Centennial Board of Finance, 
1336 Spring Garden Street, . 



General Fund, 

Broad and Pine Fund, . 

Fund for Purchases at Chicago, 



OVERDRAWN. 



$8,517 


48 


508 


59 


222 


61 


50 


00 


$3,270 


12 


3.265 


07 



$9,298 68 



103 69 
$6,638 88 

$2,659 80 



RICHARD CADBURY, 

Treasurer pro tevi. 



3^ 



REPORT OF THE 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

Who can recall the early days of this now great Institution with- 
out being grateful, not only for the good it has already done, but for 
the strong and well founded hope we entertain for the immense good 
it will continue to do, not only for the youth of both sexes in our own 
State, but for the young throughout our broad land. 

For those interested in the advancement of the Pennsylvania 
School of Industrial Art the work of the year which has just closed 
has been arduous in the extreme. The building in which the School 
was located in 1892 and the beginning of 1893 was inadequate for 
our purpose. Pupils from many of the outside states as well as 
from our own, were being turned away from our doors for want of 
room. Our hearts were filled with dismay, but courage was given us 
to work onward and upward ; our path has been difficult and our 
discouragements many, but the generosity of some of our citizens 
has placed the School in the beginning of 1894 in large and com- 
modious quarters in the building which is still called the '* Deaf 
and Dumb" but now within its walls, ears are open to the instruc- 
tion here given and happy voices tell of the advantages here en- 
joyed. 

In the Chicago Exhibition the drawings and textile work of this, 
our School, were held in high esteem and more than one professor 
from the technical schools in foreign lands turned aside on his way 
home, to visit our School where these industries were brought to 
such perfection. A graduate of the School was a judge of awards 
for drawing and textile fabrics at the Columbian Exposition. The 
foreign Commissioners were surprised to find this judge a young 
woman whose opinion and advice were so frequently sought for and 
taken, that in recognition of her services she was entertained at a 
banquet given by members of the Foreign Commissioners and a 
bronze medal was presented to her by the Commissioners from Ger- 
many. 

In 1873 the women of our country banded together and organized 



37 

for the success of the Exhibition of T876, with the purpose of open- 
ing through it " avenues of usefulness to the young women of our 
land." That organization has seen since more than the light of dawn 
shining on the heads of many a young woman through those "ave- 
nues of usefulness." Many of those who spent time, energy, talents, 
and money to accomplish this purpose have gone to their everlasting 
rest. One, with whom some who now send forth this report stood 
side by side for twenty years laboring for this end, we mourn, as we 
always shall mourn, Mrs. Crawford Arnold, but gratefully and gladly 
may we say of all these good women, " Their works do follow them." 

FANNIE S. MAGEE, 

Secretary. 



38 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS 

Annual and Honorary Members. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their name and 
address to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
the third page of the cover, A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly 
acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership, One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, .... A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 

Honorary Membership, . . . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 

"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and from 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Laws. 



PATRONS. 

*Baird, John Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. ^Gibson, Hem-y C. 

Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. Houston, H. H. 

*Childs, George W. Lea, Henry C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Scott, Mrs. Thomas A, 

*Drexel, A. J, Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Whitney, A. & Sons. 



* Deceased. 



39 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 

Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. 

Bailey, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 

Baker, John R. 

Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*Bartol, B. H. 

Bartol, H. W. 
^Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Biddle, Chapman 

Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 

Biddle, Clement 
«Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
*Borie, C. & H. 

Bowen Sc Fox 
*Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
*Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 
*Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
*Chew, Samuel 
^Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence H. 



*Clark, Ephraim, 

Clark, E. W. 
«Clark,J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edw. H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coftln, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 

Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
^Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 

Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, I. Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 

Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 

Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 

Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 



Deceased. 



40 



Gibson, Miss R. 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
*Graff, Frederic 
Graff, Mrs. Frederic 
Green, Stephen 
Hagstoz & Thorpe 
Harrison, A. C. 
Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
^Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
■*Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 

Hockley, William Stevenson 

Horstmann, F. O. 

Horstmann, W. H., & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 

Hughes, John O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David and Sons 
*Jones, Jacol) 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, Miss E. B. 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs, William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
^Knight, Edw. C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
* Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

ILittle, Amos R., & Co. 
*Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 



MacVeagh, Wayne 
*'Massey, William 

Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughn 

Merrick, Miss L. W. 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
*Millikin, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
^Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 
*Newbold, Charles 
*Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, Jr. 

Page, Joseph F. 
*Patterson, Joseph 

* Pepper, George S. 

* Pepper, Lawrence S. 
Pepper, William, M.D. 
Pepper, William Piatt 

■^Phillips, Henry M. 
"•■■Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
^Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
*Roberts, Jacob, M.D. 

Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
* Rogers, W, D. 
*Santee, Charles 



Deceased. 



41 



Scott, James P. 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D., & Co. 
*Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 

Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 

Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
*Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
*Spencer, Charles 
«-Steel, Edward T. 

Steel, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
"■'•Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 



Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
*Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, \\\ G. 

Warner, Redwood F. 

Weightman, Miss Annie W. 

Weightman, Miss Mary L. 

Weightman, Jr., Mrs. William 
*" Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
^Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William & Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 

Wright, James A. 
«Wright, John W. 

Wurts, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



Deceased. 



r 



42 



Annual members (for 1893) who have subscribed not less than 
ten dollars : — 



Barney, Mrs. CD., 


^10 00 


Bement, Clarence S., . . . . 


10 00 


Biddle, Cadwalader, . , . . 


10 00 


Biddle, Mrs. Chapman, • . . 


10 00 


Borie, Mrs. Henry, 


10 00 


Brazier, Josepli H., 


10 00 


Brown, Alexander, 


10 00 


Brown, Miss Martha M., . . . 


10 00 


Brown, T. Wistar, 


10 00 


Buehler, Mrs. William G., . . 


10 00 


Burnham, Mrs. William, . . . 


10 00 


Cadwalader, Mrs. John, . . . 


10 00 


Caldwell, J. E., & Co , . . . . 


10 00 


Chandler, T. P., Jr., 


10 00 


Clark, Miss Frances, 


10 00 


Cochran, Travis, 


10 00 


Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . . . . 


10 00 


Coleman, Miss Anne C. . . - 


10 00 


Coles, Edward, 


10 00 


Coxe, Alexander B. , . . . . 


10 00 


Coxe, Eckley B., 


TO 00 


Cramp, Charles II., 


10 00 


Cramp, Henry W 


10 00 


Curtin, Mrs. Roland G., . . . 


10 00 


Da Costa, Dr. J. M., .... 


10 00 


Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . . . . 


10 00 


Dickson, Samuel, • 


10 00 


Dulles, J. Heatley, 


10 00 


Durant, Mrs. F. C, 


10 00 


Eisenbrey, Mrs. \V. H 


10 00 


Felton, Mrs Samuel M., . . • 


10 00 


Galloway, William 


10 00 


Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . . . . 


10 CO 


Gillingham, Joseph E., ... 


10 00 


Graff, Miss Henrietta, .... 


10 00 


Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . . . . 


10 00 


Guillou, Victor 


10 00 


Hamilton, VV. C, 


10 00 


Hance Bros. & White, . . . . 


10 00 


Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, . . . 


10 00 


Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . . . 


10 00 


Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . . 


10 00 


Hippie, Frank K., 


10 00 


Hutchinson, Miss, 


10 00 


Jack, Dr. Louis 


10 00 


Jayne, Mrs, David, 


10 00 


fayne, Dr. Horace, 


10 00 


Keen, W. W., M D , .... 


10 00 


Keith, Sidney W., 


10 00 


Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D., . . . 


10 00 


King, Mrs. Rufus (Cincinnati), 


10 00 


Leonard, James B , 


10 00 


Lewis, Miss Bertha, 


10 00 


Lewis, Edward, 


10 00 


Lewis, Enoch, 


10 00 



Lewis, Dr. F. W. 



^10 00 



Lewis, Robert M., 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, ... 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. J. Dundas, . 10 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, ... 10 00 

Lippincott. Mrs. Horace G., . 10 00 

Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S. , . . 10 00 

Mackellar, Thomas, 10 00 

Magee, Miss Anna 10 00 

Magee, Miss Eliza J., . . . . 10 00 

Magee, Miss Fanny S , ... 10 00 

Magee, Horace, 10 oo 

Mason, Frederick T., .... 10 00 

Moulton, Mrs. Byron P., . . . 10 00 

Neall, Dr. Daniel, 10 00 

Neall, Frank L., 10 00 

Newall, George M., 10 00 

Pancoast, Albert, lO oo' 

Pancoast, Mrs. Altiert, .... lo 00 

Paul, Dr. James W., 10 00 

Paul, Miss M.W., 10 00 

Pepper, David, lO OO 

Pepper, Mrs. David, 10 00 

Piatt, Franklin, 10 00 

Poulterer, Mrs. William, ... 10 00 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H., ... 10 00 

Price, J. Sargeant, 10 00 

Ritchie, Craig D., 10 00 

Roberts, Miss E. C, 10 00 

Roberts, Miss F. A., 10 00 

Roberts, Mrs. George B, . . . 10 00 

Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, ... 10 00 

Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, . • . . 10 00 

Rosengarten, J. G., 10 00 

. 10 00 

. 10 00 
10 00 

. 10 00 

. 10 00 

. 10 00 

. 10 00 

. 10 00 



Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin 

Sanders, Mrs. John, . . 

Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., 

Smedley, Samuel L., . 

Smith, Miss Christiana B 

Smith, Edward Brinton, 

Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, . 

Stevenson, Miss Anna P., 

Stdle, Dr. Charles J., .... 10 00 

Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, ... 10 00 

Townsend, Henry C, . . . . lO 00 

Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, . 10 00 

Welsh, John Lowber, .... 10 00 

Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, . . 10 00 

Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, ... 10 00 

Wilson, Joseph M., 10 00 

Wister, Mrs. Casper 10 00 

Wood, Mrs. Howard, .... 10 00 
Wood, Miss Juliana, .... 10 00 
Wright, Mrs. R. K , .... 10 00 
Wyeth, Stuart, 10 00 



43 



Annual Members (for 1893) who have subscribed not less than five 
dollars : — 



Ashhurst, R. L 

Ashhurst, Mrs. R. L., 
Bartol, Mrs. C. C, . . 
Bartol, Henry G., . . 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. Lawrence, 
Caldwell, Mrs. J. Albert, 
Carter, Mrs. Wm. T., . . 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . 
Clark, Miss Annie Hampt 
Cohen, Miss Mary M., . 

Colton, S. W., 

Corlies, Miss, 

Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth 
Dana, Charles E., . . . 
Day, Frank Miles, . . . 
De Haven, Mrs. Holstien, 
Denniston, Miss Amy, . 
Denniston, Miss Alice, . 
Denniston, Arthur C, 
D'Invilliers, Mrs. Charles, 
Dissel, Charles, .... 
Dissel, Mrs. Charles, . . 
Dixon, Mrs. G. D., . . 

Duane, Russell 

Du Pont, Mrs. L., . . . 
Durant, Miss Ethel, . . 
Eisenbrey, Miss Edith, . 
Eisenbrey, Miss Sarah H. 
Eyre, Wilson, Jr., . . . 
Garden, Morton, . . . 
Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C, 
Harrison, Miss Maud L., 





00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 



Harrison, John, 

Harrison, Mrs. John, ... 
Howell, Miss Isabel T., . 
Hyneman, Mrs. S. M., . . 
Keen, Frank H., .... 
McP^adden, Mrs. George H., 
McMurtrie, Miss, . . . . , 
Morwitz, Joseph, Jr., . . . 

Nichols, W. J., 

Norris, Miss Clara G., . . 
Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . 
Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . 
Pepper, Mrs. John W., . . 
Randolph, Miss Anna, . . 
Randolph, Miss Elizabeth J., 
Randolph, Miss Evan, . . 
Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood 
Rexamer, G. W., .... 
Roberts, Mrs. G. W. B., . 
Roberts, Thomas, . . . 
Roberts, Thomas, Jr., . . 
Rogers, Miss Mary, . . . 

Sharp, Mrs. Isaac 

Simpson, Mrs. William, 
Siter, Mrs. E. Hollingsworth 
Smith, Harrison Hoxie, 
Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, . 
Walker, Mrs. R. J. C, . . 
Winpenny, Mrs. Bolton, . 
Wright, Joseph, ..... 
Zell, Miss, 



$5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 ^o 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



Donation to School Fund 
Stephen Farrelly 



325 00 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

C. H. Hutchins, President Knowles Loom Works. 

Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. M. C Crompton, President Crompton Loom Works. 

Horace Wyman, Vice-President Crompton Loom Works. 

Justin A. Ware, Treasurer Crompton Loom Works. 

Lorenzo Maynard, Maynard, Mass. 

J. C. Cochran, President Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, V: 

James Boyd, Philadelphia. 



44 



Contributions for the purchase of the property at Broad and Pine 
Streets, up to May 31, 1^93. 



Allen, vSamuel L. & Co., .... 

Arnold, Crawford, 

Associate Commiitee of Women, . 

Becker, Henry, 

Bromley, George D., 

Bromley, John & Sons, .... 

Butterworlh, James, 

Button Conyers &. Co., . . . . 

Cash — sundry items 

Centennial Board of Finance, . I 

Chandler, T. P., Jr., 

Clark, Charles D 

Cooke, C. A. M., 

Coxe, Charles B., 

Coxe, Miss Rebecca, 

Coxe, Mrs. Brinton, 

Cramp, Irene, 

Cramp, J. B., 

Davids, Richard W., 

Davis, Mrs. C. G., 

De Haven, A. C , 

Delano, Eugene, 

Diehl, Mrs. M. Margaret, . . . 

Doan, Horace A., 

Dornan Bros. & Co., 

Dulles, J. Heatley, 

Dulles, Miss Mary C, 

Earle, James S. & Sons, . . . . 

Erben, Miss Helen, 

Erben, Search & Co., 

Fleisher, Mrs. Louis, 

Fleisher, S. B., 

Fleisher, S. B. & B. W., . . . . 

Fox, George S. & Son, 

Frazier, W. W., ....... . 

Friend, A" L", 

Garrett, William E. Jr., . . . . 

George, Mrs. H. C 

Gibson, Mrs. Henry C, . . . . 
Girard Life & Trust Co., . . . . 
Gowen, Mr. and Mrs. F. I., . . . 

Graff, Miss Henrietta, 

Gratz, Miss, 

Green, Jacob, 

Harrison, C. Leland, 

Harrison, Charles C, . . . . . 
Harrison, Mrs. George L., Jr., . 

Hazletine, Frank, 

Hensel, Colladay & Co., . . , . 
Hoffman, Mrs. Phoebe W., . . , 
Hynemann, Mrs. Samuel M., . , 

Jacques, Mrs. H. PL, 

Jones, Washington, 

Keith, Sidney W., 



$100 00 

200 00 

5000 00 

50 00 

250 00 
1000 00 

100 00 ; 

250 00 

14 05 
1,000 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

10 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

150 00 

25 00 

25 00 

15 00 
100 00 

5 00 

25 00 

250 00 

100 00 

20 00 

100 00 

100 00 

1000 00 

20 00 

5 00 

300 00 

5 00 

200 00 

10 00 

5000 00 

I 00 

100 00 

1000 00 

20 00 

20 00 

20 00 

5 00 

10 00 

500 00 

100 00 

100 00 

200 00 

25 00 

5 00 

I 00 

100 00 

100 00 



Kemble, Miss Mary $100 00 

Koch, Justus, 50 00 

Leonard, James B ...... . 100 00 

Lewis, Dr. Francis W., .... 200 00 

Lewis, The Misses, 300 00 

Lippincott, Mrs. J. Dundas, . . 5000 00 

Lippincott, William, 50 00 

Longstreth, Edward, 100 00 

Lunn, John, 50 oo 

Martm, Edward, 25 00 

Matthews, E. J., 50 00 

McCaffrey File Co , 25 00 

McKean, Thomas, 1000 00 

McNeely & Co., 500 00 

Meigs, William H., 50 00 

Morris, John T., 5000 00 

! Morris, Miss Lydia T., . . . . looo 00 

j Paul, Abraham B., I 00 

, Peabody, Charles B., 100 00 

Pennock, Miss, 100 00 

I Penrose, Miss, ....... 100 00 

' Pepper, David, 50 00 

1 Pepper Estate, George S , . . . 3000 00 
I Pepper, William, M.D., .... lOOO 00 

Pepper, William Piatt, looo 00 

Pettitt, Charles W., 25 00 

Pilling & Madeley, 250 00 

Piatt, George, 25 00 

Piatt, Miss Emily 25 00 

Preston, Mrs. G. Rutledge, ... 25 00 
Priestman, Miss Amelia, .... 50 00 
Rawle, William Brooke, .... loo 00 
Redfield, Mrs. John H., .... 10 00 

j Redfield, Miss Eliza 5 00 

Ritchie, Craig D., 10 00 

Robb, Thomas, 100 00 

Rush, Miss Catharine Murray, . 25 00 

S. A., 25 00 

1 S. A, E., 100 00 

j S. L., 1000 00 

Samuel, J. B, 5 00 

Sanders, Dallas, 10 00 

Search, Theodore C, . . . . . 1 000 00 

Shippen, Edward, 25 00 

Stafford, James, 50 00 

j Stille, Charles J , 20 00 

j Thomson, Frank, 1000 00 

Toomey, M. D., 5 00 

i Tower, Miss Henrietta, .... 20 00 
Weidner, Mrs. P. A. B., . . . . 500 00 
Weightman, Mrs. William, Jr., 10,000 00 
Weightman, William, .... 100,000 00 

j W^ellens, Jules, 50 00 

j West, Harry F., 20 00 



45 



White, Mrs. William R., . . . . $20 00 

Wilkinson, Mrs. H. N 50 00 

Willing. Mr. and Mrs. Edward S., 500 00 

Wilson, James L., 25 00 



Wood, Howard, $100 00 

Wood, Mrs. Howard, 300 00 

Wood, Stuart, 1000 00 

Wright, Sydney L., 100 00 



Collected by the Associate Committee of Women. 



Agnew, Mrs. Ervin, $5 00 

B. S. H., 50 00 

Bailey, A. Goddard, 5 00 

Bailey, Banks & Biddle, .... 100 00 

Bailey, E. W., 5 00 

Bailey, Mrs. J. T., 5 00 

Baily, Joshua L., 100 00 ; 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew, 500 00 

Balch, Mrs. Thomas, 50 00 

Barclay, Clement B , 50 00 

Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. J. H., . . 5 00 

Bartol, Mrs. C. Cheyney, .... 5 00 j 

Beale, Mrs. Truxton, 15 00' 

Biddle, Mrs. Chapman, .... 100 00 

Blanchard, The Misses, .... 3000 00 

Boldt, Geo. C, 100 00 | 

Borden, Edward P 25 00 1 

Bradford, The Misses, 20 00 ; 

Brock, Mrs. John Penn, .... 50 00 

Brook, Miss, 5 00 , 

Brook, Miss Lizabeth F., . . . 5 00 

Brown, Alexander, 500 00 

Brown, Miss Martha M loo 00 

Brown, Mrs, Samuel B 100 00 

Burnham, Williams & Co., . . . 1000 00 

Busch, Henry E., lo 00 , 

Caldwell, James E. & Co , . . . 250 00 ' 

Cash, 100 00 

Cash, 25 00 

Cash 3 00 

Cash, I 00 

Chandler, Mrs. Wm. Penn, ... 10 03 

Clapp, Mrs. N. T., 50 00 

Clapp, B. Frank, 50 00 

Clark, C. H., Jr., 100 00 

Clark, Clarence H., looo 00 

Clark, E. W., . 1000 00 

Coffin, Altemus & Co., .... 100 00 

Cohen, Charles J., • 10 cx) 

Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson, . , . 300 00 

Coles, Edward, 100 00 

Colket, George H , 50 00 

Corlies, Mrs.'S. Fisher, .... 25 00 

Cramp, Charles H , 700 00 

Crozer, George K., looo 00 

Crozer, J. Lewis 100 00 

DaCosta, Dr. J. M., 20 00 

Denniston, Mrs. E. E , 75 00 

Dickson, Mrs. Samuel, .... 10 00 

Dissel, Charles, 100 00 



Duane, James May, $5 00 

Duane, Russell, . 25 00 

Dwight, Mrs. E. Waterman, . . 5 00 

Earnshaw, Mrs. Alfred, .... 10 00 

Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B., . . . 50 00 

Ellison, Mrs William P., ... 25 00 

Evans, Miss Eleanor, i 00 

Farnum, Mrs. J. Edward, ... 10 00 

Felton, Mrs Samuel M., .... 20 00 

Fisher, Ellicott, 10 co 

Friend, A, 25 00 

*' 5 00 

Fox, Miss Hannah, 100 00 

Fox, Mrs. Samuel M., 250 00 

Gallagher. Thomas, 25 00 

Galloway, William, 250 00 

Gilbert, Samuel H., 100 cx) 

Gillingham, Mrs. Joseph, ... 10 00 

Gilpin, Mrs. Washington, ... 5 00 

Graham, Mrs. E. V 50 00 

Graff, Mrs. Frederick 30 00 

Grant, Mrs. W,S , Jr., 2500 

Griffiths, Mrs. B. B., 20 00 

Griswold, Miss Jennie, .... 10 00 

Grosbeck, R. Benoist, 20 00 

Gross, H. B 25 00 

Hacker, Mr. and Mrs. Charles . loo 00 

Hare, Mrs. I. Clarke 20 00 

Harrison, Mr. and Mrs. John, . looo 00 

Harrison, Mrs. Alfred C 250 00 

Harrison, Mrs. Charles C, . . . 50 00 

Harrison. Mrs. Joseph, .... 1 000 00 

Harris. Mrs. J. Campbell, , . . 300 00 

Hart, Mrs, Harry C, 100 00 

Heberton,Mrs, G. Craig, , . . . 500 00 

Hecksher, Mrs. Richard, .... 50 00 

Helme, William C, 25 00 

Henry, Charles W , 10 00 

Henszey, Mrs. William P., . . . 100 00 

Homer, Le Boutellier & Co., . . 25 00 

Horstmann, Walter, 25 00 

Houston, H, H., 500 00 

Hunter, Miss J. 50 

Hutchinson, Miss, 5° 00 

Jacobs. Mrs. E. B., 100 00 

Jayne, Mrs. David, 100 00 

Jenks, John Story, 200 00 

Jenks, Mrs. William F., . . . . 100 00 

Johnson, Mrs. J. Warner, ... lo 00 

Jones, Owen L., . • 25 00 



40 



Keating. Miss E. E., $ioo 

Keim, G. DeB., 50 

Kennedy, Mrs. Robert Lennox, . 1000 

Kingsley, Edward T., 25 

Koons, Miss Mary, 5 

Lewis, Edwin C, 10 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs., I 

Lewis, Edward, 50 

Lippincott, Miss Emily A., ... 20 
Lippincott, Mr. & Mrs J. Dundas, 500 

Lippincott, Mrs. J. Bertram, . . 50 

Lip})incott, Mrs. Joshua, .... lOO 

Little, Amos R., 50 

Logan, John P., 15 

Lovering, Mrs. Joseph, .... 100 

Lukens, Charles 25 

Magee, Horace looo 

Magee, James R., 100 

Magee, Miss Anna J., loo 

Magee, Miss Eliza j., 200 

Magee, Miss Fannie S., . . . . looo 

Martin, Mrs. Edward, 25 

Martin, Mrs. J. Willis, 10 

McCune, Clement, 5 

McMurtrie, R. C, 18 

Middleton, Mrs, C. W , .... 25 

Mitchell, Mrs. S. Weir, .... 100 

Mitchell, Wilson 25 

Mitcheson, Mrs. E, B. A., . . . 200 

Morgan, John B., 25 

Moulton, Byron P., 55 

Muhlenberg, Henry A., .... 25 

Norris, Dr. Isaac 100 

Norris, Dr. William F., . . . . 10 

Parks, Mrs. J. Lewis, 5 

Peters, Mrs. "Richard, Jr., ... 15 

Pfalzer, Simon, 5 

Piatt, Charles, 100 

Potts, Mrs. S. P., 5 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H., . . . 500 

Price, Eli Kirk 25 

Price, Mr. and Mrs J. Sergeant. 50 
Proceeds of an entertainment held 

at Musical Fund Hall, . . . 1404 

Putnam, Mrs. Earle B., . . . . 20 

Randolph, Mrs. Evan, 500 

Rawle, Mrs. James, 10 

Reilly, Thomas Alexander, . . 500 

Reilly, Mrs. Thomas Alexander, 500 

Roberts, George B., 100 

Roberts, Miss E. C, 50 

Roberts, Miss F. A., 50 

Roberts, Miss Fannie, 50 



00 Roberts, Miss Lizzie, . . 

00 Roberts, Thomas, . . . 

00 Rodman. Mrs. Lewis, . . 

00 Rogers. Mrs. Charles H., 

00 Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin, 

00 Rosengarten, Joseph G., . 

00 Rosengarten, Miss Fannie 

00 Rulon, Mrs., 

00 Saniuel. Edward, .... 

00 Scott, Mrs Thomas A., . 

00 Sharpless, Saniuel J., . . 

00 Simpson, Mrs. William, Jr., 

00 Sinnickson, Miss, .... 

00 Sinnickson, Mrs. Charles P. 

00 Smith, Charles E 

00 Smith, Edmund D., . . . 

00 Smith, Harrison Hoxie, . 

00 Smith, Miss Sally R., . . 

00 Smith, Mrs. J. Frailey, 

00 Smith, Mrs. Pemberton, . 

00 Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, 

00 Smith, W. Hinckle, . . . 

00 Snodgrass, Mrs. James H., 

00 Stewart, W^ S 

00 Strawbridge & Clothier, . 

00 Tait, Mrs. Caroline G., 

00 Taylor, Joseph E., . . . 

00 Taylor, Miss Emily W., . 

00 Thomas, George C, . . 

00 Thomas, Mrs. George C, 

00 Thomas, Miss Annie Agnes 

00 Thomas, Miss Harriet, . 

00 Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . 

00 Townsend, John W , . . 

00 Townsend, Mrs. John W., 

00 Townsend, Mrs. E. Y., . 

00 Townsend, Mr. and Mrs. H 

00 Tower, Mrs. Charlemagne, 

00 Trotter, Mrs. Wm. Henry, 

00 Van McCallum, Mrs. John, 

00 Vaux, George, 

00 Wharton, Mrs. Charles, . 
W^harton, Mrs. Joseph, . . 

40 Whelen, Mrs. Charles S., 

00 WHiire, Mrs. S. S., ... 

00 Wilcox, Mrs. Joseph. . . 

00 Winpenny, Mrs, J. Bolton 

00 Winsor, James D., . . . 

00 Wister, Mrs, Caspar, . . 

00 Wood, R. D. & Sons. . . 

00 W^right, Charles A., . . . 

00 Wright, Joseph, .... 
00 I 



$50 00 

500 00 

200 00 

10 00 

20 00 

250 00 

250 00 

5 00 

100 00 

[ooo 00 

200 00 

25 00 

I 00 

25 00 

ICO 00 

100 00 

5 00 

50 00 

100 00 

10 00 

25 00 

50 00 

25 00 

20 00 

500 00 

100 00 

25 00 

10 00 

50 00 

25 00 

I 00 

I 00 

100 00 

25 00 

25 00 

20 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

50 00 

25 00 

100 00 

100 00 

10 00 

100 00 

15 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

300 00 

5 00 

50 00 



47 



Adolpson, Louise, $2 oo 1 

Algeo, Bradley C, lO oo | 

Allen, Miss, i cx) 

Bailey, Vernon H , i cx) 

Benardino, D., . 3 oo 

Birkmire, John S , lo oo 

Bond, Catherine A., . 
Bower, Freda M.. 
Brinton, Annie H., . 
Brylawski, Delia, . . 
Bunting, Ethel, . . 
Bye, Edith L., . . . 
Carpenter, Kate V., . 
Cauffman, Stanley H. 
Chappel. Chrissie, . 
Chase, Eliza B., . . 
Comfort, William, . 
Crowther, John, 



Amount collected, chiefly through the efforts of Mr. Stratton, from 
teachers and pupils in the School, to be expended by the Principal in 
improving and furnishing the building. 

Kenyon, Angie D., $5 oo 

Kiehl, Annette, i 50 

Kingsmore, Mary, 75 

Koerper, Fannie T., i co 

Lachenmeyer, Paul, So 00 

Letchworth, Sallie, 2 00 

Lipp, Emma, i 00 

Lufkin, Bertha, 50 

MacLister, Robert G i 00 

Marenzana, Emilio I 00 

McCarter, Wm., Jr., i 00 

McNeill, F. W., 2 00 

Messier, Ella, i 00 

Miller, F. C 50 

Miller, L. W., 50 00 

Nill, Mary I 00 

Plasschaert, Henry 50 00 

Pollock, Grace, i 00 

Ramsey, Charles F., 2 00 

Ramsey, Ethel, i 50 

Reeves, Gertrude, i 00 

Rice, W. S., 25 

Ritchie, Mrs., I 00 

Roebuck, Wm., 5 00 

Sayles, H. T., 5 00 

Scattergood, Mrs., 10 00 

Scheffer, Morris, 50 

Scot, Walter i 00 

Simons, Amory C, 10 00 

Slater, Mary E., 25 00 

Smiley, William, 50 

Smith, Emma, i 00 

Smith, Oscar, 2 50 

Stewardson, John, 10 00 

Stratton, Howard F., 50 00 

Suplee, Eleanor H., I 00 

Taylor, Miss, 2 00 

Taylor, Miss, i 00 

Turner, Wm. Laird, 10 00 

Walenta, George T., 14 25 

Washburn, Maurice K., .... 25 00 

Washington, Elizabeth, .... 5 00 

Watt, Paul, 50 

Whitall, Matilda F., I 00 

Willis, Albert P., 50 00 

Wise, Herbert, 50 

Wolfersberger, Wm., 50 

Yarnall, Sallie, 5 00 



... 25 00 
... I 00 
... I 00 
... I 00 
... I 00 
... I 50 
... 2 00 
... I 00 
... 10 00 
... I 00 
... 50 
... 5 00 

D'Ascenzo, Nicola, 25 00 

Dean, Ernest 

Denison, Grace, 

Dickerson, W^illiam, .... 

Drain, John, 

Dryfoos, Carrie, 

Ehrlicher, H., 

Fetherston, Florence C, . . . 

Fetherston, Hannah E., . . . 

Finckel, Conyers B., .... 

Ford, James R 

Fox, Helen A., 

France, E. W., 



1 00 

2 00 
2 00 
I 00 
I 00 
I 00 
5 00 
I 00 ^ 
5 00 
I 00 

20 00 
10 00 

French, Catherine E., 25 00 

French, Mrs., 5 00 

French, Sara B., 50 

Gaffney, Michael, ...... 50 

Gallen, Victoria, lo 00 ' 

Geizer, George, 2 00 I 

Gledhill, B. H 50 I 

Goodwin, Myrtle D., 10 00 

Gray, Wm 50 00 

Hallowell, Elizabeth M., ... 10 00 
Hamburger, David E., .... 25 00 

50. 

25! 

I 00 I 

5 00 I 

1 00 j 

2 00 I 



Heck, W^illiam H., 
Hengen, Wm. D., 
Huntington, Mrs., 
Inskip, Wm., . . 
Jacobs, Isabel M., 
Jones, Shelley T , 




UJ ■_ 

S i 

s i 

HI E 

T < 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE NINETEENTH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MKMBKRS 



For the Year endinor December 31. 1894. 



PHILADELPHIA, 

1895. 



OFFICERS FOR 1895 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT 

\VM. WEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 

TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. DALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, 

DALTON DORR. LESLIE W. MILLER. 

ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

RICHARD CADBURV. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS, 

The Governor of the State, The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT, 

Byron P. Moulton, Appointed by the State Senate. 
Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 
Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 
F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

Samuel Gustine Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fairmouni 
Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

To ser7'e for three years : 

John T. Morris, Charles H. Cramp, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

Theo. C. Search. 

To serve for two years : 
Robert K. McNeely, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr., 

Alfred C. Lamhdin, M.D. 

7b serve for one year : 
A. C. Harrison, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt, 

Charles E. Dana. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1895. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

William Platt ?¥.v\'^k, C/iairman ; Stuart VVuoi), T. C. Search, William 
Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, R. K. McNekly, A. C. Harri- 
son, Charles E. Dana, J. S. Jenks, C. II, IIardinw, T. P. Chandler, Jr. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.- 

AKJ\ 
Charles E. Dana, Chairman : Samlel Gustine Thompson, Wh.son Eyre, 
Jr., Charles Grafly, Frank Miles Day. 

MUSEUM. 
A. C. Lambdin, M.D , Chairman ; J. T. Morris, J. S. Jenks, A. C. Harrison, 
T. P. Chandler, Jr., Dalton Dorr, ex officio, Mrs. Jno. Harrison, Miss Anna 
Blanchard, Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, Miss Maoee, Mrs. Joseph F. Sin- 
nott, Mrs, E. D. Gillespie, cx officio. 

INSTRUCTION. 
T. C, Search, Chairman ; Wm, Wood, J. S. Jenks, R. K. M( Neely, C. H. 
Hardlng, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Mrs, T. A. Reilly, Mrs. William Weight- 
man, Jr., Mrs. George K. Crozer, Mrs. Howard Wood, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, 
cx officio. 

FINANCE. 
C. N. Weygandt, Chairman ; Stuart Wood, J. S. Jenks, T. C. Search, T. 
P. Chandler, Jr. 



* The President is cx ojj/icio a member of all Committees, 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Report see page 36.) 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 



MRS. 



ICE- PRESIDENT, 

JOHN SANDERS. 



SECRETARY, 

MISS FANNIE S. MAGEE. 

Mrs. Singerey Balch, 
Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 
Mrs. C. William Bergner, 
Miss Anna Blanchard, 
Miss Mary Cohen, 
Miss Margaret L. Corlies, 
Mrs. George K. Crozer, 
Mrs. E. E.'Denniston, 
Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison, 
Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 
Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 
Mrs. Richard Henry Lee, 



treasurer, 
MRS. BVRON P. MOULTON. 

Miss Leach, 
Mrs. Craig Lippincott, 
Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 
Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 
Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 
Mrs. Charles Wirgman, 
Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 
Mrs. Howard Wood, 
Miss Zell. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, 

Organized as a Museum of Industrial Arts, has grown far beyond the limits set 
for it at first. The pictures and statuary in the Bloomfield-Moore collection and the 
food-products in the collection of British India indicate its present scope. Its divi- 
sion into departments, under the supervision of specialists, has been undertaken. 
Those already organized, comprise: 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY, 
Edwin AtLee Barber, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS, 
F. D. Langenheim, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY, 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE, 
Chas. D. Clark, Honorary Curator. 



Dalton Dorr, Director of the Museu?n. 

M. D. WooDNUTT, H. M. Wilder, Assistants. 

William Lindsay, Superintendent. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Comprises in its organization the following Departments : 
School of Drawing 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 
School of Decorative Painting. 
School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
School of Applied Design. 
School of Wood Carving. 
School of Decorative Sculpture, 
School of Architectural Design. 
School of Mural Decoration. 
School of Normal Art Instruction. 
School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 

L. W. Miller, Principal. 

Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 

Bradley C. Algeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in Textile 

Design and Mechanical Drawing. 
Charles X. Harris, Professor of Drawing. 
Charles E. Dana, Professor of Water Color Painting. 
Henry Plasschaert, Professor of Sculpture. 
Joseph H. Shinn, Jr., Instructor in Design applied to Textiles, 
Florence C. Fetherston, Instructor in Design applied to Printed Fabrics. 
William Laird Turner, Instructor in applied Design — Evening Class, 
Frank X, Bell, Instructor in Wood Carving. 
William Roebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Related Branches. 

F. Maxfield Parrish, Instructor in Mural Decoration, 

Julian Millard, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Architectural Design. 

Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 

Thomas Capper, Instructor in Jacquard Sketching and Designing. 

Elizabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Pen and Ink Drawing. 

Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patent Laws. 

Joseph C, Haas, Instructor in Dyeing. 

John Scott, Instructor in Carding and Spinning. 

A. M. Grillon, Instructor in French. 

Madame A. M. Grillon, Instructor in German. 

Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Design. 

Paul Lachenmeyer, Instructor in Drawing— Evening Class. 

M. Louise VanKirk, Lecturer on Methods of Teaching and of the Kindergarten. 

Thomas B. Ridington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 

Norman E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Roberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand Loom Department. 

Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building. 

Leonora J, C, Boeck, Registrar. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 

THE NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



This report is for the year ending December 31st, 1894. 

Another year has rolled around, and on looking back we have 
much that is gratifying to record of steady progress in all departments 
of our Institution — the details of which you will hear presently from 
the Director of the Museum and the Principal of the School. The 
City of Philadelphia was asked to give an appropriation for our School 
and I am happy to say we shall receive from that source in the year 
1895 t^^ ^^^ of ^5000. ^The Associate Committee of Women, always 
so ready to assist in raising money and in efficient work on all the 
Committees with the Board of Trustees, have again proved their abil- 
ity by two most successful entertainments, held on June 9th (a garden 
parly) and December 14th, 1894 (the Carnival of Nations), by which 
the handsome sum of ^5000 was turned into our treasury — and the 
hearty thanks of all interested in our noble institution are due and 
hereby publicly offered to them for their practical and timely assistance. 

The Legislature of Pennsylvania has been asked to appropriate a 
considerable sum " to the reduction of the large mortgage incurred in 
the purchase of this property," as well as an increased annual amount 
for the support of the School, now nearly double its former size and 
having 590 pupils enrolled for the School year. A mural tablet has 
been placed by the Trustees in the new entrance hall of this building 
to record a generous gift of Mr. William Weightman, who made the 
purchase of this fine large property possible in 1893. Mrs. Chapman 
Biddle, by her Will endowed a Scholarship in the School, as a memo- 
rial of her husband, the late Chapman Biddle, Esq. 

To the Principal of the School, and to the fine corps of teachers 
under him in all departments, to the Director of the Museum, his 
Assistants, and those who have given their valuable, voluntary time and 
help, and the Assistant Treasurer, the thanks of the Board of Trustees 



lO 

are most heartily given, through me, their President, for their earnest, 
untiring, systematic and efficient work in their several spheres of duty, 
which have made our Institution what it is to-day. The report of the 
Director of the Museum will now be read, followed by the report of the 
Principal of the School, etc. 

WILLIAM PLAT r PEPPER, 

President. 

REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

The number of visitors to the Museum during the past year was 
379,419 ; an increase of 142 over the previous year. This would seem 
to indicate that the average maximum of visitors under present condi- 
tions has been attained. But, large as these figures are, the substitu- 
tion of trolley for horse cars on the lines reaching the Museum, will 
probably make some increase in the number of visitors this year. The 
proportion of visitors to population is now a fraction over 36 per cent., 
which is a gratifying evidence of appreciation on the part of the public 
of a Museum of this kind. Tested in another way, however, I regret 
to say that the evidence of public appreciation is not so gratifying. 
For several years, money-boxes, placed by your direction in conspicu- 
ous places about the building, have invited visitors to contribute 
therein to the purchase fund of the Museum. But in no one year have 
the funds collected in this way exceeded ^164.00. This year they 
amounted to ^122.97, which is equal to a gift to the purchase fund of 
y^^ of a mill by each visitor. Or, in other words, an average of one 
cent from thirty-three people. Now, bearing in mind the fact that 
no charge is made for admission to any of the departments of the Mu- 
seum, or for the facilities furninshed students to work therein ; that the 
building is open free, daily, Sundays included, throughout the year, it 
should seem that visitors would have contributed more liberally than 
that. Supposing that only one visitor out of every five had considered 
that he had derived five cents worth of pleasure or profit from his visit 
and dropped a nickel in one of the boxes a's a voluntary admission fee, 
at the end of the year there would have been a fund of ;g3,794.i5 to 
spend in addition to the collections. More than three and a half mil- 
lions of people have visited Memorial Hall since it was opened free to 
the public. A contribution of five cents from each visitor would have 
amounted to ^172,151.00 to expend in purchases for the Museum, in 
excess of the cost of the present collections. Consider for a moment 



II 



what a centre of interest the Museum, thus nobly endowed by its 
visitor-patrons, would be to Philadelphia to-day. 

I have dwelt at some length on this subject of small voluntary 
contributions to the purchase fund by visitors to the Museum, because 
it is evident that our citizens do not yet realize how entirely they have 
it in their power, in this easy way, at trifling individual cost, to be 
constantly gathering together here in Memorial Hall, for their own 
and their children's enjoyment, examples of the most beautiful works 
the world of artist-artizans is producing or has produced. And I ven- 
ture to hope that all who receive this report will endeavor to make 
the practice here suggested, become a custom of the community. 

Although only a small sum was expended by the Institution in 
purchases for the collections, because the funds usually available for 
that purpose were all pledged to repay advances made for the purchase 
of objects at the Columbian Fair, yet the year has been fruitful in 
valuable gifts and loans. 

Twenty-five new show cases were bought at a cost of $425.00. 

The most important work of the year was the rearrangement of 
the large West Corridor, as the Textile Department of the Museum, 
under the supervision of Mrs. John Harrison, the Honorary Curator of 
the Department. There was a peculiar fitness in selecting this room 
for that purpose as the fac-simile reproduction of the Bayeux Tapestry 
occupies the length of the walls. In this room Mrs. Harrison has 
made a systematic grouping of the textiles, including laces, embroid- 
eries and tapesteries belonging to the Museum ; to which she has made 
valuable additions from her own private collections. A prominent 
position is given here to the handsomely carved stand of swinging 
frames containing the illustrations of the history of lace manufacture 
prepared by the Countess di Brazza for the Columbian Fair. This 
stand was shown at the Lace Exhibition which Mrs. Harrison organ- 
ized at the School last year, and was purchased by a special subscrip- 
tion of a number of ladies of this city for presentation to the Insti- 
tution. 

Passing through the Textile room the visitor enters the Southwest 
Pavilion where the Lamborn, Lewis, Vaux and Hammer collections of 
Greco-Roman antiquities are displayed. An illustrated hand-book of 
the last named collection was issued last spring. 

The corresponding room at the north end of the Corridor has 
been given over to the display of the rich and carefully selected 
" Ethnological East Indian collection," belonging to Professor Max- 



T2 

well Sommerville, who generously consented to ])lace it here on view 
during his absence abroad. 

The Department of American Pottery, under the active care of 
Mr. Edwin AtLee Barber, its Honorary Curator, has received numer- 
ous accessions. A most gratifying feature of the year's growth, is the 
gift by several manufacturing potters of specimens of their wares. 
Already Mr. Barber has made in this department a very full and com- 
plete collection illustrating the early history of American Pottery, and 
we may feel hopeful that, having gained the co-operation of leading 
potters in securing examples of the latest productions of their kilns, 
the present progress of the industry will be adequately represented. 

The Department of Numismatics received two notable additions 
in the fine collections of coins and medals made by Mr. Clarence B. 
Moore and the late Mr. Thomas Hockley. There are now upwards of 
fourteen thousand specimens in this department, and Mr. F. D. Lang- 
enheim, its Honorary Curator, is engaged in the laborious task of 
supervising their classification and arrangement for exhibition. The 
removal of the large painting by Rothermel of the Battle of Gettys- 
burg to the State Capitol at Harrisburg, has enabled us to construct an 
enclosure in the well-lighted corner of the East Gallery, where the 
picture formerly hung, for the display of the coin collections. When 
the full series are on view here, it may confidently be expected that 
so large and important a collection will add materially to the reputation 
of the Museum. 

It is proposed to bring together in the room in which the coins 
are now stored while arranging, the numerous examples of goldsmith 
work, jewelry and plate which are at present on view in various parts 
of the Museum. Mr. Charles D. Clark has kindly consented to super- 
vise this work. 

Last year through the kindness of Mr. Frank Miles Day, we were 
presented with detailed drawings, most carefully and accurately made 
by two of his students while traveling abroad, of the pillar around 
which winds the stair to the Pulpit of Nicola Pisano in Siena. These 
drawings were prepared with a view to having a pillar moulded to com- 
plete the model of the staircase and pulpit which we already have. 
It should be remembered that permission to copy this staircase was 
obtained for us by a former Philadelphian, the late Miss Anne Hampton 
Brewster ; and that it was an exceptional favor to receive. Models of 
the pulpit can be bought from any of the authorized dealers in plaster 
casts, but permission to take castings of the staircase was never before 



13 

granted to any one. This Museum, therefore, was the first to exhibit 
the two parts together — the pulpit and the staircase — just as they stand 
in the cathedral. With the column added, the structural adaptation of 
the winding stairs will be shown ; and I trust that it will be possible to 
make this addition during the coming year.* 

We still have stored, in the boxes in which they were shipped, 
the large Siamese pagoda and the Japanese booth which the gener- 
osity of one of the patrons of the Museum enabled us to purchase 
at the Columbian Fair. The pagoda was bought with the view of 
having it erected in the middle of the South Vestibule where it would 
be an imposing and attractive figure. The booth is interestmg as 
showing the architectural methods of the Japanese. Means should be 
provided to place both these structures in position. 

Mr. John Struthers, although no longer officially connected with 
the Museum, has shown his continued interest in it in a very practical 
way by presenting us with a fine camera and lens for use in the photo- 
graph room. 

Another gift of special interest is the donation, by Mr. A. D. 
Pell, of several choice specimens of French and English porcelains, 
which he proposes to make the nucleus of an historical collection to be 
selected by him from his own extensive and very valuable collection 
of European porcelain. 

Mr. Edgar H. Butler donated a fine marine painting. The Ship- 
wreck, by Edward Moran, and the Fairmount Park Art Association de- 
posited on loan Hamlet and Ophelia, by George Pettit, a character- 
istic example of that artist's work 

Appended is a detailed list of the gifts and loans : 

Purchases for the Museum : 

Bellarmine Jug (Fulham?) Stoneware. 

Two Chromo-lithographs ; Arundel Society Subscription. 

Gifts were received from : 

LiEUT.-CoL. J. P. Nicholson: 

Bronze Badge of Pennsylvania Reserves, 1861-1890. 
Gilt Medal ; Oliver C. Bosbyshell. 
Bronze Medal of I'ost 51, G. A. R. 



* Since this report was made, the President of the Institution, Mr. William 
Piatt Pepper, has offered to bear the expense of erecting this pillar. The students 
of the school will do the work under the direction of Mr. Henry Plasschaert, the 
Professor of Sculpture. 



14 

Mr. a. D. Pell : 

Six Cups and Saucers, French, English, and Vienna Porcelain. 
Three Plates, French, and English Porcelain. 

Mr. John T. Morris: 

Porcelain Night Lamp, old German. 

Thirteen Pieces American Pottery, from Potteries at Greenpoint, N. Y., Ben- 
nington, Vt., and Eastern Pennsylvania. 

Mr. E. Lycett : 

Twelve Specimens of Stoneware, iliustrating lustre glazing. 
Specimen of Glaze, illustrating " crazing." 

Mr. Philip Schou, Director of the Royal Porcelain Factory, Copenhagen : 
Large Porcelain Vase, decorated in shades of blue. 

Mrs. William Weightman, Jr.: 

Silver Vase, with cover; repousse decoration. Siamese. 
Large Earthenware Vase, painted, from India. 
Photograph of Siamese Pagoda, framed. 
Five Rugs of Woven Grass, Siamese. 

Lieut. C. Ricchiakdi, of the Royal Siamese Commission to the Columbian Fair : 

Wood Mosaic, representing Columbus's First Sight of America. Made by 
Carallina, of Florence. 

Miss M. L. McLaughlin: 

Decorated Vase, American Faience. 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

India Silk Hanging, embroidered in colors. 

Eight Examples of Rare Old Laces: Punto a Maglia, Spanish Point, Point de 
Gene, Valenciennes, Malines, Milanese, Guipure, and Devonshire. 

Embroidered Military Coat, time of William of Orange. 

Dish of Tortoise-shell Ware. 

Mr. E. a. Barber : 

Fourteen Specimens of American Pottery, from Potteries at Trenton, Phoenix- 
ville, East Hampton, L. I., Baltimore, and Eastern Pennsylvania. 

Two Flasks of Blown Glass. American. 

Mr. Carl Edelheim: 

Ancient Ph<enician Glass Bowl. 

Mr. Carl M. Voelker : 

State Bank Note of 1 86 1, Egg Harbor Bank, N. J. 

Mrs. Geo. K. Crozer : 

Chinese Cabinet of Carved Wood, inlaid with Ivory, Part of the Chinese 
Government Exhibit at the Centennial Exposition of 1876, 
Mr. Clarence B. Moore : 

Collection of thirty-seven Aboriginal Indian Relics from Florida and Ohio. 

Collection of upwards of 2000 Coins (now listing). 



15 

Committee on Washington Memorial Arch, New York, through Mr. R. W. 
Gilder, Secretary. 
Two of the Bronze Medals designed by St. Gaudens. 

Mrs. J. W. Queen: 

Gilded Table, with top of Roman Mosaic. 

Prof. Daniel W. Howard : 

Plaque of American Earthenware, with Portrait of General Garfield. 
Saucer of American Earthenware, colored figure decoration. 

Mr, John Struthers : 

Photographic Camera, with lens. 

Mr. William Platt Pepper : 

Two Chinese Screens of carved Bamboo. 

Mrs. Gustav A. Schindler : 

Four examples of Point and Pillow Laces, Venetian Point, Milanese Guipure, 
and Point D'Alencon. 

Anonymous : 

Two pieces of Confederate Paper Money. 

Mr. E. J. Cartlidge: 

Eight Pieces of Decorated American Porcelain, made at the Works of Charles 
Cartlidge, Greenpoint, N. Y,, about 1850. 

Mr. Wm. H. Rau: 

Head of an Egyptian Mummy. 

Mrs. Thomas Hockley : 

Crucifix of Carved Ivory, French, of the XVI. Century ; Turkish Tobacco Box ; 
Japanese Bronze Stork. 

Mr. Herman Dock : 

Model of the Aztec Calendar Stone, Mexico. 

Beaver Falls Art Tile Company : 

Forty-two Relief Titles in various colors. 

Mrs. Margaret Heininger : 

Three Coins: German Kreuzer of 1852; VI Kreuzer of 1806; Mexican 2 
Reals of 1827. 

Mr. William Simon : 

Six Pieces of Continental Paper Money. 

Mrs. Annie Tyndale: 

Four small Porcelain Buttons, made at the Works of Charles Cartlidge, Green- 
point, N. Y., 1848. 

Mrs, Henry Nagle : 

Two framed Pictures, embroidered and painted on satin. 1800- 1820. 



i6 

Miss Elizabeth Hemphill (bequest) : 

Two Marl)le Vases and Marble Mantel Slab. 

Mr. E. II. Butler : 

Oil Painting by E. Moran : " Shipwreck." 

Mrs. John Harrison, Mrs. Edward S. Willing, Associate Committee of 
Women, Mrs. Owen J. Wister, Miss Mary C. Dulles, Miss Martha M. 
Brown, Mrs. William T. Carter, Miss Fannie Rosengarten, Mrs. John 
Farr Weightman, Miss Juliana Wood, Mrs. M. II. Messchert, Mrs. 
Alexander B. Coxe, Mrs. Travis Cochran, Mrs. Charles Wheeler, 
Mrs. William Platt Pepper, Miss Nina Lea, Mrs. S. Weir Mitchell, A 
Lady; Mrs. Beauveau Borie, Mrs. Emma Tower Reilly, Mrs. Clarence 
II. Clark, Miss Helen C. Denniston, Mrs. Thomas McKean, Mrs. Louis 
C. NoRRis, Mrs. Thomas Roherts. 

Lace Exhibit at the Columlnan Fair prepared by Countess di Brazza, compris- 
ing a Carved Stand of Swinging Frames containing illustrations of the history of 
Lace Manufacture ; also a collection of Lace Making Implements, ancient and 
modern. 

Loans were made by — 

Mrs. Elvira N. Solis : 

Piano, made by Leuchte & Newton, New York ; the Case of inlaid woods. 

Prof. Maxwell Sommerville : 

East'India Ethnological Collection: Carvings, Fabrics, Embroideries, Figures, 
Vases, etc., illustrating the life and arts of India. 

Sixty-six Pieces, mostly Porcelain, of Japanese and French manufacture. Per- 
sian Tiles, Enamels, etc. 

Dr. Robert 1 1. Lam born : 

Sixty-three Pieces added to his Collection, comprising Metal work, Lamps, 
Fire-making implements, Ivories, etc. 

Mr. W. a. Reever : 

Martin Luther Prayer Book : printed in Frankfurt, 1 778. 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

Nine Pieces of Antique Silver Ware. 

Dr. Clement Biddle, U. S. N. : 

Collection of two hundred and twelve pieces of Chinese and Japanese art 
work ; mostly of Porcelain, Bronze, Silver and Ivory. Also 42 Coins. 

Mrs. William Weightman, Jr. : 
Large India Rug. 

Mrs. Herman Burgin : 

Two Plates of American Pottery, witli portraits of Clay and Harrison. 

Miss Ella P. Chapman : 

Child's Coach, made in England in 1763. 



^7 

Mrs. Thomas Hockley: 

Collection of Coins and Medals numbering upwards of 1600 pieces (now listing). 
Mrs. Annie Tyndale: 

Six Pieces of American Porcelain, made at the Works of Charles Cartlidge, 
Greenpoint, N. Y., 1848-53. 

Fairmount Park Art Association : 

Oil Painting by George Pettit ; " Hamlet and Ophelia.'" 

Contributions to the Library were received from — 

Mr. John T. Morris, Boston Library Bureau, Edward Muy!)ridge, Scott Stamp 
and Coin Company, Mr. E. A. Barber, Mrs. John Harrison, Dr. E S. Vanderslice, 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, National Academy of Design, New York ; 
Bo'"ton Museum of Fine Arts, Cincinnati Museum Association. 

DALTON DORR, 

Director of the Aluseuvi. 






LU 



CO 
(T. 
O 

CO 

> 

O 
Cd 

LU 
00 



UJ 



O 



< 

z: 

O 



J 
< 


Ji ^ 


OD 


:g 


o 


% 


ro 


ro 


s8 


so 


Os 


sS 


t^ 


=§ 


?i 


gs 


t^ 




Os 


S 


r~. fo 




t^ 


OS 






OS 






oo_^ 


Os 










•* 


pi^ 


^ 


I*, 


s 










































IT) 


lO 


6 








oo" 


ro 


Pi 


so'~ 








PI 






Os 


o. 


^ 




■> o\ 












so 


oo 


00 




t^ 








OS. 


00 


t^ 


t^ 


H 












" 


^ 








N 




" 


M 


fo 


PI 


p) 


ro 


CO 


1 


_ 








































u 










































E 




ro 


VO 


00 


er> 


■* 


H 


CI 


so 


Os 


SO 


OS 


in 


^ 


o 


2; 


;*■ 


3; 


CO 






00 


f 


Irt 


t^ 


t~- 


00 




M 




On 




OS 


r>. 




■♦ 


SO 


ro 


o 












M 


OS 






in 


f) 


". 


t^ 








Os 


m 




m 














































o 




tr> 








so" 


SO 


lO 


■«f 


rC 




4 




OS 


so 


Q 


t^ 
































" 






•^ 




H 


" 


J 


Q 








































< 


















































































s 


N 


00 


OS 


^ 


^ 


OS 


00 





m 


■* 


M 


M 


00 


O 


o 


H 


o 


a 


1 








rj- 


00 




1^ 






ro 


00 


SO 


ro 


^, 


Os 


■<»- 


m 


00 




t^ 


00 


vO 




<N_ 


t^ 


0_ 


t~> 




SO 


in 


m 




in 


0_^ 


ro 


pl_ 


z 


> 




co' 










o" 




o- 

H 


o" 


2 


^ 


N 


^' 


oo 






8 


N 


< 


o 


•J 

% 






































O 
















" 


























• 


'> 


li 






































o 


c 


vS 


c2 





sg 


s 


^ 


o 


^ 


1^ 


8 


^ 


ro 


8s 


jn 


■* 
S" 


ro 
ro 


?: 







c 


'- "^ 


o^ 


00 


00 


<s 




OS 


1^ 


■*; 


ro 


"? 




OS 




q. 


*1 


". 


q? 




o 


E 

c 


OS 








■* 


OS 


in 


o" 






OS 


so" 


>o" 


ro 




pr 


in 






N 










C4 




M 


N 


N 


ro 


M 






N 


ro 




ro 










































1 


;! 


ro 


'O 




in 




O 


in 


^ 


t- 


Tj- 


in 


o 


o 


„ 


t^ 


so 


-1- 


t^ 








00 


^ 






m 


(^ 


so 


Tf 




8 


^ 


in 


~ 






t-^ 


t^ 


o 






X 


vO_ 






0_ 


r^ 




■<1- 


Os 




sO_^ 




Os 


ro 


00_ 


t^ 


















































Tf 










OS 


o" 


ocT 




00 














ro 


ro 




a 


(JL, 


(?1 








w 


ro 


CI 


ro 


N 


I*- 


ro 


w 


ro 


•*■ 


■*• 


SO 






J5 


c 

4, 

c 
















































































ct 










































E 






00 




00 










00 


so 


00 


ro 


Tt- 


t^ 


so 











>- 




o 


■<>■ 


00 




so 


so 






2" 


00 


<N 


O 


SO 





Os 




ro 






4) 






00 


00 


t^ 


sO_ 


OS 




so 




^ 


cs 


in 


P) 




r^ 


00 






W) 










































:^ 


r~- 

















ro 






so* 


O 


in 


SO 




o' 


00 




-< 


J. 










" 


- 


M 


N 


o 


fO 


■^ 




in 




ro 


ro 


in 








> 

X 








































' 












































"O 


lO 


m 


N 


s 


Os 


M 


r^ 


„ 


^ 


Os 


in 


in 


r^ 


t^ 


„ 


^ 




_>. 


X. 




^0^ 


vg^ 


^ 




!n 


ro 


f) 


so 


Cs 


r-. 


5 


^ 


i^ 


g. 


?n 


N 




























































so' 


OS 




so 


Os 


in 


ro 




00 







OS 








c 
u 

X 

c 


" ID 








M 








N 


M 






ro 




in 


•^ 


SO 












































n 


1 








































-C 






vo 


t^ 


VO 






OS 






^ 


ro 


CJ 


so 


r^ 






■^ 










M 


vg^ 


00 




OS 


M 


ro 




OS 




O 


m 


in 


00 


to 


SO 




c 


'i 




Cl_ 


Tl- 


O 


ro 


sO_^ 








ro 




ro 






^. 


in 


q_ 














































>, 








-=? 


(n" 


ro 


00 


OS 


m 




r- 




so' 




so* 




pr 




'— > 


J 

X. 

% 


C 

s 

o 






















P) 


ro 






PI 












































^ 


i 


c 


8 


s 


1 


O 


Ss 


sg 


S 


•* 


so^ 


? 


^ 




^ 


OS 


^ 


f 


?o 






_o 


t>. 




sO_ 




sO__ 


ro 




(X)^ 




o_^ 


OS 










r>. 






c 








































3 


• '^ 








so' 






oo' 


OS 




t~~ 


OS 


o" 




■* 


rs. 










" Is 










H 


M 






0) 


P) 




ro 


ro 




ro 


■^ 


ro 














































u 


IS 









































c 


u 












































































> 


c 


lO 


t~~ 


00 


SO 


OS 


OS 


OS 


M 


00 


8 


SO 


■* 


„ 


in 


O 


^ 


m 










8 


f^ 


so 




N 


(S 


ro 


00 


Os 


o 


O 


O 




oo 


OS 


o 






c 


c 


t^ 


t^ 






ro 


t^ 


ro 




ro 


I-; 


°°. 


in 


■*; 


OS 




-*• 














































<r^ 










OS 




Os 








o' 




pT 


oo" 






SO 


tc 




0. 






















W 


p» 


p» 




P) 


w 








-C 











































£ 


V 

a. 






































































1 


^ 






































^ 


^ 




ro 




m 




(N 








so 




OS 


OO 


ro 





W 


SO 


w 










X 


\o 








00 


1^ 


so 


ro 








so 


00 


■* 


m 


m 








X 




^ 










r^ 




lO 


sO__ 




t~~ 


00 


PI. 


00 





t^ 
















































c 












go' 


so' 








SO 


r^ 




ro 


OS 




OS 














" 








H 


'-' 






" 






" 










.2 









































i 


t) 












































































b 


B 1) 










































C 








































< 


c 






OS 




N 









O 




t^ 


s 




O 






t^ 




rt 


o 








ro 




so 




so 


SO 




t-~ 




o 


8_ 


m 






3 


c 


o 


03 


en 


t^ 


sO_ 


t-; 


t^ 


N 


as 


-^ 


00 


Os 


in 


PI 


o_ 




? 




^ 




V 


H 






n" 


in 


ro 


t^ 


cT 


so' 


in 


oo' 


o" 


pT 


^ 


tc 


tC 


-^ 




X 


JC. 






































fc 


c 


^ 












































































.• 




H 














































OS 


S<s 




ro 






^ 


ro 






00 





OS 


8 




00 




3 




i^ 




f^ 






r^ 


oo 


m 














t^ 


OS 


oo 


Os 






3 






SO 


SO 




m 






OS 


in 










"- 


t^ 


in 






5 M 








































( 


m" 








Tl- 


N 


N 


■<*• 




so'~ 


ro 


Os 


Os 


SO 




ro 


■<? 




C5 

•— > 


ti 


H -^ 










































^ 


00 


OS 


^ 


„ 


N 


ro 


-il- 


in 


SO 


^^ 


~oo~ 


OS 


o 


„ 


M 


"ro" 


■>*• 












t^ 




00 


00 


00 


00 


00 




00 




oo 


OS 


OS 


Os 


OS 


s 






a 


S 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


oo 


00 


oo 


OO 


oo 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


00 


00 






* 




* 


* 


* 

































19 











AN END OF THE CENTRAL COURT — FROM A PEN-AND-INK DRAWING BY WM. E. RICE, 
A PUPIL IN THE SCHOOL. 

THE SCHOOL. 

The progress of the School continues to be quite as satisfactory in 
every respect as that noted in former reports. The registration shows 
an increase in the attendance, of i86 pupils, or rather more than 46 
per cent, over the registration for the preceding year. The following 
additions have been made to the corps of instructors. Miss Slater 
having resigned, Mr. Plasschaert has been engaged to take entire charge 
of the Department of Decorative Sculpture, to which he formerly de- 
voted only a portion of his time. Mr. D'Ascenzo having also resigned 
his position to spend some years abroad, Mr. F. Maxfield Parrish has 
been appointed to succeed him as instructor in charge of the class in 
Mural Decoration. Mr. Joseph H. Shinn has been appointed Instructor 
in Design in the Textile School in place of Miss Goodwin who has also 
resigned and gone abroad, and Mr. Simon's place as Instructor in 



20 



Wood Carving has been filled by the appointment of ]\Ir. Frank X. 
Bell. 

Mr. Charles E. Dana having returned to America, after spending 
some time abroad, has very kindly resumed the position of Professor 
of Water Color Painting, in which he did such good work for the 
School some years ago. He has gathered an earnest and devoted class 
of students, and the influence of his example as the most accomplished 
master of water color which the city possesses can hardly be over-esti- 
mated. 

In the Textile School the following specialists have been added to 




FROM A rEN-AND-INK DRAWIMG BY VEKNON H. liAILEV, A PUPIL IN THE SCHOOL. 

the teaching force: Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patents and 
Patent Laws; Joseph C. Haas, Graduate of the School of Chemistry 
at Mulhouse, Instructor in Dyeing ; Thomas Capper, Instructor in 
Jacquard Work, and John F. Scott, Instructor in Carding and Spin- 
ning. 

Among the additions to the equipment are a good many valuable 
sets of machinery, which will be found described in detail in the list 
of donations included in this report, the most notable being the com- 
plete outfit for a carding and spinning mill which has been placed here 
by Ernest Gessner, of Aue, in Saxony. The donation of this machi- 
nery by a foreign manufacturer furnishes gratifying evidence of the 
importance attached to the School and its influence by manufacturers 
at even so great a distance as Germany. 

A kiln for firing terra cotta and pottery has been erected in the 



basement of the School building by Mr. Plasschaert, our Professor of 
Sculpture, at his own expense, and furnishes another illustration of the 
unselfish spirit in which the members of the faculty serve the School. 
It is a matter to which allusion has often been made in these reports, 
but one which can hardly be repeated too often, that the true strength 
of the Institution and its main reliance for all that is to give it char- 
acter and influence is found in the spirit of loyalty and devotion which 
animates the whole body of teachers, whose example, I must say again, 
amounts to nothing less than consecration. 

A welcome addition to the furnishing of the School-rooms has 
been made by setting up six large show-cases which were purchased at 
Chicago by the Associate Committee of Women. Three of these are in 
the Art School, one in the Search Library of the Textile School, one 










SPECIMEN OK TKIMMING WOVEN IN THE SCHOOI 



in the-Exhibition-room, and one in the room occupied by the Associate 
Committee of Women. All of them are filled already with good ma- 
terial, and add very much to the attractiveness of the rooms in which 
they are placed. 

An improvement in the School building of much importance has 
been made in the removal of the small rooms and narrow passages near 
the main entrance, throwing the whole space into which one enters 
from the street into an open lobby. The work, which was done under 
the supervision, and at the expense, of the Associate Committee of 
Women, constitutes a very handsome improvement, mdeed. The 
marble floor is the gift of Mr. William Weightman. The gas fix- 
tures — two chandeliers and four wall-brackets, are a gift from the 
Thackara Manufacturing Company. 

The course of illustrated lectures under the auspices of the T. 
Square Club, the inauguration of which was announced in the last report, 
were given in the auditorium, the lecturers being Prof. Warren P. Laird, 



22 



on January 24th, on '^ Greek and Roman Ornament;" Mr. Walter 
Cope, February 7th, ''Gothic Ornament;" Mr. Percy Ash, March 
7th, "Applied Ornament;" Mr. E. V. Seeler, on "Wall Deco- 
ration," March 28th, and Prof. Wm. H. Gray, "Stained Glass," 
April 6th. 

In addition to these, Prof. A. L. Frothingham, of Princeton, 




PERUVIAN WATER JAR — FROM A DRAWING BY ONE OF THE PUPILS. 

lectured April 6th on " Rome and the Early Revival of Art in the 
Middle Ages." 

Under the auspices of the Associate Committee of Women and for 
the benefit of the School, the Countess di Brazza delivered a lecture on 
" Italian Lace and Its Artificers," in the auditorium, on the evening 
of November 23d. The lecture was illustrated by means of a collec- 
tion of lace, part of it old and possessing historical interest, and much 
of it the product of the schools which the lecturer has been active in 
establishing within the last few years in Northern Italy. 

The lecture was not only instructive and valuable in itself, but 



23 

netted a considerable profit, which has been applied in the service of 
the School. 

January 20th a reception was given by the Associate Committee 
of Women. The School was thrown open for the inspection of visi- 
tors, and all the departments were in operation. 

The following exhibitions have also been held dm-ing the year: 
One in March of Stained Glass by Mrs. Fanny Darby Sweeny, and 
Decorative Designs by Mr. Nicola D'Ascenzo, both of whom were for- 







n 



! 



'H 



PEN-AND-INK 



DRAWING FROM PHOTOGRAPH BY ONE OF THE PUPILS. 



mer pupils of the School; one from March 31st to October 31st of 
the Liberian Exhibit from the Columbian Exposition, and one of the 
Russian Educational Exhibit from the same place, which was opened 
in November and is still in progress as this report is written. 

On March 13th, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott deposited in the School 
five large pictures, which are hung in the Principal's ofiice and in the 
library. They are ''The Lay of the Last Minstrel," by Rothermel ; 
- The Blacksmith of Mardey," by Wittkamp; " The Invalid Asylum," 
by Baumgartner, and " What are the Wild Waves Saying " and - Lon- 
don in a Fog," by James Hamilton. 



24 

The School has also beeif the recipienl of a number of valuable 
objects of industrial art, the gift of Mrs. Thomas Hockley, viz. : Two 
lanterns, one of hammered brass and one of Chinese bronze, a hal- 
berd, sword, dagger, helmet, shield, battle-axe, several wrought-iron 
lanterns, parts of a chandelier, two brackets, an amphora of glazed 
earthenware, two pairs of antlers, two antelope heads and several 
stuffed birds, as well as a Chickering Grand Piano, three book cases, 
two cases for photographs, a graphoscope, and one thousand and fifty 
photographs and chromo-lithographs comprising many of the most 
important publications of the Arundel Society. 

Two Spanish water-coolers have also been presented by Mr. Per- 
cival Thomas, and a portrait of Mr. Frederic Graff, the gift of Mrs. 
Graff. 

A lace bedspread and curtains, examples of German work, have 
also been received from the Royal Industrial Museum at Stuttgart in 
exchange for the silk portiere produced in the School and purchased for 
that museum. 

A large and very rich piece of Japanese embroidery was presented 
by Mr. Rudolph Blankenburg. 

The following objects of industrial art for use in the School were 
purchased at the World's Fair by funds provided by the Associate 
Committee of Women : Two mugs, a claret jug, cup, two vases and 
two tankards, all in Bavarian pewter. 

The following were purchased from the Temple Fund : An Indian 
bottle and inlaid table, a hammered brass bowl, brass lantern, Koran 
stand and Siamese basket. 

The Textile School has received the following donations of mate- 
rials and assistance. 

From the Atwood Machine Company of Stonington, Conn. — one 
2o-spindle silk qui Her. 

W. W. Altemus & Son, of Philadelphia — one 12-spindle bobbin- 
winder, with improved variable motion ; one 12-spindle cop-winder for 
carpet yarns ; one improved presser spooler. 

From C. Moore & Company, of Philadelphia — Jacquard twine 
for harness. 

John Greer, of Philadelphia — one upright warping mill. 

Sykes Brothers, of Philadelphia — 200 pounds of carpet yarn. 

William Thornton, Philadelphia — 200 pounds of carpet yarn. 

M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Company, of Camden, N. J. — one 
improved high speed ingrain carpet-loom with fifth box attachment. 



25 

The Aberfoyle Manufacturing Comijany, of Chester, Pa. — Fine 
cotton yarns. 

Woolen yarn from Thomas Wilson & Co., of Philadelphia. 

Mohair yarn from John Durnley, of Philadelphia. 

Six hundred hook raise and drop Jacquard machine from Richard 
Hey & Son, of Philadelphia. 

Forty pounds of assorted worsted yarns from George C. Hetzel & 
Co., of Chester, Pa. 

Improved foot-power card-stamper from John Royle «S«: Sons, of 
Paterson, N, J., loaned for the use of the School. 

Card clothing from American Card Clothing Company of Worces- 
ter, Mass., through Mr. Arthur White, of Philadelphia. 

Improved card-clothing machine from Clarence Arnold, of Phila- 
delphia. 

The following outfit for a carding and spinning mill which has 
been placed in the Textile School by Mr. Ernest Gessner, Aue, Saxony : 
One full set of carding machines, two condensers, three sample spin- 
ning frames, one fulling mill, one shearing or cropping machine, two 
rotary steam cloth presses, one 2-horse power steam-engine. 

We are also indebted to Firth & Foster Bros, and to Thomas 
Beardwood & Bro. for their kindness in finishing many of the fabrics 
produced in the School ; to Conyers Button Si Co., Quaker City Dye 
Works, J. B. Stetson & Co., and the Eddystone Print Works, for ma- 
terials ; and to J. M. Sharpless & Co., Messrs. Pickhardt & Kuttroff, 
W. J. Matheson & Co., E. Sehlbach & Co., New York and Boston 
Dyewood Co., Andreykovicz & Dunk, C. Bischoff & Co., for chemicals 
and dye-stuffs ; to Mr. Jonathan Horsfall, Messrs. O. T. Janney & Co., 
L. Craigin & Co., for chemicals for use in the dye house, and to the 
following firms for donations of yarns: Erben Harding & Co., George 
Campbell & Co., through Mr. J. D. Blackwood and James Sullivan 
& Co. 

One hundred and seventy-seven volumes and pamphlets have been 
added to the library during the year, of which thirty were purchased. 

One hundred and forty-seven volumes were donated by Mrs. 
Thos. Hockley, Mr. John Struthers, Prof. Curley, Dr. W. N. Egle and 
L. W. Miller. 

The Commencement Exercises were held in the School building, 
Broad and Pine streets, on the evening of June 8th, 1894, and were 
followed by a garden party in the central court under the auspices of 
the Industrial Art Society. 



26 

Addresses were made by the President, by Mr. Theodore C. 
Search, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, Mr. Henry G. Kittredge, and by Lieu- 
tenant Robert Crawford. 

The following prizes and certificates were awarded at the same 
time : 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize for the Best set of First Year's Works. — Anne Bal- 
derston. 

Frederic Graff Prize, ^25. — James N. Kennedy. 

(For work in Architectural Design ; competed for by students in the evening 
class only.) 

Henry Perry Leland Prize. — William Seltzer Rice. 

(Given by Mrs. Jolin Harrison for work in Pen and Ink.) 

Richards First Prize.— Sophia Bentia Steel. 

Richards Second Prize. — Jane Hovey Allen. 

(Given by Mr. F. De Bourg Richards, for work in Pen and Ink.) 

RiPKA Prize. — Effie Ives. 

(Given by Messrs. Ripka & Co., for work in color.) 

Weber Prize. — Daniel E. Sutton. 

Honorable mention to Helen Howe Knight. 

(Given by Messrs. Weber & Co., for Mechanical Drawing ) 

Weil & Taws Prize. — Madeleine Earned. 

(Given by Messrs. Weil & Taws, for Flower Painting.) 

Academy Scholarship. — John Birkmire. 

(A free scholarship in that Institution given by the Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts.) 

The following prizes were awarded by the Associate Committee of 
Women : 

Maddock First Prize, $20. — Nellie Kulling. 
Maddock Second Prize, ^10.— Anne Balderston. 

(Given by Mr. Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for design for a covered 
dish.) . 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

First, ^20, for general excellence of first years' work, to Anne Stretch Caspar. 
Honorable mention to Lizzie Elliott Smith. 

Second, $10, for Oil Cloth Design.— Harry William Sharadin. 
Third, ^10, Printed Fabrics. — Frances Louise Farrand. 
Fourth, $10, Wall Paper. — Mabel Gibson, 
Honorable mention to Elise A. Guillou. 
Fifth, ^10, Concours in Design. — Matilda French Whitall. 
The Mrs. GeoTrge K. Crozek Prize, ^20, for Work in Drawing, to Alfred 
J. Dewey. 



27 

Honorable mention to Daniel B. Sutton. 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20, for Work in Modelling, to 
Emilio Marenzana. 

Honorable mention to John Finn. 

Certificates, Class A. — Laura Gertrude Alburger, Anne Balderston.^'John 
Birkmire, Anne Stretch Caspar, David Frank Gledhill, Helen Howe Knight, Chas. 
Orin Provost, William Seltzer Rice, Daniel Everett Sutton, Emma Smith, Lizzie 
Everett Smith. 

Class B.— Frances Louise Farrand, Agnes Gendell, Elise A. Guillou, Made- 
leine Lamed, Ella Messier, Harry William Sharadin, Andrew Paul Watt, Matilda 
French Whitall. 

Applied Design Certificate. — Joseph Harry Shinn, Adeline May Thumlert, 
Sallie Garrett Yarnall, Sarah Baynes French. 

Diplomas, — Anne Haslam Brinton, Isabel Maud Jacobs, 

Teachers' Certificates. — Nellie May Trevor, Maud Gertrude Trevor. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

American Wool Reporter Prize, ^30. Awarded to students in the second- 
year class. — Harland James Maynard, of Maynard, Mass. 

Finckel Prize, $15. — Thomas L. Flower, of Philadelphia. 
Honorable mention to Edward Currie, of Philadelphia. 

American Wool Reporter Prize, $20. Awarded to students in the first- 
year class, — John Mortimer Walton, of Providence, R, I. 

Finckel Prize, ^10. — Robert McClements, of Auburn, N. Y. 

Honorable mention to Albert Sidney Howard, of Clinton, Mass., and to William 
Blackwood, of Philadelphia. 

The above prizes are given by the American Wool Reporter, of Boston, Mass., 
and by Mr. M. L. Finckel, of the Germantown Hosiery Mills respectively. 

Diplomas, — William Kirk Greer, Frederic Sidney Hunt, 

Second- Year's Certificates.— Charles Brombach, Joseph C. F, Clark, John 
W. Connelly, Edward Currie, Thomas L. Flower, George Geiser, J. Loring Glover, 
Jr., Mark B. Halfpenny, Harland James Maynard, James Harris Sayles, Charles 
Martin Wood. 

First Year's Certificates. — Herbert Armstrong, William Blackwood, Chas. 
H. W. Cliff, Herbert G. Coe, John W. Davis, Fred. D. Frissell, Albert S. Howard, 
Robert McClements, William P. Nichols, Sol. Sl^urman, John M. Walton, Adrien 
F. Wellens. 

Certificates Awarded on the Completion of the Two-Years' Evening 
Course.— J. Dobson Koch, Charles F. Noska, James O'Brien, Joseph Rawnsley, 
John F. Scott, John T. Simpson, C. Gordon Stafford, Clinton H. Stafford, Edgar S. 
Stafford, Walter Thompson. 

Chemistry and Dyeing Class. — George Taylor Van Boskerck, John Alfred 
Crablree. 



28 



Evening Dyeing Class. — One Year, Oliver Harrison, Thomas Moore; Two 
Years, Edward Thomas Fearon. 

Eleven appointments to State scholarships have been made during the year, 
viz., for Adams, Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Cameron. Columbia, Elk, Franklin, 
Montgomery, Northumberland, and Tioga counties— making twenty-two holders of 
these appointments at present registered in the school. . 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education were filled, 
as usual, by a competitive examination, conducted by the Principal — each Cirammar 
School Principal being authorized to send candidates. 

Five of these appointments are made each year, each appointment being for 
three years. Of the fifteen registered in the last three years, ten are now in the 
school. 

In addition to the above, nine scholarships have been filled from the Normal, 
High, and Manual Training Schools of the city. These scholarships are granted 
in the day classes of this institution, on the completion of the course of study in any 
of the above-named high schools ; and in the evening classes, to students who have 
not finished their course — two scholarships for each school, one in the day and one 
in the evening classes, being at the disposal of the faculties of the several schools. 

The President of the T. Square Club, Mr. Walter Cope, has established three 
scholarships, in the evening modelling class, as prizes to be competed for by mem- 
bers of the Club. The first competition was held on the 23d of October, and the 
three winners are now registered in the School. 

Of the five hundred and ninety students registered for the year ending December 
31st, 1894, three hundred and twenty-five were men and two hundred and sixty-five 
were women. 

Appended, are lists of students registered since December 31st, 1894, 
showing their occupations and the localities from which they come. 



Architects, 


18 


Finishers, 


. 2 


Artists, 


2 


Illustrators, . 


• 3 


Beamers, .... 


3 


Laborers, 


. 2 


Bookbinders, 


2 


Lawyers, 


. I 


Carpenters, .... 


5 


Loom Fixers, 


. 10 


Carvers, .... 


17 


Manufacturers, 


. 19 


Chemists, .... 


2 


Mechanics, . 


• 5 


Clerks, .... 


• 21 


Overseers, 


• 3 


Decorators, .... 


5 


Painters, 


. 21 


Designers, .... 


51 


Patternmakers, 


. I 


Draughtsmen, 


12 


Students, 


244 


Dressmakers, 


2 


Teachers, . 


117 


Dyers, 


8 


Weavers, . . . . 


. 9 


Engineers, . . 


. 2 






Engravers, .... 


• 3 




590 



29 



From Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, 
Massachusetts, 
Delaware, 
New York, 
Connecticut, 
Michigan, 
New Hampshire, 
Wisconsin, 
Alabama, 
Illinois, . 
Maine, 
Nebraska, 
Ohio, 
Rhode Island, 



471 

59 

31 

6 

4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 



590 



L. W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



3° 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For the Year ending May 31st, 1894.) 
ENDOWMENT FUND. 



Balance on hand June ist, 1893, . 

Investments paid off or sold, 

Temple Fund investments sold, . 

Life Membership, Daniel Baugh, 

Betjuest of George S. Pepper, 

Chapman Biddle Memorial Scholarship, 

Mortgage, Broad and Pine streets. 

Temporary Loan, ..... 

Centennial Board of Finance, 

Proceeds of sale No. 1336 vSpring Garden street, 

Loan for purchases at Chicago, 

Annual Contributions, ..... 



$10,132 08 

17,550 00 

22,979 00 

100 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

325,000 00 

10,000 00 

12,541 73 

14,034 50 

2,350 00 

1,305 00 



Appropriation from Temple Fund income : 

Balance Scholarship 1892-1893, . 

Museum Exhibit, 
Donations — Purchase property Broad and V 

General purposes, .... 

Interest on mortgage, . 

Sundry purposes, .... 

Purchase Lace Exhibit, Chicago, . 
Income — Temple Fund, .... 

Endowment Fund, .... 

Graff Architectural Prize Fund, 

Weightman scholarship, 
State appropriations, .... 

City " Park commission, . 

Tuition fees, ...... 

Proceeds of sales Countess di Brazza book, 
Proceeds of sales Photographs, etc.. 
Return insurance premiums, . 
Sundries, 



120 00 
1,282 29 

590 00 

510 00 
1,270 00 
2,682 46 

755 00 
2,448 29 

2,397 43 
12 50 
30 00 

10,000 00 

9.433 86 

9,491 50 

224 86 

25 40 
27 30 
66 33 



^461,359 5. 



31 




PAYMENTS. 




Investment for Endowment Fund, . 


i.S,25i 54 


Temple Fund Income : 




Balance, Scholarships 1892- 1883, . 


. 120 00 


Museum Exhibit, 


1,282 29 



— 1,402 29 



Centennial Board of Finance : 

Repaid advance from Endowment Fund, 11,000 00 

Expenses, ....... 109 95 

1336 Spring Garden street ; 

Paid mortgage held by Endowment Fund, 4,000 00 
Expenses, ....... 308 95 



1,109 95 



Expenses of School, 
Expenses of Museum, 
General Expenses, 
Museum Exhibits, 
Museum purchases at Chicago, 

Lace Exhibition of 1894, 
Lace purchases, .... 
Mortgage Broad and Pine paid off, 
Balance on hand May 31st, 1894, 




4,30s 95 

57,838 04 

13,459 14 
1,489 63 

1,735 96 
2,958 69 

4,694 65 

468 56 

616 20 

350,000 00 

720 58 



461,359 53 



RICHARD CADBURY, 

Assis^an/ Treasurer. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PURCHASE OF PROPERTY, BROAD AND 
PINE STREETS. 



Philip C. Garrett. 

Mrs. Thomas Hockley, 

Dr. Roland G. Curtin, , 

Hugh DeHaven, . 

Miss Julia A. Myers, . 

Murta & Appleton, 

Mrs. Elias D. Kennedy, 

Dr. Isaac Norris, . 

Associate Commitee of Women, 

Charles D. Barney, 

Mrs. W. W. Gibbs, 



Sioo 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


roo 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


10 


00 



$590 00 



32 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES. 

Clarence E. Moore, ^300 00 

Miss Bache, 5 00 

Mrs. William Pearsall, 5 00 

John S. Jenks, 200 00 



$510 00 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTEREST ON MORTGAGE THROUGH 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

Mrs. Joseph Harrison, . 
Miss Anna Blanchard, . 
Mrs E. E. Denniston, . 
Mrs. John Harrison, 
Mr. John Harrison, 
Mr. George C. Boldt, . 
Mrs. Charles Hacker, . 
Mrs. Roberl Lennox Kennedy, 
Mr. John A. Brown, 
Mr. Howard Wood, 
Mr. E. F. Kingsley, 
Mr. Stephen P'arrelly, . 
Mr. Clement McCune, . 
Miss E. J. Magee, 
Miss A. J. Magee, 
Miss F. S. Magee, 
Cash, .... 
Mr. C. Wilmer Middlelon, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 
Mrs. George K. Crozer, 







$150 00 






100 CX) 






100 00 






25 00 






25 00 






50 00 






50 00 






25 00 






25 00 






25 00 






10 00 






25 00 






5 00 






50 00 






50 00 






100 00 






5 00 






50 00 






300 00 






100 00 



$1,270 00 



Oftertory at Museum for purchases at Chicago, . . . $165 56 

Through Miss Blanchard— A Friend, for principal of mortgage, 1,000 00 

^Maxwell vSommerville, for printing annual report, . . 100 00 

Henry Ilobart Brown, for School, 1,00000 

Numismatic Society. " 1°° *JO 

Sundries " • 316 90 

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PURCHASE OF LACE EXHIBIT AT C 



32,682 46 
IHCAGO. 



Mrs. Edward S. Willing, 
Mrs. John Harrison, 
Associate Committee of Women, 
Mrs. Owen J. Wister, . 

Carried forward, 



$25 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 



$250 00 



33 



Brought forward, 
Miss Mary C. Dulles, . 
Miss Martha M. Brown, 
Mrs. William T. Carter, 
Miss Fannie Rosengarten, 
Mrs. John Farr Weightman, 
Miss Juliana Wood, 
Mrs. M. H. Messchert, 
Mrs. Alexander B. Coxe, 
Mrs. Travis Cochran, . 
Mrs. Charles Wheeler, . 
Mrs. William Piatt Pepper, 
Miss Nina Lea, . 
Mrs. S. Weir Mitchell, 
A Lady, 

Mrs. Beauveau Borie, . 
Mrs. Emma Tower Reilly, 
Mrs. Clarence H. Clark, 
Mrs. Helen C. Denniston, 
Mrs. Thomas McKean, 
Mrs. Louis C. Norris, . 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, . 



5250 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00- 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
5 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 



$755 00 



34 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 



(For Seven Months Ending December 31st, 1894). 



Balance on hand May 31, 1894, . 
Tuition fees, ..... 
State appropriation, .... 
City appropriation, Park Commission, 
Temple Fund income, 
Endowment Fund income, 
Weightman Scholarship income, 
Grafif Architectural Prize Fund income, 
Chapman Biddle Scholarship income, 



LIFE MEMBERSHIPS. 



Mrs. Robert K. McNeely, 
Mr. Robert K. McNeely, 
Miss Florence McNeely, 

Annuals. . 







^720 38 






9,060 00 






7,500 00 






5,561 91 






1,693 70 






2,627 15 






30 00 






12 50 






S33 


$100 00 


100 00 


100 00 





300 00 






1,000 00 



CONTRIBUTIONS: INTEREST ON MORTGAGE. 
Through Associate Committee of Women. 



Miss Agnes Irwin, ....... 


. ^30 00 


Miss Margaret Corlies, 


5 00 


Dr. Louis Jack, 


25 00 


Dr. J. M. DaCosta, 


10 00 


Associate Committee of Women, .... 


1,000 00 


B. Frank Clapp, 


10 00 


Mrs. M. F. Kemble, 


100 CO 


Mrs. C. W. Bergner, 


100 00 



GENERAL PURPOSES. 



Mr. Joseph Morwitz, 

Burnham, Parry, Williams Company, 

John M. Sharpless & Co., . 

Mr. Clement B. Moore. 



Carried forward. 



1,280 00 



$ 50 


00 








500 


00 








250 


00 








300 


00 


I 


,100 


CX) 




$30 


,893 


97 



35 



Brought forward, . ...... 

Mr. Charles Piatt, for building Broad and Pine Streets, 

Associate Committee of Women, for painting hall, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hampton, value of articles left by her to 

Museum, which her heirs wished to retain, . 
Mrs. Bloomfield Moore, to refund expenses incurred on 

some of her pictures, ...... 

Contributions for School : 

Henry Hobart Brown, ... ... 

Sundries, ......... 

Numismatic Society for expenses incurred for them at Mu- 
seum, ......... 

Temporary loan, ....... 



^30,893 97 
100 00 

25 00 

15 00 

205 00 



Si, 000 00 

1=^8 -.7 



1,158 37. 

80 00 
26,000 00 





PAYMENTS. 




Maintenance School, 


. 


.524,682 43 


" Museum, 




. 7,877 86 


General Expenses, , 


. 


1,260 40 


Museum Exhibit, 




303 70 


Graff Architectural Prize, 




25 GO 


Temporary Loans paid off. 




23,000 00 


Balance on hand December 31st, 


1894, . 


1,327 95 



^^58,477 34 558,477 34 



RICHARD CADBURY, 

Assistant Treasurer. 



36 



REPOKT OF THE 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The close of the year 1894 finds us not only satisfied with our In- 
stitution but more than ever convinced of the necessity of its existence. 
In reaching this conclusion we are guided not only by our own con- 
viction, but by the opinions of those better able to judge of it than we 
are ourselves For several years we have had through gifts to the 
School of machinery, etc., abundant evidence of the estimation in 
which it is held in this part of our country, and during the past year, 
men of Science, visitors to the School from foreign countries, from 
New York, Massachusetts and the West, have left behind them ample 
testimony that we are doing most satisfactorily a much needed work. 
The following extract from a newspaper ])ul)lished in Columbia, 
Georgia, shows that our School is thoroughly understood and appre- 
ciated in the South : 

" Foremost among such schools, and of special interest to South- 
ern men, is the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, at 
Philadelphia, which numbers among its many departments a textile 
school which is not only the first school of its kind to be established 
in America in point of time, but is undoubtedly one of the two or 
three first-class schools in the world in point of excellence of equip- 
ment and thoroughness of methods. The school is modelled, as far 
as it owes its character to any European precedent, on the great Gov- 
ernment Schools of Germany and France, although, with the excep- 
tion of an extremely modest subsidy from the State of Pennsylvania, 
it is conducted without public support by the efforts of public spirited 
individuals. It has not even a handsome endowment from some 
wealthy patron as has been the case with several other schools, but 
represents rather the faithful and unselfish service of a number of phil- 
anthropic men and women who feel that it represents a movement of 
vast importance, which must be carried on by this consecration of in- 
dividual effort until it is recognized by "the State, or receives an ample 
endowment from some other source. 

" The School is fitted with appliances for the actual production of 
every conceivable fabric that is made in the loom; carding, spinning, 
weaving, dyeing, finishing; these are the operations at which the 
pupils assist daily while they are pursuing their studies in science or 
art that are tributary to success in industrial life. Their chemistry, 
for which a spacious and well-furnished laboratory is provided, is the 



37 

chemistry of the dye house and the fulling mill ; the mathematics in 
which they are trained, is the mathematics of the mechanical engineer 
and the mill superintendent ; their art is the art of the designer, which 
is identical with the method of its application and which expresses it- 
self not only on paper but in the stuff itself." 

Such is the testimony given to our School from those outside our 
own State. 

The talents of our young people are entrusted to us all ; let us 
never forget that if those talents lie buried, the reproach of their 
burial will rest not with those to whom God gave them, but with the 
people of this Commonwealth and city, whose duty it is to foster and 
encourage the abilities of our rising generation ; and to whom we now 
earnestly appeal for help to strengthen the hands of the men and 
women having this work in charge. 

Already some of our graduates are Superintendents in many 
factories; some engaged as managers, as chemists, and as designers, 
instead of standing before looms under the direction of foreigners. 
This is our present reward and we hope the time is not far distant 
when our manufactured goods will be exported to other countries, 
thus giving emphasis to the doctrine held by some that the surest 
road to '' Protection " is by so instructing our youth that they may be- 
come thoroughly well equipped artisans and honest citizens. 

We, the members of the Associate Committee of Women, feeling 
in a great degree responsible for the purchase of the large building in 
which the wSchool now finds its home, and having by our own exertions 
gathered a large part of the purchase money for the same, are also in- 
terested in securing means for the payment of the sum remaining on 
mortgage, principal and interest. 

Individually and collectively we are at all times working for the 
benefit of the Institution. An amateur theatrical entertainment was 
given in the spring, suggested by Mrs. Weightman, and the generosity 
of our Treasurer, Mrs. Moulton, placed at our disposal for a garden 
party, her country home in June last. Part of the proceeds of these 
two entertainments was used for necessary alterations to the School. 
On the 13th of December, the Carnival of Nations was given at the 
Academy of Music. The profits of these entertainments will be seen 
by the report of the Treasurer. 

By order of the Committee, 

FANNY S. MAGEE, 

Sec7-etary. 



38 



At a Stated Meeting of the Associate Committee of the Pennsyl- 
vania Museum and School of Industrial Art, held on January i8th, the 
following resolution was passed : 

We, the members of the Associate Committee of the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art, desire to put upon record our 
sincere sorrow at the removal from her earthly labors of our late co- 
worker, Mrs. Frederick R. Shelton. 

We tender to her husband and sons our sincere sympathy in their 
loss. 

We also wish to further add the testimony as to our sense of ap- 
preciation of her valued services rendered to the organization of the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Her conscientious work as Secretary of the Associate Committee 
of Women, her untiring efforts for every detail committed to her care, 
until her resignation was imperative owing to other duties. 

In certain parts of the work it will be difficult to fill her place. 

E. D. Gillespie, 
Elizabeth B. Roberts, 
Sarah Morris Ogden, 

Committee. 
Fannie S. Magee, 

Sec. of A. C. IV. 



Elizabeth R. Moulton, treasurer, in account with the Associate 
Committee of Women of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of In- 
dustrial Art. 



1894. 

To Balance, ..... 
Forty-four ten dollar Subscriptions, 
Fifty-four five-dollar Subscriptions, 
One fifteen dollar Subscription, 
Interest on Mortgage, 
Theatricals, Berlitz School, 
Garden Party, .... 
Carnival of Nations, 
Interest on deposit, . 
Fines, ..... 



^132 07 



440 


00 


270 


00 


15 


00 


775 


00 


455 


00 


1,911 


92 


6,932 


85 


10 


50 


9 


00 


^10,951 


34 



39 



1 894. 

By Robert K. McNeely, Treasurer, ^6,525 o^ 

- . 2,732 82 

167 13 

<^98 31 

75 00 

50 00 

4 00 

699 08 

$10,951 34 

THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

Received towards payment of interest on mortgage of the School building, Broad 
and Pine Streets, in 1894 : 



Carnival of Nations, 

Garden Party, . 

Alterations at School, 

Stationery, 

Prizes, 

Printing, . 

Balance on hand, 



From Mrs. C. William Bergner, 

" Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 

" Miss Magee, 

" The Misses Magee, . 

'* Mrs, Denniston, 

" Mrs. William Weightman 

" Mrs. George K. Crozer, 

" Miss Blanchard, 

" Mrs. Howard Wood, 

*' Mrs. John Harrison, . 

" Mr. John Harrison, . 

« Mr. George C. Boldt, 

" Mrs. Charles Hacker, 

" Mrs. Robert L. Kennedy, 

*• Mr. John A, Brown, 

" Mr. R. F. Kingsley, 

" Mr. S. Farrelly, 

" Mr. C. McCune, 

" Mr. C. Wilmer Middleton 

*< Cash. 



A Friend (through Miss Blanchard, towards paying principal of 
gage), 



$100 00 

150 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

300 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

50 00 

50 00 

25 00 

25 00 

10 00 

25 00 

5 00 

50 00 

5 00 

$1370 00 
$1000 00 



40 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 
ANNUAL AND HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their name and 
address to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
page 47. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, .... A subscription of not less than Five Dollars, 

Honorary Membership, . . . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 

'' All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and from 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Laws. 

PATRONS. 

*Baird, John Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. *Gibson, Henry C. 

Bloomfield-Mooi-e, Mrs. Houston, H. H. 

-'•Childs, George W. Lea, Henry C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

*Drexel, A. J. Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Whitney, A. & Sons 

* Deceased. 



41 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 
Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
Arnold, Crawford 
Baeder, Adamson & Co. 
Bailey, Joel J. 
Baird, Mrs. Matthew- 
Baker, John R. 
Baker, W. S. 
Barclay, R. D 
Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
^Bartol, B. H. 
Baugh, Daniel 
Bartol, H. W. 
*Bickley, H. W. 
Biddle, Alexander 
Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Biddle, Chapman 
*Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 

Biddle, Clement 
^Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A, 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
*Borie, C. & H. 

Bowen & Fox 
*Bro\vn, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
^Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T, 
*Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
^Chew, Samuel 
••■Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence H. 



•'■Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
■•••Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edward H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 
*Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
*Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 

Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, I. Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs, Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
^Disston, Albert H. 

Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 

Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas «& Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 

Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 

Gibson, Miss R. 



Deceased. 



42 



^Gowen, Franklin B. 
•■■Grafif. Frederic 

Graff, Mrs, Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, vSamuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
*Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
^Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
•••Hockley, William Stevenson 
*Horstmann, F. O 

Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
^Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David and Sons 
^Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
■^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, Miss E. B. 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
*Knight, Edwd. C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Levi^is, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
*Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 

McNeely, Miss Florence 



McNeely, Robert K. 

McNeely, Mrs. Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 

Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 

Merrick, Miss L. W. 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
*Millikin, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
^Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 
^Newbold, Charles 
*Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, Jr. 

Page, Joseph F. 
*Patterson, Joseph 
*Pepper, George S. 
*Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
^Phillips, Henry M. 
^Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
* Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
*Roberts, Jacob, M.D. 

Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 



Deceased. 



43 



^Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scotl, James P, 
*Scott, Mrs. James P 

Scull, D. & Co. 
*Seibert, Henr)' 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 

Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 
*Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
*Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
"^Spencer, Charles 
^Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C, 

Sweatman, V.^C. 

Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
■^Temple, Joseph E. 



Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C, 

Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
^Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
*Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 

W^arner, Redwood ¥. 

Weightmann, Miss Annie W. 

Weightman, Miss Mary L. 

Weightman, Jr., Mrs. William 
*Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
■^White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William & Co. 

W^rig^it, Edward N. 
^Wright, James A. 

Wright, John W. 

Wurtz, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



Deceased. 



44 



Annual Members (for 1894) who have subscribed not less than ten 
dollars. 



Bement, Clarence S., . . . 


$10 00 


Biddle, Cadwalader, . . . 


10 00 


Brazier, Joseph H,, ... 


10 00 


Borie, Mrs. Henry, . . . 


10 00 


Brown, Miss Martha M., . 


10 00 


Brown, T. Wistar, .... 


10 00 


Buehler, Mrs. William (j., . 


10 00 


l>urnhani, Mrs. William, 


10 00 


Cadwalader,' Mrs. John, . . 


10 00 


Caldwell, [. E. c\: Co., . . 


10 00 


Chandler, T. P., Jr., . . . 


10 00 


Clark, Miss Frances, . . . 


10 00 


Cochran, Travis 


10 00 


Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . , 


10 00 


Coles, Edward, 


10 00 


Coxe, Alexander B., , . . 


10 00 


Coxe, Eckley B., 


10 00 


Cramp, Charles H., . . . . 


10 00 


Cramp, Henry W., .... 


10 00 


Da Costa, Dr. J. M 


10 00 


Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . . 


10 00 


Dickson, Samuel, .... 


10 00 


Durant, Mrs. F. C, . . . . 


10 00 


Eisenbrey, Mrs W. H., . . 


10 00 


Ellison, Mrs, Rodman B., . 


10 00 


Fellon, Mrs. Samuel M., • 


10 00 


Calloway, William, . . . 


10 00 


CJillespie, Mrs. E. D., , . . 


10 00 


Gillingham, Joseph E., . . 


10 00 


Gowen, Mrs. Francis I., . . 


10 00 


Graff, Miss Henrietta, . . 


10 00 


Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . . 


10 00 


Guillou, Victor, 


10 00 


Hamilton, W. C, .... 


10 00 


Hance Brothers & White, . 


10 00 


Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, . 


10 00 


Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . . 


10 00 


Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . 


10 00 


Hippie, Frank K., .... 


10 00 


Hutchinson, Miss, .... 


10 00 


Jack, Dr. Louis, 


25 00 


Jayne, Mrs. David, .... 


10 00 


Jayne, Dr. Horace 


10 00 


Jenks, Mrs. Wm. H., 2 years, 


. 20 00 


Keen, Dr. W. W., . . . . 


10 00 


Keith, Sidney W., .... 


TO 00 


Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D., . 


10 00 


Leonard, James B., . . . . 


10 00 


Lewis, Miss Bertha, M.D., . 


10 00 


Lewis, Edward, 


lo 00 


Lewis, Enoch, . . • . . . 


10 00 


Lewis, Dr. F. W., . . . . 


10 00 



years 



Lewis, Robert M., . . . 
Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, . 
Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G 
Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, 
Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S 
Mackellar, Thomas . 
Magee, Miss Anna, . . 
Magee, Miss Eliza, J., 
Magee, Miss Fannie .S., 
Magee, Horace, . . . 
Mason, Frederick T., . 
Moulton, Mrs. Byron P 
McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, 
Neall, Frank L., . . . 
Newhall, George M., . 
Pancoast, Albert, . . 
Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, 2 
Paul, Dr. James W., . 
Paul, Miss M. W., . . 
Pepper, David, . . . 
Piatt, Franklin, . . . , 
Powers, Mrs. Thomas H 
Price, J. Sergeant, . . 
Randojph, Mrs. Evan, 
Rcilly. Mrs. T. A., . . 
Ritchie, Craig D., . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, . 
Roberts, Miss F. A., . 
Roberts, Mrs, George B. 
Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, . 
Rosengarten, J. G., . . 
Rowland, Mrs Benjamin, . 
Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., . 
Sinnott, Mrs. Joseph F., . . 
Smith, Miss Christiana B., 
Smith, Edward Brinton, . 
Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, . . . 
Stille, Dr. Charles J., . . . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . 
Townsend, Henry C, . . 
Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . . 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, 3 yeai 
Wilson, Joseph M., . . . 
Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, . . 
Wistar, Mrs. Caspar, . . . 
Wood, Mrs. Howard, . . . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, . . . 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K., . 
Wyeth, Stuart, 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 no 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 DO 
10 00 
10 00 
10 GO 
10 00 

to 00 

10 00 
20 GO 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
15 00 
10 GO 
IG GO 
IG GO 
IG GO 
10 GG 
lO GG 
10 GG 
10 GO 
IG 00 
IG GO 
10 GO 
10 GG 
10 GO 
IG GO 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 GO 
30 GO 
10 GO 
TO GO 
10 GO 
TO 00 
10 00 
10 GO 
10 00 



45 



Annual Members (for 1894) who have subscribed not less than 
five dollars : 



Ashhurst, Richard L., . . 
Ashhurst, Mrs. Richard L., 

Bartol, Mrs. C. C 

Bartol, Henry G., .... 
Bergner, Mrs. C. William, . 
Bergner, Miss Catherine, . 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. Lawrence, 
Carter, Mrs. William T., . . 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampton, 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . 
Cohen, Miss Mary M., . . 

Colket, G. L , 

Colton, S. W^ (2 years), . . 
Corlies, Miss Margaret I.., . 
Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth P. 
Curtin, Mrs, Roland G., . 
Dana, Charles E , . . . . 
Dana, Mrs. Charles E., . . 
Day. Frank Miles. .... 
De Flaven, Mrs, Holstein, 
Denniston, Miss Amy, . . 
Denniston, Arthur C, . . 
Dissel, Charles, .... 
Dissel, Mrs, Charles. . . , 
Dixon, Mrs. George Dallas, 

Duane, Russell, 

Durant, Miss Ethel, . . . 
Eisenbrey, Miss Alice Edith 
Eisenbrey, Miss Sarah H., 
Garden, W, Morton, . . . 
Gest. Mrs, William, . . . 



$s 


00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 


10 


00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 



Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C, 
Harrison, John, .... 
Harrison, Mrs. John, . , 
Harrison, Miss Maud S,, 
Howell, Charles H„ . . 
Keen, Frank H„ . . 
Lee, Mrs, Richard Henry 
Mortwitz, Joseph, Jr,, 

Nichols, W. J 

Norris, Miss tiara G,, 
Norton, Mrs, Charles D,, 
Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., 
Pepper, Mrs. John W., . 
Randolph, Miss Anna, . 
Randolph, Miss Elizabeth J., 
Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood, 
Reyburn, Mrs. W, S,, . . . 
Roberts, Mrs. Harry, .... 

Roberts, Thomas, 

Roberts, Thomas, Jr., . . . 
Rogers, Miss Mary [2 years), 
Simpson, Mrs, William, . . 
Siter, Mrs, J. Hollingsworth, 
Smith, Harrison Hoxie, . . 
Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, . . 
Walker, Mrs. R. J, C, . . . 
Williams, Mrs, Francis Howar 
Winpenny, Mrs J. Bolton, . 
Wright, Joseph (2 vears), . . 
Zell, Miss H. A 



$5 00 
5 00 



00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
, 5 00 
5 00 
10 00 
5 00 



5 00 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

C. H. Hutchins, President Knowles Loom Works. 

Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. M. C. Crompton, President Crompton Loom Works. 

Horace Wyman, Vice-President Crompton Loom Works. 

Justin A. Ware, Treasurer Crompton Loom Works. 

Lorenzo Maynard, Maynard, Mass. 

J. C. Cochran, President Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

James Boyd, Philadelphia. 



47 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witness, 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain \Jiere insert a 
descriptio7i of the property] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE TWENTIETH 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MKMBKRS 



For the Year ending December 31, 1895. 



PHILADELPHIA, 

1896. 



OFFICERS FOR 1896. 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH. CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 



TREASURER, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. 



SECRETARY, 

D ALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, 

DALTON DORR. 



PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, 

LESLIE W. MILLER. 



ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

RICHARD CADBURY, 

735 Drexel Building. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 

The Governor of the State, The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Byron P. Moulton, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

Samuel Gustine Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fair mount 



Park. 



ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To so've for three years : 

A. C. Harrison, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt, 

Charles E. Dana. 

To serve for two years : 

John T. Morris, Charles H. Cramp, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

Theo. C. Search. 

To serve for one year : 

Robert K. McNeely, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr., 

Alfred C. Lamrdin, M.D. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1896. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

William Platt ?kvvkk, C/iairman ; Stuart Wood, T. C. Search, William 
Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, R. K. McNeely, A. C. Harri- 
son, Charles E. Dana, J. S. Jenks, John T. Morris, T. P. Chandler, Jr. 

STANDING COMMITTEES* 

AKT. 

Charles E. Dana, Chairman : Samuel Gustine Thompson, W^ilson Eyre, 
Jr., John J. Boyle, Frank Miles Day. 

MUSEUM. 

A. C. Lambdin, M.D., Chairman : J. T. Morris, J. S. Jenks, A. C. Harrlson, 
T. P. Chandler, Jr., Dalton Dorr, ex officio, Mrs. Jno. Harrison, Miss Anna 
Blanchard, Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, Miss Magee, Mrs. Jones Wister, 
Mrs. E, D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

INSTRUCTION. 

T. C. Search, Chairman ; Wm. Wood, J. S. Jenks, R. K. McNeely, C. H. 
Harding, Chas. E. Dana, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 
Mrs. Singerly Balch, Miss Leach, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 

C. N. Weygandt, Chairman ; Stuart Wood, J. S. Jenks, T. C. Search, 
Byron P. Moulton. 



* The President is ex officio a member of all Committees. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Report see page 38.) 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 

VICE PRESIDENT, 

MRS. JOHN SANDERS. 



SECRETARY, 

MISS FANNIE S. MAGEE. 



TREASURER, 

MRS. E. E. DENNISTON. 



Mrs, 
Mrs. 

Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



S. H. Austin, 


Miss Leach, 


SiNGERLY Batch, 


Mrs. Craige Lippincott, 


C. C. Bartol, 


Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 


C, William Bergner, 


Mrs. Byron P. Moulton, 


Anna Blanchard, 


Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 


Mary Cohen, 


Mrs. T. a. Reilly. 


Margaret L. Corlies, 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Ada ^^ Crozer, y 


Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, 


E. E. Oenniston, 


Mrs. Jones Wister, 


Rodman B. Ellison, 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott. 


Joseph Harrison, 


Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 


Morris Jastrow, 


Mrs. How^ard Wood, 


Richard Henry Lee, 


Miss Zell. 



MR^ 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Daniel II. Hastings, Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, 



Mrs. Bloomfield Moore, 
Mrs. Frank Reeder, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 
Mrs. Matthew Simpson. 



Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 
Mrs. Caspar Wister, 
Mrs. Robert K. Wright, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, 

Organized as a Museum of Industrial Arts, has grown far beyond the limits set 
for it at first. The pictures and statuary in the Bloomfield-Moore collection and the 
food-products in the collection of British India indicate its present scope. Its divi- 
sion into departments, under the supervision of specialists, has been undertaken. 
Those already organized comprise : 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY. 
Edwin Atlee Barber, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 
F. D. I>ANGENHEIM, Honorary Cjirator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honorary Cuj-ator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Chas. D. Clark, Honorary Curator. 



D ALTON DCRR, Director of the Miisenni. 
M. D. WOODNUTT, Assistant. 
William Lindsay, Superintendent. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Comprises in its organization the following Departments : 

School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 

School of Decorative Painting. 

School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 

School of Applied Design. 

School of Wood Carving. 

School of Decorative Sculpture, 

School of Architectural Design. 

School of Mural Decoration. 

School of Normal Art Instruction. 

School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 
L. W. Miller, Principal. 
Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 

Bradley C. Algeo, ^Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in Textile 

Design and Mechanical Drawing. 
Charles X. Harris, Professor of Drawing. 
Charles E. Dana, Professor of Water Color Painting. 
Henry Plasschaert, Professor of Sculpture. 
CoNYERS B. FiNCKEL, Professor of Chemistry. 

A. M. Grillon, Director of School of Modern Languages and Instructor in French. 
Florence C. Fetherston, Instructor in Design applied to Printed Fabrics. 
William Laird Turner, Instructor in Design Applied to Woven Fabrics. 
Frank X. Bell, Instructor in Wood Carving. 
William Roebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Belated Branches. 

F. Maxfield Parrish, Instructor in Mural Decoration. 

Julian Millard, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Architectural Design. 

Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 

Elisabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Pen and Ink Drawing. 

Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patent Laws. 

Joseph C. Haas, Instructor in Dyeing. 

Joseph H. Shinn, Jr , Instructor in Design applied to Textiles. 

John F. Scott, Instructor in Carding and Spinning. 

A. M. Schmidt-Grillon, Instructor in German. 

Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Drawing and Design. 

Paul Lachenmeyer, Instructor in Drawing. 

Alfred J. Dewey, Instructor in Drawing. 

M. Louise Van Kirk. Lecturer on Methods of Teaching and of the Kindergarten. 

Thomas B, Ridington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 

Norman E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Roberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand Loom Department. 

Alfred Burhouse, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

J. M. Woelfel, Instructor in Wet Finishing. 

Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Registrar. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



The year just passed brought us much encouragement in many ways, 
but especially from the fact that the work of our Institution was rec- 
ognized as being of great importance to the welfare of the State of 
Pennsylvania by the last Legislature, which voted $80,000 for the sup- 
port of our school for the next two years ; $40,000 for each of the two 
years. 

Because of insufficient State revenues, Governor Hastings felt 
obliged to cut down the appropriations voted to many admirable in- 
stitutions, and so cut ours in half, leaving $40,000 for the second year^ 
the first payment on which will be made on May 20, 1897, thus leaving 
the School without State aid for over a year and a half. We have 
appealed to the public to make this up to us by subscription ; for the 
school work, now so flourishing and enlarged, must go on; and the re- 
sponse is showing that we have the public with us and we will, no 
doubt, receive enough to make up this deficiency. Although we re- 
ceive no State aid for this year we continue to keep as pupils those 
appointed to the State Free Scholarships, the expense of which, of 
course, is paid by the funds of the Institution. 

We have again to congratulate ourselves upon the united way in 
which the work in all departments has been carried on by all who are 
so deeply interested and much of our success is due to this unity. 

Thanks are due to the Associate Committee of Women for their 
wise and continuous efforts for the best interests of the Institution. 

We have to lament the most unexpected death of our friend and as- 
sociate, Mrs. George K. Crozer, whose admirable advice and well 
directed energy were of great value to the Institution. 



12 

The details of the workings of the Museum and of the School will be 
found in the Reports of the Director of the Museum and the Principal 
of the School. 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, 

P7'esident. 

REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

I have the honor to submit the following report : 

During the year ending with the ist inst., the Museum was visited by 
382,085 persons. This is an increase of more than 2500 over the pre- 
vious year and again brings forward the record of the maximum num- 
ber of visitors from the previous to the following year. It is satisfac- 
tory to note that large as the attendance is, and although the galleries 
are often crowded to excess, there has been no instance of misbehavior 
calling for arrest and no act of petty vandalism to reprimand. While 
the visitors are drawn from all classes of the community, good be- 
havior and appreciation of the proprieties of the place are generally 
observed. 

The inconvenient crowdmg of the galleries which has become a 
common occurrence on Sunday afternoons, requires consideration. 
While on the one hand the number of visitors is increasing, on the 
other hand the demand for more floor space for the Museum collections 
is making encroachment on the passage-ways. I would, therefore, re- 
spectfully suggest that you determine whether the time has not arrived 
to petition the Park Commissioners to have plans prepared for the en- 
largement of the building. 

The most notable event in the review of the year is the opening of 
the new Coin room to the public on the 14th of December. 

The collections include, beside the large private collections of Clar- 
ence B. Moore, Dr. Isaac Norris, and the late Thomas Hockley, two of 
which have been presented to the Museum, the collections of the Nu- 
mismatic and Antiquarian Society, of the Philadelphia Library Com- 
pany, and of the American Philosophical Society. The coins are 
arranged in specially constructed flat cases with heavy plate glass 
covers. The room is well lighted and it can, if necessary, be made 
double the present size by setting back the wall cases by which it is 
enclosed, on two sides. Altogether, the plans adopted give to the 
Museum one of the most conveniently arranged coin rooms to be found 
anywhere. Thanks are due to Mr. F. D. Langenheim, and to my 



13 



r 



l.r2 




rS'Wz 



Plaque of Fictile Ivory— " The Nativity "—XI. or XII. Century— Rhenish. 



assistant, Mr. Hans M. Wilder, for the classification and arrangement 
of the coins. 

To the Department of American Pottery, where Mr. E. A. Barber is 
believed to have gathered the most complete and representative his- 
torical collection of the art in existence, his continued interest and 
assistance have made numerous valuable acquisitions. The apathy of 
the potters themselves, is the chief difficulty in the way of making the 
collection illustrative of the potter's art in America at the present 
time. 

The Textile Department is again indebted to Mrs. John Harrison, 
for valuable gifts of laces, embroideries, and other precious fabrics. To 
her this department is indebted for the gift of an interesting collection 
of specimens of antique lace presented by Mr. Carl Schneider, of 
Frankfort-on-t he-Main. 

To Mrs. Harrison the Museum is also indebted for the loan of a por- 
tion of her large collection of antique silver ornaments and jewelry, in 
hammered, repousse and filigree work. 

The annexed list of gifts and loans will show that the Museum has 
been more than usually fortunate in the value, the number and variety 
of its acquisitions during the year. 

^ Chief among the gifts is a collection of Venice and Vienna glass, 
presented by Mr. John T. Morris. This collection was selected by 
Mr. Morris at the two great factories of Lobmeyr and the Venezia- 
Murano Company, with a special view of making it representative of 
the best and highest artistic work which these factories are producing, 
or have produced. 

It numbers seventy pieces, about evenly divided between the two 
factories, and each piece is accompanied by a full description of arti- 
cle, whether original or a reproduction, the date, and the name of the 
artist, when such informition was obtainable. The collection fills two 
large cases, and when placed on exhibition will doubtless prove one 
of the most attractive features of the Museum. 

It is proper that I should make record before closing this report, of 
the loss the Museum has sustained in the death of Dr. Robert H. I.am- 
born. Dr. Lamborn was one of the earliest friends of the Museum, 
and it was his practice to loan to us from time to time those of the art 
treasures which he was constantly collecting that he thought would be 
desirable for us to have. Finally, these loans became so numerous, 
that at his request they were brought together into one room. This 
room he named the Lamborn Room, and it was his purpose, had he 



15 

lived to have made the Lamborn Room the chief repository of his art 
treasures. 

Following is the list of the gifts and loans : 

Purchases for the Museum : 

Fourteen Terra Cotta Tobacco Pipes, made by A. Peyrau, New York. 
Two Pitchers, Porcelain; made by Tucker & Hemphill, about 1835. 
Money Bank, Earthenware. Log Cabin. Philadelphia, 1852. 
Pitcher, Rockingham ware, Pennsylvania. 
Colander, Earthenware. Pennsylvania, 1830-47. 
Chromo-Lithograph ; Arundel Society Subscription. 

Gifts were received from : 
Mr. William Platt Pepper : 

I>arge Button, painted with figures in enamel on copper in the style of the last 
century. French. 

Rev. E. Aug. Dai ley : 

Three specimens of Chinese wood carving. 

Mr. John T. Morris : 

Pitcher, decorated. Tucker Porcelain. 

Pitcher, white Parian ware. 

Small Wreath; white Parian ware. 

Pitcher; Yellow ware. American. 

Pair Curtain Knobs. American. " Flint enamelled," 

Collection of Seventy Pieces of Glass, comprising 

Thirty pieces by Lobmeyr, Vienna; 

Thirty-six pieces by Venezia-Murano Company, Venice ; 

Two pieces, Old Holland ; 

'I'wo pieces, English, by Webb, 

Two Mummy Cases; one containing Mummy. 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

Saddle Bag; woven wool. Syrian. 

Mat ; hand knitted. 

Silver Head ornament. Syrian. 

Purse of vegetable fibre ; Florida Indians. 

Fifty-two framed Photo-Lithographs of ancient Textiles. 

Two framed pictures made by bits (?) of old stuffs. 

One framed Embroidery on Parchment. 

One framed Embroidery on Tissue. 

Embroidered Waistcoat; Louis XVL 

Nine specimens of Lace. 

Nine specimens of Textiles and Embroideries. 

Mr, Carl Sch.neider, Frankfort-on-the-Main, through Mrs. John Harrison: 
Sixteen small specimens of Lace. 

Eight specimens of Textiles. 



Mrs, George K. Crozer : 

Five specimens of rare Laces; Point d'Argentan, Duchesse, vSpanish and Buck- 
inghamshire Trolley, 

Dr. F, W. Lewis : 

Pair of decorated Porcelain Vases; Dihl & Guerhard, Paris; 1780-1S15. 

Mr, AiiRAM Singer : 

Lon Flax Heckle, German ; dated 1769. 

Mr. E, Lycett: 

Small Earthen Cup, illustrating lustre glazing. 

Mr. John Moss, Jr.: 

Two Mexican Uanderillos. 

Mr. Ciiari.es \Vin(;knder: 

Five specimens of American Stoneware, made at lladdonfield, N, J. 

Miss Emma Volans (bequest), through Mrs. R, ^leade Bache: 
Large Vase ; Royal Worcester. 

Miss Anna Blanciiard: 

Specimen of Needlework, " Punto Tagliato;" Italian. 
Specimen of Pillow Lace ; Flemish. 
Embroidered Cap; Hungarian. (?) 

Mr. William H. Rau : 

Ten Photographs of Laces, 

Mr. Edgar M, Hoopes : 

Reproduction in Iron of the Key of the Bastile. 

Miss Juliana Wood : 

Chromo-Lithograph by the Arundel Society, "Marriage of the Virgin," by 
Perugino. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John P. Nicholson : 
Bronze Badge of the 28th and 147th P. V. 
Two Bronze Badges of Knights Templar, Boston, 1895. 

Mr. Louis C. Madeira: 

Nine Copper Tokens ; U. S. and Canada. 

Mr. George Eakins : 

Salt Cellar; Old Chinese Porcelain. 

Mrs. Sinnickson : 

Embroidered Scarf; Algerian, 

Edwin Bennett Pottery Company : 

Jardiniere and Pedestal of " Brubensul " ware. 



17 

Miss M. L. McLaughlin ; 
Vase ; American Faience. 

Miss Ethel Halsey, through Mrs, BIoouifield-Moore: 
Pack of old Playing Cards; German. 

Mr. Stanislaus V. Henkels : 
Bowl; Tucker Porcelain. 
Pitcher; Lustre glaze; English, 
Mug, blue and white; English. 
Temple Standard; India. 

Mr. F. D. Langenheim : 

Plaster Cast of the " Mantuan Vase" in the Ducal Museum, Brunswick. 

Mr. E. a. Barber : 

Two Saucers; transfer prints of American views; Trenton. 
Two small red earthen Bowls. Montgomery County, Pa. 
One Tile with portrait head in relief. Zanesville, Ohio. 
Two Tiles with intaglio portrait. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mr. a. C. Harrison: 

Large Earthen Dish; Montgomery County, Pa., 1797. 

Mrs. Josefa Gans : 

Ten specimens of hand-knit Lace. 

Mr. Isaac A. Schwarz : 

Upright Piano, mahhgany ; made by Loud & Bro. 

Mr. Joseph P. McHugh : 

Set of "Washington Memorial Plates" (six) in blue and white Delft. 

Dr. Marcus Benjamin : 

Tobacco Pipe, white clay, view of the Capitol at Washington in relief around 
bowl. 

Mr. Richard L. Edwards (bequest) : 

Oil Painting ; portrait of Lorenzo di Medici, said to be by Pontormo, pupil of 
Andrea del Sarto, 1494-1557. 

Mosaic Tile Company, Zanesville, Ohio : 

Collection of one hundred and twenty-seven Tiles, 

Mr. Ethan Allen Weaver : 

Two earthen roofing Tiles, made at Bethlehem about 1745. 

Dr. William Pepper : 

Plaque, silver and Niello decoration, Persian. 

Mrs. Catharine A. Queen (Memorial to John A. Queen, dec'd) : 

Mahogany Sofa and four chairs, made by Hillborn & Co., Philadelphia. 

2 



i8 

Mrs. Louis Rodman Fox : 

Bronze Hanging Lamp, Venetian. 

Mrs. William Platt Pepper : 

Set of Gold Filigree Jewelry, Chinese. 
Necklace, Earrings, Bracelet and Pendant. 

Loans were made by ; 

Dr. Robert H, Lamborn : 
One Lamp. 
Two Plaster Statuettes. 

Dr. Isaac Norris : 

One hundred and thirty Coins and Medals. 
Bronze Statuette, copy of the " Venus of Milo." 

Mr. Jonathan Godfrey : 

Two Pitchers and a Cup and Saucer, made at the Carllidge Porcelain Works, 
Greenpoint, N. Y. 

The Library Company of Philadelphia : 

Collection of eight hundred and fifty-five Coins. 

Miss Marion Phyfe : 

Seven pieces of English Cut Glass. 
Two Pitchers, Tucker Porcelain. 
One large Vase, India Porcelain. 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

One hundred and fifty-two pieces of antique and curious Silver for use and per- 
sonal adornment. 
Eighteen specimens of Lace and Needlework. 
One Silk Empire Gown. 
One large Tapestry Wall Hanging. 
Three Illuminated Manuscripts on Vellum, Spanish. 
Four Heliogravures of ancient Greek Portraits. 
One engraving, portrait, framed. 
Two Oil Paintings, portraits, framed. 
One Specimen " Punto Retirato," Sicilian, Sixteenth Century. 

Mr. Samuel Spackman : 

Collection of thirty-three articles of Norwegian manufacture, mostly of wood, 
comprising Tankards, Bowls, Mangles, Hames, etc. 

Mrs. William Weightman, Jr. : 
Large India Rug. 

Miss Alice Cartlidge Ferguson : 

Porcelain Door Plate with view of the Capitol at Washington, made at the 
Cartlidge Porcelain Works, Greenpoint, N. ¥., about 1850. 



19 

The Numismatic and Antiquarian Society : 

Fifteen specimens of Paper Money, Colonial and Confederate. 

Six Confederate Postage Stamps. 

Proof Set of U. S. Coins, 1895, ^'^ pieces. 

One Silver Seal, Archaic. 

One Small Mosaic. 

Piece of Amber enclosing insect. 

Small Electrotype of "The School of Athens," ijy Raphael. 

Mrs. Bloomfield Moore : 

Eleven Paintings, on wood and canvas. 

Pair of Carved Stools. 

Large Vase and Cover, French " Sarreguemines." 

Two Tiles, framed. 

Mrs. Edward Wetherill : 

Collection of hats and bonnets (twelve), 1810-20. 

American Philosophical Society : 

Collection of Nine Hundred and Eight Coins and Medals. 
One vSmall Earring, pearl set in gold. 
Large Coin Cabinet. 

Mr. James Richmond : 

Large Ebony Cabinet, French, decorated with over one hundred enamel plaques. 

Accessions to the Library by purchase : 

Nine Volumes on Numismatics, viz. : 

Doctrina Numorum Veterum, 8 vols., by Josephus Eckhel. 

Atlas Antiquus, by Dr. Henry Reipert. 

By gift from : 

National Academy of Design, New York, Cincinnati Museum Association, 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Detroit Museum of Art, Fairmount Park Art Asso- 
ciation, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Publishers' Journal of the Society 
of Arts, Mr. Lyman Haynes Low, Mr. John Wilson, Mr. John T. Morris, Mr. Wil- 
liam Lindsay, Mr. A. E. Barber. 

DALTON DORR, 

Director of the Museum. 



LU 
CO 



o 

CO 

Cd 
O 

H 

CO 
> 

O 

a: 

LU 
GQ 



LU 

h- 

Ll 
O 

-J 
< 
z 
cr 

o 



< 


E: 5; 


K 


S 





O 


m 


„ 


v8 


VO 


^ 


vg 


r-» 


^ 


N 


g^ 


ro 




ON 


CO 




r-. ro 




f^ 


q; 


"2 


w 


? 




''2 


00 


On 


■^ 


°°. 


ro 


^ 


■* 


". 


Tf- 


q. 


« 


e2 











00 




On 


OO 






vo" 






cT 




pT 












IT) ON 








J? 




NO 


00 


00 




t^ 


VO 


t-. 




ov 




1 


s 


oo 


» 














H 




M 




N 


(S 


w 




ro 




N 


ro 


ro 


ro 


{v* 












































* 

f 


u 










































^ 




m 


VO 


00 


ro 


Tj- 


M 


CI 


VO 


On 


VO 


ON 


in 


VO 


o 


On 


■* 


^ 


ro 







e 




CO 


'J- 




r- 


t^ 


OO 












On 


r^ 






VO 














^ 


l/^ 




Cv 










N 


t^ 




i>. 


ro 


On 
























































o 




lO 








VO 


VO 


in 


-t- 


t^ 








Ov 


no" 


o" 


l^ 










lU 
































M 












Q 


























' 
















H 

















































CI 










































H 


■o 




R^ 




00 


Ov 


'^ 


-*• 


On 


CO 







■* 








O 







o 




Q 


s 




>o 








00 


m 


t^ 


OO 




ro 


00 


VO 




On 


Ov 


•^ 




oo 




IT 


>"; 


oo 


VO 


■* 




f-- 


o_ 




1- 


VO 






in 


OO 


in 





ro 




OJ 


Z 




oo" 








mT 





lO 


o" 


o" 


o" 


Tt- 


ro 


„' 


oo" 


ro 


01* 


o" 


„" 


oo" 


< 


o 










M 












M 


<N 


H 




M 


n 


P) 


PJ 




X 


^ 


> 

c 

c 








































O 














































'* N 


m 





N 


f 


„ 





„ 


„ 


n 


VO 


in 





ro 


"J- 


ro 


t^ 


„ 


•^ 




.n 


E 


VO 






VO 


VO 


in 




•* 









Ov 


in 


•* 




r^ 









o 


o 


N 


q^ 


00 


OO 






<^ 


r; 






in 


■^ 


ON 


t^ 


o 


pT 




Ov 


ro 






O 


cj; 








■* 


Ov 




o" 






ON 


no" 


vo" 


ro 


T? 


or 










6 




(M 










(N 




M 


w 


(N 


m 










ro 










u 


X 










































Xl 


X 


^ 


vo 


in 


in 


■* 





in 


^ 


t^ 


•* 


in 


O 


o 


„ 


t^ 


vo 


^ 


1^ 


in 




B 


CO 












>o 


•»^ 


t^ 


O 


■«■ 




On 








r^ 





in 




-J^ 


•-1 


in 


\D 


t~; 


t 


't 


q; 


M 





VO 


ro 


00 


ON 


ro 


OO 


t^ 




in 




a 


^ 


^ 


►h" 


h' 


H~ 


T? 


ON 


o" 




h' 


00~ 


fC 


in 


•^ 


„" 


„" 


„' 


r^ 


ro 


in 




a 


c 


m 








" 




ro 


'm 


CO 




■^ 


ro 




ro 


-*■ 


■* 


NO 


•* 


■* 




C/2 














































E 










































tn 


:J 


2: 


H 


00 


N 


OO 


in 


H 


M 


M 


00 


VO 


00 


ro 


^ 


tX 


NO 


H 


O 


NO 




3 


"*■ 


O 






m 


vc 


VO 


N 






00 




O 


VO 


o 


On 


00 


rr- 







0) 


"„ 


"_ 


00 


CO 


t^ 


vO_ 


°^ 




vi? 


", 




01 


in 


M 




t^ 


00 


in 


NO 






X. 














in 


0* 








no" 





in 


vo" 




o" 


00* 


vo" 




^ 
















<N 




<N 


ro 




ro 


in 








in 




'l- 
















































T 




VO 


»o 


fO 


c^ 


On 


ON 


N 


1^ 


„ 


•* 


s 


in 


in 


,,^ 


t^ 


„ 


l_l 


ro 




>, 






o\ 


VO 







in 


m 


N 


VO 


On 


■* 


in 









-^ 


t^ 










VO 


•o 


VO 




VO 
















O 




r>. 


in 


". 


NO 




^ 


i! 

-a 


"1 

c 








-r 


vo' 


On 


N 


vo" 


ON 


" 


" 


ro 


oo" 


o' 




vg^ 




NC' 
















































e 










































-C 


!_, 


VO 


^ 


VO 


in 


m 


On 


Tj- 


m 


Tj- 


ro 


s 


NO 


f^ 


in 










1) 
C 




u 


N 


ON 






ON 




(n 




ON 





-^ 


in 






lO 


\ 






i 




"- 


VO 


"^ 


^. 




ND_ 


"2 


in 




m 




ro 




CO_ 


NO 


in 


vO_^ 




►^ 
















fn 




6\ 








M* 


vo' 




vo' 










c 


c 






















P) 


ro 










ro 








o 














































o. 










































t 


£ 
o 


















































































c 


U 








































>. 


c 


c 


8 


^ 


ON 


vg 


Ov 


VO 


^ 


5 


vo' 


o" 


% 


t^ 


in 


Sn 


vo 


vf 


?n 


ON 




OS 




_o 


t^ 




q 


°°. 


VO 


m 




oo_ 




0^ 


ON 






ro 




r^ 


NO 
















































S 












VO 




oo" 




oi 




t^ 


c> 


o" 


r^ 




tC 




in 






^' 


'j~. 








" 


" 


" 


"^ 




CM 


0) 




ro 


ro 


ro 


ro 


■a- 




M- 






t 


x 










































o 


C 


























































"> 


lO 


r^ 


00 


VO 


ON 


On 


On 


N 


OO 





VO 


^ 






o 


Tf 


in 










Ji 


8 


t^ 


VO 








rn 




ON 


c 


o_ 


O 









ON 





00 




<3 


o 


c 

e 


t^ 


t^ 


i-i 


in 


r^ 


t^ 


<n 




ro 




°°. 




Tl- 


ON 




rt; 






1^ 


H 






C> 


rn 


ON 


ro 


i-T 


in 


o' 


T? 


N 


00* 


in 


oT 


no" 


tC 


ro 


























<N 


N 


(N 


N 






ro 


ro 






X 












































s 

3 


Cl, 























































































































1) 


_c 








































^" 


^ 


'-' 


en 


VO 


in 


^ 


M 








VO 


rn 


ON 


CO 


ro 





N 


vo 


01 


M 


rrs 




(J 




x; 


^ 


O 






00 


t^ 


VO 


m 








vc 


oo 


"J- 


in 




Pt 


fo 




u 


^ 






CO 


m 


"2 


in 


t^ 




lO 


vO__ 


■n 


f^ 


CO 


N 


°° 





t^ 








1 




'5 


cT 












vo' 








vo" 


i-C 






Ov 




ON 






s 


c 










" 








H 


" 




" 


" 


" 




^ 


Pi 


PI 






*J 


_o 










































E 












































1 V 




























- 












>, 




c 








































I? 


<c 


c 


00 


rj- 


ON 


in 


w 





N 


in 





CO 


t^ 


ON 


„ 


O 


ro 


01 


t^ 


in 




rt 




o 












VO 




VO 


VO 






VO 




O 


O 




ro 


in 




3 


c 


o 


oo_ 




t^ 


vO_ 




t^ 


N 


ON 






q\ 




(N 










Ov 


0_ 
















































^ 
u 


















t>^ 


N 


VO 


in 


oo" 


o 






tC 


t^ 








,£ 


X 


























H 














fa 


C 


X 








































>. 


> 

rt 




t^ 


Ov 


VO 


t^ 








T^ 


m 




in 







ON 





ro 




00 












t^ 


"*- 




t^ 


00 











o 


00 


t-- 


ON 




00 


On 






D 


s 


3 




ro 


VO 


NO 


N 


m 






o\ 


in 


ro 




ro 






t-. 


LO 






ho 

< 








































S 


o 












N 


f» 


^ 


in 


vo' 


ro 


On 


ON 


NO 


t^ 




" 


o" 






t; 




00 


ON 


Q 


„ 


« 


m 


^ 


in 


VO 


t^ 


00 


On 







0) 


ro 


^ 


in 






t~ 






t^ 




OO 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 






OO 


Ov ■ 


On 


ON 


Ov 


ON 


On 






'^ 


3 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 




CO 


OO 


00 


OO 


eg 




00 


00 


00 






•s- 




* 


* 


_£_ 
























H 












An Alcove in the School of Drawing. 



THE SCHOOL. 

The history of the School continues to be a record of uninterrupted 
progress. The attendance steadily increases, and an appreciable im- 
provement is noticed each year, not only in the evidences of more 
adequate preparation, but of more serious and intelligent purpose on 
the part of the pupils in attendance. 

The registration for the year is 712, an increase of 122 over that 
recorded in the last annual report, or rather more than 20 per cent. 

Miss Frances L. Farrand and Mr. Alfred J. Dewey have been added 
to the staff of the Art School as instructors in Drawing. In the Tex- 
tile School tlie organization of the corps of instructors remains the 
same as it was a year ago, except that Mr. Joseph Shinn, one of our 



younger teachers, and one who has received his entire training in this 
School, has charge of the work in Jacquard Designing that was form- 
erly taught by Mr. Capper. 

The most important addition that was made to the equipment of the 
School was the installation of a complete spinning plant by the M. A. 
Furbush Machine Co., of this city, which is mentioned elsewhere in the 
list of donations received. 

This machinery, which comprises a full set of carding machines for 
wool, and a 400 spindle "mule," 66 feet long, represents a money 
value of about ^3000, and its presentation furnishes the most gratifying 
evidence which we have received this year of the estimation in which 
this School is held by that large and influential class of progressive 
and public spirited manufacturers to which the School was already so 
deeply indebted, and on whose confidence and support its success and 
usefulness must always to a great extent depend. 

It is gratifying to note that this interest is by no means confined to 
our own city or State, but that manufacturers in all sections of the 
country, and especially in New England, are among our most generous 
friends. 

The liberality of these manufacturers in furnishing a very large part 
of the equipment of the Textile School has been noted in former re- 
ports. 

By request of the officers, an exhibition of the work of the School 
was made on the occasion of the annual meeting of the National As- 
sociation of Wool Manufacturers, which was held at Boston, on January 
10, 1895, ^^ which meeting Mr. Theodore C. Search, Vice-President 
and Chairman of the Committee on Instruction of this Institution de- 
livered an address on the work of the School, and its significance as a 
factor in the economic problems which the age presents. 

The address was printed in full in the Bulletin of the Association, 
and was extensively circulated in pamphlet form, as well as by being 
copied by many other journals throughout the country. 

The appreciation shown by the members of the Association is best 
expressed in their own words. The following resolution was adopted 
at the conclusion of Mr. Search's address : 

^'-Resolved, That wool manufacturers present at the thirtieth annual 
meeting of the National Association of Wool Manufacturers having 
examined the splendid exhibit here presented of the work of the pupils 
of the Philadelphia Textile School, and having listened to the explan- 
ation of its methods and the general plan and purpose made by its 




A Room in the Weaving School— Hand Looms. 




24 

Vice-President, Mr. Tlieodore C. Search, desire to make this public 
expression of their appreciation of the work of this institution, and 
their belief in its practical value and constantly enlarging usefulness 
in the advancement of textile manufacture in the United States. We 
recognize the Philadelphia Textile School as the equal of the best 
European institutions of similar character, and we cordially commend 
it to the patronage and generosity of all textile manufacturers who re- 
alize that the future progress of the United States in these great in- 
dustries must be along the lines of the most perfect workmanship and 
the highest artistic development." 

At the close of the exhibition, which was made at the Parker House, 
in connection with this meeting of the Association, it was decided, at 
the urgent solicitation of many of its members, to allow the work to 
remain on exhibition some time longer for the benefit of the city at 
large. The request for this continuance was emphasized in an espe- 
cially gratifying way by the well known dry goods house of Parker, Wil- 
der & Co., who generously placed at our disposal the entire first floor 
of their establishment in Winthrop Square. The exhibition remained 
open for one week, and attracted an amount of interest, and of the most 
favorable comment from the public, as well as from the press of Boston, 
that was gratifying and encouraging in the extreme. 

As one result of the interest which was thus excited, a bill was 
promptly passed by the Massachusetts Legislature, which was in session 
at the time, providing for the establishment of similar schools in- four 
of the principal manufacturing centres of that State, a joint special 
committee of both houses of the Legislature having first visited our 
School and presented a most favorable report regarding the importance 
to the State of promoting and encouraging this form of education. 

Subsequent discussion of the question seems to have developed a 
very general conviction on the part of those who have taken the most 
active part in it, that the movement in Massachusetts is most likely to 
result in the establishment of a system of night-schools for the benefit 
mainly of operatives, and devoted to rather elementary work, while 
that section of the country will continue to rely on our school to 
furnish the more advanced instruction. It will be seen, therefore, that 
any schools of this kind that are likely to be established in the near 
future, even in New England, are justly to be regarded as preparatory 
and tributary to our own rather than as rivals of it. 

Another exhibit of school work was made in the House of Repre- 
sentatives at Harrisburg on March 5th, at wliich time a joint meeting 



1l^ ^ 



Modelling Room 




#<^ill^ll^^fe 


1 


C" ^^^1 




■.>;. > 


i 






>.'^' ^ / « . f 1 


1 


; : 1 ^Hbv H "*i*j# 


m-: i.; > *^ €i5 


::;JLi-"'«^^--| ^imi -^ 




1 

i 


'■ ■■ ^y^ 


r ^- 


Lifli 


1 


'Tir 



v.,1 



26 

of both houses of the State Legislature was addressed by Mr. Theo- 
dore C. Search, Mr. Charles H. Harding and Mr. Alexander Crow, of 
the Board of Trustees. A pair of silk curtains designed and woven 
in the School, and in the ornamentation of which the arms of the State 
had been introduced, were presented to the State by Vice-President 
Search on this occasion. The curtains are of considerable interest as 
being, probably, the most elaborate example of weaving that has hith- 
erto been produced in America. A replica was exhibited at the Co- 
lumbian Exhibition, and one was purchased for the Museum of Indus- 
trial Art at Stuttgart by the director of that institution. 

After repeated solicitations from the authorities of the Atlanta 
Exposition, that the School should make an exhibition there — solici- 
tation to which I first felt compelled to give a negative answer, on 
account of the expense — I decided at last that we would make the 
exhibition. This I did in compliance with what I found to be the very 
earnest desire of the State authorities, and at the request of a commis- 
sion of which General Hastings was president. In order that our 
exhibit might be properly installed, I offered the services of Mr. Algeo, 
one of our teachers, as the person to have charge of installing all the 
educational exhibits from Pennsylvania, and he went to Atlanta and 
superintended this work. Our exhibition was about the same as we 
made at Chicago, and occupied a conspicuous place in the Manufac- 
turers' and Liberal Arts Building. The exhibit was made without any 
expense to this institution. 

In pursuance of the arrangement authorized last spring by the Mu- 
seum Committee, I have taken steps to place in the north vestibule at 
Memorial Hall this Atlanta exhibit as soon as it is returned to us. 
This will give us what we have never had before — a permanent exhi- 
bition at the Hall of a sufficiently comprehensive character to do jus- 
tice to the School. 

Extensive alterations were made in the plumbing and heating appa- 
ratus during the summer months, under the direction of Mr. Thomp- 
son, superintendent of the building, and Mr. France, who has always 
given a great deal of attention to this part of the establishment, the 
engineering work being necessarily in very close relation to the run- 
ning of the machinery in the Textile School. I desire to testify in 
this place my sense of grateful recognition of the manner in which 
this vacation work has been attended to by Mr. France and his assist- 
ants, for all of whom the vacation has virtually not existed, the whole 
summer having been spent in this work, and a considerable expense. 



27 

which would otherwise have been necessary, has been saved. The cost 
of these alterations, therefore, has been very slight, hardly anything 
more than the cost of materials. The installation of the new carding 
and spinning machinery, already alluded to, has also been accom- 
plished mainly in the same way — pretty much all the expenses outside 
of the cost of the shafting and the belting having been generously 
contributed by Mr. Furbush himself, and the extra labor incident to 
its setting up being done by our own people. 

The following addition to our list of free scholarships was made 
during the summer: Mrs. C. E. French-Graham, of Asheville, N. C, 
sent to President Pepper, on July 15th, a gift of $1000, by which she 
established a perpetual scholarship in the Art School, to be known as 
the " Clayton French Scholarship," in memory of her father. Later 
in the year she requested me to make the appointment of the first re- 
cipient, and I accordingly, with her full approval, gave the appoint- 
ment to Miss Nettie S. Stemple, a deaf and dumb girl, who had been 
recommended to me by Superintendent Crouter, of the Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb at Mt. Airy. 

In June, 1895, ^^^ scholarships in the evening School — namely, one 
in the Art School and one in the Textile School — were established by 
the Industrial Art Society as prizes to be awarded by the instructors to 
deserving students already registered in the School. These scholar- 
ships were conferred this year on O. N. Falk of the Textile School, 
and Anne S. Bowman, of the Art School. Following is a list of free 
scholarships provided for in the School and of the appointments that 
have been made for the current year : 





Authorized 


Actual 




Appointments. 


Incumbents 


State Scholarships, 


. 64. . 


. 22 


Public School, .... 


• 15 


• 15 


Temple Scholarships, . 


. 21 


. 21 


Barton Scholarships, 


. 6 


. 6 


Weightman Scholarship, 


I 


I 


Chapman Biddle Scholarship. 


I 


I 


Clayton French Scholarship, 


I 


I 


Industrial Art Society's Scholarships, 


2 


2 



The second course of Illustrated Lectures, under the auspices of the 
T. Square Club, were given in the auditorium as follows: January 23d, 
F.A.Hays, on *' Pen and Ink Drawing;" February 6th, "Design 
and Rendering." Edgar V. Seeler, and on November 6th, Frank 
Miles Day, on "Taormina and Girgenli." 



28 

On January 17th, a brass tablet on a slab of red Sienna marble 
commemorative of the munificent gift of Mr. William Weightman, by 
which the purchase of this property was made possible in 1893, was 
placed in the lobby of the School. 

The entire system of prizes awarded in the Textile School was 
changed at the close of the school-year ending June 7, 1895. The 
money-prizes which, up to that time, it had been customary to award, 
have been replaced by a system of medals in gold, silver, and bronze, 
the highest prize being the Theodore C. Search gold medal, presented 
to the School by Mr. Search, and bestowed on the graduate of the 
full course of three years who attains the grade of " Highest Honor." 

Gold, silver, and bronze medals were also presented by the Textile 
World and the American Wool Reporter^ botli of Boston, and the 
Finckel Silver Medal, by Mr. Martin L. Finckel, of this city. 

The School has been the recipient of a number ot valuable gifts 
during the year, notably a collection of pieces of Lobmeyr glass, 
comprising an interesting variety of vases, goblets, bottles, pitchers, 
etc., in various colors, and with enamelled or etched decorations, pre- 
sented by Mr. John T. Morris; who also gave the School a collection 
of embossed and painted leather made by Mora Bros., of Milan. The 
gift of glass was supplemented by a similar gift of several pieces pre- 
sented by Mr. Lobmeyr himself. 

A bronze salver and two bronze pitchers, of the time of Francis I., 
have also been presented by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, and a papier mache 
vase, of Persian workmanship, by Dr. William Pepper; a piece of 
Irish embroidery presented by Mrs. Carmick, and a number of cos- 
tumes, etc., presented for the use of the Sketch Class, by Miss Anna 
Hartshorne. 

Several pieces of Javanese cotton were purchased with funds pro- 
vided by the Associate Committee of Women. 

The Textile School has received the following donations ; 

A set of wool-carding machines, a woollen mule, and a traverse or 
floor-grinder, with assistance in placing them in position, from the 
M. A. Furbush Co., of Philadelphia. Value, about ^3000. 

A Bramwell feeder, from the George S. Harwood & Son Co., of 
Boston, Mass. Value, $250. 

Card clothing for the above-mentioned set of cards, from the Am- 
erican Card Clothing Co., H. A. White, Manager. Value, $700. 

A large show-case, with contents, hemp, jute, and flax, with other 
material for use in the school, from Messrs. C. Moore & Co., Phila- 
delphia. Value, $50. 



29 

A wool-picker and a *' willow," for opening and cleaning wool, 
from Mr. Wm. Schofield, Manayunk. Value, $450. 

A burr-picker, from Sargent & Sons, Gran itevi lie, Mass. Value, $650. 

Self-balancing hydro extractor, with small engine, bolts, etc., com- 
plete, from Schaum «& Uhlinger, Philadelphia. Value, ^300. 

One Curtiss & Marble teasel-gig, from Thomas Dolan, Philadelphia. 
Value, $100. 

A machine for making card clothing, including shaft and belting, 
from Clarence W. Arnold, Philadelphia. Value, $75. 

Fancy yarns from the Cranston Worsted Mills. Value, $15. 

Scouring soap, from the Warren Soap Co. Value, $g. 

Woollen yarns from the Assabet Manufacturing Co., ^180; Mr. W. 
H. Sayles, of Dayville, Conn., $60 ; and W. A. Walton & Co., of Rich- 
mond Switch, R. I., $25. 

Materials of various kinds, cotton, yarn, card-fly, oil, etc., from D. 
Trainer & Sons, Trainer, Pa. ; The Continental Worsted Mills, Phila- 
delphia ; and Crew, Levick & Co., of Philadelphia. 

Assistance, and loans of machinery, from Mr. John Lunn, Philadel- 
phia ; Southwark Mills Co. ; Beswick & Kay; George Campbell & Co. 

A 15-H.P. upright engine, loaned by the J. B. Stetson Co., of Phila- 
delphia, and a smaller engine loaned by Mr. Thomas Ridington, of 
Bridgeport, Pa. 

A lathe loaned by Prof. W. R. Wilson, of the Economic Museum. 

The Textile World, Fibre and Fabric, Boston, Mass., and the Tex- 
tile Record and Textile Colorist^ Philadelphia, have placed standing 
advertisements of the Textile School free of charge in their valuable 
journals. 

Eighty-four volumes and pamphlets have been added to the library 
during the year, of which three were purchased, and the remaining 
eighty-one donated by Mr. Lorin Blodgett, Gen. A. Hun Berry, Mrs. 
Thomas Hockley, Mr. J. C. Smock, State Geologist of New Jersey, 
Miss Magee, Mr. Edwin Atlee Barber, The Bureau of Ethnology, 
Washington, and Dr. W. N. Engle, State Librarian at Harrisburg. 

Three original drawings by old masters have been presented by Mr. 
Leo Nardus. 

The commencement exercises were held in the Academy of Music 
on Friday evening, June 7th, and were followed by an exhibition of 
students' work and a garden party at the School Building, Broad and 
Pine Streets, the latter being under the auspices of the graduates. 



3° 

Addresses were made by Mr. Theodore C. Search, Mayor Warwick, 
Frank P. Bennett, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie and Dr. Edward P. Davis. 
The following prizes and certificates were awarded at the same time : 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize for the Best Set of First Year's Works. — Florence 
Wellsman Fulton. 

Honorable mention to Nelle Lemert Montgomery. 

P'rederic Graff Prize, ^25. — James N. Kennedy. 

Honorable mention to Maurice M. Sloan. 

(For work in Architectural Design; competed for by students in the evening 
class alone.) 

Henry Perry Leland Prize.— Sophia Bertha Steele. 

(Given by Mrs. John Harrison for work in Pen and Ink Drawing.) 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

First, $20, for second best set of works in the Course of Industrial Drawing. — 
Alfred James Dewey. 

Second, $10, for Wall Paper. — William Seltzer Rice. 

Third, $10, for Design for Rug. — David Frank Gledhill. 

Fourth, ^10, for General Excellence of Applied Design. — Agnes Bowman 
Slaymaker. 

Fifth, $10, for Mural Painting. — Luigi Mastrangelo. 

Weber Prize. — William H. Jacoby. 

(Given by Messrs. F. Weber & Co. for instrumental drawing.) 

Ripka Prize. — William A. Hammer. 

(Given by Ripka & Co, for decorative work in color.) 

Weil & Taws Prize. — William Seltzer Rice. 

(Given by Weil & Taws for flower painting.) 

First Richards Prize. — Jane Hovey Allen. 

Second Richards Prize. — Christian Kunkle Keller, Jr. 

(Given by Mr. F. DeBourg Richards for work in pen and ink.) 

Maddock First Prize. — Agnes Gendell. 

Maddock Second Prize — Sara H. Atkinson. 

(Given by Mr. Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for design for a jar- 
diniere.) 

Academy Scholarship. — Katharine Norcross Evans. 

(A free scholarship in Academy of Fine Arts, given by that institution.) 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, S20, for work in drawing. — Nellie Adeline 
Kulling. 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20, for work in modelling. — Sara H. At- 
kinson. 

The Mrs, Aubrey H. Smith First Prize. — Katharine Norcross Evans. 

The Mrs. Aubrey H, Smith Second Prize. — Oscar L. Smith. 

(Awarded for work in water-color painting.) 



31 

The Mrs. Singerley Balch Prize, $io. — Helen Howe Knight, 

(Awarded for oil cloth design.) 

The Magee Special Prize, ^io. — Otto C. Herold. 

(For general excellence of work in drawing.) 

The Mrs. George K. Crozer Special Prize, $20, for work in the Life Class. — 
Divided between Albert Paul Willis and James N. Berdey. 

Special Prize, ^10, for Life Class work in modelling. — Mabel R. Chase. 

(Given by a friend of the School.) 

Industrial Art Society Scholarship. — Anne Smythe Bowman. 

(Awarded for earnestness and progress.) 

Certificates, Class A. — Hannah Louise Adolphson, Earl Stetson Crawford, 
Alfred James Dewey, Florence Wellsman Fulton, Mary Hyde Graff, Charles Joseph 
Henkels, Mary Robbins Humphreys, Christian Kunkle Keller, Jr., Nellie Adeline 
Kulling, Leonard Rudolph Leopold, Nelle Lemert Montgomery, Edwin Stimble 
Mullison, Clarence Herbert Rowe, Norma Isabelle Simpson, Agnes Bowman Slay- 
maker, Anne Austin Snyder, Mary Hastings Vaughan. 

Class B. — Laura Gertrude Alburger, Anne Balderston, Helen Howe Knight, 
William Seltzer Rice, Agnes Bowman Slaymaker, Daniel Everett Sutton. 

Applied Design Certificates. — David Frank Gledhill, Lillie Lewis. 

Teachers' Certificates. — Hannah Heston Coggins, Katharine Norcross Evans, 
Frances Louise Farrand, Elizabeth Purl Tawresey. 

Diplomas. — Laura Gertrude Alburger, Sara H. Atkinson, Agnes Gendell, Elise 
A. Guillou, Madeleine Earned, Andrew Paul Watt. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Theodore C. Search Gold Medal. — Harland James Maynard, of Worcester, 
Mass. 

Honorable mention to Thomas Lister Flower, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Awarded to the pupil attaining the grade of highest honor for the graduate of 
the three years' course. 

The American Wool Reporter Gold Medal. — John W. Davis, Roches- 
ter, N. H. 

(Awarded for general excellence.) 

The Textile World Silver Medal, for best results in final examinations, in- 
cluding woven piece of cloth, John M. Walton, of Providence, R. 1. 

Honorable mention to William Blackwood, Philadelphia, Pa., and William Pierce 
Nichols, Providence, R. I. 

The Finckel Silver Medal, for general excellence. — George L. Osgood, 
Brookline, Mass. 

Honorable mention to George L. Harrington, E. Rochester, N. H. 

The American Wool Reporter Silver Medal, for best results in the final 
examination, including woven pieces of cloth — Robert Talcott Francis, Pontoosac, 
Mass. 

The Textile World Bronze Medal, for best work in figured design and color 
study. — Joseph Milson, Catasauqua, Pa. 

Awarded to the Special Day Dyeing Class.— The ''Textile World " gold 
medal for best comparative results : Walter C. Lotte, Philadelphia. 



32 

Honorable mention to Howard M. Wilkinson, Philadelphia. 

Awarded to the Evening Dyeing Class. — The "Textile World" bronze 
medal for the best term's work in dyeing to Oliver H. Harrison, Philadelphia. 

Awarded TO the Second Year Ev^ening Class in Textile Design and Manu- 
facture — The " American Wool Reporter" bronze medal for the best results in 
the final examinations coupled with the previous term's work : Samuel Gaffin, 
Philadelphia. 

The Industrial Art Society scholarship for the most satisfactory progress, ( )laf Nils 
Talk. 

Diplomas. — Thomas Lister Flower, Harland James Maynard, James Harris 
Sayles. 

Second Year Certificates. — Herbert Armstrong, William Blackwood, Charles 
H. W. Cliff, Herbert Gladstone Coc, John Davis, William Pierce Nichols, John 
Mortimer Walton. 

First Year Certificates.— William Gardner Abbott, Joseph Theodore G. 
Bartmann, Howard H, Bromley, Carlton Alphonso Caswell, George Herbert Col- 
lins, Lawrence M. Ddlon, Robert Talcott Francis, Henry Burchard Green, George 
Larkin Harrington, William Gray Knowles, Jr., William Orne Lamson, Jr., Joseph 
Milson, George L, Osgood, Jr., George Pilsbury Parker, Samuel Latta Pinkerton, 
Battle Sorsby Searcy, Amandus E. Strampe. 

Certificates Awarded on the Completion of the Two Years' Evening 
Course. — William Bisselt, Samuel Butterworth, Olaf Nils Falk, Samuel Gaffin, John 
Hinfey, John Keddie, Frank Nettleton, Frederick Pfeiffer, Anton Scholz. 

Special Day Dyeing Class, — Charles Horrocks, Walter Charles Lotte, Howard 
Morris Wilkinson. 

Evening Dyeing Class.— Oliver U. Harrison, Walter K. Kuhl. 

Nine appointments to State scholarships have been made this year, viz., for 
Chester, Dauphin, Fayette, Franklin, Northampton, Philadelphia, Pike, Lacka- 
wanna and Warren Counties, making twenty-two holders of these appointments at 
present in the school. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education were 
filled as usual by a competitive examination conducted by the Principal, each Gram- 
mar School Principal being authorized to send candidates. 

Five of these appointments are made each year, each appointment being for three 
years. Of the fifteen appointed in the last three years thirteen are at present regis- 
tered in the school. 

In addition to the above, ten scholarships are annually filled from the Normal, 
High, and Manual Training Schools of the city. These scholarships are granted in 
the Day Classes of this Institution on the completion of the course of study in any 
one of the above named high schools; and in the evening classes to students who 
have not finished their course ; two scholarships for each school, one in the day and 
one in the evening classes being at the disposal ot the faculties of the several schools. 
While these appointments are made for one year, they are sometimes renewed in 
recognition of meritorious work on the part of the pupil, and twelve appointees to 
these scholarships are at present registered in the school. 

Of the seven hundred and twelve students registered for the year ending December 
31, 1895, three hundred and ninety were men and three hundred and twenty-two 
were women. 



33 



Appended are lists of students registered since December 31, 18945 
showing their occupations and the localities from which they come. 



Architects, 
Artists, . 
Beamers and Twi 
Bookkeepers, 
Brokers, 
Carders, 

Carvers and Mode 
Carpenters, . 
Civil Engineers, 
Chemists, 
Clergymen, . 
Clerks, . 
Cloth Menders, 
Decorators, . 
Designers, 
Draughtsmen, 
Dressmakers, 
Dyers, . 
Engravers, 
Hairdressers, 
Illustrators, , 



17 


Jewelers, 


6 


Laborers, . 


5 


Loom Fixers, 


6 


Machinists, . 


2 


Manufacturers, 


I 


Metal Workers, 


26 


Office Boys, . 


6 


Painters and Pap 


3 


Photographers, 


3 


Plumbers, . 


I 


Potters, 


24 


Reporters, , 


I 


Ship Fitters, 


7 


Stenographers, 


43 


Students, . 


12 


Superintendents, 


I 


Teachers, . 


17 


Weavers, 


10 




2 





er Hangers, 



From Philadelphia, 

" Pennsylvania, 

*' New Jersey, 

" Massachusetts, 

*' New Hampshire, 

" Rhode Island, 

" New York, . 

" Connecticut, 

" Ohio, . 

" Michigan, , 

" Delaware, . 

" North Carolina, 

" Alabama, 

'' Wisconsin, . 

" Iowa, , 

" Tennessee, . 

" Japan, . 



712 



L. W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



34 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



Balance on hand June I 

Tuition fees, 

State Appropriation, 

City Appropriation, Park Commission 

Temple Fund Income, 

Endowment Fund Income, 

Weiijjhtman Scholarship Income, 

Graft' Architectural P. F. Income, 

Chapman-Biddle Scholarship Incom 

Bequest of George S. Pepper, . 

Life Memberships, . 

Annual Subscriptions, 

Sales of books, etc , School, 

Refund of expenses at Museum, 

Temporary Loan, 

Temporary I^oan, T. C. Search, . 



(For the Year ending May 31. 1895,) 



1894, 



DONATIONS 
Interest on Mor 



Miss Agnes Irwin, . 

Miss Margaret Corlies, 

Dr. Louis Jack, 

Dr. J. M. DaCosta, . 

Associate Committee of Women, 

B. Frank Clapj), 

Mrs. M. F. Kemble, . 

Miss A. Blancharcl, . 

Associate Committee of Women, 



5 00 

25 00 

10 00 

1000 00 

10 00 

100 00 

ICO 00 

4000 00 



General 


Purposes. 


Mrs. C. W. Bergner, 


100 00 


Joseph Morwitz, .... 


50 00 


Burnham, Parry, Williams l\: Co., 


500 00 


John M. Sharpless & Co., . 


250 00 


Clement B. Moore, .... 


300 00 


Mrs. Longstreth, .... 


10 00 


City of Philadelphia, Mayor's Fund, . 


. 5000 00 


John S. Jenks, ..... 


200 00 



280 00 



$720 38 

10,549 00 
10,000 00 

9,362 14 

3,555 20 

4,946 26 

60 00 

25 00 

33 33 

2,500 00 

300 00 

1,340 00 

205 00 

285 00 

31,000 00 

4,248 66 



6,410 00 



Carried forward, 



$11,690 00 $79,129 97 



Brought forward, 
Charles Piatt, . 
Dr. Isaac Norris, 



35 

Broad and Pine Streets Property. 

$11,690 GO $79,129 97 
100 00 
100 00 



Tex TILE School (Through T. C. Search). 

C. C. Hetzel, 

Conyers Button, ...... 

[, Bromley & Son, ...... 

Associate Committee of Women, Painting Hall, . 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hampton (value of articles left by 
her to Museum which her heirs wished to re- 
tain), .... .... 



500 00 




250 00 




500 GO 







1,250 00 



15 00 



Total Donations, . 








13,180 00 


Contributions to School for use 


of portion of 








building : 










H. Hobart Brown, . 




2000 


00 




Sundries, 


. 


564 87 


2,564 87 








$94,874 84 




PAYMENTS. 








Maintenance of School, . 






. $50,767 


42 


Maintenance of Museum, . 




. 


• 13,250 


43 


General Expenses, . 






• 2,368 


47 


Graff Architectural Prize, . 






25 


00 


Museum Exhibits, . 






438 


99 


Temporary Loans paid off. 






. 23,000 


00 


Endowment Fund Investment, . 


. 




. 2,500 


00 


T. C. Search, Loan returned, . 






• 1,455 


00 


Balance on hand May 31, 


1895. . . 


• 


. 1,069 48 



$94,874 84 $94,874 84 

RICHARD CADBURY, 

Assistant Treasurer. 



We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer from June I, 1894, to May 31, 
1895, ^"^ ^^'^ fi"*^ them correct, the balance in the Treasurer's hands on May 31, 
1895, l^eing as above, §1069.48. 

C. N. Weygandt, 

February 26, 1896. Commit lee. 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT. 



(For the Seven Months ending December 31, 1895.) 



Balance May 31, 1895, .... 

Endowment Fund Principal — l}e(iucst of ( George 
Clayton French Scholarship, 
Temple Fund Principal — Mortgage paid olT, 
State Appropriations, .... 

Park Warrants, City, 

Tuition Fees, ...... 

Payment for use of Rooms at School, 
Temporary Loans, ..... 

Temple Fund Income, .... 

Endowment Fund Income, 
Graff Architectural Prize Fund Income, . 
Chapman-Biddle Scholarship Income, 
W. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship Income, . 
Annuals, ....... 

Donations — For Interest on Mortgage, " A 

For Principal on Mortgage, " B, 

General Purposes, " C, 



PAYMENTS. 



S. P 



$r,o69 48 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
2,500 00 
5,200 :,2 

11,937 00 
1,221 00 
2,671 66 

1,381 GO 



'-j3 



37 

12 50 

3c 00 

30 00 

975 00 

100 00 

3,^75 00 
3,820 00 



M3,i34 33 



On account School, ^^25,555 97 



On account Museum, , . . . . . . 

Graff Architectural Prize, ...... 

Temporary Loan returned, ...... 

Mrs. Jones Wisler on account of advance made by her for 
purchases at Chicago to be repaid from Income Tem- 
ple Fund, ......... 

General Expenses — Interest on Loans, Commissions, Sala- 
ries and other Clerical Expenses, .... 

Balance on hand December 31st, 1895, .... 



7,671 32 

25 00 

1,671 66 



1,767 27 

J, 566 31 
4,876 80 



^43,134 33 



RICHARD CADBURV, 

Assistant Treasurer. 



37 



DONATIONS. 



A " — For Interest on Mortgage 
Miss Anna Blanchard, . 



" B" — Principal of Mortgage : 
F. W. Lewis, . 
Mrs. W. F. Jenks, . 
Miss Margaretta Hutchinson, 
Mrs. T. H. Powers, 
Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, 
Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 
Miss Anna Blanchard, 
Miss Caroline E. Cope, . 
Miss Fannie S. Magee, . 
Miss Eliza J. Magee, 
Miss Anne J. Magee, 
Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 
Howland Croft, 
Mrs. Louis Rodman, 
J. G Rosengarten, . 
Miss Fanny Rosengarten, 
Mrs. Thomas A. Reilly, , 
Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 
Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison, 
William P. Henszey, 
J. W. Curtis, . 
Mrs. Joseph Sinnott, 
Mrs. Jones Wister, . 
Mrs. Richard H. Lee, 
Mrs. F. A. Roberts, 
Miss E. C. Roberts, 
William F. Fray, . 
Mrs. George K. Crozer (G. K 

'' C " — General Purposes : 
Mrs. Evan Randolph, 
John Story Jenks, . 
William E. Garrett, 
Crawford Arnold, . 
Theodore C. Search, 
Alfred C. Harrison, 
R. K. McNeely, special, . 



$ioo oo 

$100 oo 



C), 



$25 


00 


100 


00 


25 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


1000 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


CO 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


500 


00 


25 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


$500 


00 


1000 


00 


200 


00 


100 


00 


1000 


00 


1000 


00 


20 


00 



^3875 00 



$3820 00 



Additional subscriptions toward paying the principal of the mort- 
gage, received after January i, 1896. 



Miss Hutchinson, 






25 00 


xMiss Leach, 






100 00 


Mrs. Alex. Biddle, .... 






50 00 


J. Bolton Winpenny, .... 






100 00 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, .... 






100 00 


Horace Magee, 






100 00 


Mrs. Wm. M. Singerly, .... 






250 00 



38 



REPORT OF THE 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The close of this year finds us ready to give to the people of this 
Commonwealth the report of the work accomplished in this their In- 
stitution during the past twelve months. While the Museum has had 
valuable additions to its treasures, and new objects of interest and in- 
struction are through it laid before our citizens, the School has been 
fitting for the battle of life the young of both sexes who come to us to 
find the armor (education) which is to protect them in their warfare, 
and to give them strength when they leave us to go forth and help 
others in varied careers of honor and usefulness. 

They leave behind them those who have trained them not only in 
their studies, but through good example ; for surely never was any In- 
stitution blessed with a more intelligent, capable, steady, considerate 
and loyal corps of teachers, and never were teachers better rewarded 
with earnest, faithful and grateful students. 

For those who look after the interests of the School, and through it 
after the character and prosperity of our city and State, the past year 
has been one of anxiety. Our well-founded hopes of aid from the 
State (aid which had been given us freely and gladly for many years), 
were dashed, while care and disappointment were our companions ; but 
though " heaviness may endure for a night, joy cometh in the morning." 
We came from our summer holiday fearing that the improvements 
projected in the spring for the comfort of an increased number of 
pupils must of necessity have been left undone. Instead, we found 
our teachers working with the plumbers and carpenters to make the 
essential changes, while to accomplish this these noble teachers had 
given up their summer holiday. Pupils in greater number than before 
are with us now, and we may safely predict that any work carried on 
through so much self-sacrifice, shared as it is by all concerned, will 
find new friends, and that this Institution will never die. 

We propose to hold during Easter week, 1896, a bazaar, with many 



39 

and varied attractions, for the benefit of the School. We rely confi- 
dently on the encouragement and support of the people of this Com- 
monwealth in this undertaking. The institution belongs to the State, 
one free scholarship is given to each county, and we are sure that it 
will be the pleasure and privilege of all to help to shift, if not remove, 
the care and burden of its support from the shoulders of the few on 
whom they have rested since 1876. 

The following is a list of prizes given through the Associate Com- 
mittee at the Commencement in June, 1895 • 

COMMITTEE PRIZES. 

General Excellence in Year's Work. $20. —Alfred James Dewey. 

Design for Wall Papers, ^10.— William S. Rice. 

Design for Rug, $10. — David Frank Gledhill. 

Design for Mural Decoration, $10. — Luigi Mastrangelo. 

General Excellence of Work in Applied Design, $10. — Agnes B. Slaymaker, 

Design for Oil Cloth (oftered by Mrs. Singerly Palch), $10. — Helen II. 
Knight. 

Caroline Axford Magee Prize (offered by Miss Magee), $20.— Otto Herold. 

Mary Aubrey Smith Prizes.— Water CoLf)R, ^10.— Oscar L.Smith. Best 
Water Color, $15. — Katharine Norcross Evans. (Offered by Mrs. Aubrey H. 
Smith, and will be continued yearly.) 

Henry Perry Leland Prize (offered by Mrs. John Harrison), $25. — Best work 
in Pen and Ink, Sophia Bertha Steele. 

?4rs. George K. Crozer's Prizes. — Best Work in Drawing, $20. — Nellie A. 
Kulling. Best Work in Modelling, $20. — .Sara H. Atkinson. Best Work 
IN Life Class, S20. — Divided between Albert Paul Willis ($10,) and James Berdy 
($10). 

FANNIE S. MAGEE, 

Secretary. 

Helen C. Denniston, Treasurer, in account with the Associate Com- 
mittee of Women of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Indus- 
trial Art. 



1895. 

To Balance, .... 
One fifty-dollar subscription. 
Three ten-dollar subscriptions. 
Three five-dollar subscriptions. 
Bertha Lewis, M.D., 
Carnival of Nations, 



Dr. 



$699 


08 


s^ 


GO 


30 


GO 


15 


00 


2 


00 


25 


GO 



$821 08 



40 

1895. Cr. 

By Holland, caterer, ^62 50 

Richard Cadbury, Ass't Treasurer, 45 00 

A. J. Milluth, I 75 

National Ceramic Art Works, 125 00 

M. A. Leach, 19 00 

Hathaway & Brothers, . . . . . . . . , 16 00 

John F. Sears, 25 00 

For the benefit of a teacher, 100 00 

Printing and stamps, . . , . . . . . . . 81 25 

Prizes, 60 00 

^535 50 

Balance on hand, .......... 285 58 



$821 08 

Audited and found correct. 

E. H. B. Roberts, 
Helen B, Jastrow. 



We have been called upon to mourn the loss of one of the most 
valued members of our Committee. Her unvarying interest, her good 
judgment and her hopeful spirit, did much to animate us all in our 
work. The memory of her patience, her gentleness and her ability- 
will still be with us, but our friend, our counsellor, has gone to her 
reward. Her husband, Mr. George K. Crozer, has arranged that the 
prizes given in her name last June shall be continued perpetually. Her 
character still lives in the memories of some of our pupils — by her co- 
workers she will never be forgotten. 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

F7'esident. 



41 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 

Annual and Honorary Members. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their names and 
addresses to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
page 47, A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership, One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, .... A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 
Honorary Membership, . . . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and from 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Lams. 



PATRONS. 

*Baird, John Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. ■'^Gibson, Henry C. 

Bloomfield-Mooi-e, Mrs. ^-Houston, H. H. 

*Childs, George W. Lea, Henry C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons. Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

*Drexe], A. J. Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Whitney, A. & Sons. 



* Deceased. 



42 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Ti'. 

Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. 

Bailey, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 

Baker, John R. 

Balser, W. S. 

B;irclay, R. D, 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*BartoI, B. H. 

Baugh, Daniel 

Bartol, H. W. 
^Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Bi(ldle, Chapman 
'^Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 
*Biddle, Clement 
*BiddIe, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss 11. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
*Borie, C. & H. 

Bo wen & Fox 
■"Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams tS: Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H.C. 

liutton, Conyers 
■•=--CaIdweIl,J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 
*Carler, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W, 

Chapman, Joseph 
*Chew, Samuel 
■^Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence E. 
*CIark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W^ 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edward H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 
"•■'Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward V. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket,C. Howard 

Collins, H H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius tv: Sons 
*Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 
*Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, I, Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 

Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 
^Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John cK: James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co, 

Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 



* Deceased. 



43 



Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 

Gilson, Miss R. 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
'••■'GraiT, Frederic 

Graff, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
■*Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
*Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
*Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
^Hockley, William Stevenson 
*Horlsmann, F. O. 

Hortsmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
*Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David and Sons 
*Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs, William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
^Knight, Edward C. 
■*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
■'''Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering, Joseph vS., Jr. 



McNeeley, Miss Florence 

McNeeley, Robert K. 

McNeeley, Mrs. Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Mears, Mrs, R. Wain 

Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 

Merrick, Miss L. W, 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H, 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
^Millikin, James 

Moore, James 
^Morris, P. Pemberton 
■^Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 
*Newbold, Charles 
*Newhold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Nobht, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, Jr. 

Page, Joseph F. 
^Patterson, Joseph 
^Pepper, George S. 
*Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, William, M D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
"^Phillips, Henry M. 
*Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
^Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H, 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
^Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
^Roberts, Jacob, M.D. 



Deceased. 



44 



Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
^Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P. 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
*Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 

Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 
^Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
*Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommervillc, Maxwell 
^Spencer, Charles 
^Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 



Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
*Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
*Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 

Warner, Redwood F. 
*Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William & Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 
■^Wright, James A. 

Wright, John W. 

Wurts, Charles Stewart. M.D. 



* Deceased. 



45 

Annual Members (for 1895) who have subscribed not less than ten 
dollars. 



Balch, Mrs. Singerly, . . 


310 00 


Bement, Clarence S., . . . 


10 00 


Biddle, Cadwalader, . . . 


10 00 


Brazier, Joseph H., . . . 


10 00 


Borie, Mrs. Henry, . . . 


10 00 


Brown, Miss Martha M., . 


10 00 


Brown, T. Wistar, .... 


10 00 


Burnham, Mrs. William, . 


10 00 


Cadwalader, Mrs, John, . . 


10 00 


Caldwell. 1. E. & Co., . . 


10 00 


Campbell, Mrs. St. G. T., 2 yr.^ 


., 20 00 


Chandler. T. P., Jr., . . . 


10 00 


Clark, Miss Frances, . . . 


10 00 


Cochran, Travis 


10 00 


Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . . 


10 00 


Coles, Edward, 


10 00 


Coxe, Alexander B., . . . 


10 00 


Cramp, Henry W., .... 


10 00 


Da Costa, Dr. J. M., . . . 


10 00 


Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . . 


10 00 


Dickson, Samuel, .... 


10 00 


Durant, Mrs. F. C, . . . . 


10 00 


Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B., . 


10 00 


Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., • 


10 00 


Galloway, William, . . . 


10 00 


Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . . . 


10 00 


Gillingham, Joseph E., . . 


10 00 


Gowen, Mrs, Francis I., . . 


10 00 


Graff, Miss Henrietta, . . 


10 00 


Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . . 


10 00 


Guillou, Victor, 


10 00 


Hamilton, W. C, .... 


10 00 


Hance Brothers & White, . 


10 00 


Harris, Mrs, J. Campl)ell, . 


10 00 


Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . . 


10 00 


Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . 


10 00 


Hippie, Frank K., . . . . 


10 00 


Hutchinson, Miss, .... 


10 00 


Jack, Di\ Louis, 


25 CX3 


Tayne, Mrs. David 


10 00 


Javne, Dr. Horace. .... 


10 00 


Tenks, Mrs. Wm. F., . . . 


10 00 


Keen, Dr, W, W., .... 


10 00 


Keith, Sidney W., .... 


70 00 


Kennedv, Mrs. Elias D , . 


10 00 


Leach, Miss Mary Alherton, 


10 00 


Lee, Mrs. Richard Henry, 


10 00 


Leonard, James B., . . . . 


10 00 


Lewis, Edward, 


10 00 


Lewis, Enoch, . . • . . . 


10 00 


Lewis, Dr, F. W„ .... 


10 00 


Lewis, Robert ^L, .... 


10 00 



Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, . , 
Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G 
Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, , 
Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S., 
Mackellar, Thomas . . 
Magee, Miss Anna, . . . 
Magee, Miss Eliza, J,, . 
Magee, Miss Fannie S., . 
Magee, Horace, .... 
Mason, Frederick T., . . 
Moulton, Mrs. Byron P 
McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, . 
Neall, Frank L., . . . . 
Newhall, George M., . . 
Pancoast, Albert, . . . 
Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, 2 year 
Paul, Dr. James W., . . 
Paul, Miss M. W., . . . 
Pepper. David, .... 
Piatt, Franklin, .... 
Powers, Mrs. Thomas H., 
Price, J. Sergeant, . . . 
Randolph, Mrs, Evan, . 
Reilly, Mrs, T. A., . . . 
Ritchie, Craig D., . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, . . 
Roberts, Miss F, A., . . 
Roberts, Mrs, George B., 
Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, . . 
Rosengarten, J. G., . . . 
Rowland, Mrs Benjamin, 
Sanders, Mrs. John, . . 
Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., 
Sinnott, Mrs. Joseph F., . 
Smith, Miss Christiana B. 
Smith, Edward Brinton, 
Smvth, Mrs. Samuel, . . 
Stille, Dr. Charles J., . . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, 
Townsend, Henry C, , . 
Weightman, Mrs. John Farr 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . . 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, . 
Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, . 
Wister, Mrs. Caspar, . . 
Wood, Mrs, Howard, . . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, . . 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K., 
Wyeth, Stuart, 



46 



Annual members (for 1895) who have subscribed not less than five 
dollars : 



Ashhurst, Richard L , . . . 
Ashhurst, Mrs Richard L., 
Bartol, Mrs. C. C, . . . 
Bartol, Henry G,, . . . . 
Bergner, Mrs. C. William, 
Bergner, Miss Catharine, 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. Lawrence, 
Carter, Mrs. William T., . 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampton 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . 
Cohen, Miss Mary M., . . 

Colket, G. L , 

Corlies, Miss Margaret L., 
Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth P 
Curtin, Mrs. Roland G., 

Dana, Charles E 

Dana, Mrs. Charles E., 
Day, Frank Miles, . . 
De Haven, Mrs. Holsteii 
Denniston, Arthur C, . 
Dissel, Charles, . . . 
Dissel, Mrs. Charles, . 
Duane, Russell, . . . 
Durant, Miss Ethel, 
Eisenbrey, Miss Alice Edith 
Eisenbrey, Miss Sarah H , 
Gest, Mrs. William. . . . 
Grant, Mrs. W. S., jr.. . . 
Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C, . 



$5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



Harrison, John, $5 00 

Harrison, Mrs. John 5 00 

Harrison, Miss Maud S., ... 5 00 

Howell, Charles H., .... 5 00 

McFadden, Mrs George, . . 5 00 

Mortwitz, Joseph, Jr., .... 5 00 

Nichols, W. J 5 00 

Norris, Miss Clara G 5 00 

Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . . . 5 00 

Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . . 5 00 

Pepper. Mrs. John W., .... 5 00 

Randolph, Miss Anna, .... 5 00 

Randolph, Mi.ss Elizabeth J, . 5 00 

Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood, . 5 00 

Reyburn, Mrs. W. S., . . . . 5 00 

Roberts, Mrs. G. W. B., . . . 5 00 

Roberts, Mrs. Harry, .... 5 00 

Rol)erts, Thomas, 5 00 

Roberts, Thomas, Jr , . . . . 5 oo 

Rogers, Miss Mary, 5 00 

Simpson, Mrs. William, ... 5 00 

Siter, Mrs, J. HoUingsworth, . 5 00 

Smith, Harrison Hoxie, ... 5 00 

Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, ... 5 00 

Walker, Mrs. R. J. C., ... 5 00 

Williams, Mrs, Francis Howard, 5 00 

Winpenny, Mrs. J. Bolton, . . 5 00 

Zell, Miss H. A., 5 00 



HONORARY MEMBERS, 

Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

C. H, Hutchins, President Knowles Loom Works. 

Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Mrs. M. C. Crompton, President Crompton Loom Works. 

Horace Wyman, Vice-President Crompton Loom Works. 

Justin A. Ware, Treasurer Crompton Loom Works. 

Lorenzo Maynard, Maynard, Mass, 

J, C. Cochran, President Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

James Boyd, Philadelphia. 



47 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witness, 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns^ all that certain \_here insert a 
description of the property] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



1 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE TWENTY-FIRST 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MEMBERS 



For the Year endintr December 31, 1896. 



PHILADELPHIA, 

1897. 



OFFICERS FOR 1897 



PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, JOHN T. MORRIS. 

TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. DALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, 

DALTON DORR. LESLIE W. MILLER. 

ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

RICHARD CADBURY, 

735 Drexel Building. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 

The Governor of the State, The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Byron P. Moulton, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

Merrill A. Furbush, Appointed by Common Council. 

Samuel Gustine Thompson, Appointed by the Cofnmissioners of Fainnount Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To serve for three years : 

Robert K. McNeely, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, Isaac H. Clothier, 

Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D. 

To serve for two years : 

A. C. Harrison, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt, 

Charles E. Dana. 

To serve for one year : 

John T. Morris, Charles H. Cramp, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

Theodore C. Search. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1897. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

William Platt Pepper, Chairman ; Stuart Wood, T. C. Search, William 
Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, R. K. McNeely, A. C. Harri- 
son, Charles E. Dana, J. S. Jenks, John T, Morris, Isaac H. Clothier. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 

ART. 

Charles E. Dana, Chairman; Samuel Gustine Thompson, Wilson Eyre, 
Jr., John J. Boyle, Frank Miles Day. 

MUSEUM. 

J. S. Jenks, Chairman : J. T. Morris, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., A. C. Harrison, 
Crawford Arnold, Dalton Dour, ex officio, Mrs. John Harrison, Miss Anna 
Blanchard, Miss Elizaheth C. Roberts, Miss Magee, Mrs. Jones Wister, 
Mrs. E D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

INSTRUCTION. 

T. C. Search, Chairman ; Wm. Wood, J; S. Jenks, Isaac II, Clothier, M. A. 
FuRBUSH, Chas. E. Dana, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 
Miss Ada Muhlenberg Crozer, Miss Leach, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 

C. N. Weygandt, Chairvian ; Stuart Wood, J. S. Jenks, T. C. Search, 
Byron P. Moulton. 



* The President is ex officio a member of all Committees. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Report see page 43. 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, 

MRS. JOHN SANDERS. 



SECRETARY, 

MISS FANNIE S. MAGEE. 



TREASURER, 

MRS. E. E. DENNISTON. 



Mrs. S. H. Austin, 


Miss Leach, 


Mrs. Singerly Batch, 


Mrs. Craige Lippincott, 


Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 


Miss Ellen McMurtrie, 


Mrs. C. William Bergner, 


Mrs. Daniel S. Newhall, 


Miss Anna Blanchard, 


Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 


Mrs. William T. Carter, 


Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 


Miss Mary Cohen, 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Miss Margaret L. Corlies, 


Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, 


Miss Ada M. Crozer, 


Mrs. Jones Wister, 


Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison, . 
Mrs. Joseph HARRisoN,1'^'^-V^'''t'1i 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 


Mrs. Theodore Voorhees, 


Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 


Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 


Mrs. Richard Henry Lee, 


Miss Zell. 


HONORARY 


MEMBERS. 


Mrs. Daniel H. Hastings, 


Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, 


Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, 


Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 


Mrs. Frank Reeder, 


Mrs. Caspar Wister, 


Mrs Aubrey H. Smith, 


Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 


Mrs. Matthew Simpson, 





THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM, 

Organized as a Museum of Industrial Arts, has grown far beyond the limits set 
for it at first. The pictures and statuary in the Bloomfield-Moore collection and the 
food-products in the collection of British India indicate its present scope. Its divis- 
ion into departments, under the supervision of specialists, has been undertaken. 
Those already organized comprise : 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY. 
Edwin Atlee Barber, Honorary Curatoi-. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 
F. D. Langenheim, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Chas. D. Clark, Honorary Curator. 



Dalton Dorr, Director of the Museum. 
M, D. Woodnutt, Assistant. 
William Lindsay, Superintendent. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 

Comprises in its organization the following Departments : 
School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 
School of Decorative Painting. 
School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
School of Applied Design. 
School of Wood Carving. 
School of Decorative Sculpture. 
School of Architectural Design. 
School of Interior Decoration. 
School of Illustration. 
School of Normal Art Instruction. 
School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 

L. W. Miller, Principal. 

Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School, 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 

Bradley C. Algeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in Textile 

Design and Mechanical Drawing. 
Charles X. Harris, Professor of Drawing. 
Charles E. Dana, Professor of Water-Color Painting. 
Paul Lachenmeyer, Professor of Sculpture. 
CONYERS B. Finckel, Professor of Chemistry. 

A. M. Grillon, Director of School of Modern Languages and Instructor in French. 
Florence C. Fetherston, Instructor in Design Applied to Printed Fabrics. 
William Laird Turner, Instructor in Design Applied to Woven Fa!)rics. 
Frank X. Bell, Instructor in Wood Carving. 
William Roebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Related Branches. 
James P. Jamieson, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Architectural Design. 
Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 
Elizabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Pen-and-ink Drawing. 
Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patent Laws. 
Joseph C. Haas. Instructor in Dyeing. 

Joseph H. Shinn, Jr., Instructor in Design applied to Textiles. 
John F. Scott, Instructor in Carding and Spinning. 
A. M. Schmidt- Grillon, Instructor in German. 

Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Drawing and Design. 
Ferdinand Lazzaro Marenzana, Instructor in Drawing. 
Raymond T. Walters, Instructor in Drawing. 

M. Louise Van Kirk, Lecturer on Methods of Teaching and of the Kindergarten. 
Thomas B. Ridington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 
Norman E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Roberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand Loom Department, 
Alfred Burhouse, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 
J. M. WOELFEL, Instructor in Wet Finishing. 

Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building and Instructor in Wood Work. 
Leonora J. C. Boeck, Registrar. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL or INDUSTRIAL ART. 
TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



^The year which has closed for us to-day has Ijeen an anxious one 
for all who are interested in this School. The withholding of the 
$4o,oco voted to us by the Pennsylvania Legislature for 1896 made it 
necessary to secure this amount from other sources in order that the 
work of the School should be carried on. The Trustees, aided most 
efficiently as usual by the Associate Committee of Women, succeeded 
in raising enough to meet our actual expenses, and by rigid economy, 
wherever it was possible, the work has gone on this winter with in- 
creasing success. 

In the early summer a lot of valuable cotton machinery was given 
to us, and Mr. France and his assistants in the Textile Department put 
this machinery in running order during the summer with their own 
hands and personal labor, by giving up their vacation to do it, and 
the School only paid for the actual materials used at cost, and in some 
cases even these were given by manufacturers deeply interested in the 
success of the School. 

In the Art Department, Mr. Stratton worked all summer to make 
the admirable changes now to be seen in his Department, and nothing 
could induce any of them to leave this building until all was rearranged 
and the School entirely ready to receive the pupils in September at 
the opening. Such practical devotion to duty is as rare as it is grati- 
fying, and I know that I am right in saying that all connected with 
the active management of this Institution are as deeply touched as I 
am by the fine spirit they have shown by their voluntary work. To 
all of them I offer the most sincere thanks of the Trustees and the 
Associate Committee of Women. 



The Free Scholarships (22) given to the State of Pennsylvania were 
carried by this Institution out of its depleted treasury, as no money 
was forthcoming with which to pay them. Let us hope this will never 
have to be done again. 

During the past summer, Mr. Miller, at the request of the Trustees, 
went to Europe to visit the Industrial Art Schools in various countries 
and find out what was being done. His interesting report published 
in the Times newspaper of September 6th, soon after his return, gives 
us much encouragement, and shows that we are working in the right 
direction. 

I must tell that one of the largest manufacturers of New England 
visited the School before the opening in the early autumn, and was 
very much surprised to see our new cotton machinery (the very latest 
and best) set up in the School and ready for use, when he had not yet 
gotten it in his factory, although it was then in process of installment 
there. So, you see, Philadelphia is not so slow after all ; and we owe 
this triumph to the earnest and self-denying work of Mr. France, the 
head of the Textile Department. 

You will hear in detail from the reports of the Associate Committee 
of Women, the Principal of the School, and of its various departments, 
and from the report of the Director of the Museum, the progress which 
has been made during the year just passed, and there is much that is 
very gratifying and encouraging. 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, 

Pj-esident, 



REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

The history of the Museum for the year is one of continued devel- 
opment in its chief departments and of extension in various direc- 
tions of its sphere of usefulness. The list of gifts and loans annexed 
to this report is remarkable for the number, value and variety of the 
articles added to the collections. It is, too, a gratifying evidence 
that this branch of the Institution is maintaining a strong and vigor- 
ous growth. 

Noteworthy accessions have been made to the Department of Coins 
and to the Department of American Pottery. The growth of the 
latter department has been such as to require a rearrangement of the 



14 

entire collection. The need for more floor space and for more cases, 
to which I referred in my report of last year, has brought the Museum 
to a point where a systematic and effective grouping of the exhibits 
becomes a matter of great difficulty. 

The Department of Textiles and Embroidery has received valuable 
additions from Mrs. John Harrison, personally, and from those whom 
she has interested in her work. Additional display screens were pro- 
vided, but the problem of effective arrangement, to which I have just 
alluded, is perhaps more difficult of solution here than in any other 
part of the Museum. 

The most important single acquisition to the collections is the 
stone Memorial Altar designed by Mr. Charles M. Burns and sculp- 
tured by Mr. Robert D. Kelley for the Memorial Church of the Advo- 
cate, in this city. This striking work has been placed on view here 
pending the completion of the church building. 

Through the generosity of our honored President, the Museum 
Committee has been enabled to add to its copy of the Siena pulpit a 
model of a portion of the column around which the pulpit staircase 
winds. Thus, by this gift we have here, in one group, the pulpit, the 
staircase and the column, reproduced exactly as they appear in the 
Cathedral at Siena. 

Early in the Spring a warm friend of the Institution conceived the 
idea of offering a series of money prizes to the pupils of the public 
schools for a competition in drawing, the subjects to be selected from 
objects on view in the Museum, and a second similar series to the stu- 
dents of the several art schools in the city. This gentleman gener- 
ously provided the prizes, and Mrs. Alice Barber Stephens, Mr. 
Thomas P. Anschutz and Mr. Howard F. Stratton kindly consented 
to act as judges. Although a large number of children were seen 
drawing in the galleries after the competition was announced, for 
some unexplained reason only seventy-four drawings were sent in. 
From these the selections were made, the prizes, amounting to $75, 
being presented to the successful competitors on the 19th of June. 
The judges, in their report, said : 

"The Committee regards the showing as encouraging. Many of 
the subjects were well chosen and well handled, and an especially 
good feature was the fact that most of the best single drawings were 
accompanied by several other studies of the same pupil, indicating 
an earnestness very praiseworthy. This was markedly the case with 



15 

the winners of the High School prizes and the first Grammar School 
prize." 

In May Mr. Charles M. Ffoulke, of Washington, on the invitation 
of the Trustees, delivered two lectures in the School Auditorium on 
the subject of Tapestries, illustrating them by examples from his 
famous private collection. Subsequent to the lectures Mr. Ffoulke 
generously permitted the tapestries to be placed on exhibition in the 
Museum for a limited period, where they attracted very general atten- 
tion. So far as I know, this was the first exhibition of tapestries ever 
held in Philadelphia. 

In order that persons visiting the Museum may see there a fitting 
representation of the work that is done at its school, the whole of the 
north vestibule of Memorial Hall has been devoted to a display illus- 
trating the courses, methods and results of the instruction in the 
several departments of the School. 

In view of the comparatively small number of persons visiting the 
Museum in the forenoon of Sundays, it was decided early in the year 
not to open the building until i o'clock on that day. This is in con- 
formity with the practice generally observed by museums elsewhere, 
and gives the employes a portion of that day for rest. 

Beginning with the ist of December, a public long-distance tele- 
phone-station was placed in Memorial Hall. 

During the year 282,475 persons visited the Museum. Of these, 
126,968 were Sunday visitors. 

Following is the list of gifts, loans and purchases made during the 
year : 

Gifts were received from : 

Mr. Joseph H. Paist, Chief Clerk Select Council : 

Photographs (32) of Centennial Commissioners of 1876, framed. 

Miss Elizabeth R. Blight: 

Large Porcelain Vase, Chinese. 

Mr. a. B. Haring: 

Earthen Plate, Dish and Whistle, made in Bucks Co., Pa., 1831-40. 
Slip Cup, with Quill, earthen, very old. 

Mr. Charles F. Haseltine: 

Illuminated Manuscript on Vellum. Taken from safe in the Haseltine Build- 
ing after the fire of February 2, 1896, melted into a solid mass. 

Mr. Charles Wingender & Bro. : 
Clay Design for a Beer Mug. 



Mr. John T. Morris : * 

Porcelain Pitcher, Phoenixville Pottery, 1884. 
Cream Ware Vase, Phcenixville Pottery, 1884. 
Bowl, earthenware, made by James Clews, Troy, Ind., 1837. 
Pitcher, earthenware, Bennington, Vt , 1849. 
Pan, earthenware, Bennington, Vt,, 1849. 
Large Porcelain Vase, Japanese, Kochi ware. 
Saddle and Stirrups, inlaid with pearl, Japanese. 
Hanging Lantern, porcelain open-work, Japanese. 
Two belleek Vases, Willetts Mfg. Co., Trenton. 
Decorated Cup and Saucer, Willetts Mfg. Co., Trenton. 
Large Porcelain Vase, blue and white, Ceramic Art Co., Trenton. 
Two small Vases and one Jug, Ceramic Art Co., Trenton. 
Rose Bowl, carved belleek, Ceramic Art Co., Trenton. 
Tray, white belleek, Morris & Willmore, Trenton. 
Tray, "pate sur pate," Morris & Willmore, Trenton. 
Large Vase, Etruria delft, Cook Pottery Co., Trenton. 
Teapot and Cream Jug, American Pottery Co., Jersey City, 1840. 
Transparency, white Parian, Phoenix Pottery, 1870. 
Dish, earthen, inscription in German, Pennsylvania, 1789. 
Dish, earthen, slip traced, inscription in German, Montgomery Co., Pa., 1800. 
Bronze Door, inlaid with silver and niello, from ancient Arab mosque. 

Miss Sarah Stevenson Cox : 
Danish Whiskey Bottle. 
Champagne Glass, very old. 

Two Plates and Cup and Saucer of Canton porcelain. 
Tureen, earthenware, blue and white, English. 
Tam O'Shanter Pitcher, W. Ridgway & Co., England, 1835. 
Two baskets, birch bark, embroidered by Indians, from Niagara, 1854. 

Willetts Manufacturing Co., Trenton : 
Two small decorated belleek Trays, 

LiEUT.-CoL. John P. Nicholson : 

Fifty-two Coins, Medals, Tokens, Badges, etc. 
Earthenware Cup taken from the rains of great Boston fire. 

Hon, J. Hart Brewer : 

Three small earthenware Medallions. 
One small Parian Head. 

Messrs. Morris & Willmore, Trenton, N. J.; 

Small belleek Vase, and same in clay to show process. 
Chocolate Jug, decorated porcelain, " The Santa Maria." 

Mrs. John Harrison : 

Peasant's comb, carved horn, from the Austrian Tyrol. 

Three Examples of Lace, Drawn Work and Embroidery, i6th century 



17 

Mr. Edwin A. Barber : 

Two Pitchers, Wannopee Pottery Co., New Milford, Conn., 1895. 

Stoneware Design for Beer Mug, Wingender Bros.^ Haddonfield, N. J, 

Stoneware Insert for Beer Mug, Wingender Bros., Haddonfield, N. J. 

Stamp for decorating Beer Mug, Wingender Bros., Haddonfield, N. J. 

Five Stamps for making Majolica, Phoenixville Pottery, before 1890. 

Slip Cup, with three Quills for decorating earthen plates. 

Small Wooden Wheel, used to decorate earthen dishes. 

Earthen Pie Dish, unglazed, to show method. 

Three Tiles, portraits in relief, American Encaustic Tiling Co., Zanesville, O. 

Two pairs of porcelain Sleeve Buttons, Greenpoint, L. I. 

Eight porcelain Buttons, campaign phrases, etc., Trenton, N. J. 

Loving Cup, unglazed to show method. 

Four Glass Bottles, early American manufacture. 

Fragment of Oil Cup from old pottery at Sellersville. 

Messrs. Barbour Bros., New York : 
Case of Flax Threads. 

RooKWOOD Pottery, Cincinnati, O. : 

Pitcher, gray stoneware, with head of Garfield. 

Eight decorated Vases. 

Mug, with cover and metal fittings. 

Dr. E. S. Vanderslice : 

Fourteen pieces Japanese Pottery, modern. 

Mrs. John Crosby Brown, Orange, N. J. : 

Collection of Chinese Musical Instruments, six in number. 

Madame Von Schindler, Vienna, Austria : 
Seven specimens of rare old Laces. 

Mr: Clarence B. Moore : 

Arbalest, or Cross Bow, European, XVI. Century. 

Collection of European Arms and Armor of the XVI. and XVII. Centuries, 

forty-eight pieces. 
Collection of Aboriginal Weapons, Implements, etc., from Florida and Ohio, 

thirty-three pieces. 
Collection of Aboriginal Pottery from graves and mounds in Tennessee, eighteen 

pieces. 

Prof. Maxwell Sommerville : 

Vase, silver on marble base. Formerly the property of Pope Pius IX. 

Mr. Daniel G. Ripley, Pittsburg, Pa. : 
Glass Pitcher, *' solid gold " decoration. 

Mr. Alfred B. Evans : 

Loving Cup, William Penn decoration, Charles Volkmar, Corona, L. I. 
Liberty Bell, miniature copy in porcelain, Morris & Willmore, Trenton. 
Two Porcelain " Napoleon " Pitchers, Morris & Willmore, Trenton. 

2 



I8 

Dr. Marcus Benjamin, Washington, D. C. : 

Pair Porcelain Sleeve Buttons, Greenpoint, L. I. 

Mr. George W. Haig : 

Teapot of black " Basaltes," England, 1790, 

Mr. Daniel O'Hara, Waltham, Mass. : 

Nine Porcelain Buttons, decorated by the O'Hara-Waltliam Dial Co. 
Thirty-two examples of Enamelling on Metal, OTIara- Waltham Dial Co. 

Miss R, A. Reeder : 

Sugar Bowl, pewter, engraved, about 1750. 

Mr. a. S. Villee, Lancaster, Pa. : 

Damascus Blade, pair Silver Spurs, Spy Glass, Boot Hooks, Pearl Snuff Box, 
all used by Captain H. W. De Ville during Napoleon's wars. 

Mr. Edward Lycett, Atlanta, Ga. 
" Murrhine " Tile, framed. 

Mr, John Harrison : 

Sledge and Tandem Harness, European, XVHI, Century. 

Mr. Edwin Bennett, Baltimore, Md. : 

Rockingham Pitcher, Edwin Bennett Pottery Co. 

Ohio Valley China Co., Wheeling, W. Va. : 

Nine examples of their manufacture. Cream Pitchers, Cup and Saucer, Plate, 
Tiles, etc. 

Loans were made by ; 

Mr, Dalton Dorr : 

Plaster Statuette, " The Bather." , 

Ancient Wood Carving, " The Nativity." 
Javanese Marionette. 

Miss Sarah Stevenson Cox : 

Three decorated Porcelain Vases. 

Small Terra Cotta Tazza by " Ipsen Veuve." 

Wedgwood Pitcher. 

Mr. F. D. Langenheim : 

Two small colored Prints, framed, S. Germany, middle of XVIH. Century. 

Brass Snuffers, Tinder Box, Flint and Steel, S. Germany, middle of XVHI. 
Century. 

Shoe Horn, Compass and Sun Dial, S. Germany, middle of XVHI. Century. 

Seal, Brass, with initials and crest, S. Germany, middle of XVHI. Century, 

Seal Ring, with initials and crest, S. Germany, middle of XVHI. Century. 
Mr. Gus. Wolter : 

Two framed Panels of carved wood. 
Mrs. John Harrison : 

Lace Maker's Pillow with Lace. 



19 

Mr. John T. Morris: 

Collection of Egyptian mortuary relics. 

Mr. Robert D. Kelley : 

Polyhedron of Glass, English, Inscription dated 1807. 

Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore : 

Greek Silver Coin of Alexander. 

Dr. Clement Biddle : 

Tea Set of Silver, six pieces, made in Canton, China. 

Set of Brushes, Comb, Shoe Horn, etc., carved ivory, Chinese. 

The Misses Bethell : 

Pair of old India Porcelain Vases, with covers. 

City of Philadelphia (from Independence Hall) : 

Pair large Sevres Vases given to the City by the French Government in 1876. 

Mr. W. W. Watson, Jr. : > 

Small Terra Cotta Jug, made by slave labor in S. Carolina, 1859. 

Mr. John I. Burtt : 

Mahogany Knife Box with half dozen Knives and Forks, early XIX, Cen- 
tury. 

Miss Rosa Warr : 

Brocade vSilk Gown and Pearl Necklace of Anne Boleyn. 

Miss Annie Milnes : 

Five Old Dolls, from Warwickshire, England. 
Toy Trunk, from Warwickshire, England. 
Metal Teapot, from Warwickshire, England. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society : 

Coins, Medals and Notes, etc., forty-two in number. 

Mr. Jackson McElmell. 1 

Mr. Wm. C. Williamson, \- Committee of Loyal Legion. 

Mr. Frederick Schober, j 

Bronze Bust of Melville, on marble pedestal. 

Purchases for the Museum : 

Four Earthenware Pitchers. 

Two Earthenware Mugs. 

One Stoneware Mug. 

Two Greco-Roman Lamps. 

One Bronze Bracelet, Roman. 

Chroma Lithograph, Arundel Society Subscription. 

Twenty-six pieces Campaign Pottery and Glassware. 



20 

Accessions to the Library by purchase ; 

The Holy Carpet of the Mosque at Ardebil, by Edward Stebbing. 
Catalogues of Coins and Medals, by Lyman H. Low. 
Old Plate, by J. H. Buck. 

By gift from : 

Mr. Stanislaus V. Henkels, Mr. Clarence B. Moore, Mr. A. S. Villee, Mr. Wil- 
liam Piatt Pepper, Gorham Manufacturing Co., National Academy of Design, New 
York, Detroit Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts, Cincinnati Museum Association. 

DALTON DORR, 

Directoi' of the Museum. 



21 



J 






CO 


o 












p 


VO 







n 


CO 




^ 


,, 


^ 


Ov 


in 


in 










vC 




en 


00 


ro 








VO 







Cl 


o" 










!>. 


< 






f; 


r- 


q; 


in 


f) 


Ov 






OO 


'=z 




oo 


m 


TT 











t 


« 


s 


















































o" 






6s 


oo" 




(N 


vo' 




00 


Cl' 


cT 


« 




Ov 


civ 


Cl 


N 




in 


ON 








m 


in 


VO 




00 






VO 






Ov 


CO 




t^ 


oo 


00 


O 


'^ 1 


















" 




cl 


CI 




CI 


rn 






m 


m 




_ 


















































^ 
























































ro 


VO 


oo 


CD 


-<J- 


M 


CI 


VD 


o\ 


VO 


o\ 


in 


VO 


O 


Ov 


T^ 


^ 


en 





w 












Ul 


r^ 


f^ 


O) 


in 


o 




Ov 




Ov 


r-. 






VO 







in 


















Ov 










". 


t^ 




t>. 




5 








i~; 


vO_ 




















































S 
















VO 


m 


-^ 










dv 


VO 




t^ 








Cl" 


















































a 














































-i 
< 


















































H 


















































u 














































H 


^ 






o% 


<N 


00 


Ov 


^ 


^ 


Ov 


00 


o 


m 


-^ 


H 


M 


00 


o 





w 





Cl 


00 


a 


£ 






VO 








oc 


m 


t^ 


oo 


ro 






VO 




Ov 


Ov 


-i- 




00 


m 


VO 






t^ 












0_ 






vO__ 








cc_ 


in 


0_ 








CJv 


z 




c- 












„" 


o' 


in 


o" 


o' 


o" 


'l- 


r^ 


„■ 








'6" 


„■" 


oo" 




< 


3 


^ 
























CI 










N 


Cl 






as 


>> 










































O 














































it 










































V 


^ 


m 





cs 


ov 


„ 





„ 


H 


n 


vO 


in 





m 


^ 


m 


r^ 


„ 


Tl- 


00 


_5 








r^ 


VO 


VO 


VD 


m 




-^ 





r^ 




ON 


m 


^ 


m 


t^ 













0_ 




OO 






qv 




^ 


ro 


in 




ov 




q_ 


Cl_ 




Ov 




r^ 














































u 


'J 


OS 










Ov 




c" 






Ov 


VO 


VO 




^ 


cP 








cjv 


c 














M 




W 


ro 


CI 




Cl 




m 


-a- 








O 


_o 






























































































































u 


3 










































-5 


!£ 


ro 


o 


ID 


in 


^ 





in 


^ 


t^ 


^ 


in 


O 


o 


„ 


f^ 


VO 


^ 


r^ 


in 


^ 




X 


OD 








ro 


m 


VO 


■«r 








in 


^ 






t--. 









H 






O 






VO__ 


t^ 




^ 


O; 




0__ 


^_ 


en 


Ov 


'o 


°°. 


r- 








u 














































^ 








T? 


ov 


d" 






co" 























Q. 




ro 












m 


M 




CI 








CO 




't- 


VO 






m 


C^ 


3 


































































































































































































































00 














00 


VO 










vD 







vO 










•o 




CO 


m 


VO 


VO 






^ 




CI 


o 


VO 





Ov 


CO 







VO 
















vO__ 


C7v 




vO_ 








































































t^ 























VO 







VO 







00 


VO 




< 


H 














C) 






m 


•^ 


m 


in 




m 


en 


in 


^ 








>> 


" 






















































































-— 




VO 


ID 


m 


f) 


Ov 


Ov 


o 


1^ 


„ 


-1- 


Ov 


in 


in 


t^ 


r^ 


„ 


„ 


m 


f^ 


>, 


y 






0\ 


VC 


rn 







m 


CI 


VO 


Ov 


t^ 


-^ 




t^ 







T^ 




Ov 


'C 




VO 


VO 


VD 




VO 





















r~- 






VO 


00 














































o 












vo' 


Ov 




VO 


Ov 






m 


oo' 


o' 




Ov 






Ov 


'— > 


a 


t 

2 














w 






w 












VO 




VO 


CO 










































H 


"5 








































"J 


-£ 




w 




t^ 


VO 


in 




gv 


~t 


ro 


1- 




Cl 


VO 


t^ 










00 








C-l 


^ 


CO 


f-. 


Ov 








Ov 














00 


\o 


vO 






c 










N 


ro 


VO 








m 








oo_ 


vO_ 


in 


0_ 


vO_ 


<»^ 






























































rn 


CO 


Ov 






l-C 




vc' 




vo" 




cT 


dv 






5 


ci 
























m 


ro 


Cl 


d 




en 


fn 


Cl 












































o 










































c 


U 














































8 


o 










VO 








VO 




m 




VO 


Ov 


N 


Ov 


o 


>. 






00 


Ov 


O 


ON 


VO 


VO 




VO 





rn 


Tf- 


in 


Ov 


m 


VO 


m 


in 


rn 






_o 




in 


c 


VO 


°° 


vO_ 






°°. 


Cl_ 


0_ 


Ov 






rn 




r-. 


vO_ 
















































s 












vo" 






oo 


O. 






c> 


o" 


t^ 




rC 






rn 


VO 


-~ 


-^ 


■~ 








>-• 


" 


" 






CI 


CI 




m 


en 


CO 


m 


^ 


m 


-^ 







^ vc 



< 

t 2 



vH^ 



Ov -* 

^ o" 




An Alcove in the School of Drawing. 



THE SCHOOL. 



The development of the School continues on very much the same 
lines, and, in all essential particulars, at about the same rate as that 
which has been in progress ever since the removal to the present loca- 
tion in 1893. 

While there is a slight falling off in the registration of pupils, this 
is confined to those attending special or partial courses only, the num- 
ber of students pursuing the full and regular courses of both the Art 
and Textile Schools being considerably larger than ever before, while 
the additions to our equipment and the extension of our facilities have 
been perhaps quite as important as those which any preceding year 
has witnessed. 



24 

During the summer the following changes were made in the arrange- 
ment of the classes and the disposition of the rooms. Finding that 
we should need for the use of the Art School the room which we had 
formerly invited the T-Square Club to occupy as a club-room, I noti- 
fied the Club to this effect a year ago, and the room was vacated by 
that organization at the end of the last School year in June, and the 
Classes in Decorative Painting and Design are now established in this 
room, which, by reason of its size and general attractiveness, is admi- 
rably adapted to this use. 

The large room adjoining this on the second floor of the north wing, 
and which was formerly used as a lecture-room, was assigned to the 
Class in Applied Design, so that all the work in color of the regular 
classes is kept together instead of being distributed through two floors 
of the building, as was the case before. 

The removal of the Classes in Applied Design allowed the large 
room, the occupancy of which they had previously shared with the 
two evening classes, to be set apart for the exclusive use of the evening 
classes — a most important improvement. 

The one large room on the third floor of the nortli wing, which re- 
mained unoccupied last year, was divided and fitted up, one-half as a 
lecture-room and the other half as a lunch-room, this last convenience 
making it possible to regulate and control a feature which had long 
given a good deal of trouble. 

In the south wing, occupied by the Textile School, the changes 
were still more extensive. 

The lecture-room was moved from the second to the third floor, two 
rooms being thrown into one, by the removal of a partition, to furnish 
the necessary space. The winding machinery, including silk reels 
loaned by the Women's Silk Culture Association, was installed in the 
room vacated in this way, and in the room on the same floor formerly 
occupied by the winding machinery were gathered all the looms which 
are devoted to silk weaving, thus forming a very complete silk depart- 
ment having the necessary separation from the other branches of tex- 
tile work. 

In the large room on the second floor the new machinery for cotton- 
spinning is being installed. A description of this machinery will be 
found in the list of donations and loans which is appended to this 
report. 

The hand-looms, with the exception of five which are kept for spe- 
cial work in a small room on the first floor, are all removed to the 




Hand-Loom Weaving-Room. 



third floor of the south wing, in the eastern half of which, unoccupied 
until now, all the looms used by the evening classes are installed. 

To make the rooms which have been taken for this new work ready 
for occupancy, a good deal had to be done to the building itself. To 
make possible the installation in the Textile School of the new cotton 
machinery, which is described later in this rei)ort, the floor of the 
second-story room was strengthened by the insertion of heavy string- 
pieces, which are carried on eight strong trusses. Three large skylights 
were let into the roof to light the room in which the hand-looms are 
installed ; and this room, as well as the new lecture-room, and the one 
occupied by the evening weaving classes, have been renovated and 
painted throughout. 

The engineering force has done a great deal of work in renewing 



26 

and rearranging the pipes of the heating system, which they sadly 
needed, and many of the larger rooms, as well as a good part of the 
outside woodwork, have been repainted. 

During the summer, Mr. Millard resigned his position as instructor 
of the evening classes in Architectural Drawing and Design, and we 
have secured as his successor Mr. James P. Jamieson, a former pupil 
of the School, and a man of much ability, who will be remembered as 
the winner of the first appointment to the Travelling Scholarship of 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

The most important addition to the equipment of the jjractical lab- 
oratories of the Textile School which has been made during the year 
was the installation of a complete set of machinery for the carding and 
spinning of cotton, which is described in detail in the list of donations. 

The addition is a most important and valuable one, and not only 
supplies about the only want that had existed in the apparatus of the 
laboratories, but it also occupies the last bit of available space in a 
building that looked so large to us when the School moved into it 
four years ago. 

We are now able to illustrate and to practice, in the most thorough 
way, every stage of the treatment which vegetable, as well as animal, 
fibres undergo in the manufacture of textiles. 

No more conclusive evidence is needed of the appreciation of our 
work on the part of the men whose lives are devoted to the actual 
work of production than is furnished by the generous gifts by the 
manufacturers of all this splendid machinery. 

That such things can be done at all through private liberality is the 
standing wonder of our relatives in Europe, where the most generous 
provision for all such instruction is regarded as one of the most 
urgent of public duties. That it is becoming to be so regarded in 
America is shown by recent legislation in Massachusetts, which has 
led to the establishment in that State of at least one, and possibly 
several, textile schools, which, while confessedly taking ours for a 
model, will command resources that have thus far been denied to us, 
and may prove formidable rivals for the leadership which we have 
hitherto enjoyed. 

If we can command the support to which we believe our success 
entitles us, we can easily retain that leadership. If it passes to others, 
we shall still have the satisfaction of recognizing in their achievement 
the triumph of principles and aims which we were the first to proclaim, 
and whose development is so identified with our name. 



27 

The third course of illustrated lectures under the auspices of the 
T-Square Club was given in the Auditorium as follows : 

"The Growth of Architecture in France," by Mr. Fred N. Mann, 
on January 2 2d, and on February 5th Mr. Walter Cope spoke on 
"Architecture and Architectural Accessories in Spain." 

In addition to the above, Mr. Claude de la Roche Francis gave two 
illustrated lectures on Heraldry, Costume and Ceremonial, on March 
20th and 27th, and on April 29th and May ist Mr. Charles M. Ffoulke, 
of Washington, gave two lectures on Tapestry, illustrated by an 
exhibition from his collection. 

The following lectures have also been given to the Textile School : 

A course on " Patents and Patent Laws," by Mr, Charles N. Butler. 

On "Hints on Successful Manufacturing," by Mr. John F. Bolger. 

On "The Manipulation of Fur as Related to the Manufacture of 
Hats," by Mr. Theodore C. Search. 

On " Selecting and Buying of Fine Wools for Worsted Yarn Manu- 
facture," by Mr. Charles H. Harding. 

On "Mill Economy and vSuperintendence," by Mr. Theodore C. 
Search. 

On "Finishing of Worsted and Woolen Fabrics," by Mr. Joseph 
M. Woelfel. 

On "Fibres Used in the Textile Arts," by Mr. Edward Atkinson, 
of Boston. 

Ninety-three books and pamphlets have been added to the Library 
during the year, of which ten were purchased and the remaining 
eighty-three donated by the Associate Committee of Women, the 
United States Government, the Metropolitan Museum, the Illinois 
State Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago, Mr. Thomas Willing 
Balch, Mr. Edward Biddle, Mr. Anson K. Cross, Dr. William N. Egle, 
State Librarian at Harrisburg ; Mr. W. F. Gurley, State Geologist of 
Illinois; Mrs. Charles Keen, Mrs. James Mifflin, Mr. L. W. Miller, 
Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, Mr. Hugo Schmidt, Mr. John B. Stetson and 
Mr. Louis Voisson, French Consul, besides four volumes on " Cos- 
tume," loaned by Mr. John T. Morris. 

This makes upwards of a thousand volumes at present in our 
Library. 

The School has also been the recipient of a number of valuable 
objects of industrial art during the year, including two vases, one a 
Minton, the other a Royal Berlin, the gift of Messrs. Bailey, Banks & 
Biddle; two Japanese vases, one of enamel, by the artist Kawabe, and 



28 

the other of porcelain, made by Takemoto Haito ; a bottle, a piece of 
Chinese bronze, and a kimono with obi, the gift of Mr. John T. 
Morris ; a collection of forty pieces of pottery from Cyprus, presented 
by Nicholas Lennig; a sample of Manchester (England) cotton 
weaving, and a silk and linen damask, presented by the firm of John 
Wanamaker; a German antique lamp, nut-cracker, Chantilly lace 
veil, white lace cape, four pewter plates and salvers, Bohemian glass 
bottle, three brass candlesticks, two German candlesticks, India table- 
cloth, two Dutch tiles, a Wedgwood pitcher, twelve fans, an alabaster 
lamp, two Brazilian woven cases, one Brazilian scourge, a Parian egg 
set, old German counterpane, colonial costume, coral necklace, antique 
bottles and jug, from Mrs. M, T. Keehmle and Miss Aspasia Eckert 
Ramborger ; twenty-one castings, moulds, cameos, medals, etc., four 
bronze statuettes, four candlesticks, a gourd, a Mexican vase, a dagger, 
a pair of horns and a blue and white platter, from the estate of A. A. 
Fesquet, through Mr. J. P. Murta, and a fancy basket from Mrs. Jones 
Wister ; two brass kettles, the gift of Miss Renshaw. 

A memorial window in memory of Mrs. Frederic R. Shelton was 
also presented to the School by Mr. Shelton. 

Two valuable paintings have been deposited in the School and are 
hung in the Library. They are "A Barnyard Scene," by Melchoir 
Hondekoeter, owned by Miss Adelaide Keen, and " The Entomb- 
ment," after Rubens, owned by Miss Estelle Pierce. 

The Textile School has received donations from the following firms : 

The Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass., i revolving 
flat card, i drawing frame, i railway head (complete), with services of 
one man to erect the same. Also i set of wrenches, i set of gauges 
for card, i trumpet and i reamer for railway head. 

Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I., i 8o-spindle filling 
frame, both two and three-quarter gauge, complete, with services of 
one man to erect the same. Also freight. 

Conestoga Mills, Lancaster, Pa., 5 looms for cotton, 5 harness 
capacity, reed space 40", single shuttle, English Clipper pattern. 

The Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass,, i box of iron cast- 
ings, I set of cams, top rollers complete, i silk loom, 37" reed space, 
4x4 box, with improved dobby and multiplier, with freight on the 
same. 

The American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass., 2 feed strip- 
pers and display case containing various samples of card clothing. 



29 

George Draper & Sons, Hopedale, Mass., i Northrop loom and i 
right-hand temple. 

Grosvenordale Co., North Grosvenordale, Conn., i specially dressed 
fine cotton warp, several hundred filling bobbins for Northrop loom. 

B. S. Roy, Worcester, Mass., i traverse grinder for grinding cylin- 
der and doffer at the same time. 

The Atvvood Machine Co., Stonington, Conn., i warper, i beamer, 

1 soft silk winder, i creel, 700 wood bobbins, i new warper, stop 
motion and parts to change quiller to new style. 

The American Drosophore Co., Boston, Mass., 2 centre drosophores, 
pipes and necessary fittings for installation in weave room, with services 
of one man to erect the same. 

Aerophore Air Moistening and Ventilating Co., Providence, R. I., 

2 vortex humidifiers, with pipes and necessary fittings for installation 
in the cotton-spinning room. 

Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I., i slubber, 
32 spindles, i intermediate, 42 spindles, i fine frame, 64 spindles and 
I set of socket wrenches. Services of one man to erect the same. 

Easton & Burnham Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I., i spooler, 32 
spindles, 7 feet 10 inches over all. 

The Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., i pair of beam stands, 
one whip roll, for 40" gem loom, a lot of electric wires, fifty drop 
wires for lamps and the loan of a Marvin safe. 

Sullivan Machinery Co., Claremont, N. H., 70 to x 36 inch Sullivan 
paper roving cans. 

General Fire Extinguisher Co., Philadelphia, installation of the 
Grinnell sprinkler system in the picker room of the School, consisting 
of fifteen sprinklers, with pipes and necessary fittings, with labor 
necessary to install the same. 

Edward Ingraham, Philadelphia, j twenty-harness positive raise and 
drop motion for a Thomas wood loom. 

The Philadelphia Spool and Bobbin Co., Philadelphia, mule and 
side drawing spools. 

James H. Billington & Co., Philadelphia, i small beam scale. 

Stanley G. Miller Co., Philadelphia, ^50 worth of mill supplies 
(heddles, brushes, belting, etc.). 

John Forrest, Philadelphia, bleaching and printing silk and worsted 
yarn. 

Crew, Levick & Co., Philadelphia, i barrel of stainless wool oil. 

R. Sergeson «Sj Co., Philadelphia, 2 dozen shuttles. 



36 

John M. Watts' Sons, Pniladelphia, 5 pounds of excelsior lubricant. 

John Lunn, Philadelphia, scouring 672 pounds of wool; also 25 
pounds of wool yarn. 

D. Trainer & Sons' Manufacturing Co., Trainer, Pa., 146 pounds 
2-40's cotton warp, 16 pounds of 2-30's cotton war}). 

Meding Manufacturing Co., Paterson, N. J., 6,35 pounds organ silk, 
1.72 pounds tram silk, i broad silk harness. 

Continental Worsted Mills, Philadelphia, 181 pounds of card-fly, 75 
pounds of wool noil. 

Sanquoit Silk Mills, Philadelphia, 3 pounds of organ silk. 

Lotte & Mazeres, Philadelphia, dyeing of the same. 

The John B. Stetson Co., Philadelphia, warping and spooling of the 
above for weaving ribbon in School colors. 

F. Muhlhauser «& Co., Cleveland, O., 500 pounds of fine shoddy. 

James Bowers' Sons, Chester, Pa., 113 pounds of shoddy. 

John G. Wright, Boston, Mass., 100 pounds of wool samples. 

Weston, Whitman & Co., Boston, Mass., check for $25 to purchase 
wool. 

Edward T. Steel & Co., Philadelphia, 100 pounds of noil. 

Sykes Bros., Philadelphia, 100 pounds of carpet yarn. 

Thomas Oakes & Co., Bloomfield, N. J., r case of yarn, 200 pounds. 

Concord Manufacturing Co., Pinacook, N. H., 20 pounds of wool 
yarn. 

W. A. Walton & Co., Richmond Switch, R. I., 50 pounds of woolen 
yarn. 

Cranston Worsted Mills, Bristol, R. I., 25 pounds of fancy knot 
yarns. 

Jeremiah Williams & Co., Boston, Mass., 100 pounds of scoured 
wool. 

Hallowell & Donald, Boston, Mass., 100 pounds of wool. 

Philip Jagode & Co., Philadelphia, i bag of scoured wool. 

Keyser, Fisler & Co., Philadelphia, 100 pounds of wool. 

Justice Bateman & Co., Philadelphia, 100 pounds of scoured wool. 

Fenno Bros. & Childs, Boston, Mass., 155 pounds of scoured wool. 

Bach, Becker & Co., Chicago, 111., 70 pounds of wool. 

Botany Worsted Mills, Passaic, N. J., 117 pounds of wool noil. 

Erben, Harding & Co., Tacony, Pa., 132 pounds of wool noil. 

Fairview Worsted Mills, Delaware Co., Pa., tt8 pounds of wool 
noil. 



3t 

Jamestown Worsted Mills, Jamestown, N. Y., loo pounds of wool 
noil. 

Broadhead Worsted Mills, Jamestown, N. Y., 88 pounds of wool 
noil. 

Wissahickon Worsted Mills, Manayunk, Pa., loo pounds of wool 
noil. 

Jagode & Lewis, Philadelphia, loo pounds of wool noil. 

Rowland Croft, Sons & Co., Camden, N. J., 115 pounds of wool 
noil. 

Alleghany Worsted Mills, Philadelphia, Pa., 129 pounds of wool 
noil. 

Yewdall & Jones Bros., W, Philadelphia, 103 pounds of wool noil. 

Arlington Mills, Lawrence, Mass., 100 pounds of wool noil. 

National and Providence Worsted Mills, Providence, R. L, 128 
pounds of white wool noil. 

Woonsocket Worsted Mills, Woonsocket, R. I., 112 pounds of wool 
noil. 

Weybosset Mills, Providence, R. L, 100 pounds of wool noil. 

Goodall Worsted Co., Sanford, Me., 103 pounds of wool noil. 

Abbott &: Co., Graniteville, Mass., 100 pounds of wool noil. 

Charles Bond, Philadelphia, 22 pounds of English raw leather, 1-6 
dozen scoop-pickers. 

Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., Chester, Pa., 3000 heddles. 

Grundy Worsted Co., Bristol, Pa., 117 pounds of white noil. 

Fred. Hartley, Boston, Mass., 100 pounds of wool. 

C. Moore &: Co., Philadelphia, 10^ pounds braided lacing cord, 
15^ pounds mule banding, i ball of loom cord, i pound cable linen 
cord, and various kinds of Jacquard twines. 

Barbour Bros., New York, samples of flax from the seed to the fin- 
ished thread. 

J. & B. Coates, Newark, N. J., samples of cotton from the raw state 
to the spooled thread. 

William Emsley & Bro., Philadelphia, creel for cards. 

J. Mullineaux, Jr., Philadelphid, 100 pounds 20/2's skeins. 

Binns Patent Band Co., Philadelphia, 400 mule bands and 30 twister 
bands and hooks. 

The John B. Stetson Co., Philadelphia, loan of one 20-horse power 
steam engine. 

Courtesies were extended by the following firms : Philadelphia Tex- 
tile Machine Co., Jackson Patent Shell Roll Co., Jacob Miller, Sons & 



32 

Co., and to the Carding and Spinning Department by Mr. John Lunn, 
Southwark Mills Co., Beswick Sc Kay, George Campbell & Co., Wil- 
liam Wood & Co., Fred Fowles and Frederick Jennings, all of Phila- 
delphia; B. Hamill & Co., of Germantown. 

Hooley & Sons, for respooling silk; Borich Mills and Firth »S: Fos- 
ter Bros., for wet finishing, George Draper & Sons, i dozen illustrated 
textile books; Pettee Machine Co., r dozen illustrated textile books. 

Laboratory and Dye-House. 
Raw wool from ; 

Justice, Bateman & Co., lo pounds samples. 

Erben, Harding & Co., lo pounds samples. 
Woolen and worsted yarns from : 

George Campbell & Co., 50 pounds worsted and woolen samples. 

Erben, Harding (^ Co., 50 pounds of worsted samples. 

O. H. Sampson & Co., 50 pounds worsted samples. 
Cotton yarns from : 

W. D'Olier & Co., 50 pounds samples. 

James E. Mitchell & Co., 50 pounds samples. 

Lieper Bros., 50 pounds F.amples. 

D. Trainer & Sons, odd samples. 
Soaps from : 

M. D. Hunter & Co., Reading, Pa., 25 pounds palm oil soap, 50 
pounds olive oil soap, 25 pounds fig soap, 50 pounds olive oil potash 
soap, box of samples. 

Holbrook Manufacturing Co., 50 pounds granulated alkali, 50 
pounds olive oil potash soap, 50 pounds olive oil soap, 25 pounds 
palm oil soap, box of samples. 
Dye-stuffs and chemicals from : 

William Pickhardt & Kuttroff, pound sample of alizarine powders. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfield Co., samples. 

Sharpless Dyewood Extract Co., 5 gallon-jars of extracts. 

Victor Koechl & Co., samples. 

Sykes & Street, samples. 

Kalle & Co., samples. 

O. S. Janney & Co., barrel of soda ash and box of cutch. 

New York & Boston Dyewood Co., samples. 

Avery Chemical Co., keg of lactic acid. 

Reed Holliday & Son, 10 pounds of Glauber's salts. 

Stamford Manufacturing Co., samples logwood extract. 



33 

Dale Extract Co., samples. 

The Theodore C. Search Library has also received a set of photo- 
graphs, handsomely bound, illustrating the process of wool combing 
by hand, presented by John Yewdall. 

For the School building, through Mr. Thompson, superintendent of 
the building : From the Holbrook Manufacturing Co., soaps and soap 
powders; from H. R. Bennett, 4 Stempel fire extinguishers; from E. 
N, Williams, floor dressing for school rooms. 

The Commencement Exercises were held in the Broad Street 
Theatre, on Friday afternoon, June 5th, and were followed by an 
exhibition of students' work at the School building, Broad and Pine 
Streets, with the usual garden party in the evening, the latter being 
under the auspices of the graduates. 

An address was made by Mr. S. N. D. North, of Boston, Mass., the 
secretary of the National Wool Manufacturers' Association, on the 
" Man and the Machine," with remarks by the President, Mr. William 
Piatt Pepper, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie and Mr. Theodore C. Search. 

The following prizes and certificates were awarded at the same time, 
the jury of award for the Frederic Graff and Henry Perry Leland 
prizes being Mrs. Alice Barber Stephens, Mr. Edgar V. Seeler and Mr. 
Frank Alleson Hayes, and for the Textile School prizes Mr. Charles 
Slamon, Mr. Thomas Capper and Mr. William H. Hampson. 

The Associate Committee of Women acted as a jury of the whole 
in awarding the prizes offered by them. 

ART SCHOOL. 

President's Prize for Best Set of Drawings Executed in the Course of 
Industrial Drawing.— Otto Charles Herokl. 

Honorable mention to Jane Hovey Allen. 

Frederick Graff Prize, ^^25. — Ira Wilson Hoover. 

(For work in Architectural Design; competed for by students in the evening 
class alone.) 

y/HENRY Perry Leland Prize, $25.— May Franklin, 
/ Honorable mention to Martha Walter. 
y(Given by Mrs. John Harrison for work in Pen and Ink.) 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN PRIZES. 

y First, $20. — Awarded for second best set of drawings in the Course of Industrial 
/ Drawing, to Martha Walter. 

Honorable mention to Helen Liming Redles and Mary P. Dow. 

Second, $10. — Oil-cloth design, to Anne Austin Snyder. 
/ Y Third, $10. — Wall-paper design to Nelle Lemert Montgomery. 

/ 3 



/v 



34 

}S Fourth, ;$io.— Satine, to Mary Robbins Humphreys. 

Maddock First Prize, ^20, — Frank W. Morris. 

Maddock Second Prize, $10, — Emma Slater. 

(Given through the Associate Committee of Women by Mr. Thomas Maddock, ol 
Trenton, N. J., for design for a jardiniere.) 
' ^ The Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20, for Best Work in Drawing. — 
Awarded to Nellie Adelina Kulling. 
X 1'he Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20, for Best Work in Modeling. — 
To Agnes Bowman Slaymaker. 

The Mrs, Aubrp:y H. Smith Prizes for Best Work in Water Color ; 

Equal Prizes of $12.50. — To Matilda French Whitall and Daniel Everett Sutton. 

Weber Prize. — Helen Liming Redles. 

Honorable mention to Milton Paul Herbert and Elizabeth Y^. Roebuck. 

(Given by F. Weber & Co, for work in Instrumental Drawing.) 

RiPKA Prize. — Matilda French Whitall. 

(Given by Ripka & Co, for work in Color,) 

Weil & Taws Prize. — Daniel Everett Sutton, 

(Given by Weil & Taws for Flower Painting.) 
X The Caroline Axford Magee Special Prize, $20, for Drawing from the 
Antique, — Awarded to Henry J. Kane, 

(Given by Miss Fannie S. Magee.) 

Industrial Art Society Scholarship. — Anne Smyth Bowman. 

(Awarded for earnestness and progress.) 

Class C. — Sophie Bertha Steele, Fred, Haeseler. 

Class B, — Earl Stetson Crawford, Mary Hyde Graff", Charles Joseph Henkels, 
Mary Robbins Humphreys, Nellie Adelina Kulling, Amy Kennedy Luff'man, Nelle 
Lemert Montgomery, Norma Isabelle Simpson, Anne Austin Snyder, Mary Hastings 
Vaughan. 

Interior Decoration.— Daniel Everett Sutton, Matilda French Wliitall. 

Teachers' Certificate, — Hannah Louise Adolphson, Anne Balderston, Mary 
Robbins Humphreys, Francis Carpenter Pyle, Agnes Bowman Slaymaker, Raymond 
Walters. 

Certificates, Class A. — Jane Hovey Allen, Mary Delany Babcock, Lillian 
Theresa Boone.. Annie Myrtle Brinton, Jacob Louis Chalfin, Grace Elizabeth Coale, 
Mary Pickering Dow, Hiram Augustus Farrand, Julius Carl Frederick Goll, Milton 
Paul Herbert, Otto Charles Herold, Mabel Farr Higgs, Bertha Marguerite Earned, 
Marie Edith Long, Sara Elliott Levis, Gertrude Lea Mann, Edward Roy Parsons, 
Anna Rice, Bessie Estelle Rice, Helen Liming Redles, Elizabeth Emma Roebuck, 
Edith Bitner Snyder, Emma Slater, Sophie Bertha Steele, Louise Kemlo Tultle, 
Meta Vaux Warrick, Martha Walter, Reba Whelan. 

Diplomas. — Christian Kunkle Keller, Helen Howe Knight, Agnes Bowman 
Slaymaker. 

THE TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

The National Association of Wool Manufacturers' Gold Medal for 
General Excellence —To John W. Davis, of East Rochester, N. H. 



35 

In the Second Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Gold Medal for General Excellenxe. — To George L. 
Osgood, of Brookline, Mass. 

The N. a. W, M. Silver Medal as Second Prize for General Excel- 
lence. — Awarded to S. S. Sheuerman, of Des Moines, la. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal for Best Results for Jacquard Fabrics. 
Designed and Woven by the Student. — Awarded to L. M. Dillon, of Atlantic City, 
N.J. 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal as Second Prize for the Preceding Com- 
petition. — Awarded to S. S. Sheuerman, of Des Moines, la. 

Third Prize for the Preceding, Bronze Medal — Awarded to Joseph Mil- 
son, of Catasauqua, Pa. 

Honorable mention to Carlton A. Caswell, of Bloomsburg. Pa. 

The Textile World Silver Medal for Best Results in the Preliminary 
and Final Examinations. — Awarded to Carlton A. Caswell, of Bloomsburg, Pa. 

In the First Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal for General Excellence. — Awarded to 
George Kent Kittle, of Pittsfield, Mass. 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal as Second Prize for the Preceding. — To 
Milton O. Dean, of Taunton, Mass. 

Honorable mention to Laurence G. Holden, of Penacook, N. H. 

The M. L. Finckel Silver Medal for Best Results in the Preliminary 
and Final Examinations. — To Don Abbott Davenport, of Pittsfield, Mass. 

The Textile World Bronze Medal for Best KEbULTs in Color Harmony 
AND FuiURED DESIGN. — To James S. McMaster, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Honorable mention to Laurence G. Holden, of Penacook, N. II. 

The Textile World Gold Medal for Best Results in Pinal Examina- 
tions AND Term Work in Dyeing. — To Norbury L. Smith, of Cohoes, N. Y. 

In the Third Year Regular Evening Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal for General Excellence. — Awarded to 
Samuel Butterworth, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

In the Second Year Regular Evening Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal for Accuracy and Neatness in Work in 
Connection with Regularity of Attendance. — To George W. Walker, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Honorable mention to Edward Hergesheimer, of North Wales. 

In the Third Year Evening Dyeing Class; 

Thk Textii E World Bronze Medal for Best Work in Dyeing Coupled 
with the Final Examination. — To Milton T. Hoffman, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Industrial Art Society Scholarship for Earnestness of Purpose and 
Progress. — To Benoni Duerden, of the Second Year Regular Evening Class. 

Diplomas. — William Blackwood, Herbert Gladstone Coe, John W. Davis. 

Certificates. — Class B. — Howard Hendrixon Bromley, Carlton Alphonso 
Caswell, George Herbert Collins, Laurence Matthew Dillon, Robert Talcott Fran- 
cis, Henry Burchard Green, George Larkin Harrington, William Gray Knowles, 



36 

William Orne Lamson, Joseph Milson, George Laurie Osgood, George Pilsbury 
Parker, Samuel Latta Pinkerton, Solomon Sheuerman. 

Class A. — Frank William Andrew, Frank Maling Bosworth, Joseph Collins, 

Herbert Christ, William Knox Denniston, Don Abbott Davenport, Milton Oswin 
Dean, Samuel Greenwood, Laurence Greenbank Holden, George Kent Kittle, 
Oscar Paul Kaspar, James Scott McMaster, William Nathan Randle, Leonard 
Benjamin Schoenfield, John Everett Sinclair, George Percival Taylor. 

Day Dyeing Class.— William E. Armstrong, Norbury Lockwood Smith. 

Third Year Evening Class. — William Bisseit, Samuel Buttervvorth, Olaf Nils 
Falk, John Hinfey, John Keddie, Frederick Pfeiffer, Anton Scholz. 

Second Year Evening Dyeing Class. — Albert J. Behm, Maggie Farrell, Wil- 
liam Robb, Walter Street, Fred. C, Weihenmayer. 

Nine appointments to State Scholarships have been made this year, viz., for Dela- 
ware, Crawford, Northumberland, Bucks, Wayne, Lancaster, Lycoming, Greene and 
Allegheny Counties. 

Nine holders of these Scholarships were either graduated or dropped during the 
year, so the number actually registered in the School at present is twenty-two, the 
same as that recorded a year ago. 

The Scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education were 
filled as usual by a competitive examination conducted by the Principal, each 
Grammar School Principal being authorized to send candidates. 

Five of these appointments are made each year, each appointment being for three 
years. Of the fifteen appointed in the last three years twelve are at present regis- 
tered in the school. 

In addition to the above, ten scholarships are annually filled from the Normal, 
High and Manual Training Schools of the city. These scholarships are granted in 
the Day Classes of this Institution on ihe completion of the course of study in any 
one of the above-named high schools, and in the evening classes to students who 
have not finished their course, two scholarships for each school, one in the day and 
one in the evening classes being at the disposal of the faculties of the several schools. 
While these appointments are made for one year, they may be renewed in recogni- 
tion of meritorious work on the part of the pupil, and fourteen appointees to these 
scholarships are at present registered in the school. 

Of the six hundred and thirty-two students registered for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1896, three hundred and thirty-seven are men and two hundred and ninety- 
five women. 

Appended are lists of students registered since December 31, 1895, 
showing their occupations and the localities from which they come: 

Architects, 8 Decorators, 5 

Artists, 3 Designers, 3S 

Bookkeepers, .... 8 Draughtsmen, . . . .11 

Carvers, 26 Dyers, 18 

Carpenters, 4 Engravers, 4 

Cabinet Makers, .... 3 Illustrators, 15 

Clerks, 22 Journalists, 2 



37 



2 


Salesmen, 


. 7 


2 


Stenographers, 


• 3 


5 


Students, 


. 321 


2 


Superintendents, 


II 


4 


Teachers, 


. . 65 


2 


Weavers, 


. 6 


6 

2 

3 


Miscellaneous, 


. 14 




632 



477 

77 

30 

10 

6 

5 

4 

4 

3 

3 

2 



Librarians, 

Leather Dealers, 

Loom Fixers, 

Lithographers, 

Manufacturers, 

Mill Hands, . 

Painters and Paper Hangi 

Photographers, 

Printers, 

From Philadelphia, 

" Pennsylvania, 

" New Jersey, . 

" Massachusetts, 

" Rhode Island, 

'' Connecticut, . 

" Michigan, 

" New York, . 

" New Hampshire, 

" Canada, 

" Delaware, 

" Ohio, . 

" California, 

" Vermont, 

" Minnesota, 

'' Indiana, 

" Wisconsin, 

" Illinois, . 

" Alabama, 

" Texas, . 

" Virginia, 

" West Virginia, 

632 

Following is a list of Free Scholarships provided for in the School, 
and of the incumbents registered at this time : 



State Scholarships, . 

Public School Scholarships, 

Temple Scholarships, 

Barton Scholarships, 

Weightman Scholarships, 

Chapman Biddle, 

Clayton French, 

Industrial Art Society Scholarships, 



Authori 


zed 


Actual 


Appointments. 


Incumbents 


67 




22 


15 




12 


24 




23 


10 




10 


I 




I 
I 


I 




I 


2 




2 



L. W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



38 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For the Year ending May 31, 1896.) 



Balance on hand June i, 1895, 

Temple Fund Principal, Mortgage paid off, 
Clayton French Scholarship contribution from Mrs. F. W. 
Endowment Fund from estate of George S. Pepper, . 
Income of Endowment Fund, ..... 

" Temple Fund, ...... 

'* Chapman-Biddle Memorial Fund, 

*' Graff Arch. Prize Fund, 

" Weightman Scholarship Fund, , 

City of Philadelphia, Park Commission, for Maintenance o 

Hall, 

State of Pennsylvania, balance of last year's Appropriation, 
Tuition fees, ... ..... 

Use of Rooms, etc., at Broad and Pine Streets, . 



VV. Graham 



f Memoria 



^551069 48 
4000 00 
1000 00 
1000 00 

4556 43 

2708 50 

50 00 

25 00 

60 00 

8879 07 
2500 00 

14,273 50 
2637 00 



DONATIONS 



For General Expenses. Schedule '' A," 
'' Principal of Mortgage, " " B." 
" Interest of Mortgage, " '' 

Annual Dues, ..... 

Offertory: glass boxes at Museum, . 

Temporary Loan (since paid off). 



Total Receipts, 



18,008 00 
4700 00 

100 GO 

1320 00 

265 00 

2671 66 
,69,823 64 



PAYMENTS. 
Maintenance of School, ....... ^49,341 50 



Graff Architectural Prize, 



General Expenses — Salaries, Commissions, etc , 

Temple Fund Income, returned Mrs. Jones Wister, ad- 
vance made by her to pay for articles purchased at 
Chicago, ......... 

Museum, Library, ........ 

Centennial Board of Finance, dividend claimed on stock, . 

Temporaiy Loan returned, ...... 

Interest on Bills Payable renewed, . . . . . 



!5 00 



Maintenance of Museum, . ...... 12,734 92 



[823 79 



2350 00 

5 15 

3 90 
2671 66 
801 84 $69,757 76 



Balance, 



RICHARD CADBURY, 

Assistant Treasu7-er. 



39 



We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer from June i, 1895, to May 31, 
1896, and find them correct. The cash balance in his hands was verified as January 
12, 1897. 



(Signed) 



February 10, 1897. 



N, Weygandt, 

Chairman Finance Com. 



SCHEDULE "A." 
Donations for General Purposes. 



Mrs. Evan Randolph, . 


. 


. 






$500 GO 


John Story Jenks, 




• 






1000 GO 


William E. Garrett, . 


. 








200 GO 


Crawford Arnold, 










lOG GO 


Theodore C. Search, . 


. 


. 






lOGG GO 


Alfred C. Harrison, . 










1750 GO 


Robert K, McNeely (for advertisi 


ng in 


directory). 






20 GO 


David Pepper, . 










IGG GO 


Mrs. J. P. Lundy, 










IG GO 


Charles F. Lennig, . 










50 GO 


J. Dundas Li])pincott, 










ICO GO 


J. Elverson, . . . • 










IGO GO 


Miss Hutchinson, 










20 GO 


Louis C. Norris, 










50 00 


Charles E. Dana, 










IGG GO 


Edward Siter, . 










25 GO 


Mrs. Frederick Graff, 










50 GO 


C. W. Bergner, . 










2GG GO 


John Bromley & Sons, 










500 GO 


W. M. & F. W. Sharpies, . 










50 GO 


Schell, Taylor & Longstreth, 










IG GO 


Hunter & Dickson, . 










25 GO 


The Sharpless Dyewood Extract 


Co., 








IGO GO 


R. G. Alford, . 










3 00 


Alexander Brothers, . 










25 GO 


Moro Philips Co., 










10 GO 


W. J. Matheson Co., Limited, 










50 GO 


WilliamWood&Co., 










500 00 


William S. Vaux, Jr., 










IG GO 


Henry Norris, . 










100 GO 


William H. Jenks, . 










5OG GO 


Cash, .... 










. 1000 GO 


Charles J. Webb, 










150 00 


Theodore Wernwag, . 










IGG 00 


Mrs. Ellen B. A. Mitcheson, 










50 GO 


Henry S. Cattell, 




• ■ 






50 GO 


W. W. Frazier, . 




• 






200 GO 


Carried forward, 


. 


. 






. $8808 GO 



40 



$88o8 


00 


50 


00 


1500 


00 


1000 


00 


250 


00 


150 


00 


4000 


00 


250 


<X) 


1000 


00 


1000 


00 




^18,008 00 



Brought forward, 
Arthur E. Newbold, . 
Robert K. McNeely, . 
John T. Morris, . 
John H. Converse, 
Conyers Button & Co., 
Associate Committee of Women, 
Stuart Wood, , . . . 

Thomas Dolan, . . . . 

Byron P. Moulton, 



SCHEDULE " B." 

Contributions for Principal of Mortgage, Broad and Pine Streets. 

Miss Fanny Rosengarten, 

Francis W. Lewis, 

Mrs. Wm. F. Jenks, 

Mrs. Thos. H. Powers, 

Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, 

Mrs. Joseph Harrison, . 

Miss A. Blanchard, 

Miss Caroline E. Cope, 

Miss Fanny S. Magee, . 

Miss Eliza J. Magee, 

Miss Anna J. Magee, 

Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 

Howland Croft, 

Mrs, Louis Rodman, 

J. G. Rosengarten, 

Mrs. Thomas A. Reilly, 

Mrs. E. E. Denniston, . 

Mrs. R. B. Ellison, 

William P. Henszey, . 

J. W. Curtis, . ... 

Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 

Mrs. Jones Wister, 

Mrs. Richard H. Lee, . 

Miss F. C. Roberts, 

Miss F. A. Roberts, 

William F. Fray, . 

Mrs. George K. Crozer (G. K. C.) 

Mrs. Alexander Biddle, 

J. Bolton Winpenny, 

Mrs. Thomas Roberts, . 



Sioo 


00 


25 


GO 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


1000 


GO 


100 


00 


100 


OG 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


OG 


100 


OG 


500 


GO 


25 


OG 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


OG 


50 


GO 


100 


GO 


100 


GO 



Carried forward. ...... ^4100 00 



41 

Brought forward, ...... $4100 00 

Horace Magee, . . . . . . . . . 100 00 

William M. Singerly, . . . . . . . . 250 00 

George C. Thomas, ........ 25 00 

Miss Leach, . . . . . . . . . . 100 00 

Mrs. John Harrison, ........ 100 00 

Miss Margaret Hutchinson, . 25 00 



^4700 00 



For Interest on Mortgage. 
Miss Anna Blanchard, ^100 00 



42 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



(^For Seven Months Ending December 31, 1896.) 

Balance on hand, June i, 1896, 

Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize Fund, 

Income of Endowment Fund, 

" Temple Fund, ......... 

" Chapman-Biddle Memorial Fund, 

'• Graff Architectural Prize Fund, 

" Weightnian Scholarship Fund, ...... 

" Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize Fund, 

City of Philadelphia— Park Commission, for maintenance of Memorial 

Hall, 

Tuition Fees, 

Use of Rooms, etc., at Broad and Pine Streets, ..... 

Advertising in Circular of School, 

Annual Subscribers, 



^65 88 

1500 00 

2039 12 

1227 50 

25 00 

12 50 

30 00 

33 75 

5218 67 

10,807 00 

1504 00 

796 50 

1085 00 



$75 00 
100 00 
300 00 
100 00 
1000 00 
100 00 



DONATIONS. 
John T. Morris, for prizes for drawings at Memorial Ilall, 
Miss Lydia T. Morris, general purposes, 
Erben, Harding & Co., general purposes, 
Theodore C. Search, general purposes, . 
" A Friend," for principal of mortgage, 
" for interest of mortgage, . 

Temporary Loans (since paid off), 
Bills payable, ..... 



PAYMENTS. 

Maintenance of School, ^27 288 50 

Maintenance of Museum, 7319 93 

General Expenses, Salaries, Commission, etc.. 

Temple Fund Income, John T. Morris, advance made by 

him for articles purchased at Chicago, 
Museum, Library, . , 

'' Show Cases, 

Centennial Board of Finance, dividend claimed on stock, 

Bills payable, 

Interest on ditto renewed. 



1,675 00 

3,600 00 

47,000 00 

^76,619 92 



749 70 



256 00 

10 23 

72 00 

3 12 

36,000 00 

917 75 



Temporary Loan returned, -j 600 00 

Balance on hand, December 31, 1896, . 



76,217 23 
^402 69 



RICHARD CADBURY, 

Assistant Treasurer. 



43 



REPORT OF THE 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The year just ended brought with it a heavy burden of anxiety for 
all those interested and working for the welfare of the now great 
School of Industrial Art. While the application for the free Scholar- 
ships granted by the School through the Governor and our Legislature 
to each county of our State were not fewer than before, the knowledge 
that these promises must be fulfilled was ours, though the support 
hitherto extended to us was lacking, and we knew that nothing but 
hard labor must be the portion of the Trustees, the Associate Com- 
mittee and the already overworked corps of Teachers. 

The proposition to hold a bazaar for the benefit of the School in 
the month of April was carried out and brought to a successful issue, 
as the report of our Treasurer shows. The different departments of 
the bazaar were in charge of separate committees, and many never 
before interested in the Institution lent a helping hand. 

The programme was a work of art. The designs on the outside 
cover and the illustrations on the inside were all drawings made by our 
pupils, and received high praise from artists and others. Not only 
may we now point with pleasure to the work of our pupils inside the 
School-house, but we can call public attention with pride to the Pilas- 
ters in the hall of Horticultural Hall, which are the work of their 
hands. 

Our earnest desire is to create among the citizens of this whole 
Commonwealth, including those who are now its rulers, a lively inter- 
est in an institution which is doing great good not only to the youth 
of our own State, but which is the means of carrying the knowledge 
gained within its walls by pupils from outside States throughout 
the length and breadth of this whole land. It is with pain that we 
must record the fact that East, South and West our School is more 
highly appreciated than by our own citizens, and in one State (Massa- 
chusetts) its perfect organization is being reproduced. 

One member of our Committee has been largely instrumental in 
obtaining from Messrs. Bailey, Banks & Biddle the use of one of their 
large windows for the exhibition of some of the work of our school. 
This is a privilege which can hardly be too highly estimated. 



44 

We hope that through this window in Philadelphia our citizens may 
not only be induced to visit the School and judge of its importance, 
but that they will then esteem it a pleasure to assist in a work which 
a few men and women have in the past twenty years carried to its 
present standing. 

Among the prizes which the Associate Committee had the privilege 
of awarding to the pupils on Commencement Day, 1896, were two 
given by Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith. It is our pleasant task to acknowl- 
edge this gift from a former member of our Committee, and to add 
that Mrs. Smith has made arrangement to have these prizes continued 
under her name in perpetuity. 

May the close of the year 1897 find us with a longer list of Annual 
Subscribers than we are able to show for 1896. 

By order of the Associate Committee of Women. 

FANNIE S. MAGEE, 

Secretary. 



Helen C. Denniston, Treasurer, in account with the Associate 

Committee of Women of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art. 
1896. Dr. 

January 12, To balance, $285 58 

" Interest, . . . . . . . . . 415 

Proceeds of bazaar, . .... . . 4621 66 



Cr. 



January 
March 30. 
April 10. 
'' 10. 
'* 20. 
*' 29. 
June 3. 



By Printing and stamps, . 

Bridge from stage to modeling-room, 

Expenses of bazaar, . 

Photo- Electrotype Co., 

S. W. Robinson, for music, 

William Piatt Pepper, President, 



Prizes, 



$4911 


39 


^75 


00 


79 


00 


65 


25 


36 


00 


36 


00 


4000 


00 



50 00 



Balance on hand. 



^34 1 25 
570 14 

^49" 39 



Audited and found correct. 



Fannie S. Magee, 
Elizabeth C. Roberts. 



45 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS^ 

Annual and Honorary Members. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their names and 
addresses to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found upon 
page 52. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly acknowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 

Life Membership, One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, .... A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 
Honorary Membership, . . . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and from 
Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment Fund." — 
By-Laws. 



PATRONS. 



*Baird, John Garrett, W. E., Jr. 

*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. ^Gibson, Henry C. 

Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. * Houston, H. H. 

*Childs, George W. Lea, Henry C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

*Drexel, A. J. Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Whitney, A. & Sons 

* Deceased. 



46 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 

Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & Co. 

Baily, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs, Matthew 

Baker, John R. 

Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
^Bartol, B. II. 

Baugh, Daniel 

Bartol, H. W. 
*Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Biddle, Chapman 
*Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 
*Biddle, Clement 
*Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
^Borie, C. & H. 

Bo wen & Fox 
*Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
*Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 
*Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
*Chew, Samuel 
*Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence E. 
*Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas. 
■*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edward H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 
^Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Coiket, C. Howard 

Collins, II. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
^Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 
*Crozer, Mrs. George K. 

Crozer, J. Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 
*Disston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 
*Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John and James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 

Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 



47 



Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 

Gilson, Miss R. 
"■••Gowen, Franklin B. 
*Graff, Frederic 
*Graff, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
*Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
*HockIey, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
*Hockley, William Stevenson 
*Horstmann, F. O. 

Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
-Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
*Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
■^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
*Knight, Edward C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
^Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
"*Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering Joseph S., Jr. 



McNeely, Miss Florence 

McNeely, Robert K. 

McNeely, Mrs. Robert K, 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Mears, Mrs. R. Wain 

Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 
*Merrick, Miss L. W. 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
*Milliken, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
*Morris, Wistar 
,Murphy, Frank W. 
*Newbold, Charles 
*Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 

Page, Joseph F. 
* Patterson, Joseph 
^Pepper, George S. 
*Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
*Phillips, Henry M. 
^Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
^Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
^Roberts, Jacob, M.D. 



Deceased. 



48 



^Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
^Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P, 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
*Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 
*Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton^ Frederic R. 
*Shelton,Mrs. F. R. 
*Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
^Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
*Spencer, Charles 
*Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornell lu 

Strawbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V, C. 



Tait, Mrs. C. G. 
*Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, vSamuel 
*Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 

Warner, Redwood F. 
*Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William c\: Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 

* Wright, James A. 

* Wright, John W. 

Wurtz, Charles Stewart, MT3. 



Deceased. 



49 



Annual Members (for 1896) who have subscribed not less than ten 
dollars. 



Austin, Mrs. S. H., 
Balch, Mrs, Singerly, 
Bement, Clarence vS., 
Biddle, Cadwalader, 
Brazier, Joseph H., 
Borie, Mrs. Henry, . . 
Brown, Miss Martha M., 
Brown, T. Wistar, . 
Burnham, Mrs. William, 
Cadwalader, Mrs. John, 
Caldwell, T. E. & Co., . 
Campbell, "Mrs. St. G. T., 
Chandler, T. P., Jr., . . 
Clark, Miss Frances, . . 
Cochran, Travis, . . . 
Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . 
Coles, Edward, .... 
Coxe, Alexander B , . . 
Cramp, Henry W., . . 
Da Costa, Dr. J. M., . . 
Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . 
Dickson, Samuel, . . . 
Durant, Mrs. F. C, . . 
Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B., 
Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., 
Galloway, William, . . 
Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . 
Gillingham, Joseph E., . 
Gowen, Mrs. Francis I., 
GrafT, Miss Henrietta, . 
Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . 
Guillou, Victor, .... 
Hamilton, W, C, . . . 
Hance Brothers & White, 
Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, 
Hippie, Frank K., . . . 
Hutchinson, Miss, . . . 
Hunter. T. Comly, . . 
Jack, Dr. Louis, . . . 
Jayne, Mrs. David, . . . 
Jayne, Dr. Horace, . . . 
Jenks, Mrs. Wm. F., . . 
Keen, Dr. W. W., . . . 
Keith, Sidney W., . . . 
Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D., 
Leach, Miss Mary Atherton, 
Lee, Mrs. Richard Henry, 
Leonard, James B., ... 

Lewis, Edward, 

Lewis, Enoch, 

Lewis, Dr. F. W., . . . . 



>IO 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


CK) 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


CH3 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2S 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


TO 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



Lewis, Robert M., . . . 
Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, 
Lippincotl, Mrs. Horace G, 
Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, 
Lovering, Mrs. Joseph 
Mackellar, Thomas, . 
Magee, Miss Anna, . 
Magee, Miss Eliza J., 
Magee, Miss Fannie S. . 
Magee, Horace, . . . 
Mason, Frederick T., 
Moulton, Mrs. Byron P 
McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, 
Neall, Frank L., . . . 
Newhall, George M., . 
Pancoast, Albert, . . 
Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, 
Paul, Dr. James W., . 
Paul, Miss M. W., . 
Pepper, David, . . . 
Piatt, Franklin, . . . 
Price, J. Sergeant, . . 
Randolph, !\Irs. Evan, 
Reilley, Mrs. T. A., . 
Ritchie, Craig D., . . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, . 
Roberts, Miss F. A., . 
Roberts, Mrs. George ¥ 
Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, 
Rosengarten, J. G., . 
Rowland, Mrs. Benjam 
Sanders, Mrs, John, . 
Shober, Mrs. Samuel L 
Sinnott, Mrs. Joseph F 
Smith, Miss Christiana B. 
.Smith, Edward Brinton, 
Smvth, Mrs. Samuel, . . 
Stifle, Dr. Charles J., . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, 
Townsencl, Henry C, . 
Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, 
Welsh, John Lowber, 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber 
Weygandt, C.N. (3 years) 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, . , 
Williams, Mrs. Francis H. 
Wister, Mrs. Caspar, . . 
W^ood, Mrs. Howard, . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, . . 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K., 
Wyeth, Stuart, .... 



bio 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
30 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



50 



Annual members (1896) who have subscribed not less than five 
dollars. 



Ashhurst, Richard L., . , 
Ashhurst, Mrs. Richard L., 
Bartol, Mrs. C. C, . . . . 
Bartol, Henry G., .... 

Bergner, C. W., 

Bergner, Mrs. C. William, . 
Bergner, Miss Catharine, 
Bigelow, Mrs, vS Lawrence 
Carter, Mrs. William T., . 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampton, 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . . 
Cohen, Miss Mary M., . . 

Colket, G. H 

Corlies, Miss Margaret L., . 
Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth P. 
Curtin, Mrs Roland G , . 
Dana, Charles E., .... 
Dana, Mrs. Charles E., . . 
Day, Frank Miles, .... 
De Haven, Mrs. Holstein, 
Denniston, Arthur C, . . 

Dissel, Charles, 

Dissel, Mrs. Charles, . . . 

Duane, Russell, 

Durant. Miss Ethel, . . . 
Gest, Mrs. William P., . . 
Grant, Mrs. W. S., Jr., . . 
Hallowell, Mrs. S. F. C, . 



^5 


00 


5 


00 


.S 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


.S 


00 


5 


00 




00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


.S 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



Harrison, John, .... 
Harrison, Mrs. John, . . 
Harrison, Miss Maud S., . 
Howell, Charles H., ... 
Kennard, Mrs. Fred. K., . 
Mc Fad den, Mrs. George H., 
Mortwitz, Joseph, Jr., . . 
Newlin, Mrs. Richard M., . 
Norris, Miss Clara Genevra, 
Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . 
Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . 
Pepper, Mrs. John W,, . . 
Randolph, Miss Anna, . . 
Randolph, Miss Elizabeth J., 
Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood 
Reyburn, Mrs W. S., . . 
Roberts, Thomas, .... 
Roberts, Thomas, Jr., . . . 
Rogers, Miss Mary, . . . 
Rothermel, P. F., Jr., . . . 
Simpson, Mrs. William, . . 
Siter, Mrs. ]. Hollingsworth, 
Smith, Harrison Hoxie, . . 
Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, . 
Walker, Mrs. R. J. C. . . 
Winpenny, Mrs. j. Bolton, 
Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, . 
Zell, Miss H. A., 





00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 




00 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 
Atwood, Eugene, Atwood Machine Co., Stonington, Conn. 
Berry, A. Hun, Boston, Mass. 
Boyd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Burnham, Charles C, Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I, 
Burnham, George W. , Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 
Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R I. 
Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 
Comins, Frank B., Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, R. I. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Easton & Bui-nham, Pawtucket, R. L 
Easton, Nicholas H., Easton and Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Firth, William, American Drosophore Co., Boston, Mass. 

Fletcher, George A., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grice, Edwin C, M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 



51 

Grinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, R, I. 

Hale, F. J., Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Hartvvell, F. W., Aerophore Air- Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, R. I. 

Hopkins, William S., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Hutchins, C. H., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Hutchins, G. F , Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Jenks, Alvin F., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. L 

Jenks, Stephen A., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. L 

Knowles, F. P., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Knowlton, Charles H., M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lasell, C. W., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass, 

Lasell, J. M.', Whitin Machuie Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 

Maynard, Lorenzo, Maynard, Mass. 

Merriam, H, H., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Murdock. Joseph, xAmerican Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Nevins, David, Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Rometsch, W. H., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia Pa. 

Russell, J. M., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Sargent, C. G., Graniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otto W., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smith, Chester B., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co, Woonsocket, R. L 

Smith, Stanley G., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Snelling, R. P., Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Taft, C. A,, Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass, 

Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Mass. 

White, H. Arthur, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Ware, Justin A., Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Whitin, G. M., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 

Wyman, Horace, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 



52 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devi'^e unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain \_he?'e insert a 
description of the property'] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OE INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE TWENTY-SECOND 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MKMBKRS 



For the Year ending December 31, 1897. 



PHILADELPHIA, 

1898. 



OFFICERS FOR 1898 



PRESIDENT, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM AVEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN T. MORRIS. 



TREASURER, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. 



SECRETARY, 

DALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, 

DALTON DORR. 



PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL,, 

LESLIE W. MILLER. 



ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

JAMES L. ALLAN, 

826 Drexel Building. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 

The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Byron P. Moulton, Appointed bi/ the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

Merrill A. Furbush, Appointed by Common Council. 

Samuel Gustine Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To serve for three years. 

John T, Morris, Theodore C. Search, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

John H. Converse. 

To serve for tico years. 

Robert K. McNeely, Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D., 

William Wood, Isaac H. Clothier, 

John B. Stetson. 

To serve for one year. 
A. C. Harrison, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt, 

Charles E. Dana. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Report see page 42.) 



PRESIDENT, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, 

MRS. JOHN SANDERS. 



Mks. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs, 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



SECRETARY, 


TREASURER, 


1 FANNIE S. MAGEE, 


MISS McMURTRIE. 


S. H. Austin, 


Mrs. Robert Millar Jannky, 


SiNGERLY BaI.CH, 


Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 


C. C. Bartol, 


Miss Leach, 


C. William Bergner, 


Mrs. Craige Lippincott, 


Anna Blanchard, 


Mlss Helen L. Murphy, 


William T. Carter, 


Mrs. Daniel S. Newhall, 


Mary Cohen, 


Mrs. Edward H. Ogden, 


Margaret L. Cor lies, 


Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 


Ada M. Crozer, 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


D. E. Dallam, 


Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, 


E. E. Denniston, 


Mrs. Jones Wister, 


Wm. L. Elkins, 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 


Rodman B. Ellison, 


Mrs. Theodore Yoorhees, 


J. C. W. Frishmuth, 


Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 


Joseph Harrison, 


Miss Zell. 


Frank K. Hipple, 





HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, 
Mrs. Daniel H. Hastings 
Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Frank Reeder, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 



Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, 
Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 
Mrs. Caspar Wister, 
Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1898. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

T. C. Search, Chairman; AVilliam Platt Pepper, Stuart Wood, Wil- 
liam Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, A. C. Harrison, 
Charles E. Dana, J. S. Jenks, John T. Morris, Isaac H. Clothier, John 
H. Converse. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 

ART. 
Charles E. Dana, Chairman ; Samuel Gustine Thompson, Wilson Eyre, 
Jr. , John J. Boyle, Frank Miles Day. 

MVHEVM. 
William Platt Pepper, Chairman; J. S. Jenks, J. T. Morris, A. C. 
Lambdin, M.D., Isaac H. Clothier, Mrs. John Harrison, Miss Anna 
Blanchard, Miss Elizabeth C. Koberts, Miss Magee, Mrs. W. T. Carter, 
Mrs. Jones Wister, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex ojficio. 

INSTR UCTION. 
T. C. Search, Chairman; Wm. Wood, J. S. Jenks, Isaac H. Clothier, 
M. A. FuRBusH, Chas. E. Dana, Stuart Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., 
William Platt Pepper, Byron P. Moulton, Charles H. Harding, John 
H. CoN^TERSE, A. C. Harrison, Mrs. C. Wm. Bergner, Mrs. Frank K. 
Hipple, Mrs. Jones AVister, Mrs. AVm. L. Elkins, Miss Ada Muhlenberg 
Crozer, Miss Leach, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 

C. N. AVeygandt, Chairman; Stuart AA'ood, J. S. Jenks, T. C Search, 
John T. Morris. 



* The President is ex officio a member of all Committees. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 

Organized as a Museum of Industrial Arts, has grown far beyond the limits 
set for it at first. The pictures and statuary in the Bloomfield-Moore collection 
and the food-products in the collection of British India indicate its present scope. 
Its division into departments, under the supervision of specialists, has been un- 
dertaken. Those already organized comprise : 

DEPAETMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY. 
Edwin Atlee Barber, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 

F. D. Langenheim, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Chas. D. Clark, Honorary Curator. 



Dalton Dorr, Director of the Museum. 
M. D. WooDNUTT, Assistant. 
William Lindsay, Superintendent. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Comprises in its organization the following Departments : 
School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 
School of Decorative Painting. 
School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
School of Applied Design. 
School of Carving and Wood-Work. 
School of Decorative Sculpture. 
School of Architectural Design. 
School of Interior Decoration. 
School of Illustration. 
School of Normal Art Instruction. 
School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 

L. W. Miller, Principal. 

Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 

Charles E. Dana, Professor of Water-Color Painting. 

Herman Deigendesch, Professor of Drawing. 

Paul Lachenmeyer, Professor of Sculpture. 

Frederic Haigh, Professor of Chemistry. 

Bradley C. Algeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in 
Textile Design and Mechanical Drawing. 

A. M. Grillon, Director of School of Modern Languages and Instructor in 
French. 

A. M. Schmidt-Grillon, Instructor in German. 

Florence C. Fetherston, Instructor in Design Applied to Printed Fabrics. 

William Laird Turner, Instructor in Design Applied to Woven Fabrics. 

Samuel Thompson, Instructor in Carving and Wood-Work. 

William Koebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Belated Branches. 

James P. Jamieson, Instructor in Architectural Drawing and Design. 

Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Historical Ornament. 

Elisabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Illustration. 

Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patent Laws. 

J. M. Woelfel, Instructor in Dyeing. 

Joseph H. Shinn, Jr., Instructor in Design Applied to Textiles. 

John F. Scott, Instructor in Carding and Spinning. 

Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Drawing and Design. 

Ferdinand Lazzaro Marenzana, Instructor in Drawing. 

Kaymond T. W^ alters. Instructor in Drawing. 

M. Louise Van Kirk, Lecturer on Methods of Teaching and of the Kinder- 
garten. 

Thomas B. Eidington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 

Norman'E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Egberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand-Loom Department. 

Alfred Burhouse, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building and Instructor in Wood 
Work. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Eegistrar. 

Anna T. Joyce, Librarian. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



During the year just closed since our last Annual INIeeting 
harmony and prosperity have existed in all branches of our Insti- 
tution. Last summer a good deal of valuable and useful work was 
done in the building by our own men at the cost of material only. 
The very good fire-escapes which have been placed at the four 
corners of this building, in fulfilment of the requirements of the 
Building Inspectors, are notable examples of this work, and were 
highly praised and accepted by those in authority. 

The number of our students has increased, and the zeal and 
devotion of both teachers and pupils to their Avork have borne good 
fruits most pleasant to all concerned. 

I was one of the founders of this Institution at the close of the 
Centennial Exhibition of 1876, and was then Chairman of the 
Committee of Purchase (a fund of $40,000 having been subscribed 
for that purpose), and was Managing Director from 1876 until 
1878. In January, 1882, I was elected President of this Institu- 
tion, and have for the past sixteen years held that honorable office. 
During this long period I have striven in every way in my power 
to advance the best interests of the Museum and the School, and 
have done what I could for both. After having given the subject 
much thought, I have come to the decision that it will be best for 
me to resign my office and let another take the helm. I do this 
for several reasons, and think that at this juncture it will be for 
the best interests of our textile school to have as president one who 
is thoroughly conversant with the details and management of that 
work. I would not have it supposed for an instant that by resign- 
ing the presidency I have lost interest in our work ; on the con- 



12 

trary, m}^ interest has gone on increasing with our increase, and 
will continue to do so, I hope, as long as I live. I shall continue 
in the Board of Trustees, and devote much of my time to the work 
of the Museum, which has in a measure been overshadowed by the 
phenomenal growth of the School of Industrial Art (its child), 
and should be equally well developed in the near future. 

I want to thank the Associate Committee of Women, my Co- 
Trustees, the teachers and the pupils of the school, and all of our 
faithful employees, for their never-failing courtesy to and their co- 
operation with me at all times during my long term of office. 

The Institution has now reached a point where success is as- 
sured, and we have, in my opinion, gone through all our dark 
periods of depression and anxiety, and there is a bright future 
before us, as the knowledge of the value and importance of this 
Industrial Art Work l)ecomes more and more known yearly in 
our land. Our Industrial Art School has the reputation of being 
the first in importance of its kind in America, and is so considered 
abroad. If our city and State will grant larger and larger appro- 
priations to our work as it increases, our Institution will be a glor}^ 
not only to this city and State, but to our Avhole country. 

At a comparatively small cost wing buildings could be extended 
from the corner pavilions of Memorial Hall over the north plaza, 
which would provide space for students' rooms, library, etc., as 
well as galleries for the display of the collections. While Councils 
are being solicited to make large appropriations for the erection 
of new art buildings and museums in other portions of the city, 
it seems proper that attention should be called to the needs of this 
Institution, which, as already stated, is the most largely-visited 
museum and art gallery in the city, and Memorial Hall is owned 
jointly by the State and the city. 

You will hear from the reports of the Director of the Museum, 
the Associate Committee of Women and the Principal of the School, 
of the progress which has been made during the past year, and 
will no doubt find it most satisfactory and encouraging. 

I have to mention with much regret the sudden death of Mr. 
Crawford Arnold on Christmas night, 1897. He had been one of 
our Trustees for eight years past, and both he and Mrs. Arnold 
(w^ho died a few years ago) were always much interested in our 
Institution. WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, 

President. 



13 



REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

A retrospect of the past year shows steady growth in the several 
departments of the Museum, and of continued public interest in 
the work of the Institution. The record of visitors for the twelve 
months ending December 31st was 294,612, an increase of twelve 
thousand over the record of the previous year. Measured by its 
record of visitors, Memorial Hall occupies the foremost position 
among the museums and art galleries of Philadelphia. 

The most gratifying feature of the increased attendance was 
the frequent visits of students and instructors from other schools 
besides our own ; notably from the School of Design for Women 
and from the University of Pennsylvania. One of the most press- 
ing needs of the Museum is cloak-rooms for the accommodation of 
these students, and studios where objects selected from the collec- 
tions may be grouped for study and instruction. 

Chief among the acquisitions of the year was the bequest of 
Mrs. Julia N. Tyndale, of this city, of the large collection of pot- 
tery made by her husband, the late General Hector Tyndale. 
General Tyndale was appointed by the Commissioners of the Cen- 
tennial Exhibition one of the Judges of Awards of Group II, Pot- 
tery, Glass, and Artificial Stone, and was elected Chairman of his 
committee. He had a practical as well as an expert knowledge of 
the subject, and his official position enabled him to enrich his pri- 
vate collection with many rare and valuable specimens. Accom- 
panying the bequest is a manuscript catalogue made by General 
Tyndale, giving a minute technical description of each piece. 
With this catalogue as a hand-book the value of the collection to 
students will be greatly increased. The collection is to be kept 
together and called the General Hector Tyndale Collection. 

Another important acquisition was the bequest by Mrs. Frede- 
rick Graff of examples of artistic furniture, silver, bronzes, pottery 
and bric-a-brac, selected from the furnishing of her drawing-rooms 
and bequeathed as a memorial of her husband, the late Frederick 
Graff, Esq., who w^as for many years a trustee and one of the Vice- 
Presidents of this Institution. 

Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, although residing permanently abroad, 
continues her active interest in the collection which the Museum 



14 

owes to her munificence. Among the valuable additions made to 
it during the year were a Portrait by Velasquez, and a Cherub by 
Guido Reni, the latter authenticated by John Richardson Jackson. 

Mr. Clarence B. Moore has given the Museum a choice collection 
of relics of aboriginal Americans, many of them the result of his 
own explorations. For this collection Mr. Moore has provided a 
suitable case, and has generously signified his intention of adding 
to the specimens as opportunity offers. 

Mr. E. A. Barber has continued his efforts to make the Depart- 
ment of American Pottery a representative one, and through him 
numerous new and valuable examples have been obtained. In 
line with this work, Mr. Bar])er has also begun collecting for the 
Museum examples of the series of English jjottery printed with 
views of American scenery, portraits, etc., which are now becom- 
ing difficult to obtain. 

The principjil purchase made by the Museum was a pair of Nio, 
or Temple Guards, which originally stood at the entrance of Toshio 
Daiji, a temple at Nara, Japan. These figures are carved in wood, 
stand some eight feet higli, and are believed to be three hundred 
years old. It is said that the Japanese Government has prohibited 
the denudation of temples and the exportation of figures of this 
kind, so that in this purchase the Museum has acquired two exam- 
ples of ancient Japanese art of great rarity. 

The Andrew Nebinger collection of pictures, seventy paintings 
and engravings, has been hung temporarily in the north corridor, 
near where the stone altar, designed by Mr. C. M. Burns, formerly 
stood. This latter work has been removed and put in place in the 
Memorial Church of the Advocate, for which church it was designed 
by Mr. Burns. 

During the year the Museum obtained by subscription a copy 
of the W. C. Walters collection of Oriental Ceramic Art, probably 
the finest example of color lithography ever issued in America. 
To supplement and illustrate this work, Mr. H. Walters generously 
donated a copy of the " Book of Progressive Paintings." 

In October five hundred circular letters were sent out, soliciting 
one dollar subscriptions to a purchase fund for the Museum. In 
response to this appeal sums of from one to ten dollars were re- 
ceived, amounting in all to two hundred and fifty-eight dollars. 
This money will be expended in purchases for the Museum. 



15 

Following is the list of gifts, loans and purchases made during 
the year : 

Gifts were received from : 
Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, for the Bloomfield-Moore Collection : 

Jewel Box, of engraved iron. 

Coffer, of copper, with colored enamel decoration. 

Three Oil Paintings: Portrait of Napoleon; "Cupid," by Guido Keni ; 
Portrait, by Velasquez. 

Four Bronze Statuettes on ebonized pedestals : Dante, Petrarch, Tasso 
and Ariosto. 
Mr. Clarence B. Moore : 

Twenty pieces Aboriginal American Pottery. 

Collection of vShell Beads and Bone Implements from Indian mound, 
Creighton Island, Georgia. 

Collection of Spear-heads, Beads, Fragments of Textiles, and charred Hu- 
man Bones, from mounds in Ohio and Georgia. 

Collection of Indian Pipes, Amulets and Implements of Stone, eight pieces. 

Collection of Indian Beads, Pins, etc., sixteen pieces. 

Five Indian Blankets, woven by Navajo squaws. 

Iron Coffer, with curious old lock. 

Two Japanese Lacquered Smoking Sets. 

Two Wooden Plaques, burned decorations, Swedish. 

Three United States Silver Dollars, dated 1795, 1799, 1800. 
Mr. C. F. Smith : 

Two small Brass Figures, Hindoo gods, from Calcutta. 
Mr. Barnard Spring, New Albany, Indiana : 

Five Clay Tobacco Pipes, made by himself. 
Dr. Marcus Benjamin, Washington, D. C. : 

Three Clay Tobacco Pipes, made by Barnard Spring. 
Mr. Edwin A. Barber : 

Stoneware Medallion, insert for beer mug. 

Small Plaster Plaque, head of Christ. 

Three round Tiles, prepared for majolica glaze. 

Paper Sampler, framed, Pennsylvania German. 

Two Plates, glazed and unglazed, from old mould, Phoenixville, 1870. 

Glass "Jenny Lind " Bottle, from old mould. Whiting Glass Works, 1851. 

Sample of Porcelain, new process by C. H. Dangler, East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Four Earthen Roofing Tiles, made in Pennsylvania about 1735 to 1840. 

Two Tea Pots (fragments), found in debris of Revolutionary Camp in 
northern part of Greater New York. 
Dr. E. S. Van ders lice : 

Bronze Vase, Japanese. Modern reproduction of antique. 

Thirteen Prints, with descriptive manuscript, of the "Twelve Falcons" 
exhibited at the Chicago Fair, 1893. Japanese. 



16 

Charles Wingender & Bro., Haddonfield, K J.: 
Two large Tankards, stoneware, blue and gray. 
Two Beer Mugs, pewter covers. 

Mr. Edward Starr : 

Plate, with view of "Landing of Lafayette." 

Mr. Wm. N. Porter, Hampton, Va. : 

Indian Arrow-head, found in Delaware. 

Mrs. Bellamy Storer, Washington, D. C. : 

Twenty-one pieces Pottery, experiments in glazing, by herself. 

Mrs. G. Kennedy : 

Fan of Peacock Feathers, from Mexico. 

Mrs. Julia N. Tyndale, deceased, bequest : 

Collection of Porcelain, Pottery, Glass, and Bronzes, comprising 574 pieces, 
together with a manuscript catalogue of the same, made by her husband, 
the late General Hector Tyndale. 

The Dedham Pottery Co., Dedham, Mass.: 

Stoneware Vase, Crackle, with blue decoration. 

Mr. John W. Clymer : 

One United States Copper Token. 

Mr. Charles Henry Hart : 

Girdle and Fan of carved tortoise-shell. 

Necklace and Pendant of carved tortoise-shell. 

Ten examples of Chinese painted silks and other fabrics. 

Col. John P. Nicholson : 

Five Medals, two of copper, two of gilt, one of base metal. 
Indian Drill, from shore of Lake Michigan. 

Mr. John Perry, Bristol, Pa.: 

Bead Ornament, from Cosenza, Italy. 

Dr. F. W. Lewis : 

Small Ivory Carving on teakwood stand. Chinese. 

Mrs. Jones Wister : 

Soapstone Bowl, from Navajo Indians. 

Mortar and Pestle, stone, from Navajo Indians. 

Mrs. Frederick Graff, deceased, bequest : 

Collection of Artistic Furniture, Porcelains, Silver, Bronzes, Bric-a-brac. 
Books, etc., selected from the furnishing of her late residence. 

Mr. F. D. Langenheim: 

Carved Drinking Gourd, from Guatemala. 
Wooden Comb, from Guatemala. 



17 

Mr. James Carr, New York City : 

Collection of Parian and Majolica ware, consisting of Busts, Figures, 
Vases, Plaques and Pedestal, 11 pieces. 

Mr. Crawford Arnold : 

"Columbus" Clock, wood. Eeproduction of clocks of 1492. 

Yamanaka, Amano & Co., Boston, through Mr. John T. Morris : 
Brass Incense Burner from Buddhist temple, Japan. 

Loans were made by : 

Mr. Simon Dingley : 

Blue and white ''Pilgrim" Plate. English. 

Mr. John T. Morris : 

Parian Transparency, and Mould for making same, from Phoenix Pottery 
Co., 1870. 

Eockingham Pitcher, Bennington, Vt., 181:9. 

"Toby" Jug, flint enamelled ware, Bennington, Vt., 1849. 

Dog's Head, terra-cotta, mounted, Phoenixville, 1867, 

" Hindoo" Vase, made by Edwin Bennett Pottery Co., Baltimore. Deco- 
rated by Miss Kate De Witt Berg. 

Large Belleek Tankard, decorated. Morris & Willmore, Trenton, N. J. 

Earthenware Jar, with inscription and date. Old Vickers Pottery, Chester 
Co., Pa., 1822. 

Three decorated Earthen Plates, Montgomery Co., Pa, 1826-1840. 

Ewer Vase, Lonhuda Faience. Underglaze decoration. 

Earthen Disli, slip decorated, Lebanon Co., Pa., 1786. 

Four pieces Old Bennington Ware. 

Seven Stoneware Vases, Dedham Pottery, Mass. 

Two Vases, "Oxblood" glaze, Dedham Pottery, Mass. 

Plate, Stoneware. Crackle. Eabbit border. Dedham Pottery. 

Five Pitchers and Jugs. American ware. 

Shaving Mug, earthenware. Middlebury, Vt., about 1835. 

Earthen Plate with mounted soldier and German inscription. Montgomery 
Co., Pa., 1805. 

Two Earthen Plates, Pennsylvania German, 1830 and 1840. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society : 

Sixty-three Coins and Medals added to their Collection. 

Miss F. F. Caldwell : 

Five pieces of Porcelain. 

Three of Carved Ivory. 

One of Carved Jade. 

Carved Ehinoceros Horn on teakwood stand. 

Silver Plaque, repousse. Spanish. 

Silver Dish, leaf shape. Turkish. 

Five Dutch Village Scenes, silver relief. 

Incense Burner, Cloisonne enamel on metal. 

Pitcher, Limoges enamel. 



18 

Mrs. a. M. Thackara: 

Saddle, Horse Equipruent and Camp Box used by General Sherman during 
the Civil War. 
Mr. Dalton Dorr : 

Six pieces of Pottery and Porcelain, mostly English. 

Small Clock, Vienna, about 1720. 
Mr. D. Dail Jr. : 

Parian Pitcher, Bennington, Vt. 
Misses N. and M. Dopson, Camden, N. J. : 

Two Chinese Caps, for boy and girl. 
Miss Susan N. Smith : 

Five i)ieces of a Porcelain Tea Set, once the property of Marie Antoinette. 

Tea Caddy of tortoise-shell inlaid with silver. 
City of Philadelphia, through Mr. Alfred S, Eisenhower, Chief of Bureau 
of City Property : 

Cabinet of Photographs of the Centennial Exliibition of 1876. 

Framed Photograph of Bird's-Eye View of Centennial Grounds, 187(3. 

Mosaic Portrait of General Wasliington, framed, on easel. 
Mr. Edwin A, Barber : 

Copper Plate, and Print from the same, used for decorating eartlienware 
Plates, by John Kidgway, llanley, England, 1840. 
Mr. William Kleinstuber : 

Set of Chinese .Jewelry, filigree gold with carved settings 

Bracelet, Brooch and Earrings. 

Purchases for the Museiiin : 

Twenty-five pieces of Englisli AVare, decorated with American views, pur- 
chased from Special Fund subscribed for the purpose. 

Two Figures, Japanese Temple Guards, wood, carved and painted, heroic 
size. Taken from the gateway of Toshio Daiji (Temple) at Nara. Over 
300 years old. Purchased from Temple Fund. 

Six Clay Pipes, portrait heads. Made by Chas. Kurtli, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Two Clay Pipes, portrait heads. Made by Chas. Becker & Co., Balti- 
more, Md. 

Chromo-Lithograph, " St. Augustine and the Child." From Arundel So. 
ciety Subscription. 

Seven pieces of Glassware, imitation of old Cyprus glass. 

Plate, with portrait of McKinley, E. Liverpool Pottery Co. 

Two Porcelain Cups and Saucers, Chinese. 

Accessions to the Library by jjurchase : 
Oriental Ceramic Art. Collection of W. C. Walters. 
Catalogues of Coins and Medals, by Lyman H. Low. 
.Journal of the Society of Arts, London, Vol. 45. Subscription. 
Median's Monthly, Vol. 7. Subscription. 
Birds, Vols. 1 and 2. Subscription. 



19 



By gift from 



Dr. E. S. Vanderslice ; Mr. E. A. Marsh, Waltham, Mass. ; Mr. Michael 
Enstum ; Mr. AVilliam Lindsay ; Mr. Clarence B. Moore ; Mr. John T. Morris ; 
Dr. Isaac Norris ; Prof. Maxwell Sonimerville ; Mr. H. AValters, Baltimore 
(Book of Progressive Paintings to accompany Walters Collection of Oriental 
Ceramic Art) ; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts ; Museum of Fine 
Arts, Boston ; National Academy of Design, New York ; Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, New York ; Detroit Museum of Art. 

DALTON DOPvR, 

Director of the Museum. 


















































^ 


J 


^ 


1^ 


00 


s 








ro 


Pi 


vS 


^ 


ov 


vg 


K 


=§ 


pi 


^ 


K 


f:; 


o\ 


\ 


S 


2 


s 


< 




en 


1^ 


t^ 


Sv 


in 


<N_ 


q\ 




ro 


CO 


Ov 


■^ 


cc 


<^ 


■«- 


■*■ 


Cl_ 


^ 


■»»■ 


VO 


9) 


H 






lO 





oo" 




cfv 


oo" 






vo" 




oo" 






«" 




dv 


ov 




cT 




2 


O 


m 


o\ 










in 


VO 


00 


OO 


N 


r^ 


VO 






Ov 


00 


t-. 


t^ 


^ 


=2 


8^ 


H 












M 


M 








Pi 


P) 


<N 


N 


CO 


PI 


w 


CO 


CO 


ro 


M 


»0 
















































» 
















































1"' 


!-' 


















































^ 






ro 


VD 


00 


CO 


•* 


„ 


ri 


VO 


Ov 


VO 


Ov 


m 


VO 


o 


Ov 


■* 


->!■ 


CO 


O 


PI 


§ 








00 


^ 




t>: 




OO 




« 




Ov 




Ov 


t~. 




•* 


VO 


ro 


o 


m 


-* 




e 














Ov 








<N 


". 






r; 


en 


o> 




Pi^ 






vo^ 


■*; 




































■;- 
















D 






lO 








vo" 


VO 






t^ 


rn 




m 


dv 


VO 





t^ 




PI* 




pT 


0* 




O 


















































V 
















































u 


Q 
















































< 














































c 


>: 
















































H 


^ 
S 






vg^ 


N 


oo 


On 


^ 


•&■ 


OV 


oo 





in 


-*- 


M 


M 


00 








H 


o 


PI 


°R 


VO 


Q 








oo 


Tf 


00 












OO 


VO 




^ 


ov 


-^ 


in 


00 




vo 


ro 


lA 


t^ 


00 


vO 


Tf 


IN 


t~~ 





t~. 


■- 


VO__ 


in 


in 


"? 


in 


o 


^ 




" 


<^ 


Ov 


Z 


V 


rt 


oo 








^ 


6 


in 


o" 


o' 


o" 


•^ 


rn 


M 


oo* 


ro 


pr 





i-T 


00* 


PI 


oo" 


< 


> 




































w 




H 


p» 


H 


X 


o 












































O 


















































c 
a 
a, 














































o 


M 


t^ 


o 


N 


0\ 


„ 





„ 


„ 


o 


VO 


in 


o 


m 


^ 


rn 


r^ 


„ 


^ 


00 


«o 




1 


VO 




rr> 


vO 


VO 


VO 


in 









t^ 


r<-> 


ov 


m 






r^ 


o 






PI 






q^ 


00 


00 


(N 




OV 


t-» 


■*; 


ro 


"? 


■*; 


ov 


t^ 


0_ 


". 


", 


=!> 


ro 


t^ 








6 


0\ 








^ 


S^ 


in 


o" 






dv 


vo" 


VO 






pr 




^ 




Ov 






o 


s 
















CI 


CO 


M 




« 


(N 


CO 


•^ 


CO 


w 








O 


c 




























































































^; 


^ 














































E 


-f 


ro 


^D 




in 


^ 





in 


'J- 


(^ 


^ 


in 





o 


„ 


t^ 


VO 


^ 


t^ 


in 


^ 


in 






00 










m 


VO 




t^ 


8 




in 


^ 






t^ 







m 




vo 




W 


vD^ 




in 


vO 


t^ 






Ov 




VO 


ro 


Ov 


rn 


°°. 


r; 




in 








V 
















































T? 








^ 


Ov 


o 


co~ 




00 


tC 




•<f 





















a 


^ 














ro 


« 


CO 


<M 


■* 


fO 


PI 


ro 


■<J- 


■* 


VO 


•* 


•il- 


ro 


ro 




J5 
















































































































































n 














































-u 


-^ 


Th 


H 


oo 


N 


CO 


m 


M 


N 


c~< 


CO 


VO 


00 


(O 


•^ 


t^ 


VO 


H 


o 


"S 


» 


in 






a. 




VO 




00 




VO 


VO 


M 


in 


f 


00 


PI 





VO 





Ov 


00 




o 


vo 


PI 




3 








00 


00 


r~. 


VO 


On 




vO_ 




■♦ 










1^ 


00 




vO__ 


in 


Ov 




bp 


H 






















































lO 


in 


in 


O 




in 




VO 


o 




VO 




o" 


00 


vo" 




VO* 




■< 














M 


M 




fO 


■* 


ro 


in 




CO 


cn 


in 




•*■ 


ro 


ro 


















































^ 
















































T3 




\o 


m 


tn 


P) 


Ov 


Ov 


M 


f^ 


„ 


^ 


Ov 


in 


in 


t^ 


t> 


„ 


„ 


ro 


t^ 


00 






OJ 






o\ 


VO 


m 


-. 


in 


cr> 




VO 


Ov 


I-. 




in 


f». 





PI 






Ov 


00 




_:C 






•■O 


VO 


VO 


x>- 






^ 






m 


■* 


q. 


r» 


t^ 




PI 


vo 




ro 




- 


o 










^ 


vo' 


oi 


IN 


vo' 


dv 


in 


tn 


m 


oo" 


6 


in 


$ 


in 


tC 


d^ 


in 




►— ) 


















f) 






Pi 


PI 


m 






■* 


in 


VO 


ro 


PI 




























^ 






















ri 


■^ 














































-C 






VO 


t^ 


VO 


in 




OV 


■* 




■♦ 


m 


M 


VO 




in 




'i- 




00 


PI 












vH^ 


oo 


t~.- 


a> 


w 


m 




Ov 


O 


-<*- 


o 


in 


in 


00 


VO 


VO 


m 


t^ 


vo 




c 


i 










(^ 


vO_ 


m 






tn 


ro 


en 




oo_ 


vo_^ 




o 


vo 




Ov 
































































rn 


go' 


Ov 






rC 


pi" 


VO 


M* 


VO* 


m 


pi" 


d^ 


ro 








.2 


c 
a 
E 
o 




















ro 


PI 


m 




PI 








ro 




CO 


















































o 




8 


O 






N 


« 


VO 


^ 


m 




VO 


r^ 




PI 


VO 


^ 


P) 


Ov 


O 


o 




>. 


c 


00 


o\ 


o 


OV 


VO 


VO 


^ 


VO 


o 


m 




in 


Ov 


m 


ro 


m 


ro 










2 


t^ 




q 


vO_^ 


°°, 


VO_ 


ro 











Ov 






m 




t^ 


vo 










_c 














































s 










vo" 






00* 


Ov 


[^ 




di 


o" 


t^ 




f^ 




in 


ro 


vo 






•^ 


13 










w 


"H 






(N 


P) 


PI 


ro 


en 


m 


m 


•^ 




•* 




•* 






u 


IS 














































o 


^ 


























































































'> 


lO 


(^ 


00 


VO 


OV 


OV 


ov 


M 


00 


8 


VO 


-l- 


M 


in 


o 


•^ 


m 


ro 


^ 


vo 













r-. 


VO 


(N 


(N 


w 


m 


OO 


ov 


o 


O 


o 


m 


00 


Ov 





00 


Ov 


P4 




5- 

< 


o 


s 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


!-<_ 






t^ 


ro 




r^ 




00 


in 




ov 




't; 


-*■ 


O; 


"? 




1^ 


E 


H~ 






dv 


ro 


Ov 


r^ 


h" 


in 


o' 


Tp 


pr 


oo" 


in 


cT 


vo" 


tC 


ro 


VO* 


































PI 


p< 




ro 






c< 






^ 
















































e 

3 
C 


fa 














































<u 
















































Xi 












































rC 


4= 


■" 


m 


VO 


in 


Tf 


M 


o 


O 


VO 


fn 


Ov 


00 


ro 


O 


N 


VO 


P) 


H 


Ov 


Ov 


PI 




o 




J= 


\o 


o 






OO 


t^ 


VO 


n 


oo 


in 


in 


VO 


00 


■* 


in 


m 




ro 


PI 






I. 






^ 


00 


in 




in 


t^ 




"5 


vO_ 




f; 











P;. 




m 


Pi^ 


r>. 




a 






























































00 


VO 


-=P 


•^ 




vo" 




Tf 


m 


dv 




OV 


-^ 


pT 


t^ 




s 


M 










" 










" 




" 








" 


P< 














.2 














































^ 


o 


























































































bO 














































b 


3 




00 


^ 


o\ 


in 


N 


O 


(N 


in 





oo 


^ 


o\ 


J 


Q 


m 


N 


r^ 


in 


oo 


„ 




rt 


o 


oo 




c^ 


m 




VO 


ro 


VO 


VO 


00 


t^ 


VO 


f^ 




8_ 


m 




m 


00 


in 




3 


O 


(J 


00_ 






vo_ 








Ov 




oo_ 


Ov 


in 








§ 


0_ 


o^ 


in 
























































lU 








cT 




ro 


c^ 




VO 






o" 


N 






t^ 




PI* 


^ 






^ 


^ 












































fa 


o 


























































































b 


S 


" 


t- 


Ov 


VO 


t^ 


r'l 


„ 


„ 


^ 


m 


„ 


in 


00 





C3V 


o 


CO 


00 


oo 


Ov 


^ 




3 


p 












t^ 


03 
















t- 


OV 


o 




Ov 




ro 






3 




ro 


VO 


VO 


^L 


in 


N 


!N_ 


Ov 




en 








*! 


t^ 


in 




Ov 


Ov 






W) 








































- 




S 


2 
















pT 


•<f 




VO 


rn 


ov 


Ov 


VO 


tC 


ro 




O 




O 




rt 


< 






































H 






•— > 


fa 














































r^ 




<» 


S> 





„ 


N 


m 


^ 


in 


VO 


(^ 


00 


ov 


o 


^ 


p) 


ro 


^ 


in 


vo 


t^ 












t-. 


oo 


00 


00 


00 








00 


00 


00 


o\ 


Ov 


Ov 


Ov 


OS 


Ov 


Ov 


o> 






CO 


3 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OO 


00 


00 


oo 


CO 


CO 




00 




oo 


<» 


00 


00 


OO 


CO 


00 






s' 




* 


* 


** 








































One of the Drawing Rooms. 



THE SCHOOL. 



The enlargement of the activities of the School for the past 3"ear, 
as indicated by the increase in enrollment, is more marked than 
it has been in any corresponding period of its history, with the 
single exception of 1894, the year of its removal to the i^resent 
location at Broad and Pine streets. The registration for the year 
1897 amounted to 809, an increase over the preceding year of 177 ; 
nearly 30 per cent. 

The increase is pretty evenly distributed among the different 
departments, and is largely to be attributed to the much greater 
demand for the free scholarships, provided for by the appropria- 
tions received from the State. In the case of the scholarships 
available for residents of this city and vicinity also, the increase 
is considerable, although the number of appointments made from 



22 

the Public Schools remains as it has been for several years. This 
is accounted for by the fact that we have, in former years, charged 
the appointments from the High, Normal and Manual Training 
Schools of this city to the Temple Fund, thus virtually restricting 
its benefits to this class of pupils. The appropriation made by 
City Councils last June enables us to place these scholarships on 
the same basis as those which have been made from the Gram- 
mar Schools ever since 1880, and, by classing them together as 
" City Scholarships," sets free the twenty-four " Temple Scholar- 
ships," which thus become available for appointments at large. 

The following lectures were given during the year : 

A course of six lectures on Heraldry, illustrated by charts and 
drawings, by Prof. Chas. E. Dana. Delivered weekly on Tues- 
days, beginning January 12th. 

A course of two lectures on Jeanne D'Arc, with stereopticon 
illustrations, by Rev. C. P. H. Nason, on February 5th and 11th. 

A lecture on the preparation of Stock and Advanced Manufac- 
turing, before the Textile School, by Mr. John F. Bolger, on Feb- 
ruary 8th. 

A course of seven lectures before the students of the Textile 
School on Patents and Patent Law, by Chas. N. Butler, Esq. De- 
livered weekly on Fridays, beginning March 26th. 

A lecture on " What Illustration Means," by Mr. Wm. Martin 
Johnson, on Feb. 16th, an exhibition of Mr. Johnson's work being 
made at the same time. 

On January 27th the National Association of Manufacturers, 
which met in convention in Philadelphia, visited the School in a 
body and adopted the following resolutions expressive of its ap- 
preciation of our work : 

" This Association, having visited in a body the School of Indus- 
trial Art of the Pennsylvania Museum, and inspected its various 
departments, desires to place on the minutes of the proceedings of 
this convention an expression, on the part of the convention, of 
gratification in finding so extensive and well-equipped a technical 
School ; of the high character of its results as shown in the fin- 
ished work of the students ; and the endorsement of its plan, pur- 
pose and scope. 

" We recognize in this School a most powerful factor for produc- 
ing from the ranks of our youth earnest, industrious and intel- 
ligent citizens, whose influence will be to strengthen the State. 




Class in Interior Decoration; 



"We congratulate our President, Mr. Theodore C. Search, upon 
his connection with and support of this School, and wish him 
Godspeed in his noble and philanthropic work." 

On June 2d the School was honored by a visit from the^Presi- 
dent of the United States, who came as the guest of Vice-Presi- 
dent Search, and was received by the Trustees and Associate Com- 
mittee of Women. He made a tour of inspection through the 
different departments, in which he manifested great interest and 
of which he expressed high approval, and in a short address to 
the students he congratulated them upon the " splendid oppor- 
tunities " afforded them by the School. 

On October 27th and 2Sth the New England Cotton Manufac- 
turers' Association held its regular semi-annual meeting in the 
Auditorium, having met in Philadelphia with the express pur- 
pose of giving its members an opportunity to inspect the School^ 



24 

whose work had ah'eady been, in part at least, described to them 
by Director France, of the Textile School, at a former meeting in 
Boston. After thoroughly inspecting our work the Association 
adopted the following resolutions : 

^^Resolved, That this Association has studied, with the greatest in- 
terest, the work of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of In- 
dustrial Art, including the Philadel23hia Textile School, and de- 
sires to record in this way its high appreciation of the important 
service which this Institution is rendering to the cause of Ameri- 
can industrial development. We feel that among the agencies 
which it is the worthiest aim of such associations as ours to pro- 
mote and support, industrial education is of the first importance, 
and we warmly commend the spirit in which this magnificent 
school is conducted, and the methods which characterize its teach- 
ing. 

'^Resolved, That no better use can be made of public funds, of 
private munificence, or of the power that results from association, 
than in the most liberal support of such institutions as the Penn- 
sylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art." 

During the summer our employees, who have the care of the 
building, were quite as busy as usual, making the necessary re- 
pairs and alterations, the building of four new fire-escapes, in obe- 
dience to the official notice which was served upon us last spring, 
causing a great deal of extra work. The construction of these fire 
escapes was all done by our own men, so that no expense was in- 
curred beyond the cost of a portion of the material (S288.72). A 
considerable portion of material was presented, as noted elsewhere 
in this report. 

In the Art School, the room which was formerly used by the 
class in modelling, was taken for an exhibition-room, and the 
modelling class was removed to a suite of four rooms in the north- 
west corner of the building, formerly used by the classes in carv- 
ing, pen-drawing, and elementary ornament. The installation of 
the modelling class necessitated the cutting of archways through 
the partitions which separated these rooms. The class in carving 
and wood-work w^as removed to the basement, and the class in pen- 
drawing, which is now an attractive and well-attended class, w^as 
removed to the third floor of the north wing, where it was in- 
stalled in the place of the former lunch-room. A somewhat more 




One of the Hand-Loom Weave-Rooms, Philadelphia Textile School. 



compact arrangement of the drawing-classes makes it possible to 
accommodate the work in elementary ornament in the main 
studio of the first floor. The exhibition-room makes an attractive 
addition to the front of the building, and makes it possible to dis- 
play enough of the work to give visitors a fair idea of the ground 
covered by the different classes, in the same way that a similar 
room in the south wang has long served to show the work of the 
Textile School. 

In the Textile School a new floor of maple was laid in the room 
occupied by the cotton machinery, which machinery was re-ar- 
ranged and received the substantial additions noted in this report. 

A complete rearrangement of the suite of rooms on the first 
floor, in the southwest corner of the building, made it possible to 
fit up a very attractive lecture-room for the department of chemis- 



26 

try and dyeing, and a separate room for experimental work in dye- 
ing, which has hitherto suffered from the fact that it has had to 
be done in the laboratory for general chemistry, the fumes gen- 
erated in which are often actively destructive of the materials 
used in dyeing. 

The auditorium, the plaster walls of which had become very 
much defaced, was renovated throughout, and the walls covered 
with burlap. New window-shades were furnished, and enough 
new gas-brackets to replace several old, unsightly ones. The room 
was, moreover, fitted with electric lights, a new screen, and every 
appliance for the most perfect work with the lantern. For this 
renovation of the auditorium, as well as for the installation of a 
new electric stereopticon which it now contains, we are indebted 
to the liberality of one of our trustees, Mr. M. A. Furbush. 

Mr. Plasschaert having resigned his position as Professor of 
Sculpture, Mr. Paul Lachenmeyer was appointed to the position 
at the beginning of the year 1897, and Mr. Ferdinand Marenzana 
was appointed Instructor in Drawing in the evening classes. The 
resignation of Mr. Harris, which was presented during the sum- 
mer, also left vacant the professorship of drawing from the antique 
and from life, which was filled by the appointment of Mr. Herman 
Deigendesch. 

Efficient service in the ever-growing evening class is rendered 
by Mr. Joseph Copeland and Miss Isabella Bradley. 

One hundred and seventy-seven books and pamphlets, and two 
hundred and eighty-nine plates of the work of the old masters 
have been added to the Library during the year. Thirty of these 
books were purchased, and the remaining one hundred and forty- 
seven books and all the plates w^ere presented by the following : 
Mrs. Frank K. Hippie, the United States Government, the late 
Crawford Arnold, the Dry Goods Economist, Lehigh University, 
Howard Pyle, Illinois State Museum, Dr. Nathan C. Schaeffer, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction; Young Men's Christian 
Association, Anson K. Cross, Charles F. Jackson, Governor Hast- 
ings, Dr. Wm. N. Egle, State Librarian, L. W. Miller. 

A number of objects of industrial art have also been presented 
to the School during the year, notably a valuable collection of 
eighty framed engravings and etchings, which were bequeathed 
to the Institution by the late Mrs. Frederic Graff. These have been 
hung in the Committee Room. 




A View of the Cotton-Spinning Room, Philadelphia Textile School. 



Mrs. Frank K. Hippie has also given a number of objects of art. 

Three specimens of Phoenician glass were presented by Elias 
A. Khouri. 

A handsome case of mounted butterflies by Mr. John T. Morris. 

A bookcase by Miss Elizabeth Roberts. 

Two earthenware vessels made by the Isleta Indians, and a 
water-basket made by the Mescalero Apaches, by Miss Anna 
Blanchard. 

An old German horn by Mr. Charles H. Bockius. 

An electric stereopticon by Mr. M. A. Furbush, who also gener- 
ously bore the expense of renovating the auditorium and intro- 
ducing electric light. 



28 

Ten pieces of faience and porcelain presented by Messrs. Rich- 
ard Briggs & Son, of Boston, Mass. 

Some draperies, two brackets, a spinning-wheel, two tables, a 
reel, one copper tea-kettle, eighteen picture-frames, an Indian 
basket, a piece of Spanish lace, four candlesticks, two lamps, two 
pearl shells, a china tea-pot, and a wrought-iron lock by Mrs. M. 
T. Keehmle and Miss Aspasia Eckert Ramborger. 

A Japanese basket by Mrs. Harold M. Sill. 

Materials for building fire-escapes presented by Messrs. Hunter 
and Dixon. 

Tools, etc., for the engineers' department by Messrs. Day 
Brothers. 

Metal work, furnace and appliances, by Messrs. Beach & Co. 

A lot of interesting colonial marble and wood-work, doorways, 
fireplaces, etc., presented by the Philadelphia Saving Fund, and 
set up in different parts of the school building. 

The Textile School has received donations from the following 
firms : 

Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., 1 20-harness improved 
4x1 box light fancy cotton loom, 1 20-harness improved 1x1 box 
lappet loom, with leno attachments. 

Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., 100 bars D. B. chain 
for Crompton woolen loom, 1 complete set 14 to 25 change gears 
for silk loom. 

Fales & Jenks Machine Company, Pawtucket, R. I., 1 60-spindle 
twister, combination warp and filling wind, 30 spindles wet twist- 
ing, 30 spindles dry twisting ; also services of one man to erect the 
same. 

Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass., 1 80-spindle im- 
proved cotton spinning frame, complete. 

T. C. Entwistle, Lowell, Mass., 1 beaming machine, complete. 

Lindsay, Hyde & Co., Philadelphia, 1 25-spindle woolen yarn 
adjustable Reel, arranged to reel from either bobbins or twister 
spools. 

Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass., 1 R. H., 1891 pattern, 25- 
spindle reel, 3" space, 54" skein ; also 2 pairs of temples and 
plates. 

Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass., 1 new im- 
proved, 1897 pattern, revolving flat card, complete, to replace the 
one which was at the School. 



29 

Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I., 1 skele- 
ton, Daly's differential motion, with stands mounted in mahogany 
wood. 

Fairmount Machine Company, Philadelphia, 1 20-harness In- 
graham dobby and findings ; also 40 33" straps, 20 6" straps, 20 
jack eyes. 

M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Company, Philadelphia, a series 
of change-gears and twist-rim for mule, change pulleys for cards ; 
also 50 lantern-slides for lecture-work. 

Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I., 1 dozen castings. 

Geo. V. Cresson & Co., Philadelphia, counter-shaft, pulleys, 
hangers, washers, etc.; also erecting of the same. 

Mr. F. T. Holder, Yonkers, N. Y., $25.00 in cash for use of 
woolen department. 

John Haugh & Co., Philadelphia, 1 60-gallon oil tank. 

C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia, jack, spindle and squaring bands 
and Jacquard twines to the value of $30.00. 

R. Greenwood & Bault, Philadelphia, dyeing 100 pounds of 
yarn, different colors. 

Ladies' Silk Culture Association, Philadelphia, display of silk 
processes from the egg to the woven fabric, also reeling machine, 
complete, and 1 extra reel. 

Aerophore Air-Moistening and Ventilating Company, Providence, 
R. I., 1 wet and dry bulb hygrometer. 

Brown Bros. Co., Providence, R. I., composition travellers for 
wet twisting. 

New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association, Boston, Mass., 
copies of Transactions of the Association from its organization to 
date. 

Whitinsville Spinning Ring Co., Whitinsville, Mass., 25 copies 
of " Prize Essays on Spinning." 

Mr. Christopher Hooker, Lowell, Mass., 5 books of the " Brun- 
ner Muster Zeitung.'^ 

C. G. Sargent's Sons, Graniteville, Mass., two framed pictures 
illustrating new improved washing-machine, and improved burr- 
picker. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co., N. Y., 1 large framed picture 
showing their various factories in Elberfeld, Germany. 

Fisher Manufacturing Co., Fisherville, Mass., 50 pounds of single 
40's cotton warp yarn, sized and beamed. 



30 

Fitchburg Mfg. Co., Fitchburg, Mass., 161 pounds net of 2-80's 
yarn. 

J. R. Montgomery Co., Windsor Locks, Conn., 40 pounds fancy 
novelty yarns. 

Mr. George Grayson, Darby, 10 pounds of fancy novelty yarns. 

Chas. J. Webb & Co., Philadelphia, 70 pounds of scoured wool. 

Messrs. Harding & Caverly, Boston, Mass., 23 pounds of wool. 

Messrs. Cunningham & Seal, Philadelphia, samples of pulled 
wools. 

Malcolm Mills Co., Philadelphia, samples of fancy novelty 
yarns. 

W. P. Wilson, Commercial Museum, Philadelphia, 275 sam- 
ples of wool, hair, noils, waste, etc. 

Chas. ^IcCloud & Co., Philadelphia, samples of fancy looped 
and knotted yarns. 

Messrs. Hughes & Muller, Philadelphia, blanket range of worsted 
suitings. 

Keyser, Fisler & Co., Philadelphia, collection of territory fleeces. 

W. Hall & Co., Lansdowne, collection of samples of various 
grades and colors of shoddy. 

Frederic Zerega & Co., Liverpool, England, collection of different 
varieties of cotton samples. 

Messrs. Jones &Herbst, Philadelphia, collection of wool samples. 

Laboratory and Dye-House. 

Stephenson Company, 25 pounds of worsted yarn samples. 

Continental Worsted Mills, 25 pounds of worsted yarn samples. 

Erben, Harding & Co., 25 pounds of worsted yarn samples. 

National Soap Co., 200 pounds of fulling and scouring soaps. 

Vacuum Soap Co., 150 pounds of soap. 

M. D. Hunter & Co., 625 pounds of soap. 

Mr. Walter S. Gardner, 3 dozen dye poles. 

India Alkali Works, 1 barrel of wool savogran. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co., 2 pounds of peroxide of 
sodium. 

0. S. Janney & Co., 140 pounds of nitrate of iron, 60 pounds of 
indigo extract, 25 pounds of cutch, 200 pounds of soda ash. 

Howe, Balch & Co., 2 pounds of indigo. 

James E. Mitchell & Co., 50 pounds of cotton yarn. 



31 

W. D'Ollier & Co., 150 pounds of cotton yarn. 

W. J. Matheson & Co., 100 pounds of bichromate of potash, 200 
pounds of salt, 50 2-pound samples of dyestuffs. 

Read Holliday & Sons, 1 pound acid magenta, 50 pounds Glau- 
ber's salts. 

New York & Boston Dyewood Co., 21 1-pound samples of ani- 
line dyestuffs, and 300 pounds of d3^ewood extracts. 

Heller & Merz, 50 2 -pound samples of dyestuffs. 
Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co., 50 2-pound samples of dyestuffs. 

Sharpless Dyewood & Extract Company, 350 pounds of dye- 
wood extracts. 

William Pickhardt & Kuttroff, 50 •> -pound samples of dyestuffs 
and 14 i^ounds of alizarine dyes. 

Victor Koechl & Co., 25 ^-pound samples of dyestuffs. 

Kalle & Co., 50 *-pound samples of dyestuffs. 

Sykes & Street, 50 i -pound sami:)les of dyestuffs. 

Geisenheimer & Co., 30 4-oz. samples of dyestuffs. 

LOANS. 

Mr. John T. Morris, Philadelphia, loan of 1 Zentmayer high 
grade microscope, Avith •] and 3-inch oculars, 8-10 and 1-5 objec- 
tives, and polariscope attachments. 

Mr. John Lunn, Philadelphia, loan of a turning-lathe and card 
clothing machine. 

jMessrs. Beswick & Kay, Philadelphia, loan of a cylinder clothing 
machine. 

Courtesies were extended by the following firms : American 
Card Clothing Company ; American Drosophore Company ; Phila- 
delphia Bobbin Company ; Mr. John Levering ; Folwell Bros. & 
Co. ; Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co. ; Firth & Foster Co., and S. A. 
Crozer & Son. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises were held in the Broad Street 
Theatre, on Friday evening, June 4th, and were followed by an 
exhibition of the students' work in the school building at Broad 
and Pine streets. 

An address, " The Modern Ideal in Education," was made l^y 
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, of Columbia University, New York, 
with remarks by the President, Mr. William Piatt Pepper, Mrs. 
E. D. Gillespie, and Mr. Theodore C. Search. 



32 

The following prizes, diplomas and certificates were awared at 
the same time : 

SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART PRIZES. 

President's Prize, $25.00. — Offered by the President for the best set of 
(h-awings executed by tlie students in the Course of Industrial Drawing. 
Awarded to Joseph Frank Copeland. 

Frederic Graff Prize, $25.00. — For work in Arcliitectural Design, com- 
peted for by students in the evening chiss alone. Awarded to Otto Charles 
Herold. 

Honorable mention to Thomas II. Jolly, Win. Farr Higgs, J. Oscar Betelle 
and C. Francis Smith. 

Henry Perry Leland Prize, $25.00. — Offered by Mrs. John Harrison for 
the best Drawing in Pen and Ink. AwvTrded to ]Milton P. Herbert. 

Honorable mention to Louise K. Tuttle. 

Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith Prize, $25.00. — Awarded annually in such manner 
and for such work as shall be determined by the Principal of the School. First 
prize of $15.00 awarded to Mary Hastings Vaughan for Diploma Piece, an orig- 
inal work in sculpture. Second prize of $10.00 to Salvadore Belotti. 

John T. Morris Prizes.— Two equal prizes of $10.00 each. Offered by Mr. 
John T. Morris for drawing of Details of the Human Figure. Awarded to 
Martha Walter and Helen Wood. 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

First Prize, $20.00.— Offered for the second best set of drawings executed 
by students in the Course of Industrial Drawing. Awarded to Charles Thomas 
Scott. 

Honorable mention to Louis J. Taws and James Sylvester Deehan. 

Second Prize, $10.00. — Offered for the year's work in the Course of Color 
and Applied Design. Awarded to Helen Liming Redles, 

Third Prize, $10.00. — Offered for w^ork in the same Course. Awarded to 
Mary Pickering Dow. 

Fourth Prizk, $10.00. — Offered for work in the same Course. Awarded to 
Anne Myrtle Brinton. 

Honorable mention to Helen Gertrude Foster. 

Mrs. Georc4E K. Crozer Prize for Drawing, $20.00. — Awarded to W. G. 
Cassner. 

Honorable mention to James Berdy. 

Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize for Modelling. $20.00. —Awarded to 
Marie Edith Long. Second prize, $10.00, to Anna Estelle Rice. 

Honorable mention to Salvadore Belotti. 

Caroline Axford Magee Prize, $20.00. — Offered by Miss Fannie S. Magee 
for most meritorious work in Pictorial Composition. Awarded to Daniel E. 
Sutton. 

Maddock First Prize, $20.00. — Offered by Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, 
N. J., for design for a Garden Vase. Awarded to Norma Isabelle Simpson. 



33 

Maddock Second Prize, $10.00. — For the same. Awarded to Marie Edith 
Long. 

Weber Prize, Draughtsman's Table. — Offered by F. Weber & Co. for best 
work in Instrumental Drawing. Awarded to Charles Sharpless Wenck. 

Honorable mention to Isabella Bradley and Eichard Shoemaker Cox. 

Kipka Prize, Sketching Outfit. — For best Decorative Work in Color. 
Awarded to Daniel E. Sutton. 

Honorable mention to Anne Myrtle Brinton. 

Henry M. Taws Prize. — Water-Color Sketching Outfit for best Flower 
Painting. Awarded to George L. Gugert. 

Honorable mention to Helen Taylor. 

Jacob H.Weil Prize. — Outfit of Oleo Water-Colors for best sketch in water- 
colors from Life. Awarded to Martha AValter. 

Honorable mention to Harry B. Mclntire. 

Diplomas. — Marie Edith Long, Anne Estelle Eice, Xorma Isabelle Simpson, 
Mary Hastings Vaughan. 

Certificates. — Course in Interior Decoration. — Mary Hyde Graff, Ee- 
becca Hemphill. 

Course ix Decorative Painting and Applied Design (Class B). — 
Anne Myrtle Brinton, Grace Elizabeth Coale, Mary Pickering Dow, Mabel 
Farr Higgs, Marie Edith Long, Gertrude Lea Mann, Helen Liming Eedles, 
Anne Estelle Eice, Bessie Estelle Eice, Edith Bitner Snyder, Meta Yaux War- 
rick. 

Industrial DRA\yiNG (Class A). — Mary Ada Ancker, Lynn Halm Boyer, 
Isabella Bradley, Susie Emma Branin, Frederick William Brown, Winifred 
Buck, Eichard Shoemaker Cox, Joseph Frank Copeland, John Wigner Cul- 
bertson, James Sylvester Deehan, Anne Cecilia Haupt, Laura Adams Humph- 
reys, Sara Anne Holt, Eleanor Wolfenden Hyde, Helen Augusta .Johns, Eleanor 
Walzer Kessler, Katherine Matilda Knight, Ellie Frances Knight, Frederick 
AVilliam Henry Meyer, Howard Dornan McKeever, Frank Wotton Morris, 
Harry Mercer Orwig, Abbie Hay Subers, Mary Lintemuth Sibley, Sophia Ee- 
becca Solis-Cohen, Charles Thomas Scott, Flora May Smith, Mary Allen Smith, 
Katherine Keen Schlater, Louis J. Taws, Charles Sharpless Wenck. 

Decorative Sculpture.— Salvadore Belotti. 

Applied Design.— .Jacob Louis Chalfin, Elizabeth Frances Foster, Helen 
Gertrude Foster, Edna Browning Euby. 

Teachers' Certificates, Elementary. — Sara Anne Holt, Esther Anne 
Eeese, Caroline Sproul, Elizabeth Anne Wood, Martha Eyre Warner. 

Teachers' Certificates, Normal Art Course. — Anne Myrtle Brinton, 
Eleanor Walzer Kessler, Sara Elliot Levis, Frederick William Henry Meyer, 
Norma Isabelle Simpson, Mary Hastings Vaughan. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL PEIZES. 

The National Association of Wool Manufacturers' Gold Medal for 
General Excellence.— Awarded to Carlton A. Caswell, of Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Honorable mention to Henry Burchard Green, of Milwaukee, Wis. 

3 



84 

In the Second Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Gold Medal for General Excellence. — Awarded to 
AVilliam Nathan Eandle, of Rock Mills, Ala. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal as Second Prize for General Excel- 
lence. — Awarded to Don Abbot Davenport, Pittsfield, Mass. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal for Best Results for Jacquard 
Fabrics Designed and AVoven by the Student. — A^varded to George Kent 
Kittle, of Pittsfield, Mass. 

The X. A. AV. M. Bronze Medal as Second Prize in the Preceding 
Competition. — Awarded to Wni. K. Denniston, of Maynard, Alass. 

Honorable mention to James S. McMaster, of Philadelpliia, Pa. 

The Textile World Silver Medal for Best Results in the Prelimi- 
nary AND Final Examinations. — Awarded to Laurence G. Holden, of Pena- 
cock, N, H. 

In the First Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal for General Excellence.— Awarded to 
John G. Talcott, of Talcottville, Conn. 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal as Second Prize for the Preceding. — 
Awarded to William Steele, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

The M. L. Finckel Silver Medal for Best Results in the Prelimi- 
nary AND Final Examinations. — Awarded to Chauncey H. Goodwin, of 
AVorcester, Mass. 

The Textile World Bronze AIedal for Best Results in Color Har- 
mony AND Figured Design. — Awarded to Wm. G. AVeise, of Middletown, 
Conn. 

Honorable mention to Harry P. Brigham. 

The Textile AVorld Gold Medal for Best Results in Final Examina- 
tion AND Term AVork in Dyeing. — Awarded to William Ingraham, of Frank- 
ford, Philadelphia. 

In the Third Year Regular Evening Class: 

The N. a. AV. AI. Silver Medal for General Excellence. — Awarded to 
George AA^. Walker, of Philadelphia. 
Honorable mention to Benoni Duerden. 

In the Second Year Regular Evening Class : 

The N. a. AV. AI. Bronze AIedal for Accuracy and Neatness in 
AVork in Connection with Regul/rity of Attendance. — Awarded to 
Charles P. Learned, of Philadelphia. 

In the Third Year Evening Dyeing Class : 

The Textile World Bronze AIedal, for Best AVork in Dyeing 
Coupled with the Final Examination. — Awarded to AVilliam Schumann, 
of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Evening School Scholarship. — Awarded by Committee on Instruction for 
earnestness of purpose and progress to Fred. Cottshott, of Philadelphia. 



35 

Diplomas. — Howard Hendrickson Broralev, Laurence Matthew Dillon, Henry 
Burcbard Green, Carlton Alphonso Caswell, Wm. Orne Lamfeon, George Pils- 
bury Parker, Samuel Latta Pinkerton. 

Second Year Day Class : 

Frank Maling Boswortb, Herbert Christ, Joseph Collins, Don Abbott Daven- 
port, AVilliam Knox Denniston, Samuel M. Greenwood, Laurence Greenbank 
Holden, George Kent Kittle, James Scott McMaster, Jr., William Nathan 
Handle. 

First Year Day Class : 

William Andrews, Harry Harding Bosworth, Harry Prescott Brigham, Wil- 
kinson Crossley, 2d, Thomas A. Deery, Jr., William Brown Dunn, Edgar Klein 
Frank, James Franklin Gable, Chauncey Harding Goodwin, George Brown 
Holden, Herbert Stanford Land ell, Kenneth Mannering McKenzie, William 
Steele, Clarence Allen Steere, John Gardner Talcott, James Edward Usher, 
William Gustave Weise, Stanley Thomas Willett, Merton Jencks Wilmarth. 

Chemistry and Dyeing Day Class : 

Henry Carroll Brooke, Clarence Eugene Gardiner, George Hellwig, William 
Ingraham, James AVebb Kitchen, Charles Ridington, Turner Eollinson, Henry 
Frost Scatchard, Jr. 

Carding and Spinning of Wool. — George Judson Gordon. 

Third Year Evening Class : 

Herbert E. Barlow, John Chadwick, Benoni Duerden, J. Martin Engel, Ed- 
ward Hergesheimer, Thomas Holt, John Norris, William H. Rogers, James 
Thomas Tither, George W. AValker, Albert Waterhouse. 

Second Year Evening Dyeing Class. — W. AY. Adams, Jr., E. J. Portner, 
William Schuman, Milton T. Hoffman. 

Forty-seven appointments to State Scholarships have been made this year, 
viz. : For Adams, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bradford, Butler, 
Cameron, Carbon, Chester, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Cumberland, Elk, Erie, 
Fayette, Forest, Fulton, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Juniata, Lawrence, 
Lebanon, Lehigh, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Montgomery, Montour, Monroe, 
Perry, Potter, Schuylkill, Snyder, Somerset, Susquehanna, Sullivan, Tioga, 
AVarren, York, and four from Philadelphia. 

Fifty-seven holders of these scholarships are at present registered in the 
school. 

The Scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education for 
the Grammar Schools of the city were filled, as usual, by a competitive exami- 
nation, conducted by the principal, each Grammar School principal being 
authorized to send candidates. 

In addition to the above, twelve scholarships are annually filled from the 
Normal, High, Alanual Training and Public Industrial Art Schools of this 
city. AVhile these appointments are made for one year, they may be renewed 
in recognition of the meritorious work on the part of the pupil, making thirty- 
six appointments of this kind which are available for the use of these schools 
in addition to the fifteen for the Grammar Schools —fifty -one city scholarships in 
all. 



36 



Of the eight hundred and nine students registered during the year ending 
December 31, 1897, three hundred and eight are women and five hundred and 
one are men. 



Appended are lists 
1896, showing their 
they come. 

Agents, 

Architects, 

Artists, 

Auditors, 

Author, 

Barber, 

Butlers, 

Bearaers, 

Carpenters, 

Carders, 

Clerks, 

Clergyman, 

Chemists, 

Cutters, 

Designers, . 

Draughtsmen, 

Dressmaker, 

Dyers, 

Electrician, 

Engravers, 

Finishers, . 

Grocer, 

Illustrators, 



of the students registered since December 81, 



)CCupation& 


and the loci 




3 


Laborers, 




12 


Librarians, 




7 


Lithographer, 




2 


Loom Fixers, 




1 


Modellers, 




1 


Mould Makers, 




1 


:\rill Workers, 




3 


Managers, 




2 


Manufacturers, 




>> 


Merchants, 




28 
1 


Overseers, 
Painters, 




2 


Photographers, 




2 


Plumber, 




(;7 


Students, 




19 


Salesmen, 




1 


Secretaries, 




21 


Stampers, 




1 


Solicitor, 




11 


SuperintendentN 




2 


Teachers, 




1 


Weavers, 




11 


Miscellaneous, 



6 
3 
8 
4 

16 
8 
7 

15 
3 
1 
398 
9 
4 
2 
] 
3 

88 

16 
2 



809 
LOCALITIES REPKESENTED. 

Philadelphia, 650 

Pennsylvania, 88 

New Jersey, ; 18 

Massachusetts, ........... 9 

Connecticut, 9 

New York, 6 

Ohio, 5 

Delaware, ............ 4 

Maine, 3 

Canada, ............. 3 

Maryland, ............ 2 



37 



Rhode Island, 

Alabama, 

Tennessee, 

Vermont, 

Wisconsin, 

New Hampshire, 

Colorado, 

Illinois, . 

Japan, 



809 



L. W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



38 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For Year Eniling May 31, 1897.) 



Balance on hand Jnne 1, 189(), 
Mrs. George K. Crozer, Prize Fund, 
Income of Endowment Fund, 

" " Temple Fund, 

" " Chapman-Biddle Fund, 

" " F. Graff Prize Fund, . 

" Mrs. AV. AVei,i,'htinan Fund, 

" " Clayton French Fund, 

" " ]\Irs. G. K. Crozer Fund, 
City of Philadelphia, Park Coiuniission for inaintena 

morial Hall, .... 
From sale of Park Guides, . 
Tuition Fees, .... 
Use of Rooms, Broad and Pine Streets, 
Advertising: in School Circular, 
Annual Dues, .... 

State Appropriation on account, . 
Bills Payahle, .... 
Temporary Loans, 
Offertory at Museum, . 

" Interest on Deposits, 

Endowment Fund, sale of $4,000 P. & R .stamped 5's, 



M( 



$65 88 

1,500 00 

4,001 77 

2,329 92 

50 00 

23 75 

60 00 

25 00 

67 50 

8,895 17 

84 35 

13,210 80 

2,580 50 

796 50 

1,375 00 

20,000 00 

78,000 00 

7,550 70 

86 59 

8 51 

4,105 00 



DONATIONS. 



For General Purposes, Schedule "A," .... 

Special Museum Fund, ....... 

" Donation for prizes for drawing by John T. Mori-: 
For Mortgage, ''A Friend," 



605 00 

85 00 

75 00 

1,000 00 



Total Receipts, 



Maintenance of School, 

" " Museum, . 

Graff' Architectural Prize, . 
General Expenses, Salaries, etc. 
Interest on Bills Payable, . 
Bills Payable, . 
Temporary Loan (Repaid), 

Carried forward, 



$146,581 94 



PAYMENTS. 



$56,051 31 

12,575 90 

50 00 

1,413 70 

1,447 61 

67,500 00 

3,600 00 

$142,638 52 



39 



Brought forward, .... 
Museum Library, . ..... 

" Special Fund, 

Special prize for Drawing, ..... 
Temj^le Fund, repaid John T. Morris for advances, . 
Centennial Board iMnance, Dividend claimed on Stock 
Clayton French Fund, investment, 
Mrs. G. K. Crozer Fund '' ... 

Income Crozer Fund " ... 



$142,638 52 

215 87 

4 70 

75 00 

256 00 

3 12 

1,000 00 

1,500 00 

40 00 $145,733 21 



Balance, 



SCHEDULE ''A. 



Donations For General Purposes, 
Miss Lydia T. Morris, 
Erben, Harding & Co., 
Theodore C. Search, . 
''A Friend," 
Miss Bache, 



$848 73 



$100 00 

300 00 

100 00 

100 00 

5 00 



$605 00 



40 



REPOKT OF THE TREASUKER. 

(For Seven Months Ending December 31, 1897. ) 

Balance on hand, June 1, 1897, 

Tuition Fees, ...... 

Income of Endowment Fund, 

" Temple Fund, 

" Chapman Biddle Memorial Fund, 

" Clayton French Fund, . 

" Mrs. Geo. K. Crozer Prize Fund, 

" Graff Architectural Prize Fund, 

" Mrs. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship Fund, 

" Mrs. Weightman Investment Fund, bonds paid off 

State of Pennsylvania, appropriation for 1896, 

" " '' " 1897, on account 

City of Philadelphia, appropriation for 1896, 

" " " " 1897, on account, 

" " Park Commission, for maintenance of Me 

morial Hall 

Use of Rooms, Broad and Pine Streets, . 

Fund for Purchase of English Plates, 

Temporary Loan (since paid off). 

Interest on Deposits (Land Title and Trust Co.), 

Advertisements in School Circular, 

Life Membership, , . . ... 

Annual Subscribers, ..... 

Offertory : glass boxes at Museum, 

Special Subscription to Museum (through D. Dorr), 

Second Mortgage to Pennsylvania Company for Insurance on Lives, 

etc., 



$848 73 

10,654 00 

2,073 75 

1,347 00 

25 00 

25 00 

33 75 

10 00 

29 00 
1,000 00 

20,000 00 

5,000 00 

7,500 00 

5,625 GO 

5,288 57 

612 20 

120 00 
10,050 00 

35 91 

30 00 
100 00 

1,010 00 

121 62 
258 00 

60,00 00 



DONATIONS. 



A Friend," for Principal of Mortgage, 
'' " Interest " 



Total, 



PAYMENTS. 



Art School, General Expenses, . 
'' Salaries and Wages, 

*' Repairs and Alterations, . 

" Equipments, 

Carried forward, . 



1,000 00 
100 00 

$132,897 53 



$1,743 91 

8,733 70 

1,674 17 

209 99 

$12,361 77 



41 



Brought forward, . 


. 






$12,361 77 


Textile School, Salaries and Wages, 








5,461 00 


'' Equipments, 








720 03 


" Expenses, . 








107 21 


Museum, Maintenance, 








6,927 81 


" Purchases of Exhibits, 








688 75 


' ' Special Fund for Plates, 








145 50 


Library, 








10 50 


Insurance, 








325 00 


Interest Account, 








8,757 68 


Coal, 








366 60 


Gas and Lighting, 








466 90 


First Mortgage, paid on account. 








6,500 00 


Second " 








17,000 00 


City Appropriation, Legal Services, 








250 00 


Temporary Loans paid in full, . 








37,500 70 


T. C. Search Loan " " . 








2,793 66 


_ 1100,383 11 


Balance, $32,514 42 


JAMES L. ALLAN, 










Assistant Treasurer. 



42 



REPORT OF THE 
ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The efforts of the Committee to arouse interest in the work of 
the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art have con- 
tinued unabated during the j^ast year, and the members modestly 
hope that the increased popuhirity of the School and its teach- 
ings is somewhat due to the persistent efforts of a small band of 
women. 

The public mind has, in a measure at least, grasped the fact 
that perfect protection for our manufacturers can only be reached 
through the production of perfect work, and that perfect work 
(especially in the manuftxcture of textile goods) can only be 
reached through perfect teachers and earnest, industrious stu- 
dents. 

The teachers we have, and the scholars are with us now in 
greater numbers than ever before. Some will shortly leave us to 
impart to others, at a distance in our country, the knowledge they 
have obtained here. 

The State and city authorities are alive to the importance of 
the work and are lending a helping hand, without which perfect 
success would never be ours ; and we are grateful that in this our 
fraternal Government should follow the examples of those paternal 
Governments of Europe where, as we all know, the best educa- 
tional advantages are given not only freely to the people, but are 
compulsory. The reports of the Principal of the School will give 
the details of the different classes. 

It was the earnest hope of some of the members of our Com- 
mittee that we might, through special effort in the month of De- 
cember, 1897, secure sufficient funds to provide a Gymnasium for 
the use of our scholars during their hours of recreation ; in this 
we have been grievously disappointed. Perhaps those who with 
kindly eyes read this report will help us to give to our pupils the 
exercise they so much need for the preservation of their health 
of body, and we may, perhaps, establish our Gymnasium before 
the close of 1898. 

Meanwhile we cheer ourselves with the thought that we accepted 



48 

the invitation of the Board of Trustees to become their " Associ- 
ate Committee " in the year 1883, and that we gave in " Free 
Gifts " to the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, 
before 1893, between thirty and forty thousand dollars from the 
proceeds of entertainments given during those years. 

This does not include the sums we have gathered for annual or 
life subscriptions. 

In 1893 we united heartily with the Board of Trustees in the 
23urchase of the valuable property at Broad and Pine streets, in 
which the School is now held, and we are j)roud to say that one- 
half of the sum necessary to supplement Mr. William Weight- 
man's generous gift for the purchase was given through us, and 
the corporation was enabled to become owner of the property. 

These facts are mentioned that those interested in our work may 
understand that our failure to realize our expectations on Decem- 
ber 14th was not due to any lack of interest on the part of those 
who lent "helping hands," either to the "Pied Piper," or to the 
" Marie Antoinette Fete," but simply that the elements and minor 
causes conspired against us. The expenses for the /.?^^ were en- 
tirely paid through the Committee. 

We are authorized by the Trustees of the Institution to state 
that the report that those interested in its behalf propose to relax 
their efforts and dispose of the School property is entirely without 
foundation. 

By order of the Committee. 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

President. 



44 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 

Annual and Honorary Members. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send their names and 
addresses to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found 
upon page 51. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly ac- 
knowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 
Life Membership, . . . One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, . . A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 
Honorary Membership, . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and 
from Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment 
Fund. " — By-Laivs. 



PATKONS. 

*Baird. John ^Houston, H. H. 

^Barton, Mrs. Susan K. Lea, Henry C. 

Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. Morris, JohnT. 

*Childs, George W. Search, Theodore C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

^Drexel, A. J. Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Weightman, Mrs. Wm., Jr. 

Garrett, W. E. , Jr. Whitney, A. & Sons. 
*Gibson, Henry C. 

* Deceased. 



46 



LIFE MEMBEKS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
^Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adatnson & Co. 

Baily, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 
^Baker, John E. 
*Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*Bartol,' B. H. 

Baugh, Daniel 

Bartol, H. W. 
^Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss A. E. 
*Biddle, Chapman 
^Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 
^Biddle, Clement 
*Biddle, AValter L. C. 

Blanc hard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
-Borie, C. & H. 

Bowen & Fox 
*Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, AVilliams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
-Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 
^Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
■^Chew, Samuel 
^Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence H. 
*Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 

Coates, Edward H. 

Cochran, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 
^Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P, 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
*Cresson, W. P. 

Crozer, George K. 
^Crozer, Mrs. George K. 
^Crozer, J. Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 
^Disston, Hamilton 

Disston; Mrs. H. C. 
^Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, James 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 

Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
^Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
^Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Garrett, Miss J. 



* Deceased. 



46 



Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 

Gilson, Miss K. 
*Gowen, Franklin Ji. 
*Graff, Frederic 
*Graff, Mrs. P'rederic 

Green, Stephen 

Ilagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havenieyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
*Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
*Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
*Hockley, William Stevenson 
*Horstmann, F. (). 

Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
*Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich cS: Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
*Jones, Jacob 

Jones, AVashington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
*Knight, Edward C. 
'^Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
*Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering, Joseph S. , Jr. 



McNeely, Miss Florence 

McNeely, Robert K. 

McNeely, Mrs. Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Meirs, Mrs. R. Wain 

Merrick, Mi.ss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 
-Merrick, Miss L. W. 

Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
*Milliken, James 

Moore, James 
^Morris, P. Peinberton 
*Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, P^rank W. 

Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
*Newbold, Charles 
*Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 

Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
*Page, Joseph F. 
^Patterson, Joseph 
*Pepper, Cieorge S. 
^Pepper, Lawrence S. 

Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
-Phillips, Henry M. 
-Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter A Coates 
-Poultney, Charles W. 

Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
^Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rlioads, Miss Elizabeth 



* Deceased. 



47 



*Eoberts, Jacob, M.D. 
*Kogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
*Eogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P. 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
*Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sliarpless, Charles S. 
*Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 
*Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
^Sherman, Roger 

vShortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 
Sommerville, Maxwell 

^Spencer, Charles 

^Steele, Edward T. 
Steele, E. T. c^^ Co. 
Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 
Strawbridge, J. C. 



Sweatman, V. C. 
Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 
*Temple, Joseph E. 
Thomas, S. Harvey 
Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 
Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 
Tyler, George F. 
*Vaux, William S. 
^Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
^Wagner, Mrs. T. 
Warden, W. G. 
Warner, Redwood F. 
^AVelsh, Samuel 
Wernwag, Theodore 
Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 
Williams, Edward H. 
Wister, Mrs. Jones 
Wood, Stuart 
Wood, William & Co. 
Wright, Edward N. 
^Wright, James A. 
*Wright, John W. 
Wurtz, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



Deceased. 



48 



Annual Members (for 1897) who have subscribed not less than 
ten dollars. 



Austin, Mrs. S. H., .... $10 00 

Bakh, Mrs. Singerly, ... 10 00 

Benient, Clarence S., .... 10 00 

Eiddle, Cadwallader, . . . 10 00 

Brazier, Joseph H., .... 10 00 

Borie, Mrs. Henry, . . . 10 00 

Brown, Miss Martha M., . . 10 00 

Brown, T. Wistar, 10 00 

Burnhain, Mrs. William, . . 10 00 

Cadwalader, Mrs. John, . 10 00 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co., . . . 10 00 

Castner, Samuel, lO 00 

Chandler, T. P., Jr., .... 10 00 

Clark, Miss Frances, .... 10 00 

Cochran, Travis, 10 00 

Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . . . 10 00 

Coles, Edward, 10 00 

Converse, John H., .... 1000 

Coxe, Alexander B., . . . . 10 00 

Cramp, Henrv AV., . . . . 10 00 

Crozer, Miss Ada M., . . . . 10 00 

Da Costa, Dr. J. M., . . . . 10 00 

Dale, KichardC, 10 00 

Denniston, Mrs. E. E., ... 10 00 

Dickson, Samuel, 10 00 

Durant, Mrs. F. C, . . . . 10 00 

Elkins, Mrs. AVilliam L., . . 10 00 

Elkins, William L., ... 10 00 
Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B., .10 00 

Fell on, Mr.s. Sanuiel M., . . 10 00 

Gallowav, William, .... 10 00 

Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . . . 10 00 

Gillingham, Joseph E,, - . 10 00 

Gowen, Mrs. Francis I., . . 10 00 

Graff, Miss Henrietta, . . . 10 00 

Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, ... 10 00 

Guillou, Victor, 10 00 

Hamilton, W. C, 10 00 

Hance Brothers & White, . . 10 00 

Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, . 10 00 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, ... 10 00 

Heberton, Mrs. G. Craig, . . 10 00 

Hippie, Frank K., 10 00 

Hutchinson, :Miss. 10 00 

Hunter, T. Comly, 10 00 

Jack, Dr. Louis, 25 00 

Janney, Mrs Robert M., . . 10 00 

Jayne; Mrs. David, .... 10 00 

Jayne, Dr. Horace, .... 10 00 

Jenks, Mrs. William F., . . 10 00 

Keen, Dr. W. W., 10 00 

Keith, Sidnev ^Y., 10 00 

Kennedy, Mrs. EliasD., . . 10 00 

Leach, Miss Mary Atherton, . 10 00 

Leonard, James B., .... 10 00 



Lewis, Edward, .... 

Lewis, Enoch, 

Lewis, Dr. F. W., . . . 
Lewis, Robert M., . . . 
Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, 
Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G 
Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, 
Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S., 
Mackellar, Thoma<, . . 
Magee, Miss Anna, . . 
Magee, Miss Eliza J. , . 
Magee, Miss Fannie S., . 
Magee, Horace, • • . 
Mason, Frederick T., . . 
Moulton, Mrs. Byron P., 
McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, 
Neall, Frank L., • . . . 
Newhall, George M., . . 
O'Reilley, Rev. Edward J 
Pancoast, Albert, . . . 
Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, . 
Paul, Dr. James W., - 
Paul, MissM. W., . . . 
Pepper, David, .... 
Piatt, Franklin, .... 
Randoli)h, ]Mrs. Evan, . 
Reilly, Mrs. T. A., . . 
Ritchie, Craig D., . . . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, . . 
Roberts, Miss F. A , . . 
Roberts, Mrs. George B., 
Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, . . 
Rosengarten, .J. G. , . . 
Rowland, INIrs. Benjamin, 
Sanders, Mrs. John, . . 
vShober, Mrs. Samuel L., 
Sinnott, Mrs. .Joseph F., 
Smith, Miss Christiana B. 
Smith, Edward Brinton, 
Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, . . 
Stifle, Dr. Charles J., . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, 
Townsend, Henry C, . . 
Weightman, Mrs. .John Farr 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . 
Welsh, Mrs. .John Lowber, 
Weygandt, C. N. ( 3 years), 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, 
Williams, Mrs. Francis H 
Wister, Mrs. Caspar, . . 
Wood, Mrs. Howard, . . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, . • 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K. , 



$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 dO 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
30 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



49 



Annual members (1897) who have subscribed not less than five 
dollars. 

Ashhurst, Eichard L., . . $5 00 Harrison, Mrs John, . . . . S5 00 

Ashhnrst, Mrs. Kichard L., . o 00 Harrison, Miss Maud S.,. . . 5 00 

Bartol, Mrs. C. C, 5 00 Howell, Charles H., .... 500 

Bero-ner, C. W., 5 00 Kennard, Mrs. Fred. K., . 5 00 

Bergner, Mrs. C. William, . 5 00 ^leFadden, Mrs. George H., . 5 00 

Bergner, Miss Catharine, . . 5 00 Morwitz, .Joseph, Jr., ... 5 00 

Bigelow, Mrs. S. Lawrence, . 5 00 New hall, Mrs. Daniel, ... 5 00 

Carter, Mr.s. William T., . . 5 00 Xewlin, Mrs. Richard M , . . 5 00 

Clark, Miss Amie Hampton, 5 00 Xorris, Miss Clara Genevra, . 5 00 

Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, . . 5 00 Norton, Mrs. Charles D., . . 5 00 

Cohen, Miss MarvM., ... 5 00 Oo-den, Mrs. Edward H., . . 5 GO 

Colket, G. H., 5 00 Pepper, Mrs. John AV., . . . 5 00 

Colton, S. W., Jr., 5 00 Randolph, Miss Anna, . . . 5 00 

Corlies, Miss Margaret L., . 5 00 Randolph^ Miss Elizaheth J., 5 00 

Cresswell, Miss Elizaheth P., 5 00 Reath, Mrs. Theodore Wood, 5 00 

Curtin, Mrs. Roland G.. - . 5 00 Revhurn, :\Irs. W. 8., . . . 5 00 

Dana, Charles E., . . . • . 5 00 Roherts, Thomas, 5 00 

Dana, Mrs. Charles K, . . . 5 00 Roherts, Thomas, Jr., . . 5 00 

Day, Frank Miles, . ... 5 00 Simpson, Mrs. William, . . 5 00 

De Haven, Mrs. Holstein, . 5 00 Siter, Mrs. E. Hollingsworth, 5 00 

Dissel. Charles, 5 00 Smith, Harrison Hoxie, . . 5 00 

Dissel, Mrs. Charles, .... 5 00 Smith, Mrs. W. Hinckle, . . 5 00 

Duane, Russell, 5 00 Walker, Mrs. R. J. C, . . 5 00 

Durant, Miss Ethel, .... 5 00 Winpennv, Mrs. J. Bolton, . 5 00 

Gest, Mrs. William P., . . . 5 00 Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, . . 5 00 

Grant, Mrs. W. S., Jr., . . 5 00 Zell, Miss H. A., 5 00 

Harrison, John, 5 00 



HOXGRARY MEMBERS. 

Atwood, Eugene, Atwood Machine Co. , Stonington, Conn. 

Berry, A. Hun, Boston, Mass. 

Boyd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Card Clothing Co. , Worcester, Mass. 

Burnham, Charles C, Easton t^- Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Burnham, George W., Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

Comins, Frank B., Aerophore Air-Moistening c^- Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, ]Mass. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Easton, Nicholas H., Easton & Burnham. Pawtucket, R. L 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jenks Machine Co. , Pawtucket, R. I. 
Firth, William, American Drosophore Co., Boston, Ma.ss. 

Fletcher, George A., Schaum cS: Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 

4 



50 

Furbush, Merrill A., M. A. Fiirbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grice, Edwin ('., M. A. Furbush c^ Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

E. I. 
Hale, F. J., Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Hartwell, F. W., Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

K. I. 
Hopkins, William S., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, P. I. 
Hutchins, C. H. , Knowles Loom Works, AVorcester, Mass. 
Hutchins, G. F., Knowles Loom Works, AVorcester, Mass. 
Jenks, Alvin F., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Jenks, Stephen A., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Knowles, I^ P., Knowles Loom AVorks, AVorcester, Mass. 
Knowlton, Charles H, M. A. Fnrbu.sh & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lasell, C. AA^, AVhitin Machine AVorks, AVhitinsville, Mass. 
Lasell, J. M., AVhitin Alachine AA^)rks, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Maynard, Lorenzo, Maynard, Mass. 

Merriam, II. H., Knowles Loom AVorks, AVorcester, Mass. 
Mnrdock, Joseph. American Card Clothing Co., AVorcester, Alass. 
Nevins, David, Pettee Machine AVorks, Xewton Upper Falls, :Mas.s. 
Rometsch, AV. H., Schaum Si Uhlinger (Fletcher AVorks), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Russell, J. M., Knowles Loom AVorks, AVorcester, Mass. 
Sargent, C. G., Graniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otto AV., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher AVorks), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, Chester B., AVoonsocket Machine & Press Co., AVoonsocket, R. L 
Smith, Stanley G., AVoonsocket Alachine & Press Co., AVoonsocket, R. I. 
Snelling, R. P., Pettee Machine AVorks, Xewton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Taft, C. A., AVhitin Machine AVorks, AVhitinsville, Mass. 
Taft, AV. L., Whitin Machine Co., AVhitinsville, Mass. 
AVhite, H. Arthur, American Card Clothing Co., AA^orcester, Mass. 
AVare, Justin A., Crompton Loom AVorks, AA'orcester, Mass. 
AVhitin, G. M., AVhitin Machine Works, AVhitinsville, Mass. 
AVyman, Horace, Crompton Loom AVorks, AVorcester, Mass. 



51 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain [^here insert a 
description of the property'] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses,. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



AND 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



THE TWENTY-THIRD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



WITH THE 



LIST OF MEMBKRS 



For the Eighteen Months ending May 31, 1899. 



PHILADELPHIA, 
1899. 



OFFICERS FOR 1899— 1900. 



PRESIDENT, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH. 



HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN T. MORRIS. 



TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

ROBERT K. McNEELY. DALTON DORR. 



DIRECTOR OF THE MUSEUM, PRINCIPAL, OF THE SCHOOL, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. LESLIE W. MILLER. 

ASSISTANT TREASURER, 

JAMES L. ALLAN, 
826 Drexel Building. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFFICIIS. 

The Governor of the State, The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Byron P. Moulton, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 

Merrill A. Furbush, Appointed by Common Council. 

Samuel Gustine Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fair mount Park, 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To serve for three years, 

Richard Rossmassler, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C. N. Weygandt, 

Charles E. Dana. 

To serve for two years. 

John T. Morris, Theodore C. Search, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jenks, 

John H. Converse. 

To serve for one year. 

Robert K. McNeely, Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D., 

William Wood, , Isaac H. Clothier, 

John B. Stetson. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 

TO THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



(For their Report see page 5i. 



PRESIDENT, 

MKS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, 

MRS. EDWARD H. OGDEN. 



SECRETARY, 


TREASURER, 


MISS FANNIE S. MAGEE. 


MISS McMURTRIE. 


Mrs. S. H. Austin, 


Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 


Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 


Miss Leach, 


Mrs. C. William Bergner, 


Mrs. Craige Lippincott, 


Miss Anna Blanchard 


Miss Helen L. Murphy, 


Mrs. William T. Carter, 


Mrs. Daniel S. Newhall, 


Miss Ada M. Crozer, 


Mrs. T. a. Reilly, 


Mrs. D. E. Dallam, 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 


Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, 


Mrs. Wm. L. Elkins, 


Mrs. Jones Wister, 


Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison, 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 


Mrs. J. C. W. Frishmuth, 


Mrs. Theodore Voorhees, 


Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 


Mrs. Francis H. Williams, 


Mrs. Frank K. Hipple, 


Miss Zell. 


Mrs. Robert Millar .Janney, 




HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Wm. W. Greist, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 
Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, 



Mrs. Wm. A. Stone, 
Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 
Mrs. Caspar Wister, 
Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 



COMMITTEES FOR 1899. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

T. C. Search, Chairman; AVilliam Platt Pepper, Stuart Wood, Wil- 
T.iAM Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., C. N. Weygandt, B. P. Moulton, 
C. H. Harding, J. S. Jenks, Johx T. Morris, Isaac H. Clothier, John H. 
Converse. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 
ART. 
Charles E. Dana, Chairman; Samuel Gustine Thompson, Wilson Eyre, 
Jr., John J. Boyle, Frank Miles Day. 

MUSEUM. 
J. S. Jenks, Chairman; William Platt Pepper, J. T. Morris, A. C. 
Lambdin, M.D., Isaac H. Clothier, Mrs. John Harrison, Miss Anna 
Blanchard, Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts, Miss Magee, Mrs. W. T. Carter, 
Mrs. Jones Wister. Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

INSTRUCTION. 

T. C. Search, Chairman; Wm. Wood, J. S. Jenks, Isaac H. Clothier, 
M. A. Furbush, Chas. E. Dana, Stuart Wood, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., 
William Platt Pepper, Byron P. Moulton, Charles H. Harding, John 
H. Converse, Richard Rossmassler, Miss Helen L. Murphy, Mrs. Frank 
K. HippLE, Mrs. Jones Wister, Mrs. Joseph F, Sinnott, Miss Ada Muh- 
lenberg Crozer, Miss Leach. Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 

C. N. Weygandt, Chainnan ; Stuart Wood, J. S. Jenks, T. C Search, 
R. Rossmassler. 



* The President is ex officio a member of all Committees. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



William Platt Pepper, Director of the Museum. 
Dalton Dorr, Curator. 
M. D. WooDNUTT, Assistant. 
William Lindsay, Superintendent. 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY. 

Edwin Atlee Barber, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 
F. D. Laxgenheim, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mi-s. John Harrison, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Chas. D. Clark, Honorary Curator. 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Comprises in its organization the following Departments : 

School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Manufacture. 

School of Decorative Painting. 

School of Chemistry and Dyeing. 

School of Applied Design. 

School of Carving and Wood-Work. 

School of Decorative Sculpture. 

School of Architectural Design. 

School of Interior Decoration. 

School of Illustration. 

School of Normal Art Instruction. 

School of Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 
L. W. Miller, Principal. 
Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 
Margarette Lippincott, Professor of Water-Color Painting. 
Herman Deigendesch, Professor of Drawing. 

Paul Lachenmeyer, Professor of Sculpture. 

J. Merritt Matthews, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

Joseph X. F. Harold, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 

Bradley C. Algeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Instructor in 

W^eand Formation — Analysis and Structure of Fabrics. 
A. M. Grillon, Director of School of Modern Languages and Instructor in 

French. 
A. M. Schmidt-Grillon, Instructor in German. 
Fanny D. Sweeny, Instructor in Design Applied to Stained Glass. 
LuDWiG E. Faber, Instructor in Drawing. 
Joseph Cope land, k a 

Isabella Bradley, " '' 

William Laird Turner, Instructor in Design Applied to Woven Fabrics. 
William Koebuck, Instructor in Weaving and Belated Branches. 
James P. Jamieson, Instructor in Architectural Design. 
John Molitor, Instructor in Architectural Drawing. 

Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing and Historical Ornament. 
Anne Balderston, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 
Elisabeth M. Hallowell, Instructor in Illustration. 
Charles N. Butler, C.E., Lecturer on Patent Laws. 
J. M. Woelfel, Instructor in Dyeing. 
Joseph H. Shinn, Jr., Instructor in Design Applied to Textiles. 

Instructor in Carding and Spinning. 

Frances Louise Farrand, Instructor in Elementary Drawing and Design. 

John F. Scott, Instructor in Drawing. 

Richard B. Doughty, Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 

Thomas B. Ridington, Engineer and Instructor in Steam and Metal Work. 

Norman E. Whitehead, Assistant Engineer. 

Edward J. Roberts, Assistant Instructor in Hand-Loom Department. 

Alfred Burhouse, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

F. M. Jennings, Instructor in Wool Grading and Sorting. 

Samuel Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building and Instructor in Wood 

Work. 
Leonora J. C. Boeck, Registrar. 
Anna T. Joyce, Librarian. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



By resolution of the Board of Trustees April 13, 1899, the time 
of the Annual Meeting of this corporation was changed from the 
second Monday in January to the second Monday in June. The 
reports made to-day will supplement those made January 2d, 
making the period now closing one of eighteen months. The next 
annual election of officers will occur one year from this date, and 
the present officers will hold over until the second Monda}^ in 
June, 1900. 

Your President has but few words to offer by way of comment 
on the work of the Institution during the past year. 

The actual situation during that period has been carefully de- 
tailed by the reports of the principal, Prof. Leslie W. Miller, and 
the curator, Mr. Dalton Dorr. Both reports bear witness to the 
great activity prevailing in all departments during the year, and 
to the successful results attained. 

The crucial point for examination concerns the application of 
our financial strength so as to produce the greatest results. Have 
we wisely applied our somewhat slender resources? The able 
work done by the pupils during the year, as attested by the annual 
exhibition, indicates very clearly that industry and continuous 
application have produced results which answer the question in 
the affirmative. The addition of the entirely new department of 
worsted drawing and spinning, which probably has no duplicate 
in any school in the world, is evidence of progression and efficiency 
that needs no further comment. In all that pertains to equipment 
of the several departments established, it does not appear that they 
can be materially improved at present. The staff of teachers is 
large and efficient, and the pay liberal without being extravagant. 

That the school has not reached the limit of its ability may be 



12 

well believed when we find so many fruitful fields waiting cultiva- 
tion. Much of the work to be done is of a laboratory character 
and should have been entered upon ere this, but the limited means 
at our disposal has prevented. 

The City of Philadelphia has never refused her help since our 
first appeal to her for assistance, and we have conscientiously used 
such funds as have been donated so as to produce the best results. 
For this financial favor the city has fifty- one free scholarships in 
our school, every one of which has been filled. 

The State of Pennsylvania has likewise been observant of her 
interests, and has always given from her abundance for the sup- 
port of the work. These funds have been applied most carefully, 
and your President feels strong in the belief that no distribution 
of the public money produces larger or more lasting results. The 
State has seventy-nine free scholarships, every one of which is 
filled. 

The work could undoubtedl}' be made effective in a still larger 
field provided our means were sufficient, and our industries de- 
mand that such should be done. The foundation for one of the 
noblest industrial institutions of the world underlies the Pennsyl- 
vania Musem and School of Industrial Art. There is no form of 
industry that is not more or less subservient to technical and sci- 
entific instruction, such as naturally belongs to and is the out- 
growth of so great a work. The educated brain has become the 
progressive centre of every trade. The School of Trades has be- 
come the salvation of those industries formerly dependent upon 
the apprenticeship system. Our (Mty and State are so deeply in- 
terested in these results that the liberal hand should not be with- 
held. 

Two years ago our legislators in their wisdom voted us $80,000 
for two years' work. The Governor, in the exercise of his preroga- 
tives and best judgment, reduced the amount to $40,000, and thus 
prevented the inauguration of a system of practical and useful 
laboratories. It would not be wise to lament over this ignoble 
termination of our anticipations, but we cannot avoid indulging 
in a momentary contemplation of the situation as it might have 
been. By the loss of so large a part of the appropriation we 
have no laboratory of Steam or Electricity. Our laboratory of 
Chemistry would have received an impulse that would have placed 
us on an equality with the best of European schools. Our school 



13 

of Engineering would have been an accomplished fact, and we 
should have been giving the very highest form of practical instruc- 
tion in all these departments of industrial education. 

By withholding the appropriation we have been unable to ad- 
dress ourselves to the new fields outlined, and their growth has 
been retarded in the most serious manner. The condition of the 
State finances has shorn the last appropriation by our legislators 
of $5000, and has to that extent interfered with the progress of 
our work. Not onh^ this, but these continued limitations and cur- 
tailments have placed us at so great a disadvantage that it will be 
necessary to raise funds, during the coming year, independent of 
those given by the City and State. Your President feels confident 
in the belief that the faith, activity and energy heretofore mani- 
fested by the officers of the corporation and School, and by the 
pupils and friends of the School, will not now be withheld, and 
that out of the difficulties which beset us we shall emerge stronger 
and more successful than ever. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

President. 



14 



REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

This report is for the eighteen months ending May 31, 1899. 
The number of visitors to the Museum for the twelve months of 
1898 was 244,775. The number for the first six months of this 
year was 88,855. It is interesting to note that some fifty per cent, 
of these visitors to Memorial Hall came on Sunda}^ afternoons. 
At these times the galleries of the building are literally crowded 
with the people who are making the visit a part of the afternoon's 
outing in the Park. The figures given above are largely in excess 
of the number of persons visiting any one of the similar institu- 
tions located in the built-up portions of the city, and demonstrate 
unquestionably that so long as it is desired to reach the masses of 
the people, and to bring the largest number under refining and 
educating influences, the location of the Museum in the people's 
pleasure-ground is the one best suited to the purpose. It is 
also gratifying to observe the increasing use of the Collections 
by the students of other Art Schools beside our own. In order 
to accommodate these schools one of the large rooms in the north 
corridor of the building was early in the year set aside for the 
exclusive use of students. Plans are now under consideration to 
provide a second room, in order that the pupils of tAvo separate 
schools may work here simultaneously. 

The most important event of. the year was the installation of 
the Hector Tyndale Memorial Collection of Pottery and Porce- 
lain. This collection was the bequest of Mrs. Julia N. Tyndale, 
the widow of General Hector Tyndale. One of the corner pa- 
vilions was prepared for the reception of the collection. New 
wall-cases, of the design adopted by the Museum, were built 
around the four sides of the room, and an open stand for the 
larger pieces of pottery was erected in the middle of the floor 
area. The collection, which is remarkable for illustrating so 
many modern European factories of importance, was opened to 
the public in October. 

Dr. Francis W. Lewis, one of the founders, and for many years 
a trustee of this Institution, has recently presented to the Museum 
his valuable collection of Greco-Roman Pottery, well known as 
the choicest and most carefully selected collection of this descrip- 



15 

tion in Philadelphia. Dr. Lewis's gift, in conjunction with the 
Hammer, Vaux, Hockley and Lamborn collections, gives the 
Museum an excellent nucleus for this important department of 
art. 

From the Misses Lewis the Museum has received a beautiful 
collection of Oriental embroideries, and a " Giallo Antico " lamp. 

By purchase on account of the Temple Fund, the Museum has 
acquired a collection of one hundred and twenty pieces of Chinese 
porcelains and enamels, most of which are exceedingly rare and 
valuable. This collection is a portion of the famous Peters's col- 
lection, which was for many years one of the principal attractions 
at Peale's Museum in Philadelphia. 

The Department of American Pottery, which, in its historical 
features, is unequalled by any other Museum, has continued to 
receive valuable accessions during the year. For this we are in- 
debted to the untiring interest and industry of the Honorary 
Curator of the Department, Mr. Edwin A. Barber, seconded by 
the generosity of Mr. John T. Morris and others. 

Closely allied to this department is the section of Anglo-Amer- 
ican Pottery, which is also under the charge of the gentleman 
just named. We have now in this section seventy-two separate 
examples of this interesting class of pottery, some of them of the 
greatest rarity and value. Mr. Barber has now in press a book 
describing all the known types and varieties of Anglo-American 
Potter}^ which will contain numerous illustrations taken from 
our collection! 

An important addition to the English Pottery section was a 
vase by Solon, decorated in pdte-sur-pdte in that artist's best man- 
ner. Mr. Solon's letter describing the decoration is copied in 
the list accompanying this report. The vase measures 24 inches 
in height. It was purchased on account of the Joseph E. Temple 
Fund. 

Another valuable addition to the collections, Avhich was also 
purchased on account of the Temple Fund, was a solid silver 
vase, 18 inches high, designed, modelled and chased by American 
workmen, whose names — by special permission of the manufac- 
turers — are signed on the piece. It is safe to say that in artistic 
and technical skill this work of American artisans is unsurpassed 
by any contemporary foreign silversmith's work. 

During the fall an exhibition of photographs was held at the 



16 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. This Photographic 
Salon— as it was called — was the first public recognition by an 
academy of the fine arts of the claims of photography to be 
classed as a fine art. Acting upon the suggestion of Mr. Clar- 
ence B. Moore, the Museum Committee resolved to endeavor to 
secure a selection of the Salon pictures for permanent exhibition 
in the Museum as a memorial of the event. The responses to 
the letters written soliciting donations were most gratifying. Mr. 
Moore generously supplemented the gifts made by exhibitors with 
several pictures purchased by himself. Mr. John Harrison also 
purchased and contributed a picture. In this way a most in- 
teresting memorial, illustrating the fine art of photography in 
1898, has been obtained for the Museum. All together, the eighteen 
months have shown good progress, the friends of the Museum 
continuing their manifestations of interest in its welfare. But it 
becomes our painful duty to record here the loss, in the death of 
Mrs. Bloom field-Moore, of one of these friends. 

Hardly had the new year begun when word came to this 
country that Mrs. Moore had died at her residence in Lon- 
don, on the 5th of January, in the seventy- fifth year of her 
age. Mrs. Moore was one of the oldest members of this institu- 
tion. She was the most munificent patron of the Museum. From 
the very first she took a keen and active interest in the formation 
of the collections. She gave liberally herself, and tried to induce 
others to do likewise. In 1881-82 she fitted up at her own ex- 
pense a suite of rooms in Memorial Hall, and filled them to 
overflowing with a rich and varied collection of costly objects 
from every department of art. Every year thereafter she made 
additions to this collection. After she had taken up her per- 
manent residence abroad, she continued making purchases and 
shipping them here ; even designating by letter the room and 
case in which she wanted the articles placed. We trust that 
this collection, which was designed and dedicated by Mrs. Moore 
as a memorial to her husband, Bloomfield H. Moore, Esq., will 
always serve equally to perpetuate among us the memory of this 
rarely-gifted woman. 

Following is the list of gifts, loans and purchases made during 
the eighteen months ending May 31st. 

Gifts were received from : 

Dr. E. S. Vanderslice : 

Coat of Chinese Official ; silk brocade, with gold thread. 



17 

" Presentation Cloth " or banner ; silk, embroidered and painted. Japanese. 

Waistcoat ; satin, embroidered. Worn in Pennsylvania, 1797. 

Tray of Iron ; shell shape. Decoration in low relief. Japanese. 

Three small Porcelain Jars. Japanese. 

Pewter Plate ; raised decoration of Scripture subjects. Old German. 

Tea Caddy ; inlaid woods. From Holland, c. 1772. 

Twenty-three small Terra Cotta Heads and Ornaments from the Pyramids 

of vSan Juan Teotchucan, Mexico. 
Crucifix of wood, carved and painted. From Mexico. 
Woven Square. Chinese. Worn on the back and front of a Mandarin's 

coat. 
Kev. Kenneth Sylvan Guthrie : 

Medal, commemorating the death of Victor Emanuel. 

Mr. E. a. Barber : 

Two Portrait Tiles (Gen. Grant), made by the American Encaustic Tiling 
Company, Zanesville, Ohio. Glazed and unglazed, 1891. 

Two Portrait Tiles (Cleveland and Harrison), made by the C. Pardee W^orks, 
Perth Amboy, N. J., 1892. 

Samples of Kaolin from Jenkintown, Pa., and from Florida. 

Twelve Triangles for supporting Pottery in the Kiln. 

Seven small Clay impressions from molds used in Decorating Pottery at the 
old Jersey City Pottery and at Phoenixville, from 1848 to 1884. 

Portion of a Glass Brooch used for the same purpose at Haig's Pottery, 
Philadelphia, about 1870. 

Jug ; Carved Stoneware. Keproduction of an old English Graybeard. 
Carved by C. C. Benham, Xew York, 1876. 

Bottle ; green glass. Made at Dyottville Glass Works, 1847. 

Five Tiles ; white, hexagonal. Made by the Mosaic Tile Company, Zanes- 
ville, Ohio. 

Mr. Henry Deakin, Chicago, 111., through Mr. John T. Morris : 
Large Japanese Bow and two Arrows. 

Miss Anne H. Wharton : 

Three Metal Badges ; six Ribbon Badges, with a printed word or sentence 

on each. Formerly the property of Mrs. Crawford Arnold. 
Embroidered Sampler, made in 1831 by Mary Ellis, a pupil in the Locust 

Street Public School. 

Mr. Charles E. Dana : 

A collection of 1293 Postage Stamps and 81 Postal Cards. 

Mr. John Story' Jenks : 

Plate for the Anglo-American Pottery Collection, with a view of the Phila- 
delphia Library. By J. & W. Ridgway, Staffordshire, England. 
Postage Stamp of Friends' Boarding School, Westtown, Pennsylvania. 

Miss L. T. Morris : 

Plate for the Anglo-American Collection, with a view of the Deaf and Dumb 

2 



18 

Asylum at Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia (now School of Industrial 
Art) ; Staffordshire, England. Maker unknown. 

Anonymous ; for Coin Collection : 
Four English Copper Coins. 
Three Swiss Nickel Coins. 

Mr. F. Wesenberg ; for Coin Collection : 

A Collection of Norwegian Coins. Sixty-two. 

Mrs. Julia T. Matthews, for Tyndale Collection : 

Tucker Pitcher ; white, with landscape on each side. 

Mr. John T. Morris : 

Vase of Cameo Cut Glass. By Stevens and Williams, England, 

Mr. Clarence B. Moore : 

Four Aboriginal Relics, viz. : Stone Chisel from Georgia ; Lance Head of 
Copper, from Wisconsin ; two Ceremonial objects of Stone, from Ten- 
nessee. 

Cuban Silver Souvenir Dollar, for Coin Collection. 

Umbrella Handle of Carved Ivory. 

Swedish Cup of Carved Wood. 

Bronze Plaque and two Gold Crosses. Photographic prizes. 

Indian Banner Stone, from Ohio. 

Mr. Alfred Evans : 

Plaster Model of the Liberty Bell. 

Mr. F. D. Langenheim : 

Pair of Leather Sandals from Guatemala. 
Pack of Spanish Playing Cards. 

Mr. Morris Stahl, Jersey City, for Coin Collection : 
One Russian Kopeck. 

Col. J. P. Nicholson : 

G. A. R. Medal ; Encampment of 1897-98. 
Guinea Token. England, 1790. 

Mr. Thomas H. Marshall : 

Capital, of carved mahogany ; from old L'nited States Bank, Philadelphia. 

Yamanaka, Amano & Co., Boston : 

Fourteen small Japanese seated figures. Wood, carved and painted. Old. 

Mrs. a. C. Brenchley : 

One Clarke's Hydrometer. London. Over one hundred years old. 

Mr. James L. Allan : 

Ten old State Bank Notes. 

Mr. John Marston : 

Hawaiian Half Dollar — silver. 

Mr. D. B. Lieber : 

Indian Tomahawk, found in Wyandot Co., Ohio, 1869. 



19 

Mr. James Carr : 

Eighteen pieces of Pottery of his own manufacture ; 6 Plaques, 5 Pitchers, 
1 Vase, 1 Teapot, 2 Tazzas, 1 Dish, 1 covered Box, 1 large Parian Bust. 

Union Metallic Cartridc4E Co. , Bridgeport, Conn. : 
One Dummy Cartridge for Mauser Rifle. 

Mrs. T. K. Conrad : 

Specimen of Lace ; '' Point de Argentan." 

Miss Maria Blanchard : 

Oxford Plate ; blue and white. Made for Bi-Centennial of old Oxford 
Church. 

Eliza A. Brown (bequest) : 

Silver Chatelaine, with two cushions. Time of the Revolution. 

Dr. F. W. Lewis : 

Collection of Greco-Roman Pottery; 96 pieces. To be entitled: ''The 
Lewis Collection." 

Miss Mary Lewis : 

Lamp, "Giallo Antico," Rome. 

Miss Elizabeth W. Lewis : 

Twenty-two pieces of Embroideries and Tapestries ; mostly Oriental. 

Mrs. Caspar Wister : 

Four small decorated ABC Plates. American. 

Collection of Photographs from the Philadelphia Photographic 
Salon of 1898 : 

Bought and Presented by Mr. Clarence B. Moore : 

" A Lowland Farm," by J. N. S. Aston, Birmingham, England. 

''The Seven Words," by F. H. Day, Boston. 

"Day's Awakening," by A. H. Hinton, London, England. 

"Day's Decline," by A. H. Hinton, London, England. 

"Rest After Work," by Edgar G. Lee, Tynemouth, England. 

"Thy Weak Eye Glimmers Thro' a Misty Veil," by J. Page Croft, Bir- 
mingham, England. 

"The Waning Day," by F. P. Cembrano, Jr., Richmond, Surrey, England. 

"The Sunset Hour," by F. P. Cembrano, Jr., Richmond, Surrey, England. 

"The House on the Marsh" (correct title unknown), by George Davison, 
England. 

Bought and Presented by Mr. John Harrison : 
"Magdalen," by Charles L Berg, New York City. 

Presented by the Artists, as follows : 
" Peace," by Hewett A. Beasley. 
"Study, Old Barrigan," by L Benjamin. 
"Portrait of Judge Gillett," by Horace L. Bundy. 



20 

"Portrait," by Clayton Stone Harris. 

" Portrait," by Clayton Stone Harris. 

''Portrait," by Clayton Stone Harris. ("Dr. J. B. Eoberts.") 

"By the Candle's Yellow Light," by Albert Holden. 

"Study," by Gertrude Kasebier. 

" The Last Gleam," by Robert S. Redfield. 

" Head of a Percheron Mare," by Schreiber & Sons. 

"Marsh Willows," by Leon W. Shaw. 

"After Dinner," by J. C. Strauss. 

"Quietude," by Frank E. Streeper. 

"Hate," by Clarence B. Moore. 

" Portrait," by Eva Lawrence Watson. ("Miss Jessie D. Smith" ). 

"Between the Showers," by Wm. J. Skeen. 

"An Italian Type," by Elias Goldensky. 

Loans were made by : 
Mr. John T. Morris : 

Four Earthen, decorated Dishes ; made in Montgomery Co., Pa. 
Brown Pottery Dog, Bennington, Vt. ; c. 1850. 
White Porcelain Vase, Bennington, Vt. ; c. 1855. 
Large Brown Pottery Pitcher, Bennington, Vt. ; c. 1840. 
A stringed musical Instrument from India (?) 
Earthen Dish ; slip decoration, Montgomery Co. ; c. 1830. 
Earthen Plate ; Sgraffito decoration, Montgomery Co. ; c. 1811. 
Earthenware Plate ; blue and white, Jersey City ; c. 1840. 
Earthenware Bread Plate ; pink print of Horticultural Hall, Trenton, 1876; 
Earthen Pie Plate ; Sgraffito decoration ; c. 1804. 
Earthen Mug ; Sgraffito decoration ; dated 1816. 
Vase ; glass. Belgium. From Brussels Exposition. 
Large Porcelain Tucker Pitcher ; landscape decoration. 
Large Hunting Pitcher ; Rockingham ware. Made at South Amboy, N. J., 
1850. 

Mr. John Niggl : 

Set of Chessmen ; carved ivory, gold mounted, with inlaid board and box. 

Miss Anne H. Wharton : 

Pair of black silk Knee Breeches and a Waistcoat of ecru satin. Worn by 
Charles Wharton, 1743-1796. 

Mr. Clarence B. Moore : 
Piece of Swedish Tapestry. 
Collection of War Relics from Cuba, comprising : 

A Mauser Rifle with Bayonet and Cartridges. 

Cartridge for Lee Rifle, U. S. N. 

Cartridge for Krag-Jorgensen Rifle, U. S. A. 

Pair of Sandals, worn by Spanish Guerrilla. 

Fragment of Spanish Shell. 



21 

Wire-Cutter, used by the Tenth Cavalry, Santiago. 
One-pound Cartridge from Spanish Cruiser "Maria Teresa." 
Grapeshot from Cayo del Toro, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 

Mr. Dalton Dorr : 

Screen of carved Jade mounted in Teakwood. 

Mr. F. D. Laxgenheim : 

Brass Key King ; middle of Eighteenth Century. Germany. 
Old Steel Table Fork ; horn handle. 18th century. Germany. 
Brass Implement for Decorating Pastry. 18th century. Germany. 

Mr. T. H. Sweeting: 

Framed Embroidery ; said to have been made by Mary, Queen of Scots. 

Numismatic and Antiquarian Society : 

Fifty-four Coins and Medals added to their Collection. 
Mr. Charles E. Dana : 

Collection of forty-one reproductions of Seals and one Bronze Matrix. 

Miss Jean W. Tatler : 

Two Cups and Saucers ; porcelain. French. Decorated by Elijah Tatler ; 
c. 1870. 

Mr. E. Kretzmar : 

Pastel Portrait of Miss Helms, a German actress ; c. 1706. 

Miss F. F. Caldwell and Mrs. H. Markoe : 

Collection of twenty -six pieces, including Silver, Porcelain, Bronze and 
Enamels. 

DALTON DORE, 

Curator of the Museum. 

Purchases for the Museum : 
From Anglo-American Pottery Fund : 

Cup and Saucer ; pink decoration ; views of New York City from the Bay. 
Adams, Staffordshire, England. 

Bowl ; cream color, with black printed portraits of Washington and Frank- 
lin. Liverpool Ware, Eighteenth Century. 

Pitcher ; copper lustre with black prints of the Surrender of Lord Corn- 
wallis and portrait of Lafayette. Staffordshire, England. 

Plate ; blue and white, with view of Table Eock. Niagara. Made by Enoch 
Wood, Burslera, Staffordshire. 

Plate; blue and white, with view of "La Grange," the residence of La- 
fayette. Made by Enoch Wood, Burslem, Staffordshire, 1824. 

Plate ; pink and white. View of Hancock House, Boston. 

Cup and Saucer and Creamer; lilac and white. ''Boston Mails" design, 
by Edwards, Staffordshire ; c. 1841. 

Soup Plate ; pink and white. *' Head waters of the Juniata," by Adams, 
Staffordshire. 

Plate with View of the Eace Bridge, Fairmount, by Jackson. 



22 

Plate with View of the Erie Canal at Buffalo, by R. Stevenson. 

Plate ; View of City Hall, New York. 

Plate ; View of Fishkill on the Hudson. 

Six Plates with Views of Chicago Fair Buildings. 

Dish ; " Commodore McDonough's Victory." 

Small Platter; light blue decoration; "Schuylkill Water Works," by 

Charles Meigh. 
Large White Platter with black print of the Capitol at Washington, by W. 

Pidgway, Staffordshire, England. 
''Washington Plate;" portrait of Washington in centre in black ; border, 

a wreath of fruits and leaves in plum color. 
Platter; pink. View of Harper's Ferry, by Adams, Staffordshire. 
Platter; black print of Log Cabin. "Columbia Star" pattern, by John 

Ridgvvay, 1840. 
Platter ; earthenware. Pink and white. View of " Landing of Columbus." 

By I. & W. Ridgway, England. 
Platter; earthenware. Blue and white. View of "Almshouse," N. Y. 

By I. & W. Ridgway, England. 
Plate ; earthenware. Blue and white. View of "Baltimore & Ohio R. R." 
By Wood & Sons, Burslem. 
From Temple Fund : 

Large Porcelain Jar and Cover, decorated with bands of flowers and con- 
ventional ornament. Old Chinese. 
Vase; Silver. American Workmanship. Design by W. C. Codman. 

Chasing by F. A. Jordan. 
* Vase ; Porcelain. Decorated by Solon. Made by Minton & Co. , Stoke- 

upon-Trent, England. Subject of decoration, the " Merry Jester." 
(Extract from a letter written by the artist, L. Solon) : 

" In the guise of a Court Jester, the frolicsome Nymph confides to her 
puppet the secret of the many tricks she has just played. From the 
branches of a tree hang the masks of various expressions she has worn 
in the different characters she has assumed to deceive her credulous 
admirers. The playthings of one moment — the idols of one day — are 
represented by the broken statuettes of cupids which lie in fragments 
at her feet. 

"On the reverse of the vase a puppet-show is seen, in which little 
wooden actors are giving a performance of ' Minerva, Goddess of Wis- 
dom, Overpowered and Vanquished by Love.' " 
" Dickeson Collection " of 120 pieces: 58 porcelains, 62 enamels on metal. 
From Offertory Fund : 

Plate with portrait of McKinley. White, portrait tinted. E. Liverpool 

Pottery Co., E. Liverpool, Ohio. 
Lace-maker's Pillow, with pattern and lace under way. 
Handkerchief ; Lace and drawn work. 

Large figure of Buddha. Wood, carved and gilded. Japan. 
Three photographs ; Birmingham, England. 

* Messrs. Bailey, Banks & Biddle contributed $100 towards the purchase of this Vase. 



23 

Accessions to the Library by purchase : 
Catalogues of Coins and Medals, by Lyman H. Low. 

By gift from : 

Dr. Isaac Norris ; Mr. Henry C. Mercer ; Mr. Henry Walters ; Mr. Samuel 
L. Parrish ; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston ; Fairmount Park Art Association ; 
Municipal League of Philadelphia ; National Academy of Design, Xevv York ; 
Detroit Museum of Art ; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. 



.• 1 

< 


?;. 


*^ 


1 


\ 





o 


00 


S 


nS 


NO 

To 


1 


nS 
On 


^ 


1 


s 


1 


rn 


PI 


On 


~0 


^ 


PI 

NO 


^ 

tv 


I 


' 1 


In 


i 




o" 




n^ 


? 


S 


1 


00 


NO 


P. 


f 


^ 


pT 


j^ 


PI 


tn 


to 


i 


pT 


i^ 


1 




^ 






ro 


vO 


00 


fo 


•^ 






NO 


On 


NO 


On 


in 


NO 





2: 


^ 


^ 


m 


.9^ 


PI 





2: 








00 




in 


t< 




OO 




C4 




ON 




ON 


t^ 




■^ 


NO 


m 




m 


,? 





Oj 




e 






Tf 






^ 




H 




PI 




f>; 




r^ 


rn 


On 


in 


pi^ 


in 


t;; 


NO 


■>!- 


■<1- 










lO 




m" 




NO 


no" 


l/i 


'P 


f^ 


ro 


-^ 


M 


On 


no" 


0* 


rC 


J^ 


pT 


f 


pT 


0~ 


o; 


r 


V 


















































U 


Q 


















































< 


^. 








" 










































H 


E 








(N 


1 


o\ 


€ 


K 


0^ 


OO 


?o 


N^ 


'^ 


VO 


rn 


00 


1 



5 


in 


i 


c? 


1 


ON 


(S 


Q 

< 
OS 


^ 


1 


oo" 








hT 


o' 


>n 


o' 


o" 


o" 




rn 


1^' 


OO* 


rn 


PI 


o" 


pf 


00* 


s 


oo" 


-^ 


o 










"^ 


" 


"^ 


'^ 


" 


" 


























O 


1 


C 

a 

o 
U 














































1 





O 
m 

00 


1 


vS^ 


H 

VO 
M 




t^ 


5: 


1 


^ 




1 


rn 
m 


J 


rn 


^ 


1 


fn 


00 


1- 


^ 




g^ 








;f 


^ 




o" 


"" 


M 


^ 


^" 


vo" 


ro 


■^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


in 


<> 


J? 


in 




O 


c 
o 
































































































1-.' 


In 
















































s 


)S 


m 


^ 




in 


•<t- 


o 


in 


■>*■ 


t^ 


•^ 


m 


o 


O 


M 


t^ 


NO 


■^ 


r^ 


in 


n 


m 


^ 






s 


In 


vo 


r>. 


% 


NO 


^ 

<> 




8. 


^ 


m 


^ 


On 


m 




t^ 





in 


2 


t 


no' 




ii 

Q. 




^ 


" 








6\ 





00 




00 






^ 














o" 




in 




g 

c 

6 








w 


rn 


« 


m 




-f 


m 




m 


■^ 


-^ 


NO 


'I- 


■* 


m 


m 






C^ 
































































































v 


^ 




00 


N 


00 


m 


„ 


c< 


N 


00 


>o 


00 


m 


■* 


t^ 


NO 


H 


a. 


"9 


M 


in 


CO 




1 


a, 

H 


'l- 


VO 


00 


g§ 


f? 
" 


NO 
NO_ 


in 




NO 


2" 


•>♦; 


pi 

no" 


o" 


NO 
PI 

in 




NO* 


^ 


o" 


rn 
00 


nS 
no" 


^ 


NO 


6 




M 














8 


r) 


en 


" 


m 


in 




m 


rn 


in 


•^ 


•<J- 




CO 


m 






















































x> 
















































>> 


1 






^ 


:8 


!>. 


1 


On 

in 


N 


w 


NO 


'J- 

ON 


m 


in 

■<}■ 


in 

o 






S 


1 


NO 




00 


O 




's 














NO 




n' 


NcT 


On 




rn 




00 


0* 




ON 


in 


tC 


On 


in 






>-^ 


t 








N 




" 


(N 


N 




P) 


c< 


" 


•^ 




•♦ 


NO 


in 


NO 


m 


pi 


PI 






T3 


rt 














■ 


































B 


C 


















































S 

B 




VO 


t>« 


VO 




ro 


On 


-s- 


ro 


^ 


m 


1 


NO 


r^ 


in 


„ 


^ 


„ 


^ 


,S 


^ 




i 

3 


'I 


w 


vg^ 


00 




^ 

N 


NO 


>n 
oo" 


On 


ON 

in 


r4 




1^ 

no' 


°°. 


no" 




1- 


N^ 


rn 


NO 
H 


^ 




>— I 


a 
















H 




m 


c» 


m 


en 


w 


PI 


PI 


rn 


cn 


PI 


m 


PI 






.2 


rt 


















































D. 
















































i 


E 
o 






























































































§ 


o 


1 


<s 






P) 


N 


NO 


^ 


m 


^ 


NO 


t^ 


m 


PI 


NO 


On 


N 


On 


2^ 





"S 




rt 


1 


? 


\ 


~ 


-. 


^ 


^ 


~ 


8 





s; 


^ 


On 


^ 


NO 


t^ 


N^ 


m 


^ 



c» 




S 


o 


|3 


" 


"~ 


'- 


NO 


!^ 


00 


oo" 


^ 


(N 


tC 


S^ 


^ 


m 


^ 


m 


5- 


en 


rn 


^ 


^ 


w 






S2 
















































o 


X 
































































































■> 


c 


U-1 


t>. 


OO 


NO 


On 


On 


On 


P) 


00 


8 


NO 


-* 


M 


in 


o 


-^l- 


iO 


ro 


•* 


NO 


-f- 








u 





r^ 


s 








rfl 


00 


On 





<g 







00 


ON 







S^ 










o 


c 


q_ 


r^ 








ro 


t^ 


m 




m 


f^ 


in 




On 




t: 




^ 




r^ 




cx 

<; 


I, 


rt 


" 






<5\ 


ro 


oi 


rn 


„~ 


in 


o" 


^ 


pT 


00* 


in 


pi" 


no" 


J:; 


rn 


NO 


00 


o" 




<u 


E 










11 






M 


M 


S 


PI 


p< 




PI 


PI 


PI 


m 


rn 


N 


PI 


PI 






^ 


















































E 

3 
C 


P-I 
































































































A 














































o 

t3 


sz 

i 

B 


.? 


^ 


H 


N 


^ 


^ 


nS 


^ 


00 


?; 


00 


N? 


<§ 


1 


^ 


in 


pI 


^ 


On 


PI 


\ 




A 


t 


00 


m 


5 




00*" 


no' 


"3 


NO_ 


"2 

H 


no" 


00_ 


-!? 


rn 




as 


^ 


di 


in 


pT 


p; 




1^ 


H 










^ 








" 






" 








"" 


PI 


PI 


•^ 


** 


" 






^ 


O 
















































3 


o 






























































































bo 


5 














































t 


3 


B 
B 

s 


§8 


^ 


ON 


ro 


% 


nS 


?n 


N^ 


nS 


00 

00 


I>- 


nS; 


P. 


8 


I 


m 


t-« 


in 


? 


in 


r^ 




3 


O 


00 


m 


?> 


NO_ 


r^ 


tt. 


N_ 


O; 


'l- 


oo_ 


On 




PI. 







On 


0_ 


O, 


"2 


"^ 




V 
















ro 


tC 


pr 


NO" 




oo" 


0* 




'i^ 














■* 




o 


A 


























H 








'"' 


" 


'^ 


1^ 


" 




P-H 


■" 


















































^" 




























































































a 

3 
C 

•— > 


s 


^ 


J^ 


0\ 


VO 


1-^ 


ro 


_ 




^ 


m 


H 


in 


00 





ON 


8 


rn 


00 


=2. 


On 


H 


o 






t/; 


(^ 


r~. 








OO 
















t^ 




CO 


On 


^ 




^ 






E 

1 


D 




ro 


NO 


NO 


PI 


in 


N 


N 


«5 


. in 


rn 


M 




>-<_ 


"- 


t>. 


in 


in 


On 


On 


oo_ 






" 








' 


" 


" 


"" 




no" 


rn 


On 


cn 


no" 


r^ 




" 


o" 


" 


0* 


pi" 






t~N 




00 


On 


o 




N 


fi 


■<*■ 


m 


NO 


t^ 


00 


ON 


o 


^ 


p< 


rn 


'4- 


in 


"2, 


t^ 


UO 










t^ 


ti. 


00 


00 




00 


00 


00 




00 


00 


00 


ON 


ON 


ON 


0\ 


ON 


ON 


On 


ON 






(»" 


;: 


CO 


00 


00 




OO 


TO 


c» 


<» 


OO 


c» 


<» 


00 


OO 


c» 


OO 


OO 


00 


00 


00 


00 






* 




'k 


* 


* 










































Northwest Corner of Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia. 



THE SCHOOL. 



The extension and development of the school-work which has 
been noted in all recent reports has continued without inter- 
ruption during the year just closed. The School of Applied Art 
has been strengthened by the appointment of two additional in- 
structors, Mr. Ludwig E. Faber in Drawing, and Miss Margarette 
Lippincott in Water-Color Painting, while the Department of 
Chemistry and Dyeing in the Textile School has been entirely re- 
organized under Dr. J. Merritt Matthews, who was appointed 
Professor in charge in place of Mr. Frederic Haigh, who conducted 
the Department for a few months after the resignation of Mr. 
Finckel a year ago. 

The Chemical Laboratories have been virtually rebuilt, and 
facilities provided for advanced work in general industrial chem- 
istry as well as in Textile Chemistry, and certain rooms in the 
north wing, which have been occupied since 1893 by the De Lancey 
School, but which were vacated last June, have been adapted to 
receive a complete set of worsted machinery with which the Lowell 
Machine Shop, of Lowell, Massachusetts, has generously offered 
to equip this Department. 

This use of the north wing by the Textile School made neces- 
sary an improvement to the building, the need of which had in- 
deed long been felt, but the accomplishment of which had hitherto 
been delayed. This was a passageway to connect the two wings 
of the building, between which there has never before been any 



26 

communication above the basement, except at the Broad Street 

front. Such a passageway, connecting the wings on the second 

floor at the Fifteenth Street end, has been constructed, and the 

■worsted machinery above referred to is in process of being installed. 

Two large windows were added in the room occupied by the 
Power Weaving Department, and the second story of the south 
wing of this building has been improved by the construction of 
partitions dividing what was formerly a single hall into three class- 
rooms. 

On February 7th a special exhibition of school-work was held 
at the Bourse in connection with the Convention of the National 
Association of Painters and Decorators. 

On April 16th a permanent memorial of the meeting here in Janu- 
ary last of the New England Cotton Manufacturers' Association, 
and of the interest in our work which was manifested by the mem- 
bers of that body, was presented and unveiled with appropriate ex- 
ercises in the School building. 

This memorial was in the form of a bronze bust of the late 
George Draper, Esq., of Massachusetts, suitably inscribed and 
mounted on a pedestal of polished granite. Addresses in connec- 
tion with the presention were made by Mr. C. J. H. Woodbury, 
of Boston, Secretary of the New England Cotton Manufacturers' 
Association, and by Hon. Albert Clarke, of Boston, Secretary of 
the Home Market Club, of which Mr. Draper was long the honored 
President. Mr. Charles H. Harding made the address of accept- 
ance on behalf of the Board of Trustees, and the memorial was 
unveiled with appropriate remarks by Mrs. E. D. Gillespie. 

The following lectures were given during the year in addition 
to those which formed a part of the regular courses of instruction : 

A course of four lectures on Heraldry by Prof. Charles E. Dana. 

A lecture before the Textile School on January 28th b}^ Mr. 
Charles H. Harding on " The Selection and Grading of Fine 
Wools," and one on February 18th by Mr. John F. Bolger on 
" The Growing Necessity for Improved Machinery in Wool 
Carding." 

. Ninety-four books and pamphlets have been added to the 
Library during the year. Of this number twenty-four books were 
purchased, and the remaining seventy were presented by the fol- 
lowing : The United States Government, the Pennsylvania State 
Government, the Philadelphia . City Government, Miss S. Corlies, 




i 



:\ 



Miss M. Atherton Leach; and^'Messrs. 
James M. Beck, J. C. M. Curry, John 
T. Morris, L. W. Miller, J. H. Reynolds, 
and Arthur E. Sears. 

A most interesting and valuable col- 
lection of Copenhagen Pottery was in 
March last presented to the School by 
Mr. John T. Morris, to whose generosity 
the Library of the School is also in- 
debted for several important additions. 
Mr. A. C. Munoz presented a large 
architectural drawing — Doorway of the 
Church of Santa Paula, Seville. 

A marble tile floor in the anteroom to the Library was presented 
by Mr. Adolphe Grant. 

A collection of samples of ornamental textile fabrics has been 



J 



K 



1 ' \\ 



\ 



28 

presented to the Art School by Mrs. Frank K. Hippie, and a similar 
collection was presented by Mr. Charles E. Dana. 

The Textile School has received donations from the following 
firms : 

Lowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass., worsted spinning and 
drawing machinery, consisting of the following pieces : 1 coiler 
gill box, 1 double can gill box, 1 2-spindle gill box, 1 2-spindle 
first drawing, 1 2-spindle second drawing, 1 4-spindle weigh box, 
1 8-spindle drawing box, 1 24-spindle reducer, 1 30-spindle Dandy 
rover, 2 72-spindle (J) spinning frames ; also 1 iron drawing-in 
frame, for use in weave room. 

Alexander Bros., Philadelphia, Pa., belting necessary to install 
the above machinery. 

Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass., 1 improved Northrop maga- 
zine loom. 

Geo. S. Harwood & Son, Boston, Mass., 1 60-inch Bramwell feed 
(complete). 

Atlas Mfg. Co., Newark, N. J., 1 12-inch R. H. Sutton improved 
side drawing machine (complete) ; also one case of wool samples, 
scoured by the Peckham wool-washing system. 

Granger Foundry and Machine Co., Providence, R. I., 1 jigg for 
speck dyeing. 

Laminar Fibre Co., North Cambridge, Mass., 25 roving cans, 3 
boxes, 3 round taper baskets, and 1 truck. 

Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., extra at- 
tachment for shedding motion on Knowles gem loom ; also other 
loom findings. 

The Jackson Patent Shell Roll Co., Pawtucket, R. I., 49 spinning 
frame rolls, with 10 extra shells ; also 24 roving frame rolls, with 
4 extra shells. 

Messrs. John Story Jenks and William Wood, set of yarn test- 
ing machinery, consisting of scales and reels, value, $200. 

Mitchell Bissell & Co., New York, 2* gross enamelled twister 
guides ; also 2 gross enamelled spinning guides. 

Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass., 1 set of change 
gears for spinning frame. 

Louis S. Fiske & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., fine washed and un- 
washed wool to the amount of $37.77. 

Jagode & Lewis, Philadelphia, Pa., 64 pounds of wool. 

Justice, Bateman & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 59 pounds of washed 
wool. 




Mr. Carl Grubnau, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa., 1 large re- 
volving case, containing 
various kinds of wool 
samples. 

Aberfoyle Mfg.'Co., Ches- 
ter, Pa., 5 pounds of mer- 
cerized cotton, 5 pounds 

of bleached single 40's cotton, 15 pounds of spun silk yarn, and 
3000 heddles. 

H. T. Whitin, Northbridge, Mass., 21 pounds of fine cotton 
yarn ; also a variety of samples of fancy fabrics. 

John Story Jenks, Philadelphia, Pa., 62 cases for displaying cot- 
ton samples. 

Metallic Drawing Roll Co., Indian Orchard, Mass., samples of 
fine cottons from the raw stock to the finished product, including 
slubbing, rovings and yarns. 

D. Trainer & Sons Mfg. Co., Trainer, Pa., 110 pounds of 2-20's 
skein yarn. 

Herbst & Jones, Philadelphia, Pa., 10 pounds of worsted yarn. 



30 

George Campbell & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 165 pounds of 
card fly. 

C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., lacing cord, loom cord, and 
harness twine to the value of $14.70. 

Clark Thread Co., Newark, N. J., 2 pounds of crochet yarn. 

Geo. A. Clark & Bro., New York, specimen case showing process 
of thread manufacture. 

E. K. Bready, Philadelphia, Pa., fancy looped and knotted 
yarns. 

Mr. S. B. Solomon, New York, valuable piece of tapestry illus- 
trating the landing of Columbus; also a collection of pictorial 
tapestries used for chair backs, screens, etc. 

Edgar K. Frank, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 kid hair rug, copy of an 
Oriental. 

Glasgow Technical College, Glasgow, Scotland, copy of diploma 
woven in silk. 

Binns' Patent Band Co., Philadelphia, Pa., bands for twister. 

Mr. Chas. Bond, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 bundle of belt lacing. 

W. J. Matheson & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 38 pounds of dyestufifs ; 
also 204 sample bottles of dyestuffs. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 8 pounds of 
dyestuff's, 108 2-ounce bottles of dyestuffs, 24 4-ounce bottles of 
dyestuffs, and 4 large sample cards. 

Pickhardt & Kuttroff, Philadelphia, Pa., 10 pounds of dyestuffs, 
a full line of alizarine powders, 1 keg of lactic acid, and 67 4-ounce 
bottles of dyestuffs. 

Schoellkopf Aniline and Chemical Co., Buffalo, N. Y., 92 2- 
ounce bottles of dyestuffs and 34 4-ounce bottles of dyestuffs. 

O. S. Janney & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 75 pounds carb. potash 
and 1 pound of dyestuff. 

C. Bischoff & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 5 pounds of dyestuffs. 

New York and Boston Dyewood Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 2 pounds 
of dyestuffs. 

Read Holliday & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., 23 4-ounce bottles of 
dyestuffs. 

A. Klipstein & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., samples of dyestuffs. 

Harway Dyewood Co., New York, samples of dyestuffs. 

A. P. Mende & Co., New York, samples of dyestuffs. 

Sykes & Street, Philadelphia, Pa., samples of dyestuffs. 

John J. Keller & Co., New York, full line of erio blues. 



31 



Avery Chemical Co., Boston, Mass., 1 keg lactic acid. 
Enterprise Chemical Co., Boston, Mass., 1 keg cotton softener. 




J. Eavenson & Son, Philadelphia, Pa., 265 pounds of olive oil 
soap. 



32 

Eichmann & Sternberg, New York, samples of mercerized 
yarns. 

J, R. Montgomery Co., Windsor Locks, Conn., samples of mer- 
cerized yarns. 

LOANS. 

Messrs. J. & W. Lyall, New York, 1 small working model (com- 
plete) of the Lyall loom ; also a working model of the principal 
motion. 

The institution is also indebted to the following for courtesies 
extended: Folwell Bros. & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; Aberfoyle Mfg. 
Co., Chester, Pa.; Firth and Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; S. A. 
Crozer & Son, Upland, Pa. ; Greenwood & Bault, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass. ; Geo. C. Hetzel & Co., Chester, 
Pa. ; Bradford Mills, Germantown, Philadelphia ; Howland Croft 
Sons & Co., Camden, N. J. ; Erben, Harding & Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Millville Mfg. Co., Millville, N. J.; Thomas Dolan & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; John Lunn, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Beswick & Kay, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Company, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. ; Jacob Miller Sons & Co., Borich Mills, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; Edmund J. Walenta, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Farbenfabriken 
of Elberfeld Co., New York ; F. H. Higgins, New York ; Peter 
Sharp, New York ; Messrs. Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
Messrs. Stoddard, Haserick, Richards & Co., Boston, Mass. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises were held at Horticultural 
Hall on Thursday evening, June 9th, and were followed by the 
annual exhibition of students' work in the School building at 
Broad and Pine Streets. 

An address, " Industrial Supremacy," was made by Hon. Albert 
Clarke, of Boston, with remarks by the President, Mr. Theodore 
C. Search, by Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, Mr. John R. Kendrick, and 
others. 

The following prizes, diplomas and certificates were awarded : 

DIPLOMAS SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

Mabel Farr Higgs, Helen Liming Eedles, Edith Baldrey Snyder, Meta Vaux 
Warrick. 

Textile School,. — Frank Malin Bosworth, Samuel M. Greenwood, George 
Kent Kittle, Herbert Christ, Laurence Greenbank Holden, James Scott Mc- 
Master, William Nathan Eandle. 




PRIZES SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

President's Prize, $25.00.— Offered by the President 
for the best set of drawings executed by the student in the 
Course of Industrial Drawing. Awarded to Gertrude 
Wilson. 

Frederic Graff Prize, $25.00. — For work in Archi- 
tectural Design, competed for by students in the evening 
class alone. Awarded to Julian F. Abele. 

Honorable mention to J. Francis Smith and J. Oscar 
Betelle. 

Henry Perry Leland Prize, $25.00. — Offered by Mrs. John Harrison for 
the best Drawing in Pen and Ink. Awarded to Margaret P. Johnson. 
Honorable mention to John Whitall Cline. 

Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith Prize, $25.00. — Awarded annually in such manner 
and for such work as shall be determined by the Principal of the School. Awarded 
to George Newman for group of work in illustration. 

3 




34 

John T. Morris Prize.— Three equal prizes of $5.00 each. Offered by Mr. 
John T. Morris for drawing of Details of the Human Figure. Awarded to 
Edwin Frank Bayha, George L. Gugert and C. W. Casner. 

ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

First Prize, $20.00.— For the second best set of drawings executed by students 
in the Course of Industrial Drawing. Awarded to Grace Kathryn Hammond. 

Honorable mention to Edwin Frank Bayha. 

Second Prize, $10.00. — For Original Design for Wall Paper. Awarded to 
Charles Thomas Scott. 

Honorable mention to Winifred Buck. 

Third Prize, $10.00.— For Original Design for Mosaic. Awarded to Freder- 
ick William Brown. 

Honorable Mention to Charles Thomas Scott. 

Fourth Prize, $10.00. — For best sheet of Plant Analysis. Awarded to Louis 
James Taws. 

Honorable mention to Mary D. Hammitt. 

Mrs. Georoe K. Crozer Prize, $20.00.— Offered for the best work in Draw- 
ing. Awarded to Joseph Frank Copeland and Charles J. Henkles. 

Honorable mention to Martha AValter and Milton Paul Herbert. 

Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize. $20.00. —For the best work in Modelling. 
First Prize. Awarded to Salvadore Bilotti. 

Honorable mention to Meta Vaux Warrick. 

Caroline Axford Magee Prize, $20.00. — Awarded to Martha Walter for 
group of designs introducing decorative use of the human figure. 

Maddock Prize, $20.00.— Offered by Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, X. J., 
for design for Wall Fountain. Awarded to Helen Liming Redles. 

Weber Prize, Draughtsman's Table. — Offered by F. Weber & Co. for best 
work in Instrumental Drawing. Awarded to Edwin Frank Bayha. 

Honorable mention to William Frederic Schaeffer. 

Henry M. Taws Prize. — Water-Color Sketching Outfit for best Flower 
Painting. Awarded to Joseph Frank Copeland. 

Honorable mention to Helen Taylor. 

RiPKA & Weil Prize. — Outfit of Oleo Water-colors. For best sketch in Water- 
color from life. Awarded to Fukawa Baski. 

Honorable mention to George L. Gugert. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 
In the Graduating Class. 

The National Association of Wool Manufacturers' Gold Medal for 
General Excellence. — Awarded to William Nathan Randle. 

Honorable mention to .James Scott MacMaster and Geo. Kent Kittle. 

The "Textile World" Gold Medal. For Best Results in Final Exami- 
nations and Terra Work in Dyeing. Awarded to Harry Harding Bosworth. 

Special Merit Scholarship as announced below. Awarded to William 
Steele. 

Honorable mention to AVilliam Shutt Teasdale. 



35 

In the Second Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Gold Medal. For General Excellence. Awarded to 
William Steele. 

Honorable mention to James F. Gable. 

The X. A. W. M. Silver Medal. For Best Eesults in Jacquard Fabrics, 
Designed and Woven by the Student. Awarded to William Gustave Wiese. 

Special Second Prize, a Bronze Medal. Awarded to Harry Harding 
Bosworth. 

Honorable mention to Chauncey H. Goodwin. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal. For Best Results in the Preliminary and 
Final Examinations. Awarded to William Steele. 

Honorable mention to William G. Wiese. 

In the First Year Regular Day Class : 

The X. A. W. M. Silver Medal. For General Excellence. Awarded to 
John Bailey Thickins. 

Honorable mention to Francis S. Xettleton and Frederic Richard McLean. 

The X. A. AV. M. Silver Medal. For Best Results in the Preliminary and 
Final Examinations. Awarded to William Richard Lockwood. 

Honorable mention to Charles Scott Althouse. 

The X. A. W. M. Bronze Medal. For Best Results in Color Harmony and 
Figured Design. Awarded to Charles Scott Althouse. 

Honorable mention to John Bailey Thickins and R. A. Foster. 

In the Third Year Regular Evening Class : 

The X. A. W. M. Silver Medal. For General Excellence, Including Best 
Results in Final Examination. Awarded to Charles P. Learned. 
Honorable mention to Frederick Cotshott. 

In the Second Year Regular Evening Class : 

The X. A. W. M. Bronze Medal. For Accuracy and Xeatness in Work in 
Connection with Regularity of Attendance. Awarded to Otto F. Porst. 

Honorable mention to Philip Schoettle. 

In the Third Year Evening Dyeing Class : 

The X. A. W. M. Bronze Medal. For Best Work in Dyeing Coupled with 
the Final Examination. Awarded to William Schumann. 

Special Prizes for Work in Original Design : 

American Carpet and L'pholstery .Journal Silver Medal. For Best 
Ingrain Carpet Designed and Woven by a Student. Awarded to George J. Yar- 
wood. 

A. C. AND U. J. Silver Medal. For Best Design for Tapestry. Awarded 
to Bertram Sidney Chadwick. 

In recognition of the exceptionally high rating obtained in every branch of 
study ; of the perfection of the volume of his samples of work in Dyeing, as well 
as his record for attendance, which showed that he was neither absent nor late on 



86 

a single occasion during the entire year, a Special Merit Scholarship for the year 
1898-99 is awarded by the Trustees to William Steele. 

Certificates — School of Applied Art, Decorative Painting and 
Applied Design (Class B). — Joseph Frank Copeland, Richard Shoemaker 
Cox, Elizabeth Wolfenden Hyde, Henry Mercer Orwig, Charles Thomas Scott, 
Louis James Taws, Charles Sharpless Wenck. 

Decorative Sculpture. — G. Silas Howell. 

Applied Design.— Mary Downing Hamraitt. 

Architectural Drawing. — Julian F. Abele, J. Oscar Betelle, William F. 
Higgs, Thomas H. Jolly, C. Marian McConaughy, C. Francis Smith. 

Teachers' Certificate— Normal Art Course. — Joseph Frank Copeland, 
Richard Shoemaker Cox, Isabella Bradley, Meta Vaux Warrick, Helen Liming 
Redles, Mabel Farr Higgs, Emma Leona Twining, Deborah Delp Weisel, Flora 
May Smith. 

Elementary Course. — Viola West Daltry, Deborah Smedley. 

Industrial Drawing (Class A). — Edwin Frank Bayha, Frances Margaret 
Bradford, Moses Lawrence Blumenthal, Rebecca Lee Boiling, Fordyce Lewellyn 
Cowell, Alice Leedom Cresson, Anna Emilia Dieck, Howard Henry Grosjean, 
Grace Kathryn Hammond, Mary B. Longenecker, Ebba Louisa Edina Lin- 
droth, Elizabeth Martin, Clifton Hyde Presbrey, Mary Elizabeth Price, Adele 
Louise Petch, Marie Starbuck Piatt, Rebecca Burd Peale, William James 
Riehle, William Albert Roller, William Frederic Shaeffer, Emma Leona Twin- 
ing, Gertrude Wilson. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Second Year Day Class : 

William Andrews, Harry Harding Bosworth, Wilkinson Crossley 2d, .James 
Franklin Gable, Chauncey Harding Goodwin, Oscar Paul Kaspar, Herbert 
Stanford Landell, Kenneth Mannering McKenzie, William Steele, William 
Gustave Wiese, Stanley Thomas Willett, Merton Jencks Wilmarth. 

First Year Day Class : 

Charles Scott Althouse, Leon Viciente Brannen, .Joseph Raymond Doyle, 
Morris Goodman Einstein, Irving Jerome .Johnson, Howard Campbell Kite, 
Charles Forney Leib, William Richard Lockwood, Frederick Richard McLean, 
Francis Scruton Nettleton, Charles Frederick Sweney, John Bailey Thickins. 

Day Dyeing Class.— Sanford Irving Benton, Louis Henrie Eddy, James 
Kelly Gass, William Shutt Teasdale. 

Third Year Evening Dyeing Class. — William Schumann. 

Third Year Regular Evening Class : 

Frederick Cotschott, Edwin Seth Jones, Charles Preston Learned, David 
Milne, Charles Pfeiffer, Edward Borton Stanley. 

Twenty-five appointments to State Scholarships have been made this year, 
viz.: For Cambria, Dauphin, Elk, Franklin, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Law- 
rence, Luzerne, Lehigh, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Sullivan, 



37 



Venango, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland and Wyoming counties, with 
three from Allegheny and four from Philadelphia. 

Seventy-nine holders of these scholarships are at present registered in the 
School, this being the full number provided for. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education for 
the Grammar Schools of the city were filled, as usual, by a competitive exami- 
nation, conducted by the Principal, each Grammar School Principal being 
authorized to send candidates. 

In addition to the above, appointments were made as usual to the scholarships 
which are annually filled from the High, Manual Training and Public Indus- 
trial Art Schools of this city. 

Of the seven hundred and twenty-nine students registered during the year 
ending December 31, 1898, two hundred and forty-nine are women and four 
himdred and eighty are men. 



Appended are lists 
1897, showing their 
they come : 



of the students registered since December 81, 
occupations and the localities from which 



Architects, 








5 


Lithographer, . 


1 


Artists, 








7 


Loom Fixers, 


8 


Beamers, . 








6 


Machinists, 


3 


Book-keepers, 








7 


Managers, .... 


5 


Card Stampers, 








3 


Manufacturers, . 


. 19 


Carpenters, 








2 


Merchants, 


2 


Carvers, 








6 


Musician, .... 


1 


Clerks, 








45 


Nurse, .... 


1 


Cutters, 








2 


Painters and Decorators, . 


8 


Designers, . 








27 


Photographers, . 


3 


Draughtsmen, 








21 


Printers and Publishers, . 


4 


Dyers, 








12 


Pressmen, .... 


2 


Engravers, 








5 


Stenographers, . 


5 


Finishers, . 








3 


Students, .... 


319 


Glass Workers, 








2 


Teachers, .... 


57 


Illustrators, 








6 


Waiter, 


1 


Laborers, . 








2 


Weavers, 


13 


Lace Draughters, 






2 


Miscellaneous, . . . . 


12 


Librarians, 








2 







729 



LOCALITIES KEPKESENTED. 
Philadelphia, 514 



Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, 
Massachusetts, 
New York, 
Michigan, 



99 
44 
14 
10 
6 



38 

Maine, 5 

North Carolina, 5 

Connecticut, 4 

Maryland, 4 

Canada, ............. 3 

Delaware, 3 

Ohio, 3 

Khode Island, 3 

Vermont, 2 

California, ............ 

Georgia, 

Illinois, 

Indiana, 

Iowa, 

New Hampshire, 

Texas, 

West Virginia, ............ 

Wisconsin, ............ 

Japan, ........ ..... 



W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



29 



39 



SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT 

For the Six Months Ending May 31, 1899. 

A course of nine illustrated lectures on " Art in Illustration and 
Decoration " was given under the auspices of the Associate Com- 
mittee of Women as follows : On March 6th, " The Industrial 
Arts," by Mr. Charles H. Caffin; on March loth, " The Illustrator 
and his Problems," and on the 20th, " The Decorator and his 
Problems," by Mr. Ernest Knaufft: on March 27th, " The Art of 
Mosaics," by Frank Miles Day, and on April 3d, " Monumental 
Brasses," by H. Kent Day. Two by Barr Ferree, on April 10th 
and 17th, respectively, "A Journey Through the Library of Con- 
gress " and " Sculpture in our Cities and Homes." On the 24th, 
Edgar V. Seeler on '' The Architect and the Sculptor," and on 
May 1st the series ended with a lecture on " Modern Triumphs in 
Glass Manufacture," by Rev. George N. Thomssen. 

Five free lectures have also been given in the Auditorium of 
the School under the auspices of the American Society for the 
Extension of Universit}" Teaching. 

Fifty-four volumes and pamphlets have been added to the 
Library since January 1, 1899. Thirteen of these were purchased 
and the remainder donated by the following : The United States 
Government, Smithsonian Institute, Wool Manufacturers Associa- 
tion, William Mann Co., New York Juvenile Asylum, the State 
Librarian, George E. Reed, and Mr. L. W. Miller. 

The following objects of art have been presented : 

A drinking-cup of Favrile glass and a vase of Grueby Faience 
by the Louis C. Tiffany Co. 

A Neapolitan reproduction in green marble of the " Flying 
Mercury," and a collection of Spanish water-jars by Mrs. E. J. 
Bartol. 

The J. B. Lippincott Co. of Philadelphia, 18 book covers, 34 
posters and 9 sets of proofs of book illustrations. 

The A. L. Diament Co., Philadelphia, sample books of wall 
papers. 

Mr. James J. Duffy and the Chapman Decorative Co., wall-paper 
samples, leathers and furniture brocades. 

The stained glass window, a memorial to Mrs. Shelton, has been 



40 

remodelled and installed at the expense of Mrs. Jones Wister and 
Mrs. William T. Carter. 

Messrs. Hunter & Dixon, of Philadelphia, a marble washstand 
and fittings. 

Dietz & Bro., plumbing work for washstand. 

Quaker City Lubricant Co., one dozen oil-cups. 

India Alkali Works, one 60-pound keg wool savogran. 

Messrs. William P. Haines ct Co., cash, $20.00. 

Welsbach Commercial Co., use of thirty lights for Working 
Reception February 24th, special reduction in price of 36 new 
lights installed, and services on several occasions. 

The following donations have been received by the Textile 
School since January 1, 1899 : 

Richard Rossmassler, Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co., Phila- 
delphia, 4 pounds 15 ounces Italian silk, also samples of broad 
silks of their manufacture. 

B. R. Dover, Philadelphia, 200 ((uills for silk ribbon loom. 

Binns Patent Band Co., Philadelphia, 50 twister bands for Col- 
lins frame. 

Hon. Philip C. Garrett, Logan, Philadelphia, a Navahoe loom. 

Schaum & Uhlinger, one 6-space circular batten lay. 

South wark Mills Co., Philadelphia, 50 pounds XX Ohio scoured 
wool. 

Champlain Silk Mills, Whitehall, New York, 6 pounds 60/2 
ply silk. 

Lowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass., 34 change gears for worsted 
spinning frame. 

Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass., 40 Whitin locking 
saddles and stirrups for Whitin spinning frame. 

Paterson Reed and Harness Co., Paterson, N. J., 6 fine reeds for 
narrow fabrics. 

Miss Mary Atherton Leach, samples of draperies. 

Farbwerk Muhlheim, Muhlheim, Germany, 2 sample books. 

D. Trainer & Sons' Manufacturing Co., Trainer, Pa., 18 pounds 
1/20 skein yarn and 7 pounds of 1/10 skein yarn. 

L. Sprague & Co., Lawrence, Mass., spools and bobbins for use 
in Worsted Department. 

Hughes & Mueller, Philadelphia, blanket range of woolen 
samples. 

Collins & Aikman Co., Manayunk, Pa., 3 yards cotton plush. 



41 

Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., Chester, Pa., 2 bundles cloth 
samples. 

Millville Manufacturing Co., Millville, X. J., 52 yards plain grey 

goods. 

Laboratory and Dye House. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co., New York, 7 pounds of dye- 
stuffs. 

New York and Boston Dyewood Co., Philadelphia, 73 4-oz. sam- 
ples of dyestuffs, and 3 2-oz. samples of same. 

J. A. and W. Bird & Co., New York, 2 pounds dyestuffs. 

William J. Matheson & Co., 27 pounds dyestuffs, 5 4-oz. samples 
of dyestuffs, and sample books. 

O. S. .Janney & Co., 100 pounds bichrome, 2 pounds indigo, 2 
pounds cochineal. 

Pickhardt & Kuttroff, 9 pounds of dyestuffs and 9 samples of 
same. 

Hanna-Schoelkopf Co., 15 pounds dyestuffs and sample books. 

Sykes & Street, 21 pounds dyestuffs, 14 samples of same, and 
1 keg of sumac. 

Roessler & Hasslacher Co., New York, 26 pounds sodium per- 
oxide, and 50 books on bleaching. 

Quaker City Chemical Co., Wayne Junction, Philadelphia, 10 
pounds each of " A " and " B " grades glugloss gelatine. 

Victor Koechl & Co., 14 bottles Janus colors and sample cards. 

The Institution is also indebted to the following for courtesies 
extended : 

Mr. S. N. D. North, Boston, Mass. ; Albert Hellwig & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; Keystone Spinning Mills Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Thomas 
Field, of Young, Smyth, Field & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Fales & 
Jenks, Pawtucket, R. I. ; Southwark Mills Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
H. B. Farrell, Philadelphia, Pa.; Wm. Emsley & Bro., Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; Alexander Crow, Philadelphia, Pa.; J. B. Stetson Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; H. J. Maynard, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Of the eight hundred and ninety-four students registered during the year from 
September 26, 1898, to May 31, 1899, six hundred and nineteen are men and two 
hundred and seventy-five are women. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

Agent, ...... 1 Librarians, 2 

Apprentices, 3 Lithographers, .... 2 

Architects, 4 Loom Fixers, .... 9 



42 



Artists, . 

Artisans, 

Baker, 

Beamers, 

Book-keepers 

Carpenters, 

Carvers, 

Card Stampe 

Clerks, . 

Designers, 

Draughtsmen 

Dyers, . 

Engravers, 

Finishers, 

Housewife, 

Illustrators, 

Laborer, 



5 


Manufacturers, . 






3 


14 


Machinists, . 






3 


1 


Merchants, . 






6 


6 


Nurse, 






1 


8 


Painters and Decorators, 




4 


3 


Physician, . 






1 


4 


Printers, 






5 


4 


Photographers, . 






4 


35 


Reporters, . 






2 


30 


Salesmen, . 






. 14 


22 


Stenographers, . 






. 7 


12 


Superintendents, . 






. 6 


3 


Students, . 






. 602 


2 


Teachers, . 






. 48 


1 


Waiters, 






. 2 


4 


Weavers, 






9 


1 


Violinist, . 






. 1 



894 
LOCALITIES FROM WHICH THE STUDENTS COME. 

Philadelphia, 701 

Pennsylvania, 85 

New Jersey, 40 

Massachusetts, 13 

New York, 12 

Michigan, ............. 6 

Maine, 4 

Connecticut, 4 

North Carolina, 4 

Maryland, 4 

Delaware, ........ ..... 3 



Ohio, . 

Canada, 

Rhode Island, 

Vermont, 

New Hampshire, 

West Virginia, 

Georgia, 

Indiana, 

Iowa, . 

Illinois, 

Wisconsin, . 



894 



W. MILLER, 

Principal of the School. 



43 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises in 1899 were held at Horticul- 
tural Hall on Thursday evening, June 8th, and were followed by 
the annual exhibition of students' work in the School building at 
Broad and Pine Streets. 

An address, " The Creative Spirit in Work," was delivered by 
Hamilton Wright Mabie, L.H.D., of New York. 

The report of the Principal presented on this occasion was as 
follows : 

The School has been attended during the past year by 898 
pupils. 

The following changes and additions have been made to the 
teaching force during the year: J. Merritt Matthews, Ph.D., was 
appointed Professor of Chemistry and Dyeing in place of Mr. 
Frederic Haigh, resigned. Mr. .J. K. Gass was appointed Instructor 
in D3^eing. 

Mr. Ludwig E. Faber was appointed Instructor in Drawing from 
the Antique, and Miss Margarette Lippincott Instructor in Water- 
Color Painting. 

Mr. John Molitor was added to the Staff of the School of Applied 
Art as Instructor in Architectural Drawing, and Mr. Richard B. 
Doughty to that of the Textile School as Instructor in Mechanical 
Drawing. 

Miss Florence C. Fetherston having resigned her position as In- 
structor in Applied Design, the work of her department has been 
divided between Director Stratton and Miss Fox, formerly In- 
structor in Instrumental Drawing, the position which was thus 
made vacant having been filled by the appointment as Instructor 
of Miss Anne Balderston. 

An interesting addition to the practical work of the Art School 
has been made in the introduction of bookbinding, in which some 
very encouraging results have been obtained, and a very genuine 
and legitimate field of usefulness opened to the young designer 
who desires to participate in the actual work of production, the 
recognition of the need of his doing so marking perhaps the most 
significant advance which has recently been made in art and in- 
dustrial education ; for the very growth of Schools of Design, as 
such, has only emphasized and aggravated the separation between 
design and craftsmanship, which is in itself the most unfortunate 
fact in modern industrial history, as the effort to re-establish the 



44 

true and natural relations between intelligent initiative and suc- 
cessful accomplishment by educational recognition of manual as 
well as mental processes marks the most important advance in 
methods of instruction which has been made by the age in which 
we live. 

Important changes in the building have been made during the 
year. A covered passage connecting the two wings at the second 
story has been built at the Fifteenth Street end and the four class- 
rooms at that end of the north wing, to which access from the Tex- 
tile School is thus provided, have been adapted to the requirements 
of the Worsted Department, which has been very thoroughly 
equipped with machinery for Worsted Spinning, 

The Chemical Laboratories were also virtually rebuilt last sum- 
mer, and several new class-rooms built in the south wing for the 
use of the Textile School and the School of Modern Languages. 

A list of benefactions, which indicate an amount of interest in 
the work of the School on the part of those best able to appreciate 
it that is gratifying in the extreme, will be found in the Annual 
Report of the Corporation. 

The following prizes, diplomas and certificates were awarded : 

DIPLOMAS SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART— ASSOCL^TE COMMITTEE 
OF WOMEN'S PRIZES. 

Richard Shoemaker Cox, Charles Sharpless Wenck. 

Textile School. — Merton Jencks Wilmarth, Herbert Stanford Landell, 
William Steele, Wilkinson Crossley 2d, James Franklin Gable, William An- 
drews, Stanley Thomas Willett. 

PRIZES SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

First Prize, $20.00. — For the best set of drawings executed by students in 
the Course of Industrial Drawing. Awarded to Marian Laurence Clark. 

Honorable mention to Nell Seymore Rogers and Eileen Anna Knox. 

Second Prize, $10.00. — For Original Design. Awarded to Isabella Bradley. 

Third Prize, |10.00. — For Original Design. Awarded to Emma Leona 
Twining. 

Fourth Prize, $10.00.— For Original Design. Awarded to Mary Anna 
Waterman. 

Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20.00.— Offered for the best work in Draw- 
ing. Divided between Walter Hunt Everett and Morris Molarsky. 

Honorable mention to Milton Paul Herbert, John Keyser and Frederic Wil- 
liam Browne. 

Mrs. George K. Crozer Prize, $20.00.— For the best work in Modelling. 
Awarded to Meta Vaux Warrick. 

Honorable mention to Edith Baldrey Snyder. 



45 

Caroline Axford Magee Prize, 120.00.— For the best Decorative Painting. 
Awarded to Mary Stone Haydock. 

Frederick Graff Prize, $25.00.— For work in Architectural Design. Com- 
peted for by students in the Evening Class alone. Awarded to Frank H. 
Keisker. 

Equal first mention to Russell Eobinson and Richard L. Watmough. 

Equal second mention to Thomas B. Temple and Jonathan Ring. 

Henry Perry Leland Prize, $25.00. — Offered by Mrs. John Harrison for 
the best Drawing in Pen and Ink. Awarded to Edwin Frank Bayha. 

Honorable mention to M. Lawrence Blumenthal. 

Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith Prize, $25.00. —Awarded annually in such manner 
and for such work as shall be determined by the Principal of the School. 
Awarded to Margaret P. Johnson for group of work in illustration. 

Faculty's Prize, $25.00.— For General Excellence. Awarded to Charles F. 
Scott. 

Honorable mention to Richard S. Cox. 

Henry M. Taws Prize. — Water-Color Sketching Outfit for best Flower 
Painting. Awarded to Mary Victoria Galler. 

Honorable mention to Mary Stone Haydock. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

In the Graduatinsf Class : 

The Theodore C. Search Gold Medal.— For " Highest Honor." Awarded 
to William Steele. 

The National Association of Wool Manufacturers' Gold Medal.— 
For General Excellence. Awarded to James F. Gable. 

Honorable mention to Herbert S. Landell. 

The "Textile World" Gold Medal.— For the best results in Final Ex- 
aminations and Term Work in Dyeing. Awarded to Wilfred Senior. 

Honorable mention to William Lockwood and Howard Kite. 

In the Second Year Regular Dny Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Gold Medal.— For General Excellence. Awarded to 
Francis S. Nettleton. 

Honorable mention to Charles S. Althouse and Irving Johnson. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal. — For best results in Jacquard Fabrics, 
Designed and Woven by the Student. Awarded to Charles S. Althouse. 

Honorable mention to Francis S. Nettleton. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal.— For best results in the Preliminary and 
Final Examinations. Awarded to Irving Johnson. 

Honorable mention to Charles S. Althouse. 

In the First Year Regular Day Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal. — For General Excellence. Awarded to 
Howard Fuller. 

Honorable mention to James V. Pomeroy. 

The N. a. W. M. Silver Medal.— For the best results in the Preliminary 
and Final Examinations. Awarded to James E. Corcoran. 

Honorable mention to Fred Roy Smith and R. R. Shillingford. 



46 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal,. — For best results in Color Harmony and 
Figured Design. Awarded to Frank W. Simons. 
Honorable mention to James V. Pomeroy. 

In the Third Year Regular Evening Class : 

The N. a. AV. M. Silver Medal. — For General Excellence, including best 
results in Final Examination. Awarded to Philip O. Schmaelzle. 
Honorable mention to Otto Porst. 

In the Second Year Regular Evening Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal. — For Accuracy and Neatness in Work in 
Connection with Regularity of Attendance. Awarded to Robert J. McCuen. 

In the Third Year Evening Dyeing Class : 

The N. a. W. M. Bronze Medal.— For best work in Dyeing coupled with 
the Final Examination. Awarded to Leroy Briggs. 
Honorable mention to John G. Wardlaw. 

CERTIFICATES SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART— DECORATIVE PAINT- 
ING AND APPLIED DESIGN. 

Special Design Certificates.— Susie EmmaBranin, Winifred Buck, Lynn- 
ton Hayes Kier, Anna Mary Waterman, Walter Thomas Weaver. 

Certificate B — Decorative Painting and Applied Design. — Isabella 
Bradley, Helen Augusta Johns, Ebba Louisa Edina Lindroth, Mary B. Long- 
necker, Elizabeth Martin, Howard Dorman McKeever, Adele Louise Petch, 
Abbie Hay Subers, Emma Leona Twining. 

Normal Certificate— Teachers' Course. — Nelle Dare Bishop, M. Law- 
rence Blumenthal, Mae Dennis, Howard Henry Grosjean, Grace Kathryn 
Hammond, Elizabeth Martin, Marion Cooper McConaughy, Elizabeth Price, 
Abbie Hay Subers, Lucy Agnes Sprague, Florence May Thomas, Elizabeth Yar- 
nall, Elizabeth AVolfenden Hyde, Eileen Anna Knox, Anna Emelia Adelaide 
Dieck, Helen Augusta Johns 

Certificate C — Decorative Sculpture. — Grovinia Boyer. 

Illustration. —Margaret Paxton Johnson, Edwin Frank Bayha. 

CLASS A. 

Industrial Drawing. — Nelle Dare Bishop, Marion Lawrence Clark, Mae 
Dennis, Benjamin Franklin Jarrett, Ida Evelyn Macfarlane, Jean Helen Mc- 
Conathy, Oscar Ernest Mertz, Nell Seymore Rogers, Lucy Agnes Sprague, 
Florence May Thomas, Florence Malissa Clegg, Mary Walker Goodfellow, Wil- 
liam Schuler Nortenheim, Monzella Josephine Lucas, Edna Wybrant Smith, 
Arthur George Sprenkle, Charles Ellwood Rambo, Charles Frederick Weber, 
Walter Bell Smith, Eileen Anna Knox, Kennard Jones Kornbau, Elizabeth 
Yarnall, Mary Sharp Hemphill, William Saxton Davis, Maud Josephine Coan 
Ella Permitta Kauffman, Edward Abraham Ervin, Helen Christine Liscom, 
Mabel Schwab, Adelene Helen Black, Marie Anthony, Walter Gravelle Myers. 



47 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Second Year Day Class : 

Morris Goodman Einstein, Francis Scrutin Xettleton, William Eichard Lock- 
wood, Howard Campbell Kite, Leon Vicienti Brannen, Charles Scott Althouse. 
Charles Frederick Swenev, Irving Jerome Johnson, Raymond Joseph Doyle. 

First Year Regular Day Class : 

Howard Fuller, John Paul Jones, Frederick Brown, Frank Wilson Simons, 
Robert Read Shillingford, Charles Emmons Pervear, Jr., Clifford Mills Hoff, 
James Edmond Corcoran, Edward Mills Maclean, Ellsworth Moore, Armon 
Peter Aleon, Charles Henry Walker, Harris Aronson Solomon, Frederick Dan- 
nerth, Jr., Edward Dewey Bloom, David Davis, Fred Roy Smith, James Voor- 
hees Pomeroy, Julian Philip Strauss. 

Second Year Wool Class — Day : 

Rawdon Ashworth Foster, George Fenton Haigh, Irving Harold Broadhead, 
Henry Conrad Grubnau. 

Day Dyeing Class : 

Louis Henrie E.ldy, Rufus Wheelright Clark, Jr. 

Third Year Evening Textile Class : 

Philip Oswald Schmselzle, Albert F. Beyer, Otto F. Porst. 

Third Year Evening Dyeing Class : 

John G. Wardlaw, Leroy Briggs. 



48 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



(For Year Ending May 31, 1898/ 

Balance on hand June 1, 1897, 
Tuition Fees, Art School, 

" '' Textile School, . 

Income of Endowment Fund, . 

" " Temple Fund, . 

" " Chapman Biddle Fund, . 

" " Clayton French Fund, 

" Mrs. G. K. Crozer, Fund, 

'^ '' F. Graff Prize Fund, . . 

'' " Mrs. W. AYeightman Fund, 
Mrs. W. Weightman Fund, bond paid off. 
State Appropriation for 1897-98, 
City of Philadelphia, appropriation for 1896 

'' " " " 1897-98, 

" " Park Commission, for n 

tenance of Memorial Hall, 
Use of Eooms, Broad and Pine Streets 
Fund for Purchase of English Plates, 
Temporary Loan (since paid off). 
Interest on Deposits in Bank, . 
Advertisements in School Circular, 
Life Membership, 
Annual Subscribers, . 
Offertory : glass boxes at Museum, 
Special Subscriptions through Dalton Dorr, 
Second Mortgage to Penna. Co. for Insurance, 
L. W. Miller, advance returned. 
Centennial Board of Finance, Check given but not 

used, 

Sale of Park Guides and Photos, 

DONATIONS 

A Friend, for Mortgage, .... 
For General Purposes, 

Endowment Fund. Received from Estate Geo. S. 
Pepper, Deceased, ...... 



$848 73 



$7,329 00 

8,038 00 

4,402 50 

2,589 00 

50 00 

50 00 

67 50 

20 00 

29 00 
1,000 00 

35,000 00 
7,500 00 
9,375 00 

9,277 33 

2,983 43 

292 13 

10,050 00 

417 31 

30 00 
100 00 

1,335 00 

206 90 

263 00 

60,000 00 

100 00 

3 12 
33 70 



1,000 00 
155 00 

900 00 



162,596 92 



Total, . 
Less payments, 



$163,445 65 
140,150 02 

$23,295 63 



49 



In Land Title & Trust Co., 
" Western Savings Fund, 
" Phila. Trust, . 
' ' Guarantee Trust, 
" L. W. Miller's hands, 



PAYMENTS 



Art School, General Expenses, 
" Salaries and Wages, 

" Equipments, . 

Textile School, Expenses, 

'* Salaries and Wages 

^' Equipments, 

Administration Expenses, 

" Salary and Wages, 

" Equipments, 

School Building Improvement, 

'* " Expense and W^ages 

Maintenance of Memorial Hall, 

Purchases for Museum, 

Library, . 

Insurance, 

Interest Account, 

Gas, . 

Coal, . 

Special Plate Fund. Purchases 

Show Case, .... 

Paid on account of First Mortgage, 
'* '' Second Mortgage 

Legal Services, 

Temporary Loans repaid in full, 

T. C. Search Loan " 

Offertory Account Purchases, . 

F. Graff Fund. Prizes, . 

Mrs. G. K. Crozer Fund. Prizes, 



SCHEDULE "A." 

Donations Fob General Purposes. 

A Friend, $100 00 

John Story Jenks, 25 00 

Mrs. D. E. Dallam, 25 00 

Mrs. Pemberton Smith, ^ ^^ 

$155 00 
4 



. 


$22,198 53 


. 


799 30 




59 17 




38 63 




200 00 




$23,295 63 


$641 81 




12,456 28 




356 04 




1,123 81 




11,701 50 




517 96 




3,593 45 




4,066 00 




118 60 




2,009 82 




2,002 54 




12,563 97 




1,091 75 




10 50 




1,999 46 




18,125 32 




968 80 




1,355 55 




271 50 




40 00 




7,500 00 




17,000 00 




250 00 




37,500 70 




2,793 66 




26 00 




20 00 




45 00 






$140,150 02 



50 



BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1898. 



11 Cash, 








$23,295 63 




47 Office Furniture, 








729 61 




51 School " ... 








1,500 00 




.56 Show Cases, .... 








15,187 37 




66 Library, 








2,561 30 




71 Engravings, .... 








1,187 92 




75 Carvings, 








769 41 




79 Mosaics, 








300 00 




83 Leather Work, .... 








10 00 




91 Wood Work, .... 








4,252 56 




95 Jewelry, 








312 96 




99 Silversmiths' Work, . 








5,742 25 




103 Metal Work, .... 








6,217 49 




101 Metal and Plaster Casts, . 








3,448 99 




115 Arras and Armor, 








1,708 79 




119 Coins and Medals, 








180 00 




123 Enamel on Metal, 








2,014 88 




127 Pottery, 








6,627 23 




IPl Porcelain, 








2,893 94 




1 '» Painted and Stained Glass, 








109 26 




139 Glass Vessels, .... 








662 82 




141 Sculpture, .... 








1,820 23 




143 Textile Fabrics, 








5,087 94 




145 Musical Instruments, 








44 94 




147 Lace, .... 








1,190 20 




149 Oil Paintings, . 








100 30 




322 Profit and Loss, 








58,616 51 




329 Temple Fund Investment, 








53,990 69 




333 Endowment Fund Investment, 








89,947 50 




356 F. GrafE 








500 00 




359 Keal Estate, Broad and Pine, 








. 553,278 99 




362 C. Biddle Fund Investment, 








1,000 00 




363 C. French '' 








1,000 00 




364 Mrs G. K. Crozer Fund Investment, 




1,500 00 




151 Special Fund Museum, 




$263 00 


153 Offertory Account, . 








536 30 


154 Special Plate Fund, . 


. 






105 63 


284 Donations. Purchase Broad an 


d Pine, 






205,171 28 


297 Temple Fund Museum, 


. 






4,167 37 


334 Endowment Fund, 


. 






81,306 81 


335 Temple Fund, . 








53,979 00 


341 Life Members, . 








14,790 00 


348 Donations, 


• 




. 1847,789 71 


62,697 20 


Carried forward, . 


$423,016 59 



51 



Brought forward, 
353 W. Weightman Scholarship, 

356 F. Graff Prize Fund, 

359 Mortgages Broad and Pine, 

362 C. Biddle Memorial Fund, 

363 C French Scholarship, 

364 Mrs. CI. K. Crozer Prize Fund, 
368 Donations for Mortgage, . 

357 Centennial Board Finance, 
364 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Income, 



(For the Year Ending May 31 
Balance on hand June 1, 1898, . 
Tuition Fees, Art School, . 

'' Textile School, . 
Income of Endowment Fund, . 

'' Temple Fund, . 

" Chapman Biddle Fund, 

" Clayton French Fund, 

" F. A. Graff Fund, . 
" " Mrs. G. K. Crozer Fund, 

'' Mrs. W. Weightman Fund 
Donations from Musical Societies, 
Special Collection for Museum, . 
Interest on Deposits at Fidelity Trust, 
City of Philadelphia Appropriation, . 
State of Pennsylvania Appropriation, 
City of Philadelphia, Park Commission, Mainte 

nance of Memorial Hall, . 
Annual Members, .... 
Balance from School Circular, . 
Life Memberships, .... 
Platform Privileges, Jubilee Parade, 
Civic Day Committee, 
Park Guides and Photos, . 
Offertory Glass Boxes at Museum, 
Bequest Estate Mrs. Eliza W. S. P. Field 
Endowment Fund from Estate George 

deceased, ..... 
L. W. Miller, Advance Returned, 
Special Plate Fund, .... 

DONATIONS. 
A Friend, for Mortgage Principal, , 
For General Purposes, Schedule "A," 







$847,789 71 $423,016 59 






1,000 00 






500 00 






419,500 00 




. 


1,000 00 






1,000 00 






1,500 00 






220 00 






3 12 






50 00 



$847,789 71 $847,789 71 
1899.) 




. $23,295 63 


$6,208 80 


9,488 00 


3,948 75 


2,633 00 


50 00 


50 00 


20 00 


33 75 


50 00 


591 00 


25 77 


374 56 


8,125 00 


20,000 00 


9,674 05 


1,290 00 


35 40 


100 00 


800 00 


250 00 


41 75 


83 20 


1,000 00 


600 00 


200 00 


13 85 


1,000 00 


300 00 


66,986 88 



Total, , $90,282 51 



52 



PAYMENTS. 




Maintenance of Museum, 


. $13,084 07 


Show Cases, 


748 00 


Temple Museum Fund Purchases, . 


2,000 00 


School Building Wages and Expenses, 


4,953 69 


Repairs and Alterations, 


2,148 09 


Art School Salary and Wages, .... 


9,739 76 


" '* Expenses, 


488 81 


'' " Equipments, 


76 31 


Textile School Salaries and Wages, . 


13,005 86 


" Expenses, 


1,137 20 


'' " Equipments, .... 


1,093 03 


Administration Salaries and Wages, . 


8,300 00 


'' Expenses, .... 


1,235 02 


" Equipments, .... 


15 80 


Special Plate Fund, 


93 50 


Gas Account, 


608 65 


Coal Account, 


1,388 20 


Insurance, ....... 


1,313 25 


Interest, ........ 


18,596 57 


General Expenses, 


698 94 


Offertory Account, 


240 00 


Advertising, 


548 92 


Paid on Account of First Mortgage, . 


2,500 00 


Library, ........ 


10 50 


L. W. Miller, Advances Made, . . . . 


200 00 


Mrs. Wm. Weightman Fund for Investment, Bone 




Bought, 


982 50 


Expenses Jubilee Parade, 


454 09 




85,660 76 



Balance, $4,621 75 

SCHEDULE ''A." 

A Friend, for Interest, $100 00 

John Story Jenks, for Show Cases, 100 00 

Miss Blanchard, for Show Cases, 50 00 

Isaac Clothier, for Show Cases, 50 00 



BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1899. 


$300 00 


11 Cash, 

47 Office Furniture, 


Dr. 

$4,621 75 
729 61 


Cr. 


51 School Furniture, 


1,500 00 




56 Show Cases, .... 


15,935 37 




66 Library, 


2,571 80 




71 Engraving and Photos, . 


1,187 92 




75 Carvings, Ivory, etc., 


769 41 




Carried forward, . 


. $27,315 86 





53 



Brought forward, 
79 Mosaics, .... 
83 Leather Work, 
91 Wood W^ork, . 
95 Jewelry and Goldsmith Work, 
99 Silversmiths' Work and Plate, 

103 Metal Work, . 

Ill Metal and Plaster Casts, . 

115 Arms and Armor, 

1 19 Coins and Medals, 

123 Enamels on Metal, . 

127 Pottery, .... 

131 Porcelain, 

135 Painted and Stained Glass, 

139 Glass Vessels, . 

141 Sculptures in Marble, etc., 

143 Textile Salaries, 

145 Musical Instruments, 

147 Lace, .... 

149 Oil Paintings, . 

322 Profit and Loss, 

329 Temple Fund Investment, 

333 Endowment Fund Investment, 
354 Mrs. W. Weightman Investment, 
356 F. Graff Fund Investment, 
359 Keal Estate Broad and Pine, 

362 C. Biddle Fund Investment, 

363 C. French Fund Investment, 

364 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Investment, 

153 Offertory Account, . 

154 Special Plate Fund, . 
284 Donations Purchase Broad and Pine 
297 Temple Fund Museum, . 

334 Endowment Fund, . 

335 Temple Fund, .... 
341 Life Members, .... 
348 Donations, .... 
353 Mrs. W. Weightman Scholarship, 

356 F. Graff Prize Fund, 

359 Mortgages Broad and Pine Streets 

357 Centennial Board Finances, 

362 C. Biddle Memorial Fund, 

363 C. French Scholarship, . 

364 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Prize Fund, 

364 *' " '' Income Fund, 

365 F. Graff Income Fund, . 



$27,315 86 




300 00 




10 00 




4,252 56 




312 96 




5,742 25 




6,217 49 




3,448 99 




1,708 79 




180 00 




2,014 88 




6,627 23 




2,893 94 




109 26 




662 82 




1,820 23 




5,087 94 




44 94 




1,190 20 




100 30 




75,452 26 




53,990 69 




89,947 50 




982 50 




500 00 




550,278 99 




1,000 00 




1,000 00 




1,500 00 




$845,192 58 






$379 50 








314 75 








205,171 28 








3,747 17 








81,906 81 








53,979 00 








14,890 00 








62,697 20 








1,000 00 








500 00 








417,000 00 








3 12 








1,000 00 








1,000 00 








1,500 00 








83 75 








20 00 




$845,192 58 



54 



REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE 
OF WOMEN. 

The prosperity upon which we congratulated ourselves in our 
last Annual Report has continued unabated in both branches of 
our Institution. 

The recognition of citizens of our whole country in the ex- 
cellence and usefulness of the School is shown by the many 
students who come to us from a large number of the States now 
in the Union. 

We lack the means to make the members of our School Family 
more thoroughly at home with us. First we need a Student Room, 
where the young men can congregate, and by their more intimate 
association with each other help forward the most important sec- 
tions of the School. No enterprise is ever successful if friendship 
between those engaged in it is wanting. We desire not only that 
our Students shall leave us well equii)ped, but that those of the 
Textile School especially shall so spread their knowledge through- 
out our country that the manufacturers of the United States may 
not only equal but surpass those of other countries, and thus the 
safest " Protection " of our manufactured goods be our lasting 
reward. 

We need, as we reported last year, for the preservation of the 
health of all our scholars, a good g3^mnasium, one room fitted 
for the young men, another for our young women students. We 
have already begun to receive contributions for this object, and 
hope that these lines will be read with interest, and our ever- 
generous citizens will, as they have done in days gone by, help us 
to contribute to the welfare of our students, who come confidently 
to us, not only for instruction, but in the hope of finding what 
they are led to expect in the City of Brotherly Love. 

We have lost, to our regret, through resignations, three mem- 
bers of our Committee — Mrs. Singerly Balch, Miss Mary Cohen 
and Miss Margaret L. Corlies. 

To our great sorrow, our Vice-President, Mrs. John Sanders, 
has passed to another life. She was one of the pioneers in our 
work, having been a member of the Women's Centennial Execu- 



55 

tive Committee for the Exhibition of 1876, of which this Insti- 
tution is the offspring. Working with many of us since 1873, 
she has left with us tender and lasting memories of her truth, 
constancy and self-forgetfulness. That those who follow us may 
know that she lived, we shall in future call our first Prize " The 
Maria Dallas Sanders " Prize. 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

President. 



56 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AXD 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 
ANNUAL AND HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Persons who may wish to become members are invited to send tlieir names and 
addresses to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found 
upon page 64. A check to the order of the Treasurer will be promptly ac- 
knowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 
Life Membership, . . . One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, . . A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 
Honorary Membership, . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and 
from Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment 
Fand."— By-Laws. 



PATRONS. 

^Baird. John ^Houston, H. H. 

^Barton, Mrs. Susan R. Lea, Henry C. 

*Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. Morris, John T. 

*Childs, George W. Search, Theodore C. 

Disston, Henry & Sons Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

*Drexel, A. J. Weightman, William 

*Drexel, F. A. Weiglbtman, Mrs. Wm., Jr. 

Garrett, W. E., Jr. Whitney, A. & Sons. 
^Gibson, Henry C. 



67 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 
Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
* A mold, Crawford 
Baeder, Adamson & Co. 
Baily, Joel J. 
Baird, Mrs. Matthew 
*Baker, John R. 
*Baker, W. S. 
Barclay, R. D. 
Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
*Bartol,'^ B. H. 
Bartol, H. W. 
Baugh, Daniel 
^Bickley, H. W. 
Biddle, Alexander 
Biddle, Miss A. E. 
^Biddle, Chapman 
*Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 
*Biddle, Clement 
*Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
*Borie, C. & H. 

Bowen & Fox 
^Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 

Button, Conyers 
^Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. George T. 
^Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Catherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
*Chew, Samuel 
*Claghorn, James L. 

Claghoni, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence H. 
*Clark, Ephraim 
Clark, E. W. 
*Clark, J. Hinckley 
Clayton, John 
*Clyde, Thomas 
*Coates, Benjamin 
Coates, Edward H. 
Cochran, M. 
Cochran, Thomas 
Coffin, Altemus & Co. 
Coleman, B. Dawson 
*Coleman, Mrs. G. Dawson 
Coleman, Edward P. 
Coles, Miss Mary 
Colket, C. Howard 
Collins, H. H. 
Cooper, John H. 
*Cope, Caleb 
Cornelius & Sons 
*Cresson, W. P. 
Crozer, George K. 
*Crozer, Mrs. George K. 
*Crozer, J. Lewis 
*Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
*Disston, Albert H. 
*Disston, Hamilton 
Disston, Mrs. H. C. 
*Dobbins, R. J. 
Dobson, John & James 
Dolan, Thomas 
Dolan, Thomas & Co. 
Dougherty, James 
Dreer, F. J. 
Duhring, Mrs. Henry 
Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 
Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
*Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
*Fuguet, Stephen O. 
Garrett, Miss E. 
Garrett, Miss J. 



* Deceased. 



58 



Garrett, P. C. 

Garrett, Mrs. Walter 

Gilson, Miss R. 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
*Graff, Frederic 
*Graff, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoz & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Haveraeyer & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 
*Heberton, G. Craig 

Hill, George W. 
*Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
*Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
*Hockley, William Stevenson 
^Horstmann, F. O. 

Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
*Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
*James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
■* Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman & Co. 
^Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
^Knight, Edward C. 
*Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leighton 
*Lewis, Edwin M. 
*Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
^Lovering, Joseph S. 

Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 



McNeely, Miss Florence 

McNeely, Robert K. 

McNeely, Mrs. Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Massey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Meirs, Mrs. R. Wain 
*Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 
*Merrick, Miss L. W. 
*Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
*Milliken, James 

Moore, James 
*Morris, P. Pemberton 
*Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 

Murphy, Miss Helen L, 
*Newbold, Charles 
*Newbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 
*Xoblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
*Page, Joseph F. 
^Patterson, Joseph 
*Pepper, George S. 
^Pepper, Lawrence S. 
*Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
*Phillips, Henry M. 
^Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 

Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
*Poultney, Charles W. 
^Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, EliK., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
^Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 



* Deceased. 



59 



Roberts, Charles 
^Roberts, Jacob, M.D. 
*Rogers, C. H. 

Rogers, Fairman 
*Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P. 
*Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
*Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
*Sharpless, Charles S. 
*Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 
*Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
^Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
*Smith, Thomas 

Smyth, Lindley 

Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
^Spencer, Charles 
^Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C. 



Sweatman, V. C. 

Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 
*Teraple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Tyler, George F. 
*Yaux, William S. 
*Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
■^Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 
*Warner, Redwood F. 
*Welsh, Samuel 

Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
*Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
*White, Samuel S. 

Williams, Edward H. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William & Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 
^Wright, James A. 
* Wright, John W. 

Wurtz, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



* Deceased. 



60 



Annual Members (for 1898) who have subscribed not less than 
ten dollars. 



Austin, Mrs. S. H., . . 
Balch, Mrs. Singe rly, . 
Bement, Clarence S., . . 
Biddle, Cadwallader, . 
Brazier, Joseph H., . . 
Borie, Mrs. Henry, . . 
Brown, Miss Martha M. , 
Brown, T. Wistar, . . . 
Burnham, Mrs. William, 
Cadwalader, Mrs. John, 
Caldwell, J. E. &Co., . 
Castner, Saranel, .... 
Chandler, T. P., Jr., . . 
Clark, Miss Frances, . . 
Cochran, Travis, .... 
Cochran, Mrs. Travis, . 
Coles, Edward, .... 
Converse, John H. , 
Coxe, Alexander B., . . 
Cramp, Henry W. , • . • 
Crozer, Miss Ada M., . . 
Da Costa, Dr. J. M., . . 
Dale, Richard C, ... 
Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . 
Dickson, Samuel, . . . 
Elkins, William L., . . 
Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B., 
Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., 
Galloway, William, . . 
Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . 
Gillingham, Joseph E., . 
Gowen, Mrs. Francis I., 
Graff, Miss Henrietta, . 
Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, . 
Guillou, Victor, .... 
Hamilton, W. C, ... 
Hance Brothers & White, 
Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, . 
Hippie, Frank K., . . . 
Hutchinson, Miss, . . . 
Hunter, T. Comly, . . . 
Jack, Dr. Louis, .... 
Janney, Mrs Robert M., 
JajTie, Mrs. David, . . 
Jayne, Dr. Horace, . . 
Jenks, Mrs. William F., 
Keen, Dr. W. W., . . . 
Keith, Sidney W., . . . 
Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D. , 
Knowlton, G. H., . . . 
Leach, Miss Mary Atherton 



$10 00 Leonard, James B., . . . . $10 00 

10 00 Lewis, Edward, 10 00 

10 00 Lewis, Enoch, 10 00 

10 00 Lewis, Dr. F. W., 10 00 

10 00 Lewis, Robert M., 10 00 

10 00 Lippincott, Mrs. Craige, . . 10 00 

10 00 Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G., . 10 00 

10 00 Lippincott, Mrs. Joshua, . . 10 00 

10 00 Lovering, Mrs. Joseph S., . 10 00 

10 00 Mackellar, Thomas, .... 10 00 

10 00 1 Magee, Miss Anna, .... 10 00 

10 00 i Magee, Miss Eliza J., . . . 10 00 

10 00 Magee, Miss Fannie S. , ... 10 00 

10 00 Magee, Horace, 10 00 

10 00 Mason, Frederick T., . ... 1000 

10 00 Moulton, Mrs. Bvron P., . . 10 00 

10 00 McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, . . 10 00 

10 00 Neall, Frank L., 10 00 

10 00 Newhall, George M., . . . . 10 00 

10 00 Pancoast, Mrs. Albert, . . . 10 00 

10 00 Paul, Dr. James W., . . . 10 00 

10 00 Paul, MissM. W., 10 00 

10 00 Pepper, David, 10 00 

10 00 Piatt, Franklin, 10 00 

10 00 Randolph, Mrs. Evan, ... 15 00 

10 00 Reilly, Mrs. T. A., .... 10 00 

10 00 Ritchie, Craig D., 10 00 

10 00 Roberts, Miss E. C, .... 10 00 

10 00 Roberts, Miss F. A., . . . 10 00 

10 00 Roberts, Mrs. George B., . . 10 00 

10 00 Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, ... 25 00 

10 00 Rodman, Mrs. Lewis, .... 10 00 

10 00 Rosengarten, J. G., .... 1000 

10 00 Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin, . . 10 00 

10 00 Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., . . 10 00 

10 00 Sinnott, Mi's. Joseph F., . . 10 00 

10 00 Smith, Miss Christiana B., . 10 00 

10 00 Smith, Edward Brinton, . . 10 00 

10 00 Smvth, Mrs. Samuel, .... 10 00 

10 00 Stifle, Dr. Charles J., ... 10 00 

10 00 Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . . 10 00 

10 00 Townsend, Henry C, . . . . 10 00 

25 00 Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, 10 00 

10 00 Welsh. John Lowber, ... 10 00 

10 00 Welsh, Mrs. John Lowber, . 10 00 

10 00 Wevgandt, C. N. (3 vears), . 30 00 

10 00 Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, ... 10 00 

10 00 Williams. Mrs. Francis H., . 10 00 

10 00 Wister, Mrs. Caspar, .... 10 00 

10 00 Wood, Miss Juliana, .... 10 00 

10 00 1 Wright, Mrs. Robert K., . . 10 00 
10 00 



61 



Annual Members (1898) who have subscribed not less than five 
dollars. 



Ashhurst, Kichard L., . 
Ashhurst, Mrs. Eichard L 
Bergner, C. W., . . . . 
Bergner, Mrs. C. William 
Bergner, Miss Catharine, . 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. LaAvrence 
Carter, Mrs. William T., 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampt 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, 

Colket,G. H., 

Corlies, Miss Margaret L 
Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth 
Curtin, Mrs. Koland G.. 
Dana, Charles E., . . . 
Dana, Mrs. Charles E,, . 
Day, Frank Miles, . • . 
De Haven, Mrs. Holstein 
Dissel, Charles, . . . 
Duane, Eussell, . . 
Durant, Miss Ethel, . 
Gest, Mrs. William P., 
Grant, Mrs. W. S., Jr. 



65 00 
5 00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Harrison, John, .... 
Harrison, Mrs. John, . . 
Harrison, Miss Maud S.,. 
Howell, Charles H, (2 years), 
Kennard, Mrs. Fred. K., . 
Morwitz, Joseph, Jr., . . 
Newlin, Mrs. Eichard M., . 
Norris, Miss Clara Genevra 
Xorton, Mrs. Charles D., . 
Ogden, Mrs. Edward H., . 
Pepper, Mrs. John W., . . 
Eandolph, Miss Anna, . - 
Eeyburn, Mrs. W._ S., . . 
Simpson, Mrs. William, . 
Siter, Mrs. E. Hollingsworth 
Walker, Mrs. E.J. C, 
Weightman, Miss Bertha, . 
Winpenny, Mrs. J. Bolton, 
Wirgman, Mrs Charles, . 
Wister, Mrs. Jones, . . . 
Zell, Miss H. A., . . . . 



$5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

10 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



Annual Subscribers who have paid ten dollars from January 
1, 1899, to May 31, 1899. 



Borie, Mrs. Henry, 
Corlies, Mrs. S. Fisher, 
Dallam, Mrs. D. E., . 
Elkins, William L. , . 
Ellison, Mrs. Eodman B. 
Gillespie, Mrs. E. D., . 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, 
Hutchinson, Miss, , 
Magee, Horace, . . . 
Magee, Miss xA.nna, 
Magee, Miss Eliza J., . 



$10 00 Magee, Miss Fannie S., . . $10 00 

10 00 Newhall, George M., . , . 10 00 

10 00 Paul, Dr. .James W., ... 10 GO 

10 00 Paul, Miss Mary W., . . . 10 00 

10 00 Eoberts, Mrs. George B., . 10 00 

10 00 Eodman, Mrs. Lewis, . . . 10 00 

10 00 Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., . . 10 00 

10 00 Smith, Miss Christiana R, . 10 00 

10 00 Smythe, A. G., 10 00 

10 00 Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . 10 00 
10 00 



Annual Subscribers who have paid five dollars from January 



1, 1899, to May 31, 1899 



Bergner, C. William, . . 
Bergner, Mrs. C. William, 
Bergner, Miss Catharine, . 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. Lawrence 
Colton, Mrs. S. H., . . 
Corlies, Mrs. Margaret, 
Cresswell, Miss Elizabeth 
Curtin, Mrs. Eoland G., 
Dana, Charles E., . . 
Dana, Mrs. Charles E., 
Day, Frank Miles, . . 
Dissel, Charles, . . . 
Durant, Miss Ethel, . . 
Gest, Mrs. William P., 



$5 00 Grant, Mrs. W. S., Jr., . , 

5 00 Harrison, Miss Maud S. , . , 

5 00 Jastrow, Mrs. Morris, . . , 

5 00 Kennard, Mrs. Fred. K., 

5 00 Morwitz, Dr. Joseph, . . . 

o 00 Xewlin, Mrs. Eichard M., . 

5 00 Norris, Miss Clara Genevra, 

5 00 Pepper, Mrs. John W., 

5 00 Eeyburn, Mrs. W. S., . . . 

5 00 Saunders, Miss Anna N., . , 

5 00 Siter, Mrs. E. Hollingsworth, 

5 00 Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, . . 

5 00 Zell, Mrs. H. A., . . . . 
5 00 



$5 00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



62 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Atwood, Eugene, Atwood Machine Co., Stonington, Conn. 

Berry, A. Hun, Boston, Mass. 

Boyd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Card Clothing Co. , Worcester, Mass. 

Burnharn, Charles C. , Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Burnhara, George W., Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

Comins, Frank B., Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Easton, Nicholas H., Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jenks Machine Co. , Pawtucket, R. I. 
Firth, AVilliam, American Drosophore Co., Boston, Mass. 
Fletcher, George A., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., M. A. Furbush & vSon Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grice, Edwin C, M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hale, F. J., Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Hartwell, F. W., Aerophore Air- Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hopkins, William S., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Hutchins, C. H. , Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Hutchins, G. F., Knowles Loom Works, AVorcester, Mass. 
Jenks, Alvin F., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Jenks, Stephen A. , Fales & Jenks Machine Co. , Pawtucket, R. I. 
Knowles, F. P., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Knowlton, Charles H., M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lasell, C. W., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Lasell, J. M., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Maynard, Lorenzo, Maynard, Mass. 

Merriam, H. H. , Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Murdock, Joseph, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Nevins, David, Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Rometsch, W. H. , Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Russell, J. M., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Sargent, C. G., Graniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otto W., Schaum & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, Chester B. , Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Smith, Stanley G. , Woonsocket Machine & Press Co. , Woonsocket, R. I, 
Snelling, R. P., Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 



63 

Taft, C. A. , Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Mass. 
White, H. Arthur, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Ware, Justin A., Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Whitin, G. M., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Wyman, Horace, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 



64 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses, 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain \_here insert a 
description of the property'] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Witnesses,