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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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N0XS09 



BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY # 




Public Document 



No. 49 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



Police ComiAiissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Tear exdix(; Nov. 30, 1908. 











BOSTON : 

WRIGHT 4 POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRTNTERS, 
IS Post OrriCE Square. 

moo. 








,' ' y Approved by r' 

' '^ \''^C\- ^ '^•*E State Bo.^d op Publication. 



. • ■ • . . • . . - ; , , , _ *..'*;';•'• 



CONTENTS. 



Report: — pace 

Increase in police work, ........ - ^ 

Burden of uonresident offenders, ....... S 

liewnrd?, trials and punishments, ....... 

Boston police in comparison, ........ 13 

Houses of ill fame and oilier fonus of public iinmociiitj-, . . .14 

.\utomobile laws, .......... 21 

Motor taxicabs, .......... 23 

v'jurj- licts, 24 

Small loans, . . . . ' . . . . . . .24 

Juvenile offenders, .......... 25 

Carrj-ing dangerous weapons, ........ 34 

Soliciting monej" in the streets, . . . .... .36 

Street stands, etc., .......... 37 

Law against spitting in certain places, ...... 33 

Dog laws, 40 

Work in public parks, ......... 42 

Suspension of licenses, ......... 45 

Deputy superintendents, ......... 45 

Laws and their enforcement, ........ 46 

The Departmext: — 

Distribution and changes, ......... 50 

Police officers injured wliilc on duty, ....... 50 

Work of the department, ......... 50 

.\rrests, 50 

Drunkenness, .......... 53 

Bureau of criminal investigation, ....... 53 

Miscellaneous business, ........ 54 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ...... 55 

Special events, . . ........ .55 

Inspector of claims, .......... 56 

Onicera detailed to as!<ist medical examiners, , .... 57 

House of detention, .......... 57 

Police signal service, .......... 5S 

Signal boxes, .......... 58 

Miscellaneous work, ......... 5S 

Harbor ser\-ice, .......... 59 

Horses GO 



CONTENTS. 



Vehicle sem'cc. 

Automobile's, 

Ambulances, 
Public carriages. 
Wagon licenses, , 
Listing male residents of Boston, etc.. 

Women voters verified. 

Listing expenses. 

Number of policemen employed in listing, 
Special police, . 
Railroad police. 
Miscellaneous licenses, 
Musicians' licenses. 

Itinerant, . 

Collective, . 
Public lodging houses. 
Pensions and l>cnefits, 
Financial, 

Distribution of police force. 
List of officers who died during the year. 
List of officers retircfl during the year, 
List of officers who were promoted during the year 
Xuraber of men in active ser\'ice. 
Officers discharged and resigned during the yc 
Absence from duty by reason of sickness during the year. 
Complaints against officers during the year, 
Xumber and distribution of horses, 
Arrests, by di\-isions, during the }"ear. 
Arrests and orfcnces for year, 

Comparative statement of crimes as to population. 
Age and sex of persons arrested. 
Licences of all classes issued. 
Dog licenses issued, ..... 

Wagon licenses issued, .... 

^ Financial statement, ..... 

Payments on account of signal ser\-ice, 
-Occidents, ...... 

Jf.ile residents listed by wards and precincts, 

Male residents, supplementary list. 

Women voters listed, .... 

Regiilations nspecting the business of making small loans. 



PACE 

GO 
60 
CI 
G3 
&4 
65 
65 
65 
65 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
67 
67 
60 
60 
70 
72 
73 
74 
76 
77 
7S 
79 
SI 
SI 
82 
96 
97 
98 
99 
99 
100 
101 
102 
104 
105 
106 
107 



Glnmmonm^altl? nf iHafifiarhuB^ttB. 



KEPORT- 



Headqcarters of the Police DEPARTiiEXT, 
OrncE OF THE Police Coumissioxeb, 29 Pembebtox Square, 
BosTOX, Dec. 1, 1908. 

To His E.xceIIency Curtis Guild, Jr., Governor. 

Your Excelle.vcy: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in comph'ance with the 
provision of chapter 291 of tlie Acts of 1906, a report of tlic 
work of the poh'ce department for the year endetl Xov. 30, 190S. 

I.\CRE.\SE IX Police Work. 

It has been a year of unusual effort on the part of tiie police 
and of unusual results. It is not merely that the numljer of arrests 
grev.- from 57,07S in 1907 to 08,1-10 in 190S, but, additionally, 
that the growth affected all parts of the city and all classes of 
crimes and delincjuencies, and that the penalties imposed in fines 
and imprisonment were greater than ever before recorded. The 
eight general divisions under which offences are classed show 
the following numbers and increases in arrests and prosecu- 
tions: — 



POLICE COMIIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 





Arresli In 
1907. 


Amsts in 
19CS. 


Increase. 


Percrnlage 

ot 

Increase. 


Offences against the person, . 

Offences against property, with vio- 
lence. 

Offences against property, without 
\iolencc. 

Malicious offences against property. 

Forger>- and offences against the 

currency. 
Offences against the license laws, . 

Offences against chastity, morality, 

etc. 
Offences not classed in the foregoing, 

including drunkenness. 


2,979 

535 

3,055 

165 

50 

302 

S28 

49,164 


3,591 

692 

4,048 

185 

76 

S2S 

1,141 

57,.585 


612 

157 

993 

20 

26 

526 

313 

8,421 


20.54 
29.34 
32.50 
12.12 
42.00 
174.17 
37. SO 
17.13 


Totals, .... 


57,078 


68,146 . 


11,068 


- 



Nearly half the total increase was due to arrests for drunken- 
ness. As they were made by the same police force, and as the 
present commissioner has never given hint or instruction on the 
subject, it must be assumed that the increase in arrests for drunk- 
enness in the past two years represents substantially the increase 
in the number of persons whom the police found it necessary to 
arrest. A policeman has no selfish motive in arresting a drunken 
man. It brings him neither glory nor reward, but, on the con- 
trar.-, it involves trouble, personal danger from the man and his 
friends, and often attendance at court when othen\nse he might 
be resting in bed after Iiis night's work. The non-residents ar- 
rested for dnmkenness reached the extraordinar)' number of 
20,270. 

The other half of the increase in total arrests is made up largely 
of arrests of juvenile offenders, and of persons violating the auto- 
mobile law, the hawkers and pedlers' law, and the law against 
spitting on sidewalks and in other public places. These are 
offences against statutes that are comparatively new; but the in- 
crease in arrests for what niay be termed standard offences of all 
characters is also marked, as the following incomplete list well 
illustrates: — 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 





Airests In 
1907. 


Arrests In 
190S. 


Increase. 


.\ssault and battery, . . . . 


2,435 


2,917 


482 


Robbery and assault to rob, . 


137 


259 


122 


Breaking and entering, 


•535 


722 


187 


Larceny and attempted. 


2,374 


3,108 


734 


Larceny from person and attempted, . 


305 


334 


29 


Forgery and uttering, .... 


47 


71 


24 


Violating liquor law, .... 


ISS 


20S 


20 


Fornication, . . . . . 


279 


375 


96 


Keeping houses of ill fame, . 


74 


114 


40 


Night walking, ..... 


169 


249 


80 


Carrj-ing dangerous weapons. 


131 


1.54 


23 


Idle and disorderly, .... 


255 


355 


100 


Ix)tteries and prize enterprises. 


59 


S3 


24 


Obstructing fire escapes. 


10 


93 


S3 


Vagrants, tramps and vagabonds. 


224 


627 


403 



The penalties imposed by tlie courts, both fines and imprison- 
ments, are far greater than ever before. It will suffice to com- 
pare with 1907. 



1007. 1908. 

1 


Increase. 


Persons fined, 


. 


. 1 11,832 15,735 


3,903 


Total amount of fines. 


• 


. SI 10,129 $159,982 

1 


549,853 


Persons sentenced to imprison 
Total 3-ears of imprisonment. 


ment, 


. j 3,861 6,815 


2,954 


• 


. ! 2,S07; 3,904 

1 1 


1,097 



8 



POLICE COMiHSSIONER. 



[Jan. 



It is impossible to give an accurate judgment as to the propor- 
tion of the increase in prosecutions and punishments which is 
due to tlie increase of offences and the proportion which is due 
to greater activity on the part of the police; and I do not make 
the attempt. The e.xact state of efficiency to which the police 
force has been brought is ecjualiy impossible of definition, and 
all estimates must be based on its work and its conduct as known 
to the public. 

TUE BURDE.V OF NOXKESIUEXT OFFENDERS. 

Thirty years ago, when the first police commission was estab- 
lished, the proportion of nonresidents to the total of all arrests 
was 19.90 per cent. In 190S it was 38.32 per cent., or almost 
double, and -in the intenening time the increase, with few excep- 
tions, had been steady. The statistics for the past ten years, 
covering arrests for all causes, are as follows: — 



I Total Arrests. 

1 


Nonresidents. 


Percentage of 
Nonresidents. 


1S99, 












36,760 


12,984 


32.65 


1900, 












.33,6.55 


10,314 


30.61 


1901, 












-34,500 


10,551 


30.58 


1902, 












34,732 


10,631 


30.61 


1903, 












43,033 


14,644 


29.38 


1904, 












50,265 


18,030 


35.86 


19a5, 












48,358 


17,167 


35.. 50 


1906, 












49,906 


18,001 


36.06 


1907, 












57,078 


20,982 


36.77 


190S, 












68,140 


26,113 


38.32 



Taking the arrests for drunkenness by themselves, and giving 
the increase by percentages, the change in the past ten years is 
even more marked : — 



^t \ 



1909.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT— No. 49. 



Total Arrests for 

Dmnkemiess. 



Percentage of 
Kooresidents. 



1S99, . 
1000, . 
1001, . 
1902, . 
19a3, . 
1004,. 
1005, . 
1900, . 
1007, . 
190S, . 



23,875 
18,601 
19,488 
19,167 
27,757 
33,511 
32,298 
32,830 
37,389 
42,468 



32.60 
38.40 
29.90 
39.35 
42.53 
43.36 
43.14 
44.57 
45.63 
47.50 



The figures in these two tables show that almost two-fifths of 
all the persons arrested by the Boston poHce, and almost half of 
those arrested for drunkenness, are nonresidents. 

Rew.\hd.s, Tri.\l.s a-vd PuxismiE.vrs. 

When my senice as commissioner began I ventured experi- 
mentally to depart in some respects from the plan of rewards 
and punishments which long had been followed. After a test of 
two and a half years I consider the new method to be established, 
and I may therefore speak of it with freedom. 

Under the former system specific acts of a meritorious char- 
acter were rewarded with medals, with additional days or weeks 
of vacation, and with public commendation in general orders. 
I have used none of these stimulants, for I believe that it is im- 
possible to administer them with an even hand to a force of 1,400 
men; that they create jealousies and disappointments; that they 
often miss the modest man of great merit; that they encourage 
tiie pushing of "claims" to special recognition; that a single 
mistake, known by the rank and file to be a mistake, turns the 
whole system to ridicule; and that a policeman who is capable 
of performing an act of conspicuous merit will not stop to think 
of a possible reward. 



10 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



These are reasons enough, it seems to me, hut especially is it 
my purpose to raise above all other considerations the single idea 
of duty to be done. I seek to convince the policeman that the 
best and bravest work that he can do is expected of him always. 
I wish him to realize that apart from the criticism or the approval 
of his immediate superiors he is making a record for himself day 
by day, and that when the time comes, that record of sobriety, of 
ability, of zeal and of results accomplished, and nothing else, will 
help him to advancement, or will intercede for him if in misfortune. 

But simultaneously with the loss of immediate rewards the 
method of punishment has been recast. To make my meaning 
clear I give the following table of trials and penalties for fifteen 
vears: — 





i 


6 

1 


1 


"5 i 


5 


i 


J 

O 


=: 
s 

i 

1 


1 

J 


1S94, . 






87 


59 


8 


10 


7 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1S95, . 






69 


35 


16 


2 


4 


9 


3 


- 


- 


1S96, . 






77 


33 


12 


2 


2 


18 


10 


- 


- 


1S97, . 






80 


39 


3 


4 


5 


23 


6 


- 


- 


1S9S, . 






58 


23 


5 


4 


3 


16 


5 


2 


- 


1S99, . 






84 


46 


5 


4 


2 


23 


2 


2 


- 


1900, . 






65 


43 


6 


1 


1 


14 


- 


- 


- 


1901, . 






70 


38 


6 


2 


2 


18 


2 


2 


- 


1902, . 






82 


44 


6 


2 


7 


23 


- 


- 


- 


1903, . 






75 


36 


10 


- 


2 


25 


2 


- 


- 


1904, . 




, 


129 


53 


15 


8 


12 


38 


3 


- 


- 


19a5, . 






105 


58 


7 


2 


7 


26 


- 


5 


- 


1906, . 






64 


33 


9 


- 


S 


8 


2 


- 


4 


1907, . 






28 


11 


5 


1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


6 


1908, . 






36 


9 


14 


1 


- 


- 


4 


1 


7 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

In a few cases each year complaints were withdrawn, either at 
tlie trial or before it; such cases are included in the table as 
trials and acquittals. 

The new system was applied in the middle of the police year 
190G, and the full effect is to be seen in 1907 and 1908, especially 
in 190S, when it was no longer an experiment. As a comparison 
will best serve in explanation, I take for that purpose the last full 
vear of the old system, noting the circumstance that the five re- 
ductions in rank in that police year were due to the unusual 
occurrence known as the "Tech. riot." 

In 1905 the cases tried numbered 105, and in 1908 the number 
was 36. But in 1905 there were 58 acquittals, and in 1908 only 
9. This illustrates the first point in the new system, which is the 
private examination of complaints by the commissioner, and the 
dismissal without trial of those found to be frivolous or otherwise 
without merit suflBcient to justify formal hearing. In 190S the 
number so dismissed was 49, and although the defendant poUce- 
man was called upon in each case to suhnjit a reply in writing, 
supported, when necessarj', by the written statements of others, 
49 such defendants were spared the trouble, the an.xiety, and, in 
many cases, the cost of counsel which a trial would have in- 
volved. Complaints from citizens are often based on spite, on 
a misunderstanding of the facts or en ignorance of the laws and 
of the powers and duties of a policeman. 

Looking further we find that in 1905 there were 7 dismissab 
from the force, following 47 con\nctions, and in 1908 there were 
14 dismissals, following 27 convictions. This develops auother 
part of the punishment system, which is this, that when a man is 
guilty of a single grievous offence, such as intoxication while on 
duty, or is guilty of an offence of less magnitude but of such 
character as to show by itself or in connection with similar pre- 
\ious offences that he is constitutionally unfit to be a poh'ceman, 
dismissal from the force is the one and final penalty. 

A result of this policy, I believe, is to cause a complaint and 
summons for trial to be regarded by the members of the force as 
a matter of great gravity, and to deter them from the commission 
of petty offences, the penalty of which they can no longer expect 
to be also petty. 

In 1905 fines ranging from two to thirty days' pay were im- 
posed upon 26 men. In no case have I usetl this form of pun- 



12 POLICE COmilSSIONER. [Jan. 

ishment. I believed that it was a great hardship to the families 
of the men, and that because of that fact a man so punished, 
whatever his offence, received the sNTnpathy of the force. For 
fines I substituted punishment duty in e.xcess of regular and extra j 

duties, thus allowing to the family of the man the money which 
he had earned, securing extra sen-ice to the public, and causing 
the offender to be regarded humorously instead of sympatheti- 
cally by his comrades. 

Another method of punishment formerly practiced, the trans- 
fer of men from one di\Tsion to another, I have never used. 
Sen-ice in all divisions is equally honorable and no division 
should be made a penal colony. The work of di^■isions differs 
in quantity and in character, and I have tried so to assign men that 
on the whole the square pegs shall be in the square holes and the 
round pegs in the round holes. Transfers of men following 
acquittal or conviction on trials have never been part of their 
punishment; they have been ordered because the very circum- 
stances of the trial made it wise to place them in new surround- 
ings; and in such transfers, as in all others, I have considered 
the places of residence of the men assigned or removed, in so far 
as the good of the service would permit. 

The system then, to state the matter briefly, abolishes special 
rewards for meritorious acts which, with the rising standard of 
efficiency that is applied to the force, have become everi'-day 
matters. It sifts charges much as a grand jury would do, and 
thus saves trouble, anxiety and expense to many men against j 

whom frivolous complaints are brought. It reduces the number j 

of small punishments, abolishing altogether the fine; but it dis- i 

charges raen con\-icted of offences which prove them to be unfit j 

for the senice. j 

The system seeks to deal with men by hand rather than with 
machinery-; to prove to them that their superiors are guided by 
common sense and a spirit of fair play, and that though the in- 
terest of the public is always first and the interest of the whole 
department is always second, the comfort, the welfare and the 
ambitions of the individual members of the force are never for- 
gotten. 

This method of treatment should bring about, and in a laige 
measure, I believe, actually has brought about, a condition in 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCmiEXT— No. 49. 13 

which a member of the force who shirks his duty, or otherwise 
misbehaves, finds himself subjected to the disapproval and the 
contempt of his own comrades. 

The Boston Police :v Comparison*. 

The police are held to the knowledge and obsen-ance of a 
multiplicity of laws, ordinances and regulations. Their official 
life and much of their private life is checked at everj' step by 
police rules. Their duties are performed in public, with the 
whole community looking on. Tens of thousands of lawless 
men and women, whether actually criminals or not, are their 
determined enemies. The majority of the people, influenced 
unconsciously by the burlesques of the variety show, the false 
or exaggerated stories printed from time to time by some of the 
newspapers, and by the reports of corruption in other cities, fail 
to understand that the police force of Boston is composed to-day 
of sound and good citizens. 

Why should it be othei-wise ? For twenty-five years all men 
taken into the police force have been sent to it by the State Civil 
Service Commission. They have been picked always from the 
top of the lists of the many who have passed the thorough mental 
and physical examinations required. They have been investi- 
gated before appointment by the police department itself, with 
careful scrutiny as to character, record and reputation. Once 
in the force they have been under sound and constant discipline, 
with positions well worth holding to and with a prospect of pay 
and pension which only a foolish man would risk. 

Are they then perfect, is their duty always well done, do they 
never require punishment ? Far from it. They do err, as all 
men err, and every year some fall and pay the penalty. But I 
can think of no botl}' of more than 1,400 men, in any trade, 
industr}' or public ser\-ice, even though free from a policeman's 
peculiar liability to blame, that would show a cleaner punishment 
sheet than the Boston police. 

In looking for the highest standard of comparison it occurred 
to me that it would be found among the commissione<l officers 
of the regular army of the United States. The regular armv 
officer is accepted everywhere as a man of honor, a gentleman 
as well as a soldier. Wherever he happens to be he is welcomed. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

in private houses and at exclusive clubs, without scrutiny or In- 
quirk", simply because he holds the commission; and the record 
of these officers as a body justifies it all. To compare the con- 
duct of tlie Boston police with theirs seems hazardous; but let 
us see. 

In the last available annual report of the judge-advocate gen- 
eral of tlie army, I find that in the twelve months which it covers 
50 commissioned officers were tried by general court-martial, 
which is the gravest procedure known to the senice, that 42 
were convicted and that 14 of those convicted were sentenced to 
be dismissed from the army. In the last police year 30 Boston 
policemen were tried by trial boards, 27 were convicted and 14 
were dismissed from the department; and the number of dis- 
missals, for reasons of rigid discipline, which I have already ex- 
plained, is the largest, with two exceptions, in fifteen years and 
probably since the department was established. It is fair to say 
that the whole number of officers of the line from among whom 
the army dismissals were made is about twice as large as the 
Boston police force. A comparison between the pro{K)rtionate 
punishments of the Boston police and those of the noncommis- 
sioned officers and privates of the army would be so overwhelm- 
ingly favorable to the police that it would not be worth while to 
make it. 

Houses of III Fame axd Other Forms of Public Immo- 
rality. 

Until this, the third year of my ser\nce as Police Commissioner, 
I have refrained from discussing the relations of the police de- 
partment to houses of ill fame, night walking and other forms of 
public or semipublic immorality. Sincere but inexperienced so- 
ciologists and humanitarians will discuss the subject at a mo- 
ment's notice; but after two and a half years of study, with the 
advantage of daily access to all forms of police information, I 
am still unprepared to do more than to state and analyze facts, 
and to touch the mere edge of criticism and suggestion. 

O CO 

'^There is a tradition in Boston that fourteen years ago, under 
the direction of a chairman of the Board of Police, then lately 
appointed, houses of ill fame were closed and their keepers pros- 
ecuted in great numbers. Nothing in the records of the depart- 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



15 



ment justifies this tradition. In 1S94 the number of persons 
prosecuted for keeping houses of ill fame was 46, and in 1895 
the number was 69. The popular belief at that time, which still 
exists, must have had its origin in the publicity with which tlie 
work was then carried on, and the knowledge that in the year 
immediately preceding, 1893, the prosecutions had numbered 
but 19. 

Public clamor will never close a house of ill fame; but it will 
spread demoralization through the community. The people who 
live by this business care nothing for public opinion. They can 
be reached only through the silent, relentless work of the police; 
and it was through such work in 1908 that 114 persons were 
brought into court charged with keeping houses of ill fame. 
This is the largest number in thirty years, and therefore in the 
history of Boston, as the following statement of prosecutions will 
show: — 



46 
69 
72 
.54 
31 
6S 

100 
5.5 
55 
SO 
66 
52 
65 
74 

114 



1S79, 








. 51 


1S94, 


ISSO, 








. 23 


1S95, 


ISSl, 








. 25 


1S96, 


1SS2, 








52 


1S97, 


1SS3, 








63 


1S9S, 


1SS4, 








67 


1899, 


1SS5, 








43 


1900, 


1SS6, 








S4 


1901, 


1SS7, 








50 


1902, 


ISSS, 








25 


1903, 


1SS9, 








55 


1904, 


1S90, 








27 


1905, 


ISO], 








31 


1906, 


IS92, 








40 


1007, 


1893, 








19 


1908, 



In order to secure evidence for these 114 prosecutions, 205 
suspected houses and apartments were searched by the police, 
and the whole number of searches in those places was 402. 

The difficulties of this work are not in the least understood by 
the public. It seems to be impossible to make even persons of 
intelligence realize that no one can be convicted of a crime, not 
even a keeper of one of these houses, unless a specific offence 
can be charged, with precise and abundant evidence to sustain 
it, in the calm and judicial atmosphere of a court, and with a 



f I 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

skillful attorney employed by the defendant to overthrow the j 

case. An indijrnant citizen, who feels sure of the bad character ■: 

• - I 

of a house, demands that it be closed by the police. He forgets ji 

that we are not in an .\siatic despotism; that in this country ii 

every person is held to be innocent until his guilt has been .! 

proved; that the one thing which is of value to the police is the ',' 

very thing which he cannot produce, or refuses to produce, and |] 

that is e\ndence that will convince or help to convince a court or j 

jury. He protests that men and women drive up to the house •; 

and drive away late at night, that there are lights, music and • 

merriment; and in hb simplicity he does not know that if a Ij 

policeman were to go before a judge asking for a warrant ;i 

on such a state of facts he would be told that he did not know ij 

his business, that the appearances which he described were to be ij 

found nightly in Commonwealth Avenue and Beac-on Street as !j 

well as in the shady quarters of the city. He does not know that j 

"spotter" e\'idence ^ — the evidence of a man who for pay would ■} 

enter these houses and join in their orgies — would not be worth t 

the time it would take to present it to a scornful jury. He does '\ 

not know that the law by its provisions classes a house of ill fame j! 

as less dangerous to the community than a place where trivial j, 

gaming is going on; that the police may, without warrant or i 

warning, break in the doors of a house in which it is suspected ) 

that men are plajing carils or shaking dice for money, but that j 

the only practicable way in which they can legally enter a house .1 

of ill fame is by means of a search warrant for liquor, obtained 
in advance from a court and subject to many chances of becom- 
ing known. 

Although the police made 1 14 prosecutions last year there were 
"high-class" houses, so called, whose keepers they could not 
reach, .\nother year will, perhaps, show a different result. 
There are houses of this character to which no man is admitted 
unless known to the keepers or in the company of others who 
are known. The critical citizen supposes that any man is wel- 
comed at any of these places unless he is suspected of being a 
policeman. There are other houses which no man enters and 
but few women inhabit. They have their accredited customers 
among men and their clients among women, and by means of 
the telephone customers and clients are brought together in 
places not under the scrutiny of the police. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 19. 



17 



Tlie 114 persons charged with keeping houses of ill fame hav- 
ing bt>en hronglit into court, what was done with them ? Taking 
the action of the lower courts onlv, for there were some api)eals 
whicli it would be difficult to follow through the procedure of 
the Superior Court, the disposition of cases was as follows: — 



Fined S.'>0 

Fined SlOO 

Discharged, .... 
Pl.nccd on file, 
Placed on probation, 
Prison at Shcrbom, 
Pending, .... 
House of Correction one year, 
House of Correction eleven months. 
House of Correct ion sbc months, 
House of Correction four months. 
House of Correction three months, 
House of Correction one montii. 



49 

7 

16 

11 

3 
o 



Total, 



1 

7 
1 
9 
4 

O 



114 



With the discharges no fault can be found, for doubtless the 
evidence was not strong en>)Ugh to convince the courts. But 
that 14 cases should have been placed on file or on probation, 
either of which disposition implies guilt, is puzzling. No person 
goes into the business of keeping a house of ill fame by accident, 
on impulse or through sudden temptation. All such persons are 
of mature years, for they own or occupy houses or apartments, 
and they must be so hardened to vice as to be free from the 
danger of contamination by the inmates of any prison. If they 
express repentance when they have been caught and convicted 
it c-ould be worked out better after a term of imprisonment than 
immediately following a release without punishment. 

The sentence in almost half the cases was a fine of S50, which 
is not even the nia.ximum money penalty provided by law. It is 
hard to believe that the Commonwealth should condone such an 
offence as this for any sum of money paid, and especially for a 
pittance that can be charged to the profit and loss account with- 
out embarrassment to the business or interruption of its success- 
ful progress. 

But besides the 1 14 prosecutions for keeping houses of ill fame, 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



the 402 seaixhes developed evidence on which were based 43 
prosecutions for violation of the liquor law, which in the lower 
courts were disposed of as follows: — 

Fined S50, 26 

Fined S75, .......... 1 

Fined SlOO 4 

Discharged, .......... 6 

Placed on file 3 

Placed on probation, ........ 1 

House of Correction three months, ...... 1 

Pending, .......... 1 

Total, 43 

It will be noticed that the prevailing fine (SoO) is. as heavy in 
the liquor cases as in the cases of convictions for keeping houses 
of ill fame. 

.\s a further result of the police searches, 78 men and 130 
women, in addition to the keepers, who were found in these 
houses were arrested, either as actually engaged in the commis- 
sion of crime or as idle and disorderly persons. Their cases 
were disposed of in the lower courts as follows: — 



Fined .$20, . 

Fined Slo, . 

Fined one cent, 

Placed on probation, 

Placed on file, 

Discharged, . 

Defaulted, . 

House of Correction one year. 

House of Correction six months. 

House of Correction four months. 

House of Correction three months, 

House of Correction two months. 

House of Correction one month. 

Prison at Sherborn, 

Jail three months, 

Jail fifteen days, . 



135 
3 
2 
27 
9 
8 

9 



i' 



Total, 



208 



1909.] 



PUBUC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



The 78 men were released on pa_\-ment of fines. Of the S3 
persons punished in anv way for keeping houses of ill fame, 27 
were sentenced to imprisonment. Of the S3 women who were 
mere inmates of the houses, not their keepers, who were pun- 
ished in any way, 22 i^ere sentenced to imprisonment. 

The work of the police for the suppression of open immorality 
in the streets tuok. the form of prosecution of common night 
walkers and of women and girls not properly to be classed as 
nicht walkers but nevertheless guilty of immoral acts and 
conduct. The persons prosecuted as night walkers num- 
bered 249, and tlieir cases were disposed of in the lower courts as 
follows: — 

Probation, 99 

On file, .9 

Defaulted, 6 

House of Correction one year, . . . . . . • 2 

House of Correction six months, ...... 7 

House of Correction four months, ...... 42 

House of Correction three months, ...... 36 

House of Correction two months, . . . . . .10 

House of Correction one month, ...... 2 

Prison at Shcrbom, ........ 30 

St.ite Farm, ......... 4 

Lancaster School, ........ 1 

Fined, 1 

Total 240 

AVomen and girls arrested in the streets but not properly to be 
classed as common n^t walkers numbered 119, and the lower 
courts made the foDowing disposition of their cases: — 



Probation, . 

Discharged, . 

On file, . . . 

Delivered to parents. 

Delivered to probation officer 

Defaulted, . 

Held for grand jurj-. 

Fined, 

Pending, 



19 
3 
2 

41 
1 
2 

2 

12 

3 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Prison at Sherborn, 

Jail, . 

State Fami, - . . . 

Ijncaster School, 
House of Correction five months, 
House of Correction four months, 
House of Correction three months, 
Hoase of Correction two months, 
House of Correction one month, 



8 
2 

1 

3 

3 

5 

7 

3 
o 



Total 119 

In some cases probation was allowed on condition that the 
persons convicted should go voluntarily, for certain periods of 
time, to unofficial institutions of a reformatorv character, such 
as the House of the Good Shepherd. 

From personal familiarity with the streets of Boston at night 
for more than thirty years I can say confidently that open solicit- 
i!i2 is now less common than ever before. But on the other 
hand, unfortunately, the number of girls from twelve to seven- 
teen years of age roaming the streets at night, far from their 
homes, and learning the lessons of prostitution, has increased in 
the past few years with startling rapidity. 

A summary of prosecutions by the police for the year in the 
directions <Iescribed above is as follows: — 

For keeping houses of ill fame, . . . . . .114 

For \-iolating the liquor law in known or suspected houses of ill 

fame, .......... 43 

For presence in such houses when searched, not as keepers but as 

inmates or patrons, ....*.... 208 

As common night walkers, ....... 249 

For immoral conduct or acts in the public streets, . . .119 

Total, 733 



I am not so simple as to suppose that any combination of 
effort by courts and police can ever drive \ice of this character 
from a city which has 020,000 inhabitants, and, for police pur- 
poses, almost double that number. It is trjing and thankless 
work, which falls mainly upon the police of three divisions 
They have been faithful and energetic and will so continue; not 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 21 

in the expectation of accomplishing the impossible, but with 
the determination to make the business of vice so hazardous and 
unprofitable that as many as possible will be driven out of it and 
others will be dcternxl from taking it up. 

I shall make no recommendations for changes in the laws 
until further opportunity has been given for the more effective 
use of laws, however imperfect, which are already in existence. 

Automobile Laws. 

The automobile prosecutions in the year endetl Nov. 30, 190S, 
involved 1,G96 persons, against whom 1,S65 separate charges 
were made. 

Of these cases in the lower courts, 15.5 were placed on file, 66 
were dischai-ged, 1 was sentenced to one month in jail, 1 to six 
months in the House of Correction and 1,642 were fined an 
aggregate sum of S19,.33S.02. 

The protection of the public from the automobile danger has 
become a heavy burden on the police department. Counting 
the men at several of the stations who give their whole time to 
the work, the men who give part of their time and the days spent 
in court by the police, it is a moderate estimate that 20 policemen 
are now retjuired for even the measure of enforcement of the 
automobile laws that has been secured. Furthermore, in the 
year just closed 10 men have been placed in Tremont and 
Boylston streets and Massachusetts and Huntington avenues 
at crossings which would have needed no [)ermanent protec- 
tion but for the automobile danger. The department auto- 
mobiles are of incidental use for other purposes, but the 
scnice was established and developed mainly to assist in the 
enforcement of the automobile laws, and three-fourths of its 
work is devoted to that end. The 30 men just mentioned cost 
in salaries alone §30,000 a year; three-fourths of the cost of the 
police automobile ser\ice, including drivers, supplies and care, 
but not first cost of machines, is .$5,664; total special expense, 
$41,664. 

.\s against this cost to the people of Boston plus the cost of 
court procedure, we find an aggregate of S19,33S in fines im- 
posed in the year by the lower courts, an appreciable projx)rtion 
of which was lost through appeals to the Suj>erior Court. It 



92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



seems to mc that, leanng out the important question of prose- 
cution and punishment, the persons who are convicted should 
be made to pay in the aggregate at least the cost of securing 
their apprehension and conviction and the specific cost of pro- 
tecting the pubh'c from their acts. 

Tlie first reconl of an automobile prosecution by the Boston 
police was made only seven years ago, when the single otfence 
of the year 1901 was the driving of a motor car in a public park 
without a permit. In 1902 there were 33 prosecutions; in 1903, 
67; in 1904, 179; in 1905, 102; in 1906, 30S. In 1907 there 
were 901 prosecutions, with fines imposed in the lower courts 
amounting to S9,344. In 190S there were 1.S65 prosecutions, 
with fines of §19,338. The figures for 1907 and 190S represent 
not the number of persons prosecuted but the number of sep- 
arate offences charged, the same person on a single appearance 
in court being sometimes charged with more than one breach of 
law or of the regulations. 

Accidents to persons due to the operation of automobiles are 
first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Beginning in 
that year their number to the present time is shown in the fol- 
lowing table: — 





KilI«L 


Ifljured. 


1000, . 


. 


- 


10 


100), . 










_ 


s 


1902, . 










- 


17 


190^ . 










2 


24 


1004, . 










1 


5-5 


lOOo, . 










O 


7S 


190G, . 










1 


110 


1007, . 




' 






7 


105 


1008, . 










6 


127 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 23 

Of tlie 6 persons killed in 190S, 1 was riding in an automobile 
and 5 were struck by automobiles. Of the 127 persons injured 
in 190S, 20 were riding in automobiles and 107 were struck by 
automobiles. 

An examination of the localities in which the accidents oc- 
curred in 1907 and 190S, respectively, shows two significant 
peculiarities: First, in the business section covered by police 
divisions 1 and 2, that is to say, between Summer and Winter 
streets on the south, and Causeway Street on the north, and 
e.xtending from Tremont Street to the water front, the propor- 
tion of all the accidents increased from 9 per cent, in 1907 to 2S 
per cent, in 190S. Second, in the territory including the Back 
Bay, Boylston Street, the boulevards, parks and all centers of 
the automobile business, a territory in which the temptation to 
overspccding is very great, the proportion of all the accidents 
decreased from CO per cent, in 1907 to 44 per cent, in 190S. 

These facts show that in the business section, which offers 
little chance for a high rate of speed, motor cars have been so 
operated as to raise in one year the proportion of accidents from 
9 per cent, to 2S per cent, of the whole; and that in the other 
parts of the city, as described, in which almost all the prosecu- 
tions have been made, the proportion of accidents, despite the 
increase in the number of cars in use, has dropped from 09 per 
cent, to 44 per cent. 

Without relaxing in other directions, it vnW be a part of the 
duty of the police in the coming year to put strong pressure upon 
those who use dangerous methods in the business section. 

Motor T.vxic.\bs. 
The introduction of motor ta.xicabs made necessary.- a special 
schedule of rates and conditions of operation, which was estab- 
lished in July. It was further required that each cab should bo 
licensed as a hackney carriage and each chauffeur as a hack or 
cab driver, in addition to the registration and license of the High- 
way Commission. Up to November 30 the number of taxicabs 
licensed by the Police Commissioner was 66 and the number of 
drivers ISo. This precaution was fully justified by results. Fast 
driving became at once so common that a s|>ecial warning was 
issued, and thereafter, within a few weeks, the police licenses of 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

12 drivers were revokerl, following conviction in court of over- 
speeding. In a few meritorious cases the licenses were restored 
after two or tliree weeks for further trial. Tlic effect of tliese 
revocations was good, and towards the end of the police war 
similar complaints against drivers became comparatively rare. 

JuKY Lists. 
L'nder the provisions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, which be- 
rame operative this year, the Election Commissioners of the city 
of Boston were authorized to call upon the Police Commissioner 
for assistance in ascertaining the qualifications of persons pro- 
posed for juiy- sennce. As a result of such call the police in- 
vestigated 7,S99 citizens with reference to their moral, mental 
and physical qualifications or defects, visiting each one person- 
allv if living in Boston and obtaining from others to whom he 
was known such additional information as seemed desirable. Of 
the 7,S99 persons investigated, 7S0 were dead or could not be 
found in Boston, 492 were physically incapacitated, 156 had been 
con\'icted of crime, 1 19 were unfit for juiy service for various 
reasons, and G,3.52 were reported as apparently fit in all respects 
for jurors. This was a veiy arduous piece of e.xtra work for the 
police, especially as in hundreds of cases it became necessary to 
trace persons who had changed their places of residence through 
two, three and even four police divisions. If the quality of 
jurors furnished by the city of Boston is not greatly improved 
by this process, which the police must go through annually, it 
never can be. 

S.MALL LO.KXS. 

There are now two classes of licenses for persons engaged in 
the business of making loans of S200 or less at a rate of interest 
greater than 12 per cent. 

The first is for loans secured bv mortgage, .oledge of household 
furniture or other property e.xempt from attachment, or by as- 
signment of wages for personal services. This class of business 
was seriously affected by provisions of chapter 605, Acts of 
190S, which required that an assignment of wages, in order to 
be valid, should be approved by the employer and by the wife of 
the person assigning, if married. The constitutionality of these 



V 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 49. 25 

j)ro\-isions has been f|iiestioncd, and the matter is now before the 
Supreme Judicial Court. 

The second class of licenses applies to persons engaged in the 
business of making small loans, as above described, for which no 
security is taken other than a note or contract, with or ^-ithout 
an endorser. This class owes its origin to chapter 60-5, before 
the passage of which such lf)ans were made without official regu- 
lation. Under the provisions of the art, and after much consid- 
eration, tlie Police Commissioner made rules governing this 
business, which will be found at the end of this report. 

In 1907 there were issue<l 55 licenses of the single cla.<s then 
requiretl. Between Sept. 1 and Nov. ^0, 190S, there were issued 
of that class 44 licenses and of the new class 40, making a total 
of S4. The whole number of applications was 92, but 4 were 
withdra\\'n, -3 are pending and 1 wa.s rejecte<I. In many cases 
both licenses were issued to the same person, firm or corporation. 
The annual fee for each license is S-jO. 

The business has lx*onie so e.vtensive that it now recjuires the 
whole time of an inspector of |>olice, who reports upon applicants 
for hccnses, examines the reports of lic-ensees to the Police Com- 
missioner and the books which they are requiretl to keep at their 
places of business, and investigates complaints from borrowers, 
^lany methods of evading the laws and regulations will undoubt- 
edly be developed and some have already appeareil. .\s the 
borrower, when he wants money, is in ccllusion with the lender, 
the work of detection and conviction will be difficult. 

Jt'VEXiLE Offenders. 

The second full year of the juvenile laws which became ef- 
fective Sept. 1, 1906, shows larger results in police work, despite 
its difficulties and <liscouragements. The problem of lawless 
youth, with its dangerous possibilities for the future, is still, in 
my opinion, the most serious that confronts the commum'ty. 

The statistics which follow were prepared especially for the 
purpose of showing the immber of fjersons under the age of 
seventeen years who were in the hands of the police for any 
reason in the twelve months ended Nov. .30, 190S, their offences, 
their ages and the disposition of their cases. . These figures will 



26 



POLICE COiBIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



not agree precisely with those contained in the general tables 
attache<l to this report, because in the latter cases the classifica- 
tion is usually with regard to the offences, rather than to the ages 
of the offenders. 

The number of juveniles in the hands of the police in the two 
years, at different ages, practically all those under eight being 
among the neglected children, is as follows: — 



Under eight years. 
Eight years, 
Nine years. 
Tea years, 
Eleven j-cars, 
Twelve years. 
Thirteen j-ears, . 
Fourteen j'ears, . 
Fifteen jears, 
Sixteen }-ears. 



Total, 



1908. 


1907. 


99 

77 


^46 
'78 


138 


143 


236 


238 


309 


265 


452 


366 


4SS 


413 


595 


4a3 


692 


499 


743 


597 



3,829 3,078 



The increase in the total is 24 per cent. In the ages under 
fourteen and between sixteen and seventeen there is no substan- 
tial variation from the general average; but between fourteen 
and fifteen the increase is 37 per cent., and between fifteen and 
sixteen it is 38 per cent. This condition shows that it is among 
the larger boys, from fourteen to sixteen years of age, that law- 
lessness is growing. 

The causes which brought these 3,829 dehnquent, neglected 
and wa)-\vard children into the hands of the police were as fol- 
lows: — 



Larceny and attempted larceny. 

Breaking and entering buildings. 

Breaking and entering buildings, attempted. 

Breaking and entering railroad cars. 

Breaking and entering vesseb, 

.\ssault and batterj', 

.\ssault, indecent, 

.\s5ault, felonious, 

•Assault on police, 

.\ssault to rob. 

Malicious mischief, 

Gaming on the Lord's Day, and present at, 

Gaming in public streets, 



762 

414 

13 

7 

4 

3a2 

3 

2 

2 

1 

225 

193 

43 



1909.] 



rUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



\it 



Stealing rides, 

Throwing missiles in streets, 

Throwing rubbish in streets, 

Neglected children. 

Trespass, 

Fugitives and runaways. 

Suspicious persons. 

Stubborn jhildren, 

Violating conditions of license inewsboys) 

Violating conditions of probation 

Violating conditions of pardon. 

Violating conditions of parole. 

Discharging firearms and fireworks in the street 

Railroads, loitering on property of. 

Railroads, walking on tracks of, 

Railroads, disturbing signals of, 

Plajnng ball in public streets, 

Playing football on Common on Sunday, 

Park rules, \-iolating. 

Fires, setting, in streets and buildings. 

Fires, false alarms of, . 

Unlawful appropriation of streets, . 

Idle and disorderly, 

Disturbing peace. 

Disturbing school. 

Disturbing public meetings, 

Robl^ery and attempted robber}-, . 

Xewspa|>ers, selling, on Common without license from 

Xewspajjers, selling, without hcense, 

Wajivard children, 

Drunkenness, 

Violating Sunda)* law (bootblacks). 

Violating spit law. 

Violating health law, 

Violating peddling law, . 

Begging in streets. 

Profanity, . 

Truancy, 

Default warrantii. 

Unlawful use of streets. 

Bathing in public places. 

Obstructing sidewalks, . 

.\rson and attempted arson. 

Carrying dangerous weapons, 

Receiving stolen goods. 

Vagrancy, . 

Fornication, 



the mavor 



ISS 

1S2 

4 

171 

loS 

122 

112 

9.3 

91 

1.5 

6 

2 

06 

47 

34 

2 

44 

3 

43 

41 

7 

3-5 

33 

33 

1 

4 

31 

29 

14 

2S 

2S 

20 

12 

7 

7 

17 

16 

13 

12 

12 

11 

9 

7 

6 

5 

5 

4 



2S 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Cruelly to aiiiniaU, extinguishing street lamps, unnatural act, 
3 each 

Evading car fare, posting bills on buildings, 2 each, . 

Violating automoliile law, bastardy, desertion, distributing hand 
bills, forgery, using false measure, interfering uith fire alarm, 
lewd and lascivious conduct, setting up a lottery, night walking, 
using obscene language, having obscene pictures, obstructing 
street cars, refusing to place a wagon as directed, taking water 
from standpipe, 1 each, ....... 



15 



I I 
i 



Total 3,829 



Tlie increase in the number of all cases, as compared with 
1907, is 7.51. Of this increase .329 cases arc chargeable to neg- 
lected children, fugitives, runaways, suspicious persons, desertion 
and violation of conditions of pardon, probation or parole. As 
these represent either no offence or no origiual offence against 
the laws tliey may be put aside. This leaver an increase in all 
other cases of 422. 

Taking offences of a serious character, such as are common to 
adults as well as to juveniles, the following show increases: — 



: I»0«. 


1907. 


Increase. 


Larceny and attempted larcem', . 


762 


757 


5 


Breaking and entering and attempted, . 


4.3S 


:3S0 


5.S 


Assault and battery, .... 


302 


296 


6 


Gaming on the Lord's Day or in public 

streets, and present at. 
Setting fires in streets and buildings, 


2-36 
41 


1.52 
14 


S4 
27 


Robbery and attempted robber}-, . 


31 


11 


20 


Drunkenness, 


2S 


27 


1 


Violating health, peddling and spit laws. 


26 


_ 


26 


Begging in streets 


17 


5 


12 


Fornication 


4 


1 


3 


Indecent assault, .... 


3 


- 


3 


Unnatural act, 


3 


- 


3 


Cruelty to animals 


3 




3 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 40. 



29 



lOOS. 


1007. 


Id crease. 


Porting and distributing bills, 


3 




3 


A--:iult on police, .... 


2 


- 


2 


Ixirtardy, ...... 




- 




Lewd arid l.iscivious conduct. 




- 




Xi!;ht walking, ..... 




- 




U-ing false measures, .... 




- 




Maintaining a lottery, . 


1 


- 


- 


L'lins obscene language. 




- 


*■ 


Assault to rob, ..... 




- 




Totals, 


1,906 


1,643 


263 











Offences of a similar character which showed a decrease were 
as follows: — 





lOOH. 


lOOT. 


Decrca.'t. 


Discharging firearms and fireworks in the 


06 


7S 


12 


streets. 








Profanity, ...... 


10 


20 


4 


Palse alarms of fire and interfering with 


s 


20 


12 


a])paratus. 








.\r?oii and attempted arson. 


7 


17 


10 


Carrying dangerous weapons. 





7 


1 


Rc'-ivinc stolen goods, 


■') 


9 


4 


P'elonious assault, .... 


2 


3 


1 


Forger>-, 


1 


3 


2 


Violating automobile law, . 


1 


•■) 


1 


Threats, ...... 


_ 


3 


3 


nape, 


- 


1 


1 


Manslaughter, ..... 


- 


1 


1 


Committing nuisances in public streets, . 


- 


4 


4 


Totals, 


112 


16S 


56 ( 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following offences, peculiar to juveniles or |>eculiar to 
them under present c-onditious, showed increases: — 



■ ^•7. Ii>c7«a.9e. 



Stealing rides, ..... 
Violating conditions of license (newsboj's) 
Loitering on railroad property, walking 

tracks and disttirbing sgnals. 
Pla\-ing ball in public places, 
Violating park rules, . 
Selling newspapers without license, 
AVa>-ward children, 
Vioiating Sunday law (bootblacks), 
Truancy, ..... 
Bathing in public places, 
Extingubhing street lamps, . 
Evading car fare. 
Obstructing street cars, 
Refusing to place a wagon, . 
Taking water from standpipe, 

Totals, .... 



1S5 
91 
S3 

47 

43 

43 I 

2S 

20 

13 

11 

3 

2 

1 
1 
1 



132 
43 



10 

16 
8 
3 
3 



215 



56 
48 
S3 

47 

33 

43 

12 

12 

10 

8 

3 

2 

1 
1 
1 



360 



Juvenile offences which shovi'ed decreases were as follows: — 





ISOI. 


I9«7. 


DecresM. 


Malicious mischief, .... 
Throwing missiles and rubbish in streets, 

Trespass 

Stubborn children, .... 
Unlawful use and appropriation of streets. 
Disturbing peace, pubUc meetings and 

school. 
Idle and disorderly, .... 
Obstructing sidewalks. 


225 ' 266 

1S6 ; 202 

1.5S ; ISS 

93 1 110 

47 1 72 

38 51 

33 ; 34 

9 i 11 


41 
16 
30 
17 
25 
13 

1 
2 


Totals, 


789 j 934 


145 



1 

?! 



This classification of offences is not scientific and none can be; 
but it will be of some service. It shows that in offences common 
to adults as well as to juveniles there was a net increase of 207; 
and in offences pc-culiar to juveniles, a net increase of 215; 
total, 422. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT— No. 49. 



31 



The table which follows gives the disposition in the lower 
courts and by the police of the juvenile cases of the year, together 
with such figures of 1907 as are applicable. The figures of 1907 
which do not appear are of no significance. 





1908. 


1 907. 


Probation, ....... 


1,129 


1,116 


On file, 


1,123 


1,023 


Di5charged by court, ..... 


396 


104 


Discharged at station houses, 


119 


231 


Fined, 


376 


156 


Suffolk School, 


1S3 


S9 


Delivered to parents, ..... 


110 


2 


Delivered to unofficial charitable institutions 

and societies. 
Pending, ....... 


9S 
S4 


72 
76 




54 


35 


LjTnan School, ...... 


45 


37 




34 


13 


Parental School, 


21 


13 


Lancaster School, 


17 


19 


Defaulted, 


11 


S 


House of Reformation, 


6 


2 


Delivered to police outside of Boston, 


6 


4 




5 


2 


Held for grand jury, 


8 


- 


Licenses revoked, ...... 


2 


_ _ 


JaU, 


1 


1 


Delivered at Xavy Yard 


1 


- 


Total, 


3,829 


- 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



It is e\-ident that between 1907 and 190S there was an important 
chansie in the policy of the courts with respect to juwnile of- 
fenders. Punislimcnts by fine or by confinement in institutions 
increased lai^ely, not only in numbers but in percentages. Tiiis 
maiter is iinf<ortant enougli to call for a special analysis. 

In 1907 there were 3,07S juveniles in the hands of the police, 
and in 190S there were 3,S29. Deduct from each year's total 
those delirered to their parents, to outside police, to the State 
BoanI of Charity, to unofficial charitable societies and institu- 
tions, the cases pending, defaulted or sent to the grand jun-, 
those discharged at station houses, and those discharged by 
c-ourts because of youthfulness or lack of evidence. These de- 
ductions will leave cases fairly brought forward for sentence at 
2,.ViS in 1907 and 2,9G2 In 190S. This is an increase of 1.5 per 
cent. 

The actual sentences to fines or to public reformatorj' or cor- 
rectional institutions in the two years were as follows: — 





I90«. 


190T. 


Hr^el, . . * . 






376 


1.56 


Suffolk School, 








1S3 


S9 


Concord Reformatory, 








54 


3-5 


Lrmaa School, 








4.5 


37 


Parental .School, 








21 


13 


Lancaster School, . 








17 


19 


House of Reformation, 








6 


2 


House of Correction, 








5 


2 


JaiL . . . 








1 


1 


Totals, . 




70S 


354 



. I 



v 



The substantial penalties, therefore, were increased in number 
by 100 per cent., while the increase in the cases eligible, so to 
speak, to such penalties was but 15 p>er cent 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

The wanton or malicious breaking of glass in windows and 
street lamps has become prevalent to an astonishing extent. It 
is so easily done, ^\ithout fear of detection, whether by day or by 
ni^ht, from the street or from beliind fences, or even by the throw- 
ing of missiles from open windows, that nothing can stop it except 
tlie fear of consequences to the comparatively few in number who 
are caught. The prevalence and the increase of this practice 
illustrate as well as anything can the spirit of lawlessness and of 
disregard for the rights and the safety of others which is so com- 
mon. In the course of the year the police succeeded in present- 
ing to the courts 151 bovs charged with this offence, and their 
cases were disposed of as follows: — * 

Placed on file, 61 

Placed on probation, ........ 36 

Discharged, .......... 31 

Pending, .......... 13 

Suffolk School, 3 

Fined, .......... 2 

Ordered to contribute -S1.60 each to pay for a particular piece of 
destruction, . - . . . . . . . .5 

Total, 151 

This is a record to encourage rather than to stop a practice 
which has been the subject of complaint to the police by hun- 
dreds of citizens, by almost every city department which has 
property e.xposetl and by at least one State department. The 
breaking of ijlass is but one of manv forms of destniction bv bovs 
which are not effectively punbhed. The police hold the post of 
trouble and harassment between careless parents and lenient 
courts. Property owners demand protection, which can be 
given only through the exemplar)- punishment of offenders; and 
when 151 supposed offenders are presented to the courts, the 
visible result is 2 fines and 3 commitments to the Suffolk 
School, — the commitments being doubtless influenced largely 
by other previous offences. I am aware that sometimes the 
courts release boys on condition that they pay for the broken 
glass. Such payment is doubtless comforting to the owner of 
the property, but its effect in restraining other boys is practically 
nothing. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



There is one powerful ally without whom this contest for law 
and order cannot be successfull}' fought. That is the parent. 
He is careless now and will so remain as long as the offences of 
his children cost him nothing. Make him pay for them through 
fines and he will become interested and efficient; possibly he 
will even employ those forms of chastisement which he alone 
practically has now the right to inflict. 

Although the juvenile laws deal only with persons under seven- 
teen years of age, to whom alone all the information under this 
head applies, it is a fact of startling significance that the number 
of persons just over that age, that is to say, from seventeen to 
twenty years, in the hands of the police last year was 3,970. 
These are the graduates of the juvenile class in the three years 
just gone, and if their offences were analyzed they would be 
found to have in them little that is childish and a great deal that 
is representative of the most serious forms of adult crime. 

Carrying Dangerous We.\poxs. 
Under the act of 1906 which authorized the Police Commis- 
sioner, in common with certain other ofBcials, to grant licenses 
for the carrj'ing of loaded pbtols or revolvers on the person, the 
following action has been taken by him : — 



.Applications, 



Gnnlcd. 



Eefiscd. 



1906, 

1907, 
1908, 



443 

681 

1020 



412 
625 
882 



31 

56 

138 



These licenses are granted in large measure to express and 
bank messengers, watchmen, special policemen and others whose 
oc-cupations and characters establish a prima facie case in their 
favor. Citizens in general seem to be unable to understand that 
under the law a licensee mast not only be of good character but 
must have reason to fear bodily harm. Both conditions are in- 
vestigated by the police and both must be found, A police re- 
port that is often made is that, although the applicant is of good 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

character and has some reason for wishing to carry a revolver, 
his nervous or irritable temperament makes him an unsafe per- 
son. 

Labor troubles always bring applicants. They are invariably 
refused, and the heat of their consequent criticism of the PoUce 
Commissioner is not cooled by the information that if they are 
dissatisfied with his judgment they are at liberty to apply to the 
mayor of any city, the selectmen of any town or to any judge of 
a court, to all of which officials the law gives the right to issue 
revolver licenses good throughout the Commonwealth. 

An officer of a society whose request had been refused threat- 
ened mandamus proceedings, — missing the humorous point that 
the judge hearing the petition would himself be one of the officials 
clothed by the statute with authority to license. A citizen who 
had changed from one ward political faction to another asked 
for a license because he feared that his late associates would kill 
him. Another, in a somewhat similar situation, applied in per- 
son the day before an election. He was advised that if he made 
an application in writing it would be considered in the regular 
way. "But," he exclaimed, "I want to take the revolver to the 
polls in the morning." Neither of these applicants received a 
license and both are .■still thoroughly alive. 

A few women have applied, usually because they carried large 
sums of money through the streets at regular hours, for deposit 
or for pay rolls; and when found to be personally fit they have 
been licensed. Not so a woman who asked lately for a license 
and was found on investigation to be seekinjr to arm herself 
against her sister, with whom she had quarrelled, the two being 
tenants of the same house which they jointly owned. 

Prosecutions last year for carrj'ing dangerous weapons on the 
person numbered 154. In practically all cases they resulted 
from searches of prisoners arrested for other offences, and this 
circumstance is significant in two ways: — 

Firsi. — It is only through an arrest for another offence and a 
consequent search, or by sheer accident, that evidence to convict 
for earning a dangerous weapon can be secured. 

Second. — The practice of carrjnng such weapons must be far 
less common than is generally supposed. The total number of 
prosecutions of all kinds in 190S was, in round numbers, 68,000. 



36 POLICE C03LMISSI0NER. [Jan. 

Deducting all persons who were summoned to court, all persons 
under seventeen years of age and all women it will be found that 
53,000 men and boys above seventeen years of age were under 
arrest at station houses and were there searched. As all persons 
upon whom dangerous weajxjns are found are prosecuted for 
that offence, and as the prosecutions numbered only 154, it fol- 
lows that of the males above seventeen years of age arrested the 
proportion found to be unlawfully armed was only about 1 in 
345. 

As the law stands to-day a policeman has no right to lay hand 
upon a man merely because he suspects him of being armed. At 
night only he may arrest him as a suspicious person, take him to 
the station house and there search him; but not in the da\"time. 
I have little faith in any of the propwsed methods of reducing the 
number of men unlawfully armed, such as licensing sales of re- 
volvers, etc. The bad man will secure his weapon in spite of all; 
the problem is to catch him with it on his person and then to 
punish him as he is not now punished. The only effective legis- 
lation, in my judgment, would be in the direction of enlarging 
the power of the police to search persons reasonably suspected of 
carrying dangerous weapons contran.' to law. 

•Soliciting ^Ioxet ix the Streets. 
At times each year persons representing certain religious and 
benevolent organizations appear in public places with placards 
and contribution boxes seeking gifts of money. This work at 
first was an incident of Thanksgiving or Christmas, and was 
tolerated by the police authorities of the time. It was then car- 
ried on by members of the organizations for a few days, and for 
the specific purpose of providing a Thanksgiving or a Christmas 
dinner for needy persons; but it has grown year by year until 
now more than fifty solicitors, many of them employed as such, 
are out annually for several weeks in the months of November 
and December. Their presence in the public streets is contrary 
to laws which are now enforced against other persons and must 
hereafter be enforced against all. With solicitors who stand on 
private property the police have nothing to do; neither are they 
responsible for those who stand on the Common or other public 
grounds, pnm'ded they obtain permission from the city author- 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

ities. As the solicitation in public streets had been tolerated for 
a number of years it seemed proper to give reasonable warning 
before stopping it. I therefore gave notice, early in the autumn, 
to the principal officer of the leading organization that the work, 
unless lei^alized, could not be continued after this vear. He ac- 
cepted the notice in good faith and expressed the intention of 
seeking the sanction of law. 

Street Sta.vds, etc. 

The law coJiceming the storage and sale of merchandise in the 
public streets of Boston, chapter 5S4, Acts of 1907, has passed 
its first full year of operation. It was designed to legalize 
whatever was good and to eradicate whatever was bad in a sys- 
tem of street occupancy for private mercantile purposes which 
had grown to extensive proportions, contrary to law, though 
sometimes under permits issued by city departments but of no 
legal value. In my annual report for 190G I explained the situa- 
tion, and state<l that unless the Legislature deemed it e-xpedient 
to pass a law under which such occupancy might be made legal, 
with proper regulations, I should consider it my duty to prosecute 
persons making illegal use of the streets. The result was the 
passage of chapter 5S4, under which the street commissioners 
have authority to issue licenses for street stands on applications 
approved by the Police Commissioner, and the Police Commis- 
sioner is empowered to determine the times and places at which 
hawkers and pedlers may carry on their business. 

The operation of this act has done away with the unlawful 
seizure and use of parts of public streets for private purposes, 
to the injury of the public. At the same time it has made it 
possible to assign lawfully, on application, such precise spaces 
as can be spared from the uses of vehicles and foot passengers. 
These assignments are made in all parts of the city, and in those 
streets in which there are many applicants all whose situations 
are alike receive equal allotments. The act also has enabled the 
Police Commissioner to clear completely from the business part 
of the city hawkers and pedlers whose push-carts, baskets and 
stands were formerly so serious an interruption to traffic. 

The moderate license fees which the street commissioners 
were authorized to charge are but an incident in an important 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

reform; but it is worth noting that in the first year of the opera- j 

tion of the law and the beginning of the second year the city of I 

Boston has l>enefited by these fees to the extent of about S32,000. ' 

As chapter 5S4 was not only a new law but represented a new 
kind of legislation, and its proNasions were necessarily elaborate, 
the practical use to which it has been subjected has uncovered 
a few minor points which it is desirable to amend. The form 
of the amendments I shall have the honor hereafter to recom- 
mend. 

The Law agaixst Spitting ix Certain Pl.\ce.s. 

Tiie act of 1906 against spitting on sidewalks and in other 
public or bcmipublic places failed in operation because it did 
not authorize the immediate arrest of offenders. The police 
had no authority other than to take names and apply for sum- 
monses; but as the names given were almost always fictitious, 
enforcement of the law became impracticable. On representa- 
tion to the Legislature an amendment was passed in 1907 ' 
which gave the right of arrest to a police officer for an ofTeuce ' 
under this law committed in his presence by a person unknown • 
to him. 

The legal machiner}- having been made effective, it became ' 

my duty to enforc-e the law. With a city of 620,000 inhabitants, 
a similar population within a dozen miles and tens of thousands 
of strangers from a distance present every day, the method of 
enforcing such a law was especially difficult to determine. The 
difficulty was not that offenders could not be detected, but that ^ 

their number at one time or another was almost coequal with 
the male portion of the people in the streets. I felt that prose- J 

cutions would be without general effect, merely imposing hard- ( 

ship upon persons ignorant of the law, unless such publicity » 

could be given to them as would sene as a general warning. I / 

therefore issued an order that, until further notice, three prose- j 

cutions a day should be made in each of the 15 land police i 

divisions. My purpose was to scatter prosecutions throughout 
the city so that the news might be carried as far as possible, 
and so that the cases might be divided among eight courts 
instead of choking the business of one. By the second day the 
newspapers, as I had expected, observed what was happening 



• 1909.] PUBLIC DOCUiLENT — No. 49. 39 

in the courts and made considerable display of it in their news 
columns, thus aiding the desirable publicity. 

This plan of forty-five prosecutions a day was followed for 
about a fortnight, when commanding oflSccrs of divisions began 
to report difficulty in obtaining the number of cases ordered. 
This was proof, additional to ray own obsen'ation, that great 
improvement had been secured in the streets. Commanding 
officers were then instructed to prosecute only such cases as 
arose, so to speak, in a natural way. The result for the poh'ce 
vear was 983 prosecutions. ITie courts have imposed fines 
ranging from SI to So, and when unusual hardship seemed to 
be involved have placed cases on file. The original instructions 
to the police were to prosecute as far as possible mature men, 
who looked as if they knew better and had the means to pay 
fines. The bad habit can ne^ er be cured completely with so great 
a number of men c-oming and going, but conditions have been 
very much improved. Cases are coming on in a natural way, 
one, two or three daily, and should the situation become bad 
again the original process will be repeated. 

I am of the opinion that die right of immediate arrest, similar 
to that containe<I in the amendment of 1907 to the "anti-spit 
law," sliould be extended to other misdemeanors which affect 
the health, cleanliness and good order of the city of Boston. 
Take, for instance, the throwing of rubbish into the streets. It 
is covered only by a city ordinance and the police have no right 
to arrest an offender. I know that the situation, especially as 
to practices actually dangerous to health, has been improved; 
but the conduct of great numbers of persons in this respect is 
still so barbarous that street litter is to be found ahnost every- 
where. City officials and private citizens have an idea that the 
pob'ce might stop the throwing of rubbish into the streets if they 
chose. The truth is that in the one offence in perhaps fifty 
which the police are in the way of witnessing the policeman is 
absolutely powerless. He sees a man, for instance, drop a 
banana skin on a crowded sidewalk. What is the e.xtent of his 
actual authority? Merely to ask the man to give his name and 
address. .\nd the man asks why; the policeman answers that 
he wants to get a summons for him to court; and the man says 
that his name and address are nobody's business, which he may 



40 POLICE CO^IMISSIONER. [Jan. 

say with impunity; but it is much more likely that he will give 
a fictitious name, or a genuine name with a genuine address fifty 
or a hundred miles away. 

It seems to me to be an absurd condition in a city of the size 
of Boston tliat the power of a policeman who witnesses a viola- 
tion of law or ordinance should be limited, because it is only a 
mbdemeanor, to asking the offender for his name and address 
in order that he may summon him to court to be fined. This 
authority is perhaps sufiicient in small places, where practically 
all persons are known to a policeman or may easily be identified, 
but in Boston it is inadequate. There are certain misdemeanors 
for which the statutes give to the police the right of immediate 
arrest and certain others in which the courts have recognized 
the right, but many which are especially offensive or dangerous 
in a large city cariy no such right. I recommend, if practicable i 

means can be found, that this situation be remedied by law. \ 

The Dog Laws. [ 

The number of dogs licensed in 190S was 11,394, an increase t 

of 832; and the fees amounted to 829,053, an increase of §2,293. | 

This gain is undoubtedly due to unusual efforts by the police, to 
which the commanding officers were urged in April. The total is I 

65 lower than the best record preWously made, in 1905, and it 
would have been the largest but for a loss of 152 in Di\'ision 9. 
Two divisions also showed losses, respectively, of 12 and 21 ; all ; 

others gained. The greatest actual gain was 212, or 39 per ceut., 
in Division 16, Back Bay; and the highest percentage of gain was 
in Division 4, La Grange Street, 60 per cent. As the conditions ( 

in neither of these divisions are such as to make probable an i 

appreciable increase in the number of dogs kept it is fair to at- 1 

tribute the gain to good police work. Division 14, Brighton, 
ranked next in actual increase, 160, or 22 per cent., and Division ;, 

5, East Dedham Street, next in percentage of increase, 26 i>er ', 

cent. This work will be pushed year by year, for every un- .' 

licensed dog represents a danger to the public, a money loss to ' 

the city and an injustice to the owners who obey the law. 
I For the second time in less than two years the police were 

charged in October by the city authorities with the duty of en- 
forcing, for three months, the laws relating to the muzzling and 



r 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

restrainino' of dogs. For the sake of a possible iniprorement of 
the legal machincr)- I feel justified in saying franklr, after two 
experiences, that the procedure which the police are required to 
follow is farcical. After the orders of the board of aldermen 
ha%-e been published in the newspapers, and the police, for the 
sake of aiding the movement, have delivered printed notices in 
hand to nearly 12,000 dog owners, the work of prosecuting per- 
sons who fail to obey is supposed to begin. 

Dogs held in leash are e.xeuipt from the muzzle wherever they 
may be, and dogs on their owners' premises from both leash and 
muzzle. A policeman finds a dog in a public street without leash 
or muzzle, identifies him if he can by the number on the collar, 
and, from the record, ascertains the name and address of the 
owner. Does he tlien summon the owner into court? Not at 
all. He obtains from the city clerk two copies of the order of the 
mayor and aldermen, which has already been delivered to all 
owners of dogs, and these copies must be attested in writing by 
the city clerk. He then ser\-es one copy i.n person on the owner 
of the dog, returns the other to the city clerk with certificate of 
sennce, and the first stage of the so-called prosecution b ended, 
without damage to any one. 

Twelve hours, according to law, must then elapse, and should 
the policeman thereafter and before the aldermanic order has 
e.vpired by limitation of time find the same dog delinquent in a 
public street he may apply for a summons for the owner. The 
owner appears in court and is fined -So, or has his case placed on 
file. 

It is evident that this whole procedure was devised without 
thought of the conditions existing in a city of the present size of 
Boston, and probably with reference only to the care of particular 
dogs of bad character. For an army of 12,000 dogs, to be re- 
strained without regard to indi\ idual temper and conduct, it is 
absurdly unfit, especially when coupled with a time limit of three 
months. It subjects the law to ridicule, the innocent police to 
undesen-ed criticism, and it justly angers the conscientious 
owner, who sees his muzzled dog under the teeth of dogs that 
ought to be muzzled but are not. 

It is not my province to join in the controversy as to whether 
or not dogs should be muzzled; but if the authorities are in 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

earnest the police should be provided with machinery that can 
be opcratetl. The reforms in the existing procedure which are 
neces-san.' to that end may be summarized as follows: — 

1. The published notice, which ib deemed sufficient for all 
other laws, orders and regulations, should suffice when dogs are 
to be muzzled. 

2. A standard form for muzzles should be established, so that 
it need not be necessary for the police to wait until a dog has 
bitten somebody in order to secure evidence that the strap or 
other contrivance wliich it was wearing over its nose was not a 
muzzle in the sight of the law. 

3. Freedom from the muzzle when on the owner's premises 
should apply only to houses or to securely enclosed land. In 
ninety-nine cases out of a hundred it is but an unobstructed step 
from a yard or a lawn to the street which offers so many tempta- 
tions to an active dog. 

4. ^^^len the order is violated the owner should be subject to 
summons, just as in the case of any other offence against law. 

5. Policemen should not be expected to handle dogs or to kill 
them unless tliey are clearly dangerous at the time. A police- 
man cannot pick up a stray dog and carrj' him to a station house, 
perhaps a mile or more distant; and the shooting of an animal 
in a city street is almost sure to involve distressing incidents and 
danger to spectators. 

I do not ask for legislation, but I deem it my duty to explain 
some of the defects of existing laws. 

Work in the Public Parks. 
The men permanently assigned to the public parks during the 
year were 2 sergeants, 20 patrolmen and 4 reserve men. Of 
these, 11 were mounted on bicycles, 5 on horsed and 1 used an 
automobile. To aid this force, details were made on Sundays, 
hohdays and special occasions, consisting of 3 lieutenants, 31 
sergeants, 754 patrolmen and 192 reserve men, — an aggregate 
of 9S0 men. On July 4, for instance, the police at Franklin 
Park, the Marine Park and Jamaica Pond numbered 164 men. 
Additional protection to the parks is given by the many men not 
assigned thereto whose routes include streets which are park 
boundaries. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCXBIENT — No. 49. 43 

The increase in police work is shown in the parks as elsewhere. 
In July, 1895, the park police, appointed by the park commis- 
sion, was incorporated in the police department under a special 
act of the Logislatui-e. The park police at that time, px-cording 
to the ncx^t preceding annual report of the commission, con- 
sisted of 1 lieutenant, 5 sergeants and 43 patrolmen, employed 
at a yearly cost of $40,787. The 2 sei^eants, 20 patrolmen and 
4 reserve men regularly assigned to the parks in 1908, with the 
entire police force on call for assistance without e.xtra expense, 
cost $29,720. 

There is no accessible record of the work done by the park 
police before they were incorporated, but as the same men, with 
additions, were retained in the parks in the years immediately 
succeeding, it is fair to assume that their work did not change 
materially. 

The first record in detail is found in the annual report of the 
Board of Police for the year ended Nov. 30, 1897. In that year 
the force assigned regularly to the parks had been increased to 
57 men, — 1 lieutenant, 5 sergeants and 51 patrolmen, — rep- 
resenting an annual cost of .$69,800. 

This park force in 1S97 made 204 prosecutions, 199 of the 
offenders being men and 5 women. Of the 204 prosecutions, 
159 were for violation of the bicycle rules, an offence which has 
now disappeared, and 45 were for all other offences. The 
regular park force in 1908, of less than half the number, and 
costing but little more than two-fifths as much, made 1,099 
prosecutions, — 1,012 men and 87 women. Of this total, 454 
were for violating automobile rules and 645 were for other 
oiTcnccs. 

The G45 prosecutions for miscellaneous offences in the parks 
in 1908 stand against 45 in 1897. Offences which would have 
been prosecutefl, whether committed in the parks or elsewhere, 
show their proportionate increase; but prosecutions for offences 
which indicate strict enforcement of special park rules are 
especially significant. 

For instance, in 1897 the number of persons prosecuted for 
driving heavy teams in park ways, for ha^nng fresh-cut flowers 
in their possession, for trespassing on cultivated ground, for 
cutting or breaking shrubs, etc., for walking on plantations. 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER, 



[Jan. 



for sleeping on grass, and for picking flowers numbered 11, and 
in 1908 the number was 94. 

In 1897 there were no other prosecutions for purely park 
offences aside from bicycles, but in 1908 the prosecutions affect- 
ing matters of order and security, such as discharging firearms 
and fireworks, gaming, placing games illegally, singing, drink- 
ing intoxicating liquors, throwing missiles and allowing dogs at 
lai^e, numbered 130. 

The park prosecutions of the year, shown according to the 
customary method, were as follows: — 





U>In 


Femals. 


ToUlL 


Dri%-ing hea%->- teams in parkways. 


1 

13 


- 


13 


Running a motor veh 

miles an hour. 
Running a motor ve'.ii 

miles an hour. 
Running a motor vehi 

miles an hour. 
Discharging firearms. 


cle fa 
cle fai 
:lefaj 


^ter t 
iter tl 
>ter tl 


ban i 
lan I( 
lan li 


i 127 

) 212 

► 115 

6 


- 


127 

212 

115 

6 


Vagrants, . 








S 


- 


S 


Disturbing the peace. 








1 


~ 


I 


Indecent assault. 








1 




1 


Indecent e.vposure, 








7 


- 


7 


-Assault and battery. 








IS 


- 


IS 


Drunkenness, 








1S2 


27 


209 


Larceny, . 








5 


- 


5 


Profanitj-, . 








3 


- 


3 


Gaming on the Lord's Day, 






19 


- 


19 


Violation of park rules, miscellaneous, 


295 


60 


355 


Totals, 








1,012 


87 


1,099 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

SusPE.\sio.N' OF Licenses. 
It is a peculiar situation that the Police Commissioner has the 
power to revoke any of the thousands of h'censes which he issues 
annually, but has not the power to suspend a license. A sus- 
pension is often a reasonable and effective measure of punish- 
ment or of discipline for an offence which does not justify 
complete revocation; but the only way in which that result can 
now be reached is the clumsy method of revoking a license and 
after a time issuing a new license to the same person. I recom- 
mend such legislation as will empower the Police Commissioner 
to suspend for a stated time any license which he has the power 
to revoke. 

Deputy Superintexde.vts. 

In order to secure the best possible organization of the police 
department, and therefore in the public interest, I recommend 
such legislation as shall provide that vacancies in the rank of 
deputy superiutendent may be filled by the PoL'ce Commissioner 
by the appointment of such members of the force as are best 
fitted, according to his judgment and experience, to hold places 
of so great importance. 

The commissioner has now full power to appoint the super- 
intendent. He may choose a member of the police department 
or a person who has never belonged to it; and under chapter 
291, Acts of 1906, he has the light to fix the salary, without 
recourse to any other authority, at any sum not exceeding 
So,000 a year. But in appointments to the position next in 
rank, that of deputy superintendent, the commissioner is bound 
by all the pro\Tsions of law which surround the promotion of a 
patrolman to be a sergeant, or, even those which attend the 
acceptance of an untried candidate to be a rescr\'e man. He 
is held within the same limits as those which apply to a deputy 
superintendent of the smallest city department. But the duties 
of a deputy superintendent of police, and his relations to the 
superintendent and to the commissioner, differ organically and 
in detail from those of a deputy superintendent in any city de- 
partment. Deputies in such departments have charge, as a 
rule, of particular bureaus or divisions, and seldom assume even 
temporarily the duties of superintendent. In the event of a 



46 POLICE CO^LMISSIONER. [Jan. 

vacancy in a Boston city department, for instance, it is not 
a deputy who is assigned to take charge of the department but, 
as provided by law, the head of another department. 

In the police department, on the other hand, which is in 
operarion twenty-four hours a day every day in the year, a 
deputy superintendent is in full charge for parts of ever^ day, 
and in the absence or disability of the superintendent steps at 
once into his place. ^loreover, as there is but one commissioner, 
and in his absence the superintendent becomes by law the acting 
commissioner, a deputy takes the place of the superintendent, 
and succeeds him, siiould it become necessary, even as acting 
commissioner. 

To this posiiioii of deputy, therefore, always important, and 
likely at times to carry supreme authority, the commissioner 
might be compelled, under existing laws, to apjwint, with full 
knowledge of the fact, officers lacking the qualities required 
for the performance even of the routine parts of the duties of a 
deputy superintendent. 

I am sure in the belief that the law should be so amended as 
to remove the police department from the danger of falling into 
such a plight. The commissioner may now appoint as superin- 
tendent a fit person, wherever found. He recommends no such 
latitude in making appointments to the rank of deputy super- 
intendent, but does recommend that the law be so amended as 
to permit him and his successors to promote to that rank the 
officer or officers already in the department who, in his or their 
judgment, may be best qualified. 

LaW.S .\NT) their EXFOKCEilE.VT. 

There are certain offences against law which all persons, even 
those guilty of them, acknowledge to be criminal. Murder, 
burglar}-, robbery, arson and the like may be called natural 
crimes; and not even a professional criminal will either argue 
to the contrary- or profess to believe that he in particular should 
be allowed to commit them. He ^vill escape if he can, but he 
never questions the propriety of the most strenuous action on 
the part of the police to catch him, to secure his punishment 
and to prevent others from following hb example. 

But only a barbarous or a half-civilized people can be content 
with laws and law enforcement which affect only the "natural" 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

crimes. Civilized life requires vcrj' much more. It cannot 
exist without innumerable laws and ordinances, designed to 
secure and to promote the comfort, health, safety and morality 
of the people. Under this head, for example, comes the whole 
body of license, sanitary and building enactments. The quality 
of these and similar laws for the public safety and comfort, and 
the degree to which they are neglected or enforced, offer the 
surest test of the civilization of a community. 

These laws, however, are disputed at every point by persons 
who know that they could liardiy live without them as a whole 
and yet insist upon their right to break such of them as they 
find inconvenient. The man who obstructs a fire escape with 
an ice chest, and feels injured because he is fined, is a firm friend 
of the law which punishes the reckless driving of an automobile; 
but the driver, while disgruntM with the automobile law and 
with the police who check his course, believes that the man of 
the ice chest was punished less than he deserved. The owner 
of a house is angry when a boy's ball breaks a pane of his glass, 
and demands that the police stop ball placing in the streets, but 
when a pob'ceman asks him to clear the snow and ice from his 
sidewalk he considers it an impertinence. The boy, on the 
other hand, and usually his parents, will regard the matter of 
the glass as a mere incident to a sport which, law or no law, 
the policeman has no right to infernipt. 

And so it goes, through an infinite variety of clashing private 
interests and indulgences, with the policeman who is doing his 
duty standing always between two fires. 

ITie weakness of our people is a lack of respect for law as law. 
A citizen \\ill demand of the police a defense of the law which 
they are enforcing at the time, contrar}- to his interest or pleasure, 
though as a matter of fact the reason for the law's existence is 
none of the business of the police. Should a policeman under- 
take to invent and enforce laws of his own the citizen would 
regard him as a crazy tyrant, but he is indignant when the poUce- 
man refuses to nullify by neglect the laws legally enacted which 
he is sworn to enforce. The citizen rejoices in moments of 
exaltation that ours is a government of laws, but when the pinch 
comes to himself he wishes it to be a government of policemen, 
— of policemen with eyes shut and ears closed. 

^^^1en such citizens ask the Police Commissioner why the 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

pob'ce have done certain things, and he answers "Because it is 

tlie law," they act as if insulted. They seem to regard such a 

reply as a mere quibble on his part, an evasion of the real issue, \ j 

which in their minds, as commonly expressed by them, is ''j 

"police interference" with something which they like to do 

even though contrary to law. •, 

Another form of remonstrance, which might be excused in an 
agitated woman whose son the police had just saved from 
hanng his head broken by coasting under an electric car in a 
forbidden street, is not too foolish to be found occasionally ou 
the editorial pages of pretentious newspapers. It runs something 
like this: "If the police would give less attention to boys coast- 
ing' ' — or to men spitting on sidewalks, or to women throwing 
slops into the street, or whatever the particular point at the time i 

may be — "and more attention to catching thieves and robbers the (s 

people of Boston," etc., etc. Policemen who do their duty in ^ 

comparatively small matters are all the more likely to do it 
when large ones come their way. No organized force needs to 
be stimulated to catch important crimiuals or to perform acts , 

of conspicuous bravery, for those are the prizes of police work. ;j 

Attention to small matters of law, moreover, interferes in no 
respect with the care of large matters. There is no particular \ 

time or place at which criminals may be caught. A policeman 
who looks into an alle\-way to see if the fire escape is clear is 
quite as likely to catch a thief half way up as he would have 
been on the next street corner, and a policeman while preventing 
boys from coasting contrary to law is just as well placed for 
catching a dangerous runaway as anjTvhere else on hb route. \ 

The record of the Boston police in the past year shows that ) 

results in small matters and in large matters can grow side by ( 

side: and to those who criticise I say that, without hurrjing and 'i 

yet without halting or turning aside, the work of enforcing all ) 

laws and ordinances, while they continue to be an obligation | 

upon the police, will be pushed steadily forward. ! 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN 0'ME.\RA, 1 

Police Commissioner for the City of Bostoti \ 



I 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 
Police Commissioner. Secretarv. 







The Police Force. 




Superintendent, 


, 


I 


Lieutenants, . 


36 


Chief inspector, 


. 


1 


Sergeants, 


86 


Captains, 




25 


Patrolmen, 


. 1,035 


Inspectors, 




30 


Reserve men, . 


. 213 


Inspector of carriages v"<-'"- 








tenant), 




1 


Total, . 


. 1,428 






Signal Service. 




Director, 




1 


Linemen, 


7 


.\s.-dstant director, 




1 


Driver, . 


1 


Foreman, 




1 




— 


Signalmen, 




6 


Total, . 


20 


Mechanics, 




3 








Employee of the Department. 




CTerks, . 


. 


10 


Hostlers, 


13 


Stenographers, 


. 


3 


.\ssistant steward of 


city 


Messengers, 




3 


prison, 


1 


Matrons of house of deten- 




Janitors, 


15 


tion. 




5 


Janitresses, 


12 


Matrons of station 


Jiouses, 


7 


Telephone operators, 


3 


Firemen on police steamers, 


S 




— 


Van drivers, . 




2 


Total, . 


S3 


Foreman of stable 




I 


• 








Itecapilulalion. 




Police force, 


, 




20 


Signal sernce, 


. 




Employees, 


• 


■ 


• 


S3 



Grand total, 1,531 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Dl.<rRIBl"TIO.\ AND Ch.WCES. 

'file distribution of the force is shown by Table I. During 
the vear 91 patrolmen were promoted from the reser\-e men, and 
196 reserve men were appointed; 1 sergeant, 12 patrolmen and 
1 reser\e man discharged; .5 patrolmen and 5 resene men re- 
signe<I; 1 deputy, 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants and 12 
patrolmen retired on pension; 1 inspector, 1 lieutenant, 1 ser- 
geant and 7 patrolmen «lie<l. (See Tables III., IV., \'., VT.) 

Police Ofticer*; ixjvred while ox Duty. 

'llie following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of duties 
lost by them on account thereof and the causes of the injuries: — 



Hew I3jrK£D. 


Number o( 
Me:^ injured. 


Duties lost. 


Continues sick on account of injuries received in 




2 


6S5 


1907. 








In arresting prisoner.*. ..... 




14 


1S6 


In pursuing criminals, 




7 


39S 


By stopping runaways, ..... 




4 


2.5 


By cars and other vehicles at cros-stngs. 




4 


196 


Various other causes, 




23 


2S4 


Totals, 


54 


1,774 



Work of the Dep.\rtme.\t. 
A tresis. 
'ITie total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest as 
that of a separate person, was 68,146, against 57,078 the preced- 
ing year, being an increase of 11,068. The percentage of in- 
crease was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person, .... Increase, 20.54 

Offences against property, committed with vio- 
lence, ........ Increase, 29.34 

Offences against property, committed without vio- 
lence, ........ Increase, 32.50 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOC U.MENT — No. 49. 



51 



Malicious offences against proi)erty, 
Forgen- and offences against the currency, 
Offenc-es against the license laws, 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc., 
Offenc-es not included in the foregoing,. 



Percent. 

Increase, 12.12 

Increase, 42.00 

Increase, 174.17 

Increase, 37 . SO 

Increase, 17.13 



There were 6,(XS7 persons arrested on warrants and 56,057 
without warrants; 6,002 persons were summoned by the court; 
64,901 persons were held for trial and 3,245 were releasetl from 
custody. The number of males arrested was 61,552; of females, 
6,594; of foreigners, 31,262, or, appro.ximately, 45.S7 per cent.; 
of minors, 8,798. Of the total number arrested, 26,113, or 38.32 
per cent., were nonresidents. (See Tables X., XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States, 

British Pro\inces, 

Ireland, . 

England, 

France, . 

Germany, 

Italy, 

Russia, . 

China, 

Greece, . 

.Sweden, . 

Scotland, 

Spain, 

Norway, 

Poland, . 

Australia, 

-Austria, . 

Portugal, 

Finland, . 

Denmark, 

Holbnd. 



.36,SS4 


Wales, . 


5,.358 


East Indies, 


13,678 


West Indies, 


1,769 


Turkey, . 


128 


South .\merica 


487 


Switzerland, 


2,.568 


Belgium, 


2.837 


.\rmenia, 


.52.5 


.\frica, . 


401 


Hungary, 


1,051 


.\sia, 


879 


.\rabia, . 


43 


Mexico, . 


290 


Japan, 


.391 


Syria, . 


21 


Roumania, 


108 


Cuba, 


SO ' 


Bohemia, 


129 1 


Malay, . 


97 




19 i 


Total, 



29 

2.3 

85 

104 

14 

16 

35 

13 

9 

12 

11 

4 

3 

5 

35 

I 

1 

2 

1 



68,146 



'i'he number of arrests for the year is 68,146, being an increase 
of 11, 068 over last year, and 13,-395 more than the average for the 
past five years. 'Hiere were 42,468 persons arrested for drunk- 
enness, being 5,079 more than last year, and 0,769 more than the 
average for the past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness 
this year, there was an increase of 11.43 percent, in males and 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

an increase of 6.25 per cent, in females from last year. (See 
Tables XI., XII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (68,146), 925 were 
for ^^olations of tlie city ordinances; that is to say, 1 arrest in 74 
was for such offence, or 1.36 per cent. j 

Fifty-five and ninety hundredths per cent, of the persons taken 
into custody were between the ages of twenty and fort}-. (See i 

Table XIII*.) 

Tlie number of persons punished by fines was 15,7.3-5, and the 
fines amounted to .5159,982.61 (See Table XII.) j 

One hundred and sixty-two persons were committed to the j 

State Prison, 6,244 to the House of Correction, 141 to the ' 

Women's Prison, 268 to the Reformatory Prison and 2,068 
to other institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 
•3,904 j"j; the total number of days' attendance in court by of- » 

fic-ers was 42,597; and the witness fees earned by them amounted * 

to $13,251.65. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was j 

.S-91,0.54.S.S. { 

Sixty witnesses were detained at station houses; 72 persons 
were accommodated with lodgings, — an increase of 4.53.84 per 
cent, from last year. There was an increase of about 3.97 per \ 

cent, from last year in the number of insane persons taken in 
charge, a decrease of about 8.31 per cent, in the number of sick , 

and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 8.94 per \ 

cent, in the number of lost children cared for. / 

The average amount of property reported stolen in the city for | 

the five years from 1901 to 1908, inclusive, was 8138,714.01; in I 

1908 it was 8150,256.71, or 811,542.70 more than the average. ' j 

The amount of property reported stolen in and out of the city, | 

which was recovered by the Boston police, was S217,.5S9.67, as / 

against 8197,620.44 last year, or 819,969.23 more. \ 

The average amount of fines imposed by courts for the five 
years from 1904 to 1908, inclusive, was 8116,892.91; in 1908 it -. . 

was SI 59,982.61 , or 843,089.70 more than the average. ' f 

Tlie average number of days' attendance in court was 37,- 
766.2; in 1908 it was 42,597, or 4,830.8 more than the average. || 

The average amount of witness fees earned was 810,976.70; in 
1908 it was 813,251.6.5, or 82,274.95 more than the average. 
(See Table XII.) 



< 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 53 



Drunkcnne.is. 
Ill arrests for drunkenness, the average number per day was 
116+ . There were 5,079 more persons arrested than in 1907, — 
an increase of 13.58 per cent.; 47.-50 per cent, of the arrested 
persons were nonresidents and 4S.73 per cent, were of foreign 
birth. ^See Table XL) 

Bureau 0/ Criminal Inveslifjation. 
The "Rogues' Gailerv" now contains 29,848 photographs, — 
23,051 of whicli are photographs with Bertillon measurements, 
a svstem used by this department during the past ten years. In 
accordance with an act passed by the Legislature March 28, 
1899 (chapter 203, sections 1 and 2), we are allowed photographs, 
witli Bertillon measurements, of all convicts now in the several 
prisons in this State, and of those who have been confined there 
and who are measured under that system and photographs taken, 
— a number of which have already been added to our Bertillon 
cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the system by 
this department in 1898, is and will continue to be of great as- 
sistance in the identification of criminals. A large number of 
important identifications have thus Ijeen made during the year, 
for this and other jjolice departments, through which the sen- 
tences in mn.iiy instances have been materially increased. The 
records of G57 criminals have been added to the records kept 
in this bureau, which iiow contains a total of 30,860. The num- 
ber of cases reported at this office which have been investigated 
during the year is 11,652. 'ITiere are 18,893 cases recorded on 
the assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports made 
on these cases are file<l away for future reference. Letters and 
telegrams to the number of alx)ut 2,704 yearly are now filed with 
the numbered reports to which they refer, so that all the papers 
pertaining to a case can l)e found in the same envelope, thus 
simplifring the matters when information is desiretl on anv case. 
The system of indexing, a<lopte<I by this bureau for the use of 
the department, now contains a list of records, histories, photo- 
graplis, dates of arrests, etc., of alwut 110,000 persons. There 
are also "histories and press clippings," now numbering 6,025, 
by this Bureau, in envelope form, for police reference. 



54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



'I'lie fijigcr-print system of identification, which wiis adopted 
in Juno, 1906, lias progri'sse<l in a satisfactory manner, and with 
its development it is expecte<l that the identification of criminals 
will be facilitated. It has betome very useful in tracing crim- 
inals and furnishing corrolxirative evidence when serious crimes 
have l)een committed. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the senice are in- 
clude<l in the statement of the general work of the department: 
but as tiie duties are of a special character, the following state- 
ment will be of interest: — 



Xunibcr of jxirsons arrested, priiiripully for felonies, . . 1,241 

Fugitives from justice from other .States, arrested and delivered 
to officers from those .States, ...... 

XumlxT of cases investigated, ...... 

Number of exf r.-i duties performed, ..... 

XuMibcr of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 

gatetl, and evidence prepared for trial in court, . 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated, and evidence prepared for court, .... 

Number of days spent in court by officers, .... 

.\mount of stolen pioi>crly recovered, . 8119,140.07 

.\niount of fines imposed by court, .... S21,73S.51 

Number of years' imprisoimient imposed by court, 972 years, S months 
Number of photograjjhs addetl to the "' Rogues' Gallery," 2,222 



Gl 

12,.500 

3,>25 



15 

3,960 



.1 

I! 



MifcellaiifOiis Business. 





190S-««. 


I90C-0T. 


1 SOT-OS. 


.\bandoiied children cared for, 


24 


25 


33 


.\ccidonts reported, .... 


2,.5.>5 


2,S30 


2,579 


Buildings found open and made secure, 


2,4S1 


2,509 


2,.5.59 


Cases investigated, .... 


24,491 


21,559 


24,397 


Dangerous buildings rc|K>rted, 


27 


60 


29 


Dangerous chimneys rc])orted, 


•5 


50 


41 


Dead bodies cared for, 


237 


3:36 


279 


Dead bodies recovered, 


_ 


- 


32 


Defective bridges reported, . 


1 


5 


5 


Defective bulkheads, . . 


_ 


_ 


2 


Defective cesspools rcpfineil. 


1.50 


211 


1.33 


Dcfe<-tivc coal holes, .... 


_ 


•i 


9 


Defective drains and vaults re|Kirted, . 


•5 


4 


3 


Defective fire alarms and clocks re|)orted, 


Xi 





9 


Defective gas pipes rei)orte<l. 


G4 


45 


40 


Defective hydrants reponed. 


07 


64 


S7 



i/ 






1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCU.MEXT — No. 49. 



55 



Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



i»*;i-«e. 


l»0«-«7. 


1M7-44. 


Defective lamps reported, . 


. -1.837 


9,187 


S,92S 


Defective fences, .... 




19 


31 


Defective sign^, ..... 




1 


2 


Defective sewers reported, . 


48 


41 


28 


Defective .<treets and walks reported, . 


9,.571 


8,572 


8,726 


Defective trees, ..... 


- 


- 


14 


Defective water gates, 


~ 


- 


3 


Defective water pijx-s reported. 


125 


1.57 


250 


Defective wires and poles reported. 


40 


30 


7 


Disturbances suppressed, 


1,170 


5.5.5 


a50 


Extra duties |)erformed, 


-31,165 


46,937 


34,206 


Fire alarms given. .... 


1.447 


2,136 


2.236 


Fires e-xtingui.-^hed. .... 


572 


796 


700 


Insane per.^jns taken in charge, . 


.•}S6 


403 


410 


Intoxicated |x;rsons a.s.sisted. 


14 


11 


36 


Lost children restored. 


1.6S7 


1,498 


1,6.37 


Mi.ssing i)ersons re|)orted, 


347 


318 


267 


Mis.sing i)ersons found, 


1.38 


1.52 


1.55 


Per.<ons rescued from ilrowning, . 


20 


13 


28 


Sick and injunxi persons assisted. 


4,264 


4,61S 


4,234 


Stray teams reported and put up, 


195 


201 


131 


Street obstructions removed. 


26,929 


28,576 


24,244 


.Suicide reported, .... 




- 


1 


Water running to waste reported. 


254 


2.54 


322 


Witnesses detained, .... 


111 


SS 


60 



I^xl, Abandoned and Stolen Propcriij. 

On the 1st of December, 1907, then? were 39G articles of lost, 
abandone<l or stoieti property in the custody of the property 
clerk; 503 were received during the year, 601 were sold, for 
which .S5S1..53 was received and paid over to tlie city collector, 
and 11 delivered to owners, finders or administrators, 46 to the 
chief of the District Police, leading 241 on hand. 



Speci.\l E\'Evrs. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



I90T. 


Dec. 


s, 


I90N. 


Jan. 


6, 


Jan. 


s, 


Jan. 


29, 


Feb. 


12, 


Meh. 


17, 


April 


12, 


April 


12, 


May 


25, 


Nfay 


29, 


May 


30, 


May 


30, 


June 


1, 


June 


16, 


June 


17, 


July 


s, 


Julv 


22 


July 


23! 


Aug. 


4, 


.\ug. 


5, 


Sept. 





Sept. 


~, 


Sept. 


30, 


Oct. 


2S, 


Oct. 


30, 


Xov. 


1, 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


". 


Xov. 


11, 


Nov. 


14, 


Nov. 


21, 


Nov. 


21, 



Funeral of Edward Cohen, president Massachusetts 
Branch, .\inerican Federation of Labor, . 

Inaugural of mayor and city council. 

Police ball, ..... 

Investiture of the pallium on .\rchbishop O'Connell 

Firemen's ball. 

Evacuation Day, . 

Detail at Chelsea fire. 

Detail at East Boston fire, 

Barnum & Bailey's circus parade. 

School regiment parade. 

Work horse parade, 

Harvard-Cornell boat race, 

.\ncient and Honorable .Artillery parade. 

The "night before," in Charlestown, 

Anniversarj-, battle of Bunker Hill, 

Fire, East Boston dock.e. 

Detail at Jamaica Plain,. 

Detail at Forest Hills Cemetery, 

Knights of Pythias parade. 

Knights of Pythias parade. 

United Spanish War Veterans parade. 

Labor Day parade. 

Fire, Winchester Street, 

Celebration of Catholic centenary, . 

Republican intercollegiate torchlight parade. 

Parade of the Holy Name societies. 

Bulletin boards. State election, 

Harvard-Carlisle football game. 

Parade of .\ncient Order of Hibernians, 

Harvard-Dartmouth football game, 

Bulletin boards, Harvard-Yale game at New Haven, 

Special detail at Division 4, football night, 



Men. 



50 

S9 
1.55 

5.5 
220 
100 
162 

5-5 
425 
127 

96 
235 
215 
537 
140 
23S 
23S 
659 
6S1 
727 
7S6 

71 
195 
644 
530 
333 

SI 
125 
111 

9S 
175 



I.NSPECTOR OF Cl..\IMS. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and law 
department in investigating claims against the city for alleged 
damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 54S cases, 
1 1 of which were on account of damage done by dogs, resuhing 
in the killing of 77 liens, 1 duck, 1 cow, 9 guinea pigs and 1 dog. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



57 



Officers detailed to assist ^Iedicu- E.xaminers. 

The officers detailed from the Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion to assist the medical examiners of Suffolk County report 
having investigated 1,114 deaths and attended 247 inquests, as 
follows: — 



K.- Ut€-^C ■> I'y A 

Accident, . 


-/■tut./* KIk 

101 


\> (*.3f>^ Ifl ( cot l^A^CU. 

Honoicidc, 


6 


Alcoholism, 


1.5 


.Manslaughter. . 


12 


.V-:|)hyxiation (gas), . 


2.3 


Munler. . 


6 


A*ii!i\-xiation (smoke). 


1 


Natural caosss. 


390 


Automobile, 


. 10 


Poison, 


17 


Abortion. . 


4 


Railroad accident. 


SO 


Burns. 


. S:J 


.Street railway accident, 


3.5 


Dromiing. 


5S 


.Stillborn, . 


12 


Electricity. 


2 


.StranguLatioo. . 


S 


Elevator, . 


•» 


Suffocation, 


6 


Explosion. 


« 


Suicide. . 


122 


Exiwsure, 


.3 








Exhaustion, 


2 


Total, 


1,114 


Causes of Death i 


n Cases ichere Inquest* \rere held. 




Alx>rtion, . 


■t 


.\sph_vxiatioo- . 


1 


Automobile, 


4 


Crushed by «lrawbridgc, 


1 


Burns. 


2 


Drowning, 


3 


Elevators,. 


2.> 


Falling iron. 


4 


Electricity, 


4 


^lachinerj'. 


5 


Explosion, 


i 


Natural causes. 


4 


Falls, 


•23 


Railroad, . 


S2 


Falling lumber, 


6 


Railway (street). 


30 


Fire ongine, 


3 


Suffocation. 


6 


Horse. 


I 


Shooting, . 


1 


Hose wagon. 


1 


Teams, . . . 


22 


Poison, 


•> 







Struck by baseball, . 


1 


Total. 


247 


Homicide, 


7 







Hoi'sE OF Detention-. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court house, 
Somerset Street. .\11 the women arreste<I in the city proper are 
taken to the house of detention in vans pronded for the purpose. 
They are then held in charge of the matron until the ne.\t session 
of the court before which they are to appear. If sentenced to 



oS POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

imprisonment, they are returned to the house of detention, and 
from there conveyed to the jail or institution to which they have 
l>een sentenced. 

Diiring the vear there were 5,600 women committed, viz.: — 



.( 



For drunkenness, ........ 3,066 V'. 

For larceny, ......... 500 

For night walking 229 

For fornication, ......... 138 

For insanity, ......... 121 

For being idle and disorderly, ...... 79 

For as.sault and battery, ....... 35 

For adulter}-, .... ..... 26 

For violation of the liquor law, . ..... 26 

For keeping a house of ill fame, ...... 53 

For witnesses, ......... 5 

For county jail, ......... 9S9 

For municipal court, ........ 175 

For various other offences, ....... 158 

Total, 5,600 

Police Signal Service. ' 

Signal Boxes. \ 

'ITie changes in the signal boxes during the year consisted of 
installing 2 new bo.xes, 1 on Division 11 and I on Division 2. 
The total number of lx).\es now in use Is 461. Of these, 261 are 
connected with the underground system ami 200 with the over- 
head. 

M i.tcellancou.f Work. 

During the year the employees of this ser\-ice responded to 
1,076 trouble calls; inspectetl 461 signal Iwxes, 15 signal desks 
and 921 batteries; repaired 103 box movements, 12 regi.sters, 
28 polar box bells, S7 locks, 3 plungers, 14 time stamps, 6 gongs, 
4 stable motors, 2 stable registers, 4 \ibrator bells, besides re- 
pairing all bell and electric light work at headquarters and the 
various .>tations. There have been made 4 bells, 90 ratchets, 
16 plungers, 1.50 complete box fittings, 16 movement slides, 3 
auto traps and a large amotmt of small work that cannot be 
clas.sified. 

During the year ail the telephone instniments usetl in the i 

' 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

signal system were removed and returned to the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company, of whom they were leased. 
They were replaced by instruments bought and owiied by the 
department, thereby saving the yearly rental. 

The telephone system in connection with the signal boxes at 
Division 14 is made practically useless by induction from high- 
tension wires. The wires on a portion of the district, the main 
streets, should be placed underground, to remedy the trouble. 

There are in use in the signal senice 27 horses, 19 patrol 
wagons and 13 pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 40,2.3.5 runs, covering an 
aggregate distance of 34, .3.58 miles. There were 39,469 prison- 
ers conveyed to the station houses; S2S nins were made to take 
injured and insane persons to station houses, the hospitals or 
their homes; and .)26 runs were made to take lost children to 
station houses. There were 743 runs to fires and 51 runs for 
liquor seizures. During the year there were 461 signal l>oxes in 
use, arranged on 60 circuits; 490,000 telephone messages and 
3,229,204 "on-<luty " calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal senice 
at the present time: — 



1.^ signal desks. 

60 circuits. 

461 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call hoards. 

41 lest boxes. 

021 cells of bat tcr>-. 

71 miles underground cable. 

70 miles overhead cahle. 

7i miles of duct. 



4.5 manholes. 
1 buggy. 
1 line wagon. 
I express w.igon. 
1 mugwump wagon. 

1 traverse pung. 

2 small sleighs. 
1 caravan. 



Harbor Service. 

The special duties performeil by the police of Division S, com- 
prising the harl)or and the islands therein, were as follows: — 

Vahic of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float 

stages, etc. S24,.5S.3 

Number of vessels from foreign ports boarded, . 691 

XumlxT of vessels ordered from the channel to proj^r anchorage, 1 ,.SS4 
Number of vessels removed from the channel bv i)olice steamers, 66 
Number of cases of assistance rendered,. .... 163 



60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Number of cases of assistance rendered to wharfingers, . 
XiiniV>er of permits granted vessels, in the stream, to discharge 
cargoes, ........ 

Number of obstructions removed from channel, 

Number of alarms of fire on the water front attended, 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm, . 

Number of boats challenged. 

Sick and injured persons assisted. 

Cases investigated, ...... 

Dead bodies recovered, .... 

Dead bodies cared for, .... 

Rescued from drowning, ..... 

Number of vessels ordered to put up anchor lights. 
Number of vessels assigned to anchorage, 
Steamers escorted, outgoing and incoming, 



20 

49 

27 

129 

4 

1,S92 

10 

.587 

32 

6 

2 

36 
967 
2a5 



The total niniiber of vessels that arrived in this port during the 
year was 9,976. Of this number, S,.522 came from domestic 
f)orts, 763 from ports in the British Provinces and 691 from 
foreign ports. Of the latter, 648 were steamers, .5 ships, 21 
barks and 17 schooners. 

The police boat "Ferret" was in commission from June 16 to 
October 4, in the v/aters of the South Bay. She did good ser- 
vice; covered 3,850 miles, made 4 arrests for larceny and 12 for 
dnmkenness; secured and returned to the owners several vessels 
found adrift; rendered assistance to persons found in a disabled 
power-boat; quelled 30 disturbances on different vessels and in- 
vestigated 35 cases of difTerent kinds that had been reportetl. 



HoasE.'s. 
On the 1st of December, 1907, there were 8S horses in the ser- 
vice. During the year 6 were solil, 10 purchased, 2 shot on 
account of being disabled and 2 died. .\t the present time there 
are SS in ser\-ice, as shown bv Table IX. 



Vehicle Service. 

Automobiles. 

.\utomobile Xo. 820, a steam runabout, has been in sen-ice 

since June, 1905. It was on dutv 266 davs during the vear and 

covered a distance of 13,572 miles in the streets of the West 

Ro.xbury district. The operating patrolman responded to 19 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 61 

alarms of fire, investigated 102 cases, conveyed 4 lost children 
to their homes and made 29 arrests. He cautioned many opera- 
tors reganling the speetl limit. 

Automobile No. 1 1517 has been in ser\icc since May 29, 190S. 
It was on duty 14.5 days and covered a distance of 7,250 miles on 
the outlying streets of the Dorchester district. The operating 
patrolman made 3S arrests, conveyer! 29 prisoners to the station, 
7 lost children to their homes, responded to 17 alarms of fire, 
cautioned 2.3 automobile operators and investigated 115 cases. 
.Automobile No. S23, a steam runabout, was purchased and 
put in commission June 29, 1907; was on duty in the parkways 
.31 1 days during the year. The operating patrolman made 39 
arrests ami cautione<l many automobile operators regarding the 
speed limit. 

Automobile No. S22, a steam runabout, was purchased July 
13, 1907. It was put in commission July 16, 1907; was on duty 
in the streets and parks in the Back Bay district 31S days during 
the year. The operating patrolman made 300 arrests for viola- 
tion of the automobile law, and cautioned many automobile 
operators regarding the speed limit. 

Automobile No. 130S0, a steam touring car, has been in ser- 
vice since June 9, 1908. It is used for the general work of in- 
spection by the officials of the department. 

Automobiles No. 9601, No. 4711 and No. 23SS were con- 
demned by a board of inspection as unfit for further use in the 
department, and were given in exchange as part payment for 
car No. I30SO. 

Cost oj runninij Aulomobiles. 

Pay of officers, S3,419 01 

Repairs 1_112 52 

Tire^ 1,514 79 

Gasolene, 689 20 

Oi' 99 SS 

Rent of garage . . 716 00 

TotaJ 57551 49 

Ambulances. 
The department is now equipped wnth 10 ambulances, located 
in the following polict.- divisions: 1, 4, 0, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 and 
16. 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

During the year the ambulances responded to calLs to convey 
sick or injuretl persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 1,140 

Gty Hospital (Relief Station), ISO 

Massat-ijusetts General Hospital, ...... 114 

E3<t Boston Relief Station, 2S 

Carney Hospital,. . . .... 11 

Lxing-iii Hospital, ........ S 

Faulkner Hospital, ........ 4 

Emergeacy Hoispital, ........ 3 

HomcEopathic Hospital, ....... 2 

.St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 1 

Metcalf HospitaJ, Winthrop, ...... 1 

Marine Hospital, ........ 1 

Emersoa Hospital, ........ 1 

Bay .Stale Road Hospital 1 

.St. Mary's Infant .\syluni, ....... 1 

Chardoa Street Home, ....... 1 

Soldiers' Home, Chelsea, ....... 1 

Calls where services were not recjuired, . . . . .147 

Home 100 

Police station houses, . . . ..... 1 1 

Morgue, .......... 29 

From fires, ......... 3 

Charles Street Jail, 3 

City Prison, 1 

Undertakers, ......... 2 

Engine House Xo. 26, . . . . . . . 1 

Ladder House Xo. 12, 1 \ 

Chebea fire, ......... 1 S 

j 

Total, 2,097 \ 



I 



! 

1 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



63 





List of Vehicles 


ii.ifd 


bi/ the Department. 






DrniioX5. * 


c 

1 

J 
5 


9 


5 = 

_3 .<* 


i 

■< 


i 

'1 


i 

CO 


1 

e2 


Headquarters, 




- 




1 


i 

: 

1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Di\'i>ioii 1, 










- 


1 i - 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Dnision 2, 










- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Di\"ision 3, 








- 


- 


' M " 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di\T5ioii 4, 










- 


1 




1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5, 










- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di%'i5ion 6, 








- 


- 


1 




1 


- 


- 


3 


Di\"ision 7, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Di\-ision S, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Di\ision 9, 








- 


- 






- 


1 


- 


3 


Di\-ijion 10, 








- 


- 


1 




1 


- 




3 


Di\-iaion 11, 






1 


- 


1 


, 1 
1 1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Di\-i*ion 12, 






J 


- 


- 




- 




- 


- 


<> 


Di\-i*ion 13, 








- 


1 




- 


1 


2 


1 


7 


Di\Tsion 14, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


1 


5 


Di\-ision 15, 








- 


- 






1 


_ 


- 


3 


Division IG, 








- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


a 


Joy i^treet stable, 




1 


4 


- 


1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


22 


Totals, . 




19 i 

1 


4 


o 


13 j 4 

1 i 


12 


9 


7 


73 



Plbi-ic Carriages. 
During the year tlierc were l,Go3 carriage licenses granted, 
Ining an increase of 4S as conipare<l with last year; 101 motor 
carriages were liceiiseti, l>eing an increa.se of SO as compared 
with last vear. 



64 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



There Ii.ns been a decrease of 38 in the number of horse-draTVTi 
h'censed carriages during the year. 

There were 103 carriages rejected on first inspection, but the 
<!efects being sh'glit and having been remedied, they were sulj- 
setjuently re-inspected and passed. 

There were 87 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were turned over to the 
inspector; 20 of these were restored to the owners, and the 
balanc-e placed in the keeping of the lost property bureau. 

The following is a detailed statement concerning licenses for 
public carriages and for the drivers of hacks and cabs: — 



Xnjiiber of applications for carriage licenses received, 

Number of applications for carriage licenses refused, 

Xnanber of carriages licensed. 

Xnmber of licenses transferred, 

Number of licenses cancelled or revoked. 

Number of carriages inspected, 

Number of carriages rejected, 

Number of carriages reinspected and passed, . 

Aiq)lications for drivers' licenses reported upon, 

Number of complaints against drivers investigated, 

Number of warrants obtained. 

Number of days spent in court, 

Articles left in carriages, reported by citizens, 

Arndes found in carriages, reported by drivers, 

Diivers' apjilications for licenses rejected. 



1,655 

1 

1,6.53 

99 

69 

1,6-53 

none 

103 

1,5S0 

125 

14 

9 

25 

62 

3 



W.\GOx Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise from 
place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 5,350 applications for such licenses were re- 
ceived, 5,346 of which were granted and 4 rejected. 

Of the licenses granted, 54 were subsequently cancelled for 
nonpaxTnent of the license fee, 28 for other causes, and 21 trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., XVI.) 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 



Listing ^La.le Residents of Boston, etc. 



Ytut. 


iiij Canvass. 


SupplemmUl IWuMd 
AppUatwa. CertlScsta. 


Crirttd 
CerUfic»t«s. 


Total Men 
listed. 


1903, 


181,045 


3,412 


53 


3,359 


184,404 


1904, 


193,195 


1,335 


55 


1,280 


194,475 


190.5, 


194,547 


705 


S 


097 


195,244 


1906, 


195,446 


775 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, 


195,900 


782 


28 


754 


196,654 


190S, 


201,255 


1,302 


57 


1,245 


202,500 



1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 

i9as. 



U'omen Voters verified. 



(See Tables XX., XXI., XXII.) 



14,611 
15,633 
14,591 
13,427 
12,822 
11,915 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not incliuling tlic services 
rendered by the members of the f»oIice forct*, wore as follows: — 

Printing, SI 6,643 75 

Clerical service, 0,-533 19 

Cards, 1,1G3 37 

Interpreters, ........ 1,025 52 

Stationery, 4S0 31 



Total S25,S46 14 



Xumbcr of PoUamcn enip!oi/nl in Lifting. 



Mav 


1, 






Mav 


o 






Mav 


3, 






Mav 


4, 






May 


G, 







1,007 

909 

826 

500 

78 



66 POLICE COJDIISSIONER. [Jan. 

t 

i 

Speclu. Police. f 

Special police officers arc appointed to serve without pay from ? 
the cin', on the written application of any officer or board in 

chaise of a department of the city of Boston, or on the appiica- '■ ' 

tion of any responsible corporation or person, such corporation ' 

or pcrs'jii to be liable for the official misconduct of the person j) 

appoiatt-d. }■ 

During the year ending November 30 there were 614 special i 

police officers appointed; 3 applications for appointment were ,| 

refuse*! for cause. j. 

j 

For city departments, ........ 151 / 

For Stile departments, ....... 7 i 

For railrotd corporations, ....... 129 

For oihsT corporations or associations, ..... 131 i 

For ibssiires and other pla«s of ainusement, .... 140 ' 

For private institutions, ....... 51 i 

For churches, ......... 5 1 

Total. 6U ( 



R.*iLROAD Police. >{ 

'1 



There were 11 persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 4 of whom are employees of the Xew York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad, and 7 of the Boston Terminal Company. 

Mlsceluxeous Licenses. 

The total number of licenses bsued of all kinds was 23,558; 
transferred, 163; cancelled and revoked, 2,077. The officers in- 
vestigated 412 complaints arising under these licenses. The fees 
colIect«l and paid into the city treasun,' amounted to $50,078.25. 
(See Tal>le XIV.) 

McsicLocs' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 
During the year there were 214 applications for itinerant 
musicJams* licenses received, ISo of which were granted, 21 re- 
jc-cted and S are pending. Of the licenses granted, 4 were sub- 
sequently cancelled on account of tlie nonpajTnent of the license 



I 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



67 



fee, id were surrendered and cancelled, and others issued in their 
stead, and 4 revoked, leaving 162 in force. 

The ofScer detailed for this special service reports that during 
the vear he examined 125 instruments, as follows: — 





Inspected. 


Pisstd. 


Condemned. 


Street organs, .... 


64 


62 


2 


Hand organs, 










13 


13 


- 


Violins, . 










l.j 


15 


- 


Harps, 










IS 


IS 


- 


Flutes, 










o 


o 


- 


Accordeons, 










1 


1 


- 


Guitars, . 










3 


3 


- 


Bagpipes, 










1 


- 


1 


Banjos, 










3 


3 


- 


>randolins, 










1 


1 


- 


Ocarina, . 










1 


1 


- 


Totals, 










125 


122 


3 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over fifteen years of age to play on musical instruments in com- 
pany with designated processions, at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five vears and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Yeve. 


Applications, 


Granted. 


Rejccte.1. 


1904, 


no 


104 


6 


1905, 


lis 


112 


6 


1906, 


157 


156 


1 


1907, 


1.54 


152 


9 


1908, 


172 


172 


— 



Public Lodging Hou.se.s. 

Every building in the city of Boston, not licensed as an inn, 
in which 10 or more persons are lodged for twenty-five cents or 
less each per night, is a public Imlging house, under chapter 242 
of the Acts of 1904; and the Police Commissioner is authorized 



6S 



POUCE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



to grant licenses to such lodging houses after the inspector of 
buildings has certified that the building is provided with proper 
e.xits and appliances for giving alarm to the inmates in case of 
fire, and the Board of Health has certified that the sanitary con- 
dition is satisfactory. Under this law 20 applications for licenses 
were received, 19 of them were granted and 1 is pending. 

The following shows the location of the licensed lodging houses 
and the number of persons lodged in each during the year: — 



Locinos. 


Xumber lodged. 


19 Causeway Street, 












8,920 


164 Commercial Street, . 












19,589 


194 Commercial Street, . 












35,984 


234 Commercial Street, . 












13,538 


23S Commercial Street, . 












11,160 


242-246 Commercial Street, 












25,145 


17 Da\-is Street, 












48,178 


42 Eastern .A.venue, 












27,431 


39 Edinborough Street, . 












18,355 


120 Eliot Street, 












49,057 


37 Green Street, . 












35,293 


1S7 Hanover Street, 












51,986 


67 Pleasant Street, 












21,542 


8S6 Washington Street, . 












77,269 


1025 Washington Street, . 












23,396 


1051 AVashington Street, , 












43,727 


1066 Washington Street, . 












15,588 


1093 Washington Street, . 












27,440 


1202 Washington Street, . 












35,030 


Total, .... 


588,628 



.!» 



.f 



r 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 69 



Pensions ant) Benefits. 

Dec. 1, 1907, there were 208 pensioners on the roll. During the 
year 17 died and 1 was dropped from the roll, viz., 1 captain, 1 in- 
spector, 1 lieutenant, 14 patrolmen and a patrolman's children 
who had attained the age of sixteen years or more; and IS were 
added, ^-iz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 2 ser- 
geants, 12 patrolmen and the mother of Patrolman L\-nch, leaving 
20S on the roll at date, including the widows of 1 1 and the mother 
of 1 policeman, wlio died from injuries received in the service. 

The pa}Tnents on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to .$1.31,720.18, and it is estimated that §132,907.50 
will be required for pensions in 1909. This does not include 
pensions for 1 inspector and 3 patrolmen, all of whom are si.xty- 
five years or over, and are entitled to be pensioned on account ■ 

of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the 30tli of 
November last amounted to $207,550. There are 65 benefi- 
ciaries at the present time, and there has been paid to them the 
sum of .$",.526.49 during the past year. 

The invested fund of the Police Relief Association on the 30th 
of NovemJjer was .$109,252.99. 

FlN.A.XCt\L. 

A requisition was made on the city council for the sum of 
S2,102,22G..5.S to meet the nmning e.vpenses of the department, 
including the pensioned police officers, house of detention, sta- 
tion house matrons, listing persons twenty years of age or more ! 
and [Kjlice signal service for the financial year. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including the pensions, house of detention, station house 
matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but // 

exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal sen'ice, were 
.$2,000,910.75. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over wliicli the police have supenision, and for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned propertv, etc., was $51,672.37. 
(See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining tiie police signal senice during the 
year was $.55.4 1 2.19. fSce Tal)Ie XVIII.') 



70 



POLICE CO^tNUSSIONER. 



[Jan. 







-Birjox 


--- ' -SgSS§22"=^ 




aopDdpQjodcnog 


1 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




■aoLuag l«u?s 


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1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 



t I I I t I I c^ I • I — 



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71 



72 



POLICE COALMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





1 

•3 

J 


Pneumonia. 

Heart disease. 

Tuberculosis. 

Apoplexy. 

Septictcniia. 

Pulmonary phthisis. 

Suicide. 

Abilominal hemorrhage. 

Bright's disease. 

Heart disease. 


..=: 


g § § g g g g g- s g- 






June 7, 1 
March 3, 1 
Sept. 18, 1 
April G, 1 
June 12, 1 
March 29, 1 
June 15, ' 
Jan. 16, 1 
Dec. 17, 1 
March 3. 1 


S 
-a 


1 3 


O p* O CO O O lT fl C? 33 


3 2 

'i 
t 

8 


■< 


John C. Blake, .... 

Ostar E. Boynton, 

Charles A. Dolalier, . 

John J. Fitzgerald, 

Everett H. Gould, 

Michael J. Kelly, 

Albert E. Knight, 

John T. Lynch 

Lobbeus B. McCausliiiid, 
Itichard J. Neagle, 


"5" 

•5 


ji 


Patrolman, .... 
Lieutenant, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Patrolman, .... 
Inspector, .... 
Sergeant, .... 



I 

i 



I 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



73 



Table III. 



List oj Officers retired during the Year, giving Age at the Time of Retire- 
ment and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



XillE. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


An at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Senrice, 


Badger, Charles A., 


Incapacitated, 


51 years, 


20 years. 


Barry, Maurice R., 


\'eteran, 


65 years. 


13 years. 


BrowTi, Boscoe D., 


Age, . 


60 j-ears, 


33 years. 


Calligan, Michael, 


Age, . 


65 j-ears. 


35 j'cars. 


Carey, Daniel W., 


Age, . 


63 sears, 


33 years. 


Coolidge, James E.,- 


Veteran, 


65 years. 


29 years. 


Coulter, James M., 


Age, . 


63 j-ears. 


34 years. 


Curr}-, James J., 


Age, . 


64 years. 


36 years. 


DriscoU, Daniel F., 


Age, . 


61 years. 


30 years. 


Fernald, .\lmerin W., . 


Age, . 


60 years. 


26 years. 


Hunt, Charles W., 


Age, . 


71 years. 


35 years. 


Lucas, Winslow B., 


Age, . . 


76 years. 


38 years. 


May, Benjamin, . 


Age, . 


61 years. 


34 J-ears. 


Ramseli, Franklin L., . 


Veteran, 


66 years. 


20 years. 


Richardson, George S., 


Veteran, 


66 years, 


20 years. 


Sullivan, Jeremiah B., 


Age, . . 


65 years. 


34 j-cars. 


Thomas, CVrus K., 


Age, . 


74 years. 


42 years. 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers who were promoted above the Rank of Pairolman during 
the Year ending Nov. SO, 1903. 



DiTE. 



Xame &nd ^*^^ 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
JIar. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
1, 1908, 
8, 190S, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 190S, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 190S, 
28, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
S, 190S, 
8, 190vS, 
8, 1908, 

8, 1908, 

8, 1908, 

8, 1908, 

8, 1908, 
8, 1908, 
8, 190S, 



Feb. 8, 1908, 



Feb. 
Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
Feb. 



S, 1908, 
8, 1908, 

8, 1908, 

?-, 1908, 

8, 1908, 
8, 190S, 



Lieut. George A. Hall, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. George D. Yeaton, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. Daniel .K. Ritter, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. Forrest F. Hall, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. John A Brickley, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. Frank L .Tones, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. Edward X. Pease, to the rank of captain. 
Lieut. James F. Driscoll, to :he rank of captain. 
Sergt. Francis J. McCauley, to the rank of inspector. 
Sergt. Walter M. Murphy, to the rank of inspector. 
Sergt. Silas T. Waite, to the rarJc of insjjector. 
Sergt. Harden J. Ringer, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. James E. Sanford, to th« rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. John F. Dobbyn, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. John E. Driscoll, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. William F. Manning, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. Herbert W. Goodwin, to the rank of Ueutenant. 
Sergt. Patrick F. King, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. Clinton E. Bowley, to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. Joseph Harriman, to the rank of Ueutenant. 
Patrolman William G. Blazo, to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Good, to the rank of sergeant. 

John F. Ahearn, to the rank of sergeant. 

Francis J. Mulligan, to the rank of ser- 



Patrolman 
Patrolman 

geant. 
Patrolman Edward 

geant. 
Patrolman 

sergeant 
Patrolman 



H. Mullen, to the rank of ser- 
.\braham L. Killam, to the rank of 



Cornelius H. Donovan, to the rank 
of sergeant. 

Patrolman James Laffej-, to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman liradlej- C. Mason, to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Dennis F. MurjAy, to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Frederick N. Wheeler, to the rank of 
sergeant. 

Patrolman Henry F. Barr)% to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Joseph F. Hurlej-, to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Daniel F. Tooroej', to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Perley S. S killings, to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Harry P. Burn?, to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John T. O'Hearn, to the rank of sergeant. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



75 



Table IV. — Concluded. 

List of Officers irho ucre promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during 
the Year ending Nov. SO, 7505 — Concluded. 



DiTE. 



Name and Rank. 



Feb. 
Feb. 



S, 190S, 
S, lOOS, 



Feb. S, lOOS, 



Feb. 
Feb. 

Mar. 

-April 
May 



S, lOOS, 

S, 190S, 

2S, 190S, 

4, 190S, 
27, lOOS, 



Sept. 17, 190S, 



I Patrolman 

■ Patrolman 

i geant . 

. Patrolman 

sergeant. 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

geant. 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

sergeant. 

Patrolman 



Walter G. Horton, to the rank of sergeant. 
.\lpheus W. Parker, to the rank of ser- 

Jeremiah N. Jfosher, to the rank of 

James W. Brooks, to the rank of sergeant. 
Ross A. Perry, to the rank of sergeant. 
Richard Fitzgerald, to the rank of ser- 

Harr>- C. Berr>', to the rank of sergeant. 
Charles B. McCIoskey, to the rank of 

Gilbert H. .\ngell, to the rank of sergeant. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Xumber of Men of Each Rank in Active Service at the End of the Present 
Year who were appointed on the Force in the Year slated. 



Din iPPOIXTED. 


1 

e 

s 

s 


t 

a 


s. 

s 

3 


J 

a. 


1 


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e 
3 

3 


a 

1 

6 


1 


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a 
2 

8 


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03 






^ 


1S6S, . 


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_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


! _ 

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_ 


1 


1S69 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 _ 


__ 


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1S70 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


3 


1S71 






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- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 




- 


1 


1S72 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


1S73 






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- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


9 


1S74 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


3 


- 


7 


1S75 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


10 


- 


11 


1S76 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1877 






_ 


- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


7 


1S7S 






- 


- 


- 


5 


1 


3 


1 


12 


- 


22 


1879 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


9 


- 


15 


ISSO 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


13 


- 


15 


ISSl 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


3 


24 


- 


33 


1SS2 






- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


o 


2 


12 


- 


25 


1883 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


4 


8 


- 


17 


1S84 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


17 


- 


20 


IS8.5 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


13 


- 


19 


1SS6 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


8 


- 


14 


1SS7 






- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


T 


1 


16 


- 


22 


1888 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


4 


4S 


- 


56 


1SS9 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


17 


- 


25 


1890 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


6 


21 


- 


31 


1891 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


17 


- 


22 


1892 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


17 


- 


21 


1893 






- 




- 


- 


2 


1 


12 


65 


- 


SO 


1894 






- 




- 


- 




- 


10 


21 


- 


31 


1895 






- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


15 


119 


- 


140 


1896 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


33 


- 


35 


1S97 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


IS 


- 


19 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


- 


33 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


3 


100 


- 


105 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


59 


- 


59 


1902 






- 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


12 


- 


12 


1903 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


93 


- 


93 


1904 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


S3 


- 


S3 


19a5 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


- 


39 


1906 






- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


_ 


36 


_ 


36 


1907 






- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


62 


111 


190S 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




151 


151 




rot 


als, . 


1 


- 


1 


25 


30 


37 


86 


1,035 


213 


1,428 



/ 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



77 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCniEXT — No. 49. 



79 







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80 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



o 



93 



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3 

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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



81 



Table IX. 
Number and Distribution of Horses used in the Department. 



Dmsioss. 



Ambu- 



Van. PitroL Riding. ^™^' Driving. ToUla. 



3, 
9, 



Headquarters, 
Division 1, 
Di%"ision 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 10, 
Division 11, 
Division r2, 
Division 13, 
Division 14, 
Division 15, 
Di\'ision 16, 
Signal semce, repair de 
partment, 40 Joy Street 
House of detention. 
Prison van, . 

Totals, . 



2 
4 



2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 



2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 



27 



10 

5 
5 

12 



I _ 



38 



2 


2 


- 


3 


- 


5 


- 


2 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


3 


1 


13 


- 


1 


2 


9 


1 


8 


- 


2 


- 


14 





6 


_ 


2 


- 


6 


11 


88 



Table X. 
Number oj Arrests, by Police Divisions, during the Year ending Nov, 

30, 1908. 



Dmsioss. 


Ualn. 


FemMa. 


ToUb. 


Headquarters, .... 


1,058 


349 


1,407 


Division 1, 










11,672 


1,066 


12,738 


Division 2, 










4,229 


226 


4,455 


Division 3, 










6,SS0 


1,198 


8,078 


Division 4, 










6,425 


912 


7,337 


Division 5, 










6,379 


1,000 


7,439 


Division 6, 










3,787 


200 


4,056 


Division 7, 










2,279 


175 


2,454 


Di\'ision S, 










36 


1 


37 


Di\-ision 9, 










2,641 


284 


2,925 


Division 10, 










3,255 


354 


3,609 


Division 11, 










2,251 


78 


2,329 


Division 12, 










1,043 


75 


1,118 


Division 13, 










1,898 


114 


2,012 


Division 14, 










913 


35 


948 


Division 15, 










5,045 


297 


5,342 


Division 16, 










1,761 


101 


1,862 


Totals, 










61,552 


6,594 


68,146 



S2 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



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84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



-5 



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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 I 1 


1 


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[Jan. 



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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 



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1 


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ss 



POLICE CO.MMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



X 


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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



89 



I I I I I I I 



o « r> -" — — 



1 


n 


fj 


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1 


^^ 




■ 


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I -< r3 ri I I C! 



I ri I I 



-? I- I I — 



■«• o rt N -H — — 



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90 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 









■? 


, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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1 


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t 
» 



A| 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



91 



1 I I I I I I r I I 



'(f 


CO 


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ri 


n 


r- 


on 


n 


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92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



99 



Table XV. 
Number of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1.908. 



Dmfflos. 


Main 


Fenules. 


Spayed. 


BrMdefS* 


Totals. 


1, . . . 


106 


31 


_ 


1 


138 


2, 


•. 




15 


6 


- 


- 


21 


3, 






314 


104 


7 


2 


427 


4, 








179 


87 


6 


2 


274 


3, 








458 


149 


20 


3 


630 


6, 








301 


79 


4 


- 


384 


7, 








703 


128 


7 


- 


838 


8, 








- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


9, 








800 


118 


37 


2 


957 


10, 








791 


154 


23 


2 


970 


11, 








1,930 


377 


93 


6 


2,406 


12, 








551 


92 


11 


- 


654 


13, 








1,331 


193 


54 


3 


1,581 


14, 








703 


140 


39 


1 


883 


15, 








347 


118 


8 


- 


473 


16, 








60S 


127 


23 


- 


758 


ToU 


U, 






9,137 


1,903 


332 


22 


11,394 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses issued in the Ciiy, by Police Di- 
visions. 



Division 1, 


. 1,162 


Division 10, . . .117 


Di^^sion 2, 


.1,899 


Di\-ision 11, 






91 


Division 3, 


. 242 


Di\-ision 12, 






63 


Division 4, 


. 544 


Division 13, 






36 


Division 5, 


. 423 


Di\-ision 14, 






58 


Di\'ision 6, 


. 250 


Di\'ision 15, 






116 


Division 7, 


. 121 


Division 16, 






102 


Di\'ision 8. 






Di\ision 9, 


. 122 


Total, . . .5,346 



100 



POLICE COMmSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement for the Year ending Xov. SO, 190S. 



EXPEN-DITCRES. 

Pay of police and emploj-ees, 

Pensions, 

Fuel and light, 

Water and ice. 

Furniture and bedding, 

Printing and stationer}', 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison, 

Repairs to station houses and city prison, . 

Repairs and supplies for police steamers. 

Rent and care of telephone and telegraph wires. 

Purchase of horses and vehicles, 

Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles, 

Carting prisoners to and from stations and city prison 

Feeding prisoners, .... 

Jledical attendance on prisoners. 

Transportation, .... 

Pursuit of criminals. 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets. 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc.. 

Travelling expenses and food for pob'ce, 

Rent of buildings, .... 

Total, 

Ej:penses of lasting, .... 

Experises of house of detention a nd station house mat rons 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII.), 

Total 

Receipt.s. 
For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner, 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itiner- 
ant musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, car- 
riage maps, etc.,' ....... 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), 



Total, 
For uniform cloth, etc.. 



51,634,012 78 

131,720 18 

19,841 75 

629 06 

3,111 69 

15,271 94 

6,844 94 

12,769 66 

8.844 68 

4,596 55 

4,114 SO 

17,716 81 

872 85 

2,643 58 

7,751 91 

1,675 55 

3,142 40 

22,&42 22 

5,226 07 

233 13 

6,553 50 

Sl,910,216 05 

25,846 14 

9,436 07 

55,412 49 

82,000,910 75 



821,025 25 



1,594 12 
29,053 00 

851,672 37 
24,774 12 



Total, 876,446 49 



1 Credited to polic« department. 



> 



1909.] PUBUC DOCU-MEXT — Xo. 49. 101 



Table X\'ni. 

Payments on ActovrJ of ike Signal Serrice during the Year ending 

Nov. SO, 1908. 



Labor, S28,030 51 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., ...... 7,364 03 

Rent of telephone instrutKnts, ..... 373 51 

Rent and care of building, 5,002 62 

Purchase of horses, hameses and vehicles, . . . 2,167 20 

Stable supplies and fnmitTire, ..... 57 60 

Repairs on building, . . . . . . . • 732 08 

Repairing wagons, hameacs, etc.,. .... 2,056 76 

Fuel, gas and water, 1,589 52 

Miscellaneous, car fares, etc^ ..... 979 06 

Signalling apparatos, repiurs and supplies therefor, 6,296 53 

Underground wires, ....... 407 43 

Printing, stationery, etc., ..... 355 64 

Total S55,412 49 



102 



POUCE COM^nSSIOXER. 



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53 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT— No. 49. 



103 



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POLICE C03DUSSI0NER. 



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1909.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT— No. 49. 105 



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106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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n the Several Wards and I 
Days in May, 190S. 


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1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 107 



ReGCLATIOXS RESPECTIXG the BcSINXSS of ITAKIXG UXSECURED 
SilALL LOAXS IX THE CiTT OF BOSTOX". 

Sectiox 1. The Police Commissioner ■vriU, upon petition, license 
suitable persons to engage in the business cf making loans of $200 
or less upon which a rate of interest greater than 12 per cent, per 
annum is charged, and for which no security, other than a note or 
contract with or without an endorser, is taken, pursuant to Acts 
of 190S, chapter G05, section 1. 

All such licenses shall expire on the first day of September next 
succeeding their dale. Applications for such licenses shall be made 
at least three weeks before the same are to be issued, and shall be 
published at the expense of the applicant, to be paid in advance, 
by the Police Commissioner, in two or more daily newspapers pub- 
lished in the city of Boston. Applications for such licenses shall 
be examined into and reported on by the chief inspector. A fee 
of $.50 shall be paid for each such license at the time the same is 
issued. (Acts of 1908, chapter 605; Police Rule.) Application 
blanks for such licenses will be furnished by the Police Commis- 
sioner. (Police Rule.) 

Sectiox 2. In the case of any loan to which the pro^•isions of 
Acts of 190S, chapter G05, section 3, apply, a sum not exceeding 
$2 if the loan docs not exceed $25, not exceeding $10 if the loan 
exceeds $100, not exceeding $3 if the loan exceeds $25 but does 
not exceed $50, and not exceeding $5 if the loan exceeds $50 but 
does not exceed $100, may, if both parties to the loan so agree, 
be paid by the boiTower or borrowers, or added to the debt, and 
taken by the lender as the expense of making the loan, and such 
sum shall not be counted as part of the interest of such loan. A 
greater amount than above specified shall not be taken for such pur- 
pose, and any money paid, promised or taken in excess of such 
amount shall be deemed to be interest (Acts of 1908, chapter 605, 
section 3) : provided, however, that upon a renewal of any loan 
no such charges shall be made or taken by the lender. (Police 
Rule.) 

Sectiox 3. Tnfercst may be charged by persons licensed under 
this rule as follows: On loans not exceeding $50, at the rate of 
36 per centum per annum; on loans of over $50, at the rate of 30 per 
centum per annum. (Acts of 1908, chapter 605, section 2; Police 
Rule.) 

Section* 4. Whenever any loan is made to which the provisions 
of Acts of 1908, chapter 605, apply, the lender shall give to the 
borrower, free of charge, a ticket of form approved by the Police 
Coramii^ioner, setting forth plainly, in the English language, the 
real n.nture and substance of the transaction, the date and amount 



lOS POUCE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of the loan, the amount added to tbe loan as the exiseiise of realizing 
the loan, the date when the debt becomes due, and the rate of in- 
terest thereon, calculated at an annual rate of percentage. There 
shall be a copy of sections 2 and 3 of this rule printed upon each 
ticket, and each ticket shall bear a number corresponding with tbe 
bwk number of the loan. (See section 5 of this rule.) 

Whenever any payment is made on account of such loan, the 
pennon receiving such payment shall endorse the date and amount 
of such payment on the back of such ticket, and a statement of 
whether such amount is a pa\"ment on account of interest or prin- 
cipal or both, and a statement of the amount then remaining due 
on the loan after deducting such pajinent. And the person receiv- 
ing such pajTnent, or his principal, shall sign such endorsement. 
If such ticket is lost or destroyed, the lender shall furnish the 
borrower, free of charge, on demand, a duplicate of said ticket, 
setting forth all the endorsements that were or ought to have been 
upon the original ticket, or upon any duplicate thereof at the time 
of its loss or destruction. (Acts of 190S, chapter 605, section 5; 
Police Rule.) 

Section" 5. Every licensee licensed under this rule shall keep 
a book, of a form and style to be approved by the Police Commis- | 

sioner, in which shall be entered at the time each loan is made an 
accurate copy of the ticket issued to the borrower, in accordance \' 

with section 4 of this rule. Every such licensee shall enter in such 
book at the time of each payment by the borrower the date of sucl; 
pajTnent, the amount then paid, a statement whether it is interest 
or a payment on account of principal, a statement of tbe total 
amount, both principal and interest, previously paid on such loan, 
and a statement of the amount still dne on the principal after such 
j payment. There shall be a separate page or a separate portion . 

j of a page in such book for each loan, numbered consecutively, in / 

j' which shall be entered all the entries and transactions relating to 

I such loan, and the nimiber on such page or portion of a page shall 

I correspond with the number on the ticket furnished to the borrower 

I in accordance with section 4 of this rule. 

! Every such licensee shall, on the first day of each month, send 

• a written report, of a form and size to be approved by the Police 

Commissioner, to the chief inspector, of all business done by him 
since the making of his last monthly report, to which the provisions 
of Acts of 1908, chapter 605, section 3, apply. Such report shall 
state briefly all loans made by him and the nature of the security 
therefor, all loans paid off, and shall set forth the names and 
addresses of all parties to each transaction, and all the dates and 
amounts of each transaction. The information so received by the 
chief inspector shall not be divulged by him, except when he is 
; refjuired so to do by law or by order of the Police Commissioner. 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 109 

Even- such licensee shall at all times allow the Police Commis- 
sioner, or any police officer authorized bj- the said eommlssiouer in 
writing, to inspect nil books, accounts and papers of such licensee 
lelatinfT to all loans made by such licensee. (Police Rule.) 

Sf-Ction' G. An a.ssociation composed exclusively of persons en- 
n^yed in a particular trade or occupation, or in trades or occupations 
usually carried on in conjunction with one another, or composed 
of pereons emploj-ed by the same individual, firm or corporation, 
which a.ssociation lends only to its own members and returns to them 
at stated times profits in excess of necessary and reasonable expenses, 
shall be excmi)t from the pro\-i«ions of sections 4 and 5 of this 
rule, with the exception of the last paragraph of section 5: pro- 
vided, lioncrer, that the manner in which the business of such 
associations is carried on shall f>e subject in all respects to the ap- 
proval of the Police Commissioner. 

SrcTiON" 7. Any pei-son or f>ersons not being dnly licensed, as 
provided in Acts of lOOS, chapter CO.j, who, on his or their own 
account, or on account of any person or pei-sons. copartnership or 
corporation not so licensed, shall engage in or carry on, directly 
or indirectly, either separately or in connection with or as part of 
any other business, the business of making loans, to which the 
prorisions of Acts of lOOS. chapter 60.5. apply, shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than $300. or by imprisonment for not more 
than sixty days, or by both such fine and imprisonment. (Acts 
of lOOS. chapter 605.) 

Sfctiox S. The Police Commissioner has authority at any time 
to and will revoke the license issued pursuant to Acts of 190S, 
chapter 605, section 1, when the licensee is guilty of a violation of 
its terms or of the regulations established by him. (.\cts of 1908, 
chapter 605, section 5.) 

Adopted Aug. 21, 190S. 



INDEX. 



INDEX 



A. 



Accidents ......... 

persons killed or injured in streets, pprks and squares . 

number of, rcportctl ...... 

.\nibulance service ....... 

.\rrcsts .......... 

age and sex of ....... 

comparative statement of ..... 

foreigners ........ 

in public parks ....... 

insane persons ....... 

minors ......... 

natixnty of ....... . 

nonresidents ........ 

number of, by divisions ...... 

number of, punished by fine ..... 

summoned by court ...... 

total number of ....... 

\ioIation of city ordinances ..... 

on warrants ........ 

without warrants ....... 

.Auctioneers ......... 



. 54, 102, 103 

10r2, 103 

54 

61,62,63 

C-9, 50, 81, 82 

97 

96 

51, 82-95 

44 

52 

51 

51 

51, 82-05 

81 



51,82-95 

50 

. 52, 90 

51,82-95 

51, 82-95 

98 



.\utomobiles . 
laws 

motor taxicabs 
police 
public 
prosecutions . 



21, CO, 61, 102, 103 
21 
23 
60, 61, 63 
63 
22 



B. 



Benefits and pensionj 

Bertillon sj-stem 

Boston Police in comparison 

Bridges, defective . 

Buildings 

jiangerous, reported 

found open and maile secure 
Bulkheads, defective 
Bunlen of nonresident offenders 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 



Carriages, public 
articles left in . 
automobile 
number licensed 



69 
53 
13 
54 
54 
54 
54 
55 
8 
53 



63, 64. 98 
64 
63 

63, 64, 98 



114 INDEX. 



PACE 

Cases investigated .......... 54,00 

Cesspool.i. defective, reported ........ 54 

Children 25, 54 

abandoned, cared for ........ 54 

lo!tt, restored .......... 55 

juvenile ofTcnders ......... 25 

Chimney."!, dangerous, reported ....... 54 

Qty ordinances, arrests for \iolation of ..... . 52, 90 

Claims, inspector of ........ . 56 

Coal holes, defective ......... 54 

Collective musicians . . . . . . . . . 67, 9S 

Commitments .......... 52, 58 

Complaints 06, 79, SO, 9S 

against police officers ........ 79, 80 

against miscelLmeoo* Ucensca ....... 06, 98 

Courts . 51, 52 

fines imposed by ......... 52, 96 

number of dajVatteadince at, by officers . .... 52,96 

number of persons sommoned by ..... . 51 

Cnminal In\"esligation, Bareau of ...... . 53, 54 

arrests ........... 54 

finger-print system ......... 54 

photographs ........... 53 

records ........... 53 

rogues' gallery ......... 53 

Criminal work .......... 96 

comparative statemest of ....... 96 

D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 34 

Dead b^xiies, cared for ......... 54, 60 

Dead bo<lies, recovered ......... 54, 60 

Deaths 57 

by accident, suicide, etc ........ 57 

of police officers ......... 50, 72 

Department, police ......... 49 

Deputy superintendents ......... 45 

Detectives, private ......... 98 

Distribution of force ........ 50, 70, 71 

Disturbances suppressed ........ 55 

Dogs 40,56,98-100 

amount received for Ecen.ses for ...... 98, 100 

damage done by ......... 56 

laws 40 

number licensed ......... 98, 99 

Drains and vaults, defective, reported ...... 54 

Drivers, hack or cab ......... 63, 98 

Drowning, persons rescutd from ....... 55, 60 

Drunkenness ........ 8,9,51,53,91 

arrests for, per day ......... 53 

inerea-se in number of arrests for ...... 51,53 

nonresidents arrested for . . . . . . . . 8, S3 

total number of amsts for ....... 51,91 



I 



INDEX. 115 



E. 

PACE 

Employees of the Department 49, 71 

Events, special .......... 55, 56 

E.\penditures 69, 100, 101 

Extra duties performed by officers ....... 55 

F. 

Fences, defective, reported ........ 54 

Financial 69, 100, 101 

expenditure ... . . ■ • • .69, 100, 101 

house of detention ......... 09, 100 

pensions .......... 69, 100 

signal service ........ 69, 100, 101 

receipts . . . ■ • • ■ . - ■ 69, 100 

miscellaneous license fees ...... 69, 98, 100 

Fines . . . - . - - . • . - . 7, 96 

average amount of . . . . . . . - 7, 96 

amount of ......... 7, 54, 96 

number punished by ........ 52 

Finger-print system ......... 54 

Fire alarms ........... 55, 60 

defective, reported ......... St 

number given .......... 55 

number on water front attended ...... 60 

Fires, ............ 55, 60 

extinguished . . . . . . . . 55, 60 

on water front extinguished without alarm .... 60 

Foreigners, number arrested ....... 51,82-95 

Fugitives from justice ......... 54 

G. 

Gaming, illegal .......... 91 

Gas pipes, defective, reported ........ 54 

n. 

Hack or cab drivers ......... 63, 98 

Hackney carriages ......... 63, 64, 98 

Hand carts ........... 98 

Harbor service, special duties performed ...... 59, 60 

" Ferret " in commission ......... 60 

Horses . . 60, 81 

bought, .sold, etc. ......... 60 

distribution of ......... 81 

number in ssr^nce . . . . . . . . . 60 81 

House of detention . . . . , . . . 57 58 69 71 

Houses of ill-fame, etc. ......... 14 

Hydrant.s, defective, reported . . . . . . ... 54 

I. 

Imprisonment, number of years of . . . . , . 52 96 

Income 09^ jOO 

IncreaM! in [Kilice work -.....,.. 5 



116 



INDEX. 



Insane persons taken in cltarge 
Inspeetor of claims 

cases investigated 
Intojdcttted persons nssintcd 
Itinerant musicians 



J. 



Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers 
Jurj' lists 
Juvenile ofTcndcrs . 



PACE 

52, 5.5 
56 
56 
55 

66, 67 



98 
98 
24 



L. 

Lamps, defectix'C, rcporte<l 
Laws and their enforcement 
Licenses, miscellaneous . 
Listing male residents 

certificatea refused . 

expenses of 

number of male rcniilents listed 

supplemcntarj' list of male residents 

women voters verified 

number of policemen employed 
Loans, small . 
Loflgcrs at station houses 
Lodging houses, public . 

applications for licences 

authority to license . 

location of 

number of persons Uxlgeil in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen projjert; 

M. 

Jledical examiners' assiiitants . 

inquests attended 

causes of death 

cases on which inf|ue«t« were held 
Slinors, number arresteil 
Miscellaneous business 
Miscellaneous licens-^s 

complaints investigatwl . 

number issued • 

number transferred . 

number cancelled and revoked 

amount of fees collected for 
Missing persons 

number found 

number reported 
Motor taxicabs 
Musicians, itinerant 

applications for licenx-ti 

instruments examine*! 

instniments condcnincd 

instnunents passed . 
Musicians, collective 







54 






46 




66 


98 
Co 
65 




65, 


100 




65, 


104 




6.5, 


105 




65, 


106 
6.5 


24, 


98, 


107 
52 


67 


,C8 


98 




67 


98 
67 
C8 
68 


35, 


98, 


100 

57 
57 
57 
57 


51 


,82-95 






54 




66 


98 




66 


98 




66 


98 




C6 


98 




66 


98 




66 


98 
55 
55 
5.5 
2.3 


66, 67 


98 




G6 


67 
67 
67 
67 




67 


08 



INDEX. 117 

N. 

PACE 

Nati\-ity of persons arrested 51 

Nonresidents, number arrested 8, S2-0o 

o. 

Offences, tables of 6, 82-97 

against t he person ...■■■■■ ^, *2, S3 

against property, nnth \-iolence 6, S3, S4 

against property, without violence ..... C, S4, So 

against property, malicious . . . . . - . 6, S6 

comparative statement of ....... 96 

forgery and against currency . ■ . . - - . 6, 86 

against license laws ......-- 6, Sfi. S7 

against chastity, moralitj', etc. . . . . . - 6, J>8, 89 

miscellaneous ....-••-- 6, 89-94 

recapitulation .......--- 95 

P. 

Parks, pubUc 42-«, UG. 103 

accidents reported in . . . . . . - 1C2, 103 

arrests in ..-.•-••- - ■*^ 

pat rol of .......... 42 

Pawnbrokers .......... 98 

Pensions and benefits ......... 69 

estimates for pensions ........ 69 

number of persons on rolls ....... 69 

payment s on account of ....... - 69 

Police 66 

railroad ........... 66 

special ........... 66 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries ..... 69 

Police department .......... 49 

how constituted ......... 49 

distribution of ......... 50 

officers appointed ......... 50 

date appointed ......... 76 

complaints against ........ 79, 80 

died 50, 72 

discharged ......... 50, 77 

injured .......... 50 

promoted ........ 50, 74, 75 

resigned .......... oO, 77 

retired .......... 50, 73 

absent sick ......... 78 

arrests by ......... 50 

detailed, special events ....... 55, 56 

work of .......... . 50 

horses in use in ........ . GO, 81 

vehicles in use in ........ . 63 

Police Relief .Association, invested fimd of .... . 69 

Police signal serxice ....... O, 58, SO, 101 

co.it of maintenance ....... 60, 100, 101 

payments .......... 101 



118 



INDEX. 



Police signal scr\-icc — Concluded. 

repairs and construction 

signal boxes 

miscellaneous work 

property of 
Private detectives . 
Property 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned 

stolen in city . 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lotlging-houses 
Punishments 



PAGE 

5S 
5S 
5S, 59 
59 
98 

52, 55, 96, 98, 100 
55, 98, 100 
52, 54, 96 
98 
. 52, 96 
52 
63, 64, 98 
67, 68, 98 
9 



R. 

Railroad police .......... 66 

Regi.'rtration (see Listing) ........ 6.5 

Rewards ........... 9 

Rogues' gallery .......... 53 

s. 

Second-hand articles ......... 98 

Sewers, defective, reported ........ 5.5 

Sick and injured persons assisted ...... 52, 55, 60 

Sickness, absence on account of ...... . 78 

Signal sen-ice, police 49,58,59,69,71,100,101 

Sipis, defective .......... 54 

Small loans 24, 98 

Soliciting money in the streets ....... 36 

Special events .......... So, 56 

Special police .......... 66 

Spitting, law against ......... 38 

Station houses .......... 52 

lodgers at ......... . 52 

witnesses detained at ....... . 52 

Stolen property, value of ....... 52, 54, 96 

Street railways, conductors and motormen licensed .... 98 

Street stands, etc. .......... 37 

Streets 55, 102, 103 

accidents reported in ...... . 102, 10-3 

defective, reported ......... 55 

obstructions removed . . . . ... . . 55 

Suicide reported .......... 55 

Suspension of licenses ......... 45 

T. 

Teams ............. 55 

stray, nut up ......... . 55 

Trees, defective .......... 55 

Trials 9 



INDEX. 119 

V. 

PACE 

Vehicles .... 60-63 

ambulances . . . . - . . . . . 61, 62 

automobiles .......... 60, 61 

in use in police department ....... 63 

public carriages ........ 63, 64, 93 

wagons 64, 98, 99 

Vessels ............ 59 

w. 

Wagons 64, 98, 99 

number licensed by diWsioas ....... 99 

total number licensed ....... 04,98,99 

Water pipes, defective, reported ....... 55 

Water running to waste reported ....... 55 

Weapons, dangerous ......... 34 

Wires and poles, defective, reported ...... 55 

Witnesses .......... 52, 55, 96 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 55, 96 

fees earned by officers as .... . ... 55, 96 

number of, detained at statioa boo-ses ..... 52, 55 

Women committed to House of Detentkn ..... 58 

\\'onicn voters veri6ed ......... 65, 106 



- * 



iiiiiii , ^ 

3 9999 06313 944 6