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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

N0XS09 



BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY if 




f 



Public Document No. 49 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Year exdixg Xov. 30, 1909. 



t/ 

BOSTON: 
WRIGHT tc POTTER rBIXTIXG CO., STATE PRINTERS, . 
18 Post Omcz Sqcake. / [^ 

1910. A •^ 



VAiS. S^CFFT.-.RYOr"--' 



AVtAL^H 



WA/V/- %V\^',b 



APPROTD) bt 

The State Boabo of Pdbucation. 



.•.•...•• '• 



CONTEXTS. ;| 



! I 



I ^ 



Report : — fioi 

Police work as to crime, ......... 5 

Xonrcsidcnt offenders, ......... 6 

.\utomobiIe laws, .......... 7 

Motor taxicabs, .......... 8 | 

Street traffic rules 9 

Jurj- work by police, ......... 10 ' ■- 

Private business in public streets, ....... II 

Juvenile offenders, ..........11 <; 

Sunday work, ........... 17 ,' i 

"Better police protection," 20 [ ■$ 

Offences against chastity and morality, ...... 22 { .■; 

Houses of m fame 23 j | 

Inmates and patrons, ......... 25 > 

Night walkers, ........... 27 

Significance of ages and birthplaces, ....... 30 

"White slavery," 34 

Securing evidence, .......... 37 

The futility of ci\"il procedure, ........ 39 

Suppression of public and semi-public immnraEty, . . . ,42 

The police attitude, .......... 48 

The Department : — 
The police force, ..........50 

Signal service, ........... 50 

Employees of the department, ........ 50 

Recapitulation, .......... 50 

Distribution and changes, ......... 51 

Police officers injured while on dutj', ....... 51 

Work of the department, ......... 51 

.\rrests, ........... 51 

Drunkenness, .......... 54 

Bureau of criminal investigation, ....... 54 

iliscellaneous business, ........ 55 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ...... 56 

Special events, ........... 56 

Inspector of claims, .......,., 57 

Officers detailed to assist medical examinezs, ..... 53 

House of detention, .......... 59 

Police signal service, ........,,59 

Signal boxes, .......... 59 

Miscellaneous work, ......... 59 



4 CONTENTS. 

ncc 

Harbor service, .......... 61 

Horses, 62 

Vehicle service, .......... 63 

Automobiles, .......... 62 

.Ambulances, .......... 63 

Public carriages, .......... 63 

Wagon licenses, .......... 63 

Listing male rcsidet>t« of Boston, etc., ...... 66 

Women voters verified, . . . .... .66 

Listing expenses, . . . . .... .66 

Number of policemen employed in Ibting, ..... 67 

Special police, ........... SI 

Railroad police, .......... 67 

Miscellaneous licenses, ......... 67 

Musicians' licenses, .......... 6S 

Itinerant, ........... 6S 

Collective 65 

Public lodging houses, ......... 69 

Carrj-ing dangerous weapons, . . . .... .70 

Small loan licenses, .......... TO 

Pensions and benefit.^, ......... TO 

Financial, ........... 71 

Distribution of police force, . . . .... .72 

List of officers who died during the year, ...... 74 

List of officers retired during the year, ...... 75 

List of officers who were promoted during the year, .... 76 

Number of men in artive service, ....... 77 

Officers discharged and resigned during the j'ear, ..... 78 

Absent from duty by reason of sickness during the year, . . .79 

Complaints against officers during the year, ..... SO 

Number and distribution of horses, ....... S3 

Arrests by divisions during the year, ....... S3 

Arrests and offences for year, ........ S4 

Comparative statement of crimes oa to population, .... 98 

Age and sex of persons arrested, ....... 99 

Licenses of all classes issued, ........ 100 

Dog licenses issued, .......... 101 

Wagon licenses issued, ......... 101 

Financial statement, .......... 102 

PajTnents on account of signal service, ...... 103 

Accidents, ........... 10* 

Male residents listed bj- wards and precincts, ..... 106 

Male residents, supplementarj- list, ....... 107 

Women voters listed, ......... 108 



I 



^[)t ^ilommonrDealtl) of illa0sac[)U5etts. 



REPORT. 



Hkadqvarters of the Police Depahtment, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 29 Pemberton Square, 
BosTO.v, Dec. 1, 1909. 

To His Excellency Ebex S. Draper, Governor. 

TouB ExcELLEXCY : — As Police Commissioner for the 
city of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with 
the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a report 
of the work of the police department for the year ended Xov. 
30, 1909. 

Police Woek as to Crime. 

By statute as well as through growth in the population and 
the activities of the city the civil work of the police increases 
yearly in proportion to the criminal part. On the criminal 
side the total number of arrests in 1909 was 71,512, as against 
G8,146 in 1908 and 57,078 in 1907. The eight general divi- 
sions under which offences are classed show the following 
numbers for the three vears: — 



i! 

I 



OFFENCES. 


.\iTesU In 
1907. 


.\iTeits In 
1908. 


Amsta In 
1909. 


Offences against the person, 

Offences against property, with \"ioIence, 

Offences against property, without \io- 

lencc. 
Malicious offences against property, 
Forgerj- and offences against the cur- 
rency. 
Offences against the license laws. . 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc., 
Offences not classed in the foregoing, in- 
cluding drunkenness. 


2,979 

535 

3,0.55 

165 
50 

302 

828 

49,164 


3,591 

692 
4,048 

18.5 
76 

828 

1,141 

57,.585 


3,156 

525 
3,783 

176 
71 

769 

1,409 

61,623 


Totals, ..... 


57,078 68,146 


71,512 



i\ 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The more serions crimes were not so numerous as in 1903, 
and the increase in the total this year is more than accounted 
for bv the greater number of arrests for drunkenness and the 
many prosecutions required to establish the new street traflSc 
rules. The penalties imposed by the courts in fines and im- 
prisonment were greater than ever before. The following 
summary shows the results for three years: — 




isos. 



IMS. 



Persons fined, 

Total amount of fines. 

Persons sentenced to imprisonment. 

Total 3'ears of imprisonmeat, . 



15,735 

S159,9S2 

8,8S3 

3,904 



17,407 

$161,399 

9,478 

4,130 



In the report for 1903 a clerical error was made in copy- 
ing into the table corresponding to that just given, the num- 
ber of persons sentenced to imprisonment. The figures were 
given correctly in the statistical part of the report, and are 
correct in this table. 

XoyEESEDENT OFFENDERS. 

The proportion of nonresident offenders among the persons 
arrested continues to increase. When the first police com- 
mission was established, in 1878, the percentage was 19.90; 
in 1909 it was 39.03. The statistics for the past ten years, 
covering arrests for all causes, are as follows : — 





Tout Arrests. 


XonroidcstL 


Pvccatia of 
Noer^daU. 


1900 


33,655 


10,314 


30.61 


1901, 








34,500 


10,551 


30.58 


1902, 








34,732 


10,631 


30.61 


1903, 








43,033 


14,644 


29.38 


1904, 








50,265 


18,030 


3.5.86 


1905, 








48,358 


17,167 


35.50 


1906, 








49,906 


18,001 


36.06 


1907, 








57,078 


20,982 


36.77 


190S, 








68,146 


26,113 


38.32 


1909, 








71,512 


27,953 


39. OS 






1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCU-MEXT — Xo. 49. 



Taking the arrests for drunkenness by themselves, and 
giving the increase in percentage, the changes of the past ten 
vears are as follows : — 



i ToUl .\rTesls for 
i DruakeoDess. 


Pareotage of 

Xocresidenta. 


1900, . 








IS.COl 


3S.40 


1901, . 










19,4SS 


29.90 


1902, . 










19,107 


39.35 


19a3, . 










27,757 


42.53 


1904, . 










33,511 


43.36 


19a5, . 










32,29S 


43.14 


1906, . 










32,3S0 


44.57 


1907, . 










37,3S9 


45.63 


190S, . 










42,4GS 


47.73 


1909, . 










45,321 


47.62 



Almost two-fifths of all the persons arrested in 1909 by the 
Boston police, and almost half of those arrested for drunk- 
enness, were nonresidents. 

Automobile Laws. 
The automobile prosecutions in 1909 numbered 2,196, as 
against 1,S65 in 1908. The fines in 1909 amounted to 
$21,000, as against $19,338 in IOCS. These figures include 
prosecutions in parks as well as in streets for violations of 
the State law or the park rules, but they do not include prose- 
cutions of drivers of automobiles for violations of the street 
traffic regulations. The considerable increase in the rates of 
speed at which automobiles might be driven, which was al- 
lowed under those sections of the automobile act of 1909 
which took effect July 1, affected the number of prosecu- 
tions. 

The first record of an automobile prosecution by the Bos- 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



tou police was made only eight years ago, when the single 
offence of the year 1901 was the driving of a motor car in a 
public park without a permit. In 1902 there were 33 pros- 
ecutions; in 1903, 07; in 1904, 179; in 1905, 102; in 190C, 
SOS; in 1907, 961; in 190S, 1.S65; in 1909, 2,196. 

Accidents to per.-ons due to the operation of automobiles 
are first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Be- 
ginning in that year, their number to the present time is 
shown in the following table : — 



Killed. 



Injured. 



1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1903, 
1906, 
1907, 
190S, 
1909, 



1 
2 

1 
7 
6 
9 



19 

8 

17 

24 

55 

7S 

110 

105 

127 

251 



Of the 9 persons killed in 1909, 1 was riding in an auto- 
mobile and 8 were struck by automobiles. Of the 251 per- 
sons injured in 1909, 49 were riding in automobiles and 202 
were struck by automobiles. 

!MoTOE Taxic^bs. 
Motor taxicabs, which came into use in Boston in the sum- 
mer of 1903, have so increased in number as to justify fully 
the original police rule, that when offered for hire cars and 
drivers should be licensed respectively as hackney carriages 
and hackney carriage drivers in the same manner as horse- 
drawn hackney carriages and their drivers. It was argued 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

in the beginning that the licenses and the certificates issued 
bv the Massachusetts Highway Commission would secure suf- 
ficient regulation, but special police supervision has been 
showTi to be necessary. In 61 cases in the year the police 
licenses of motor taxicab drivers have been either suspended 
or revoked in consequence of convictions in the courts and 
fines for violations of law, almost all for overspecding. These 
revocations and suspensions do not deprive the driver of the 
right to operate ordinary motor cars if under license by the 
Highway Commission ; they prevent him for a specified time, 
nr permanently, from acting as driver of a motor ta.xicab. In 
the first part of the year licenses were revoked after convic- 
tion in court, and under ordinary conditions were reissued 
within a reasonable time. But under the act of 1000, which 
gave to the Police Commissioner the right to suspend any 
license granted by him, direct suspensions for a specified pe- 
rio<l. usually fourteen days, were ordered. The changing 
character of this service is indicated by the fact that in the 
past year 456 police licenses to operate motor taxicabs were 
issued, as against 186 licenses issued for the motor taxicabs 
themselves. Police licenses to use and operate motor vehicles 
offered for hire, besides taxicabs, were issued for 15 sight- 
seeing automobiles and G6 other motor vehicles. 

Street Tbaffic Kctles. 
Under the authority of chapter 447, Acts of 1008, the 
street commissioners of the city of Boston established in De- 
cember, lOOS, rules and regulations for street traffic. They 
were advertised extensively in the newspapers, and 40,000 
pamphlet copies were distributed to the public through the 
police and by other means. When the rules took effect, on 
the 1st of January. 1009, instead of immediately prosecuting 
the persons who violated them, the police devoted themselves 
fnr three weeks to the work of instructing and advising driv- 
ers in the streets. In the crowded parts of the city during 
that time the police regularly stationed there were re-enforced 
bv ."0 picked men drawn from outside divisions, not to pros- 
cciito. but to in?-triict. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

After repeated notices, prosecations -were begun, January 
26. Thereupon the indifference of many drivers to the value 
and the meaning of the rules became manifest. It seemed to 
have been assumed that the rules would be a nine-days won- 
der, and would then be forgotten. Great numbers of drivers, 
despite the opportunities afforded them, had not made the 
slightest effort to learn what was expected of them in the 
general interest. To prosecute was the only remedy, and for 
three months the prosecutions numbered about 500 a month. 
Then the good effects of this apparently hopeless work began 
to appear. In the next three months the monthly average 
fell below 300, and in the succeeding four months to but 
little more than 100 monthly, or 3 or 4 cases a day for the 
whole city. The rules are enforced more closely than ever, 
the drivers have learned them and are obeying them, and 
they themselves as well as the whole public are enjoying the 
consequent benefit of well-regulated streets and orderly traffic. 

The prosecutions for the ten months numbered 2,724. It 
is a peculiar circumstance that at all times, and especially in 
the past three months, great numbers of prosecutions, often 
a majority, were due to the violation of ordinary rules of good 
driving, such as taking the left-hand side of the street, or 
"cutting corners " when turning to the left into a street, — 
a vicious practice, and dangerous to foot passengers as well [ 

as to vehicles. It is hard to teach a whole community, stran- \ 

gers in the city as well as residents ; but the course which has 
been pursued with reference to these rules has firmly es- : 

tablished them, and, though the careless and the ignorant j 

Trill always expose themselves to penalties, the number of j 

such will doubtless diminish still further. 

Jury Woek bt Police. j 

Under the provisions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, the | 

Election Commissioners of the city of Boston were authorized I 

to call upon the Police Commissioner for assistance in as- | 

certaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury 
service. As a result of such call, the police investigated 8,225 
citizens with reference to their moral, mental and physical 
qualifications or defects, visiting each one personally if living 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

in Boston, and obtaining from others to whom he was known 
such additional information as seemed desirable. Of the 
8,225 persons investigated, 808 were dead or could not be 
found in Boston, 223 were physically incapacitated, 58 had 
been convicted of crime, 266 were unfit for jury service for 
various reasons, and 6,870 were reported as apparently fit in 
all respects for jurors. 

In addition to this work, details of police in plain clothes 
were furnished at the request of the district attorney to ob- 
serve jurors in eight important criminal trials. The whole 
number of days given by the police to that service was 1,665. 
It was delicate work, but so well was it done that no criti- 
cism of the police arose from any quarter, and the district 
attorney made generous acknowledgment in writing. 

Peitate BrsiXESS ix Public Streets. 
During the year the department investigated and reported 
upoa 1,109 applications made to the street commissioners for 
licenses for the storage and sale of merchandise in the public 
streets. Of these applications, 1,034 were approved either 
fully or with amendments, and 75 disapproved. The law on 
this subject, which was passed in 1907, has now been in full 
effect for two years. Its purpose was to regulate the use of 
the public streets for private business in the interest of the 
whole public The use had previously been contrary to law, 
and had been greatly abused by individuals. Under the new 
system it is lawful as far as permitted, and each individual 
holds a license which describes precisely the space which he 
is allowed to occupy. Payment for licenses was only an in- 
cident of the new system, but, as a matter of fact, the fees in 
two years, ranging from $5 to $100 for each license, have 
brought to the city of Boston a revenue of about $52,000. 

JuTENiLE Offenders. 
The statistics of the third full year of the operation of the 
juvenile laws, which became effective in 1906, are now avail- 
able.- They were prepared especially for the purpose of 
showing the number of persons under the age of seventeen 
years who were in the hands of the police for any reason in 



12 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



the twelve months ended Xov. 30, 1909, their ofFenecs or 
misfortunes, their ages, and the disposition of their cases. 
These figures will not agree precisely with some of those 
contained in the general tables attached to this report, be- 
cause in the latter cases the classification is usually with re- 
gard to the offences, rather than to the ages of the offenders. 

The number of juveniles in the hands of the police in the 
three years, at different ages, practically all those under eight 
bf-ing among the neglected children, is as follows : — 





\GES. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Under eight years, 










46 


99 


147 


Eight years, . 










78 


77 


75 


Xine years, 










143 


138 


122 


Ten years, 










238 


236 


182 


EHeven j-ears, . 










265 


309 


276 


Twelve years, . 










366 


452 


451 


Thirteen years. 










413 


488 


524 


Fourteen j-ears. 










433 


595 


554 


Fifteen years, . 










499 


692 


567 


Sixteen years, 










597 


743 


757 


Totals, . 


3,078 


3,829 


3,655 



The causes which brought these 3,655 delinquent, neglected 
or wayward children into the hands of the police in the three 
rears were as follows : — 



OFFENCES. 


1907. 


1908. 1909. 


Larceny and attempted larcenj-, 

Breaking and entering buildings, cars, ves- 
sels, and attempted. 
.\siault and batterj-, .... 


757 
380 
296 


762 
438 
302 


693 
342 
239 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



13 



OFFENCES. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Assault, indecent, felonious, on police, to 

rob. 
Malicious mischief, . . . . 


3 

266 


8 
225 


1 

121 


Gaming on the Lord's Day, and present at, . 


152 


193 


224 


Gaming in public streets, .... 


- 


43 


74 


Stealing rides, 


132 


188 


131 


Throwing missiles in street. 


202 


182 


176 


Neglected children, 


SI 


171 


226 


Trespass, . . . 


1S8 


158 


151 


Fugitives and runaways 


4 


122 


128 


Suspicious persons, ... 


9 


112 


72 


Stubborn children, ..... 


110 


93 


74 


Violating conditions of license (newsboy.s), 


43 


91 


244 


Violating conditions of probation, 


- 


15 


13 


Violating conditions of pardon, . 


6 


6 


15 


Violating conditions of parole, . 


- 


2 


1 


Discharging firearms and fireworks in the 

streets. 
Railroads, loitering on property of, . 


78 


66 
47 


91 
54 


Railroads, walking on tracks of. 


- 


34 


20 


Railroads, disturbing signals of, 


- 


2 


- 


Playing ball in public streets, . 


- 


44 


75 


Park rules, violating, .... 


10 


43 


30 


Fires, setting, in streets and buildings. 


14 


41 


38 


Fires, false alarms of, ... . 


20 


7 


10 


Unlawful appropriation of streets. 


72 


47 


87 


Idle and disorderly, ..... 


34 


33 


28 


Disturbing peace, . . . . " . 


51 


33 


36 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



OKlh-NCES. 


190T. 


1908. 


1909. 


Disturbing school, 


- 


1 


6 


Disturbing public meetings, 


- 


4 


2 


Robbery and attempted robbery. 


11 


31 


14 


Newspapers, selling, on Common, without 

license from the mayor. 
Newspapers, selling, without license, . 


_ 


29 
14 


19 


Waj-ward children, ..... 


16 


28 


24 


Drunkenness, 


27 


28 


34 


Violating Sunday law Cbootblacks), . 


S 


20 


12 


Violating health law, .... 


- 


7 


- 


Violating peddling law, .... 


- 


7 


6 


Edging in streets, ..... 


5 


17 


32 


Profanit}", ...... 


20 


16 


18 


Truancy, 


3 


13 


- 


Default warrants, ..... 


12 


12 


9 


Bathing in public places, .... 


3 


11 


22 


Obstructing sidewalks 


11 


9 


8 


.\rson and attempted arson, . . . 


17 


7 


- 


Carrj'ing dangerous weapons, 


7 


6 


7 


Receiving stolen goods, .... 


9 


5 


8 


Vagrancy, . . . 


3 


5 


2 


Miscellaneous, ..... 


16 


51 


38 


Totals, 


3,078 


3,829 


3,655 



The apparent reduction in the number of children under 
seventeen jears of age reported as in the hands of the police 
in 1909, when compared with the number in 1908, is hardly 
an actual reduction. In the cojirse of the year two of the dis- 
trict courts established new policies in part. In one case a 
court decided that it would receive no complaints for mis- 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 



15 



demeanors against children under fourteen years of age, and 
it made but few exceptions. The reason given for this deci- 
sion was that, if a case proved to be one in which a fine ought 
to be imposed and payment of the fine were not made there 
was no provision of law under which the offender could be 
committed. The court considered it absurd that offenders 
should be brought before it when the only action that could 
be made was to discharge, to file or to place on probation. 

Another court adopted the policy in many cases of refer- 
ring complaints directly to the probation officer, without is- 
suing summonses ; and the further proceedings were outside 
the knowledge of the police. 

The cases in these two courts which would have appeared 
in the police record in previous yeart, but do not appear this 
year numbered 228, or rather more than the apparent reduc- 
tion in the total cases in 1909. 

Unusual attention was given by the police this year to viola- 
tions of the conditions of licenses, mostly for newsboys, 
granted by the school committee in the case of boys under 
fourteen years of age and by the Board of Aldermen to minors 
above that age. This action was in accordance vnth the ex- 
pressed wishes of the Juvenile Court and of the school au- 
thorities. The conditions of the licenses are simple and 
reasonable, their aim being to assure the attendance at school 
of boys of school age, and to protect the health and the morals 
of the licensees. 

The disposition made in 1909 of the 3,655 cases of delin- 
quent, neglected or wayward children, and the disposition 
made in like cases in 1907 and 1908, are shown in the fol- 
lowing table: — 



DISPOSmOS OF CASES. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Probation, ...... 

On file, 

Discharged by court, .... 
Discharged at station houses, . 


1,116 

1,023 

104 

231 


1,129 

1,123 

396 

119 


1,003 

1,134 

326 

194 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



DISPOSITION OF C.\SES. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 

1 


Fined 


156 


376 


367 


Suffolk School 


S9 


183 


126 

1 


Dcliwrcd to parents, .... 


2 


110 


59 


DcUwn<d to unofficial charitable institutions 

and societies. 
Pcmling. 


72 
76 


98 
84 


157 
76 


Coneorxl Rcfomiatorj', .... 


35 


.54 


40 


LjTiian School, ..... 


37 


45 


49 


State Bo.<»id of Charity, .... 


13 


34 


51 


Parental School, ..... 


13 


21 


IS 


Lancaster School, 


19 


17 


21 


Defaulted, 


8 


11 


1 


House of Reformation 


2 


6 


2 


Delivered to police outside of Boston, 


4 


6 


3 


House of Correction, .... 


2 


5 


3 


Held for grand jurj', .... 


- 


8 


10 


Licer.<e3 revoked, 


- 


2 


- 


JaiU 


1 


1 


- 


Delivered at Xa\y Yard, .... 


■- 


1 


- 


Children's institutions department, . 


- 


- 


10 


Industrial School at Shirley, 


- 


- 


5 


Miscellaneous, 


75 


- 


- 


Totals, 


3,078 


3,829 


3,655 



It may be said that on the whole the cases in 1909 which 
ponuittcd of the imposition of the penalty of fine or of com- 
mit nicnt were about the same in number as in 1908. The 
ca?es in which such penalties were imposed by the courts in 
lOOT, IOCS and 1909 are shown in the following table: — 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCLTMEXT— No. 49. 



DISPOSITION- OF CASES 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Fined, .... 




. 


156 


376 


367 


Suffolk School, 






S9 


1S3 


126 


Concord Refoimatorj', 






35 


54 


40 


Lyman School, 






37 


45 


49 


Parental School, 






13 


21 


18 


Lancaster School, 






19 


17 


21 


House of Reformation, 






2 


6 


2 


House of Correction, 






2 


5 


3 


Jail, .... 






1 


1 


- 


Industrial School at Shirk}-, 






- 


- 


5 


Totals, . . . . 


354 


70S 


631 



In the three animal reports previous to the present I ex- 
pressed the belief that juvenile lawlessness was the most 
difficult problem with which the police had to deal, and that 
it threatened the greatest danger to the future of the com- 
raunitv. That belief I still hoIdL 



SUXDAY WOEK. 

Chapter 420, Acts of 1909, " Relative to the performance 
of work on the Lord's Daj," was in force during the last six 
months of the police year. 

The enforcement in Boston of the laws regailatinar business 
or lalxir on Sunday has proceeded for the past three years on 
the following plan: — 

1. Chapter 98, Revised Laws, and amendments thereto, 
names about twenty-five occupations or kinds of business 
which are permitted on Sunday. With these the police have 
nothing to do. 

■2. The law provides further that works of necessity and 
charity may bo performed. But the individual policeman is 
not allowed to decide whether or not a particular work not 



IS POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan, 

corerei by chapter 93 is one of necessity or charity. That 
is a qiiation for the conrts. The policeman takes the names 
of the persons concemc-d, for ordinarily he has no legal right 
to zrmt them or to stop the work. The separate cases are 
then submitted to the courts and by them decided, ^\^len 
court ^ieciiions are given from time to lime which indicate 
that p«rticnlar kinds of work are deemed to be of necessity 
or charity, the whole police force is informed, and thereafter 
such <i«isions govern its action- 
Bat no matter how much a proposed Sunday work not 
speci££»i in the list allowed by law appeared to be one of 
neoessrr. there had been up to the time of the passage of 
the EseTT act no authority inside or outside the police depart- 
ment "sriiich in advance eomld declare it to be necessary. Xo 
permri could be given lawfnlly, and the work could be entered 
upon ^Asly in the expectation that the persons performing it 
would lie summoned to oomirt for judicial decision. 

It wa* at this poict — and at this point only — that the , 

new att became operatire, for it provides that the Police f 

Comir25=ioner, or certain officers designated by him, may ." 

decide «i proper representation that a proposed Sunday work j 

is neeeaary, and may h~jse a permit therefor. ; 

The police department, though neither seeking nor desiring | 

ihe ainfiority for itself, has exercised it with scrupulous re- j 

gard 3A?- the letter aid spirit of the law. A form of appli- i 

cation and permit was prepared, which besides embodying the j 

cc-nditaons of the law, called for such information as the j 

name *A the applicant, the character of the work to be done, j 

whe^ttr in a building or &nt of doors, whether noisy or not, j 

the reasons for doing it oa Sunday, and approximately the i 

time required and the nionber of persons to be engaged, 
upon E. The superinteraient of police and in his absence 
the dej^ity superinteiKlent in command at headquarters were \ 

desigiasZfcd in accordance with the provisions of the act as j 

the «S«rr3 to receive and pass upon applications. li 

A r'/'Ogh classification of the permits issued in six months 
is as f^.-flows : — 



■i 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCIDIENT— No. 49. 19 



Railroad companies, ...... 

Electric and gas companies, 

Repairs in manufacturing, mercantile and other buildings, 
Carting and storing of perishable goods, ... 
Public work by city departments or by contractors, . 
Street railway companies, ..... 
Telegraph and telephone companies, 
Discharging or loading steamers, .... 
Miscellaneous, ....... 



189 
143 
127 
78 
77 
22 
19 
12 
63 



Total, "30 

Xo permits were issued for the sale of goods. The only 
permits for the manufacture of goods were issued to one 
concern on two Sundays, when the shortage of surgical 
bandages required that its work should not be interrupted. 
The permits for transportation of perishable goods applied 
to ice in certain emergencies, to the delivery of fresh meats 
on board steamers preparing to sail, and mainly to the receipt 
and care of poultry arriving on Sundays, especially on the 
Sunday before Thanksgiving. The permits to railroads, 
street railway, telephone, telegraph, gas and electric com- 
panies and to public departments and contractors were for 
repair and renewal work which could not be done on week 
days without injury to the public service or total suspension 
in certain places. Permits for work in buildings covered 
for the most part repairs or renewals of pipes, engines, boilers, 
tanks, elevators, etc., — work which could have been done on 
work days only with serious interruption to business and 
some risk to persons. 

The provision of the new law that no permit shall be 
issued more than si.x days in advance of the Sunday on which 
the proposed work is to be done is a wise safeguard, but it 
tends to multiply in appearance the number of permits 
granted. In many cases a necessary piece of public or private 
work continues from Sunday to Sunday, but a new permit 
for it must issue each week. .:\mong the miscellaneous per- 
mits, for instance, are nineteen which were issued weekly 
in order to allow for the removal of garbage from the Xavy 
Yard, where many ships of war with their crews were 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

gathercxl. In this case, as in the vast majority of other 
cases, the work done wouM unquestionably have been lawful 
at any time; but the benefit of the new law is that it provifles 
for a permit in advance, which assures those who engage in 
the work that they will not be put to the trouble and expense 
of appearing before a court. 

The best proof that the authority conferred b}- the new act 
has not led to neglect in the enforcement of the ordinary pro- 
visions of the Sunday law is found in the following summary 
of prosecutions for violations of the Sunday law in the past 
five years : — 

^XlR. Prosecutions. 



1905, 

1906, 
1907, 
190S, 
1909, 



221 
165 
770 
629 
756 



" Bettek Police Pkotectiox." 
The demand for " better police protection " is often made 
by individual citizens and by local organizations. It repre- 
sents the supposed necessities of sections, streets and even 
separate buildings. Many of those who make the demand 
have never thought of the distinction between a watchman 
over particular property, with no duty except to see that it is 
not injured, and a policeman with a long route to cover, and 
responsible, as far as he can be responsible, for all persons and 
property thereon. It is a constant struggle to retain the 
services of the police for the whole public as against local 
and even private demands, and the struggle is successful only 
at the cost of hostile criticism on the part of those who are 
disappointed. 

At police headquarters the relative needs of all parts of 
the city are carefully c-onsidered, and on that basis all avail- 
able men are assigned to the several divisions. The division 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 21 

commander, in turn, responsible for his whole division and 
familiar with its peculiarities, places his men in detail where 
they seem to him to be most needed. He must not only 
weigh, but balance; for when he decides that there ought 
to be a man in a place not now covered, he must, in order to 
make the decision effective, find a man doing duty in another 
place where he is less needed. It is at that point that the 
commander usually fails, and at that point also that the 
citizen or the organization, with eyes fixed on one spot, 
enters into the case. With the whole number of patrolmen 
fixed and limited by law as well as by the needs of the city 
in other departments, it is plain that a policeman cannot 
be placed at a new post unless first taken from an old post. 
Such transfers cannot of course be made on the judgment or 
the demand of citizens, however able and honest they may be, 
who have given no study to the situation as a whole. 

The demands and the criticisms here considered are com- 
mon to all police forces and to other public departments as 
well. In the case of the police they sometimes follow a par- 
ticular assault or street robbery, and every critic at such a 
time rejoices when he can say that " no policeman was in 
sight." He seems not to understand the simple proposition 
that a criminal can choose his own time, and that he never 
chooses a time when a policeman is in sight; that it is only 
when a criminal miscalculates or is reckless that he acts in 
the sight of a policeman or when a policeman is at hand. 
Nevertheless, the Boston police made last year nearly 2,S00 
arrests for assaults of various kinds and assault and battery, 
1S5 arrests for robbery or assault to rob, and 3S6 arrests for 
pocket picking actual or attempted. 

The general subject of " police protection " was touched 
upon twenty-eight years ago, in the annual report of the 
Police Commissioners for ISSl, and as an illustration of 
the unchanging character of public criticism the language 
then used may well be quoted, as follows : — 

The Board is well aware that many persons feel that every mis- 
demeanor or annoyance, no matter how small, is something that the 
police are responsible for and should prevent; forgetting that they 
are in a large city, where indiridual rights must often yield to the 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



public good and convenience, and where the millenium they desire 
could not be obtained, as long as human nature remains as it is, 
even though policemen should be stationed on every street comer. 
The present force is employed in the way best calculated to carry 
out the interest for which it was intended. The men are stationed 
wherever in the best judgment of this Board they can do the most 
eflficient service. 

Offexces .\gaixst Ch-vstity axd Moeality. 
The annual report of the Boston police department has 
included for many years a statistical table of arrests for 
offences against chastity and morality. The normal number 
of such arrests in the year represents faithful police work; 
a marked increase is proof of exceptional vigilance and 
activity. The table which follows gives the whole number 
of arrests for offences against chastity and morality in each 
of the last eight years, those years being chosen because they 
represent not only the present police administration, but 
the three next preceding administrations : — 



YE\R. 


ArresH for Ot- 

Chastit/asd 
UrnUtj. 


YEAR. 


Arrests for Of- 
fences agiinst 
Cbistit; and 
MoralitT. 


1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905. 


704 

709 
876 
807 


1906, . 

1907, . 
190S, . 
1909, . 


895 

843 
1,165 
1,432 



This table omits from the total of each year the figures 
covering certain small items which are included in the regu- 
lar statistical tables, but represent disorder rather than 
immorality. On the other hand, all yearly totals in this 
table include some offences involving sexual immorality, 
such as rape and indecent assault, which are usually classi- 
fied under the heading " Offences against the person." As 
the figures of all years are treated uniformly, the means of 
comparison are perfect. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



23 



A closer view, showing the three great causes of arrest 
on account of sexual immoralitv, is given in the following 
comparative statement : — 



ARRFSTS FOR — 


1902. 


1903. 1904. 1906. 1906. 1907. 1908. 


1909. 


Fornication, 


138 


94 


253 


284 


2C0 


279 


375 


520 


Keeping house of ill fame, . 


55 


80 


66 


52 


65 


74 


114 


112 


Night walking, . 


259 


271 


236 


190 


249 


169 


249 


375 


Totab, 


452 


445 


555 


526 


574 


522 


738 


1,007 



With these offences and with conditions affecting them 
the matter which follows will deal. 



Houses of III Fajie. 
The number of persons prosecuted in 1008 for keeping 
houses of ill fame was 114, much the largest up to that time 
in the historv of the department. The number in 1909 was 
112; and because of the diminishing material upon which 
to work, the procuring of evidence for the prosecutions in 
the second year doubtless required double the effort on the 
part of the police that was required in the first year. The 
prosecutions for keeping houses of ill fame each year for 



mirty ye 


ars ai 


re sn( 


)WU 1 


n tne 1 


ollowing t 


able: — 






1880 23 


1895, .... 69 


1881, 








. 25 


1896, 






. 72 


1S82, 








. 52 


1897, 






. 54 


1883, 








. 63 


1898, 






31 


1884, 








67 


1899, 






. 68 


1885, 








43 


1900, 






100 


1886, 








84 


1901, 






55 


1887, 








50 


1902, 






55 


1888, 








25 


1903, 






80 


1SS9, 








55 


1904, 






66 


1890, 








27 


1905, 






52 


1891, 








31 


1906, 






65 


1892, 








40 


1907, 






74 


1893, 








19 


1908, 






114 


1S9J, 








40 


1909, 






112 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The evidence on which to base these 112 prosecutions 
was obtained through police efforts of many kinds, includ- 
ing 295 searches with warrants in 115 different places. 

The lower courts disposed of the cases of persons prose- 
cuted for keeping houses of ill fame in the years 190S and 
1900, as shown in the following table: — 





1908. 


1909. 


Fined SoO, 




49 


51 


Fined S75, 




- 


1 


Fined SlOO, 




7 


6 


Discharged, 




16 


13 


Placed on file, .... 




11 


8 


Placed on probation, 




3 


5 


Prison at Sherbom, 




2 


- 


Pending, 




1 


- 


House of Correction one year, 




7 


3 


House of Correction eleven months, 




1 


- 


House of Correction nine months, . 




- 


1 


House of Correction eight months, . 




- 


2 


House of Correction six months. 




9 


5 


House of Correction four months, . 




4 


5 


House of Correction three months, . 




3 


7 


House of Correction two months, 




- 


1 


House of Correction one month. 




1 


- 


House of Correction nine months, and SlOO fine. 


- 


1 


House of Correction three months, and SlOO fine, 


- 


1 


House of Correction two months, and S7.5 fine, . 


_ 


1 


Common jail, 




1 


Totals, 


• 


114 


112 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 25 

The penalties in 1909 indicate no change on the part of 
the courts in their estimate of the gravity of this crime and 
the difBculty of securing evidence for convictions. 

In 190S the penalties imposed upon 97 r>cr;ons who were 
convicted reached a total of $3,150 in fines and one hundred 
and seventy-five months of imprisonment, besides 2 persons 
sent to the Women's Prison on indeterminate sentences. 

In 1909 the penalties imposed upon 99 persons who were 
convicted reached a total of $3,500 in fines and one hundred 
and fifty-four months of imprisonment. 

The maximum penalty under the nuisance act is $100 
fine or twelve months' imprisonment, or both. The maxi- 
mum line was imposed in I'.tOS in 7 cases, and in 1909 in 
C cases: the maximum imprisonment in 1908 in 7 cases and 
in 1000 in 3 cases. In no case in either year did a court 
impose the maximum combined penalty of $100 fine and 
twelve months' imprisonment. 

The searches in suspected houses of ill fame disclosed evi- 
dence on which were bascJ 20 prosecutions for violating the 
liquor law, with the following results: — 

Fined S50, 11 

Fined SlOO, 1 

House of Correction three months, . .... 3 

Discharged, ......... 4 

Placed on file, ......... 1 

Total, 20 

IXMATES AXD PaTEOXS. 

The searches of houses of ill fame resulted further in the 
arrest on the premises of 135 men and 167 women, other 
than the keepers of the places, who were either actually 
engaged in the commission of crime or were open to prose- 
cution as idle and disorderly persons. The manner in which 
these cases wore disposed of in the lower courts, all the 
men being released on payment of fine?, is shown in the table 
which follows, in comparison with the disp^^sition of similar 
cases in the year 1908: — 



26 



POLICE COMmSSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1»M. 



1«09. 



Fined S20, . 
Fined SI 5, . 
Fined SIO, . 
Fined one cent, 
Placed on probation, 
Placed on file. 
Discharged, . 
Defaulted, . 
House of Correction one 3'ear, 
House of Correction six months, 
House of Correction four months, 
House of Correction three months, 
House of Correction two months, 
House of Correction one month. 
Prison at Shcrbom, 
JaU three months. 
Jail fifteen days, . 
Lancaster School, . 
Held for grand jurj'. 
Totals, . 



135 
3 



9 
S 



- I 



216 

12 

2 

24 

15 

6 

3 

1 
3 

8 

1 

7 
o 



205 



302 



The birthplaces of the 167 women prosecntefl in conse- 
quence of having been found in hoiue? of ill fame were as 
follows : — 



United States, 

Canada and British Provinces, 
Ireland, .... 
England, .... 
Russia, .... 



113 

22 

19 

3 

4 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 27 

Scotland, 2 

Austria, .......... 1 

Germany, .......... 1 

Total, 167 

The ages of the women prosecuted in consequence of having 
been found in houses of ill fame, given under the heads of 
native-born and foreign-born, are shown in the following 
table: — 



AGES. 


Born In 
United Suta. 


Foreign-born. 


ToUL 


17, - 










1 


I 


1 

1 


19, . 










6 


1 


7 


20, . 










9 


2 


11 


21, . 










12 


2 


14 


22 










11 


3 


14 


23, . 










11 


2 


13 


24, . 










5 


I 


6 


25, . 










7 


1 


8 


26 to 30, 










26 


15 


41 


31 to 35, 










l.S 


12 


25 


36 to 40, 










5 


11 


16 


41 to 50, 










G 


2 


S 


Above 50, 










1 


2 


3 


Totals, . 


113 


54 


167 



NiGHT W.\I,KERS, 

The work of the police for the suppression of open ira- 
nioralitv in the streets took the form of prosecution of 
common night walkers and of women and girls not properly 
to be classed as common night walkers, but nevertheless 
guilty of immoral acts and conduct. The persons prosecuted 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



as night walkers numbered 375, and their cases were dis- 
posed of in the lower courts as follows, comparison being 
made with the year 1908 : — 



1908. 



Probation, .... 

On file 

Defaulted, .... 
Fined, ..... 
House of Correction one year, 
House of Correction sbc months, 
House of Correction four months. 
House of Correction three months, 
House of Correction two months. 
House of Correction one month, 
Prison at Sherbom, 
State Farm, . 
Lancaster School, . 
Jail four months, . 
Jail three months, 
Discharged, . 
Pending, 

Totals, . 



90 

9 

6 

1 

2 

7 

42 

36 

10 

2 

30 
4 
1 



172 

8 

12 

1 

12 
52 
44 
11 
1 
45 
10 

2 
1 
2 

o 



249 



375 



The birthplaces of the 375 persons prosecuted as common 
night walkers were as follows : — 



Uriitfd States, 

Canada and British Provinces, 
Ireland, .... 
Ru.«ia, .... 

Austria, .... 



266 

52 

22 

7 

5 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



Sweden, 

England, 

Germany, 

Xonvay, 

Italy, 

Spain, 

France, 

Hungar>', 

Poland, 

Scotland, 

Total, 



o 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



375 



The ages of the persons prosecuted as common night 
walkers, given under the heads of native-bom and foreign- 
bom, are shown in the following table : — 



ipra Bom tn 
•^°^- jCniUslSuta. 


Foreign-bora. 


ToUl. 


16, 










1 


- 


1 


17, 










1 


- 


1 


IS, 










6 


3 


9 


19, 










12 


3 


15 


20, . 










11 


3 


14 


21, - 










27 


5 


32 












38 


11 


49 


23, . 










38 


13 


51 


24, . 










15 


14 


29 


2.5, 










16 


5 


21 


20 to 30, 










62 


24 


se 


31 to 35, 










21 


19 


40 


36 to 40, 










12 


7 


19 


Above 40, . 










6 


2 


8 


Totals, 


266 


109 


375 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Women and girls arrested in the streets but not properly 
to be classed as common night walkers numbered 4C, and 
the disposition of their cases was as follows: — 

Discharged at stations, 3 

Delivered to parents, ........ 1.^ 

Delivered to Board of State Charities, ..... 3 

Delivered to private institutions, ...... 3 

Placed on probation, ........ 11 

Sent to Women's Prison, ....... 6 

Sent to State Farm, 1 

Fined, .......... 2 

Pending 2 

Total, -io 

These persons, though conducting themselves in an im- 
nioral manner in the streets, were in most cases hardiv 
more than delinquent or wayward children, as the ways in 
which their cases were disposed of indicate. Their birth- 
places were as follows : — 

United States, ......... 41 

Canada and British Pro\-inces, . ..... 2 

Russia, .......... 2 

Austria, .......... 1 

Total, 46 

SiGxiFic.vxcE OF Ages axd Birthpl-vces. 
I now bring together for purposes which will appear later 
certain fresh information concerning the ages and the birth- 
places of women and girls prosecuted in Boston in a single 
year for specific offences of three kinds against the laws of 
chastity and morality. There is a prevalent belief that the 
women and girls who so offend are of immature age and in 
most cases of foreign birth. This belief has been created 
largely and fostered mainly by persons whose pecnliarity of 
temperament, lack of information or interested motives lead 
them to exaggerate what may be called the humanitarian 
aspect of vicx', as distinct from the legal aspect. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



31 



In 1909 the Boston police prosecuted 167 women and 
girls who were found in places resorted to for prostitution, 
though not the keepers, and in a majority of instances not 
even residents, of those places. They prosecuted 127 women 
and girls for fornication committed in other places, such 
as ordinary lodging houses or even the public parks and 
streets, which could not be proceeded against as houses of 
ill-fame. They prosecuted 375 women and girls as common 
night walkers. These three classes of prosecutions involved 
a total of CG9 women aTui girls, and it is with them that this 
information deals. The first table relates to the matter of 
birth, as follows : — 



BIRIUPLXCE. 


.^.-Tested in 

Resorts 

of Pnxtitn- 

tioti. 


Arrcst«J for 

Fomicatioo 
inOthtr 
Pla«5. 


Arrtsted as 

Cow woo 

Nigbt 


- 
ToUls. 


United States, 


. 


1 

113 


93 


266 


472 


Canada and British Proi 


•inces, 22 


12 


52 


S6 


Ireland, 








1 

19 


15 


22 


56 


England, 








5 


2 


4 


11 


Russia, 








4 


2 


7 


13 


Scotland, 








2 


- 


1 


3 


Austria, 








1 


- 


5 


6 


Germany, 








1 


1 


3 


5 


Hungao', 








- 


1 


1 


2 


Poland, 








- 


I 


1 


2 


Sweden, 








- 


- 


5 


5 


Xorway, 








- 


- 


3 


3 


Italy, . 








- 


- 


2 


2 


Spain, . 








- 


- 


2 


2 


France, 








- 


- 


1 


1 


Totab, . 


107 1 

1 


127 


375 i 

i 


669 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



The following table gives the ages of the G69 
under consideration, those of the native-born and 
foreign-born being stated separately: — 



[Jan. 

persons 
of the 



.VGIS. 



UaitjdSatCT. Foreign-bora. 



15, 
16, 
17, 
18, 
19, 
20, 



21, . 

22, . 
23, 

24, 

25, . 
26 to 30, 
31 to 35, 
36 to 40, 
41 to 50, 
Above 50, 
Totals, 



1 

1 

3 

9 

20 

23 

44 

62 

35 

20 

24 

109 

47 

26 

IS 

1 



472 



3 

4 

9 

7 

15 

16 

17 

6 

49 

41 

22 

4 

4 



197 



ToUh. 



1 
1 

3 

12 
24 
32 
51 
77 
71 
46 
30 
158 
SS 
48 



669 



The following considerations are appropriate to the stndv 
of the foregoing figures : — 

1. At twentj-one years of age or under, the native-bom 
in the second tzMe number 101, the foreign-bom 23; but 
between thirty and forty years the native-born are 73 and 
the foreign-bom »>3, Herein is no suj^estion of exceptional 
youthfulness among the foreign-bom- 

2. By the censtis of 1905 it appears that of the women 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT— No. 49. 33 

in Boston between the ages of eighteen and fifty, both in- 
clusive, 4C.C3 per cent, are foreign-born. Of the women 
offenders of the same ages treated in the foregoing tables, 
20.20 per cent, are foreign-born. Assurance is thus given 
that there is no excess of foreign-born among oflFenders of 
this character. 

3. The whole number of arrests in Boston in 1909 for 
all offences was 71,512, and the arrests of the foreign-bom 
were 45.77 per cent. Of the 669 women arrested for the 
particular offences under consideration here, the percentage 
of the foreign-bom was 29.45. It appears, therefore, that 
when foreign-bom women become law breakers their offences 
do not show an excess in the direction of sexual immorality. 

4. The- census of 1005 shows that of the 109,416 foreign- 
born females in Boston 102,535 had been residents of Massa- 
chusetts more than two years, and S5,277 more than five years. 
The percentage for two years' residence is 93.71 and for five 
years' residence 77.94. The foreign-born women in the fore- 
going tables number 197, and according to the above facts 
1S4 of them would have been residents of Massachusetts 
more than two years and 153 more than five years. 

5. Of the 197 foreign-bom women, 156 were natives of 
English-speaking countries, the birthplaces of half of thera 
being within a day's journey of Boston ; so that on the day 
of their arrival they wotild have displayed no peculiarity 
of language, dress or manners to distinguish them from the 
mass of the settled population. Of the 669 women, but 41 
of any age or of any length of residence here were natives 
of non-English-speaking countries. 

It should be remembered that these 669 women were 
arrested separately and from time to time through a period 
of twelve months; that they were presented to the courts, 
and with few exceptions were convicted ; that they were real 
women, gtiilty of real offences; and that an aggregate thus 
obtained is far different from a result produced through the 
multiplication of one "pet" case by ns many hundreds as 
the imagination of the multiplier will sanction. The facts 
as to ages, birthplaces and terms of residence herein set out 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

should be an assurance to the people of Boston that the im- | 

moral life of their citv is not sustained by the feeding to it i 

of young and helpless foreigners. ' 

" White Slavery." 

This topic follows naturally upon the foregoing matter. 
The term " white slave," as applied to a particular phase of 
prostitution, was coined many years ago, probably in London. 
It was meant at first to describe a girl or a woman who had 
been enticed from her home in a foreign country, placed in 
a brothel without suspicion on her part as to what she was to 
become, and there kept against her will. Soon it was made 
to include any girl or woman who passed from one country 
to another and entered a similar resort, even though she 
were of depraved character and fully understood her situa- ; 

tion. i 

Careless use has carried the term far beyond its first j 

or even its second meaning, and into the region of the in- { 

definable. Sober-minde<l persons employ it as a convenience, f 

often with an apology; but because of its sharp appeal to ' 

popular imagination it has become a plaything for persons 
of a different type, who use it to stimulate as well as to ex- 
press a certain form of hysteria. So effective is it in shock- 
ing the innocent and in moving the benevolent that no 
opportunity for its use is passed over, whether the " white 
slave " be a rowdy girl walking the streets, or a mature 
woman of hardened character and many criminal convic- 
tions. 

There is no ground for even reasonable suspicion that in 
Boston M'omcn and girls are forced into an immoral life 
or compelled to remain in it under physical coercion or re- 
straint. If such a case were known to the police, the victim j 
would be released at once and her keepers arrested. A per- J 
son who knew of such a case and failed to inform the police i 
would be as black a criminal as the criminals themselves; and } 
a person who pretended to such knowledge without possessing | 
it might fairly be set down as an irresponsible gossip. Single j 
cases arise from time to time in which it appears that a j 
woman is induced to lead an immoral life bv the threats or 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

persuasions of a depraved husband or so-called " lover ; " 
but rarc-h- in such ca.-es is it her tirst experience in mercenary 
immorality, and release from the life is open to her whenever 
she chooses to leave the man. 

In the great majority of cases prostitution is practiced 
in Boston by women and girls who do not depend upon it 
exclusively for a livelihood and do not live apart for the pur- 
pose. They are prepared for semi-professional immorality 
by lack or disregard of religious training; by early contact 
with the vicious in speech and action; by the craving for 
means to buy better clothes than they can afford; by flashy 
public entertainments and reading matter, which rouse their 
bad instincts, teach them the forms and methods of vice, 
enlarge upon its rewards in money and luxury, stimulate 
vanity, idealize the unchaste, and by coarse picture and 
printed sneer degrade the home and caricature the relations 
of husband and wife. The transition from a virtuous life 
to a life devoted wholly or in part to mercenary immorality, 
the only kind with which the law and the police have much 
to do, is rarely sudden. Almost always there is a prelimi- 
nary corrupting process of the kind just described, with long- 
ings for luxuries, excitement and '' good times; " and the bad 
road is much more likely to be taken at last xmder the 
guidance of a girl or a woman who has already travelled 
upon it than through the persuasions of men. 

Boston, like all large cities, attracts many loose or un- 
fortunate women and girls, who come to it from other places 
of their own free will ; and if they pursue an immoral life 
here, it is not because thev are forced to it by men or bv 
other women, but because they are vicious, or eager to spend 
more than they can honestly cam, or, in the aspect most 
favorable to them, are drawn to it through their necessities. 
It is not of much use, however, to expend sympathy upon 
a woman or a girl who is too proud to ask assistance from one 
of the scores of private benevolent organizations which 
alx)und in Boston, but is not too proud to solicit strange men 
in the streets, or to sell the little virtue that she ever had to 
chance acquaintances. 

Benevolent men and women in and about Boston have 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

]atclv befn shocked and imposed upon by means of a circular 
issued under the name of a chartered organization, soliciting 
subscriptions of money. The circular asserts that young 
girls are " sold " in Boston for immoral purposes, and " kept 
by heinous methods from their freedom ; " and to this it 
adds: " We believe the annual traffic in human souls in this 
city [Boston] amounts to hundreds." 

From a like source and printed in Boston newspapers of 
large circulation I find such assertions as the following: — 

There are at present in Bosion, according to a recent canvass, 
4Sf63 women gaining a livelihood altogether or in part for immoral 
purposes. 

The life of a " white slave " is on sa average five years, and where 
there are nearly 5,000 siich women, it follows that their ranks must 
be recruited by 1,000 each year. Where do they come from? I find 
that the Provinces supply the largest quota. 

The last sentence is as grossly libellous upon a worthy 
element in the population as the preceding sentences are 
absurd. It has been shown already in this report that of 
the C69 women and girls arrested in Boston last year for 
any of the offences which might connect them with " white 
slavery," in even the most fanciful use of that term, 472 
were natives of the United States and 86 were natives of 
Canada or the British Provinces. And yet this authority 
finds that " the Provinces supply the largest quota." The 
" recent canvass " which produced exactly 4.963 as the num- 
ber of women in Boston gaining a livelihood altogether " or 
in part " by immoral means is clearly a myth, and the 
calculations based upon it are equally mythical. Xot all the 
agencies in Boston combined, the police department included, 
could make a canvass of such a character that would be worth 
the paper upon which it was recordefl. 

Such assertions as these would be unworthy of notice but 
that they are used in soliciting money; that they secure pub- 
lication in Boston newspapers, which are read by hundreds 
of thousands of persons who have no means of detecting the 
folly and the falsehood ; and that they are copied and com- 
mented upon in all parts of the country. 

Because of these considerations, I felt it to be my duty to 



I 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT— No. 49. 37 

the city of Boston to secure through the newspapers, under 
my oflicial signature, the widest possible circulation to the 
following statement : — 

A report of the United States Immigration Commission, 
relative to the " importation and harboring of women for 
immoral purposes," was presented last week to Congress, 
and parts of it were printed in the Boston newspapers. 
This is the so-called " white slave traffic," and as many per- 
sons have been led to believe that Boston was deeply in- 
volved, I have obtained from Washington and examined 
carefully a full copy of the repoit. Though it consists of 
01 printed pages, the name of Boston is mentioned but four 
times, always in the most casual manner, as, for instance, 
that it is one of the dozen cities in which investigations were 
made, and that it is among the seaports through which women 
who have been sent back to their own countries may some- 
times re-enter the United States. There is no suggestion of 
the existence in Boston of conditions which prevail in some 
other cities and are fully described in the report. While 
so many persons and organizations are endeavoring to pro- 
mote the material welfare of Boston, its good name, which is 
better than " great riches," needs to be protected from the 
assaults of societies and individuals whose recent use of the 
" white slave " as a means of stimulating subscriptions has 
been varied, persistent, and, I think I may justly say, un- 
scrupulous. 

SECURrN'O EviDEXCE. 

In my last report I explained the difficulty of securing 
evidence strong enough to convict for immoral practices, 
especially in the case of keepers of houses of ill fame, even 
though appearances M-ere sufficient to convince an ordinary 
observer. The police, moreover, stand at a disadvantace 
in so far as results are concerned, for they are compelled to 
keep within the bounds of both law and morals; they are 
allowed to enter suspected places as police officers with search 
warrants, or individually, under orders, to observe and re- 
port, but on no account to take part in immoral acts, or so to 
place themselves as to bo open to the charge of immorality. 
Any private organization, however, with no official respok- 



3S POLICE COiDIISSIONER. [Jan. 

sil)ilitv and eager to make a case, is free to hire men and 
Avonien by the day or the week who may go to any lengths 
for the sake of procuring evidence. They sometimes betray 
their employers, sometimes invent or exaggerate in order to 
earn their pay, and with juries have the standing which 
they deserve. But the police department cannot use its men 
in such ways, and would not if it could. The men of the 
police forc-e are required to be manly and moral, and what- 
ever they can do under their official obligation in a moral 
and jiianly way for the suppression of vice they will do, — 
nothing more. They have not the gift of impersonating de- 
generates, and none among thorn would be allowed to spend 
his days and nights with degraded men and women for the 
sake of securing a conviction. 

In some other cities the practice is different, and in sup- 
port of the attitude of the Boston police department, though 
it needs no support, I may properly q»iote a single mild 
passage from a long and searching criticism uttered from 
the bench by !Mr. Justice Crane of the Xew York Supreme 
Court, and reported in August, 1909 : — 

" Such work," he says, " is revolting and should not be 
countenanced for a moment, much less compelled. A police- 
man may be obliged to do many disagreeable things, but he 
is human, and should not be subjected to such temptations 
or debasing influences, and I am confident this community 
does not demand or expect it. To close a disorderly house | 

we liuve not gr.t to degrade young men. It is said that the 
evidence can be procured in no other way. In this I must 
differ, for such places have frequently been closed either upon 
testimony of occupants or else upon what can be seen going | 

on daily. One does not have to take poison to discover its 
deadly effects. I trust this word of warning from me will , 

stop such practices." | 

The Boston method has its compen'sation in the fact that | 

police testimony has high standing with the courts. Of 112 1 

persons arrested in 1909 for keeping houses of ill fame. 90 
were convicted: and the 13 discharges represented usually 
those cases in which two persons, such as husband and wife, 



15 



:i 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 39 

are arrested at the same place, and the individual respon- 
sibility can be determined only on hearing in court Of 
302 persons arrested in houses of ill fame, other than the 
keepers, only six ^ere discharged ; and of 375 night walkers 
arrested, only two were discharged. 

TuE Futility of Civil Procedure. 
Surprise is often expressed by lawyers and others that 
the police do not have recourse in the pursuit of houses of 
ill fame to Revised Laws, chapter 101, section 8, which is 
as follows : — 

The supreme judicial court or the superior court shall have juris- 
diction in equity, upon an information filed by the district attorney 
for the district or upon petition of the board of police or police 
commissioners, or other authority having control of the police, or 
of not less than ten legal votere of a city or town, stating that a 
building, place or tenement therein is resorted to for prostitution, 
lewdness or illegal gaming, or is used for the illegal keeping or sale 
of intoxicating liquors, to restrain, enjoin or abate the same as a 
common nuisance. 

The Boston police long ago tried this law, and found it 
wanting. It is a rule of the department that when a convic- 
tion has been secured the owner of the real estate involved 
shall be notified by the commanding officer on a printed 
form provided for the purpose. In consequence of such 
notice or of representations made to him personally, an 
owner who is a good citizen will remove an offending tenant. 
But unfortunately many such places are owned by persons 
who are well aware of the uses to which they are put, who 
derive large incomes from them, and will do nothing towards 
removing nuisances except under legal compulsion. At this 
point the law should come in, and its weakness may oest 
be illustrated by means of a case which actually arose within 
the year. 

The secretary of a private society represented that he had 
secured sufficient evidence against a particular house, and 
asked the police department to apply for an injunction 
against the owner of the property. A petition was made in 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the name of the Police Commissioner, the person proceeded 
against offered no defence, and an injunction against that 
person specifically -was granted. 

The situation then vrzs this: if it could be shown that the 
house was resorted to for purposes of prostitution after the 
injunction had been issued, the owner of the real estate 
might be punished for contempt of court; but to show such 
use would require sul«5tantially the same kind and quantity 
of fresh evidence that would be needed to secure criminal 
conviction of the keeper of the house. 

The injunction became operative September 14, and the 
police continued their se^rchcb and surveillance of the place. 
Then the expected happened, just as it had happened in all 
previous cases of civil procedure within the experience of 
the police. The title of the real estate was transferred, 
and the injunction, except under legal conditions which 
probably would never arise, became worthless. The proceed- 
ings had cost about $75, and would have cost a great deal 
more but for the fact that the legal preparations and the 
|i appearances in court were made by the commissioner's sec- 

retary. It was worth while, however, in order that a fresh 
test of the futility of dvil procedure might be given. 

In the enthusiasm of the few days which elapsed between 
the issue of the injunction and its overthrow by the simple 
but expectc-d process of a transfer of the title of the property, 
the secretary, at whose request the police department had 
begun proceedings, issued in print to the members of his 
society and the contribators to its fund, several of the Boston 
daily newspapers also publishing it, the following account 
of the affair: — 

At the cri'ont request of the pastor of an institutional church 
situnted in the danger-zone in the South End, your secretary under- 
took the task of patherrcT the necessary court evidence against an 
immoral honse alleged to have continued unmoteted for twenty-two 
years. Sinjilar repeated appeals to the police by that pastor had 
been fniitlfc=s. Tlie poli<Te eaplain of the precinct confessed to your 
secretary that he was f-jm-eries^ to close this house. Yet in ten 
days our agents had galiiered overwhelming eridence of the extent 
and character of the illegal b-jsiness. We instituted an equity action 



!l 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 41 

under a law which allows an injunction to issue to restrain and 
abate the nuisance. The injunction was allowed and a decree issued 
which if not obe}-ed will bring the offenders into court for contempt. 
If the authorities will now station officers in front of the place as 
they have in other instances been placed before immoral houses 
not under injunction, the remedy will be effective. If this is not 
done, the society will have to see that the court decree is enforced. 
It would seem that the public could expect at least such ser^-ice from 
the police, especially when the dignity of the court is in question. 

The fantastic assertions and snggestions made in this state- 
ment have already been answered in part; the official po- 
lice record of the house itself for the two years ended Nov. 
30, 1909, will dispose of the remainder. The house was 
searched with warrants Dec. 6 and 15, 1907, Feb. 22, !^^arch 
13, 19 and 21, April 17 and 2.5, :S[aj 23 and 26 and Aug. 
13, 1908. In the same period it was visited, imder orders, 
but without warrants, by policemen from other stations, in 
citizens' clothes, Jan. 28, Feb. 16 and 28, Zklarch 4, 10 
and 15, April 5, 15, 18, 22 and 25, June 25, and July 
9, 21 and 22, 1908. No single search developed evidence 
sufficient for a prosecution; and the policemen in citizens' 
clothes were either refused admittance because of suspicion 
as to their identity, or, if admitted, failed to obtain evidence 
because restricted in their action by their orders and by their 
personal sense of decency. But by combining all possible 
points of evidence a case for the court was prepared, and Aug. 
13, 1908, the keeper of the place was tried and convicted. 
What was the result ? A fine of $50, which was paid with- 
out a murmur, and the nominal proprietorship was passed 
on to another woman. 

FolloK-ing this, and before the sale of the property in 
October, 1909, the house was searched three times and was 
visited twenty-one times by policemen in plain clothes. They 
failed to secure the evidence which the private agents secured 
in ten days, for the .sole reason that if their acts had qualified 
them to give the testimony which the agents gave in court, 
they would have been discharged from the police force. 

This house is closed now for the same reason that scores 
of other houses of long standing in that and other neighbor- 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

hoods have recently been closed ; and the reason is that the 
persistent but lawful course of the police has so alarmed 
keepers, inmates and patrons that the business in those places 
has ceased to pay. There is nothing peculiar in the case of 
this one house, except that it presents the single instance in 
two years in which the police in the prosecution of keepers 
of houses of ill fame received assistance in any form from 
anv source other than such as their own efforts developed. 

In the same street, which is short but for more than a 
generation has been notorious, nine other houses have been 
nnder constant surveillance. 

Houses A. B and C have boon sciuchcd, but no evidence of 
immoral business has been found. 

Houses D and E were searched, but, though the evidence 
found was insufficient, the keepers took warning, moved out, 
and respectable tenants took their places. 

Honse F was searched, and four arrests for fornication 
were made; a warrant for keeping a house of ill fame was 
refused by the court, but the keeper move^l, and the house is 
now occupied by respectable tenants. 

House G, lodging house, keeper convicted of keeping a 
house of ill fame, was fined $50, and the immoral business 
has been stopped. 

House H, apartment occupied by man and wife; wife ar- 
rested Jtily 4, 1909, as a common night walker, and case 
placed on file; July 7, 1909, two persons arrested for forni- 
cation; July 9, 1909, husband arrested for keeping a house 
of ill fame, and fined $50 ; moved away, and place now occu- 
piefl by respectable people. 

Honse I, keeper arrested for keeping a house of ill fame, 
fined §50 and moved away; under new tenant four arrests 
for fornication were made, but warrant for keeping a house 
of ill fame was refused by the court, and the house is still 
watched. 

SrppREssiox OF Public axd SK^ri-PCBLic Immoealitt. 

The last annual report described fully the work of the po- 
lice for the suppression of public and sonii-publie immorality 
during the year which ended Xov. 30, 190S. It was the first 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 43 

time in the thirty years of police control by commissioners 
that the subject had appeared in an annual report otherwise 
than in the general statistical tables of crime. The -work 
was entered upon two years ago with deliberation, and has 
since been carried forward and will continue to be carried 
forward in accordance ^vith a well-considered plan. In ex- 
planation of the plan upon which the police are acting, this 
passage may be quoted from the report of 1908 : — 

Public clamor will never close a bouse of ill fame; but it will 
spread demoralization tliroiiirh the community. The people who live 
by this business care nothing: for public opinion. They can be 
reached only throujrh the silent, relentless work of the police. 

And again : — 

I am not so simple as to suppose that any combination of effort 
by courts and police can ever drive vice of this character from a 
city which has 020,000 inhabitants, and, for police purposes, almost 
double that number. It is tryinj and thankless work, which falls 
mainly upon the police of three divisions. They have been faithful 
and energetic, and will so continue; not in the expectation of ac- 
complishing: the impossible, but with the determination to make the 
business of y\ec so hazardous and unprofitable that as many as pos- 
sible will be driven out of it and others will be deterred from taking 
it up. 

Xothing has happened in the past year to change either 
the plan or the point of view. Police action has not been 
delayed by the hostility of prosecuted criminals and their 
friends; neither has it been hurried by the impatience of per- 
sons of good intention who do not understand. It is a pecu- 
liar circumstance that manifestations of both feelings became 
public in the second half of the second year in which the 
police had done more than ever had been done before in Bos- 
ton for the suppression of public and semi-public immorality. 
It would be unfortunate for the city if either kind of attack 
were to divert a Police Commissioner from an effective and 
permanent course of action upon a subject so important and 
yet so difficult. 

The one duty of the police in this matter, and the wisest 
policy as well, is to enforce the laws. No attempt to trans- 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

form a house or a neighborhood -which is devoted to vice for j 

the sake of the money which it earns can be of permanent j 

benefit unless founded on law. If houses of ill fame can be J 

closed on a large scale, and immoral women can be driven I 

from the streets bj mere threats on the part of the police, 
that circumstance is in itself a reasonable indication that the 
business had previously been tolerated, and that when the | 

spasm of reform has passed it will again be tolerated. People 
of this character understand the kind and the quantity of 
evidence needed by the police to obtain a conviction, and how 
hard it is to secure it ; they regard lightly the sentences usu- 
ally imposed ; they know their legal rights, and are assisted 
in maintaining them by expert attorneys. They will give up 
the business only when convinced through constant but lawful 
pressure that it has ceased to be profitable, and that their 
chances of gain and immunity are better elsewhere. Their 
old plan of removal from one police division to another is now 
of no avail, for the police pressure is equal in all parts of the 
city to which they would think of migrating. 

Here is the illustrative record of one woman, with the 
street numbers omitted: In the summer of 1908 she occupied 
an apartment in Bennot Street, and let rooms to night walk- 
ers; searched Aug. 8, 1908, but evidence was insufficient to 
prosecute. Sept. 1, 1908, she moved to Harrison Avenue, 
where she opened a lodging house; searched Nov. 29, 1908, 
and four arrests for fornication made ; arrested Dec. 2, 1908, 
for keeping a house of ill fame, and fined $50 ; appealed, but 
withdrew appeal and paid fine, i^foved off the division, but 
in Jnly, 1909, reappeared in an apartment in Broadway Ex- 
tension, where she let rooms to night walkers ; searched July 
24, 1909, and liquor seized ; evidence insufficient to prosecute 
for keeping a house of ill fame, but convicted Sept. 2, 1909, 
for violation of the liquor law; fined $50, and vacated the 
premises, ^^^lere this woman, who is a type of many, will 
reappear cannot be foretold; but wherever it may be, the 
police will mett her. 

In the last annual report allusion was made to a police 
movement in 1894 to which a great deal of publicity was 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 45 

"^iven at the time, and in the report surprise was expressed 
that the recorded results in the form of prosecutions were so 
meager. I have examined again the department records of 
that period and have consulted with officers who were in posi- 
tions of authority at the time, and I find that results were 
obtained bv police threatenings rather than by process of law. 
As a consequence, the persons who closed their places and 
scattered soon recovered their courage and resumed the busi- 
ness, knowing that they could be punished only after con- 
viction of an offence against the law. 

In confirmation of this belief, I quote from a letter ad- 
dressed by a clergyman to the chairman of the Board of Po- 
lice in the July following the general agitation of 1894. Con- 
cerning a particularly bad neighborhood, the letter speaks in 
part as follows : — 

The time has now come for the law as ■well as the GospeL They 
are paralyzing all our efforts to do good here. Some houses are 
worse than others, and I send herewith a list of the most notorious, 
which I desire to have cleaned out immediately. I am especially 
anxious that the keepers of the places are caught and convicted. 
Only in this way can the evil be eradicated. You did a fine work 
here some months ago. But they are back again, as brazen and bad 
as ever. The only thing to do is to keep them on the move. I realize 
the difficulty your force has to get con\ncting eddence, and shall be 
glad to render them any assistance in my power. 

The houses and the persons of the character described, in 
that neighborhood and elsewhere, have now been kept under 
constant but legal pressure for two years. Some of the re- 
sults of the work are shown in the tables and the reading mat- 
ter already presented in this report ; but they present only a 
suggestion of the detail. 

If it were proper to publish the addresses, a remarkable 
list of notorious houses lately closed could be given. One in 
particular, situated in what is now a business street, had been 
carried on as a house of ill fame for fifty years, with the e.x- 
ccption of the period between June 1, 1883, and Aug. 1, 
1880. It was searched often, and convictions were some- 
times obtained; but as a different woman was put forward 



46 POLICE COMmSSIONER. [Jan. 

on each occasion as the ostensible proprietress, the penalties j 

■were fines of $50 or $100, which were merely charged to j 

profit and loss. At the time of the police movement ot 1S94: ' 

the inmates of the house were sent to live in rooms outside, 
but business was continued by the proprietress through as- 
signations made by telephone. In a few months, the storm 
having blown over, they returned, and matters went on as 
before. The record of the past two years shows that nine 
searches were made with warrant.«, and that officers from other 
stations were sent to the place twenty-six times, without se- 
curing entrance, as only persons kno\vn in the house were 
admitted. But the business was so disturbed that the search 
of Oct. 22, 1909, showed that but two women were living in 
the house, that there was no liquor to be found and very little 
food. Three weeks later, Xovember 12, the house was va- 
cated, the telephone taken out, most of the furniture sent to 
an auction room, the rest removed and the doors were locked. 
Lawful pressure on the part of the police had made the busi- 
ness unprofitable, and when the proprietress became con- 
vinced that the pressure was to be continued, she gave up. 

The following is the record for two years of a house which 
has not yet been closed : twenty-three searches and two liquor 
seizures; se%'en different women put forward as the proprie- 
tress, representing a change after each of the following con- 
victions: March 3, 1908, violating liquor law, fined $50; May 
12, 1908, liquor law, $50; Aug. 12, 1908, keeping a noisy 
and disorderly house, $50; Jan. 29, 1909, liquor law, $50; 
March .3, 1909, liquor law, $50; March 26, 1909, liquor 
law, $50. 

A notorious house was closed after the following prose- 
cutions in three months: violating the liquor law, fined $50; 
liquor law, $100; liquor law, discharged by court; house of 
ill fame, fined $100; hou=e of ill fame, new ostensible pro- 
prietress, finrd $50; liquor law, dischargetl by court. 

Another house was closed in July. 1909, after a siege of 
eighteen months, in which there were fifteen searches without 
result, and the following prosecutions: house of ill fame, 
fined $100; house of ill fame, disscharged by court; house of 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 47 

ill fame, placed on probation; four women arrested as idle 
and disorderly, fined each $15 ; again, five women arrested on 
the same charge, fined each $20. 

Another house in the same street which closed also in July, 
1009, was searched four times without result, but ac other 
times evidence sufficient for the following prosecutions in less 
than two years, involving seven different keepers, was ob- 
tained: violating liquor law, fined $50; house of ill fame, 
fined $50 ; liquor law, $50 ; house of ill fame, $50 ; house of ill 
fame, $50; house of ill fame, $50; house of ill fame, dis- 
charged by court. Though the house is closed, a new war- 
want is still out for a former proprietress once fined $50, who 
has disappeared. 

Scores of similar cases might be cited, but these will 
suffice to show to the uninformed but impatient citizen that a 
rap on the door and an order from a policeman will not close 
a house of ill fame; that liquor warrants must be obtained, 
plans laid and searches made by groups of policemen ; that 
the disappointments in securing evidence are far more numer- 
ous than the successes; that even when the police think ihey 
have evidence enough it often proves in the sight of the courts 
insufficient to convict; and that the penalties on conviction 
are not such as to close a place which is doing a profitable 
business. 

It is a fact, moreover, that Boston in its treatm.ent of what 
is commonly called the " social evil " is peculiar in one im- 
portant, perhaps vital respect. Boston is almost the only 
city of its size or perhaps of half its size in the United States 
in which the police refuse to set apart prescribed localities 
where houses of ill fame may be carried on without penalty 
or interference: and Boston is right. All law breakers here 
are liable to the penalties of the law and the la.st who should 
be exempted are those who make a business of vice. But in 
other cities the localities in which vice is free are as well 
known .^s the Common is known in Boston. In a report re- 
cently published by the chief of police of a city of moderate 
si/e in the middle west, he cites as proof of his severity 
towards evil doers the fact that he has ordered the keepers 



-•i ?( (I.K l: ( I '.M.MI<.<IuX1:Pw [Jan. 

■■•: :.;v.-ci= '■£ ill tamo ::: iho privileged tcrritoiy to take the 
zic.::.-: plates ott their ucv-r- tnJ remove their red light.-. 

I rv'-eixcd lately froni a United States coiniui.-iioner a 
.-.■•Lvlrde of que-tiou-- i'k-ntical with tho-e nent to all other 
citiv--?. It was made i:p in the belief that the toleration of 
vioc :n iiarticiilar loe-a".Ltie= e.xisted here as eUewiiere. J'lit 
the c"-/--tions were so foreign to all conditions in JJoston that 
pric-ti'-allv none cou'.] I-;- an-wered. and I was obliged to say 
in rr.y rejily : — 

71.e sitnaiii'ii in Bo.-t..:; •- t. :ii!ly (lirierciit from ihat existiiijr in 
(••:r.rr (iiir's. as indicatvd by t!.e schedule of questions received by 
nic-. I:. I'.o.-lnn there is nerher in law u^m- by undei-slandin;,' aiiv 
.v:-c::-;c. set aiiiut witiiin ■vvl.;..--; prostitution may Ije praelicod without 
leal liability. Rec-a'.atiic. ar.d registration in the sense implied in 
yizr S'ji.ednle are thc-rt:\'re i:.. possible. All persons engasin? in the 
h-.:rl.-es5 or cniEmittinc nc:s f-.'.rrani- to law are ]..ru.scciitcd wherever 
'ouT.d and whenever s'.::l^ie:.t evidence can be obtained. 

T;;]; Police Attitcdk. 
The aii'tude of the i;'..?"'.n police department towards pub- 
lic :::.■; -(-uii-public s-.\-.;.il immorality and some oi the etTects 
of ;:- -.vork in tw... y^ ar- !.;;ve lieen shown in part in this ro- 
:-or" and in the repi^ct f'-r 1005. The pi-'lice have producf-d 
re--;'--, a- it is tluir d"\v :•'• do. but they are not re-p'^nsildc 
:-r -'Z.'- di-fip of the p i- ■:.'!!- stream of de-cription and speeii- 
lation T^iu-hing the •"!]•:-: sr.bjeot ^'n earth \\diich lately has 
]}f(Ti T-'jured thr^jtiih -••::;e nf-wspap^er colunms into thon-ands 
f.f ^•■■";=''-]iolils. It i- the dr.ry of the police to do this work. 
ha--:-.] as it is to n.ai.'.y men: and they do it faitlifnlly as 
-worn '■.i'ncers of the law. r.'-'t a; vrdunteer- ^vifh a taste fi'ir 
ir. J^y iiK-linati'''n. ::)':-:-over. as well as imder orders, they 
V.-. .rk in silence, yev.-.c .-.f searches and arre-ls for viola- 
tior. <■■: tIio laws a^'ain-t i::i!:.'-.rality i- tK^t fnrni-bed ly the 
pol;.v-. ;iiid the new-pa" vr r' p^rts. r-r.raic r.r =eii>;;tiri!;al. fnr- 
merly ba-ed there<-.n. :.o l.-.nc:er appear. Paid auetits of 
?,-,(-.;.---;..: fiji,] amateur " -■•'■i''I'-'C:ists." s^'^me sincere but nnwi-e. 
'■rb- r- 7i]>"-r'-(-iKiry ;::. : :•■••!■;:■--. arr- f-iidrav..i-iiig t^-" uW tla- 
b'lar.k tIiii- creati-d. T!.-- latir-er which tiny i>:-int serve- oidy 
To .r :•(■ the dancer^ 'r.- ':-::ri>''-ity '"•f the i;iii'>c('iit. ti> ^rra'ify 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 49 

the prurient tastes of the depraved, and to supplement appro- 
]iriately the lascivious printed and pictured suggestions which 
occupy adjoining pages and constitute for thousands of boys 
and girls their first and progressive lessons in vice. The po- 
lice prosecute only liecause the laws are violated. Thac is the 
extent of their official right and obligation; but as citizens 
thc-y rejoice in good work by whomsoever honestly carried on, 
which tends to preserve the innocent from participation in 
vice or to reclaim them should they fall. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPIIEX O'MEARA, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



oO 



PiiIJCK COMMIS.<I<>\ER. 



[Jan. 



.o-.vs ; 



TIIK DKrARTMKNT 



The ]■■'.':<■>■■ ilc-]>;irliii( lit i> iif iiivrf-r.t c<.ii>Ti:!;tc-(l as fol- 



I'i.!ii>' ('(lInnli^^io!l(■r. 



>u;'(-riii!'-:. 
I)c;.iny - ;; 
Cir.ef iii-|'' 
C.'iptiiiii-. 
lu.-lH-c-Ior-. 
I:i~i>cclfir '■: 
u-!iarit . 



.V-lhllMit-. 



irn;:i:'.-s Iii-u- 



Tl(< /''..'>'■■ Forct. 

1 l'titro:rav:; 
24 R'-<f-rvf ::: 

.•■;u 

T.,:al. . 



\.V7,:, 

l-'l 

1.439 



Dirc-cior, ... 1 I.in'-rnf-:.. 

.\>-istriiit ';:.--'V.r. 1 iJrivf-r. 

Ft'rcrnan. ... 1 

."■i;::!:ilrii<-:.. . (i T'»tal. 

Mfcliaiii'-. ... 3 



•-•'J 



fkrk-. . 
."^u-a'i.u'ra;J.'- 

Matrcn^ '.:' : 

Tifi:i. 
Mairoiis I,: 
Firc-iDcii '•:: r 
V;:;i drivir-. 
r'^p.-iiian '.:' 



.■; .\--i.-tr;r!: .-•(•wap: •■!' citv 
7 T'!'-;'hor.^ ■ ;>frat'>ri. 



'•'■ .-Ii-a::i'i- 



■I". 



13 

1 



1 



P'.:i<<. (V,rr 
P..!ic.:- for- 
^:<:::al^.■,•. 



-I'l'K-r a;.'l -■ crciarv. 



.4:>.' 
•JO 



< .ra 



1..".4-- 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IENT — Xo. 49. 



51 



DlSTEIBCTIOX AXD ChAXGES. 

The distribution of the force is shown bj Table I. During 
the year 150 patrolmen -were promoted from the reserve men, 
and 02 reserve men were appointed] ; 4 patrolmen discharged ; 
13 patrolmen and 4 reserve men resigned; 2 captains, 1 
lieutenant. 1 sergeant and IG patrolmen retired on p>ension; 
1 captain and 9 patrolmen died. (.See Tables III., IV., 
v., VI.) 

Poi.K K OfFICKKS IXJIRKD WlflLE OX DcTY. 

The following stnteiiirnt shows the number of police 
officers injured while on duty during the past year, the num- 
I>or of duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes 
of the injuries: — 



now INJIRED. 


Xumber rf 
Men InjuTfd. 


OstieslosL 


In arresting prisoners, ..... 

In pursuing criminals, ..... 

By sto[)ping runaways. ..... 

By cars and other vehicles at crossings, . 
\'arious other causes, ..... 


19 

13 

2 

5 
32 


160 

728 

143 
437 


Totals, ....... 


71 1 1,468 



WOHK OF THE DeP.VETMEXT. 

A tresis. 
The total numl>cr of jx^rsons arrested, 
arrest as that of a separate pers^'m, was 
CS,14f; the i>rfceding year, iK-ing an increase of 3,366. The 
percentage of increase was as follows: — 



counting each 
71..T12, against 



OfTpiiccs a:;ainst th" jxTso'i, . . . . 

OfT-^nccs against pr(>i>,Tty. committed with vio- 
lence, ........ 

OffiMices against pni|>crly, committed without \-io- 
bnce, ........ 

Malicious ofTenccs against property, 
Fo'-g^rj' anil ofTcnces against the currency, . 
Off 'nc'cs azain-^t tlie license laws, 
OfTcnces against chastity, morality, etc., 
Offences not include*! in the foregoing. 



PwCent. 

Decrease, 12.11 
Decrease, 24.13 



Decrease, 


6.55 


Decrease, 


4. 86 


Decrease, 


6.57 


Decrease, 


7.12 


Increase, 


23.48 


Increase, 


7.01 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



There were 6,128 persons arrested on -warrants and 
56,480 without warrants; 8,904 persons were summoned by 
the court; 69,086 persons were held for trial and 2,423 were 
released from custody. The number of males arrested was 
64.385 ; of females, 7,127; of foreigners, 32,736, or, appro.xi- 
mately, 45.77 per cent.; of minors, 8,101. Of the total num- 
ber arrested, 27,953, or 39.08 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X., XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States 


f 




. 38,776 


British Provinces, 




. 5,602 


Ireland, 




. 13,908 


England, 






. 1,784 


France, 






160 


Germany, 






556 


Italy, . 






. 2,648 


R«f5sia, . 






. 3,176 


China, . 






474 


Greece, . 






378 


Sweden, 






1,271 


Scotland, 






923 


Spain, . 






45 


Xorway, 






378 


Poland, 






357 


Australia, 






21 


Anstria, 






186 


Portugal, 






89 


Finland, 






209 


Deiunark, 






96 


Holland, 






21 



Wales, . 


33 


East Indiffl, . 


7 


West Inifips, . 


78 


Turkey, 


78 


South .\merica. 


11 


Switzerland, . 


15 


Belgium, 


53 


Armenia, 


26 


Africa, , 


6 


Hungary, 


33 


Asia, 


11 


Arabia, 


1 


Mexico, 


8 


Japan, , 


17 


Sj-ria, . 


66 


Rouroania, 


4 


Cuba, . 


2 


Egj-pt. . - 


1 


Philippines, . 


4 



Total, 



71,512 



The number of arrests for the year is 71,512, being an 
increase of 3,366 over last year, and 15,513 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 45,321 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 2,853 more than last year, 
and 7,260 more than the average for the past five years. Of 
the arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase 
of 6.66 per cent, in males and an increase of 7.25 per cent. 
in females from last year. (See Tables XI., XII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (71,512), 842 
were for violations of the city ordinances; that is to say, 1 
arrest in 84 was for such offence, or 1.17 per cent. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUJIExNT— No. 49. 53 

Fiftv-five and ninety-one hundredths per cent, of the per- 
sons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and 
forty. (See Table XIII.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 17,407, and 
the fines amounted to $161,399.84. (See Table XII.) 

One hundred and two persons were committed to the State 
Prison, 6,5CG to the House of Correction, 1C5 to the Women's 
Prison, 254 to the Reformatory Prison and 2,391 to other 
institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 4,130^^2 ; 
the total number days' attendance in court by officers was 
49,674: and the witness fees earned by ihom amounted to 
$14,218.39. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $112,802.39. 

Fifty-seven witnesses were detained at station houses; 
35 persons were accommodated with lodgings. — a decrease 
of 37 from last year. There was a decrease of S.09 per cent, 
from last year in the number of insane persons taken in 
charge, an increase of about 3.84 per cent, in the number of 
sick and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 
33.72 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property reported stolen in the city 
for the five years from 1905 to 1909, inclusive, was 
$147,108.81 ; in 1909 it was $167,065.96, or $10,897.15 more 
than the average. The amount of projicrty stolen in and out 
of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, was 
$242,549.84, as against $217,589.67 last year, or $24,900.17 
more. 

The average amount of fines imposed by courts for the five 
years from 1905 to 1909, inclusive, was $126,896.20; in 
1909 it was $161,399.84, or $34,503.64 more than the 
average. 

The average number of days' attendance in court was 
39,908.4; in 1909 it was 49,674, or 9,765.6 more than the 
average. The aver.nge amount of witness fees earned was 
$11,733.05; in 1909 it was $14,217.39, or $2,484.-34 more 
than the average. (See Table XII.) 



54 POLICE CO^IMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Drunkenness. 
In arrests for drunkenness, the average number per day 
-nras 124. There were 2,853 more persons arrested than in 
190S, — an increase of 6.71 per cent.; 47.62 per cent, of 
the arrested persons were nonresidents and 49.42 per cent, 
were of foreign birth. (See Table XI.) 

Bureau of Criminal Imestigation. 
The- " Rogues Gallery " cow contains 32,632 photographs, 
— 2.'>.S29 of which are photographs with Bertillon measure- 
ments, a system used by this department during the past ten 
years. In accordance with au act passed by the Legislature, 
March 28, 1899 (chapter 203, sections 1 and 2), we are 
allowed photographs with Bertillon measurements of all con- 
ricts now in the several prisons in this State, and of those 
who hare been confined there and who are measured under 
that ^stem and photographs taken, — a number of which 
have already been added to our Bertillon cabinets. This, 
together with the adoption of the system by this department 
in 1S03, is and will continue to be of great assistance in the 
identification of criminals. A large number of important 
identifications have thus been made during the year, for this 
and other police departments, through which the sentences in 
many instances have been materially increased. The records 
of 1,-^36 criminals have been added to the records kept in 
this Bureau, which now contains a total of 32,396. The num- 
ber of cases reported at this office which have been investi- 
gated during the year is 13,474. There are 20,27.5 cases 
recorded on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and 
rer>orts made on these cases are filed away for futtire refer- 
ence. Letters and telegrams to the number of about 2.614 
yearly are now filed with the numbered reports to which they 
refer, so that all the papers pertaining to a case can be found 
in the same envelope, thus simplifying matters, when infor- 
mation is desired on any case. The system of indexing, 
adopted by this Bureau for the use of the department, now 
contains a list of records, histories, photographs, dates of 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



55 



arrests, etc., of about 120,000 persons. There are also 
'■' histories and press clippings," now numbering G,131, by 
this Bureau, in envelope form, for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification, which was 
adopted in June, 1000, has progressed in a satisfactory man- 
ner, and with its development it is expected that the identi- 
fication of criminals will he facilitated. It has become very 
useful in tracing criminals and furnishing corroborative evi- 
dence when serious crimes have been committed. 

The statistics of the wi:«rk of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 
ment ; but, as the duties are of a special character, the follow- 
ing statement will be of interest : — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . 1,071 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to officers from those States, ...... 43 

Number of cases investigated, ...... 10,564 

Number of extra duties performed, ..... 1,SS3 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated, and evidence prepared for trial in court, ... 73 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated, and evidence prepared for court, .... 12 

Numl)er of d.ays *pcnt in court by officers, .... 4,431 

Amount of stolen property recovered, .... $139,707.46 

Number of years' imprisonment impo.sod by court, S.33 years, 9 months 

Number of photographs added to "Rogues' Gallerj-," . . 2,7S4 



Miscellaneous Business. 



1906-07. 


190T-0S. 


190S-09. 


.\bandoned children cared for, 


25 


33 


S 


.Accidents reported, .... 


2,S30 


2,579 


2,978 


Huildings found open and made secure, . 


2,509 


2,559 


3,420 


Cases investigated, .... 


21,559 


24,397 


25,6.56 


Dangerous buildings re))ortcd. 


60 


29 


11 


Dangerous chimnevs rcjjorted. 


50 


41 


6 


Dead bodies cared for. 


336 


279 


343 


Defective bridges re])ortcd, . 


5 


5 


7 


Defective cesspools reported. 


211 


133 


199 


Defective coal holes, .... 


o 


9 


1 


Defective drains and vaults reported, 


4 


3 


3 


Defective fire alarms and clocks rc])ortcd. 


6 


9 


S 


Defective gas pipes rei)ortcd, 


45 


40 


79 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Miscellaneous Business - 


- Concludt 


>d. 






190S-0T. 


1907-08. 


1908-09. 


Defective hydrants reported. 


&4 


87 


104 


Defective lamps reported, . 


9,1S7 


8,928 


13,247 


Defective manholes, . . . . 


— 


— 


11 


Defective fences, . . . . 


19 


31 


10 


Defective sewers reported, . 


41 


28 


103 


Defective streets and walks reported. 


8,572 


8,726 


9,669 


Defective trees, . . . . . 


- 


14 


16 


Defective water gates. 


- 


3 


20 


Defective water meters, 




- 


3 


Defective water pipes reported. 


157 


250 


177 


Defective wires and polM reported. 


39 


7 


30 


Disturbances suppressed. 


555 


650 


1,253 


Extra duties performed, 


46,937 


34,206 


31,874 


Fire alarms given, .... 


2,136 


2,236 


1,962 


Fires extinguished, .... 


796 


700 


735 


Insane persons taken in diaige, . 


403 


419 


385 


Lost children restored. 


1,498 


1,637 


2,189 


Missing persons rejxirted. 


318 


267 


305 


Missing persons found. 


152 


155 


140 


Persons rescued from drowning, . 


13 


28 


61 


Sick and injured persons a^s^ted, 


4,618 


4,234 


4,397 


Stray teams reported and put up. 


201 


131 


132 


Water running to waste reported. 


254 


322 


377 


Witnesses detained, .... 


88 


60 


57 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On the 1st of December, 1908, there were 241 articles of 
lost, abandoned or stolen property in the custody of the 
property clerk ; 809 were received during the year, 221 were 
sold, for which $258.69 was received and paid over to the 
city collector, and 21 delivered to owners, finders or admin- 
istrators, 82 to the Chief of the District Police, leaving 726 
on hand. 

Sfeciai. Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police detailed for duty 
at each : — 

1909. UoL 

Jan. 17, Fire old Pro\ndence station train shed, . . . 104 

Jan. 20, Police ball 90 

Feb. 17, Firemen's bail 56 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



57 



1909. Mfn. 

Mar. 14, L.-itxir meeting, Fancuil Hall, ..... 213 

Mar. 17, Evacuation Day, ....... 26.5 

A|)ril 10, C'rossK-ountrj- run, Cathe<lral Y. M. C. A.. . .110 

.\pril 17, Har\ar(l-Coliimbia bo.it race, . . . . 50 

.\pril 19, -Marathon race, ..;.... 305 

May 2S, School regiment parade, ...... 404 

May 31, Work horse parade, ...... 104 

Jlay .31, KitipHtiEc Bros, circus parade. ..... S.5 

.June 7, .\ncient and Honorable parade. .... 2.5.5 

.luiie Hi, The "niglit before." in Charlestown, . . . 218 

.lunc 17, .\niiivcrsari-, battle of Hunker Hill, .... G.50 

.lune 22, Performance of .loan of .\re. ."^tadium. Brighton, . 9G 
.lunc 27, Holy Family Tenijierance League parade. . .10.5 

June .30, .Silver iubilr^e of ,\rc]'.bishcp O'CV.niiell at Catlicuml. . Si 
June 30, Recejition to .\rchbi^hop O'Connell at Mechanic's 

building .3a5 

July 31, Funeral fif ("apt. William J. Lowcn,-, . . . 67 

Sept. 14, Visit of President Taft, .325 

Sept. 15, Visit of President Taft, 241 

Xov. 2, Bulletin boards, State election. .... 325 
Nov. 6, Harvard-Cornell football game. . . .5.3 

Xov. 13, Harvard-Dartmouth football g.ime, .... 102 

Xov. 20, Harvard- Yale Football game, ..... 19S 
Xov. 20, Bulletin boards, Harvard- Yale football game, .115 

Xov. 20, Special detail at Division 4. football night, . 323 



Xiiwbcr of Police Officers employed as a Lifting Detail Each Day during 
the Listing Seofun. 

v«. 
1.073 



-May 1, 
May 3, 
-May 4, 
May 5, 
May 6, 



1,090 

76S 

2S0 

77 



UVc'sPKCToi; OF Cl..\I.M.«. 

The officer detailed to assist tho coniniittcc on claims and 
law doiinrtnunt in invosticating daini.s against flic citv for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he inve-tiiraled 
44S eases. 9 of which were on aeeoniit of damage done liv 
(logs, resulting in the killitig of 90 hens and 2 <hicks: 1 ease 
heing on aceonnt of damage done hv a wild deer. 



5S 



POLICE COM-MISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Other Serrices performed. 
Xumlx-r of ca.?cs investigated, 
Xumber of witnesses examined, 
Xumbcr of notices served, 
Xumber of jiictures taken, . 
Xumber of permissions granted, 
Xumber of da3-s in court, 
Xumber of da)-s at the committee on claims, 



44S 

3,360 

1,002 

106 

2,400 

60 

30 



Officers df.tailed to assist Medical Examinf.es. 
The officers detailed from the Bureau of Criminal Inves- 
tigation to assist the medical examiners of Suffolk County 
report having investigated 977 deaths, 751 of which were 
males and 226 females, and attended 193 inquests, as fol- 
lows : — 

Causes of Death in Cases inrestigated. 



Abortion, . 

Accident, . 

Alcoholism, 

Asphyxiation (gas), 

Automobile, 

Bums, 

Drowning, 

Electricity, 

Devator, . 

ExjK)siire, 

IL\haastion, 

Homicide, 

Manslaughter, 



4 

169 

16 

1 

12 

44 

63 

1 

16 

1 

3 

7 

16 



Murder, . 


2 


Xatural causes, 


. 392 


Poison, 


. 30 


Rabies, 


2 


Railroad accident. 


51 


Stillboni, . 


9 


Strangulation, . 


i 


Street railway accident, 


28 


Suffocation, 


3 


Suicide, . 


100 



Total, 



Causes of Death where Inquests were held. 



Abortion, . 

Accident, . 

Automobile, 

Drowning, 

Elevators, 

Electricity, 

Explosion, 

Falling iron. 

Falls, 

Falling lumber, 

Falling stone, 



19 
3 
3 



Fire engine, 
Homicide, 
Hose wagon. 
Machinery, 
Manslaughter, . 
Xatural causes. 
Railroads, 
Railway (street). 
Teams, 

Total, . 



977 



1 

4 

2 

2 

2 

6 

66 

36 

20 

193 






'] 



I 

■ I 

! 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



59 



House of Detzxtiox. 

The liou~e of dcteiuion for wonun is located in the court 
hou^e, Somerset Street. -Vll the women arrested in the city 
proper are taken to the hou^e of detention in vans provided 
for the purpose. Thev are then held in charge of the matron 
until the next session of the court before which they are to ap- 
pear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are returned to the 
house of detention, and from there conveyed to the jail or in- 
stitution to which ihey have been sentenced. 

DurinfT the vcar there were 5,74G women committed, 



For drunkenness, 

For larceny, 

For night walking, 

For fornication, . 

For insanity. 

For being idle and disorderly. 

For assault and batter^". 

For adultcn-. 

For violation of the liquor law. 

For keeping a house of ill fame. 

For witnesses. 

For county jail, . 

For nuinicipal court. . 

For various other offences, . 



Total, 



3,07S 

428 

366 

223 

124 

50 

38 

13 

2.5 

56 

2 

1,032 
142 
169 

5,746 



Police .S;<.-\.\r. Sehvice. 

Signal Boxes. 

The change in the signal bo.\es during the year consists 

of installing one new box on Division 14. The total number 

of bo.xes now in use is 462. Of these, 271 are connected with 

the underground system and 191 with the overhead. 



Miscellaneous Worh. 
Duritig the year the employees of this service responded 
to 1,03." trouble calls; inspected 4C2 signal lx).\es, 15 signal 
desks and 021 batteries; repaired SO box movements, 16 



60 POLICE CO.MMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

reiriMcr-:. 17 polar box bell?, 57 locks, 10 plnngers, 14 time j 

stainpr:. 4 eongs, 3 stable motors, 2 stable rr-jristers, 5 vibrator 
bells. b4-si*!es repairing all lx-11 and electric light work at head- 
quarters and the various stations. There have been made -t 
bells, 34 line blocks, 20 plungers, 10 eomplete box fittings, 
and a large amoimt of small work thai cannot be classified- 

Eichitt-n time stamje of a new and improved type were 
onlere*!, the old ones having been in serricit- more than twenty 
years. 

The underground work done during the- year consisted of 
laying ali^mt 37,000 feet of cable and pl».-ing 10 post boxes 
in the iJrighton district ; and placing a small quantity of 
cable (300 feet) at Grove Hall and Eliot S^juarc. 

There are in use in the signal scr\"icie 2»» horses, IS patrol 
wag«>ns and 13 pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 41.107 rims, covering 
an asan-gaie distance of 3."».917 miles. There were 43,553 { 

pris^>ners c*^»nveyed to the station houses: '••'»7 runs were made 
to take injured and insane persons to statkm houses, the hos- 
pitals or their homes; and G40 rims were made to take lost 
children to station hous<-s. There were C>72 nms to fires and 
51 runs for liquor seizures. During the year there were 4G2 
signal V»3tfe? in use. arranged on GO circaits: 517.454 tele- 
phone TOfsssages and 3,347.769 " on-<lnty *' calls were sent I 
over the lines. 

The following list c^jmprises the prc.fjerty in the signal 
service at the present time: — 

i 



15 signal desks. 


45 manhole?. 


60 cjrruh*. 


1 buggr. 


462 strtrt signal boxes. 


1 line iragnn. 


14 staWk;' rail boards. 


1 express wagon. 


4S test J)*>»s. 


1 mugiruiaip wagon 


921 etJb of J»attcr>-- 


1 travtise (Hing. 


7S miVr* rir»derground rable. 


2 small sk%h.*. 


04 mil*-* overhead cable. 


1 caravan. 


7i milfc* ruf duct. 





1910.] PUBLIC DOCUilENT— No. 49. 61 

Habror Service. 
The special duties performed bv the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as fol- 
lows : — 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float 

st.igos, etc., $14,320.40 

Xiimlx'r of vessels from foreign ports boardc<l, . 742 

XuiiiIht of vessels ordered from the channel to proper anchorage, 1 ,.372 

XuiiilK-r of vess<'ls n'moved from the channel by |X)lico steamers, 09 

XiimlK-r of c.'ises of assistance rendered, .... 118 

Xunil)cr of cases of assistance rendered to wharfingers, . . 13 
Xuniber of permits granted vessels, in tlie stream, to discharge 

their cargoes, ......... 48 

Xunilx-r of obstructions removed from channel, ... 15 

Xumljor of alarms of fire on the water front attended, . . 127 

X'umber of fires extinguished without alarm, .... 1 

Number of boats challenged, ...... 1,703 

Sick and injured persons assisted, ..... 18 

Cases investigated, ........ 733 

Dead Ixxiies recovered, .... ... 38 

Res<-ucd from drowning, ....... 32 

Number of vessels ordered to put up anchor lights, . . 25 

Xumlx-r of vcs-sels .assigned to anchorage, .... 1,254 

Steamers escorted, outgoing and incoming, .... 216 

The total number of vessels that arrived in this jwrt dur- 
ing the vcar was 11,027. Of this nuniljcr, 0,i;OS came from 
domestic ports, 777 from ports in the British Provinces and 
742 from foreign ports. Of the latter, G03 were steamers, 10 
shi]-s. 11 barks and 2S schooners. 

The j>olice boat " Ferret " was in commission from June 
20 to October 1 in Dorchester Bar. She covered a distntice 
of .'),:;0S miles; made 4 arrests for larceny and 1 for drunken- 
ness; recovered property value<l at $4-3-3; rcscuetl 12 jiersons 
from disabled boats and 2 from the water; made secure 3 
yadits that had broken away from their moorings; quelle<l 
28 disturbances; investigated 2-3 case?, and notifietl ".0 owners 
of i>(.wer kiats to have mufflers attached to their exhausts. 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

HOESES. j 

On the 1st of December, 1908, there -were 88 horses in the 
service. During the year 5 -were sold, 7 purchased, 1 shot 
on account of being disabled and 3 died. At the present time 
there are 86 in service, as shown by Table IX. 

Vehicle Service. ; 

Automobiles. , 

Automobile Xo. 2222, a steam runabout, has been in ser- I 

vice since June, 1905. It was on duty 137 days, and covered ; 

a distance of 7,672 miles in the West Roxbury district. This 
machine went out of commission and was replaced on May ' 

10, 1909, by a new Ross steamer, 'So. 14567. It has been on j 

duty 156 days, and covered approximately a distance of f 

9.3G0 miles in this district. The operating patrolman made ; 

20 arrests, returned 2 runaway boys to the Parental School, r 

assisted in 96 arrests made for violation of the automobile J 

law, and many operators were cautioned by him in regard ( 

to speed limit. He responded to 17 alarms of fire, investi- p 

gated 98 cases and served 102 summonses in criminal pro- j 

ceedings. j 

Automobile Xo. 2223 went into commission April 17, 1909, i 

being in service ISO days, covering a distance of 7,200 miles J 

of streets on Division 11. The operating patrolman made 
2S7 arrests, conveyed 25 prisoners to the station, 6 lost 
children to their homes and 4 to the station, 1 man to the 
City Hospital, responded to 16 alarms of fire, investigated 
59 cases and cautioned 73 chauffeurs. jj 

Automobile Xo. 2224. a steam runabout, was purchased 
and put in commission June 29, 1907; was on duty in the 
parkways 299 days during the year. The operating patrol- 
man made 93 arrests, and cautioned many automobile opera- 
tors regarding the speed limit. 

Automobile Xo. 2225, a steam runabout, was purchased 
ai:d put in commission July, 1007 ; was on duty in the streets 
and parks in the Back Bay district 310 days during the year. 
The operating patrolman made 405 arrests for violation of lij! 

I 



I 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



63 



the automobile law, and cautioned many automobile opera- 
tors regarding the speed limit. 

Automobile Xo. 17182, a steam runabout, has been in ser- 
vice since June 11, 1900. It -was on duty 152 days during 
the year, and covered a distance of 7,C00 miles in the streets 
of the Brighton district. The operating patrolman responded 
to 6 alarms of fire, investigated 25 cases and made 25 arrests. 
He cautioned many automobile operators regarding the speed 
limit. 

Automobile Xo. 2221, a steam touring car, has been in ser- 
vice since June 9, 1908. It is used for the general work of 
inspection b}' the officials of the department. 



Cost of running Automobiles. 



Pay of officers, 

Repairs, 

Tires, . 

Gasoline, 

Oil. . 

Rent of garage. 

Total, . 



U,0-'>(> 91 
1,42S .30 
8.56 97 
7.5.5 74 
119 03 
S7G S4 

. .SS,093 SS 



Ambulances. 

The department is now equipped with 10 ambulances, 
l(K-atcd in the following jwlice divisions: 1, 4, C. 7, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15 and 16. 

During the year the ambulances resjwnded to calls to 
convey sick or injured persons to the following places: — 



City Hospital, ...... 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarkct .Siiuare), 

City Ho.>ipital (lUlief .Station, llast Hoston), . 

Calls where scr\iees were not required, 

M.is.-i.ichusetts General Hospital, . 

Home, 

Morgue, 



Police station houi«es. 
Lying-in Hospital, 
Faulkner Hospital, 
Caniey Hospital, 
Kinergenry Hosjiital, 
Children's Hospital, 



S74 

623 

267 

ISl 

113 

72 

26 

21 

13 

S 

4 

3 
o 



64 



POLICE COiMMISSIOXER, 



[Jan. 



Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirman-, 

From fires, 

Cambridge Hospital, . 

Homccopathic Hosjjital, 

St. Marj-'s Infant .\sylum, . 

Private Iiospital in Cambridge, 

Total, .... 

List of Vehicles vscd hy the Department. 



2,21.5 



Divisions. 


2 
1 

-3 


1 


i 

= 

< 


e 


i 


i 

-< 


S 




3 


Headquarters, 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Di\-Lsion 1 , 






- 


- 


1 


~ 


1 


- 




3 


Division 2. 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Di\-ision 3, 






- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di\-L¥ion 4, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


I 


- 


- 


2 


DiHsion .5, 






- 


- 


1 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


2 


Di\Tsion 6, 






- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Di\Tsion 7, 






- 


- 


1 


- 


I 


- 


- 


3 


Di\Tsion S, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


Di\-Lsion 9, 






- 


- 1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Di\-Lsion 10, 






- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 11, 






- 


1 




- 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Di\-ision 12, 






- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di\ision 13, 






- 


1 




- 


1 


2 


1 


7 


Di\ision 14, 






- 


1 




- 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Di\-ision 1.5, 






- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Di\Tsion 16, 






- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


Joy .Street stable, 


3 


.5 


- 


1 


4 


2 


2 


2 


19 


Totals, . 


• 


18 

1 


5 


6 


13 


4 


11 


8 


6 


71 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUilENT— Xo. 49. 



65 



Plblic CAKRr.\(;K.«. 

Diiriiic: the vcar there were 1.777 c-arriape Iktnses granted, 
boinir an increase of 124 as conipare<l with last year; 2G7 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of ICG as 
compared with last year. 

There has hocn a decrease of 41 in the nunil>er of horse- 
drawn licensed carriages during the year. 

There were 3 carriages rejected on first inspection, lint 
tlie defects being slight and having bec-n remclictl, they were 
suliscquently reinspccted and passe<l. 

There were GO articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were turned over to 
the ins]iector; 20 of these were restored to the owners, and 
the balance placed in the keeping <>{ the lost property bureau. 

The following is a detaile<l statement concerning licenses 
for public carriages and for drivers of hack.s and cabs: 



Number of ."ipplications for carriage licenses rorpivo<l. 
Number of applications for carriage licenses refusc<l. 
Number of carriages licensed, .... 
Number of licenses transferred, .... 
Number of licenses cancelled or revoked. 
Number of carri.ages inspected, .... 
Number of carriages rejected, .... 
Number of carri.agcs reinspecte<l and pa.-we<l, . 
.\pi)lications for drivers' licenses rp;>ortcd uiKin, 
Nuniber of complaints against drivers inve-iligated. 
Number of warrants obtained, .... 
NumlxT of days spent in court, .... 
.\rticles left in carriages, reporte<l by citizens, 
.\rtic1es found in carriages, reporteii by drivers, 
Drivers' applications for licenses rejectcti. 



1,779 



1,777 

113 

41 

1,776 

3 

3 

l,Sfi2 

114 

5 

6 

22 

69 

1 



Wagox Licexse.s. 

Licen.*cs arc granted to persons or cor i>f<rat ions to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 5,447 applications for such licenses were 
receive<l, r>,4;]o of which were granted and 12 rejected. 



\ 



66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the licences granted, 20 were subsequently cancelled 
for nonpavnaf-nt of the license fee, 63 for other causes, and 
CI transferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., XVI.) 



Listing Male Residents of Bostox, etc. 



Ylaji. 


Mij Can Tan. 


Supplemenlal 
Application. 


Refused 
Certificates. 


Granted 
Certificates. 


Total Men 
listed. 


i9a3, 


181,045 


3,412 


53 


3,359 


184,404 


1904, 


193,195 


1,335 


55 


1,2S0 


194,475 


19a5, 


194,.>47 


705 


S 


697 


195,244 


1906, 


195,446 


775 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, 


19.5,900 


7S2 


2S 


754 


196,6.54 


190S, 


201,255 


1,302 


57 


1,245 


202,500 


1909, 


201,391 


S04 


29 


775 


202,166 



i9a3, 
nm, 

1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 



Women Voters verified. 



14,611 
15,633 
14,591 
13,427 
12,822 
11,915 
11,048 



(See Tables XX, XXI, XXII.) 



■ Listing Expenses. 
The expen-^es of listing residents, not including the ser- 
vices rcndertfl bv the members of the police force, were as 
follows : — 



Printing, . , . . . 


. 515,436 14 


Clerical .ser\'ice, .... 


6,G07 59 


Cards, 


1,.566 07 


Interpreters, .... 


977 15 


Stationcrj-, .... 


245 CO 


Tc'lciihoncs, .... 


. ■ . . 124 83 


Total, 


. 824,057 44 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



67 



' 
i 



Xumber of Policemen employed in Listing. 



Mayl 


1,073 


May 3, 


1,079 


May 4, 


•. ... 768 


Mayo 


280 


May 6, 


77 



i 



Fl 



Special Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to serve without pay 
from the city, on the written application of any officer or 
board in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or on 
the application of any responsible corporation or person, such 
corporation or person to be liable for the official misconduct 
of the person appointed. 

During the year ending Xov. 30, 1909, there were 596 
special police officers appointed; 6 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause, and 1 appointment was revoked 
for intoxication. 

For city departments, ........ 141 

For State departments, ...... .7 

For railroad corporations, ....... 136 

For other corporations and associations, ..... 105 

For theatres and other places of amusement, .... 133 

For private institutions, ....... 60 

For churches, ......... 14 



Total, 



596 



Railbo.uj Police. 
There were 210 persons appointed railroad policemen 
during the year, 11 of whom are employees of the !N"ew York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 142 of the Boston & 
;Maine Railroad and 57 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad. 

MiSCELLAXEOrS LiCEXSES. 

The total number of licenses issued of all kinds was 
25,353; transferred, 234; cancelled and revoked, 2,639. 
The officers investigated 344 complaints arising under these 
licenses. The fees collected and paid into the city treasury 
amounted to $51,714.25. (See Table XIV.) 



-1 



68 



POLICE COMillSSIONER. 



[Jan. 



MusiciAXs' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 2<;7 iii)i>lication.s for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 228 of which were trranted. 24 
rejected and 15 are pending: : o were sul>s<t]uently cancelled 
on account of the nonpayment of the license foe; 3 were sur- 
rendere<l and cancelled, and others issued in their stead. Of 
the total nuinlier granted, ~'/ have l)een jiaid for; l.">:> granted 
Xovember 30 were not paid for when the rep'»rt was made up. 

The officer detailed for this special srnifx- rej^rfs that 
durinir the vear he examined 10,"i instruments, as follows: — 



In«prctcd. 


P.««L 


Condemned. 


Street organs, 








j 55 


.>3 


2 


Hand organs, 








! ^" 


ir. 


1 


^'iolins, . 








i 12 


12 


- 


Harps, 








I 


9 


- 


Flutes, . 








1 4 


4 




-\ccordeons, 








1 


1 


- 


Guitars, . 








• 3 


3 




Bagpipes, 








j 1 




- 


Banjos, . 








i ' 


* 


- 


Mandolins, 








1 




- 


Ocarina, . 








1 




- 


Totals, 


105 


102 


3 



C'olUclire. 
Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over fifteen years of age to play on mn>ical instruments 
in company with designate<l prrK-essions, at stated times and 
plac-es. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five j-ears and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


i9a5 


118 


112 


6 


1906 


157 


156 


1 


1907, 


154 


152 


2 


1908 


172 


172 


- 


1909, 


178 


176 


2 



Public Lodgixg Houses. 

Every building in the city of Boston not licensed as an 
inn, in which 10 or more persons are lodged for twenty-five 
cents or less each per night, is a public lotlging house, under 
chapter 242 of the acts of 1904 ; and the Police Commissioner 
is authorized to grant licenses to such lodging houses after 
the inspector of buildings has certified that the building is 
provided with proper exits and appliances for giving alarm 
to the inmates in case of fire, and the Board of Health haa 
certified that the sanitary condition is satisfactory. Under 
this law 21 applications for licenses were received, 20 of 
them granted and 1 is pending. 

The following shows the location of the lodging houses and 
the number of persons lodged in each during the year: — 



Locinos. 



Number lodged. 



69 and 71 Beach Street, 
19 Causeway Street, 
164 Commercial Street, 
194 Commercial Street, 
234 Commercial Street, 
238 Commercial Street, 
242-246 Commercial Street, 
17 Davis Street, 
42 Ea.stem Avenue, 
39 Edinborough Street, 
120 Eliot Street, . 
37 Green Street, 
187 Hanover Street, 



11,859 
10,064 
21,160 
38,037 
12,989 
17,952 
7,577 
35,983 
26,527 
15,534 
48,518 
36,028 
48,222 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



laCATIOS. 



Number lodged- 



67 Pk-asant Street, 
SS6 Washington Street, . 
1025 Washington .Stre«-t. . 
1051 Washington Streft, . 
1066 Washington Street, . 
1093 Washington Street, . 
1202 Washington Street, . 



Total, 



22,245 
80,SSS 
14,573 
39,578 
14,479 
29,232 
26,294 



558,339 



CAEErrxG D.YXGEROCS Weapoxs. 
Under the act of 1906 which authorized the Police Com- 
missioner, in common with certain other officials, to grant 
licences for the carrying of loaded pistols or revolvers on the 
person, the following action has been taken by him : — 





Applications. 


Granted. 


Bcfused. 


1907 

190S 

1909 


681 

1,020 

871 


625 ' 56 
882 ; 138 
800 71 



These licenses are granted in large measure to express and 
bank messengers, watchmen, special policemen and others 
who>e occupations and characters establish a prima facie case 
in their favor. 

Small Loax Licexses. 

During the year there were 31 applications received for 
secured small loan licenses; 21 were granted, 4 cancelled and 
G disapproved. 

There were 67 applications received for unsecured small 
loan licenses; 59 were granted, 2 cancelled, 5 disapproved 
and 1 withdrawn. 

Pexsioxs axd Bexefits. 
Dec. 1, 19C8, there were 208 pensioners on the roll. Dur- 
ing the year 16 died, viz., 1 captain, 2 lieutenants and 13 
patrc.Inien and 21 were added, viz., 2 captains, 2 lieutenants. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 71 

1 sergeant, 16 patrolmen and 1 fireman, leaving 213 on the 
roll at date, including the •widows of 11 and the mother of 1 
policeman, who died of injuries received in the service. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $133,443.53, and it is estimated that $135,- 
472.50 will be required for pensions in 1910. This does not 
include i)ensions for 1 inspector and 4 patrolmen, all of whom ' 

are sixtv-five years or over, and are entitled to be pensioned ' 

on account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the 
thirtieth day of November last amounted to $207,550. There 
are 63 beneficiaries at the present time, and there has been 
paid to them the sum of $7,442 during the past year. 

The invested fund of the Police Relief Association on the 
thirtieth day of November was $122,022.54. 

FiXAXCIAL. j 

A requisition was made on the city council for the sum 
of $2,166,492.39 to meet the running expenses of the de- 4 

partmeut, including the pensioned police officers, house of de- Jj 

tention, station house matrons, listing persons twenty years | 

of age or more, and police signal service for the financial i 

year. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past ; 

year, including the pensions, house of detention, station house | 

matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but f 

exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal service, ? 

were $2,030,506.78. I 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision and for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, etc., was $53,- 
016.66. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service durinir 
the year was $57,262.53. (See Table XVIII.) 



POLICE COiLMISSIONER. 



[Jan . 






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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT— No. 49. 



73 



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>rlson, 


Matrons (house of deten 
Matrons (stations). 
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Foreman, 
Signalmen, . 
Mechanics, . 
Linemen, 
Drivers, 
Van drivers. 
Foreman of stable, 
llostlore, 
Jiuiitore, 
Jan i tresses, . 
Assistant stow^^l, eity i 
Telephone operators. 


J5" 

s 



74 



POLICE COMinSSIONER. 



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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



75 



Table III. 

List of Officers retired during the Year, giving Age at the Time of Re- 
tirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Xa«e. 


C»n«e of Age »t Time Years of 
HetiremeDt. of Retirement.! Service. 


Brewer, George E., 


Incapacitated, 


' 48 j-ears, 


21 years. 


Chase, Fremont, . ... 


Incapacitated, 


49 years. 


IS years. 


Chick, Samuel B., . 


Age, . . 


CO years. 


28 }-ears. 


Clark, Thomas R., . 


Age, . 


60 years, 


1 

29 years. 


Cleveland, Lindell, 


1 Incapacitated, 


43 years, 


' 18 years. 


Cross, James A., 


Incapacitated, 


45 }-ears, j 21 j-ears. 


Donovan, Dennis, . 


Age, 


65 }-ears, 


' 32 years. 


Everbeck, Gorham H., . 


Age, . 


60 jcars. 


35 years. 


Faniham, Jewett, . 


Age, . 


60 jears, 


29 years. 


Garland, Monroe T., 


Age, . 


60 years. 


30 years. 


Holmes, Robert S.,' 


Age, . 


63 years. 


25 years. 


Marsh, Reuben, 


Age, . 


60 jears, 


34 years. 


Murphy, Timothy J., 


Age, . . 


62 years, 


28 years. 


Mackinnon, Edward C, . 


Incapacitated, 


34 years. 


7 years. 


Norcott, John P., . 


Veteran, 


60 jears, 


18 years. 


Nugent, Michael J., 


Age, . 


65 jears, 


32 years. 


O'Brien, James E., 


Incapacitated, 


44 years, 


20}'ears. 


Ryan, Thomas E., . 


Age, . 


63 years, 


36 years. 


Savorj', George E., 


Veteran, 


65 years. 


36 years. 


Stevens, Ira W., 


Age, . 


61 years. 


35 j'ears. 


Sugrue, Timothy F., 


Incapacitated, 


37 years. 


9 years. 


* Fireman nr 


nrtlrr^^ ct^^mnp^i 








76 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Tablk IV. 

LUl of Ojjlccrs tcho irere promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during 
the Year ending Xov. 30, 1909. 



Date. 



Name and Rink. 



May 17, 1000, 

May 17, 1000, 

May 17, 1000, 

May 20, 1000, 

Xov. 24, 1000, 

Xov. 24, 1000, 

May 20, 1000, 

May 20, 1000, 

.Sept. 4, 1009, 

Dec. 17, lOOS, 

Det". 17, lOOS, 

.May 20, 1000, 

Sept. 4, 1000, 

Xov. 24, 1000, 

Xov. 24, 1009, 

Dee. 17, lOOS, 



Dec. 


17, 


190S, 


Dec. 


17. 


lOOS, 


Mav 


20, 


1000, 


Sejjt. 


4, 


1000, 


Xov. 


24. 


1000, 


Xov. 


24, 


1000, 


Xov. 


24, 


1000, 



Chief Inspector William B. Watt.s to the rank of dep- 
uty superintcntlent. 

Capt. Philemon D. Warren to the rank of deputj" 
superintcndc-nt. 

Capt. Laurence Cain to the rank of deputy superin- 
tendent. 

Capt. Joseph Dugan to the rank of chief inspector. 

Ins|)ector John H. McGarr to the rank of captain. 

InsiXH-tor .\in.«Iey C. .\rmstrong to the rank of cap- 
tain. 

Lieut. George C. Garland to the rank of captain. 

Lieut. James P. .Sullivan to the rank of captain. 

Lieut. Joseph Ilarriman to the rank of captain. 

Sergt. William H. Pclton to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. Thoma.s J. Xorton to the rank of in.«poctor. 

Sergt. Michael J. GofT to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. George H. Guard, to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. William J. .Shcehan to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Thomxs F. Goode, Jr., to the rank of lieu- 
tenant. 

Patrolman Joseph F. Loughlin to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Sumner .S. Foster to the rarik of sergeant. 

Patrolman Eklgar F. Palmer to the rank of .sergeant. 

Patrolman John J. McCarthy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John C. Muqihy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John W. Pyne to the rank of .sergeant. 

Patrolman .Martin H. King to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Michael J. Sullivan to the rank of ser- 
geant. 



1 
. \ 



: I 
1 1 






1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



77 



Table V. 

Number of Men in Each Rank in Active Service at the End of the Present 
Year who were appointed on the Force in the Year stated. 





^ 




c 1 



















•= 


s 


















-1 


s. 


1 






JS 






g 




Date ipTOixTED. 


1 

■Ji 


3 ^ 


X 

5 


1 


1 

u 

8. 


g 
J 

3 

a 


2 


i 

5 


s 

> 


3 
|2 


1S6S, . 


_ 





1 

1 


_ 


\ _ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1SC9, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


i - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1S70, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


: - 


1 


2 


- 


3 


1S71, . 


- 


- 


1 ~ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1S72, . 


- 


- 


i -1 2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


1S7.3, . 


- 


1 


i ~ 


2 


■ - 


- 


1 


3 


- 


7 


1S74, . 


- 


1 




1 


1 


i 1 


- 


1 


- 


5 


1S7.5, . 


- 


- 


[ 


- 


1 


- 


9 


- 


10 


lS7fi. . 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1877, . 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


1S7S, . 


- 


- 




4 


1 


3 


1 


10 


_ 


19 


1S79, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


9 


— 


15 


ISSO, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


11 


_ 


13 


ISSl, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


3 


20 


_ 


28 


ISSJ, . 


- 


- 


- 


4 


2 


6 


1 


12 


_ 


25 


1SS3, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


4 


S 


_ 


17 


)SS4, . 


- 


- 


~ 


1 


- 


1 


1 


17 


_ 


20 


1SS.5, . 


- 


- 




1 


1 


1 


3 


13 


_ 


19 


1SS6, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


S 


_ 


14 


1SS7, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


14 


_ 


20 


1SS8. . 


- 


- 




- 


1 


4 


2 


46 


_ 


53 


1SS9, . 


- 


- 




_ 


2 


2 


4 


17 


_ 


25 


1S90, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


2 


6 


20 


_ 


30 


1S91, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


2 


16 


_ 


21 


1S92, . 


- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


3 


17 


_ 


21 


1893, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


14 


61 


_ 


79 


1894, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


21 


_ 


31 


189.5, . 


- 


- 


- 


- , 


4 


3 


15 


113 


_ 


135 


1896, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


31 


_ 


34 


1S97, . 


- 


- 


— 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


17 


__ 


IS 


1S9S, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


33 


_ 


33 


1900, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


— 


3 


95 


_ 


100 


1901, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


55 


_ 


56 


1902, . 


- 


- 


- 


- ! 


- 


_ 


1 


11 


_ 


12 


1903, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


91 


_ 


92 


1904, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 1 


- 


_ 


_ 


81 


_ 


81 


19a3, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ [ 


- 


_ 


_ 


39 


_ 


39 


1000, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ i 


- 


- 


- 


36 


_ 


36 


1007, . 


- 


- 


- 


- . 


- 


— 


_ 


110 


_ 


110 


lOOS, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 1 


- 


- 


_ 


So 


60 


145 


1000, . 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 




61 


61 


Totals 


1 


3 


1 


24 


30 


37 


87 


1,135 


121 


1,439 



^ 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



i ■= 



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S 2 3 2 3 o 3 




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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 



79 



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so 



POLICE fO.MMISSItjXER. 



[Jan. 



_ _ _ t c 5c 



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y U U 



_ tC ;£ i£ 

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— -/.- 



— 7 1 7 1 1 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



SI 



to ^ 

— 5 ~ 

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^iiri.S'S'S.S — — — 
'3'3'BJi = =^'5 '5 '3 

MtCtfl2.tCM^MtCtO 

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82 



POLICE COMillSSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 

Xumber mkd Di^^ribtUion of Ifori-es w^ed in the Department. 



Dirxnoa. 


i V-. 

1 


! 


' Ridise. 


Asbo- 
baa. 


DtaiiiC. 


Totals. 


Headquarter^ 


- 


- 


- 


i - 


i 

i 2 

1 


! 2 


Di>ision 1, - 


- 


2 


- 


1 


1 


3 


Di\'ision 2, , 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 3, , 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Division 4, , 


- 


^ 


- 


1 


- 


. 3 


Division 5, . 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Division 6, - 


- 


1 


- 


1 




2 


Division 7, - 


- 


J 1 

1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Division 9, . 


- 


! 2 
1 


- 


~ 


- 


2 


Division 10, , 





2 




1 


- 


- 3 


Di\-ision 11, - 


- 


2 


8 


- 


1 


11 


Division 12, , 


- 


1 




_ 


- 


1 


Di\-ision 13, . 


- 




5 


_ 


2 


9 


Di\-ision 14, - 


- 


1 


5 


1 


1 


S 


Division 15, - 


_ 


2 


- 




- 


2 


Division 16, . 


- 


1 


13 


! 
i 


- 


14 


Signal ser^Toe. ipjirtir de- 
partment, -Ml Joj Stseet. 

House of detemioo, 

1 


2 


1 


— 


— 


6 


7 
2 


Prison van, - 


4 


- 1 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Totals, , 


6 ; 


26 i 


36 i 

1 


6 


12 


S6 

• 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



Table X. 

Xumbrr of Arre-^U, by Police Divi.sions, during the Year ending Nov. 30, 

1909. 



DnisioS3. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters, . 






950 


258 


1,208 


Division 1, 






12,341 


1,037 


13,378 


Di\-ision 2, 






5,2S2 


2S7 


5,569 


Division 3, 






6,705 


1,238 


7,943 


Division 4, 






6,S27 


941 


7,768 


Di\-ision 5, 






6,179 


1,171 


7,350 


Division 6, 






4,034 


321 


4,355 


Division 7, 






2,023 


183 


2,206 


Di\-ision S, 






47 


-" 


47 


Di%-ision 9, 






2,3SS 


340 


2,728 


Di\-ision 10, 






3,215 


456 


3,671 


Division 11, 






2,359 


119 


2,478 


Division 12, 






1,152 


90 


1,242 


Division 13, 






1,S33 


136 


1,969 


Di\-ision 14, 






SS2 


32 


914 


Division 15, 






5,620 


420 


6,040 


Division 16, 






2,548 


98 


2,646 


Totals, 


64,385 


7,127 


71,512 



84 



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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



87 



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88 



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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



97 



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1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



99 






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100 



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i 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



101 



Table X\'. 
Number of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1909. 



Dnisioss. 


H>la. 


Femalta. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


ToUls. 


1, . . . 91 


20 


_ 


2 


113 


2, 






11 


4 


- 


- 


15 


3, 






291 


97 


12 


1 


401 


4, 






139 


&8 


5 


2 


234 


5, 






411 


154 


21 


2 


588 


6, 






324 


102 


2 


- 


428 


7, 






668 


108 


10 


- 


786 


9, 






966 


173 


45 


3 


1,187 


10, 






710 


151 


18 


1 


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11, 






2,070 


4.5S 


106 


6 


2,640 


12, 






493 


84 


17 


1 


595 


13, 






1,314 


222 


64 


2 


1,602 


14, 






622 


128 


39 


1 


790 


15, 






494 


167 


9 


- 


670 


16, 






■ 614 


146 


28 


- 


788 


Total 


s, 


• 


9,218 


2,102 


376 


21 


11,717 



Table XVI. 
Total Number of Wagon Licenses issxud in the City, by Police Divisions. 



Division 1, . . .1,140 


Di\-ision 10, . . . 132 


Division 2, 






1,908 


Division 11, 






109 


Di\nsion 3, 






. 209 


Division 12, 






34 


Di\-ision 4, 






600 


Division 13, 






47 


Di\ision 5, 






362 


Division 14, 






56 


Division 6, 






231 


Division 15, 






240 


Di\nsion 7, 






126 


Division 10, 






111 












Di\-ision 9, 






130 


Total, .... 5,435 



102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement fur the Year ending Nov. SO, 1909. 



Expenditures. 
Pay of police and employees, 
Pensions, 
Fuel and light. 
Water and ice, 
Furniture and bedding. 
Printing and stationery. 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison. 
Repairs to station houses and city prison, 
Repairs and supplies for police steamers, 
Rent and care of telephones and lines. 
Purchase of horses and vehicles, 
Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles, 
Carting prisoners to and from stations and city prison. 
Feeding prisoners, ....... 

Medical attendance on prisoners, .... 

Transportation, ....... 

Pursuit of criminals, ...... 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, iasignia, etc., 

Travelling expenses and food for police. 

Rent of buildings, ....... 



Total, 



81,721,672 37 
13.3,443 53 

19,.579 70 

862 04 

4,841 86 

12,449 73 
7,194 34 

11,185 .55 
9,442 98 
6,275 52 
4,894 71 

19,446 78 
1,004 25 
2,726 78 
8,340 62 
1,637 28 
3,835 a3 

16,092 12 

3,494 20 

159 56 

7,a33 50 

§1,995,612 45 



Expenses of listing, ....... 24,957 44 

E-xpenses of house of detention and station house matrons, 9,936 89 
E.xpenses of signal senice (see Table XVIII.), . . 57,262 53 



Total, 



S2,087,769 31 



Receipts. 
For all licenses issued by the police commissioner, . $21,49125 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned jjroperty, itiner- 
ant musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, car- 
riage maps, etc.,' ...... 1,302 41 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), . 30,223 00 

Total. $53,016 06 

For uniform cloth, etc., ...... 15,652 43 

Total, $68,669 09 



' CmSted to police department. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 



103 



Table XVIII. 

Paijmcnti on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending Xov. 

30, 1909. 



Labor, ....... 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., .... 

Rent and care of buildings, .... 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and vehicles, 

Stable supplies and furniture. 

Repairs on buildings, ..... 

Repairing wagons, harnesses, etc.. 

Fuel, gas and water, ..... 

Miscellaneous, car fares, etc., 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor. 

Underground wires, ..... 

Printing, stationer)', etc., .... 

Total, 





. S28,417 81 




. 7,004 88 




5,003 64 




2,945 25 




30 65 




796 98 




3,479 24 




1,670 70 




959 85 




3,485 49 




3,235 75 




232 29 




S57,262 53 



104 



POLICE COJDIISSIONER. 



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Showing the Number 0/ Male Persons, Twenty Years 0/ Aye or More, who were Residents of the City of Boston on the First Day of May, 
1000, listed by the Listing Board in the Several Wards and Precincts of Said City during the First Seven Week Days in May, 1000. 


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INDEX, 



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i 

I 



,'.4 



INDEX. 



A. 

PAGE 

AccidenU S, 55, 104, 105 

persons killed or injured in streets, parks and squares . . 104, 105 

number of, reported ......... 55 

Ambulance service ....... . . 51 

Arrests 5,6,7,51,55,84,98 

age and sex of .......... 99 

comparative statement of . . . . . . . .98 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. .... 22, 23, 31 

foreigners ......... 52, 84-97 

insane persons .......... 56 

minors ........... 52 

nativity of .......... 52 

nonresidents 52, 84-97 

number of, by di\isions ........ S3 

number of, punished by fine ....... 53 

summoned by court ........ 52, 84-97 

total number of ......... 51 

violation of city ordinances ....... 52, 92 

on warrants ......... 52, 8 1 7 

without warrants ........ 52, 84-97 

Auctioneers ........... 100 

Automobiles 7, 62, 104, 105 

accidents due to ......... 8 .: 

laws ........... 7 

motor taxicabs ......... 8 

police 62, 63 

public ........... 65 

prosecutions .......... 7 

s- I 

Benefits and pensions ......... 70 -^a 

Bertillon s>-8tem .......... 54 '/^ 

Better police protection ......... 20 

Bridges, defective .......... 55 

Buildings ........... 55 

dangerous, reported ......... 55 

found open and made secure ....... 55 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ....... 54 -M 

■ -3 
c. 

Carriages, public 65, 100 

articles left in .......... 65 

automobile .....'..... 65 

number licensed . . . . . . . 65 100 



112 INDEX. 



PACE 

Cases investigated .......... 55, 61 

Cesspools, defective, reported ........ 55 

Children 11,55 

abandoned, cared for ........ 55 

lost, restored .......... 56 

juvenile offenders ......... II 

Chimneys, dangerous, reported ....... 55 

City ordinances, arrests for \noIation of ..... . 52, 92 

Claims, inspector of ......... 57 

Coal holes, defective ......... 55 

Collective musicians ........ 6S, 100 

Conunitments .......... 53, 59 

Complaints 67, 80, 100 

against police officers ........ SO, SI 

against miscellaneous h'censcs ...... 67, 100 

Courts 52, 53 

fines imposed by ........ . 53, 9S 

number of days' attendance at, by officers .... 53, 55, 9? 

number of persons summoned by ...... 52 

Criniin5d Investigation, Bureau of ....... 54 

arrests ........... 55 

finger-print sjstem ......... 53 

photographs .... .... .51 

records ........... 54 

nines' gallery .......... 54 

Criminal work . . . . . 5, 9S 

comparative statement of ........ 9S 



D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 70 

Dead bodies, cared for ......... 55, 61 

Dead bodies, recovered ......... 55, 61 

Deaths 58 

by accident, suicide, etc. ........ 58 

of police officers ......... 51, 74 

Department, police .......... 50 

Detectives, private .......... 100 

Distribution of force ......... 51, 72 

Disturbances suppressed ......... 56 

Dogs 57, 100 

amount received for licenses for ...... 100, 102 

damage done by ......... 57 

number licensed ........ 100, 101 

Drains and vaults, defective, reported ...... 55 

Drivers, hack or cab ........ 65, 100 

Drowning, persons rescued from ....... 56, 61 

Dnmkenness .......... 7, 54, 93 

arrests for, per day ......... 54 

increase in number of arrests for ...... 52, 54 

nonresidents arrested for ....... 7, 54, 93 

total number of arrests for ...... 52, 54, 93 



INDEX. 113 

E. 

PAGE 

Employees of the Department ........ 50, 72 

Events, special .......... 56 

Expenditures 71, 102, 103 

Extra duties performed by officers ....... 55, 56 



F. 

Fences, defective, reported ........ 53 

Fmancial 71, 102, 103 

expenditure 71, 102, 103 

bouse of detention ........ 71, 102 

pensions .......... 71, 102 

signal ser\-ice 71, 102, 103 

receipts 71, 102 

miscellaneous Ucense fees ...... 71, 100, 102 

Fines 6, 7, 9S 

average amount of ......... 53 

amount of ......... 6, 53, 9S 

number pimished by . . . . 6, 53 

Finger-print system ......... 55 

Fire alarms ........... 5o, 56 

defective, reported ......... 55 

ntmiber given .......... 56 

number on water front attended ...... 61 

Pircs 56,61 

extinguished . . . . . . . . 56, 61 

on water front extinguished without alarm ..... 61 

Foreigners, number arrested ....... 52, &4-97 

Fugitives from justice ......... 55 



G. 

Gaming, illegal .......... 93 

Gas pipes, defective, reported ........ 55 



H. 

Hack or cab drivers ........ 65, 100 

Hackney carriages 65, 100 

Hand carts ........... 100 

Harbor ser\->ce, special duties performed ...... 61 

" Ferret " in commission ........ 61 

Horses . . . 62, 82 

bought, sold, etc. ......... 62 

distribution of .......... 82 

number in senice . . • . . . 62, 82 

House of detention ......... 59, 71, 102 

Houses of ill-fame, etc. ......... 23-49 

Hydrants, defective, reported ........ 56 



114 



INDEX. 



I. 

PACE 

Iznpswyament, number of tcats o4 , ..... 6^ 55, 98 

p«noQS sentenced to ........ 6 

Incoo* 71, 102 

Tr>«iiT>^ p«cM>a§ taken in char;ge ....... 53, 56 

Inspector of claims .......... 57 

tatta investigated . . ... .55 

lujuntDt cnosicians ........ 68, 100 

J. 

Junk erjOtetoea 100 

Jonk ^»p keepers .......... 100 

Jury work by police ......... 10 

Jaraaie offenders .......... 11 

L. 

T«Tr»j»» defective, reported ........ 56 

^ifi'ns^—j cntsceUaneous ........ 67, 100 

Listixi; male residents ......... 66 

ccstifieates refused ......... 66 

exjtttaes of ... . ..... 66, 102 

maber ct. male residents listed ...... 66, 106 

sqiplanentary list of male residents ..... 66, 107 

veiisea voters verified ....... 66, 108 

oombtr of policemen easpioyed in ..... . 57, 67 

Loan*, snail 70, 100 

Jt<A^yn at station bouses ........ 53 

Lodpa; brMises, public ........ 69, 100 

ajipGcations for licenses ....... 69, 100 

astbonty to b'ceose ......... 69 

locatKa of 69, 70 

snmlKr of persons lodged in . . . . 69, 70 

Lost, alaiKloDed and stolen property ..... 56, 100, 103 

M. 

ViinVJ»<, defective 56 

MfdVyl exazniners' assistants ........ 5S 

■aqcexts attended ......... SB 

czxaes of death ......... 55 

cades oa which inquests were held ...... 5B 

yUaxs, cnscDber arrested ........ 52, S4-97 

ySjaoMaataas business ......... 55, 56 

Miw i Bine i a ns licenses ....'.... 67, 100 

oxB^hiaXa investigated ....... 67, 100 

Bomber woed* ......... 67, 100 

■ transferred 67, 100 

incelled and revoked 67, 100 

: of fees collected lor 67, 100 

Mjas3^ pezsoas .......... 56 

• reported ......... 56 

found ..........56 



INDEX. 115 

PAGE 

Motor taxicabs .......... 8 

Musicians, itinerant ........ 68, 100 

applications for licenses ........ 68 

instruments examined ........ 68 

instruments condemned ........ 68 

instruments passed ......... 68 

Musicians, collective ........ 68, 100 

Nativity of persons arrested ........ 52 

Nonresidents, number arrested ...... 6, 84-97 

o. 

Offences, tables of 5, 84-97 

against the person ........ 5, 84, 85 

against property, with violence . . . . . . 5, 85 

against property, without \nolence . . . . . 5, 86 

against property, malicious . . . . 5, 87 

comparative statement of ........ 93 

forgery and against currency . . . . 5, 87 

against license laws . . . . . . . 5, 88 

against chastity, morality, etc. ..... S, 22, 89, 90 

juvenile 12, 13 

miscellaneous ......... 5, 91—96 

recapitulation .......... 97 

• P 

i Parks, pubUc 104, 105 

i accidents reported in ....... 104, 105 

I Pawnbrokers 100 

Pensions and benefits ......... 70 

estimates for pensions ........ 71 

number of persons on rolls ....... 71 

! payments on account of ........ 71 

j Police 67 

I railroad ........... 67 

special ........... 67 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries .... 71 

Police department .......... 50 

how constituted ......... 50 

distribution of .......... 51 

officers appointed ......... 51 #?J 

date appointed ......... 77 M 

t complaints against ........ 80, 81 g 

I died 51,74 « 

(discharged .......... 78 :3 

injured .......... 51 '^ 

f promoted .......... 51,76 

I resigned 51, 78 .i 

\ retired 51,75 if 

absent sick ......... 79 ' '■'^. 

' arrests by .......... 51 \ 

I detailed, special events . . . • . 56, 57 



%' 



116 INDEX. 

PAGE 

Police department, work of ........ 51 . 

horses in use in . . . . . . . . . 62, S2 

vehicles in use in ......... &4 

Police Relief Association, invested fund of ..... 71 

Police signal seirice 50, 59, 72, 102, 103 

cost of maintenance .... .... 71, 102, 103 

payments .......... 103 

signal boxes .......... 59 

miscellaneous work . . . . . . . 59 

property of .......... 60 

Private business in public streets . . . .11 

Private detectives 100 

Property 53, 56, 100, 102 

lost, abandoned and stolen 56, 100, 102 

recovered 53, 55, 9S i 

sale of condemned ........ 100, 102 

stolen in city 53, 98 

taken from prisoners and lodgers ...... 53 

Public cartiages 65, 100 

Public lodging-houses 69, 70, 100 

R. 

Railroad police .......... 67 

Registration (see Listing) ........ 66 

Rogues' gallery .......... 54 

s. 

Second-hand articles ......... 100 

Sewers, defective, reported ........ 56 

Sick and injured persons assisted . . . . . 53, 56 

Sickness, absence on account of ....... 79 

Signal service, police 50, 59, 72, 102, 103 

Small loan licenses ......... 70, lOO 

Special events .......... 56 

Special police ........... 67 

Station houses .......... 53 

lodgers at .......... 53 

witnesses detained at ........ 53 

Stolen property, va.'ue of ....... 53, 55, 9S 

Street railways, conductors and motormen licensed .... 100 

Street traG5c rules 9 

prosecutions under ......... 10 

StreeU 56, 104, 105 

accidents reported in ....... 104, 105 

defective, reported ......... 56 

pri\-ate business in ......... 11 

Sunday work ...... ..... 17 

T. 

Teams 56 

stray, put up ..... ..... 56 

Trees, defective .......... 56 



INDEX. 117 

Y. 

PAGE 

Vehicles 62-64 

ambulances .......... 63 

automobiles .......... 62 

in use in police department ....... o4 

public carriages ........ 65, 100 

wagons 65, 100, 101 

Vessels ........•-•• 61 



w. 

Wagons 65, 100, 101 

number licensed by diwions . . . . . . .101 

total number licensed ....... 65, 100, 101 

Water pipes, defective, reported ....... 56 

Water running to waste reported . . . .... 56 

Weapons, dangerous ......... 70 

"White Slavery" 34 

Wires and poles, defective, reported ....... 56 

Witnesses 53,56,98 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 55, 98 

fees earned by officers as . . . . . . ... 98 

number of, detained at station houses ..... 5.1, 56 

Women committed to House of Detention ..... 59 

Women voters verified ........ 66, 108 



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