(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

onarici • 
Noxsoa 



BOSTON 
i PUBLIC 




■■! 



Public Document 



No. 49 



FIFTH AJSnSlUAL REPORT 



I 
I 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



I 

n 



Yeak ending Xov. 30, 1910. 




if 



J-1 






BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEB PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTEBS, 

18 Post Oiticb Square. 

1911. 



t» 



■i -4 



I 






'^^>k'\'\VrA > Ol-A^l ^//Mv;s Vi^'=\-vW^ 



\ \ APFBOVED BT 

Thb State Boabo or Pdbucatiok. 



• • *• * 



CONTENTS. 



Repobt:— '"■ 

Police work as to crime, ......... 5 

Nooresident offenders, ......... 6 

Street traffic rules, .......... 7 

Police work on jury lists, ......... 7 

Automobile laws, .......... 8 

Private use of public streets, ........ 9 

Juvenile offenders, .......... 11 

Department expenses, ......... 12 

Offences against chastity and morality, ...... 14 

Houses of ill fame, .......... 15 

Inmates and patrons, ......... 17 

Night walkers, ........... 19 

The law and the police, ......... 20 

The business of vice modernized, ....... 22 

Public and police, .......... 24 

Arrests for drunkenness in Boston, ....... 25 

One day of heavy arrests, ... . ... . .26 

Arrests for dnmkenness in fifty-one years, ...... 31 

Nonresidents arrested for drunkenness, ...... 34 

Effect of "Policies" on arrests for drunkenness, ..... 35 

Punishment and probation, ........ 36 

Law and policy in the use of special policemen, ..... 39 

Financial relations of the city of Boston and the police department, . 59 

Law the only true basis of police action, ...... 67 

Thb Depabtiient: — 
The police force, . . . . . . ' . . .70 

Signal service, ........... 70 

lE^ployees of the department, ........ 70 

Recapitulation, . . . . . . . . . .70 

Distribution and changes, ......... 71 

Police officers injured while on duty. ....... 71 

Work of the department, ......... 71 

Arrests, ........... 71 

Drunkenness, .......... 73 

Bureau of criminal investigation, ....... 74 

Miscellaneous business, ........ 75 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ...... 76 

Speeial events, ........... 77 

Inspector of claims, .......... 77 

Officers detailed to assist medical examiners, ..... 78 

House of detention, .......... 79 

Police signal service, .......... 79 

Signal boxes, .......... 79 

Miscellaneous work, ......... 79 

Harbor service, . . . . . . . . .80 

Horses, ............ 81 



4 CONTENTS. 

rAGB 

Vehicle service, .......... 81 

Automobiles 81 

Ambulances, .......... 82 

Public carriages, .84 

Wagon licenses, .......... 84 

Listing male residents of Boston, etc., ....... 85 

Women voters verified, ........ 85 

Listing expenses, . . . . . .85 

Number of policemen employed in listing, ..... 86 

Special police, ........... 86 

Railroad police, .......... 86 

Miscellaneous licenses, ......... 86 

Musicians' licenses, . . . . . . . . . .87 

Itinerant, ........... 87 

Collective -87 

Public lodging bouses, ......... 88 

I Carrying dangerous weapons, ........ 89 

I Small loan licenses. .......... 90 

: ' Pensions and benefits, ......... 90 

; Financial, ........... 90 

Distribution of police force, ........ 92 

List of officers who died during the year, ...... 94 

List of officers retired during the year, ...... 95 

List of officers who were promoted during the year, .... 96 

Number of men in active service, ....... 97 

Officers discharged and resigned during the year, ..... 98 

Absent from duty by reason of sickness during the year, . . .99 

Complaints against officers during the year, ...... 100 

Number and distribution of horses, ....... 102 

Arrests by divisions during the year, ....... 103 

Arrests and offences for year, ........ 104 

Age and sex of persons arrested, ........ 119 

Comparative statement of crime as to population, .... 120 

Licenses of all classes issued, ........ 121 

Dog licenses issued, .......... 122 

Wagon Ucenses issued, ......... 122 

Financial statement. .......... 123 

Payments on account of signal service, ...... 124 

Accidents, ........... 125 

Male residents listed by wards and precincts, ..... 127 

Male residents, supplementary list, ....... 128 

Women voters listed, ......... 129 



®l)c (Eommontoealtl) of illassachusetts. 



REPORT. 



Headquabters or the Poucb Depabtxent, 
OmcE or THE Pouce CosraisaioNEB, 29 Peiibebton Square, 
BonoN, Dec. 30. 1910. 

To His Excellency Eben S. Drjiper, Governor. 

Your Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a report of the 
work of the police department for the year ended Nov. 30, 1910. 



Police Work as to Chime. 
The magnitude of the work of the department in matters 
not criminal will appear in later pages. On the criminal side 
the total number of arrests in 1910 was 71,207, as against 
71,512 in 1909, 68,146 in 1908 and 57,078 in 1907. The eight 
general divisions under which offences are classed show the 
following numbers for the four years: — 



Omnca. 


Arresto 
in 1907. 


Armta 
in 1908. 


Arrests 
in 1909. 


Armt« 
in 1910. 


Offences against the person, 
Offences against property with violence. 
Offences against property without vio- 
lence. 
Malicious offences against property, 
Forgery and offences against the cur- 
rency. 
Offences against the license laws, 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc., 
Offences not classed in the foregoing, in- 
cluding drunkenness. 


2,979 

535 

3,055 

165 
50 

302 

828 

49,164 


3,591 

692 

4,048 

185 
76 

828 

1,141 

57,585 


3,156 

525 

3,783 

176 
71 

769 

1,409 

61,623 


3,326 

479 

3,584 

137 
69 

532 

1,308 

61,766 


Totals, ..... 


57,078 


68,146 71,512 


71,201 



6 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



A summary of fines and imprisonments is shown as fol- 
lows: — 



UOT. 



uti. 



1909. 



uu. 



Persons fined, . . . 11,832 
Total amount of fines, . . |S110.129 
Persons sentenced to imprison- 6,891 

ment. 
Total years of imprisonment, . 2,S07 



15,735 

$159,982 

8,883 



17,407 

$161,399 

9,478 



3,904 4,130 



14,949 

§138,140 

9,533 

3.841 



The reduction in the ntmvber of persons fined and in the 
aggregate of the fines, as compared with 1908 and 1909, indi- 
cates a decrease in minor offences. A like inference may be 
drawn as to the more serious crimes from the fact that, although 
the persons sentenced to imprisonment in 1910 numbered 55 
more than in 1909, the aggr^ate of their sentences fell from 
4,130 to 3341, a reduction of 289 years. That this condition 
did not extend to the small number of crimes which are the 
gravest <rf all b shown by an increase in the number of persons 
sentenced to State Prison from 102 in 1909 to 140 in 1910. 

XONHESIDEXT OFFENDERS. 

The proportion of nonresident offenders among the persons 
arrested continues to increase. When the first police commis- 
sion was established, in 1878, the percentage was 19.90; in 
1909 it was 39.08 and in 1910 it was 39.65. The statbtics for 
the past ten years, coreiing arrests for all causes, are as fol- 
lows: — 



YUL 



Total Arrests. 



Nooresideots. 



Perce&ticeci 
NonreadotL 



1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910. 



34,500 
34,732 
43,033 
50,265 
48,358 
49,906 
57,078 
68,146 
71,512 
71,201 



10,551 
10,631 
14,644 
18,030 
17,167 
18,001 
20,982 
26,113 
27,953 
28,233 



30.58 
30.61 
29.38 
35.86 
35.50 
36.06 
36.77 
38.32 
39.08 
39.65 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUIMENT — No. 49. 



In the single matter of arrests for drunkenness the percent- 
age of nonresidents arrested has increased steadily in ten years 
from 29.90 per cent, in 1901 to 47.86 per cent, in 1910. Almost 
two-fifths of all the persons arrested in 1910 by the Boston 
police, and almost half of those arrested for drunkenness, were 
nonresidents. 

Street Traffic Rules. 

The street traffic rules, established two years ago by the 
street commissioners imder the authority of chapter 447, Acts 
of 1908, are now in smooth and successful operation. 

In the first three months of their enforcement, in 1909, 500 
prosecutions a month were needed in order that drivers of 
vehicles might be con\'inced that it was absolutely necessary 
that they should learn and obey the rules. In the next three 
months the prosecutions dropped to 300 a month, and the total 
for the ten months to Nov. 30, 1909, was 2,724. The total for 
the twelve months ended Nov. 30, 1910, was 1,025; and as 
drivers continue to learn and obey, that number will doubtless 
be further reduced. 

Police Work ok Jury Lists. 

For the third year the police department, imder the pro- 
visions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, has assisted the Election 
Commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons pro- 
posed for jury service. The police findings in these three years 
may be summarized as follows: — 





IMS. 


1M9. 


i$it. 


Total*. 


Dead or could not be found in Boston, . 


780 


808 


1,055 


2,643 


Physically incapacitated. 


492 


223 


332 


1,047 


Convicted of crime, .... 


156 


58 


183 


397 


Unfit for various reasons, 


119 


266 


707 


1,092 


Apparently fit, 


6,352 


6,870 


7,565 


20,787 


Total of names submitted to police, 


7,899 


8,225 


9,842 


25,966 



\:\ 









8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The police department is not expected and does not under- 
take to guarantee the fitness of men upon whom it reports. It 
simply obtains the best information that it can as to their 
moral, mental and phj'sical qualifications, and furnishes it to 
the Election Commissioners. The court records are searched, 
as they always have been, by agents of the election board, and 
when the present sj-stem was established, three years ago, it 
was agreed by the Board and the Police Commissioner that 
the police should not attempt to duplicate that work- The 
police came, additionally, upon 397 men whose conviction of 
crime had not been otherwise discovered. 

\Mth a superior criminal court and eight municipal courts in 
constant operation in Boston, and with the changes in name, 
readence and occupation on the part of many men who have 
been convicted in the course of years, here or elsewhere, it 
would be absurd to suppose that any possible search of records 
could disclose the experiences in court of the great numbers 
of men who are annually required for jury service. 

Automobile Laws. 

The automobile prosecutions in 1910 numbered 2,334, as 
against 2,196 in 1909. The fines imposed by the lower courts 
amounted to S23,332, as against $21,609 in 1909. These figures 
include prosecutions in parks as well as in streets, for \'iola- 
tions of the State law or the park rules, but they do not include 
prosecutions of drivers of automobiles for violations of the 
street traflSc regulations. 

The first record of an automobile prosecution by the Boston 
police was made only nine years ago, when the single offence 
of the year 1901 was the driving of a motor car in a public 
park without a permit- In 1902 there were 33 prosecutions; 
in 1903, 67; in 1904, 179; in 1905, 102; in 1906, 308; in 1907, 
961; in 1908, 1,865; in 1909, 2,196; in 1910, 2,334. 

Accidents to persons, due to the operation of automobiles, 
are first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Begin- 
ning at that year their nuirber to the present time b shown 
in the following table: — 



1911.] 



1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904. 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 



PUBLIC DOCUIVIENT — No. 49. 



Year. 



KUled. 



2 

1 
2 

1 
7 
6 
9 
13 



InjuTd. 



19 

8 

17 

24 

55 

78 

110 

105 

127 

251 

280 



Of the 13 persons killed in 1910, 6 were riding in automobiles 
and 7 were struck by automobiles. Of the 280 persons injured 
in 1910, 32 were riding in automobiles and 24S were struck by 
automobiles. 



Private Use of Pubuc Streets. 

Chapter 584, Acts of 1907, "An Act relative to the use of 
public streets in the city of Boston for the storage and sale 
of merchandise," has been for three years in successful oj>era- 
tion. The puipose of its passage was to regulate the use of 
public streets for private business in the interest erf the whole 
public. Such use had previously been contrary to law, and 
had been greatly abused by individuals. Under the new sys- 
tem it is lawful as far as permitted, and each individual holds 
a license which describes precisely the space which he is allowed 
to occupy. PajTnent for licenses was only an incident of the 
new system, but, as a matter of fact, the fees in three years, 
ranging from So to §100 for each license, have brought to the 
city of Boston a revenue of about $83,000. 

As the licenses are issued by the street commissioners, the 



M 



10 POLICE C0M:MISSI0NER. [Jan. 

Police Commissioner approving, and the fees are collected by 
them, the police department receives no credit therefor in 
the city's books. But as a matter of fact this revenue, which 
is the result of legislation recommended, framed and in a large 
measure carried out by the police department, has been sev- 
eral thousand dollars 4n excess of the amount of the salaries 
of the Police Commissioner, the secretary and the whole staff 
of clerks employed by the department during the three years 
in which the act has been in effect. It is fair to assume, more- 
over, that the successful and profitable operation of the act 
encouraged the subsequent legislation concerning street pri\'i- 
leges of other kinds, from the licensing of which the city expects 
to derive a very large revenue. 

The situation before regulation was applied is described in 
the following passage from my first annual report, in Decem- 
ber, 1906: — 

The police are embarrassed in their efforts to secure a just and law- 
ful regulation of the use of the streets and sidewalks for the use of 
private business. A canvass made in September showed that 338 
permits issued by the superintendent of streets were in effect. Of 
these, 285 were for the use of parts of sidewalks in front of premises 
rented by the persons holding the permits, and 53 were for stands 
occupied by persons ha%ing no permanent places of business. The 
Police Commissioner can find no law which justifies the use of any 
part of a public street for the purchase or the sale of merchandise. 
The exercise by the citj' of Boston of the authority to issue such per- 
mits could be derived only from an act of the Legislature. The sj's- 
tem has grown up through fifty years, and is confused, at least in the 
popular mind, by the existence of what are known as the market 
limits. To break it up would be to cripple a brge, complicated and 
legitimate business, which is carried on mainly to the satisfaction of 
the public. And yet it seems to be necessary that such small parts 
of^the sj-stem as may tend to obstruction or to injustice to persons 
renting ^neighboring premises should be discovered and eliminated; 
the part remaining should then be placed under the sanction of the 
law. jThe police would thus be saved the embarrassment, which has 
often arisen, of acting upon complaint against the dealer without a 
permit, brought by a neighboring dealer holding a permit which the 
police have a strong reason to believe is without legal validitj'. I 
respectfully recommend a thorough investigation of the subject, in 
order that the authority to give these street pri\'ileges may be estab- 
lished, and that thereafter persons assuming such pri\-ileges without 
right in law may be checked and punished. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

This recommendation went to a committee of the Legisla- 
tm-e which was so burdened with other business that it could 
not give the time needed for an investigation of this new and 
novel subject. Persons using the streets unlawfully could not 
; be made to believe, on the other hand, that the matter was of 

interest to them. It was only by repeated announcements by 
the Police Commissioner, that unless an act legalizing the 
I practice were passed he would consider it his duty to prosecute 

i; all persons who unlawfully occupied the streets, that the slight- 

est interest could be aroused. Even then it was only by draw- 
ing personally an act which was new in itself, novel in prin- 
ciple and elaborate in detail that he succeeded in placing the 
matter fairly before the committee late in April, 1907. No 
report was made until June, and it was not until June 28, the 
last day on which any acts were approved by the Governor, 
;^ that the bill became a law. 

; To put the act into effect was even more diflScult, but after 

I nearly two years of explanations and remonstrances, with a 

;; few prosecutions, it was so satisfactorily accomplished that I 

can recall no complaint received in the past twelve months. 
t It is a popular mistake that the operation of the law affects 

^ only the market district; on the contrary, it extends to all 

[• parts of the city, and of more than 1,200 licenses issued an- 

nually, probably two-thirds are remote from that center. 
j It is proper to say, further, that the act placed in the hands 

of the Police Commissioner the control of hawkers and pedlers 
; in so far as the times and places for carrj'ing on their trade 

r were concerned; and one of many results has been to keep 

them out of the business paits of the city in the business hours. 
I have gone into this matter in some detail because it shows 
the difficulty of restoring to the public its rights in the streets 
! which private persons desire to monopolize; and the possibil- 

.. ity of such restoration with benefit to the order of the city 

and even to its pecuniary profit. 



Jm'EMLE Offenders. 

The laws pro%-iding for special treatment of juvenile offend- 
ers, passed in 1906, took effect on the first day of September 
in that year. The four annual reports of the Police Commis- 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

sioner made since that date have given full details of the opera- 
tion of those laws in so far as the information possessed by the 
department would permit. They are now omitted because 
they vary but slightly from jear to year. 

The subject of juvenile lawlessness is of the greatest impor- 
tance, and the police will continue to do such part of the work 
for its suppression as the laws shall assign to them from time 
to time. 

DEP.A^RTilENT EXPEXSES. 

In another part of this report will be found, in the usual 
form, a statement of the receipts and expenditures of the depart- 
ment for the police year ended Nov. 30, 1910. The special 
exhibit which follows was prepared from the reports of the 
city auditor in order that it might cover the city's fiscal year, 
which ends January 31 annually, and that advantage might 
be taken of the more detailed separation of accounts made by 
the auditor. 

About 8-5 per cent, of all expenditures by the police depart- 
ment is for pay of members of the sworn police force and of 
persons retired therefrom on pension, both classes being sub- 
ject, as to numbers and rates of pajTnent, to authorities inde- 
pendent of the Police Commissioner. 

The expenditures of the police department for general pur- 
poses, including the pay of all persons not members of the 
sworn police force, represent about 15 per cent, of the total. 
Such expenditures have been reduced rather than increased 
in the past four years, and I expect that a like condition will 
continue in the ne.xt fiscal year. 

These statements are based on a careful analysis which I 
have made of the expenses of the police department as shown 
in the reports of the city auditor for the fiscal years 1905-06, 
1907-08, 190S-09 and 1909-10. The fiscal year 1906-07 is 
omitted because of the fact that in June, 190G, the single Police 
Commissioner succeeded the Board of Police, and the Licens- 
ing Board was established, the effect of which was so to di\ade 
expenses and change details of bookkeeping that for purposes 
of comparison that year is not available. 

Putting aside payments on account of pensions and on account 



I 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

of salaries of the sworn police force, the analysis shows that the 
expenditures charged to the police department for all other 
purposes were as follows: — 

Fiscal year 1905-06, §319,653 

Fiscal year 1907-08 292,341 

Fiscal year 1908-09, 276,221 

Fiscal year 1909-10, 286,833 

These figures show a reduction in miscellaneous expenses 
charged to the police department as between the years 1905-06 
and 1909-10 of $32,820. 

The collections by the police department on account of the ^ 

licenses which it continues to issue, the amount of which col- 
lections depends to some extent on police \-igilance, were 
§46,742 in 1905-06 and §51,339.25 in 1909-10, a gain of 
$4,597.25. 

It is proper to state, on the other side, that when the Licens- 
ing Board was established in 1906 it relieved the police depart- 
ment of certain expenses for clerks, rent, printing, etc. All 
e-xpenditiu-es of the Licensing Board in the fiscal year 1909-10, 
exclusive of the salaries of the members and the secretary, 
amounted to $21,411. It may therefore be said that the sav- 
ing in the general expenses of the police department as between { 
1905-06 and 1909-10 was sufficient to balance the running j 
expenses of the Licensing Board, to meet the added miscel- i 
laneous costs of an enlarged police force and the general in- i 
crease in the price of labor and supplies, and to show a balance * 
above all of $11,409. f 

The act under which the Police Commissioner is now serv- i 

ing required him to appoint a secretary at a salary of §3,000 | 

a year, and authorized him to expend annually $3,500 for legal ji 

counsel. By the appointment as secretary of a lawyer who 
has attended successfully to the legal business of the depart- 
ment in addition to the duties of his office, the expense of 
$3,500 a year has been saved, such saving in four and a half 
years to date amounting to §15,750. In two instances only, 
and then for special public reasons, have pajTnents been made 
under this authority, the fees amounting to $350. 



14 



POLICE CO>DnSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Offences against Ciustity aso Mor.\litt. 

The particularly vigorous work of the police in the years 
190S and 1909 for the suppression of public and semipublic 
sexual immorality was continued in 1910; but the previous 
work seems in itself to have reduced in some directions the 
number of opportunities for successful action. 

The table which follows gives the whole number of arrests 
for offences against chastity and morality in each of the last 
nine years, those years being chosen because they represent 
not only the present police administration, but the three next 
preceding administrations: — 



Yfun. 


AjTesU for 

Chjaitvand '"^ 
MoraLly. 


.*lTi3jta fur 

Chastity uxl 
Morality. 


19fr2, 
1903, 

1904, . 
1905, 
1906, 


704 '' 1907, 
709 ' 1908, 
876 i| 1909, 
807 ]■ 1910, 
895 


843 
1,165 
1,432 
1,301 



This table omits from the total of each year the figures 
covering certain small items which are included in the regular 
statistical tables, but represent disorder rather than immoral- 
ity. On the other hand, all yearly totals in this table include 
some offences involving sexual immoralitA-, such as rape and 
indecent assault, which are usually classified under the head- 
ing "Offences against the person." As the figures of all years 
are treated uniformly, the means of comparison are perfect- 

A closer \-iew, showing the three great causes of arrest on 
account of sexual immoralitj", is given in the following com- 
parative statement: — 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



15 



Arbests for— 1902. 


190S. 


1904. 


1905. 


190C. 


UOT. 


1908. 


1909. 


191«. 


Fornication. 

Keeping house of ill 

fame. 
Night walking, . 


138 94 

55 SO 

259 271 


253 

66 

236 


284 

52 

190 


260 

65 

249 


279 

74 

169 


375 
114 
249 


520 
112 
375 


408 

60 

366 


Totals, 


452' 445 

1 


555 


526 


574 522 


738 


1,007 


8.34 



The foregoing figures, in common with some others in the 
first part of this report, will show a slight variation from those 
to be found in the statistical tables given later. The reason 
is that in this place court prosecutions are considered and ia 
the tables arrests are recorded. At the beginning and the end 
of each year a slight variance is likely to arise in some cases 
because the arrest and the arraignment in court do not take 
place on the same day. 

Houses of III Fame. 
The number of persons prosecuted in 1908 and 1909 for 
keeping houses of ill fame was very much the largest in the 
history of the department, and to that fact, as well as to cir- 
cumstances which will be described later, is to be' attributed 
the reduction in the number prosecuted in 1910. The number 
of prosecutions for keeping houses of ill fame each year for 
thirty years is shown in the following table: — 



f 1881, 








. 25 


1896, 


72 


1882, 








. 52 


1897, 


54 


1883, 








. 63 


1898, 


31 


1884, 








67 


1899, 


. 68 


1885, 








43 


1900, 


. 100 


1886, 








84 


1901, 


55 


1887, 








50 


1902, 


. 55 


t 1888, 








25 


1903, 


. 80 


i 1889, 
1890, 








55 


1904, 


66 








27 


1905, 


. 52 


I 1891, 

( 1892, 

1893, 








31 


1906, 


. 65 








40 


1907, 


. 74 








19 


1908, 


. 114 


1894, 








46 


1909, 


. 112 


1895, 

• 








69 


1910, 


60 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The evidence on which to base these 60 prosecutions was 
obtained through police efforts of many kinds, including 369 
searches with warrants in 125 different places. In 1909 the 
number of places searched was 115 and the number of searches 
was 295. The difference between the work and the results in 
the two years indicates greater caution on the part of the 
offenders and the extension of police action to places less marked 
with suspicion. 

The lower courts disposed of the cases of persons prosecuted 
for keeping houses of ill fame in the years 190S, 1909 and 1910, 
as shown in the following table: — 



1 "-• 


1M». 


1910. 


Fined SoO, 






49 


51 


23 


Fined S75, 






- 


1 


3 


Fined SlOO, 






7 


6 


2 


Discharged, .... 






16 


13 


8 


Placed on filC; .... 






11 


8 


3 


Placed on probation, 






3 


5 


2 


Prison at Sherbom, 






2 




- 


Pending 






1 


- 


4 


House of Correction one year. 






7 


3 


1 


House of Correction eleven months, 






1 


- 


- 


House of Correction nine months, . 






- 


1 


1 


House of Correction eight months, . 






- 


2 


- 


House of Correction six months. 






9 


5 


4 


House of Correction four months, . 






4 


■o 


2 


House of Correction three months, . 






3 


7 


3 


House of Correction two months, . 






- 


1 


- 


House of Correction one month. 






1 




- 


House of Correction nine months and SlOO fine. 


- 


1 


- 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — No. 49. 



17 



UM. 



U09. 



UIO. 



House of Correction three months and SlOO fine, 
House of Correction three months and SoO fine, 
House of Correction two months and S75 fine, . 
Common jail, ...... 

Defaulted, 

Held for grand jury, 

Totals, 



114 



112 



60 



The ma.ximum penalty under the nuisance act is SlOO fine 
or twelve months' imprisonment, or both. The maximum fine 
was imposed in 190S in 7 cases, in 1909 in 6 cases and in 1910 
in 2 cases; the maximum imprisonment in 1908 in 7 cases, 
in 1909 in 3 cases and in 1910 in 1 case. In no case in any of 
those years did a court impose the maximiun combined penalty 
of SlOO fine and twelve months' imprisonment. 

The searches in suspected houses of ill fame disclosed evi- 
dence on which were based 23 prosecutions for \-iolating the 
liquor law, with the following results : — 

Fined, 14 

House of Correction six months, 1 

House of Correction three months, 1 

Discharged, 4 

Placed on file, 3 

Total, 23 

IXMATES AXD P.\TROXS. 

The searches of houses of ill fame resulted further in the 
arrest on the premises of 84 men and 103 women, other than 
the keepers of the places, who were either actually engaged 
in the commission of crime or were open to prosecution as 
idle and disorderly persons. Tie manner in which these cases 
were disposed of in the lower courts, all the men being released 
on payment of fines, excepting 3, who were placed on proba- 
tion or had their cases filed, is shown in the table which follows, 



IS 



POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. 



in comparison with the disposition of similar cases 
190S and 1909: — 



[Jan. 
in the years 





uos. 


1939. 


1910. 


Fined SIO, 


- 


- 


1 


Fined S30, 


- 


- 


1 


Fined S25, 




- 


4 


Fined S20, 


135 


216 


131 


Fined S15, 


3 


12 


5 


Fined $10, 


- 


2 


5 


Fined 1 cent, 


2 


- 


- 


Placed on probation, 


27 


24 


19 


Placed on file 


9 


15 


5 


Discharged, 


S 


6 


2 


Defaulted 


2 


3 


3 


House of Correction one year, 


1 


- 


1 


House of Correction six months. 


1 


1 


1 


House of Correction four months, . 


9 


3 


2 


House of Correction three months, . 


4 


8 


8 


House of Correction two months, . 


1 


1 


- 


House of Correction one month, 


1 


7 


- 


Prison at Sherbom, 


3 


2 


- 


Jail four months, 




- 


1 


Jail three months, 


1 


- 


1, 


Jail fifteen days, 


1 


- 


/ 


Lancaster School, 


- 


1 


- 


Held for grand jury, 


- 


1 


2 


Pending, 


- 


- 


1 


Totals, 


208 


302 


187 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCIIMENT — No. 49. 



19 



Night Walkers. 

The work of the police for the suppression of open immoral- 
ity in the streets took the form of prosecution of common night 
walkers, and of women and girb not properly to be classed as 
common night walkers, but nevertheless guilty of immoral acts 
and conduct. As night walkers offend in public the police 
were able to make substantially as many prosecutions as in 
1909, the figm-es for the last four years being, 169 in 1907, 
249 in 190S, 375 in 1909 and 366 in 1910. Cases were disposed 
of in 1910, in comparison with 1908 and 1909, as follows: — 





IMS. 


1909. 


1919. 


Probation, 


99 


172 


190 


On file 


. 


9 


8 


10 


Defaulted, .... 






6 


12 


8 


Fined, .... 






1 


1 


4 


House of Correction one year, 






2 


- 


- 


House of Correction six months, 






7 


12 


12 


House of Correction four months. 






42 


52 


42 


House of Correction three months. 






36 


44 


27 


House of Correction two months, 






10 


11 


7 


House of Correction one month, 






2 


1 


1 


Prison at Sherbom, 






30 


45 


44 


State Farm, .... 






4 


10 


14 


T^ancaster School, .... 






1 


- 


— 


Jail four months.. .... 






- 


2 


4 


Jail three months. 






- 


1 


_ 


Discharged, 






- 


2 


3 


Pending, 






- 


2 


- 


Totals 


249 1 

1 


375 


366 



! 



20 POLICE C0M:MISSI0NER. [Jan. 

The great proportion of night walkers placed on probation 
gives particular interest to the results of such action. In no 
spirit of critic'ism, and without haN-ing gone below the surface 
of the matter, it is worth while to note results in 68 cases in 
which night walkers prosecuted by the police in one particular 
division were placed on probation within the year. Of the 
6S, 1 was sent to a State asylum for the insane; 9 are in private 
reformatory' institutions in accordance ^\nth the terms of their 
probation; 5 were surrendered by the probation officers and 
sentenced; 2.3 defaulted, that is to say, broke the conditions 
of their probation and presumably disappeared; 16 were dis- 
missed because of satisfactory conduct during the term of 
their probation, which is usually six months; and 14 cases are 
pending. 

Women and girls arrested in the streets for immoral con- 
,1 duct, but not properly to be classed as common night walkers, 

numbered 58, and their cases were disposed of as follows: — 

Delivered to parents, 22 

Delivered to State Board of Charities, 7 

Delivered to private institutions, 1 

Discharged at station house, 6 

Placed on probation, 9 

State Farm, 4 

Woman's Prison at Sherborn, 1 

Lancaster School, 3 

House of Correction sLx months, 1 

House of Correction four months, 2 

House of Correction three months, 1 

House of Correction two months, 1 

Total, 58 

The Law axd the Pouce. 
An attempt to close a house of prostitution by means of an 
injunction against the owner of the real estate was described 
in last year's report. The procedure is based on Revised Laws, 
chapter 101, section 8, but has long been known to the police, 
through actual experiment, as of no value for such a purpose. 
At the request, however, of an officer of a private organiza- 
tion, and as a further test of the law, the poUce department 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCTOIENT — No, 49. 21 

aided in securing an injunction against the owner of the house. 
No court contest was made by the respondent and the injunc- 
tion became operative Sept. 14, 1909. 

The theorj- of the law and the beHef of interested though 
inexperienced jjersons is that, with an injunction against the 
fiulher use of the house for purposes of prostitution, the owner 
of the real estate would be in contempt of court, and subject 
to imprbomnent if the house were again so used. But in 
line with previous experiences the title of the real estate was 
almost immediately transferred to another person, and as 
against the new owner the injunction had no force. 

Meanwhile, the police had continued to watch the house ^ 

and to search it with warrants, woman number 1, who was in ,--^'^ 

charge of the premises when the injunction was sought, though ; 

not the owner of the real estate, having turned the manage- 
ment over to woman number 2. When the last annual report 
of the police department was closed, Nov. 30, 1909, the house 
was apparently occupied by permanent male lodgers. 

But woman number 2 gradually took up the old practices, ' 

and in consequence of evidence secured by the police in Febru- ■ 

ary, 1910, a warrant for her arrest was applied for. It was \ 

refused by the court on the ground that it appeared that she | 

had given up business at that place. What she had really \ 

done was to transfer the management to woman number 3, j 

which is the plan usually followed in such cases. | 

The police were compelled to begin their work over again ] 

with woman number 3, and it was not until November, 1910, 
that they secured evidence enough to take her to court. She 
was arrested, and after her case had been continued she pleaded 
guilty, paid a fine of $50 and turned the house over to woman 4. 

Dec. 3, 1910, the police had suflScient evidence to ask for 
a warrant for woman number 4, which was granted, but she 
kept out of the way, woman number 5 taking her place, and 
was not arrested until December 28, when the case in court 
was continued to Jan. 6, 1911. \ 

The record of this particular house in the past two years t 

illustrates many aspects of the contest which the police are } 

carrying on against the business of vice; but especially and j 

most discouraging of all, I venture to say, is that attitude of 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the courts which makes it easy for keepers of houses of ill 
fame to avoid con\'iction, and when convicted after all, to 
escape, in many cases, with petty fines. 

\Mien court results are considered it is hardly an exaggera- 
tion to say that in cases such as the following the police are 
wasting their time and the laws are brought into contempt. 
A woman controls a house of eight suites. She lives in one of 
them, rents such of the others as she chooses, and two have 
been used for years for immoral purposes. They are barri- 
caded like old-fashioned gambling houses, and when the f>oIice 
appear and are seen through a peephole, they are unable, as 
a rule, to gain entrance in time to secure incriminating evi- 
dence. From Dec. 1, 1907, to INIarch 3, 1908, seven different 
women were the ostensible keepers of the place. On the latter 
date the seventh woman was convicted of keeping a house of 
ill fame, and the penalty was a fine of SoO. Under these con- 
ditions a policeman in uniform was stationed in front of the 
house from Aug. 16, 1908, to Oct. 16, 1909. The business 
apparently was too profitable to be given up readily, but it 
was damaged to such an extent that on the latter date the 
apartments were vacated. In a few months, however, busi- 
ness was resumed. From .■\pril 10 to Nov. 20, 1910, the place 
was searched twenty-one times by the police, and the only 
success, if a fine of S50 imposed by the court can be called a 
success, was the connction of the woman who was the osten- 
sible keeper in August, 1910. It is practically useless to attempt 
to collect evidence when the results are such as these. On this 
point I may appropriately repeat what I said in my annual 
report two years ago: — 

It is hard to believe that the Commonwealth should condone such 
an offence as this for any sum of money paid, and especially for a pit- 
tance that can be charged to the profit and loss account without en»- 
barrassmcnt to the business or interruption of its successful progress. 

The Business of Vice ^Iodernized. 

In previous reports I have spoken of the gradual disajv 

pearance of the old-fashioned houses of ill fame, — single 

houses with resident inmates. The movement has continued 

through the past year, and among those which gave up busi- 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 23 

ness it is worth while to mention three houses standing to- 
gether in a short street between Bowdoin Square and the State 
House, which had been carried on for a generation. The char- 
acter of their "trade" may be judged from the fact that when 
the furniture of one of them was sent to an auction room it 
was estimated to have cost SI 8,000. Police pressure accounts 
in a large measure for these surrenders, but the most important 
instrumentality in the change which for good or for evil has 
taken place in the business of vice is the telephone, with the 
modern sj-stem of operation which throws its use open not 
only to subscribers but to the whole public. The "telephone 
house," as it has come to be known, and in most cases it is 
but an apartment, is practically an exchange, in which the 
tenant, without keeping women in the place, fills orders, so 
to speak; and even when the police become suspicious and 
arrive with a liquor search warrant, which is their only legal 
and practicable means of securing entrance, they usually find 
nothing incriminating on the premises. A person carrying on 
the business in this way receives messages by telephone from 
men, and has at her call numbers of women and girls who use 
the telephone at stated times to learn whether or not they are 
wanted. 

The telephone is essential, also, in a large number of cases 
in which women live alone, or usually two together, in the small 
flats which have become so numerous. By its use men can 
arrange with the women and the women can communicate one 
with another from house to house. In one police division 
which contains no known houses of ill fame, in the sense in 
which the term has heretofore been used, 17 places were searched 
in 1910, 15 of which were flats of this character. In all the 
17 places e\ndence of violation of the laws was obtained, result- 
ing in the arrest of 2 persons for illegal sales of liquor and of 
35 persons for adultery or fornication. But not in a single case 
was the evidence sufficient to establish a charge of keeping 
a house of ill fame. 

Lodging houses in great numbers, where "no questions are 
asked," and men and women may come and go at pleasure, 
pro\nded they make no disturbance, are practically beyond the 
reach of the police except in cases in which criminal practices 



24 POLICE COABIISSIONER. [Jan. 

are carried on to such an extent that it is possible, through an 
unexpected search, to secure evidence of a character and quan- 
tity' to convince a court that the house is a place "resorted to 
for prostitution." In one place 6 persons were arrested for for- 
nication and conxncted. On the strength of that exidence the 
proprietor was arrested on a charge of keeping a house of ill 
fame, but was discharged by the court. In another case 26 
persons were arrested for fornication and convicted, and the 
two proprietors were fined, respectively, S.50 and SIOO. Again, 
with 10 arrests and convictions for fornication, the keeper of 
the house was fined S75; and in still another, with 8 arrests 
and convictions for fornication, the keeper was placed on pro- 
bation. Similar instances, though less marked, have been 
numerous. 

I am aware that some hotels of the lower class are large 
contributors to the convenience of mercenary \-ice. In a few 
cases in which the police were able to show that women were 
allowed to loiter on the premises for immoral purposes, and 
afterwards committed criminal acts, the managers of hotels of 
this kind have been convicted of keeping places resorted to for 
prostitution, and their business has been destroyed. Even the 
most carefully conducted hotels cannot question their guests 
and determine their legal relations to one another; but there 
are hotels of another kind, whose managers are careless, indiffer- 
ent or actually aware that their rooms are used for immoral pur- 
poses, and are ready to profit by such use. To this latter class 
the police will continue to give particular attention. 

Public and Police. 
The police department regards the business of vice as a 
social tragedy which has gone on from the beginning and pre- 
sumably will continue to go on to the end; but police action 
against it is confined, of necessity, to the attempted enforce- 
ment of the laws. The police have no other mission or authority, 
and their efforts to reduce the profits of the business, to secure 
the adequate punishment of those who engage in it, and thus 
to check its growth, have met with practically no helpful or 
appreciative response from any direction. If a future Police 
Commissioner were intending to pursue the same course with 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — No. 49. 25 

respect to the business of vice that has been followed for four 
years, I should advise him that he might expect loyal support 
from the police wlien once he had con\-inced them that he was 
in earnest; little encouragement from courts; bitter hostility 
from persons whose profits were curtailed; indifference from 
the public; and from a few enthusiasts in the cause of social 
purity, whose admirable purposes are not sustained by straight 
and intelligent thinking, he would be sure to receive some 
measure of abusive criticism. I should advise him that unless 
he held his oath of office in high regard, and cared for no reward 
other than the consciousness that he had done his dutj-^ faith- 
fully and with some benefit to the community, it would be 
better for him personally that he should follow the easy road 
of indifference, which is always chosen by those who are offi- 
cially blind. 

Arrests for Druxkex.vess in Boston. 
The subject of the increase in arrests for drunkenness in 
Boston has been discussed a good deal in the last year or two. 
After careful study of the matter I feci sure that whatever else 
the figures of such arrests may show they furnish no conclu- 
sive evidence in any year or series of years to prove that drunk- 
enness among the people of Boston is increasing. The prob- 
lem is too complex to be solved by means so simple. Without 
anticipating the full statements which appear later in this 
report, I may properly emphasize at once a point which is 
vital in the consideration of the whole subject. The arrests 
per 1,000 of population in 1910 were 71. IS, as against 33.33 
per 1,000 in 1902. Hence, drjnkenness in Boston might be 
regarded as having more than doubled in eight years, which 
is an absurd assumption. On the other hand, the arrests in 
Boston in 1S92 were 71.S7 per 1,000, as against 33.33 in 1902. 
Hence, drunkenness by this proc-ess of reasoning must have 
decreased more than half in the ten years from 1S92 to 1902, 
an assumption equally absurd. .Again, the rate per 1,000 
increased from 33.33 in 1902 to 47.69 in 1903 and 56.89 in 
1904, but no one could imagine that those increases in arrests 
represented corresponding changes in one or two years in the 
drinking habits of the people. 



26 



POLICE com:missioxer. 



[Jan. 



It is necessary to take into consideration the changes in 
the course of years in the laws relating to the punishment 
and probation of drunken persons, and to the sale of liquor; 
the vast increase in the number of persons living in adjacent 
no-license cities and towns who make Boston their drinking 
place; the "policies" which from time to time, through city 
authorities, courts and commissioners, have directed or influ- 
enced the police in taking drunken persons into custody; and 
the reasonable insistence on the part of the sober and orderly 
people who are in the vast majority, — an insistence which 
in the last few years has been especially emphatic, — that 
drunken men shall not be allowed to make life dangerous and 
uncomfortable in the streets and other public places, and in 
the trains and cars which all must use. 



OxE Dat of HEA^•Y Arrests. 

As an introduction to the study of this subject an analysis 
of one day's arrests, probably the heaviest for the year, may 
first be presented. The daily police reports received Sunday, 
March 27, 1910, showed that in the twenty-four hours of the 
police day ended at S o'clock that morning there had been 327 
arrests for drunkenness. Saturday arrests are always more 
numerous than those of any other day, and this particular 
Saturday was the eve of the festival of Easter. In order that 
a thorough analysis of the arrests for drunkenness on one such 
day might be made, special reports were called for from all 
police divisions on the ^londay following, and the results are 
given herewith. 

^^'hole number of persons arrested for drunkenness in Bos- 
ton in the twenty-four hours ended at S A.ii. Sunday, March 
27, 1910: men, 310; women, 17; total, 327. 





Men, 


Women. 


Touh. 


Residents of Boston, . 


143 


13 


156 


Xot residents of Boston, 


167 


4 


171 


Married, 


92 


9 


101 


Unmarried, .... 


21S 


S 


226 



1 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 49. 



27 



The ages were as follows: — 



Under 21, 
21 to 25, 
26 to 30, 
31 to 35, 
36 to 40, 
41 to 45, 
46 to 50, 



6 
40 
43 
57 
59, 
44 
40 



51 to 55, . 

56 to 60, . 

61 to 65, . 

66 to 70, . 

Total, 



17 


5 






10 


i 


7 


•i 


4 


? 




X 



327 



The following were the times at which arrests were made: — 



8 A.M. to 12 M., 
12 M. to 5 P.M., 

5 P.M. to 6 P.M., 

6 P.M. to 7 P.M., 

7 P.M. to 8 P.M., 

8 P.M. to 9 P.M., 

9 P.M. to 10 P.M., 

10 p.m. to 11 P.M., 

11 P.M. to 12 midnight. 
Midnight to 1 a.m., 

1 A.M. to S A.M., . 



Total, 



23 
48 
17 
15 
24 
28 
32 
33 
54 
32 
21 

327 



The birthplaces of the persons arrested were as follows: — 



United States 


• 


168 


Poland, . 


4 


Ireland, . 


. ■ 


85 


Finland, . 


3 


Canada and 


British Prov- 




Germany, 


3 


inces, . 


• • • 


31 


Norway, . 


2 


England, . 


. 


9 


Russia, 


2 


Sweden, . 


■ • > 


8 


France, 


1 


Scotland, . 


• 


7 


■ 




Italy, . 


. 


4 


Total, 


. 327 



The 171 persons who were not residents of Boston were 
registered as follows: — 



'I 
il 



Outside Massachusetts, 


19 


LjTin, 


. 10 


No home, 


13 


Everett, . 


8 


Foreign seamen. 


10 


Quincy, . 


. 8 


Cambridge, 


17 


Brockton, 


6 


Chelsea, . 


10 


Newton, . 


5 



2S 



POLICE COMNIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Somenille, 






5 


Waltham, ... 2 


yialdcD, . 






3 


Watertown, ... 2 


Mcdford, . 






3 


Andover, .\rlington, Brook- 


Revere, 






3 


line, Concord, Duxburi-, 


Woburn, . 






3 


Fan River, Hopedalc, 


Abinglon, 






2 


Ijttleton, Manchester, 


Braintrec, 






2 


ilarblehead, Milton, Xa- 


Canton, . 






2 


tick, Needham, New Bed- 


EJcdham, . 






2 


ford, Randolph, Rock- 


Hyde Park, 






2 


land, Saugus, Southbor- 


Lawrence, 






2 


ou^, Stoneham, Swamp- 


LoireU, . 






2 


scott, Walpole, Wey- 


ilelrose, . 






2 


mouth, 1 each, . 22 


Salem, 






2 




SLaron, 






2 


Total, . . .171 


WaktSeld, 






2 





The following statement shows the number of residents of 
each of the se\'eral sections of the city arrested throughout 
the citj', whether in their home police division or elsewhere: — 





-irraarS in 


Arre^el in 


Totil r.cs:- 






H<irj- 


Otbff 


dcnls 


Po:v.jlat:oc 




D.Ttfjar* 


DJTiSOCS. 


An-cst«L 




Qiarlestown, 


16 


4 


20 


i 41,444 


East Boston, 


.? 


6 


11 


.58,488 


North End, .... 


8 


1 


9 


33,575 


West End, .... 


5 


5 


10 


46,458 


Court ."kiuare Drvbion, . 


— 


- 


- 


.3,717 


LsGrange Street Division, 


o 


3 


S 


1 17,295 


.ScKithEnd, . . . . 


1-3 


10 


23 


1 .59,161 


Roxbur*', .... 


23 


11 


34 


i 142,260 


.Sooth Boston, 


13 


5 


IS 


j 72,768 


Dorchester, .... 


6 


6 


12 


' 96,829 


West Roxbury, 


- 


3 


3 


1 45,637 


Brixton, 


1 


4 


o 


26.588 


Back Bay, . . . . 


1 


2 


3 


26,365 


Totals, .... 


95 


60 


156 


I 670,585 



The figures of population are those of the United States 
Census of May 1, 1910. They are given by sections of the 
city rather than by police divisions, in order that they may be 
the better understood. In some cases, as, for instance, "Xorth 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



29 



End," "West End," etc., where there are no established boun- 
daries, the figures represent the populations of the local police 
di\'isions. In other cases, as in South Boston and Roxbury, 
the figures represent the aggregate populations, respectively, 
of divisions 6 and 12 and dixisions 9 and 10. 

It may be stated, further, that the poUce listing showed 
that on April 1, 1910, there were in Boston 204,500 male resi- 
dents twenty years of age or more. 

The arrests of residents and nonresidents of Boston, by 
police divisions, were as follows: — 





Residcnta 

of 
IJc»ton. 


Noi>- 

residcutiol 

Bostoa. 


ToUU. 


Population. 


Di\Tsion 1 North End, 


19 


63 


82 


33,575 


Di\-ision 2 Court Square, . 


9 


9 


18 


3,717 


Di\-ision 3 West End, 


6 


22 


28 


46,458 


Di\Tsion 4 LaGrange Street, 


14 


28 


42 


17,295 


Di\Tsion 5 South End, 


20 


7 


27 


59,161 


Di\-ision 6 South Boston, . 


14 


7 


21 


33,285 


Division 7 East Boston, 


5 


2 


7 


58,488 


Di\-ision 8 harbor police, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Division 9 Dudley Street, . 


19 


- 


19 


70,961 


Division 10 Roxbury Crossing, 


12 


2 


14 


71,299 


Di\-ision 11 Dorchester, 


8 


1 


9 


96,829 


Di\-ision 12 South Boston, . 


2 


1 


3 


39,483 


Division 13 West Ro.tbury, . 


2 


4 


6 


45,637 


Di\-ision 14 Brighton, . . . 


1 


4 


5 


26,588 


Di\Ts:oa 15 Charlestown, . 


21 


20 


41 


41,444 


Di\-ision 16 Back Bay, 


4 


1 


5 


26,365 


Totals, .... 


156 


171 


327 


670,585 



I 



30 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

The 327 cases were disposed of as follows: — 

Released when sober by probation officers, without going to couit, 169 

In court, not punished: — 

Placed on file, 33 

Placed on probation, 19 

Released, 5 

Defaulted, 3 

— 60 
In court, punished: — 

Fined S5, 37 

Fined SS, 1 

Fined SIO, 1 

Jail fourteen days, 1 

House of Correction ten days, 5 

House of Correction fourteen days, 5 

House of Correction one month 18 

House of Correction two months, 4 

House of Correction tliree months, 7 

Sent to State Farm, 17 

Sent to Deer Island hospital, 1 

Sent to Prison at Sherborn, 1 

— 98 

Total 327 

The following features of this one day's record, which in 
almost all respects, except the number of arrests, b tj-pical 
of the whole year, desene particular notice: — 

1. The nonresidents were 52.29 per cent., a proportion in 
excess of the normal, for the nonresidents arrested for drunk- 
enness in the entire year were 47.86 per cent, of the whole 
number. An interesting detail is the fact that of 110 persons 
arrested in the North and West Ends only 25 were residents 
of any part of Boston. 

2. The women arrested numbered but 17 in a total of 327. 
Only 2 were under thirty years of age, one being twenty-two, 
the other twenty-seven; and of those remaining, 8 were be- 
tween thirty and forty, 3 between fort}' and fifty, 2 between 
fifty and si.xty, 1 was sixty and 1 was sixty-five. SLx of the 
women were arrested in one di\'ision in a tenement-house 
carouse, 2 being taken at midnight Saturday and 4 at 3 o'clock 
Sunday morning. That these G were old offenders was shown 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — x\o. 49. 31 

by the fact that they ranged from thirty-five to skty-five 
years of age, and that all were sent away, 3 to the State Farm i 

and 3 to the House of Correction. Four of the 17 were non- 
residents. It is a remarkable circumstance that nine of the I 
fifteen land di\-isions contributed not one woman resident to 
the number arrested. Xo woman, for instance, was arrested - 
who lived at the North End, the West End or South Boston; i 
and I mention those sections in particular because together they \ 
have a population of more than 150,000 persons, the great 
majority of whom are poor or in moderate circumstances. 

3. Again, taking the same three sections which furnished 
no women residents to the list, the returns show among the - 
arrests in all parts of the city only 9 men who lived at the 
North End, 10 at the West End and IS at South Boston. 

4. A subject for further study by sociologists is found in 

the fact that although but 6 of the 310 men arrested were •' 

under twentj--one years of age, only 92 were married, as against 
218 unmarried. Unmarried men of mature age form the great 
majoritj' of the offenders. 

5. Of the 327 persons arrested, 169 were released by the 
probation oflScers without even going to court and 60 others 
passed through the courts unpunished; that is to say, 229 of 
the 327 arrested were simply cared for, and, except for con- 
finement until they were sober, suffered no damage in person ' 
or property. Of the 9S who were punished by the courts, not 

one of whom e\ndently from his record was deemed worthy of 

probation, 39 escaped with fines. | 

Arrests for Drunkenness in Fiftt-oxe Years. j 

The material for the table which follows has been gathered j 

with much diflSculty from the reports of the Chief of Police j 

up to 1S7S, of the Police Commissioners appointed by the \ 

mayor of Boston from 1S78 to ISSo, of the Board of Police ■ ] 

appointed by the Governor from ISSo to 1906, and of the Police -i 

Commissioner appointed by the Governor from 1906 to 1910. | 

It will be of ser\-ice not orJy to the police department but to ■ 

all officials and private citizens who may be interested in the jj 

subject. It was compiled for no other purpose. •■{ 

Prior to 1SS6 the reports contain no separate figures for | 

i 



32 



POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



men and women, and prior to 1SS7 there is no separation of 
residents and nonresidents. 

The reports of the Chief of Police are for calendar years; 
of the early Police Commissioners, for twelve months ending 
April .30, annually; and of the Board of Police and the present 
commissioner, for twelve months ending November 30, an- 
nually. Figures for the year 1SS.5 cannot be given, except 
those of population, because the Board of Police took control 
July 23 of that year and though it reported for the period 
from that date to Xovembcr 30, no report can be found for 
the time from May 1 to July 23. Even if it had been made 
the total of the two reports would cover only seven months. 

The figures of population at the beginning and in the middle 
of each decade are those of the United States and the State 
censuses, respectively; all others are estimates based thereon. 

The following is the table of arrests since 1S60: — 



YtiE. 


i 

Males. FemalM. Totals. 

1 


1 


.Arrest* per 

1.000 of Fop- 

uhtion. 


1S60, 


- 




13,157 


- 


177,840 


73.98 


1S61, 


- 


- 


17,324 


- 


180,000 


96.24 


1S62, 


- 


- 


14,904 


- 


183,000 


81.44 


1S6.3, 


- 


- 


17,924 


- 


186,000 


96.36 


1S&4, 


- 


- 


14,380 


- 


189,000 


76.08 


1865, 


- 


- 


13,835 


- 


192,318 


72.19 


1S66, 


- 


- 


15,542 


- 


197,000 


78. 89 


1S67, 


- 


- 


13,800 


- 


200,000 


69.00 


ISGS, 


- 




18,475 


230,000 


80.33 


1SG9, 


_ 1 _ 
i 


19,446 


235,000 


82.74 


1870, 




- 


18,678 1 

1 


250,526 


74.68 


1871, 


- 


- 


18,089 - 1 260,000 


69.57 


1872, 


- 


- 


16,612 - ' 270,000 


61.53 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCU^IENT — No. 49. 



33 



Veir. 


Malo. 

1 


Females. 


Totala. 


Non- 
reBdenU. 


PopoIatioD. 


ArrefUper 

1.000 (rfl-op- 

uUtion. 


1S73, 


1 


- 


16,810 


- 280,000 

j 


60.04 


1S74, 


i _ 
1 


- 


18,090 


- i 330,000 


54.82 


1S75, 


? 


- 


16,645 


- 


341,919 


48.68 


1S76, 


- 




15,067 




346,000 


43.55 


1877, 


1 


- 


14,373 


- 


350,000 


41.07 


1S7S, 


i 


- 


13,976 


- 


354,000 


39.48 


1879, 


i 


- 


14,267 


- 


358,000 


.39.85 


ISSO, 




- 


17,329 


- 


362,839 


47.76 


ISSl, 


i _ 
! 


- 


19,360 


- 


367,000 


52.75 


1SS2, 




- 


18,466 


- 


372,000 


49.64 


1SS3, 


- 


- 


18,629 


- 


377,000 


49.41 


1SS4, 


- 


- 


16,784 


- 


384,000 


43.70 


1885, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


390,393 


- 


1886, 


13,304 


2,875 


16,179 


- 


402,000 


40.24 


1887, 


16,081 


3,060 


19,141 


7,809 


414,000 


46.23 


18SS, 


19,399 


3,645 


23,044 


9,621 


426,000 


54.09 


1889, 


21,580 


3,411 


24,991 


9,808 


438,000 


57.06 


1S90, 


20,492 


3,478 


23,970 


8,964 


448,447 


53.45 


1891, 


23,727 


3,669 


27,396 


10,941 


458,000 


59.80 


1S92, 


29,933 


3,705 


33,638 


13,779 


468,000 


71.87 


1893, 


27,661 


3,153 


30,814 


13,728 


478,000 


64.48 


1894, 


22,075 


2,988 


25,063 


11,157 


488,000 


51.36 


1895, 


23,354 


2,831 


26,185 


11,595 


496,920 


52.69 


1896, 


28,125 


3,075 


31,200 


14,356 


510,000 


61.17 


1897, 


26,591 


3,052 


29,643 


13,413 


523,000 


56.68 


1898, 


23,273 


2,884 


26,157 


11,615 


536,000 


48.80 



34 



POLICE co:ndiissioxer. 



[Jan. 



YuR. 


Males. 


Ftmalea. 


Totals. 


resid^n. P'^'-'i-- 


Arresla per 
l.OC*0r,f Pop. 


1S09, 


2L053 


2 822 


23,875 


9,815 


549,000 


43.49 


1900, 


16,159 


2,442 


18,601 


7,155 


560,892 


33.16 


ICtOI, 


16,916 


2,572 


19,488 


7,631 


568,000 


34.31 


1002, 


16,666 


2,501 


19,167 


7,543 


575,000 


33.33 


1003, 


24,543 


3,214 


27,757 


11,806 


582,000 


47.69 


1004, 


29,SSS 


3,623 


33,511 


14,533 


589,000 


56.89 


ioa5, 


2S,734 


3,564 


32,298 


13,a37 


595,380 


54.24 


1006, 


29,340 


3,490 


32,830 


14,635 


610,000 


53.82 


1007, 


33,600 


3,789 


37,389 


17,061 


625,000 


59.82 


lOOS, 


38,442 


4,026 


42,468 


20,270 


640,000 


66.36 


1009, 


41,003 


4,318 


45,321 


21,585 


655,000 


69.19 


1910, 


43,489 


4,243 


47,732 


22,846 


670,585 


71.18 



XONRESIDEXTS ARRESTED FOR DrUXKEN"N*ESS. 

In the foregoing table that part which gives the number of 
arrests per 1,000 of population should be considered in its 
relation to nonresidents arrested for drunkenness. Xo city 
in the United States approaches Boston in the relative size of 
the population outside its official limits but practically part 
of it in business and social affairs. The official population is 
670,000, but in those parts which make up what has come to 
be known as the "real Boston" there is an equal number of 
persons who cannot be counted in a computation of the num- 
ber of arrests per 1,000. They live, moreover, in cities and 
towns which are practically all and always without liquor 
licenses, and for such of those persons as wish to drink liquor 
Boston is the common resort. 

The following tabic, which has appeared in several recent 
annual reports, as showing the proportion of nonresidents 
arrested for drunkenness in the preceding ten years, is here 
reproduced: — 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCIBIEXT — No. 49. 



35 



Year. 



Totil Arresia for 
Dnuikenness. 



Percectace of Non- 

residcDls. 



1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910. 



19,4SS 
19,167 
27,757 
33,511 
32,298 
32,380 
37,389 
42,468 
45,321 
47,732 



29.90 
39.35 
42.53 
43.36 
43.14 
44.57 
45.63 
47.73 
47.62 
47.86 



Effect of "Policies" ox Arrests for Druxkenness. 
Since 1906 the police department has been free, for the first 
time practically since 1S60, from such relations to liquor laws, 
actual or proposed, or to the granting of licenses to sell liquor, 
as might influence the police consciously or unconsciously to 
increase or to reduce the number of arrests for drunkenness. 
In the years immediately preceding 1906 such considerations 
were less potent, even though licenses were still granted by the 
boards of police, because the system of liquor laws and the 
rules regulating the granting of licenses had become well estab- 
lished. But from 1S60 to 1S75 the contest between prohibi- 
tion, which was then the law, and license, which many sought 
to substitute, was sharp and continuous; and both sides watched 
the figures of arrests for drunkenness. Then, in 1875, came 
what might be called the open license laws, under which licenses 
were granted to all suitable persons and places, without regard 
to number. Some years afterwards the law limiting the num- 
ber of licenses by population took effect, accompanied and 
followed by radical increases in the schedule of fees charged. 
Through all the intervening years proposals for new legisla- 
tion have been numerous, and annually the citizens have voted 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

upon the question whether or not licenses should be granted. 
All disputants were inclined to point to the number of arrests 
for drunkenness whenever the record seemed to help their 
cause. 

In the early part of the period which the table covers manifH 
ulation of arrests for drunkenness was bold and even lawless. 
In 1S64 the city authorities instructefl the police that all per- 
sons arrested for drunkenness but not put into court, several 
thousands annually, were to be entered as "lodgers." Thb 
continued until 1S70, when it was or<lcred that such persons 
should be entered as "disorderly." The new rule was fol- 
lowed until the Board of Police Commissioners, in 1S79, put 
an end to it, with the following comment: — 

The onlj' object could be to cover up the number of arrests for 
dmiikcnncss, as the police had no more authoritj' in law for discharg- 
ing, on their own responsibility, a person arrested for being disorderly 
than they had for discharging a person arrested for intoxication. On 
the 21st of November last an order was issued instructing officers to 
enter on the records, in all cases, the actual cause of arrest. 

It is fortunate that through the years in which thb deceit 
was practiced the police, on their own account, followed the 
custom of marking on the books a "d" against the name of 
every person actually arrested for drunkenness, but put down 
officially as a "lodger" or as "disorderly." It is this which 
makes it possible to give in the table a correct statement of 
arrests for drunkenness in those years. 

PCXISHSIENT AND PrOBATIOV. 

For many years before 1SS2 the usual punishment for a 
first offence of drunkenness was a fine of S5 and costs, amount- 
ing to about S7.50. In 1SS2 the fine was reduced to SI and 
costs; and later, through the establishment of the probation 
system, the fine for a first offence, unless attended by disorder 
or other misconduct, practically disappeared. 

There is a general lack of information on the part of the 
public as to the lenient and yet legal course of treatment 
received in Boston by persons arrested for drunkenness who 
are not known to be old offenders. A certain custom of the 



1911.] PUBLIC DCXrU^IENT — Xo. 49. 37 

police of a western city has caused the public exploitation of 
what is called the "sunrise court;" and many good citizens 
have suggested that the "court" be established in Boston. 
I The "sunrise court" consists simply in this, that early in the 

' morning the officer in charge of a police station in that city 

examines the men who have been arrested for drunkenness, 
and, according to his judgment or inclination, discharges such 
of them as he chooses, the advantage to them being that they 
are not compelled to appear in court and will be in time to 
go about any work which they have. 

This method may be an advance over those previously fol- 
lowed in that dty, but it is a crude and unlawful form of a 
system established by law and carried on by lawful processes 
in Boston for nearly twenty years. Xo policeman has a right 
under our laws to discharge a man who has been arrested for 
a specific offence. Those taken into custody merely as sus- 
picious persons may be set at liberty, but for the protection 
of the citizen himself it b required that if arrested he shall be 
arraigned in court. The man arrested for into.xicatioa may 
escape arraignment, but through a system that is strongly 
safeguarded. Here is the method of operation, under specific 
provisions of law, of the Boston "sunrise court: " — 

At 4 or 5 o'clock in the morning the officer in charge of a 
station has brought before him ail men under arrest for drunk- 5 

enness who have become sober enough to meet the require- 4 

ments of the law. He tells them that each has a right to make 
and sign a statement, giving his true name and address, the 
number of persons dependent upon him and his place of em- 
ployment, declaring that he has not been arrested for drunken- 
ness within the twelve months next preceding, and asking that 
he may be released on what is commonly called probation. 
This printed form is not a police document; it is prepared by 
the municipal court, and the police assist the man in filling 
it properly. 

From the five divisions in the city proper, in which most of 
the arrests are made, the men are taken to the city prison 
with their statements. Probation officers are in immediate 
attendance there, as at all the station houses which send prison- 
ers to other courts. The probation officers are not policemen, 



t 



38 POLICE CO^nilSSIONER. [Jan. ■} 

\ 
but officers appointed by the courts and responsible to them. 
Probation work is their sole occupation, and with long experi- 
ence not only with the general subject but in multitudes of 
cases of particular individuals, and with complete records to 
aid them, they pass upon the applications for release. Tliose 
who are deeme<l worthy are set at liberty immediately and 
early enough to go about their business, and even among the 
others many are afterwards placed on probation by the courts. \ 

A person who is refused probation by the officer first and by -J 

the court afterwards may safely be regarded as undeserving. i 

This information will explain the meaning of some of the J 

entries as to disposition of cases under the preceding account =• 

of one day's arrests for drunkenness in Boston. .\s already l 

pointed out, the arrests of that day were unusual in number [ 

and to some extent in matters of detail. But if the cases of f 

the 47,732 persons arrested for drunkenness in 1910 had been ^ 

disposed of in like manner, the record would have been as ; 

follows : — ' 

Released when sober by probation officers without going to ^ 

court, 24,668 

Placed on probation bj- court, 2,778 

Cases filed by court, 4^16 

Discharged by court, 730 

Defaulted when on bail, 439 

Fined, 5,6S9 

House of Correction, ten days to three months, .... .5,6S9 

State Farm, 2,4S2 

Jail fourteen daj-s, 147 

Prison at Sherborn, 147 

Total arrests, 47,732 

Released without going to court, 24,668 

To be disposed of bj' court, 23,064 

Released by court without penalty, 8,763 

Punished by fine or imprisonment, 14,301 

Probation work is carried on by 3 men and 3 women in the 
superior court and by 16 men and 5 women in the lower courts. 
The statistics for that work in the police year are not available. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 39 

but on the assumption that they are in proportion to those 
of the preceding probation year, it ^^ll be found that many 
more than twenty thousand persoas arrested in Boston for 
drunkenness in 1910 were released lawfully when sober by 
court officers, but without going to court; that thousands of 
others, though appearing in court, suffered no punishment, 
and that those punished were a small minority. 

The fact is that the police are in a large measure the care- 
takers of great numbers of men who voluntarily become intoxi- 
cated; that their arrest saves them in many cases from injury, 
death or robbery ; that when they need a doctor or a hospital 
they receive the benefits of either or of both without cost; 
and that while awaiting action upon their cases they are even 
fed at the expense of the citj'. 

Considering all the conditions which I have described it is 
not strange that arrests for drunkenness should increase rela- 
tively as well as actually. Neither the police department nor 
the indi\idual policeman desires that such arrests shall be 
made except as a performance of duty towards the intoxicated 
persons and the sober public. As the police have received no 
specific instructions on the subject, and as arrests are to police- 
men a source of danger, trouble and often loss of time in court 
which should be their own, and are profitable to them neither 
in money nor in their department records, it is safe to say that 
whether the arrests be 40,000 or S0,000 in a year they will 
have been made from proper motives and for the general welfare. 

Law and Policy in the L'se of Specul Policesien. 
A discussion arose in the course of the year concerning the 
appointment of certain men as special police oflficers for regular 
police duty on the Common and in Blackstone and Franklin 
squares, which are practically one open space at the South 
End. I am informed that the project had its origin in a request 
made to his honor the mayor for a special policeman in the 
squares named because of the presence of a children's play- 
ground; and that the plan was extended to include the Com- 
mon. As the discussion involved the mayor, the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission and the Police Commissioner, and as it 
developed many questions affecting the law, public policy. 







1 


( 


'• 


1 » 


' 1 




•1 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

police organization and the relations of the police department 
to the city, I consider it advisable to make the communica- 
tions which passed a matter of permanent record. 

The first notice of what was proposed to be done appeared 
in a newspaper article July 10, and was to the effect that the 
mayor intended to "clean up" the Common and other public , 

parks and playgrounds, and for that purpose would apply to | 

the Civil Service Commission for the right to appoint special } 

policemen. The newspapers of July 12 confirmed the authen- v 

ticity of this announcement by reporting a conference held 
on the 11th, in which the Civil Service Commission was rep- i 

resented as having consented to such appointments as an e.vperi- ,| 

ment for a period of ten days. Up to this time no complaint ^ 

as to conditions on the Common had been received by the .; 

Police Commissioner for months, and no request or sugges- » 

tion on the subject had ever come from the mayor, .\fter the J 

newspaper publications complaints from three citizens, dated, 
respectively, July 11, 1.3 and 21, and addressed to the mayor, 
were forwarded by him. It is fair to assume that they were 
the first which he had received. 

Following the published announcements of the action of the 
Civil Service Commission I was invited to call at its office, 
and was there informed that it had reason to believe that the 
manner in which the mayor proposed to appoint special police- 
men was illegal, that its legality was under investigation and 
that a formal report thereon would be made. As a matter | 

of fact, the commission aftenvards sent a letter to the mayor, j 

a copy of which it sent also to the Police Commissioner, in 
which it stated that candidates for such places must be taken 
from the ci\'il senice lists, and that after they had been cer- 
tified their appointment could be made only by the proper 
police authority, that is to say, in Boston, the Police Com- 
missioner. 

July 16 the first communication on the subject from the 
city authorities reached me, in the form of applications, dated 
July 15, for the appointment of four men as special policemen 
for duty on the Common and Public Garden and in Franklin 
and lilackstone scjuares. The "City Record" of the same date 
had already announced, among the department changes in the 
week ended July 14, the appointment of the same persons as 



] 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 41 



I 



"emergency men for special police duty on Boston Common 
and Public Garden for a period of ten days at S2.50 per day." 
The pay of a man appointed to the regular police force from 
the top of the civil service list, after competitive mental and 
physical examinations, is S2 a day for the first year, S2.25 for 
the second, and, unless he is sooner promoted to be a patrol- 
man, Ji2..50 for the third. This fact may properly be mentioned, 
though it does not affect the principle on which I subsequently 
acted ; and it may be added that not one of the four applicants 
met the police requirements of age, height and weight. 

After full consideration I addressed to his honor the mayor 
the following letter: — 

July 20, 1910. 
Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, Mayor. 

Dear Sir: — I have received from the superintendent of public 
grounds applications, bearing your signature in approval, for the ap- 
pointment of three persons as special police officers on Boston Com- 
mon and the Public Garden, and of one person as a special police 
officer in Blackstone and Franklin squares. 

Chapter 2S2, section I, Acts of 1898, pro\"ides that the Police Com- 
missioner "may upon the written application of any officer or board 
in charge of a department of the city of Boston, approved by the 
mayor of said city, appoint special police officers for such department." 

These four applications would be granted as a matter of course but 
for the fact that I have learned through newspaper publications, made 
apparently with your authority, and also by direct communication 
from the Ci\'il Service Commission, that j'ou intend that these men, 
and possibly others, shall be employed Acclusively in the j>erformance 
of regular police duty in public places. Such ser\ice by them would 
be so peculiar an experiment, and would raise so many questions of 
law, of ci\"il service regulation and of public policy, that I feel under % 

obligation to communicate further with you. 

Under the provisions of the section just quoted there are now li- 
censed as special police officers 138 persons, as follows: — 

School janitors, with authority in and about the premises of the school- 
houses to which they are assigned respectively, . .84 

Drawtcndcrs and assistant drawtendcrs, with similar authority at their 
respective places of emploj-ment, ...... 45 

At the House of Correction, Deer Lsland, ..... 4 

In other departments, ......... 5 

These 138 men arc all regular employees of the city, and are fully 
occupied with the duties of the positions to which they were appointed 
on certification by the Civil Service Commission. Police authority 



42 POLICE commissioner; [Jan. 

has been given to them as appropriate to their occupations, to be ex- 
ereL-=od only at their places of rc-gular employment and mainly for the 
protection of citj' property in their care. 

On the other hand, the applications which I Iiavc now to consider 
involve the proposition that men not now employed by the city shall 
be taken into its .service as policemen exclusively; that they shall be 
paid such wages as the city authorities may determine; that thej' shall 
be seat into pubhc aud much-frcfiuented places witii the authority of 
police officers but with oaly a special policoman's badge to prove it, — 
without examination as to their moral, mental or phj'.sical qualifica- 
tion?, without previous police experience and without knowledge of 
the laws which restrirt a policeman in his action quite as much as 
they confer upon him the powei to act. 

This would be the beginning of an untested, unorganized, unin- 
stnicicd, undisciplined police force, controlled as to appointment, wages 
and conditions of duty by the city authorities as established from tirac 
to time, and limited as to number only by the desire of such authorities 
and the acquiescence of the Police Commissioner for the time being. 

Boston is too large a city anrl its police problems arc too difficult to 
pcncit of the cmplojTDftnt of special policemen of a type that in towns 
and small cities is useful, perhaps, for holiday and Saturday night ser- 
^^ce. It is well known in this department that a special policeman, 
when off his own premkes, is likely to create rather than to prevent 
disorder. Even trained and experienced members of the police force 
doing dutj- in plain clothes arc accustomed to patrol in couples, be- 
cause of the increased danger of resistance and tumult in the event <rf 
an arrest. 

The Boston police are assigned to all parts of the city in accordance 
with the judgment awi experience of the heads of the department. 
The department can no more satisfy the demands of particular persons 
in each section than the mayor and the city council can appropriate 
money for local imprwemcnts under similar demands, amounting in 
the aggregate to a dozen times the city's ability to provide. Hundreds 
of policemen, if the ci;y could afford to pay them, might be employed 
to greater public advaiita^e elsewhere than on the Common, the Public 
Garden and the squares mentioned; they are needed far more in Dor- 
chester, West Roxburr and Brighton, where single routes often cover 
miles of streets, and in the great centres of business and of population, 
which offer endless opportunities for increased police service. 

Reports of violations of law more serious than mere misdemeanors 
are seldom received by the police as affecting the Common or other 
public grounds. The complaints which liave reached you, two of 
which have been fonvaided to mo, are of a kind with which my four 
years of service as Police CommLssioncr have made mc familiar. They 
come in the main from pt-r-ons who cannot understand that the Com- 
mon, fbr instance, is essentially a public place; that it is open at all 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

times to all kinds of men, women and children; that a policeman has 
no right to exclude any person who wishes to go upon it, and no right 
to arrest or otherwise interfere with any person unless he has com- 
mitted a specific violation of law, of which the policeman has evidence. 
It is not a violation of law to be dirty or rude or \Tilgar, to "loaf" on 
benches or in the paths, to be noisy up to a certain point, to be under 
the influence of liquor short of into-vication, to be "offensive" or "dis- 
gusting " in appearance, as the complainants usually aver. 

The vast majority of the people who go upon the Common are 
orderh' and respectable, and are little troubled by those who are of a 
different tj-pe. Immoral men and women are to be found there as in 
all similar jilaccs; but a respectable woman or girl who keeps to the 
hghted and frequented paths may cross the Common with as little 
danger of unpleasant experiences as in any public thoroughfare at a 
I corresponding hour. Should she go into secluded places, wliich even 

a prudent man would avoid, she takes a needless risk. As for the rest, 
it is largelj' a matter of walking on the grass, dropping paper or other 
rubbish, plaj-ing ball where ball playing is not allowed, and similar 
minor misdemeanors common to undisciplined crowds, in which juve- 
niles below the age for prosecution are a large and troublesome element. 

As the newspapers have discussed this matter extensively on infor- 
mation purporting to have been received from your office, I shall take 
the liberty of furnishing to them copies of this letter. 

Respectfully, Stephen O'Meara, 

Police Commissioner. 

The reply of his honor the maj'or was as follows: — 

JuLT 20. 1910. 
Stephen 0'Me.\ra, Esq., Police Commissioner. 

De.\r Sir: — I beg to aclaiowledge the receipt of your communica- 
tion of the 20th inst. 

As a result of an agitation started by residents of streets in the 
\-icinity of Franklin Square, and of complaints received in regard to 
conditions on the Common, I directed the superintendent of public 
grounds to apply for permission to appoint four special police officers 
to do police duty, and to as.sign three of them to the Common and 
Public Garden and one to Franklin Square. 

You decline to confirm these appointments on the ground, first, 
that the appointment of sp)ecial police officers to do regular police 
duty would constitute a dangerous precedent; that^ it would be, in 
your own words, "the beginning of an untested, unorganized, unin- 
structed, undisciplined police force, controlled as to appointment, 
wages and conditions of duty by the city authorities as established 
from time to time, and limited as to number only by the desire of 
such authorities and the acquiscence of the Police Commissioner for 



i 

44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. j 

the time being;" aiul secoiully, that, if appointed, these officers might 
be more proi)erIy assigned to other sccJioos of the city, where coiuU- 
tions arc admitted l)y you to be even wonH? than those descril>ed on 
the Common and in Franklin Scjuare. 

Permit me to assure you that it is not at all my intention to in- 
augurate a separate police force in the city of Boston. If no other 
reason existed the finances of the city would deter me from such a 
course. Moreover, the confirmatorj' power, which is lodged with the 
Police Commissioner, seems to me to afiord a sufficient guarantee 
against the likelihootl of any excessive increase in the present force. 

The facts as reported to me are that at no time of the day arc there 
more than two police officers on the Common, and for certain periods 
there is onlj' one; neither of the officers is a bicj'cle patrolman. The 
superintendent of iniblic grounds assures me that he has repeatedly 
tried, without avail, to secure, through the captains of the police sta- 
tions whose authority extends in and alxiul ihe cunnnon, a sufficient 
force of officers to properly police the territory-. The Common con- 
tains forty-eight acres and Ls of a peculiar character, being situated in 
the midst of a large population, with subway entrances and exits 
attracting great crowds, and with two conreniencc stations which are 
magnets for persons of an undesirable character; irresponsible idlers 
are accustomed to sleep on the grass and benches both day and night, 
and the basement of the bandstand has been more than once broken 
into and ased as a lodging place by tnunpts; the trees and hillocks 
afford hiding places where. mUdemeanors may be committed, with 
facilities for escape. There Is certai.nly here the opportunity for de- 
grading si)ectacles if not positive crimes, and I have received abundant 
e\ndence that good citizeas find it to their advantage to avoid this 
district after dark. Xo less grave accusations have been made against 
some of the habitues of Franklin Sfjuare, and, if the reports of the 
complainants are not exaggerated, a thorou<^ cleansing of this district 
is urgently called for in the interest of public morality. 

It was the very fact that the Common is for the most part an open 
and exposed area, and that any misdeeds committed thereon are j)C- 
culiarly public, that seemed to me to make a particular scandal of its 
degraded condition and to justify me in asking for extra officers to 
cope with the emergency. I see no reason to suppose that discreet 
men, vested with proper authority, and approved by the Ci\"il Service 
Commission, the superintendent of public grounds and yourself, could 
not exercise a salutorj' influence, and, even without making nomerous 
arrests, correct many of the evils which now e.xist. The mere approach 
of an officer will disperse disorderly groups, and his presence on the 
scene acts as a preventive to obnoxious conduct. 

I recognize fully that as Police Commiginner you must assume the 
responsibility for the appointment of these special officers, but I trust 
that mere loyalty to your own department and an excessive regard for 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 45 

the technicalities of tlic ca.<e will not override your seiisc of the larger 
interests which are involved. It seems to me j'our duty either to 
ratify these appointments or to meet the situation by increasing the 
number of officers on the Common and Franklin Square, so that both 
these parks may become safe and agreeable places of public resort, 
instead of enjoying the unpleasant notoriety which is now attached to 
them. In any event, it seems to me the duty of Iwth of us to endeavor 
to diminish these evils rather tlian attempt to argue them out of ex- 
istence. 

Yours respectfully, .John F. Fitzger-^ld, 

Mayor. 

The subject of the discussion haWng resulted in some unusual 
demonstrations of excitement among persons who never before 
had thought of it, I made public, July 2.5, through the news- 
papers, the following matter in the form of memoranda: — 

1. If I had written my name in approval on three applications for 
the appointment of men to act as police officers under the control of 
the mayor, there would have been no public agitation concerning the 
Conraion. 

2. But I had reason to believe, because of information given to me 
voluntarily by the Civil Service Commission, that the appointments 
would be illegal, and I was sure that it would be contrary to public 
policy to send untested and untrained ci\-ilians to the Common for 
police duty. Therefore, without either appro\ing or rejecting, I wrote 
fully to the mayor, and his answer did not remove the objections 
which I had stated. The applications remain in my possession with- 
out having been acted upon. 

3. I was fully aware that the eas>- way would have been to become 
officially responsible for those irresijonsible men and for others whose 
names were sure to follow. I knew that my action might be seized 
Ufwn as the ba.sis of just such an agitation as did actually arise; and 
that a generous and sensitive public, unacquainted with the laws which 
restrict police action and the demands from all parts of the city for 
police service, might be deceived as to conditions on the Common, 
and as to the utility of a.ssigning additional men to duty there at the 
expense of other places. I knew also that the source of the movement 
was such as to make it probable that an attempt would be made, as it 
has been made, to turn my action to political account. Nevertheless 
I did what seemed to me to be my plain duty. 

4. Since writing my letter to the mayor I have written, until now, 
nothing on this subject. Informally and at their request I explained at 
length the law and the police situation to the evening newspaper re- 
porters at police headquarters. They took no notes and each wrote 



46 POLICE C0.AOIISSI0XER. [Jan. •! 

hastilr and from recollection a sununarj' of what I was supposed to j 

have said. All were honest except oae, a stranger previously to head- I 

quarteri. The report made by him was garbled to ser\-e the policy 
which his paper had already adopted. It was niade highly sensational, 
however, and a large part of the public has since had spread before it, 
not alone in that paper but in others which copied from it, statements 
in quotation marks, purporting to be mine, which I never uttered, — 
sratcments expressing ideas which I never held and ascribing to me 
action wliich I never took. 

5. For months I had received no complaints, oral or written, as to 
conditions on the Common. Xoae liad come to me through the 
mayor's office, before the receipt of the applications for police appoint- 
ments. C'xcf'pting two letters which were written to him after the news- 
paper? had announced his plan of special police. These were for- 
warded to me in accordance with the routine of his office, and pre- 
sumaKy were all that up to that time he had received. Reports as fo 
conditions and policing on the Cooamon, the Public Garden and the 
immediate \'icinity were called for by me from the commanders of the 
three police divisions concerned, and I have them in WTiting. 

6. I have not directed that mon? policemen shall or shall not be 
assigned to the Common. It is my duty to divide the number of 
patrolmen allowed to the departmeai by the mayor, whose authority 
under the law is final as Jo that point, among the sixteen police di- 
vision?, in accordance with my jodsment and the recommendations 
of ihe superintendent and the 'livKion commanders. Every di\Tsion 
commander would be glad to have more men, and probably every 
patrolman on the Common or elsewhere believes honestly that more 
men o-j<rht to be placed in his particular locality. The apportionment 
amoriz the di\'isions cannot be made on the basis of special appeals, 
which come from all purts of the 40 square miles of territorj' and the 
.520 miles of streets for which the <lepartment is required to care. The 
commanding officer of Division 4, which includes the Common, has 
been familiar with it for a geaeration, as patrolman, captain and 
dejKity superintendent. lie has al^vays been free, as all other division 
commaaders are, and he is still free-, to assign his men to the parts of 
the division in which he believes they arc most needed for the pro- 
tcctioa of persons and property. Whenever he is of the opinion that 
ii Ls wirie to take men from the hotel and theater section, or the rail- 
road .section, or the populous and rather turbulent section in the near 
.South End, in order fo increase the patrol on the Common, he has a 
perfect right so to do. But no more men can be assigned to his diN-ision 
without injustice to other sections of the city, and he will not be in- 
structed to make assignments of his men contrary to his own judgment. 
This b not an expedient for present purposes; it is the established pro- 
cedure of the department, laid down specifically in the rules. 

7. The Common and the Public Garden, the latter in Di%'ision 16, 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

are dindcd into four routes, which require 12 patrolmen for the three 
tours of duty in each twenty-four hours. In addition, 2 sergeants 
\'isit the routes on each tour, inspectors from headquarters are often 
there and 2 patrolmen in plain clothes patrol the Common at intervals. 
From 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. another patrolman is on permanent post at the 
corner of Tremont and Boj-lston streets; and during the greater part 
of the same period 2 patrolmen, one in uniform and one in plain clothes, 
are stationed on the Tremont side of the Common for the regulation 
of automobiles. The parts of Tremont, Boylston, Arlington and -^ 

Beacon streets surrounding the Common and the Public Garden are j', 

on twelve day and night p)olice routes; and, in addition, there are in '{] 

streets bounding the Conunon and Public Garden 8 crossing police- ; 

men who are at their posts from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Independent of all ( 

irregular visits of policemen and of all policemen in the surrounding 
streets the number of men required for the regular routes on the Com- 
mon and the Public Garden, is five times greater than the size of the ; 
territory would justify, if that were the only consideration, and of !; 
course it is not. It would require a force of more than 5,000 men to • i 
police the whole city as well, and the number of patrohnen actually 
present for duty in each twentj--four hours will hardly average 1,150. 

8. Such is the police arrangement for the enforcement of the laws; 
but neither that nor any other arrangement can eliminate conduct, 
however offensive, which is not in violation of law. The steady pur- 
pose of this department is that policemen, above all persons, shall 
rcsfKct the law; and if the time ever comes when, by order or encour- 
agement from their superiors, or in response to special agitation, the 
police assume authority which the law does not give to them, and thus 
themselves become law breakers, the people of Boston will be the 
sufferers. Boston newspapers as well as those in New York are con- 
stantly praising Maj-or Gaj-nor of that city for his attempts to bring 
its police back to the solid basis of the law; and yet some of the same 
Boston newspapers, and doubtless manj' citizens, criticize at tliis time 
the Police Commissioner of Boston as narrow and technical because 
he has insisted steadily, and still i.isists, that the police for whom he is 
responsible shall follow the law at all times, not their own impulses. 
The presence of a {wlieeman has a moral influence over offensive per- 
sons who arc not actual law breakers, but the specific duty of a police- 
man is to protect life and property and to prevent and detect crime. 

9. The arrests on the Common since April of this year, not counting 
those made in the adjoining streets, have numbered 133, of which 124 
were for drunkenness and the remainder for other minor offences. 
In addition, five young girls were taken up and delivered to their 
parents. The di\"ision commander reports further as to the Common: 
"During the past two years I do not recall, nor can I find any officer 
here who remembers, recei\-ing a complaint of crime of a serious 
nature." 



! 4S POLICE CO-MMISSIONER. [Jan. 

10. The memoranda which I am making are incomplete, because 

• I do not wL<h to repeat any part of my onginal letter to the mayor; I 

j neither can I undertake to dispel all the false impressions which have i 

! been created. The police department will continue to do the best • 

i that it can for all citizens and sections, but it will not knowingly sac- f 

rificc the rights of one for the sake of another, no matter what the f 

political, social or sensational pressure which it may be compelled to > 

withstand. 

The ne.\t letter to his honor the mayor, resulting from the 
c-au.-;e mentioned in the first paragraph, was as follows: — 

JCLY 26. 1910. 

Hon. JoHX F. FiTZGER.\LD, Mayor. 
i Dehb Sir: — I received this n.oming by telephone, through your 

1 secretary- and mine, a request that I confer with you at a time and 

] place to be agreed upon. I need not say that our relations of per- 

sonal courtesy and my regard for the dignity of your office are such 
' that even though uninformed as to the subject of any conference 

I which you might wish to hold I should attend without question and 

1 at your convenience. 

i I learn the purpose of the conference, however, from an official an- 

I nouncement made in your behalf and printed in the morning papers. 

The statement represents that you do '"not feel that there is any need 
I of further controversy upon this subject, or that the notoriety given 

I to the evil conditions on the Common is doing Boston an\- good." 

I may be pardoned for saying that I regard my part of what has 
\iccn made public in tliis relation as merely a performance of official 
duty; and that the notoriety which has been brought upon the citj' 
! is due to nothing which was either initiated or exploited by me. 

' The statement made in your bclialf informs me further that vou 

"will offer to make a special appropriation providing for as many 
police officers as are needed for the proper protection of citizens upon 
! the Common." 

I I should be glad to accept any addition to the police force which 

}'ou might authorize, for under section 13, chapter 291, .\cts of 1906 
it is not a matter of appropriation but of af^roval by the maj-or, as 
the following passage shows: — 

Exct-pt as authorize*! by the mayor of said dty said commissioner shall 
not appoint any greater number of patrolmen than the present board of 
police of the .said city is now authorized to appoint. 

I had .supposed from your letter of July 20, 1910, that the condition 
of the finances of the city would not permit of an increased expenditure 
for the police, but if your present view be different I shall \x glad to 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

lay before you the need of increased police protection in Dorchester, 
which, in police divLsion 11, alone has a population of more than 
100,000, with about 90 patrolmen for day and night duty; in West 
lloxbury, covering one-third of the whole territory of the city, with 
about GO patrolmen; in the adjoining part of Roxbury, with a numer- 
ous population and many scmipublic institutions of great value and 
importance; in Ea.st Boston, South Boston and Charlestown, which 
are not only populous but include vast railroad, commercial and steam- 
ship properties. I mention these sections in particular because I hear 
constantly from their citizens and citizens' associations of the well- 
founded need of more policemen. I have not mentioned certain parts 
of the city proper which must be provided with police in the public 
interest even though the inhabitants do not call for them. Neither 
have I laid stress upon the many congested crossings now unprotected 
which should have policemen not only for the comfort but for the 
actual safety of the people; nor upon the needs of that part of the 
city in which, especially at this time of the year, there are hundreds of 
closed hou.'ses representing many millions of dollars in themselves and 
in their contents, which are absolutely unguarded except bj' the police. 

I beg to suggest that the proposed conference be deferred for such 
short time as shall allow of a proper presentation by me and by the 
citizens themselves of the needs of the different sections. Should it 
then appear that other parts of the city maj' well wait, and that addi- 
tional police for the Common is the paramount need, I shall be glad to 
acquiesce. 

Allow me to assure you that if, notwithstanding my suggestion, you 
desire to see me without delay, I shall be at your ser\nce at any time 
or place of which you shall give me reasonable notice. 

Respectfully, Stephen 0'Me.\r.\, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 

On the receipt of a message by telephone on the same day 
I met his honor at his office, and the result of the interview- 
will be shown in a letter printed hereafter, under date of August 
3. But in the meantime I received from the Civil Service 
Commission the following letter and enclosure: — 

Office of Civil Service Commission, 

July 29. 1910. 
Mr. Stephen' O'Meaiu, Police Commissions. 

My De.*r Sir: — As stated to you in a conference held last week, 
his honor the mayor of Boston, on July 11, 1910, requested authority 
to appoint persons to do police duty in the public grounds of Boston. 
The conimiHsion, pending further consideration of the law, granted 
him, so far as it had any power to do so, authority to make emer- 
gency appointments for ten days. 



I' 



50 rOLICE C0M:\IISSI0XER. [Jan. 

Ii has tonday sent to him a letter upon the subject, a copy of which 
I tike pleasure in enclosing for 3'our information. 

Yea will notice that this commission expressly disclaims any desire 
«r authority to pass upon the question which ha.s arisen between j-ou 
KT^- the mayor as to the necessity or desirability of appointments; and 
thU comrmssion has expressly disclaimed any power to confer authority 
apoa any one to act as a police officer. 

I have the honor to remain, 

Yours verj' truly, Ca.\BLES Waurex, 

Chairman. 

[EXCLOSCRE.J 

Office or Civn. Service Commiss'ox. 

July 29, 1910. 
HOQ. JOHX F. FITZGER.MJ), MoyoT. 

DE.tR .^ib: — .\t a conference with you on Jolj* 11, 1910, upK>n your 
siixeinent that there was urgent need for the appointment of piersons 
lo do police duty on the public grounds of the city of Boston, this 
fjOBiinissian granted you authority (so far as it had power to do so) 
lo make ten-day emergency appointments under the Civil Service 
Ki&s, pending consideration bj- the commissioa of the law affecting 
lie ease. 

Ursder Ci\"il Ser\-ice Rule 7, class 17, "watchmen, gatemen and 
piartls in the public parks, . . . and all other persons doing {X)lice 
■fay in the parks, public grounds, . . . and in all other public insti- 
"sratxis, places and departments," are classified. 

tTodtT CiitI Service Rule 7, class 14, "The regular and reserve police 
iwccs ia .he city of Boston" are cl.issified. 

It thiH appc.irs that ail persons doing pwlice duty, whether as reg- 
ilar or special police, so constituted in accordance with the laws of 
lie Commonwealth, or whether doing police diity in any other form 
■siitn such duty is not purely incidental, are subject to the Ci\'il Ser- 
Ti» La^ and Rules, and, therefore, can only be appointed in accord- 
1Z/C& with .^=uch law and rules after requisition and certification from 
lie d'l^Ae Usts of persons who have been competitively tested for 
eaep&teticy, and who possess requisite qualiScations as to age, height, 
■siEKfit, residence, etc., or after requisition and certification bj' the 
dceamtftion in such other manner as the rules proAnde. 

Accordingly, if you still dasire to make appointments of persons as 
watchman or guards, or to do police dutj- in the public grounds of 
Boston, a requisition should now be made by you, or by the head of 
lie proper department in the city of Boston. Upon receipt of such 
RqaEitHO the commission wiil certify from the eligible lists the proj)er 
mmber "A name?, in accordance with the Civil Service Law and Rules; 
aad from such names the appointing official may make as many ap- 
p«(nUneDts as he, in his judgment, may deem necessarj'. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

In making this decision upon j'our request of July 11, the Civil 
Sen-ice Commission has considered only the law of the case and the 
manner in which persons required for the duties desired shall be ap- 
pointed in accordance with the law. It has not considered in any way 
the question of the necessity of such appointments, and it expressly 
disclaims any intention of passing judgment upon that question. 

Moreover, in certifying names of persons eligible to perform police 
duty, the Civil Service Commission expressly disclaims any assertion 
of jwwer to confer authority upon any one to act as a police oflScer. 
Its duty is to certifj' to heads of departments the names of persons 
whose competency has been tested under Ci\Tl Ser\-ice Law, and who 
are eligible for appointment by the proper officials. The powers which 
such ehgibles will possess after appointment, and the manner in which 
such powers are vested, are matters over which the Civil Ser%uce Com- 
mission has no jurisrliction. 

Very respectfully yours, Ch.vrles W.^rren, 

ChaiTinan. 

The letter written to his honor the mayor in consequence 
of what had passed at the conference July 26 was as follows: — 

Aco. 3, 1910. 
Hon. JoHX F. FiTZGER.\LD, Mayor. 

Dear Sir: — Because of a conversation held with your honor July 
26 1 directed the commanding officers of the fifteen land divisions of 
the police department to report to me, after careful consideration, the 
number of additional patrolmen needed in their respective divisions. 
They were informed that the inquiry had reference to a possible in- 
crease in tiie number of patrolmen to be allowed to this department by 
the mayor of Boston, under the authority vested in him by section 13, 
chapter 291, Acts of 1906. Their reports in writing are now in my 
hands, and I am forwarding herewith a summary which I have made. 

It is for your honor to say whether or not the city of Boston can 
afford to pay for these additional policemen or for any of them. Should 
you authorize an increase it can be neither prevented nor limited by 
anj- other authority. Not even the city council can interv'ene. No 
question of a vote for an appropriation of money is involved, for under 
the statute the expenses of the department are paid by the city on the 
requisition of the Police Commissioner. But, on the other hand, the 
city is protected by the provision that the mayor alone has the power 
to authorize an increase in the number of patrolmen ; and without the 
assent of the mayor the Police Commissioner can neither increase nor 
diminish the salaries of members of the force. 

I have been aware of the police needs hereinafter described, for they 
have been pressed constantly upon me by citizens and associations, 
but I have been aware, also, that the financial ability of the city wa-s 



.-■_' I'OI.K K <()MM1SSI().\F.I;. .1:,::. 

liiijiii-il. ai\'l \\v.\i in ;;11 iliji.ittiiicuts uf iis .~e!'vio'' tiic <iuc-.-iio:i v.:,- :;<.• 
wiiut iiiiiilit Hi Ik; .-pint I'U" ii'iw iiiucli thu city could atTonl ■■• -;•■■::!. 
I'l.r tii;ii rr;i-MU I iviii;'.i:i(-j -il':it until :i rccc::* .-uece.-iio:i ■ :' : •- 
isiLi'li' it i]cci'>.-:i!y tl'.at I --iioii'l .-]K';ii<. In tluit .-■iecc'.->'io:"i I v.\;- ;ir.-i 
c;i!!i-'l iipiiii lo ;i]'i;ioini fur -rvicc on the (.'onuiion. as .~]i.--eial ci'v jk.- 
lic- :iir!!. tmtrainoil civilian- \vi,()-c a])p()intnirnl \v..>;iM liuv- ;••■:; l.o'ii 
iii'-'ial anil unwi-c. and I I'f'l-'-d. Xcxt canic a.u al;'-r;:ati\'-' ■!■ :;;a;: 1 
tiia; adviitional fcgular ijoliccnicn >lionld lie ::--:.:nid '■> ti..:" ]^:i':-, 
and 1 a!i-\vci(d that tlu- commander of tiic division had a r'y/: ', .-o if) 
a--i'jn tln-in if in hi.- jnd<_nn'-nt tiicv were- Ic.-- i.-cd^-d in ot!;'t par:- f'f 
':..- di\i-ion: imt iliat no utlr-r divi.-i(<n could I"' -;rippi.-d for ";.'• j.'ir- 
•.i',-'-. An off.i- of an incr<:i-r of five i-c'riilar ]> 'lii-cinen. on '•.-,:, .ii:ir,!i 
•• ■:' i!ii-y lie <v][X to the f'o!!i:no:i. I n-fil>cd. 'K-cau-r- in'-n caT.;io" I'-? 
:■■• i\cd into the di-paMliK!.; :rioi-tj;a'^ed to a particular u-'-. a:;-! 1k- 
ea ;-.'. if tin- force wrre to !•'• iiicrersed. tiiere \va- far !norc n'-'.-l of tl:e 
:.; .'. ,;.'-"i\ i.\ .nai;'. otncr p.;rT-- Oi 'Ik (i. v. v. .ia:i'T;2'''i i«j ^Ji•,'.. ;*.•.;-'? 
::>-d- I pre.-int Thciu h'.rc'.vith in the form of the fol!ov.-i:!ir .-urjiman^ 
■ .f t!ir ri'iiiiM.-; (jf lifiee:i 'livi-ion CMininander-. ;.!1 of!ieer,-r of <:.--'-ai ex- 
p. ::'-iice and nf eoinpleii.- k.'io'.vl.dirf of their :>-p'-c:ive divi-jr.;;-: — 

1. To k"cp exi-tiirs rouTv.- filled, except for oriiinary ah-f-r.cf-.-; o:i 
ac'-r,.int of .-ickn(-.-< or I'or fither Ia\vful rea.-on^. v.ouM refj'.jirc 1"; pa- 
tr''!r.j' -1 in ailditioii to ']>•■ jire-c-nt force. 

J. 'I'll keep exi-tinir ro\;:e. filled at all tit:.''-, making iiood .-uch 
ah-'-r. fc-. would r;-riuire l-''^ patrolmen in adii:ion to th":' prf.=<-i;i 
I' ''<'<'. 

'■',. New route.- which ouL-ijt to he e.-ta!i!i.-hed in ordtr to 'iivide cx- 
i-'in'.: route- iiou' tuo Ioul'. "r lKcau<e of incre:-(-! need of jirov-ction 
for per.-nn- and pro]ii-i'iy :,:..! the cnffi'T-enient of the laws. v.'.-^Id r-- 
fx::i vi .-iiidiiional p.atroln.e!. if the route.< were to Ke .-ubir-ct to ordi- 
tiar.v ali-ence-. or '.'!) a.diiiti'i:..-.! tiatiohm n if the route- were •<•> :>e k(-pt 
iille 1 at all tiine.^. 

1. .v. \v jio-t- at >treet c.''.--in'_'< wnuld refptin.- '.I additional ji.'iTol- 
ni' ;: if they were to he >ti''JecT Ki or(!inar.\' ah.-enee^. or 11 addiiirinal 
paMolnien if they were to I.'- kejit filled at all tin:e-. 

The tot.il ninnher of additional iiatrolmen required to keep ".lie old 
alid the new ;oute- and po-t- filled at all tilt;'- :- -o larfre tltal it l- 
!!eec--:iiy to ili-:ni-- fiom further con-ideratio.u ihe Ik'JK' of -'-curir.: 
-o mai;y. I turn, t hi-rel'or-'-, to the niimlx-r of additional men :jt-'-<i(-d 
v.vhout attenijititm tf) .-ujiply the al-.-ences froiti day to day ea;i--(-'I hy 
-i'-kiie-s, attendance ;it cf.urt. deaths in famihe-. vacations a:.'d the 
ot.e rhiy oCf iti fifier^n me.de mandatory liy chaptrr r,Vi. Acts <•: lfi07. 
■.\!.i'!i v.;i-: :iee'ijii',l 1 ly 'he '-Itv in your fornier adinitii-t.'-atior:. Vtscs- 
ti'/U- in the <lep:;r;na-nt ap- n.ade |o extend at:nua!l.v ovt a r>'-r;0'! of 
:i>:::ly -ix months in ordi-r 'ijal the i.umlicr of a'l-enti'-- a" a- y one 

ti!:.e may l.e ;i- -Uiall as pO--ilile. 

laL'im; the >malli-r nu:: '•> r-. wiiich <!o not ine'ude ti." :...\:.z of 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — So. 49. 



53 



places of tcmporarj' absentees, the division commanders rejwrt that 
additional men are needed as follows: — 

To fill existing routes, 26 

To establish new routes, ........ 8-4 

To place men at iinguanlcd crossings where they are much needed, . 9 

Total, 119 

The financial a.spect of the proposed increase needs to be explained. 
The pay of a man appointed to the police force is $2 a daj' for the 
first year, S2.25 for the second year, and, unless sooner promoted to 
be a regular patrolman it is not until his third year that he reaches 
S2,50, which, according to the "City Record," was the rate at which 
the proposed special policemen were to begin their service. 

When new men arc needed for the force they are certified by the 
Ci\nl .Ser\ice Commis.sion from the top of a long list of men who have 
passed severe physical and mental examinations. The names of the 
men certified are posted in all police stations for about ten days, in 
order that anj-thing known against any of them by the police may be 
reported. They are then summoned for personal inspection at head- 
quarters and those selected are sworn in. For about two weeks they 
are drilled and instructed in the daj-iime, and in the first half of the 
night they patrol routes in company with experienced officers, who 
continue the instruction. It will be seen that even the tested men 
sent down by the Ci^nl Service Commission are not permitted to do 
police work until after the lapse of about a month. 

These facts are given because they bear directly on the question of 
cost. If 15 men were appointed each month, beginning September 1, 
at S2 a day, the incrca-sed expense to the end of the present fiscal year . 
would be as follows : — 



September, 1.5 men, .30 days, 
October, 30 men, 31 d.aj-s, 
November, 45 men, .'JO days, 
December, 60 men, 31 days, 
Januarj', 75 men, 31 days. 



$900 
1,860 
2,700 
3,720 
4,650 



Total S13,830 

For the next fiscal j'car estimates would be made based upon the 
existing strength of the force and any further additions which your 
honor might authorize. 



Here followed in full detail a statement of the particular 
senices for which additional men were needed in the several 
dixTsions; and the letter closed as follows: — 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

I expect to submit to your honor in a few days certain recommenda- 
tions within the power of the mayor and the city council to carrj' out, 
which, if acted upon favorably by them, will a.«ist greatly in the con- 
trol of the Common and other public grounds in so far as the police 
department is concerned. 
I am, 

Re.<--pectfiilly yours, Stephen 0'Mear.\, 

Police Commissioner of the Ciiij of Boston. 

The rccommcndatioas promised were contained in the fol- 
lowing letter:' — 

AcG. 5, 1010. 
Hon. John- F. Fitzgeu-vld, Mayor. 

Dear .Sir: — In the public interest I beg to call to your attention 
the following facts and conditions: — 

The city paries are under the control of three commissioners, &p- 
pointcd by the mayor. The Common, the Public Garden and the 
other public grounds and sriuares are under the control of a superin- 
tendent of public grounds, also appointed by the mayor. 

Tho city parks on the one hand and the Common and other public 
grounds on the other hand are open at all times to all persons, and 
because the public grounds are nearer to the centers of population 
they are used much more freely in proportion to their size. 

.\s parks and grounds are alike owned and managed by the city, 
and are used by the same persons for the same purposes, the rules 
which govern them ought to be substantially the same, with a leaning, 
in case of variance, to greater strictness in the more frequented places. 

The exact reverse Is the case. The parks have rules designed for 
the safety and comfort of the people and the preservation of property, 
which represent the watchful experience of twenty-five years. The 
Common and other public grounds have onlj- sections 66, 67 and 68, 
chapter 47 of the ordinances, which overlook altogether many of the 
most objectionable incidents of life in such places. 

Here are certain illastrations: — 

In the city parks it Is an offence punishable by fine to stand or lie 
on a seat; on the Common it is not. 

In the parks it is an offence to sleep on a seat or elsewhere; on 
the Common it is not an offence to sleep on a seat or to sleep in any 
other place except in so far as the sleeper might trespass on the grass. 

In the parks it is an offence to drink intoxicating liquors; on the 
Common it is not. 

In the parks it Is an offence to be "under the influence" of intoxi- 
cating liquor; en the Common it is only the general law as to actual 
dnmkenness, applicable to all places, which is in effect. 

In the parks it is an offence to "utter abusive or indecent language;" 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCU^IENT — Xo. 49. 55 

on the Common the language must be addressed to another person, 
and must be "obscene or profane," in order to come under section 50, 
chapter 47 of the ordinances, which applies to all public places. There 
is a large opportunity for nastiness between profane or obscene lan- 
guage addressed to another person and indecent language merely 
uttered. 

In the parks it is an offence to "annoy another;" the Common has 
onlj- tlie general laws of assault, the use of profane or indecent language, 
etc. Tliis distinction is more important than it may seem to be. A 
man, for instance, might accost a woman in language that was neither 
profane nor obscene, or might follow her from place to place without 
speaking, and according to the laws applicable to the Common he 
could not be punished unless his acts amounted to that vague offence 
known as "disorderly conduct." Such actions in the parks would 
be a breach of the rule which forbids him to "annoy another," and 
would be legally punishable. Moreover, a policeman in uniform or 
in plain clothes might well secure through his own observation evi- 
dence of annoyance sufficient to con\-ict without the appearance of 
the woman, as complainant or witness in court or elsewhere. On the 
other hand, when the offence is the use of obscene language, as on 
the Common, no prosecution is possible unless the policeman has 
actually heard the language, which practically would never hapjsen, 
or, the offender haA-ing been caught, the woman is willing to appear 
against him and in open court repeat the vcrj' words which she accuses 
him of having addressed to her. 

The absurdity of the present situation becomes clear when it may 
be truthfully said that a man at the easterly end of Commonwealth 
Avenue, which is a part of the city parks, might be prosecuted for a 
dozen different violations of wholesome rules, and yet by simply 
crossing Arlington Street might commit in the Public Garden exactly 
the same offences without a possibilitj' of legal punishment. 

I beg to recommend that in the resfK?cts mentioned and in all others 
which may be found desirable the ordinance governing the conduct 
of persons on the common and other public grounds shall be so amended 
as to confonn to the park rules. If the rules were those of a body 
independent of the city I should hesitate to point to them as models 
to be imitated, but as they have been established by a city commis- 
sion for use in city parks there can be no offence. 

I beg to call your attention further to the Lafayette Mall of the 
Common. It b the westerly sidewalk of Trcmont Street, between 
Park and Boylston streets; many subway exits and entrances open 
upon it; and immense numbers of persons pass over it wholly or in 
part without desire to linger. There are no scats on the mall and the jl 

persons who idle upon it, especially near the Park and Boylston Street it 

ends, are often an obstruction or worse; but unless they commit a 
specific offence against the law their right to be in that place as a part j; 






56 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

of the Common cannot be disputed. I recommend that the ordinance ij" 

relative to obstructing sidewalks or loitering upon them, with an amend- i 

ment which I shall presently explain, be so extended as to include the |l 

Lafayette Mall. 'j 

The ordinance in question is section 34 of chapter 47, and in so far (' 

as it applies to the present ca.se it provides that: — ^' 

\\ 

Xo person shall, in a street, wilfully, maliciously and wantonly obstruct .■•' 

the free passage of foot travelers, nor shall any person in a street ... h'' 

wilfully, maliciously and wantonly saunter and loiter for more than five f: 
minutes after being directed by a police officer to move on. 

The words "wantonly" and "maliciously" were inserted in both 
clauses of this ordinance in the year 1903, the amendments becoming 
effective without the approval of Mayor Collins. The change prac- 
tically put an end to prosecutions for such offences, for proof sufficient 
for a court that the obstruction or the loitering was wanton and mali- 
cious can rarely be produced. I believe that in the interest of the whole 
city the ordinance should be restored to its original form, and so re- 
stored it would be of great public service in the Lafayette Mall as well 
as elsewhere. ' | 

I ask attention also to the provision contained in section 66, chapter E 

47 of the ordinances, that — 4 

i 

Xo person shall walk, stand or lie on the grass of anj- of the public grounds, 
except in accordance with a permit from the maj-or. 



I? 



In consequence of customs wliich have long existed, it is impo.ssiblc j; 

for the police either to enforce or not to enforce this ordinance without l\ 

arousing public criticism. Their strict duty would be to enforce it, '' 
but on holidays, on the occasion of band concerts and numerous public 
celebrations, and on warm summer nights the city practically invites 
thousands of persons to go upon the grass. The police ought not to 

be expected to discriminate on their own responsibility between times jt 

and persons. It seems to me that cither the ordinance should be :i 

amended to conform to the popular practice, or the practice ought to ij 

be made to conform to the ordinance. I feel sure that if the city author- ■; 
ities apply themselves to the question they will find a rea.=cnable 
solution. 

The police enforce the park rules in the parks not only by their \ 

presence but by means of hundreds of prosecutions yearly. They il 

cannot enforce those rules on the Common and other public grounds j 

for the simple reason that in tho.se places the rules do not exist. It is ; 

not surpricing that the public, which knows and values the park rules ! 

and is not aware that they are without effect on the Common and i 

other public grounds, should sometimes express indignation because of | 

1 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 57 

the supposed neglect of the police in the latter places. The police do 
their duty if they have behind them laws or ordinances without which, 
in any specific instance, the authority of a policeman is no greater than 
that of any other citizen. 
I am. 
Respectfully yours, Stephen O'Meara, 

Police Commissioner Jor the City of Boston. 

The final letter in the series was as follows: — 

Aug. S, 1910. 
Stephex 0'Me.\ra, Esq., Police Commissioner. 

Dear Sir: — I beg to acknowledge receipt of j-our letters, dated 
August 3 and 5 resf>ec lively, containing a statement of the increase 
required in the number of police officers of this city as estimated by 
your captains of di\nsion, and an outline of proposed changes in the 
ordinances and in the rules and regulations governing the public 
grounds, which, in j-our opinion, will tend to relieve the unfortunate 
conditions existing on the Common. These letters present two phases 
of the same subject which, in the interest of clearness, it seems better 
to keep distinct. 

Your communication of August 5, analj'zing the distinctions which 
now exist between the rules governing parks and those governing public 
grounds, contains an implied recognition of the evih to which your 
attention has been repeatedly called, not only in my letters addressed 
to j'ou upon the subject, but in articles published in the press. It is 
the first admission by you, though not a direct one, of facts now gen- 
erally understood, and in that respect it marks a forward step in this 
discussion. As such I have transmitted it to the city council, which 
must take action if the ordinances are to be amended. 

Some of your recommendations, if vigorouslj' applied by an adequate 
detail of officers, seem io me to promise substantial improvement, and 
you are to be congratulated upon the thought and care which you have 
ob%iously expended upon this aspect of the question. I am still, how- 
ever, of the opinion that 2 officers cannot, under any set of rules and 
regulations, properly control the disorderly elements on so central a 
park as Boston Common. The argument in j-our letter that the more 
frequented parks require more stringent rather than less stringent 
rules involves the parallel conclusion that they require at the same 
time a larger detail of police. ' :-"'^ 

My only object in calling attention to these conditions has been to 
protect the public. WTiether this is accomplished by the proper en- 
forcement of existing laws or by the passage of more stringent ordi- 
nances and park regulations is a matter of indilTerence to me. The 
agitation will have ser\ed its purpose if respectable people ha%-ing busi- 






5S POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

ncss on the Commoa, or even a mere desire to \nsit this famoas spot, 
can do so in the future without being subjected to insult and homili- 
ation. 

-Vs to the proposed increase in the number of patrolmen, it is not 
clear whether you aetually recommend this addition to your force, 
though I assume that if I were to accept my share of the responability 
your approval wouW not be lacking. With this ambiguity in your 
letter I did not feel Bke presenting so important a question to the city 
council on the eve d the declaration of the tax rate. Now that the 
tax rate has been <k«Lired it becomes of course impossible to increase 
the appropriation of yoor department, unless this should be dace by 
a loan order or by a transfer from the reser\-e fund, both of which 
would be contrary to all precedent and clearly improper. The city 
cannot borrow money to pay current expenses, nor can the resert'e 
fund be used to creaJe a large permanent increase in the appropriation ■ 

of any department. j 

If the estimates of yoor di\"ision commanders are to be accepted, the i 

amount of this increise may be readily calculated. You state that if j 

15 officers were added each month to the end of the present fiscal year, | 

making 7.5 in aU, the increased expense would be 813,8-30; but as all ' 

of these new officas would undoubtedly be retained as permanent ( 

members of the force, and the logic of your position would require that ; 

the 44 remaining oSeers, ceccssarj- to complete the estimated total of 1 

119, should be subeeqoently employed, the ultimate annual cost to I 

the city of all these patrolmen, at their maximum salary of 81,200 per | 

year, would be 8142,.*00. It is fair to inquire whether the city should } 

undertake to augnaemt its present police force at so heavy an expense 
until every measure for the development of efficiency with the present 
numbers has been eoiansted. , 

I regret to observe that in the report submitted to you bj' the cap- i; 

tain of Station 4 do mention is made of the Common. I trust that I 

this docs not indicate that he b satisfied with the deplorable coodition f. 

there, but shall look forward to co-operation on his part in our efforts 
to rid this territory of the undesirable elements which seem to hare 
made it their daytsnic resort and midnight camping ground. 

Respectfully, Jonx F. FitzgeraU), 

ilsyoT. 

It 13 proper to a»ld that with this letter the agitation, which 
in proportion to its origin was the most extraordinarj- that I 
have ever known in Boston, came to an end. 

The method of policing the Common and other public grounds 
has not been chamied in plan or in the number of policemen 
assigned to the doty. 

In the period of more than four months which has since 



[• 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

elapsed, no complaint as to conditions in those places has j 

been received by the Police Commissioner from any source, 1 

and neither complaint nor comment has appeared in any news- '-, 
paper that I have seen. The people in this community who 
were stirred to excitement ha\e turned to other affairs, but - * 

throughout the country a vague remembrance of the discredit ; 

that was brought upon the city of Boston doubtless continues ; 

to exist. •! 

No additional patrolmen have been allowed to the police \ 
department, and the city council has taken no action on the 

Police Commissioner's recommendation that the rules of the , 
city parks be extended to the city's public grounds. 

A single question of great importance, which was an out- 
growth of the discussion, is explained in the matter which fol- ', 
lows. i 

FiX.VNCLVL ReLVTIONS OF THK CrXT OF BoSTON AND THE '; 

POUCE DEP.VBTirENT. 

In consequence of public statements pre\-iously made I :" 

addressed the following letter to his honor the mayor: — ; 

Nor. 28. 1910. ; 

Hon. JoHX F. FiTZGER.^U), Mayor. 

Dear Sib: — The daily newspapers of August 5, 1910, quoted your 
honor as having said that the corporation counsel had informed you 
orally that under chapter 4S6, Acts of 1909, the "charter act," so called, 
the method by which means for the pa3Tnent of the expenses of the ^ 

police department were to be pro\ided by the city of Boston had been ; 

changed, and that you exi)ected from him a written confirmation of | 

his opinion. For twenty-fire years, as you are aware, the statutes ? 

have provided that the money needed for the police department shall be j 

secured through requisition by the board or the commissioner charged ■ 

with its control. But the opinion of the corporation counsel was said ' 

to have been to the effect that the charter act had so changed the re- j 

lations of the pwlice department to the city as to limit the Police Com- -5 

missioner to those appropriations which the mayor and the city council 1 

should see fit to make, and to subject the commissioner to penalties \ 

of fine and imprisonment if the exj»enditurcs authorized by him ex- ;| 

ceeded the siuns appropriated. ,« 

As the police appropriation for the fiscal year 1910-11 was much 3 

smaller than the sum for which requisition was made, it now becomes j 

clear that a deficiency will arise; and thus the question becomes of • J 

immediate importance. As a plain business precaution, therefore, I i 



60 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

feci obliged to inquire of j'our honor whether or not the corporation 
counsel has given orallT such an opinion as that attributed to him, 
and if so whether or not he has since submitted a \mtten statement 
on the subject, a copy of which may be furnished to me. 

Respectful!}-, Stephen 0'Mear.\, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 

In response to this letter the following reply with enclosure 
was received: — 

Xov. 29, 1910. 

Stephen 0'Meah.\, Esq., Police Commissioner. 

Deau Sir: — Your letter of Xovember 28, referring to an opinion 
of the corporation courisd and a letter confirming the same, is hereby 
acknowledged. I htg to enclose i. copy of a letter from Mr. Babson, 
under date of Augu-ft 4, -K-hieh is undoubtedly the document which 
you have in mind. Wh3e Mr. Babson is abundantly able to make 
clear his o^ti meanLiji, I may add that a reason for not providing for 
additional patrolmfrti hy iLc exercise of the power of transfer from the 
reser\-e fund is that the additions would probably be permanent, and 
would entail a coniinuing expenditure extending over a series of years. 
The power of tran.-3'er is e-videnfly an emergency one, since it is given 
to two executive officers and not surrounded with the checks and safe- 
guards attached to th» piower of ordinary appropriation. 

Since the additional appointments which were under discussion at 
the time that Mr. Babeorj's opinion was rendered have not been made, 
it is fair to assume thiat tlic deficit which you anticipate is for ordinary 
expenditures. Under these circumstances I am quite ready to au- 
thorize the city auditor to make a proper transfer from the reser\-e 
fund to your department. Will you kindly g?ve me your estimate of 
the amount which yoa expect you \vill need? 

Youis verj' truly, John F. Fitzger.\U), 

Mayor. 

[Encloscre.] 
Law DEPAnTiiEXT, Boston, .-Vug. 4, 1910. 

Hon. John' F. Fitzgee.ud, Mayor. 

Dear Sir: — In PoUce Commissioner O'Meara's letter occurs the 
sentence "Should you ainhorize an increase in the police force it can 
be neither preventc<J rior limited by any other authority." 

This statement, altiiouzh correct, is practically incorrect. By stat- 
ute the city of Boston is to pay the expenses of the police department, 
including the salaries of tLc police. .\s money for this purpose cannot 
be raised by loan, the expenses of the police department must be paid 
by annual appropriations out of the tax le\'>'. In accordance with the 
law the Police Commisioaer, on Jan. S, 1910, sent to Mr. Hibbard, the 
then mayor, a statement of his estimates of the total amount required 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 61 

for the police department for the fiscal j-ear, the estimate being S2,219,- 
202.51, and on the same date, in compliance with section 8 of chapter 
291 of the Acts of the 3'ear 1903, made a requisition on the city council 
for said sum of 52,219,202.51 to par the expenses of the police depart- 
ment for the coming year. I am i:;formed that Mr. O'Meara appeared 
before the committee of the city council and stated in substance that 
this estimate and requisition were based on what would be required if 
the maximum number of policemfia were employed during the whole 
year; that as a matter of fact there were always vacancies from deaths, 
resignations, etc., and that at least 5 of the policemen were paid for 
by the board of health, so that the wbole amount would not be required, 
and with his apparent approval and acquiescence the appropriation 
for the police department for the fiscal year was fked at 82,145,000. 
No mention was made at the time rten the Police Commissioner made 
his requisition in accordance with the statute of any contemplated in- 
crease in the force. 

Unless an additional appropriation is made by the city council for 
the {X)lice department the appointment of any considerable number of 
policemen would cause a deficiency in the police appropriation, so that 
practically action by the city coondl in making a sufficient appropria- 
tion is as necessary for the appointment of additional police as is the 
concurrent action of the Police Commissioner and your honor in au- 
thorizing an increase in the force. 

The amendments to the city charter proN-ide a penalty of imprison- 
ment for not more than one year or a fine of not more than 81,000, 
or both, for any official who expends intentionally in any fiscal year 
any sum in e.\cess of the appropriations duly made in accordance with 
law. 

The appropriations for the year have been made, the city council 
has adjourned, the tax rate has been fixed in accordance with the ap>- 
propriations, and it is now too late to make an appropriation for the 
poUce department sufficient to cover the additional expense involved 
in the cmplojonent of additional police. It would seem as though the 
Police Commissioner had intentionaDy delayed making this suggestion 
for an increase until the present time, when practically it is too late to 
pro\-ide for the paj-ment of thee officers. If this proposed increase in 
the number of officers had not be«i an afterthought, resulting from 
the correspondence with j-our honor, the Police Commissioner would, 
in accordance with the statute, have sent in his requisition for the in- 
creased appropriation to the dty council long before this time. 
Yours respectfully, Thomas M. Babsox, 

Corporation Counsel. 

The corporation counsel was misinformed as to the statement 
made to the committee of the dty council by the commissioner. 
He stated that if half the proposed reduction in the depart- 



i 






62 POLICE CO-ABIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

ment estimates were made the appropriation would be a safe 
one; but the whole proposed reduction was made. 

The corporation ctjimsel could not have been aware that 
the tax rate, supposed to have been fixed at the time of his 
writing, August 4, was not legally and finally declared until 
Axigust S. Neither coald he have foreseen that four days 
after the date of his letter appropriations of $50,000 for the 
City Hospital and $100,000 for a new ferry boat would have 
been made. 

The corporation ctjunsel, moreover, went far outside the 
limits of a legal opinion addresser] officially to his superior 
when he wrote this sentence: "It would seem as though the 
Police Commissioner had intentionally delayed making this 
suggestion for an increase until the present time, when prac- 
tically it is too late to p^o^^de for the pajTnent of these officers." 
He could not have understood that the situation had been 
createtl by persons other than the c-ommissioner, or that the 
suggestion for an increase had been made in response to an 
in\ntation from the mayor given but eight days before. 

The following letters were sent to his honor the mayor and 
tlie .\ttorney-Genera]: — 

Dec. 2. 1910. 

Hon. JoH.v F. FiTZGEOALD, Mayor. 

Dear Sir: — I beg to acknowledge receipt of }-our letter of Novem- 
ber 29 vsith copy of a cooununicatioa uader date of Aug. 4, 1910, 
signed bj' the corporation counsel. \ 

VXTien a closer estimate of the probable deficit for the fiscal year can j 

be made I will furnish it lo you; but for your present information, as \ 

affecting the general financial arrangements of the city, I may saj- that '| 

it will probably not cMccd S7,000. '• 

I feel compelled to say that neither in your letter of November 29 | 

nor in that of the corporation counsel do I find a definite answer to | 

the question which was raised in the reputed newspaper inter\-iews to 
which I alluded in my letter of November 2S, and is again suggested 
in the communication of the corporation counsel. Deficits, tax le%T€S, 
and appropriations as discussed by him an? of particular interest from 
year to year; but it is a matter of \ital acd continuing importance to 
determine whether or not the "charter act" changed the financial re- 
lations of the city of Bostcm and the police department from the status 
established and maintained by all prc\'ious statutes on the subject for 
twenty-five years. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. . 63 

As a means of assisting in the determination of that question I re- 
quest that your honor will obtain from the corporation counsel an 
opinion, of which I shall be glad to have a copj-, on the following 
points: — '■ » 

1. Is the Police Commissioner for the citj' of Boston empowered by 
law to make requisition upon the city of Boston for all expenses for 
the maintenance of buildings, the pay of the police, clerks, stenog- 
raphers and other cmploj-ees, and all incidental e.vpenses incurred in 
the performance of the duties of said commissioner, or in the adminis- 
tration of said police, without regard to the amount of money pre\-i- 
ously appropriated by the citj' council? 

2. Is the Police Commissioner an "official of said city" within the 
meaning of section 16 of chapter 4S6 of the Acta of the j-ear 1909? 

3. Must the requisitions of the Police Commissioner for the mainte- 
nance of the police department be made annually upon estimates of 
the probable cost of the department; or may they be made by him 
from time to time to meet expenses incurred; estimates submitted by 
him prior to the begiiming of each fiscal year being regarded as reason- 
able notice to the city and not as any limitation upon his right of requi- 
sition? 

Respectfully, Stephen 0''Mear.\, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 

Dec. 2, 1910. 
Hon. D.\XA ^L\LO^•E, Attorney-General. 

Sin: — The authorities of the city of Boston having so expressed 
themselves as to rai.se a doubt concerning the relations at present ex- 
isting between the city and the Police Commissioner in the matter of 
expenditures for the maintenance of the police department, I respect- 
fully request from you an opinion thereon. Such relations were un- 
disputed for many years, but it is now suggested, if not j-et actually 
asserted, by the city authorities that chapter 4S6, Acts of 1909, took 
from the Police Commissioner rights heretofore exercised by him 
which past Lcgi.'^latures have regarded as vital to the independent ex- 
istence of the police department. The doubts which have been raised 
arc expressed in the following questions, and as the estimates for the 
next fiscal year are now required, it is of vital importance that I should 
be authoritatively advised: — 

Here followed in identical form the three questions included 
in the letter to his honor the mayor, with the signature of the 
commissioner. 

December 9 I received the following reply from the Attor- 
ney-General: — 



I 



64 POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. [Jan. 



Thz CoieVOXTTXALTB OF JIassachcsetts. 

Department of the Attornet-Gexeral, 

Bosio.v. Dec S, I'JlO. 

Mr. .Stephen" 0'Meab.v, Police Commissioner. 

De.\k Sir: — You prerent certain questions for my consideration in 
rdation to the effect of St. 1909, c. 4S6, establishing a charter for the 
crry of Boston, upon several statutes under which you act, and par- 
tifularly in relation to j'our right to make requisition upon the citj' of 
B-vston for the expenses of your department. 

The board of jwlice for the city of Boston was first established by 
St. I&S5, c. 3'23, which pro\ided in section 4 that "the said city of 
Eceton shall pro\"ide all such suitable accommodations for the police 
of said city as said board shall require, and all buildings and property 
uaed by said police shaU be under the control of said board. .\11 ex- 
I>a5=e for the maintenance of buildings, the pay of the police and all 
incidental exp)enscs incurred in the administration of the said police 
sbafl be paid by the said city of Boston up>on the requisition of said i, 

board." Section 5 pro\Tded that, — jj- 

(!' 

Said board of police shall not appoint any larger number of patrolmen 
ttin the present police commissioners of .said city are now authorized to 
appoint, except as authorized by said city, nor shall the pay of the police 
be increased or diminished except by the concurrent action of said city 
aod said board of police. 

Said section 4 was re-enacted in St. 1906, c. 291, an act providing 
for the appointment of a Licensing Board and a Police Commissioner 
of the city of Boston, in the last paragraph of section 8, which is as 
fo3ow3: — 

,\n expenses for the maintenance of buildings, the pay of the police, 
c'lfAs, stenographers and other employees, and all incidental expenses 
inrmred in the performance of the duties of said commissioner or in the 
adc:iinistration of said police, shall be paid by the city of Boston upon the 
requisition of said police commissioner. 

Your own quarters and salary are provided for in the first paragraph 
of section S, " the expense of which shall be paid by the city of Boston." 

It H clear, therefore, that, at least until the enactment of St. 1909, 
c. 456, you were authorized to make requisition upon the city of Boston 
for an expenses legally incurred by you in connection with the conduct 
of your department. 

Your specific questions, which are hereinafter quoted, request my 
opcnion upon the question whether or not St. 1909, c. 4S6, works any 
cbar.ge in •his respect. 

1, Is the Police Commissioner for the city of Boston empowered bj' law 
to tcake requisition upon the city of Boston for all e.-qx'nses for the main- 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

tenancc of buildings, the pay of the police, clerks, stenographers and other 
employees, and all incidental expenses incurred in the performance of the 
duties of said commissioner, or in the administration of said police, T\-ith- 
out regard to the amount of money previously appropriated by the city 
council? 

The Police Commissioner of the citj' of Boston is an oflScer appointed 
directly by the Governor, and while the city of Boston is responsible 
for the expenses of his department and for his salai-y, he is a State 
officer, and is not in any way subject to the authority of the city of 
Boston. If the Police Commissioner were limited to the amount ap- 
propriated by the city of Boston he would be subject to and not inde- 
pendent of the authority of that citj' with respect to the management 
of his department. I am, therefore, of the opinion that the commis- 
sioner may make requisition upon the city of Boston for all the gen- 
eral expenses of his department, notwithstanding that there may be 
no specific appropriation from which they may be paid. See Batch- 
elder r. Salem, 4 Cu-sh. 599; City of Charlestown r. Gardner, 9S Mass. 
5S7, where, at page 5S9, the court said: — 

The power ^ven to the school committee to contract with teachers 
necessarily implies and includes the power to determine their salaries. 
And in so doing they are not restricted to the amount appropriated for 
the purpose by the city council. The price to be paid is as much a part 
of the contract as the individual who is to teach or the school which is to 
be taught. The selection of a teacher depends verj* much upon the amount 
of compensation which can be offered to him. If the city council could 
establish the salary, it could thereby greatly narrow the range of choice, 
or even indirectly prevent the possibility of obtaining any suitable in- 
structors. 

2. Is the Police Commissioner an "official of said city" within the 
meaning of section 16 of chapter 486 of the Acts of the year 1909? 

Section 16, to which j'ou refer, is as follows: — 

No official of said city, except in case of e.vtreme emergency invoUnng 
the health or safety of the people or their property, shall expend inten- 
tionally in any fiscal year any sum in excess of the appropriations duly 
made in accordance with law, nor involve the city in any contract for the 
future payment of money in excess of such appropriation, except as pro- 
vided in section six of this act. .\ny official who shall folate the pro- 
visions of this section shall be punished by imprisonment for not more 
than one year, or by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars, or both. 

In ray opinion the Police Commissioner is not an official of the city 
of Boston, within the meaning of that section. 

3. Must the requisitions of the Police Commissioner for the main- 
tenance of the police department be made annually upon estimates of 



^' /' 66 POLICE COiDIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

the probable cost of the dcpartmenl, wr may they be made by him from • 

time to time to meet the expenses me.'ozmd; estimates submitted by him • 

prior to the beginning of each fiscsJ year being regarded as reasonable ' 

notice to the city and not as anv Eis£tt£tSon upon his right of rcqaisition? ■ 

i 

There seems to be no statutory smborrty requiiing the commis- } 

sioner to make estimates of the piK>&cJ>le cost of his department, and 
it is doubtful if he can be legally iwrjobwl to do so; nevertheless, the 
city of Boston is entitled, in fairDcss, lo a statement from him as to 
the probable expenses of his departmttBi, iii order to pro\'ide the ncces- 
sarj' appropriation and to estaHJilii Jhe ra.te of taxation, but such 
estimates are to be regarded as a '^reasoiiable notice to the city" I 

rather than as a limitation upwn las right to make requL^tion for 
furtlier sums should the proper adoDiEiitraLion of his department or 
any unforeseen but necessarj- exptodhares require further funds. 
Vcr\- trd!T Toars, Daxa ^Lvlont, 

Atlomcy-Gencral. ' . 



December 2S I received fro-n Kis honor the mayor a copy 
of the -opinion of the coqx)rati.-jtn counsel, as follows: — 

L»-»- I>zp.um«EXT, Dec. 2S. 1910. 

Hon. JoHX F. Fitzgerald, Mayor. 

Dear Sir: — My opinion has beem requested by your honor and the 
Police Commissioner on the foUoitia^ qoestions: — 

1. Is the Police Commissioner for dLe eity of Boston empo-nrcred by 
law to make requisition upon the Gty (A Eosloa for aJl expenses for the 
maintenance of buildings, the pay tA slse p»>Cce, dcrts, stenographers 
and other emploj-ees, and all incideatia! expenses inccrred in the perform- 
ance of the duties of said commisa«aw, vr ia the administration of said 
police without regard to the amouiil tA Eiooey previocsJy appropriated 
by the city council? 

In my opinion be \~. The only IBisitatkin upon his authority to 
make such requisition is that he shall ucA appoint any greater nimiber 
i of patrolmen or increa.se their pay ezeepl with the concurrent action 

i of the mayor and Police CommisaMjer. 

2. Is the Police Commissioner an "offidal of the city" within the mean- 
ing of section IG of chapter 456 of ibe Aets of the year 1909? 

The Police Commis.sioaer is not aos ■^ official of the dty"' in the ordi- 
narj- signification of the words. TTL* «wrt, ho-arever, might consider, 
as far as the expenditure of money aijipnipriated ms concerned, that 
while he was expending it he was sraeai an o>£cial, but considering the 
act creatmg the office, the only pan tA iecttoQ 16 which could possibly 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

apply to him would be as to his deliberately making a contract for the 
future pajTnent of money in excess of the appropriations made upon 
his requisition. Even this is somewhat doubtful. 

3. Must the requisition of the Police Cormnissioner for the maintenance 
of the police department be made annually upon estimates of the probable 
cost of the department, or may they be made by him from time to time 
to meet expenses incurred; estimates submitted by him prior to the be- 
ginning of each fiscal year being regarded as reasonable notice to the city 
and not as any Umitation upon his right of requisition? 

In my opinion the requisitions of the Police Commissioner for the 
maintenance of the police department may be made by him from time 
to time to meet expenses to be incurred. In other words, if the ques- 
tion was amended so that the words "to be" shotild be inserted be- 
tween "expenses" and "incurred" mj- answer to this question would 
be in favor of the power of the Police Commissioner. 

I do not think that, except in exceptional instances, the Police Com- 
missioner should incur the expenses first and make the requisition 
afterwards. I think he should make the requisition and then incur 
the ex-penses. The expenses so inctirred the city would have to pay 
under the statute. 

^^^len I use the word "requisition" in my answers to the first and 
third questions I mean the requisition of the Police Commissioner to 
the city government which usually accompanies the estimate. I do 
not mean the request to the city auditor to draw a draft on the city 
treasurj' for the paj-ment of bills approved by the Police Commissioner 
and to be paid out of the police appropriation. 

Yours respectfully, Thomas M. Babson", 

Corporation Counsel. 

It thus appears from the concurring opinions of the Attor- 
ney-General and the corporation counsel that the fears of the 
latter, as expressed August 1 in his letter to his honor the 
mayor and by his honor made public, are unfounded; and 
that the financial relations of the city and the police depart- 
ment continue as established long ago by the Legislature, 
notwithstanding the passage of the "charter act." 

Law the Only True Basis of Police Action. 

Within the year I had occasion to make to the public the 
following statement: — 

The steady purpose of this department is that policemen, above 
all persons, shall respect the law; and if the time ever comes when, by 



6S POLICE COiDIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

order or encouragement from their s-jperiors or in response to special 
agitation, the police assume authority -which the law does not give to 
them, and thus themselves become law breakers, the people of Boston 
vrill be the sufferers. Boston newsjwpers, as well as those of New 
York, are constantly praising Mayor Gaxiior of that city for his at- 
tempts to bring its police back to the solid basis of law; and j-et some 
of the same Boston newspajjers, and doubtless many citizens, criticize 
at this time the Police Commissioner of Boston as narrow and tech- 
nical because he has insisted steadily a.id still insists that the police 
for whom he is responsible sliall follow the law at aU times, not their 
own impulses. 

I regard the strict observance of the laws as tlie most impor- 
tant lesson to be impressed upon the polic-e of any city. Their 
authority is no more than that of a private citizen except in 
so far as such authority is conferred upon them specifically 
by the laws. Therefore, to the police in their official acts the 
laws should stand as paramount to all other powers or influ- 
ences. The temptation to break the laws or to go outside of 
them for the sake of securing what may appear at the time to 
be an advantage to the community" should always be resisted. 
If the people of Boston were as well educated on this point as 
are their police, the police would have fewer calls to "clean out" 
this or to "suppress" that when neither can lawfully be done. 
Xo man without police experience can know the frequency 
with which citizens demand of polic-emen action which the 
laws do not permit them to take. The spirit of "lynch law" 
seems to be in all classes of citizens, and to manifest itself in 
indi\'iduals whenever their own profits or comforts are jeop- ■ 

artlized. 

Obetlience to law, with the iLse of none but lawful methwLs, ! 

is the rule of action in the Boston police department; but 5 

some of the large cities of the L'nitcl States have not yet ! 

leamerl that rule. A magazine article lately published describes j 

with praise the lawless practices, for ostensibly useful purposes, • | 

of the police of a western city, conc-eming which it exclaims: — I 

At no stage a legal proceeding; it was police work, through and ] 

through. If you look long and hard er.ough at this subject the con- } 

tradiction between legal and police mt-thods becomes sublime! I 

! 

1 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 69 



Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN O'MEARA, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 






It is natural that a writer wn'th such a notion of police duty, 
in a countrj' supposed to be governed by law, should describe ,;^- 

as "archaic" the Boston belief that the police should never I 

themselves become law breakers, even to gain advantage over -^ 

a criminal. Part of the "sublime contradiction" between legal | 

and police methods in the city which had won the magazine 
writer's admiration was the police "permission" to saloon keep- 
ers to do business on Sunday contrary to law, if they would 
use only their side doors; and to keepers of disorderly houses 
to carry on their operations in localities indicated by the police. ; 

In another western city the situation was such that the maga- 
zine writer commended the police authorities for wiping out ) 
the "State-made blue laws," and allowing all saloons and thea- j I 
ters to be open on Sunday; with, of course, the customary 
free areas for disorderly houses. 

The time will come when the people of such cities, weary of 
the x-iolence and corruption which surely accompany police 
lawlessness, will try to struggle back to the solid basis of law 
which is the rule of the Boston police. 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 
Police Commissioner. Secretarj-. 2 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent, 
Deputy superintendents, 
Chief inspector, 
Captains, 
Inspectors, 

Insjjector of carriages (lieu 
tenant). 



1 

3 

1 

23 

30 



Deutenants, 
Sergeants, 
Patrolmen, 
Reser\-e men, 

Total, 



38 

86 

1.183 

110 

1,476 



Director, 

Assistant director. 
Foreman, 
Signalmen, 
ilechanics, 



Signal Serricc. 



Linemen, 
Driver, . 

Total, 



20 



Clerks, . . . . 

Stenographers, 
Messengers, 

Matrons of house of deten- 
tion, . . . . 
Matrons of station houses. 
Firemen on police steamers, 
Van drivers. 
Foreman of stable, . 



Employees of the Department. 
13 



Hostlers, 
3 Assistant steward of city 
3 prison. 

Janitors, 
5 Janitresses. . . _ . 
7 ■ Telephone operators, 

2 I Total, 



13 

1 
16 
12 

3 



87 



Recapiiulation. 

Police Commissioner and secretarj', 

Police force, . . . . . 

Signal service, . . . . . 

Employees, . . . . . 



Grand total. 



2 

1,476 
20 

87 

1,585 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 



Distribution' .\xd Changes. 
The distribution of the force is shown by Table I. During 
the year 91 patrolmen were promoted from the reserve men, 
1 patrolman was reappointed and 84; reserve men were 
appointed; G patrolmen and 1 reserve man discharged; 6 
patrolmen and 3 reserve men resigned; 1 captain, 1 inspector 
and 17 patrolmen retired on pension; 1 captain, 2 sergeants 
and 10 patrolmen died. (See Tables III., IV., V., VI.) 

Police Officers injured while ox Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof and the causes of the 
injuries : — 



Ho* IsjrnEO. 



In arresting prisoners, . 

In pursuing criminals, . 

By stopping runaways, . 

By cars and other vehicles at crossings, 

Various other causes, . 

Totals, . . . 



Number of 
Men injured. 



24 

12 

3 

6 

39 



84 



Number of 
Duties lost. 



292 

590 

56 

42 

1,216 



2,196 



. I 



Work of the Dep.vrtment. 

Arrests. 

The total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest 

as that of a separate person, was 71,201, against 71,512 the 

preceding year, being a decrease of 311. The percentage of 

increase and decrease was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person, Increase, 5.38 

Offences against property, committed with violence, Decrease, 8.76 
Offences against property, committed without vio- 
lence, Decrease, 5.26 

Decrease, 22.15 

Decrease, 2.81 

Decrease, 30.81 

Decrease, 7.16 

Increase, .23 



Malicious offences against property, 
Forgery and offences against the currency. 
Offences against the license laws, 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc.. 
Offences not included in the foregoing, . 



POLICE CO:\i:\IISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



There were 'tjDOl persons arrested on warrants and 5S,461 
•vrithout warrants; 6,779 persons were summoned by the court; 
6S,79S persons urere held for trial and 2,403 were released from 
custody. The nuraber of males arrested was 64,503 ; of females, 
6,69S; of foreigners. 32,050, or approximately 45.85 per cent.; 
of minors, 7,Gj3. Of the total number arrested, 28,2.33, or 
39.G5 per cent., were nonresidents. (See Tables X., XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States, 


3S,o51 


Wales, . 






25 


British Pro\-iiices, . 


5,023 


East Indies, 






7 


Ireland, 


14,617 


West Indies, 






82 


England, 


1,759 


Turkey, 






90 


France, 


123 


South Americr 


., 




14 


Germany, 


4SS 


Switzerland, 






25 


Italy, . 


2,504 


Belgium, 






69 


Russia, . 


2,672 


Armenia, 






10 


China, . 


403 


Africa, . 






S 


Greece, . 


277 


Hungar}-, 






15 


Sweden, 


1,13S 


Asia, 






3 


Scotland, 


960 


Arabia, . 






1 


Spain, . 


42 


Mexico, 






8 


Norway, 


39S 


Japan, . 






11 


Poland, 


4S9 


SjTia, . 






102 


Australia, 


28 


Roumania, 






1 


Austria, 


ISO 


Iceland, 






2 


Portugal, 


115 


Bavaria, 






2 


Finland, 


249 


India, . 






3 


Denmark, 


S4 








Holland, 


23 


Total, 






. 71,201 



The number of arrests for the year is 71,201, being a decrease 
of 311 from last year, and 7,033 more than the average for 
the past five years. There were 47,732 persons arrested for 
drunkenness, being 2,411 more than last year, and 6,.5S4 more 
than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests for 
drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 6.06 per cent, 
in males and a decrease of 1.73 per cent, in females from last 
year. (See Tabks XI., XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (71,201), 576 
were for violations of the city ordinances; that is to say, 1 
arrest in 123 wai, for such ofl'ence, or .80 per cent. 

Fifty-five and twenty onc-hundredths per cent, of the per- 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. • 73 

sons taken into custody were between the ages of .twenty and 
forty. (See Table XII.) 

The number of persons puni.shed by fines was 14,949, and 
the fines amounted to $138,140.61. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred and forty persons were committed to the State 
Prison, 6,417 to the House of Correction, 12.5 to the Women's 
Prison, 211 to the Reformatory Prison and 2,640 to other 
institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 3,841 -j 2 ; 
the total number days' attendance in court by oflScers was 
44,922; and the witness fees earned by them amounted to 
§11,927.60. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
8115,136.06. 

Seventy-^ight witnesses were detained at station houses; 
17 were accommodated with lodgings, — a decrease of IS from 
last year. There was a decrease of 4.93 per cent, from last 
year in the number of insane persons taken in charge, an in- 
crease of about 4.73 per cent, in the number of sick and injured 
persons assisted, and an increase of about 2.&4 per cent, in 
the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property reported stolen in the city 
for the five years from 1906 to 1910, inclusive, was $152,654.20; 
in 1910 it was $176,519.27, or $23,864.93 more than the aver- 
age. The amount of property stolen in and out of the city, 
which was recovered by the Boston police, was $354,466.73, 
as against $242,549.84 last year, or $111,916.89 more. 

The average amount of fines imposed by courts for the five 
years from 1906 to 1910, inclusive, was $133,959.79; in 1910 
it was $138,140.61, or $4,180.82 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance in court was 
41,845; in 1910 it was 44,922, or 3,077 more than the average. 
The average amount of witness fees earned was $12,129.42; 
in 1910 it was $11,927.60, or $201.82 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In arrests for drunkenness, the average number per day was 
130. There were 2,411 more persons arrested than in 1909, — 
an increase of 5.31 per cent.; 47.86 per cent, of the arrested 
persons were nonresidents and 49.88 per cent, were of foreign 
birth. (See' Table XI.) 



74 • POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Bureau of Criminal Inrestigation. 

The "Rogues' Gallery" now contains 34,313 photographs, 
21, A" of which are photographs with Bertillon nK^asurements, 
a system used by this department during the pait ten years. 
In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, sections 
IS and 21, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon measure- 
ments taken of convicts in the State Prison and Reformatory, 
a number of which have already been added to our Bertillon 
cabinets. This, together with the adoption of th? system by 
this department in 1S9S, is and will continue to be of great 
assistance in the identification of criminals. .\ large number 
of important identifications hive thus been made during the 
year for this and other police departments, tLrough which 
the sentences in many instances have been materially increased. 
The records of 1,0S2 criminals have been added to the records 
kept in this Bureau, which now contains a total of 33,478. 
The number of cases reported at this office which have been 
investigated during the year is 11,044. There are 21^512 cases 
recordefJ on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and 
reports made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
Letters and telegrams to the number of about 2,79.5 yearly 
are now filed with the numbered reports to which they refer, 
so that all the papers pertaining to a case can be found in the 
same envelope, thus simplifying matters when information is 
desired on any case. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc, of about 
125,000 persons. There are also " histories and press dippings," 
now numbering 6,220, by this Bureau, in envelope form, for 
police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification, which uttls adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactorj- manner, and 
with its development it is expected that the identification of 
criminals will be facilitated. It has become ver\' useful in 
tracing criminals and furnishing corroborating e\'idence in many 
instanc-es. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the ser^-ice are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — No. 49. 



75 



ment; but, as the duties are of a special character, the follow- 
ing statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . . 913 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to officers from those States, ....... 38 

Number of cases investigated, 11,044 

Number of e.vtra duties performed, 1,256 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and e\'idence prepared for trial in court, ... 80 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court, 5 

Number of days sf)ent in court by officers 3,314 

Amount of stolen property recovered, .... $238,473.75 
Number of j-ears' imprisonment imposed bj- court, 570 years, 1 month 

Number of photographs added to " Rogues' Gallery," . . 1,681 

Miscellaneous Business. 



IMT-M. 



Abandoned children cared for, 

Accidents reported. 

Buildings found open and made secure. 

Cases investigated. 

Dangerous buildings reported. 

Dangerous chimnej's reported. 

Dead bodies cared for. 

Defective bridges reported, . 

Defective cesspools reported. 

Defective coal holes. 

Defective drains and vaults reported. 

Defective fire alarms and clocks reported. 

Defective gas pipes reported. 

Defective hydrants reported, 

Defective lamps reported, 



33 

2,579 

2,559 

24,397 

29 

41 

279 

5 

133 

9 

3 

9 

40 

87 

8,928 



UO(-M. 



8 

2,978 

3,420 

25,656 

11 

6 

343 

7 

199 

1 

3 

8 

79 

104 

13,247 



UC9-10. 



15 

3,187 

2,707 

27,964 

23 

3 

368 

3 

152 

5 

9 

4 

62 

139 

36,502 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Miscellaneous Biisincss — Concluded. 





ISOT-M. 


UO»-M. 


ISOS-IO. 


Defective fences, .... 


31 


10 


16 


Defective sewers reported, . 


2S 


103 


S4 


Defective streets and sidewalks reported, 


S,726 


9,669 


9,04S 


Defective trees, 


14 


16 


59 


Defective water gates, 


3 


20 


S 


Defective water meters, 


- 


3 


11 


Defective water pipes reported, 


2.50 


177 


203 


Defective wires and poles reported. 


7 


30 


79 


Disturbances suppressed, 


650 


1,253 


767 


Extra duties performed, 


34,206 


31,874 


33,997 


Fire alarms given, .... 


2,236 


1,962 


2,045 


Fires extinguished, .... 


700 


735 


S65 


Insane persons taken in charge. 


419 


3.S5 


366 


Intoxicated persons assisted. 


- 


- 


29 


Lost children restored. 


1,637 


2.189 


2,247 


Missing persons reported. 


267 


305 


346 


Missing persons found. 


155 


140 


178 


Persons rescued from drowning, . 


2S 


61 


33 


Sick and injured persons assisted, . 


4,234 


4,397 


4,605 


Stray teams reported and put up, 


131 


132 


181 


Water running to waste reported, . 


322 


377 


345 


Witnesse.'! detained, .... 


60 


.57 


78 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 
On Dec. 1, 1909, there were 726 articles of lost, abandoned 
or stolen property in the custody of the property clerk; 50S 
were received during the year, 359 were sold, for which S-52S.37 



^1 



1911.] 



PraLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 



77 



was received and paid over to the city collector, and 55 de- 
livered to owners, finders or administrators, 2 to the Chief of 
the District Police, leaving SIS on hand. . 

Special Eaents. 
The folloH-ing is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 



1910. 

Jan. 9 
Jan. 11 
Jan. 22 
Feb. 
Feb. S. 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 17 
April 9, 
April 19, 
May 11 
May 27 
May 30, 
May 30, 
June 1 
June 6 
June 16, 
June 17, 
June 27, 
July 4, 
July 4, 
July 4, 
Aug. 9, 
Aug. 10, 
Sept. 
Oct. 9, 
Oct. 12, 
Oct. 21 
Nov. 8, 
Nov. 12, 
Nov. 16, 
Nov. 19, 



Police ball, 90 

City election, bulletin boards, 285 

Unveiling of memorial to Bishop Phillips Brooks, . 72 

Inaugural of mayor and city council, Faneuil Hall, . 57 

Firemen's ball 51 

Funeral of Lieutenant-Colonel Talbot, .... 159 

Evacuation Day, 320 

Cross-countr}- run, Cathedral Y. M. C. A., ... 85 

Marathon race, 441 

Parade of Fusilier Veteran Association, . . . 120 

Parade of school regiment 508 

Work horse parade, 87 

Har\-ard-ComeU boat race, 110 

Bamum & Bailey circus parade, 100 

Ancient and Honorable parade, 235 

The "night before" in Charlestown, .... 221 

.\nniversary battle Bunker Hill, 587 

Forepaugh & Sells circus parade, 85 

Safe and Sane Fourth of July parade 811 

Bulletin boards, Jeffries and Johnson fight, . . . 164 

Firewoits, Charles River Basin, 398 

Albany Street fire, general alarm, 345 

Catholic Total Abstinence parade, 288 

Labor Day parade, 886 

Visit of Cardinal Vanutelli, 140 

Columbus Day Celebration, 1,114 

Visit of Colonel Roosevelt, 136 

State election, bulletin boards, 350 

Han-ard-Darfmouth, foot-ball game, .... 102 

Harx-ard-CarUsle, foot-ball game, 79 

Sjjecial detail at Di\Tsion 4, foot-ball night, . . . 342 



Inspector of Cluiis. 
The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims 
and law department in investigating claims against the city 
for alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investi- 



78 



POLICE com:missioner. 



[Jan. 



gated 534 cases, 11 of which were on account of damage 

done by dogs. 

Other Services performed. 

Number of cases investigated, 5-^4 

Number of witnesses examined, 3,755 

Number of notices served, 1,251 

Number of pictures taken, 148 

Number of permissions granted, 2,676 

Number of days in court, 52 

Number of days at the committee on claims, .... 30 



Officers det.\iled to .v.ssist ^Iedical Ex.\-min"ers. 
The officers detailed from the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation to assist the medical exj.miners of Suffolk County report 
having investigated So3 deaths, &i55 of which were males and 
218 females, and attended 2.59 inquests, as follows: — 



Causei 


of Death in 


Cases Investigated. 




Abortion, .... 6 


Manslaughter, . 


28 


Accidents, 




111 


Murders, . 


11 


Alcoholism, 




7 


Natural causes, 


294 


.\5ph\-xiation (gas), 




14 


Poi-son, 


18 


Automobile, 




14 


Railroads, 


55 


Bums, 




43 


Railway (street). 


41 


Concealed birth. 




1 


Stillborn, . 


12 


Drowning, 




58 


Strangulation, . 


1 


Electricity, 




5 


Suffocation, 


1 


Elevators, 




21 


Suicides, . 


73 


E-xplosion, 




3 


Teams, 


25 


Exhaustion, 




3 






Fire engine. 




2 


Total, 


S53 


Homicides, 




6 






Causes of Death vchere Inquests icere held. 




Abortion, .... 3 


FalUng iron, 


1 


Asphj-xiation (gas), 




3 


Falling tree. 


1 


Accidents, 




4 


Falls, 


53 


Automobile, 






17 


Plre engine. 


2 


Bums, 






5 


Homicides, 


6 


Drowning, 






3 


Manslaughter, . 


1 


Elevators, 






17 


Railroads (steam). 


31 


Electricity, 






4 


Railway (street). 


41 


Explosion, 






3 


Teams, . 


22 


Falling burlap. 






3 


Suicides, . 


4 


Falling lumber, 






10 






Falling stone. 






5 


Total, 


259 






ii 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 79 

House of Detention'. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
hoa-^, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
profjer are taken to the house of detention in vans pro\-ided 
for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the matron 
until the next session of the court before which they are to 
appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are returned to 
the house of detention, and from there conveyed to the jail 
or ia'^titution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year there were o,.374 women committed, viz.: — 

For drunkcnncRS, 3,(kl 

For larceny, 395 

For night walking 330 

For fornication, 1°' 

For in-sanity ^ 

For being idle and disorderly, 38 

For assault and battcrj-, 38 

For aduherj-, 23 

For violation of the liquor law 13 

For keeping a house of ill fame, 23 

For witnesses, ' 

For county jail 961 

For municipal court, 116 

For various other offences, 192 

Total 5,374 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total nimiber of boxes now in use is 462. Of these, 
274 are connected with the underground sjstem and ISS with 
the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 
During the year the employees of this ser\'ice responded to 
1,079 trouble calls; inspected 462 signal boxes, 15 signal desks 
and 921 batteries; repaired 105 box movements, 5 registers, 
24 polar box bells, 36 locks, 10 plungers, 14 time stamps, 6 
gongs, 2 stable motors, 3 stable registers, 3 \ibrator bells, 
S transmitters, 2 pole changers and 31 relays, besides repairing 
all bell and electric light work at headquarters and the various 
stations. There have been made 1 bell, IS line blocks, 10 



so 



POLICE com:missioxer. 



[Jan. 



plungers, 16 complete box fittings, and a large amount of 
small work that cannot be classified. 

The underground work done during the year consisted of 
laying about 22,510 feet of 7 conductor cable on Divisions 11 
and 12 and placing 5 underground post boxes on Division 
11, and 1 on Division 12. 

There are in use in the signal service 27 horses, 19 patrol 
wagons and 1.3 pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 42,663 nms, covering 
an aggregate distance of 36,832 miles. There were 46,226 
prisoners conveyed to the station houses; 916 runs were made 
to take injured and insane persons to station houses, the hos- 
pitals or their homes; and 532 runs were made to take lost 
children to station houses. There were 678 runs to fires and 
44 runs for liquor seizmes. During the year there were 462 
signal boxes in use, arranged on 60 circuits; 52.5,887 telephone 
messages and 3,305,980 "on-duty" calls were sent over the 
lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal serv- 
ice at the present time: — 



13 signal desks. 
60 circuits. 

462 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call hoards. 
57 test boxes. 

921 cells of battcrj-. 
432,772 feet underground cable. 
334,950 feet overhead cable. 
40,13S feet of duct. 



45 manholes. 
1 buggj-. 
1 line wagon. 
1 express wagon. 
1 mugwump wagon. 

1 traverse pung. 

2 small sleighs. 
1 caravan. 



H.\RBOR Service. 
The special duties performed by the police of Di\nsion S, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows: — 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float- 
stages, etc., 812,066.26 



Number of vessels from foreign ports boarded. 
Number of vessels ordered from the channel to proper anchorage. 
Number of vessels removed from channel by police steamers. 
Number of cases of assistance rendered, .... 
Number of cases of assistance rendered to wharfingers. 
Number of permits granted vessels in the stream to discharge 
their cargoes, 



737 

1,516 

28 

98 

5 

2S 



1 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 81 

Number of obstructions removed from chamiel, .... 25 

Number of alarms of fire on the water front attended, . . 123 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm, .... 3 

Number of boats challenged, 1,958 

Sick and injured persons assisted, 9 

Cases investigated, 1,172 

Dead bodies recovered, 43 

Rescued from drowning, 11 

Number of vessels ordered to put up anchor lights, ... 16 j 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage, 1,427 ! 

i 
The total number of vessek that arrived in this port during i 

the year was 10,9S2. Of this number, 9,431 came from domestic : 

ports, S14 from ports in the Britbh Provinces and 737 from i 

foreign ports. Of the latter, 6S4 were steamers, 6 ships, 25 ? 

barks and 22 schooners. \ 

The police boat "Ferret" was in commission from June 17 
to October 7 in Dorchester Bay. She covered a distance of 
4,000 miles; made 5 arrests for larceny and 2 for drunkenness; 
recovered property valued at §2,200; rescued 30 persons from 
disabled boats; made secure 16 yachts that had broken away 
from their moorings; quelled S disturbances; investigated 18 
cases and notified 15 owners of power boats to have mufflers 
attached to their exhausts. 

Horses. 
On the 1st of December, 1909, there were 86 horses in the 
service. During the year 1 was sold, 4 purchased, 7 shot on 
account of being disabled, 1 given to Red Acre Farm and 1 
died. At the present time there are SO in the service, as shown 
by Tabic IX. 

Vehicle Service. 
Aulomobiles. 

There are 7 automobiles in the service at 'the present time; 
2 for general use attached to headquarters; 2 for the Back 
Bay and Fenways, attached to Division 16; 1 in the Dorches- 
ter District, attached to Di\-ision 11; 1 in the West Ro.xbury 
District, attached to Divbion 13, and 1 in the Brighton Dis- 
trict, attached to Divbion 14. 

The following return shows the extent and natiu-e of the 
service performed by the automobiles during the year: — 



S2 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1 


Milaru. 


Anou. 


Fire p Lost 


35. 
36, 

3S, . 
40. 
6774, . 


265 
290 
305 
279 
166 


9,275 
10,150 
16,775 
18,135 

6,640 


4S0 

205 
44 
38 

223 


3 

5 

2S 

31 

19 


450 

400 

90 

50 

45 


2 

7 
3 
5 


2 

2 

11 

1 


Total, . 


1,305 


60,975 990 


86 j 1,035 


17 


16 



Cott of running Automobiles. 

Pay of officers S4,290 30 

Repairs, 1,568 81 

Tires, 1,248 92 

Gasoline 621 75 

Oil, 65 89 

Rent of garage, 1,054 51 

License fees, 20 00 

Total, SS,870 18 

Ambulances. 

The department b now equipped with 10 ambulances, 
located in the following police divisions: 1, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15 and 16. 

During the year the ambulances responded to calls to con- 
vey sick or injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 887 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haj-market Square), . . . 747 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston), .... 241 

Calls where services were not required, 197 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 145 

Home, 93 

Morgue, 19 

Grace Hospital, 11 

Carney Hospital, 11 

Police station houses, 11 

From fires, 10 

Lj-ing-in Hospital, 7 

Faulkner Hospital, 6 

Homceopathic Hospital, 4 

.\ustin Farm, 1 

Boston State Hospital, 1 



1 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCUTMENT — Xo. 49. 



83 



Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmarj-, 

Soldiers' Home, 

St. Elizabeth Hospital, 

Temporary Hospital, Copley Square, 

Washingtonian Home, 



Total, 



2,396 



List of Vehicles used by 


fhe Department. 






Divisions. 


1 

£ 


< 
J 

1 


J 1 

i I . 


s 
■ 
> 


s 

s 

3 
s 

■< 


J 


J 


.a 
3 
e2 


Headquarters, 




- 


i - 
1 


1 

2 




- 


1 


- 


1 


1 
2 


Division 1, 






! 


- 




- 


li - 
1 


- 


3 


Di\nsion 2, 








- 


1 ~ 




- 




_ 


- 


1 


Division 3, 












- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4, 








_ 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5, 










- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 6, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 7, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 8, 






- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Division 9, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 10, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 11, 








- 


1 




- 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Division 12, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 13, 








1 


1 




- 


1 


2 


1 


8 


Division 14, 








- 


1 




- 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Division 15, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


_ 


- 


3 


Division 16, 








- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


Joy Street stable, . 


^ i 


5 


- 


1 


4 


2 


3 


4 


23 


Totab, . 


• 


• 


19 : el 7 13 

. 1 ! 


4 


11 j 8 


7 


75 



: 
- :, 



84 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Public Carrlvges. 

During the year there were 1,714 carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 71 as comparer] with last year; 317 motor 
carriages were licensed, being an increase of 50 as comparefl 
with last year. 

There has been a decrease of 117 in the number of horse- 
drawn licensed carriages during the \ear. 

There was 1 carriage rejected on first inspection, but the 
defects being slight and having been remedied, it was subse- 
quently reinspected and passed. 

There were 122 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were turned over to 
the inspector; 20 of these were restored to the owners, and 
the balance placed in the keeping of the lost property bureau. 

The following is a detailed statement concerning licenses 
for public carriages and for drivers of hacks and cabs: — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received, . . 1,714 

Number of carriages licensed, 1,714 

Number of licenses transferred S2 

Number of licenses cancelled or revoked, 78 

Number of carriages insi)ectcd, 1,714 

Number of carriages rejected, 1 ^ 

Number of carriages reinspected and passed, .... 1 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon, .... 1,367 

Number of complaints against drivers investigated, ... SI • • 

Number of warrants obtained, 13 | 

Number of daj-s si>ent in court, 8 •] 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens, .... 18 <\ 

.Articles found in carriages, reported by drivers, .... 122 H 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected, 3 jl 

W.\GOX LiCEXSES. :| 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 'l 

and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- ij 

disc from place to place within the city for hire. ' '% 

During the year 5,498 applications for such licenses were t 

received, 5,4SS of which were granted and 10 rejected. J 

Of the licenses granted, 33 were subsequently cancelled for 
nonpajTnent of the license fee, 2-5 for other causes and 49 
transferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., X^^.) 

1 



I 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCU-MEXT — Xo. 49. 



So 



LisTiXG ^I.\LE Residents of Bostox, etc. 



Vtii. 


May 
CanvasB. 


i^upplexneota] 
Applications. 


Refused 
Certificates. 


Granted 
Certificates. 


Total .Men 
listed. 


1903, . . . 


181,045 


3,412 


53 


3,359 


184,404 


1904, . ... 


193,195 


1,335 


55 


1,280 


194,475 


1903, . 


194,547 


705 


8 


697 


195,244 


1906, . . . 


195,446 


775 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, . . . 


195,900 


782 


28 


754 


196,654 


190S, . . . 


201,255 


1,302 


57 


1,245 


202,500 


1909, . . . 


201,391 


S04 


29 


775 


202,166 


1910,'. . . 


203,603 


897 


47 


850 


204,453 



I Changed to April I. 

JVome?i Voters rerified. 



1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 



14,611 
15,633 
14,591 
13,427 
12,822 
11,915 
11,048 
10,486 



(See Tables XX., XXI., XXII.) 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the semces 
rendered by the members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Printing 814,444 84 

Clerical scmcc, 7,199 68 

Cards 1^229 83 

Interpreters, 928 01 

Stationen-, 351 36 

Filing cases, 149 00 



Total, 824,302 J2 



S6 POLICE CO>D[ISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Xumber of Policemen employed in Listing. 

April 1, 1,119 

April 2, 1,0S7 

April 4 695 

April 5, 295 

Special Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to serve without pay 
from the city, on the vrritten application of any officer or board 
in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or on the 
application of any responsible corporation or person, such cor- 
poration or person to be liable for the official misconduct of 
the person appointed. 

During the year ending Xov. 30, 1910, there were 6.55 special 
police officers appointed, 2 applications for appointment were 
refused for cause, and 1 appointment was revoked for cause. 

.\ppointment5 were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From United States Army officers, 2 

From State departments, 13 

From citj' departments, 144 

From railroad corporations, 133 

From other corporations or associations, 138 

From theaters and other places of amusement, .... 140 

From private institutions, 57 

From churches, 8 

Total, 655 

R.ULRO.\D Police. 
There were 115 persons appointed railroad policemen dur- 
ing the year, S of whom were employees of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 101 of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad and 6 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 

MiscELL-^'Eocs Licenses. 
The total number of licenses issued of all kinds was 25,.333; 
transferred, 1S6; cancelled and revoked, 2,S62. The officers 



1911.) 



PUBLIC DOCU.MENT — No. 49. 



87 



investigated 255 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees c-ollected and f>aid into the city treasury amounted to 
$oO;JS4. (See Table XIV.) 

ilcsiCLvxs' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 
During the year there were 212 applications for itinerant 
masic-ians' licenses rec-eived, 1S4 of which were granted, 21 
rejected and 7 are pending; 1 was subsequently cancelled on 
account of the nonpajTnent of the lic-cnse fee, leaving the num- 
ber in force November 30 last 1S3. 

The officer detailed for this special sennce reports that dur- 
ing the year he e.^tamined 126 instnunents, as follows: — 



IxsTBmcfra. 


laftzvA. 


Pased. 


CondemBed. 


Street organs, 










64 


61 


3 


Hand organs, 










IS 


17 


1 


Molia«, 










15 


15 


- 


Harps, 










13 


13 


- 


Flutes, 










6 


6 


- 


Accordion?, 










4 


4 


- 


Guitars, . 










3 


3 


- 


Bagpipes, . 










1 


1 


- 


Banjos, 










1 


1 


- 


Ocarina, . 










1 


1 


- 


Totals, 


126 


122 


4 



Collectire. 
Collective musidans' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over fifteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions, at stated times and 
places. 



ss 



POLICE CO-MMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five years and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Yt\n. 



JIfipUcationA. 


Gnnted 


lo7 


156 


154 


152 


172 


172 


17S 


176 


226 


222 



Rejected. 



1906 { 

1907 i 

190S, I 

1909, } 

1910, 



PcBuc LoDGixG Houses. 

Even- building in the city of Boston not licensed as an inn, 
in which 10 or more persons are lodged for twenty-five cents 
or less each per night, is a public lodging house, under chapter 
242 of the Acts of 1904; and the Police Commissioner is author- 
ized to grant licenses to such lodging houses after the inspector 
of buildings has certified that the building is provided with 
proper exits and appliances for gi^^ng alarm to the inmates 
in case of fire, and the board of health has certified that the 
sanitary condition is satisfactory-. Under this law 23 appli- 
cations for licenses were received, 19 of them granted and 4 
rejected. Of the number granted, 1 was cancelled and another 
bsued in its stead. One was revoked for cause but was restored. 

The following shows the location of the lodging houses and 
the number of persons lodged in each during the year: — 



LociTios. 



Number lodged. 



69 and 71 Beach Street, 
19 Causeway Street, . 
164 Commercial Street, 
194 Commercial Street, 



26,300 

S,945 

21,734 

37,524 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



SO 



Location. 



Xumber lodged. 



2.34 Commercial Street, 
2-38-246 Commercial Street,* 



14,505 
2S,926 



17 Da\-i3 Street, 36,625 

42 Eastern .\ venue,' • 9,982 

39 Edinborough Street i 18,250 

120 Eliot Street • 48,066 

37 Green Street, 36,500 

187 Hanover Street, j .>3,597 

67 Pleasant Street I 19,178 

886 Washington Street '. 78,093 

1025 Washington Street ! 32,954 

1051 Washington Street ; .38,112 

1093 Washmgton Street, I 25,258 

1202 Washington Street, ' .30,209 



Totals .564,758 

' 242-3-16 Commercial Street. Ixrurd to April 30. 1»10. 
- Licensed to .\pril 30; 1910. 

C.\RRYIXG D.WGEROCS We.\PON"S. 
Under the act of 1906, which authorized the Police Com- 
missioner, in common with certain other ofScials, to grant 
licenses for the carrying of loaded pistols or revolvers on the 
person, the following action has been taken by him: — 



Year, 



.^plintjons. 



OraQled. 



Befuscd. 



1907, . 

190S, . 

1909, . 

1910, . 



681 

1,020 

871 

931 



625 

882 

soo 

829 



56 
138 

71 
102 



90 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

These lic-enses are granted in large measure to express and : 

bank messengers, watchmen, special polic-emen and others | 

whose oct-upations and characters establish a prima facie case } 

in their favor. j 

S^r.\LL LoAX Licenses. ' 

During the year there were 2.5 applications rec-eive<l for / 

securefl small loan licenses; 2.3 were grantetl and 2 disapproverl. 

There were 5.3 applications received for unsecured small loan 
liceases; 49 were granted and 4 disapproved. 

Pensions .vnd Benefits. 

Dec. 1, 1909, there were 2L3 pensioners on the roll. During | 

the year 22 died, viz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 captain, 2 
inspectors, 2 lieutenants and 16 patrolmen, and 20 were added, 
viz., 1 captain, 1 inspector, 17 patrolmen and the widow of 
Sergeant .Schiehuber, leaving 211 on the mil at date, inc^uding 
the widows of 12 and the mother of 1 policeman, who died 
of injuries received in the service. 

The paj-ments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to .S131,515, and it is estimated that $131,798.75 
mil be required for pensions in 1911. This does not include 
pensions for 1 chief inspector, 1 captain, 1 inspector and 5 
patrolmen, all of whom are sbrty-five or over, and are entitled 
to be pensioned on account of age and term of ser\nce. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the thir- 
tieth day of November last amounted to S207,.5o0. There are 
66 beneficiaries at the present time, and there has been paid 
to them the sum of $7,432 during the past year. 

The invested fund of the Police Relief Association on the 
thirtieth day of November was $128,449^22. 

j 

FlX.VXCI.\L. 

A requisition was made on the city council for the sum of 
S2,219,202..51 to meet the running expenses of the department, 
including the pensioned police officers, house of detention, sta- 
tion hou^e matrons, Ibting persons twenty years of age or 
more, and police signal ser\nce for the financial year. 

The total e.xpenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including the pensions, house of detention, station house 



1911.] PraLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 49. 91 

matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but 
exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal service, were 
S2,ftSS,S27.9.5. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasurv- from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, and for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, etc., was §51,444.64. 
(See Table XR'.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was .S62,993.3S. (See Table XMII.) 



92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





o 

*^ 
C5 

>^ 

cT 

o 

< 

1 

"3 
5 

8 

e 

CO 

1 
8 

:? 

"5- 

.5 
•§ 
r5 
s^ 
."^ 

c5 




•»I»jox 


(M « « 


§ 


g 2 


O 


« iO 




•ooijnsjaa ;o Knog 


1 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•MIArtS |»«*S 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 

to 

> 


a 


1 1 1 1 1 -« 1 C4 


*o 


3 2 








rf» 


1 1 1 1 1 *-• 1 C^ 


■* 


S = 








•#« 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 Ct 


■* 


t>. t-> 








« 


1 t 1 1 1 -« 1 e^ 


CC 


S 2 








M 


I 1 1 1 1 -■ 1 C4 


-»• 


t- Ci 








«-l 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 N 


r* 


§ »= 








e 


I 1 1 1 1 -N 1 P4 


'^ 


S'." 








ei 


J 1 1 1 1 -4 t M 


-•■ 


S f 








- 


1 1 » 1 1 -* 1 c* 


•Q 


« 1 






HH 


*^ 


1 1 1 1 1 •-• 1 C4 


^ 


s = 






5 


« 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 e« 


^r 


g " 






to 


1 1 1 1 1 *- 1 C4 


»o 










^ 


1 I 1 — 1 1 I CI 


iO 


S ' 








•e 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 c* 


Ti 


O kO 








e« 


1 1 1 1 1 -4 1 C4 


*o 


s = 








- 


1 r 1 1 1 -• 1 C4 


U3 


a "= 








-BJ3V«T»bptaH 




00 


8 ' 


<3 






■ 


z 

< 


. . . 5 . . . . 

a 

i . . 1 . . ■. . 

.2 - 1 . 

1 "III ■ ; .: 

& iW I ii\ 
.§ f 1 1 i 1 1 ^ 


5 

c 

& 


a 
a s 

o " 
= 3 

1 1 




i 1 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 



93 



»(5t- — — — Or?»^ — M-^MCC^^M 


1 


.cii'i<<< le^iii — 1 1 


OO 


1 i_ — «c=»r»— •— rai t 1 1 


1 


ii.iiiiiiii-^-^^ii 


t 


1 — I 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 -« 1 1 


s 


1 1 t » 1 C« 1 - ( 1 


00 


I — ( » 1 t • t 1 1 1 e-i — — 1 1 


3 
CI 


I — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 — 1 1 


s 


1 — riiiitlliMinii 


j 


t — 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 


1 


1 — 1 1 1 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 I I 


g 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 


re 


t — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 — 1 1 


t* 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t C4 1 . 1 


s 


I 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ( 1 1 1 1 e-i 1 1 1 


s 


1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C« 1 1 t 


o 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -« M i 1 


o 


1 1 1 t 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 M M I 1 


o 


> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r* 1 t 1 


i 


tiilliiillii-i^eo 


3 


j ' ' i '^ ' 

i . 'a .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 'A '. 

^ 1 -1 •= - 

~ „- £ * <* E 

c « i t » ri S 

i i|l|ll! tl ill II 


. 1 

c 

1 



94 



POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



o 

5 



< 






e: :S 



I s 



5 



13 2 2.5 c— S'^ J h s 



I 



O' 



oocsoccoooo 



■^ . ■'^ i>'.> 



! SS 



M C^l r-. C^ — I ^ C-1 






J: I 



•-H^^rCwOccC"!""' 



o 






O N o ? ?; u -r 



« >%b— C H-i JS ^ 



- X 



C3 



c S g =:5:h 2-r 






> 



iiSi-=" 






O 



'C^^.'XO 



e s c a 

ej eJ ej =3 



s s. 






1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



95 



Table III. 

IJM of Officcm retired during Uie Year, giring Age at the Time of Retire- 
ment and the S umber uj Yean' Service of Each. 



X.nr. 


Cause of 
RetircXDelit. 


\t<: at Time 
ol Ktriremeut. 


Yon 

of Service. 


Bates, Edward M., 


Age, . . 


60 years, 


30 years. 


Brown, William E., . 


Age, 


64 }-ears, 


32 years. 


Coburn, David, .... 


Age, . . 


65 j-ears. 


36 years. 


Corbctt, Patrick, 


Age, . . 


63 years, 


30 years. 


niinhar, (■larcnce M.. 


Incapacitated, 


51 years, 


22 years. 


Gillette, Charles W., . . . 


Age, . . 


61 years. 


35 years. 


Hildrcth, Alfred H 


Incapacitated, 


45 years, 


21 years. 


Houghton, Daniel F., 


Age, 


60 years, 


30 j-ears. 


Innis, William H., 


Age, . . 


60 years, 


32 years. 


Keane, Timothy F 


Incapacitated, 


51 years, 


26 years. 


Lewis, George E., ... 


Age, 


61 years. 


32 years. 


Mahoney, Edward H., 


Age, . . 


60 years. 


27 years. 


Morse, Robert A. F., . 


Incapacitated, 


51 years, 


22 years. 


Nannery, James, 


Age, 


65 years. 


31 jears. 


Xickerson, .\rthur W., 


Incapacitated, 


40 years. 


15 jears. 


Olds, Edward R., ... 


Incapacitated, 


47 years. 


22 years. 


Robinson, George M., 


Age, . . 


60 years, 


36 years. 


Swan, Clarence \., 


Age, . . 


65 years. 


33 years. 


Trask, Frederick G 


Incapacitated, 

1 


4.3 years, 


20 years. 



96 



POLICE COM:\nSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

Li-fi of Officers uho icere promoted above the Rank of Patrolma.i during 
the Year ending Nov. 30, 1010. 



D»Tr. 



March 3, 1910 
June 25, 1910 
March 3, 1910 
March 3, 1910 
April 7, 1910 
March 3; 1910 
April 7, 1910 
April 7, 1910 
July 7, 1910 
Xov. 17, 1910 



Kame aad Rank. 



Lieut. John E. Driscoli to the rank of captain. 
Sergt. Gilbert H. Angell to the rank of inspector. 
Sergt. Francis J. Hird to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. Michael H. Crowley to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergt. Thomas Keane to the rank of lieutenant. 
Patrolman Amasa E. Augusta to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman John E. Hughes to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Perley C. ICneeland to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Thomas F. Gleavey to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman John C. McDonald to the rank of ser- 
geant. 



^1 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



97 



Table \'. 

Xxonber of Men in Each Rank in Active Service ai the End of the Present 
Year who icere appointed on the Force in the Year stated. 



DiTE APPorerxB. 


1 _i 


1 

fl 
II 


i i 

i ' 


5 

c 


1 


2 


• 

£ 


I 
1 


> 


s 
e2 


ISGS. . . . - 


_ 


1 






_ 




1 

1 

1 




1 


1S69. . 




— 


"" 


- 


1 


1 - 


-. 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


ISTO, . 




. - 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


! 2 


- 


3 


1S71, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


— 


— 


1 


1S72, . 




' - 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1S73, . 




\ 


1 


1 - 


1 2 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


7 


1874 . 




1 - 


1 


1 _ 


1 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


lS7o, . 






- 


1 - 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


8 


_ 


9 


IS76, . 




1 1 


- 


1 _ 
j 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1S77, . 






1 




- 


1 


— 


_ 


2 


_ 


4 


1S7S. . 




! 


- 


- 


4 


1 


3 


1 


6 


_ 


15 


1S79, . 




j - 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


8 


_ 


14 


ISSO, . 




i - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


S 


_ 


10 


ISSl, . 




i - 




- 


2 


1 


2 


3 


19 


_ 


27 


1SS2. . 




1 _ 

I 


— 


- 


4 


2 


6 


1 


12 


_ 


25 


1SS3, . 






- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


3 


7 


■_ 


15 


1SS4, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


16 


— 


19 


ISSo, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


13 


_ 


19 


1SS6, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


8 


_ 


14 


1SS7, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


14 


_ 


20 


ISSS, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


6 


1 


40 


_ 


48 


1SS9, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


3 


17 


_ 


24 


1S90, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


6 


19 


_ 


29 


1891. . 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


2 


16 


_ 


21 


1892, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


17 


_ 


21 


1893, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


13 


61 


__ 


79 


1894, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


10 


21 


_ 


31 


1S95, . 




- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


3 


15 


111 


^ 


134 


1896, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 




2 


31 


_ 


34 


1897. . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


17 


_ 


18 


1S98, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


31 


_ 


31 


1900, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


91 


_ 


97 


1901, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


-1 


1 


53 


« 


54 


1902, . . 




- 


- 


- 


— 


_ 


- j 


1 


9 


_ 


10 


1903, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


~ 1 


2 


88 


__ 


90 


1904, . . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


I 


1 


80 


_ 


81 


1905. . . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


i 
j 


_ 


37 


_ 


37 


1906, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


35 


_ 


35 


1907, . . 




-1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 1 


_ 1 


108 


_ 


108 


1908, . . 




- i 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


143 


_ 


143 


1909, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 


57 


88 


1910, . 


— 


"■ 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


1 


53 


54 


Totals, 




1 i 

1 


M 


1 


23 


30 


39 1 

1 


S6 

I 


1,183 


110 1,476 



9S 



POLICE COM.MISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



a -3 
% -5 





1 


xxxaoxaox* .w'xxxxxx i 










. 


c:s:;ss=JcJ>>rtc3S-ScJc5S 




- £ 


OiOCCJCOcJOOODCtOO 




11 


>> >■* >i >1 >j >» ?*i~ r^ J^i >i >i >* J^ ^ ^^ ' 1 




?i n n ti ?i f 1 CI o f» " -• ^ "• -» -' -I 11 




r^^ — ^^^t5^ii^ ^^^ "^ ^■^ei^ ac^s^ a^ c^ V^t:'- i 








1 "3 


ccs-oociot)! ■*-<o-^e<ico— ; 






== sooo ooo 












j==5i rooiocsi 1 1 i=5C50 






-^-^ •— I^H f— I.-H ^^.-H^H. 










1 2 


>:o csroo— 1 -vt^c^; 




1 a 


C^ — (MCOIM -"<NC<. 




1 y 








■| 










1 




i 




1 


so o coco 












1 1 = =-. 1 1 C5 1 , o =-. =: r-. 1 1 1 








1 — 












s 


1--; M o — Li — M 1 




s 


^H .— ( .— 1 ^H , 




1 I 


:l 






; \ July 
April 

! ; May 

. Nov. 
. . July 
. Jan. 
. April 








X 


li 

!i 

;l 

i 

1 




< 


. u . . . - 1 




Z 


>>^8cr -'5 -=■ - -ti"2 ' 

r ?" - s = T5 S S-— >* t£ 3 z. > c I- 1 
= ^.= -:: = S.SJ'E^ £f = 5-^ S -.2 

1 
j 




je 


.1 
1 




= 








nan, 
nan, 
ennm, 
nan, . 
nan, 
nan, 
nan, . 
c man, 
man, 
nan, 
nan, 
nan, 
nan, . 
nan, 
nan, . 
cman. 










^— >^ — ^^>>^^^^s:^> ; 










OCirSaSOtrhOOOOOOt: ; 












-m^-m^-r. .m^.^.^-^VjVi.^.^.^.^.^.^Vi J 















I 

I 

I 



i 



k 



1911-1 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — Xo. 49. 



99 







, 


Hi 


3 










to 








j5 


M 


w 


PO 


C^ 


es 








^ 


O 


u^ 





lO 


t^ 


^ 





























^ 


PJ 


•* 


a 


w 


n 


e^ 










e^ 


CO 


^H 


^-4 


r-« 


-r 






o 


1 












n 






5 


■^ 


















*-i 




















cs" 




















&3 




















& 




















O 




















fe: 




















.§> 








































•§ 








































o 




















(^ 




























































ix 




















o 




















-c 








































J 













o* 














^H 


















0" 














•5 




cT 





kT 





tT 


» 






g 




o 


f-H 


.§ 


Irt 


-S 


1 




> 


.1 

CO 




t-4 


■*■» 
00 

3 
3 


eg 


1 

u 




> 

S5 


^ 




a 


















J 


C£ 


















S) 


o 


, 
















d 


o 


M 






"5 


M 


s 


3 


s 


g 


C^ 


£§ 


8? 


00 


IN_ 


o_ 





00 


t* 










>-^ 


«-H 












a> 




















as 






































•3 




















<5 


i 





00 





§s 





•* 


03 




a 


lO 


w 


■<1< 


>* 


eo 






£ 


B 


















•-^ 




















8 


























































«» 




















09 




















.s 




















"^ 




















"» 




















a> 




















ts 




















Q 




















"s- 




















J 




















s 




















3 




















:&: 




1 


0' 



















>-4 


l-H 























I 


3 

c 


.a 


03 








p 








Q 


e4 


fa 


s 


:3 


9 



00 




•* 




M 








f-H 












d 


•>* 


3) 





















(N 






s 


oT 


l-H 




u 











§ 


t~ 


t« 


w 



o 



<u 



2 3 

o « 

•« a 

o — • 

S »» 

S '3 



a g 

3 3 

a a 



% 



f 



> > 

< < 



100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



•5 



"5 

c 



= >,= >. -^ 



5 



3 
< 



> - 

a 3 
< -5 






c 
to 

c 



a 



I 



3 
O 



2 = = 



X s ^ 



-^ 5 .^ = £ 



u 

5 






O 



«= = s c 

= p ? p 

c «^ *n ■^ 

S -73 



S "3 

3 S 



03 






_= -3 -3 -3 

"=. ^ s s 

3 '5 '3 ■= 

u o o o 



-3 

6 



•3 

to s 

.:= O 



aa ~ » 

I « O 

>> 5 >* 

ill 

o - o 

33 O OQ 

o o o 

■.^ ...^ <*^ 

u o S 
u u o 

5 o o 

Sou 

33 X 33 

>I >^ >! 



o 

C3 

I 

3 



o 

-3 



O 3 



3 = 3 

o o a 



o 



> 



3 

o 



C3 

o 

■> 

eS 
u 

3 t 



.2 S= 
X o 

o - 



-3 = 3 



-3 



o 



c3 






.2 - 



2 .= 05 



O C3 
J3 ^ 



3 3 
-3 -3 



3 



3 >> 

^•3 









o 



^ E 



te 



t3 Z 



'3 ^3 — .^ — 

3 3 to to M 

O O O CI « 

o o z z z 



-3 !* 

- 2 

o - 
O 






i 






1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



101 



















>. 
















































3 
























■3 
























■*A 
















































3 
























a 


>. 














































30 


3 






















a 


•a 






















3 


•«j 






















& 
























£ 

























«« 
























r' 



























"m 
























•a 






















C 


3 






















5 


a. 




















, 


•3 




















ci 


o 

-T3 


5 


3 



















« 


L4 


•3 


.-H 


















.2 


o 


2 

-3 




c 

Q 


















o 


Ui 






















o 


o 


3 


>. 
























1-3 






. 














1 












M 










J 


s 


_fi 


S 

■*:> 


S 
■^ 






^ 










s 


2 


•o 












5 












a 


o 

-3 

c 

ej 

.§ 
'E 


c 


-a 
§ 

1 






•*^ 


>, 


>, 


>, 


>, 


-*3 


.2 


§• 








>> 




e 


i? 


*3 


*» 


1-3 


d 


-5 


u 


n 


OQ 


•*j 




























'3 


1 


1 


■| 


'3 


"a. 


^ 


;& 




'i 


'3 




a 


-.A 


.*d 


-*» 


-** 


a 










.*A 




o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


'3 


■3 


'3 


■3 







O 


2: 


^ 


^ 


'Z 


P 


O 





O 





!5 






. 


^1 






^: 
















• 


1 






1 
























bO 
















o 








B 
















3 


■§ 






■§ 














>J 


2 






>J 


8 


<D 


>J 


>^ 


>! 


>^ 




-*j 






-»^ 




S 


•^ 


1^ 


•*d 


■— > 




3 


g 


» 


3 


O 

o 


3 


3 


3 


3 




•a 


o 


s 


a 


•o 


a 


_c 


-T3 


■B 


■3 


-3 




«M 


Ij 


3 


•S 


•.^ 


3 


"3 


«*1 


<M 


<— * 


«-• 




o 


••* 

o 


4» 


5 

J 


o 


-*a 


a 
















-*-» 


o 


■.J 


w 




«3 


■*» 


-u> 


.*:» 




o 


V 


3 


o 


g 


^^ 


u 













— 




"2 


a 


o 


13 


2 


.2 


_o 





.2 




"m 


s 




s 


bO 


a 


-^^ 


"So 


"S 


"S 


"3) 




u 


J3 


o 


V 


o 


a 











V 






< 


O 




^ 


O 


& 


^ 


;?; 


'Z 


iz; 






• 


• 




• 


■ 


e 


fi" 


c" 


g- 


a 




.« 


., 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


ei 


eJ 


C3 


c3 


es 




a 


a 


e 

si 


§ 




c 


s 


s 


s 


s 


a 




M 


a 


J 


a 


S 


J 


§ 


§ 




> 




> 


9 
1 




2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


u 


k. 


u 



Ui 




1 




^ 
£ 


<2 


i 


<2 


1 


1 


m 
tf 


K 


1 




CO 


•* 


o 


..H 


1—1 


1—1 


^H 


1.H 


^H 


ff-i 


1-1 





3 
O 
J3 

O 



o 



"> 



bO 

c 



3 
O 

■? 



•3 

2 
o 

1-3 

a 
■3 
"5. 

a 

o 



J5 
bCI 

■? 

a 
o 



^ 



10-2 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table K. 

Xiimber and Distribution of Hortes used in the Departmerit. 



Divisions. 


Vu. 


P»xnJ. 


Riding. 


.\inbu- 
laDCe. 


Omric^. 


ToUU. 


Headquarters, . 


- 


" 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Division 1, 


- 


2 


- 


1 


~ 


3 


Diviiion 2, . . . 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 3, . . . 


- 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4, . . . 




2 


~ 


1 


- 


3 


Division 5, 




3 




- 


~ 


3 


Division 6, . . . 




1 


- 


1 




2 


Division 7, . . . 




1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Di\Tsion 9, . . . 


_ 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


Division 10, ... 


" 


2 


_ 


1 


- 


3 


Division 11, 


_ 


2 


« 


- 


1 


9 


Division 12, 


- 


1 




- 


- 


1 


Division 13, . . . 


- 


2 


3 


- 


1 


« 


Division 14, 


- 


1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


Division 15, 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 16, ... 


- 


1 


14 


- 


- 


15 


Signal sen-ice, repair de- 
partment, 40 Joy Street. 
House of detention, . 


3 
2 


2 
- 


1 


: 


3 


9 
2 


Prison van, 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


4 


Totals, . . . 


9 


27 


30 


6 


8 


SO 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Division* during the Year ending Nov. 30, 

1910. 



DiVUION*. 



Mmk*. Foniks. 



Headquarters, 
Di\Tsion 1, 
Di\'ision 2, 
Di\"ision 3, 
Di^^sion 4, 
Di\Tsion 5, 
Di\Tsion 6, 
Di\'ision 7, 
Di\Tsion 8, 
Division 9, 
Dhnsion 10, 
Division 11, 
Di\'ision 12, 
Division 13, 
Di\Tsion 14, 
Dixnsion 15, 
Division 16, 
Totals, 



796 
13,4M 
4,034 
6,499 
6,959 
6,392 
4,381 
2,261 
33 
2,4&4 
3,367 
2,136 
1,051 
1,658 
1,046 
5,675 
2,267 



267 

938 

211 

1,067 

1,038 

1,078 

359 

189 

309 

463 

77 

79 

99 

39 

370 

115 



64,503 i 6,698 



Totab. 



1,063 
14,402 
4,245 
7,566 
7,997 
7,470 
4,740 
2,450 
33 
2,793 
3,830 
2,213 
1,130 
1,757 
1,085 
6,045 
2,382 



71,201 



i 



104 



POUCE COM.MISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 






•3 t- 



- s ^ 

3 '-" < 

5 = 9: 

2 ^ 



?o 



-s Z 





■? 


, 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




^ 






























1 






























^ 






























^ 




























































G 






























b 


2 


.» 


^ 


.. 


_ 


^^ 


.. 


r» 


^ 


:3 


71 


^ 


^ 


71 


«.9 




" 


tj 


r^ 


"s* 










r- 




?^ 






.a, «> 






























J -^ 






-1 
























I "* 
































^ 


_- 


_ 


^^ 


^ 


, 


^^ 


I 


I 


rs 


f 


.^ 


I 


~ 
























































































































































•« 






























« 


— 


■^ 


•^ 


^ 


:3 


1 


n 


-- 


1 


:3 


^ 


^ 


t 


^ 








t;;; 
























^1 


























































1 


ri 


_. 


-5 


_, 


„^ 


_ 


n 


•r- 


n 


30 


^H 


cs 


71 


, , 


n 




3 














■V 










ef 






^r 
























■£ 






-^ 
























,o 






























■«. 






























i 1 = 


n 


.. 


o 


1 


71 


1 


, 


, 


1 


rs 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 e _ 






























: i^-5 






— 




















































1 S o 






























' 3 ^ 






























^ • 


— 


X 


?i 


_ 


, 


_^ 


, 


, 


1 


_ 


1 


n 


1 


1 


o| 


























































— s 






























5.S 


























































































*• 






























• 


-s- 


n 


•3 


o 


, , 


, 


-y 


.- 


^ 


71 


7< 


r* 


^ 


7i 


c 




71 
















r- 










= ? 






























1 ^.s 






^ 






















































1 * 






























1 


^ 


_ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


, 


■^ 


r- 


.^ 


■o 


7) 


o 


— 


7» 








t; 




■<r' 










t-- 




75 






5 






























3 






























^ 






71 
























1 


« 


r» 


t 


:S 


_^ 


^ 


I 


rt 


7« 


1 


C5 


^^ 


1 


, 


t 




^ 






X. 
























1 


3 






'\ 


























E 






























































































1 ^^ 
































< CO 


































f^ 


«• 


r* 


«* 


X 


.^ 


71 


«= 


-^ 


_^ 


„^ 


O 


71 


7« 


1 


i 




rr 


X 


^< 


rs 










r* 




73 






! 


^ 






























































1 


Zc 
































- 


- 


- 


. 


. 


. 


- 


- 


- 


cT 


- 




- 


^ 






















so 








.3 






























s 


-.; 


- 


- 


■ 


- 


• 


- 


- 


- 


- 


s 

^ 


• 




- 


^ 
^ 


^ 


















































? 








■^ 


X 


" 


* 


* 


■ 


■ 


* 


■ 


" 


" 




* 




■ 


9 


Ii! 




























w 


i** 
















■^ 




c 










5 


- 


- 


. 


- 


. 


- 


•^ 


2^ 


- 


"a 


. 




. 


_- 






























































-^ 


^ 




f^ 








r 


m. 




3 








3? 


< 






J 


"5 


5 


^ 


-§ 


3 


"a 


•2 

.0 


U 


i 




f 

S 














































































































3 S 




















































^ 












•0 


























.5'* 






>k 






« 


I 


J 


1 


















a 


































< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


^ 


w 


w 


w 


HH 


•> 


^ 


«£ 


^ 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



105 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




R 


•o 


U5 


o 


CO 


-r 


o 


« 






M 


CO 








CI 












M 






eo 


e» 


M 


■* 


■<f 


o 


00 




1 


3 


n 


1^ 


^^ 


U3 


•o 




1 




•-•5 


h. 


O 


a 


•V 


M 


^ 


CI 


CI 


la 




T 


»H 














1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


X 


















CI 


















o 


O 


o 


r- 


^ 


00 


o 


1 


CI 


a 




'S* 
















o 


a 


tn 


.1 


00 


CO 


T 


n 


(» 




7i 








o 






■<r 


>a 


s 


«o 


•O 


o 


CO 


•* 


m 


o 


f^ 


N 


CI 


CO 








N 












M 






CO 


















CO 


CO 


« 


1 


1 


1 


M 


1 


1 


CO 


N 


t- 


«o 


«o 


o 


^ 


•* 


o 


M 


.H 


•o 


c< 




CO 


.-4 

CI 






o 

CO 
































1 


















•3 








■ 




• 


• 


• 


M 


• 
















a 








2 










-s 








«> 


















a 










3 








S 










^ 








a 










C3 


. 
























■3 










9 






a 


2 


1 


i 

1 

1 


2 
1 

O 


1 


■s 

o 

1 

1 


s 

1 

•o 

J3 
o 
o 

1 


3 





' 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




CI 


o 


CI o 


o 


o 


o 


o> 




■f 


t- 


CO 












X 


CO 


' B 


«s 


1 


•* 


X 

1-1 






s 


-> o 


r- 


•■I' 


CI 


t» 




.-< 




o 








0> 


u 
















r> 
















2 


h. 


o 


1 CI 


^^ 


1^ 


CI 


CO 




CI 


o 








a> 


O 
































> 
































P 


1 


■«• 


1 n 


1 


1 


1 


t- 
















f^ 


> 
































a 
















u 
















f: 


ai 


^ 


-■ o 


o 


CO 


CI 


to 


s 




■a> 


X 








c^ 


s 
















o 
















w 


















s; 


CO 


d 


o 


CO 


t^ 


s 
















p5 
















u 
















a. 
















§ 
















CI 


oa 


N to 


o 


o 


a 


o> 


Oh 


■» 


»^ 


d 

CO 








5; 


H 
















a> 
















z 




























■ II 


< 

















o 


CI 


^4 


1 '^ 


1 


r 


1 


^ 


< 
















m 
















M 
















o 
















o 


» 


CI ■* 


a 


o 


et 


to 


In. 


•^ 


t>- 


CI 








b- 








CO 








•^ 


O 
















?« 
















- 


>k 


^ 


S 


' 


' 


o 


a 
i 


3 

1 


woUing by da 
building, 


ti 

a 

=3 


to- 
1 


5 ■ 




•o 


•0 = 




> 


S 




u 


.a 
s 


2 S 


3 

1 


s 

1 


te 






a 


o S 


e 


a 


a 




o 


o 






9 


o 




•n 


■o 


•O -TJ 


T3 


•n 


■a 




a 
o 


i 




", 


. a 


li 




.1 


M 


ecC'M 


uS f 




•J 


.2 6 = 


1^1 


1 f2 




§ 


§ 


§-i 


ih 






a 


n 


a a 


a 


a 


a 


II 



J 

-Si 



^9 



;.-2 
I 

I 



106 



POLICE CO.AEMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



I i 

^ o 
— 'tl 

< 5 

r-t < 

c 

< 



t I I I I I I I r r I I 



o 
12; 



— r: c ri -^ -^ 

on — 



- n rt 



i| j 

^t i 



I — I -■ 



ITIT^^ 



r- I C5 CO 






= I t^ — 



«5 — ri O C3 



Tl — t- CI X o r- r; ?« o rt 

ro -non -■ •«< 

*c ri — 



ri — ri ^ 






« I i 

_. •= _= J 

1il i J i i 

i^t- I 1 I 1 

-= = = £ T ^« = 

>lr 3 i £"11 



o 

* 3 



r = 3 o 

5 H = g a 



= = - >» >. >. 



- — 3 - £ — *^ c" ^ 
■= = = 5 o c-== S 
< s i. S :; ►i ►:: 



- .5 >!: 



; =. o o c 
I c* c; u u 



i 



-: >j I-: 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



107 



1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


' 




^ 


^^ 




r- 


^ 


^ 










X 


«3 

-I- 


» 


eo 


^^ 


1 


1 


= 


§ 




1 


?« 


1 


' 


= 




rs 


n 


(^ 


1 


"■ 






5 


3 

-1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


ftC 


S 


g 


f^ 


' 


1 


I 


o 


n 




to 


': 


' 


r* 


g 


i\ 


s 

« 


o 


- 


1-1 


t- 


5 


s 


« 


1 


" 


1 





^ 





CT 

s 


o 


so 


' 


»c 


i~ 




s 


















M 










































& 


tc 




s 










*^ 


ec 


9 








s 


> 


"a 


U 






















H 


o 













C 




c 










a 


.b 

















g 










3 










>t 


a 


% 


>>o tt 


















a 


i 

Is 


3 
,- 


c<= - 




■ 


^ 


a 




S-9 






gc 


■s 


•g 


".1 




« 


1 






1 


3 


K 


|s 





s 


^1 


^ 




>j 


-! 


:^ 


2 


H 







' 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 







w r^ 


n 





^- 










^4 


















^H 


' g 


1 


« 






1 


1 


1 


1 



















^ 


1 


M 


■* 


3 


>^ 












u 
























g 


1 


1 


1 


n 


N 




•* 






•^ 



















































^^ 












S 


eo 


rt 01 


1 


1 


". 


Z 




^^ 




















< 

























■< 












(0 




1 00 


n 


00 


N 


bl 




•o 






t~ 



























f."] 












!«• 
























n 





'-> t* 


n 





r- 










-^ 


CO 


rn 




1.^ 








3 

















































3 


^ 


1 


1 


M 


on 






'^ 








1^ 












•<i< 

















« M 


f^ 


00 


a 
















'^ 














• 


5 • 


• 


• 








«» 












a 










• 


S 


• 


• 













































« 


s 


. 






nf 


a 


3 


§ 
















•a 


s • 

3 








.i 

hi 



•0 

a 


and other b 
mit. 
0U8 miachiof, 


a 


■0 

a 
« 

1 
i 

•T3 


m 

1 






a 


a E u 


» 


■q 


H 




1^ 


|8 8^ 


1 


S 






.5 


■§ S 


> 





u 
u 

BS 

s 
O 

u 

s 

< 

00 

H 

z 

H 
(>• 
b. 

O 

Q 
Z 

•< 

>< 

e: 
§ 



o 



1 


1 




§ 


§ 




^4 
.1 


1^ 




« 


et 




00 


2 




1 


1 






3 




■0 






i 


§ 




■«• 


■* 




§ 


3 




1 

s 

1 


1 


i 



w 



108 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



I 



I 


•B 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


, 


1 


. 




1 


1 


I 


1 


BC 




























: a 




























JZ 




























i 




























a 




























•; 


^ 


«. 


^ 


rs 


, 


^^ 


X 


_ 


^^ 


r; 


i/S 





., 


2.— 








T 








«c 












— .3 




















?• 








^ t. 




























iH 




























■^ 






























I 


I 


1 


^^ 


1 




„ 


«c 




•c 


t^ 


I 


1 


















































































































•< 




























a 


1 


^ 


I 


1 


„ 


I 


^ 


- 




X 


r» 


1 


1 






























t *• 




























c 


^^ 


^ 


I 


r^ 


^^ 


^^ 


^ 


^ 


J , 


_^ 


.^ 


'?» 


^^ 


; = 








Ji 








3 




X 


71 






1 ^ 
















— 




— 
































































^ 




























1 *3 X 


J 


«. 


, , 


_ 


1 


. 


cr 


r- 


_ 


t^ 


•-- 


1 


, 


• X 3 




























' 2 ^o 




























= ^0 




























= e 




























3 J= 




























M *» 




























•* 3 


1 


I 


t 


I 


1 


I 


ri 


t- 


, 


_ 


h- 


I 


1 


5 <= 




















-r 








-s 2 




























1 ?a 




























' =^s 
























































! -s 


^ 


^^ 


1 


^ 


^ 


1 


.^ 


- 




- 


^ 


^ 


.^ 


c 
















X 












! c « 




























1 O t 




















































































1 '^ 




























' 


^^ 


^^ 


^ 


^ 


^^ 


_^ 


X 


.^ 


, , 


t; 








r> 


















ii 












1 3 




















ri 








o 




























1 ^ 






























8 


1 


1 


- 


- 


! 


- 




5 


- 


r: 


- 


- 


1 


































1 






























[a. 




















































































: =c 


J 


— 


^ 


1 


» 


— 


1 


X 


§ 


1 


S 




•c 


r-i 






















?i 










ea 


























































1 

i 


s 




























1 






1 






, 






. 


3 






, 








i 






=' 














•0 
3 


t 










. 


"S 


. 




. 


3. 






^ 


1 


. 


*0 


•o 












- 


^ 




X 


3 


I a 


_>» 




■3 






— 






jj 


^_^ 






i 


o 












3 












3 




z 


"i 

tf 


^ 


-= 




"3 


te 


3 




^ 


1 





"5 

_3 


3 


§ 
§ 

u 


^ 


> 
_3 


■3 


"3 




_2 
_2 


^ 


1 


1 


5 


S 





3 





Cj 






3 




'> 










-3 


3 


*2 


b h 


u 


5 


__^ 


3 


si 




zz 


-^ 


_3 


2 


X 





1 


.2 2 


s 




3 

1 


C 






0.2 

3 u 
"5 




3 



s 

3 
1 


5 
J 


> 

5 


c 
"? 


_| 




5 
'S 


11 
1 = 






< 


d 





Q 


^ 


^ 


-^ 


^ 


«<c 


«S 


Sh 


S 





1911. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



J 1 


1 1 


1 


' 


1 


■* — < 


- n 


ri 


n 


3 


1 1 


1 a 


1 


1 


o 
n 


: 1 


1 N 


1 


M 


n 


1 ^^ 




(M 


" 




1 1 


l>- CO 


1 


^^ 


^^ 




M 






t~ 


1 1 


1 ^ 


r 


I 


X 










5 


■" 


1 fJ 


o» 


M 


« 




n 


?« 


n 




1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 


n 










t^ 


'" 


CO 


ot 


M 














a o 




o 






= ."S 


a 

3 


^ 






^ » 




JZ 






>. 


a 








= et 










3 a 


» 


i 






i O. 

. s 

- 2 


1 o 

8 -^ 


3 
ft 

1 


• 














2 -a 
1 .9 


a > 

•a ft 


■a 
1 


s 

e 






g 


2 


1 


Public 
taini 

Public 
liceni 

Second 
fully 

Peddlin 


1 

3 

e 


1 
1 


f2 





' 


1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


I 


1 






•* 


w^ 


C4 


o 


" 


§ 




M 






1 


<-* 


1 


O 


1 


i» 


S 


1 






1 


1 


■ 




1 


^ 


.-1 


1 






1 


1 


M 


CO 


- 


r< 


X 


- 




o 




















r« 




















U 








































>• 


1 


1 


1 


I 


I 


_, 


I 


1 




r- 








































J 




















•< 
















































































S 


^ 


1 


1 


w 

■* 


1 


- 


1 


- 
























>• 




















H 




























































X 




















< 


?l 




M 


X 


•-4 


» 


n 


























u 














^ 






r- 




















X 




















Z 


•v 


^^ 


IN 


o 


,_, 


o 


n 


04 




< 








1^ 




o 








o 














.^ 






-< 


























































z 


^^ 


1 


1 


n 


1 




1 


I 




:b 




















ib 




















o 






















« 


^ 


« 


o 


^ 


M 


« 


M 




t- 








eo 




O 


.-* 






d 




















2: 




























• 






• 
















«a 








































g 




















g 














• 


• 


• 


B 




• 
















2 




















O 














5 






*?■ 














C 






u 


.<? 


















a 
'3 


r? 
































u 






•o 














CS 


. 


. 


q 


d 














a 


. 




o 


. 








§ 


S 


- 


t 


b 


« 


>> 


>^ 






■3 




§ 


a 


a 


J 


S 


e 






i 


J5 


2 


3 

■a 


3 
T) 


& 






< 


< 


-<; 


< 


<: 


< 


a 


a 





■■ i 



110 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



X = 



^ 








































































































5 




















































1 


























a 




























^ 


00 


1^ 


O 


•^ 


»-■? 


-• r< 


_ 


_ 


•/• 


_ 


r: c< 






= 


■o 




■^ 


» 




CI 






— • 




— s 




T 










'.\ 


























































































— 




























, 


J S> 


n 


1 


CO 


,, 


1 ,^ 


ri 


r? 


r 


I 


^ I 


E 








































































































<< 


























.4 


1 


1 ri 


M 


1 


=> 


O 


^ 


X 


1 


rs 


,^ 


Tl ?1 










f-t 






























































































"1 


























s 


_ 


1 ^^ 


1- 


n 


M 


CI 


1 X 


^ 


^^ 


^ 


o 


r- 1 






c 


fl 




M 


M 














^ 














■^ 












s 


























.5 














































































s t: 


1 


i 


1 


1 


-^ 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


X 1 




































































































































-E - 


























S s 

i s 


1 


' s 


^' 


1 


.~5 


O 


1 2 


T 


1 


1 


r> 


O 1 



I — — n o 



o — — • c» 



= rs fl 







^^ 


1 


?l 


tl 


1 


^^ 


o 


1 


^ 


1 


— 


_ri 


^m 


1 


1 












































































































































s 


































































3C 
































































! 




I 




2 




•^ 


^ 


o 






^ 




t-. 


a 


^2 


N 






















, 


. 




. 


. 




. 


































































.M 





= c 

o 1 



3 

a 



=■ fc 



?= ^ •= == 



s 



►— I.H M 



OO 00 — 

-■ — 2 

•3 -3 ■= 

g 5 * 

■3 ^ 



3 

-3 



3 
5j 



.* 3 S 



•5 ^ 2 .^ § 



^ — ^3 ^C ^3 p 



I 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Ill 



M -< O 



N 


1 


•0 


1 . 3 


90 


" 


•-•5 


CO 

n 


n 


- 


r3 


1 1 


o 


n 


1 




• 


s 





I I I I I I I I "5 -< 



T " n s -^ T 



CO w X ^ r^ 

3 31 o 






8 3 

£ 5 



g 5 

2 o 



C3 

z 

o 
o 

u 

o 
ft. 



o 

O 

H 
O 

03 

H 
O 

z 

H 

b. 

O 



O 



I I « Tl 1 — 



I I I 3 a 



3 



3 « -• 






I I N t^ N 



-• O I M « 



S - 3 



ra CO X o 00 

o •* o 



?l I « -H 



3 
3 



3 



* 

"a 
3 



2 :3 



I 



3 ^ t 



1 !-i 
I s i 



i .1 

- '^ a 
i ' i 



. a 

u o 

c s 

a .2 

8 -2 



3 



3 .S 

a a 



o 

a 



.3 

■o 

=1- 

a 



3 

cr 
.3 



O 



O 



I 



II 



112 



POLICE CO^IMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



o 
a 



" a 



'.d 

O 

u 

o 



o 



•8 

.if 

a 



1^^ 



a a 
o b 



^1 
■e. 



I o -. 



r< t- — 



— no— I I 



I -r I 



I I I 3 I 



OX II- — 



r> X. I rs t>- M T« — 



or-- — ?>»-'5r; — — -i-XMn — 



t = I 



— I- I 1 I 



u 
o 
z 



o 
•3 



"3 — .2 



— 3 



-^■3 = 2 



c s 



e 

-3 



o c o 



§ 
f 

o 

5 



-S £ "^ *> 



■fi e 



•5 

w 

3 
O 



O 

e 



2 £ 

:5 



7 - ? = 

-5 - t; -3 



S S u 



= 3 

c u 






2 H 



o 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



1 


1 


CS 


a 


, 


1 


, 


, 


, 


, 


1 


1 


, 


1 


1 


1 


M 


, 


1 








-»■ 


3 


































s 








_ 


ft 


o 


« 


■3 


^ 


h. 


ts 


M 


•3 


M 


*^ 





« 


*-i 












r> 


-^ 


rs 






>o 




















*iN 




















•a" 




















•3 

n 


I 


n 


n 


1 


§ 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


.«• 




« 


t. 


' 


1 


t^ 


' 


s 








_^ 


X 


, 


o 


*4 


o 


1 


1 


X 


o 


1 


N 


1 


1 


n 





r* 




n 














s 






•3 


•3 


















^^ 


-i 


^_^ 


30 


_ 


VI 


"f 


1 


1 


1 


■^ 


O 


1 


CO 


n 


1 


t^ 


•<■ 


^ 




t- 










« 




X 

3 






M 


S 


















' 


' 


1 


1 


" 




" 


n 


M 


1 


O 




1 


a 


' 


1 


1 


r~ 







"^ 


i 


3 


5 


I 


rj 


1 


o 
o 


^^ 


1 


O 
t* 


Cl 


1 


X 


1 


1 




CI 









s 


^ 




1 


, 


_^ 


■3 


..- 


CJ 


^^ 


•3 


r» 


?« 


f-t 


o» 


1 


N 


, 


^ 












r» 


rs 


•3 








X 










M 




■0 


























•.a* 






















n 


« 


^ 


» 


o 


01 


>3 


^ 


r- 


o 


M 


•3 


n 


^^ 


c< 


■n 


^ 




en 




•a 






a 


m 


r3 






o 


(N 










^ 





























■» 


O 














t-i 




o 


1 


I 


•3 


1 


•• 


N 


n 


1 


1 


N 


o 


1 


_ 


M 




n 


1 


^^ 




n 














•9 


























■* 


•>r 


TZ 


^ 


^ 


•* 


•* 


a 


«3 


^^ 


O 


^ 


CI 


^ 


^_, 


^^ 





00 













^ 














•3 


t^ 




r^ 





























3 






^ 


«3 














.-< 






• 






"3 


• 


• 


- 


• 




• 


- 


f 


■ 




• 


• 


• 


• 




























b 
























a 
















SL 
























a 
> 












"o 




s 
2 


1 




"0 




a 


■s 






"5 






i 








vj 


i 


.2 


a 

a 
s 
« 

2 

1 


O 

s 

s 
"> 

-a 


■3 




.2 
*** 




3 


«» 








C 


2> 


_2 
e 

g 


o 


• 


s 




d 
.2 

> 

i 


§ 

■1 

■•3 


> 

i 
1 


3 
1 

1 

5 


a 

1 

1 


■3 
'> 

Be" 

.3 




1 

I 


3 

3 
•0 

B 
1 


0. 

M 

a 
1 

1 




e 

cS 


e 

.3 

M 
a 


C 

o 
S 

i 




1 


JD 


*■! 


1 

s 




J 
5 


a 


e 


^ 




1 


X 

a 


■35 S 


i 


i 


>• 
3 


1 


1 




o 


o 


g 


.2 


•■ 


s 


R 


9 


^ 


^ 


1 


e 


1 


-a 


a 


1 




Q 


Q 


Q 


Q 


o 


Q 


Q 


Q 


■!4 


(4 


(S 


S 


s 


s: 


^ 





114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







_; 


































1 


1 f 


1 


1 


1 


1 










1 


I 


1 






































































J 
































-1 
































>? 
































"■ 






























t 


■^ 


O O 


^ 


^^ 


, , 


^ 


OC 


o 




_ 


^ 


^^ 


C^ 










o o 




o 
























— "s 




"^ 1^ 










CI 


















-r,»- 
































"r* 
































































"" 


































1 


r: r* 


1 


o 


, 


1 


z 


J 




I 


1 


1 


1 










r\ o 










>— 


















_ = 




M 




























































S 
































K 


i 


-^ o 


1 


'J* 


1 


^ 


*5 


I 




1 


—« 


1 


CI 










*c o 




























"^1 






























•5J 


s 


I 




























1 
































: { 


M 


X o 


.-* 


*1 


^^ 


1 


-1 


, 




^^ 


?i 


— < 


^^ 








r< *i 




-^ 






rt 
















^ 






^ '^ 


























s 


g 


I 




























1 


^ 






























" ^^ ~ 






























1 


X — • 


; ! 


! O 


1 


r>. 






n 


1 






1 


1 


1 






i>i 




1^ 




■^ 






















































2 


= — ^ 
































= Sf 
































= -= 






























3 


•X. — 






























— 3 


I 


■^ "I 


t 


X 


, 


i 


X 


, 




1 


ro 


1 


1 


•? 


^ 


11 




























3 




i^.* 




























































5 


r^ 


J! 


M 


— X 


r^ 


CI 


I 


1 


X 


o 


» 


1 


^^ 


r^ 


C3 


1 


2 


-J 




ri :3 










t^ 














































^H 






























X 


3 


_. 


— » 


O O 


^^ 


ri 


'^ 


^^ 


x 


o 


^ 


'^ 


•v 


'^ 


M 


3 


_s 




■<? r* 










CI 














a 


X 


C 




























< 


i 































^ 




I 


-* t* 


1 


t- 


1 


t 


_ 


, , 




1 


1 


1 


_ 




is 


5 














■? 
















to 


s 






























» 


f 






























o 


































. >^ "" 






























•X. 


_ 


-r rs 


, 


■^ 


, - 


^^ 


— 


_ 


^ 


^ 


■^ 


^ , 


c^ 




O 


. 1 




? s 




o 






- 
















OS 


<ift 
































. 


S a 






. 


^ 


. 


. 




. 




, 


, 




d 
































12: 






•f J 


J;^ 






1 








*o 












■ 




_i 


•^ 






- 


• 








• 


> 






, 




S -2 


> 




^ 










^3 












5? 




S 5 


«» 




S 


£ 








'•^ 
















































^ b 


3 




.£ 


J 


X 




— 


3 












•b 


u 


1 a 


« 


*3 


-| 


E 


i 




2 


Sc 




u 


^. 






























'» 


*o 






5Sr 


■r 


I .» 


1 


3 


> 


c^ 


— 




!2 


— 




3 








^ 




3 z 


3 




t" 


J = 


"w 




^- 


S 


» 




.2 








i 


1. 


.2 


> 


^ 


^" 


*? 

5 




_s 


"H 


^ 


1 


2 






55 


1 


~ r 3 




=r 


5 


CJ 






3 


^ 


"3 


3 










&c 


j|.|| 






9 


ll 


H 


1* 


1 


3 

1 


a. 


s 

ED 


is 








H 


5>2 5 a 


S 


~ 




M" 


_c 


-f 


= 


^ 
? 




J 


i 








S-' 


6 :3 


c5 


M 


^ 


^ 


3 


^ 


.5 


^^ 




J 


4 



1911.] PUBUC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



115 



1 1 


' 


' 


1 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


r 


1 


' 


1 


1 


' 


1 


n 


I 




^^ ^N 


s 


^ 


« 


•V 


n 


*' 


* ■ 


*4 


- 


T* 


•* 


C3 


o 


^ 


■0" 








1 1 


' 


^^ 


' 


1 


' 


' 


M 


1 


' 


n 


^4 


1 


« 


•-• 


1 




o 




1 1 


a 


M 


1 


1 


1 


-^ 


' 


' 


1 


Tt 


■^ 


n 




•o 


M 


•«" 


00 




1 t 


n 


O 


« 


1 


3 


N 


1 


1 


- 


-^ 


' 


s> 


n 


r- 


I.H 


1 


!0 




>-• 1 


o 


^ 


"^ 


^ 


n 


.-• 


1 


1 


' 


!-• 




1 


rs 


t- 


1 


1 


' 




1 «^ 


3 


1 


1 


1 


' 


' 


1 


1 


1 


o 




•V 


1 


rs 


' 


00 

1-* 


o 




1 1 


a 


1 


M 


' 


55 


r« 


n 


' 


'- 


o 


CI 


M 


M 


■* 


•fl" 


n 






" 


s 


« 


CO 


•» 


i; 


» 


n 




- 


r« 


-^ 


O 


lO 


s 


1< 


9-* 


04 




^H r^ 


'^ 


M 


•^ 


' 


?i 


1 


1 


1 


' 


' 


'^ 


■* 


1 


1 


^^ 


t^ 


1 











































3 

.2 2 

1 i 

.2 '2 

> a 

■a 2 

i .1 

o > 

5 » 



o 
a 



5 

s 



s 



= - 5 

1 = i I 

tilt 



o • o 

2 O Ob 

i "i J i I 
2 o « = - 

5 II 1 1 

a S ^ :» « 






!S S S 



O 



- -3 = 
c 2 :: 



J3 



« "1 



I i 

3 eS 

g 2 

=i 5 



E 



1 ° 

i I 



cu a, 



116 



o 

o 



■A 

< 

Eh 



o 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



:=:! 



M -I « — O O O 



— -. I 30 I t~ =1 O 

— -J" rt n -r 





1 5 I 














^ 


==s 






































3 




Cl 






"■ 


1 






e r 


c 


i*-3 






o 


= S 


o 




-d 





1 ri 


... 


-1 


1 ^ 


I t^ 


o 


'•Z 


t- 


r = 


— 


t - 








CI 


ri 




ri 




r; 



I o I — c* 



— = o I o I — = ;i I e — s 

— ri I- — Si'— ~ " 



s 5 



5 
^ 



1 o I I o — 



I 3 t- — 



i "^ 



z 

■■A 



3 



■2 ms 



3 = i « 
1 1 £ i 



S J 



"■50 



: : 2 § I I 5 

:^ M <8 cS w h o 

-= -i .i 9 =5 =1 = 



o _a 






-s i S 



"2 J - 



i 



1 1 
■ 1 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



117 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


.1 


, 


, 


1 


1 


1 


r. 




























O 




























■* 




























r« 




o 


n 


" 


■ 


X 


M 


' 


^ 




- « 


" 


?• 


3 

n 




1 


i\ 


1 


1 


M 


I 


' 


s 


» 


I 


1 


?1 


S 

3 




U3 




1 




I 


1 


1 


^ 


M 




1 


* 






1 


?i 


1 




U5 


n 


1 




>3 


h- 




T* 


s 




1 


1 


1 


1 


t>. 


, 


1 


r 


1 


■^ 


1 


Tt 


^ 




























•a 




1 




1 




1 


1 


1 


o 


^ 


" 


1 


' 


o 

s 

3 




O 


" 




1 






r 


h* 


..< 


n 


' 


] 


o 




•3 


ra 




.-t 


2 


M 




s 




X 




?• 


g 

3 




1 


1 


1 


1 


M 


1 


1 


X 


'^ 


' 


1 


1 


ft 

S 




•3 


n 


.-» 




2 


m 




?5 


Ti 


X 


" 


Tt 


2 






• 






• 


■ 


i 


• 








- 


























































































. 












3 






S 


• 


" 










a 








"3 






3 










3 




S 






>f 


s 






fit 


- 


- 






•D 






H 




a 


















8 

•E 

S 


O 

2 


s 

- tt 
a 

s 


a 

a 

o 

■5 


§ 

i 

5 




1 

a 

3 


_3 


6 


■ 


3 

i 

3 

! 

i 

B 


i 

•5 


"3 
_3 
'S 

> 






s 


o 


J 


tt 


a 




u 




•^ 


is 

i 

s 








i 
1 




3' 

o 


so 

1 

g 


o 


5 

i 


11 


1 

2 


-3 

S 




* 


1 




w 


QQ 


01 


H 


H 


H 


H 


> 


> 


;S 


? 


s 







118 



POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



« < 





■3 


1 


u r 1 


1 


1 


1 


„ 


?3 




M 












5 


O 
•^ 




1 












rt 










































■- S 


= -r r- 


5> 


;•< 


X 


r? 


X 




.2_: ^ 


r- x r; 


9 


?o 


o 


o 


CI 




^1 ~ 


-»• «3 — 




o 


r5_ 


ro 


t» 




a^ ' ~ 










C5 


x" 












O 


» 




^ 2 


X ;; 2 




^ 


o 


g 


r5 








S 


r^ 




I.-5 




1 "^ 


T» t- 










3 




















.3 










o 


r^ 




S 
















i| - 


t — ^ 


■ 


_^ 


CI 


X 


?o 










ri 


o 


rs 






"^ 






ri 


M 


ri 




^■f 










■S 


X 












c\ 


ri 




a 1 t- 


_ ^ _ 


» 


^ 


= 


o 


_ 




a 1 -T 


's. /. •z 




2 


o 


o 


S 




.1 ' *"- 


r» 






■-•5 


o 
















£ 


rf 




,3 












M 




•^ 
















1 


1- ^ ri 


, 


1 


ri 


s 


ca 




S = *' 






r* 


o 


X 


r^ 




fl^ 1 = 


~ 








■J 
o' 


■s 




































CO — 
















-»a ^ 


— _ _ 


^ 


X 


X 


2 


_ 




2 = : »- 


•= — ?i 


r'l 




1^ 




o 




^ E :=^ 


m — 




n 


X 


=. 


T? 




^1 ; " 


ri 










X 


z 










3 


o 


o 
















i ! = 


= z ri 


o 


„ 


X 


o 


-^ 


^ 




= Z I- 






r^ 




:3 


2 




m Ti 






r3 


^ 


.K 


















p 


■— ■ s — 


— 








?l" 


o" 




^ 






























































< 


— 


^ -• f- 


3 


ri 


X 


o 


.^ 1 




— *» 


t- z r; 






o 


:3 


O i 


3 


2 \ rs 


T «; — 




5 


r? 


t-- 


•1 i 




3 t -^ 

1 






































o 


t» i 




' J : = 


-s- 2 X 


-!■ 


„ 


1 


-1 


X 1 








t^ 


C5 


Co 


s> 1 




s ~ 


«s "" 






3 


o 


o I 




• .5 1 










is" 


o" j 




. ■ ^ ' 
















X 1 1 
















J5 . 
















. -' 


•s r« = 


3 


a 


t- 


■^ 


n 




' 1 1 3 




rt 






O i 








-T 


O 


t^ 


O 1 




a 
















s 1 ^^ 










o 


■e 1 












o 


o 




; ■ 


L t. !■ 


5 


« 




i 












ic 




*2 








- — £ 




3 


























a 












— 


•• — J 


s 


1 


3 


o 


1 






V. -*- X 












X 












1 




a £ 


^ — -S 


3 


o 


^ 


^ 


1 




o i 


1- i. a 


3 


^« 




.n 


1 
j 






o 


— — ^ ? 

^ S « i — 


i 


o 


1 




I 




Cs. 

o 


•s 


J 


"L 




_3 


. 




, te 






3 












1 o 




















5^ 5 > o 






es 








i a 


s 


=^ = - ». 


5 


u 


C3 


o 






! e 

< 


s 

^ 






S 
3 


i 

o 


lO 






^ 




,3 C 




1= 
O 




3 
o 






M 


ri^ji^-ri^o t 


d 


1^ 


3C-- 




s 


- — - c . i- 


. 3 


3 





iS 






' 


z 


± -?. -i.' 


<: 


i: 


Z 


z 





1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 



n 

e5 



■a .5 



8 



i, 



8 

■§ 

a 





8 

el 

1 


bi 


o 1 


O 1 t 


CO CO *# 


§ 






S 


« ^ 


O CO -* 


= = i 


OO 






s 
sis 

a 

X 

•4 


b! 


•O 1 


CB 1 1 


^ e« CO 


g 






s 


S •' 


S '^ - 


2 = S 


9* 






i 

s5s 

s 


b 


2 1 


S5 ' ' 


- '- s 

n 


% 






s 


R " 


§ 


O o Ok 
eo e« g 


V 






E 

.Is 

i 

■< 


h 


2 1 


s - ' 


= s g 


i 






s 


5 2 


g t- .» 


s s s 


s 






1 
SB'S 

s 

< 


fa 


§ - 


o « , 


S S 5 


g 




s 


s 




>Q flO ^ 


3 5 i 


i 






s 

sis 
i 


fa 


s - 


g « - 


2 S 1 


a» 




fe 


s 


U s 


OJ 1^ O 


S s 1 


3 

s- 




1 


sis 

i 

< 


fa 


g ' 


« « . 


■* « 2 


s 




s 
1 


s 


S 5 


s a " 


K & g 


»• 




a" 


s 

sis 

i 

•< 


fa' 


X ' 


S " ' 


" S 5 


2 

2 




s 


S « 


1 s » 


S 3 S 


«o 




l_ 


< 


fa 


(<a 


^ n €o 


r- ig >o 


9D 




s 




g K s 


3 I S 


a 

5 






g 

■< 


fa° 


Ok -« 


5 I 1 


-• Oi ^ 


s 






s 


3 S 


5 s - 


« 3 i 


i 






s 

sis ■ 
e 


lb 


C« 1 


M 1 1 


• ■ s 


3 






s 


5 2 


5 -» ■ 


' - 1 


§ 






s 

1 ■ 


fa' 


1 1 1 t 1 1 1 n 


3 






s 


- 1 


-^ 1 1 


' ' 3 


s 






• 8 

1 


1 


1 :2 


o V •o 
6 6 6 
»: 2 55 


« »C 00 

4 :S :S 


1 





1 



120 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







1^ 


^ 


ul 


=5 


o 


CI 




1 


•'T 


55 


o 


r3 


o 


TT 






o 


a 

T 






C5_ 


§ 




; 


o" 


-^ 


«■ 


-r" 


-<" 


cf 




1 


«» 










^ 






_ 


30 


1;; 


_ 


CI 


o 






i6 






5 

2 


(M 

-r" 


s 




1 


rs 


ro 






T 


"^ 




1 


Tl 


ft 


?l 


n 


ei 


n 










V— 




^ 


^^ 




•*inoD 






n' 


•i 




s 




Xq pMOdnB lam 




o 


O 


^ 


A 




s^ 


-aosijdaii jo tmx 


tS 


ZJ 


C5 


— ^ 


r? 


65 


1 


rf 


c-f 


rf 


-r" 


n 


«" 


"§ 




SS 


o 


_^ 


.^ 


^^ 


^ 


-2 




?l 


■~s 


'•O 


-^ 


o 


1^ 


o 


unoj Xq panxlnii 


2 


?i 


3£ 


S5 




s 


5 


tjmj JO laaodiv 


--^ 


..-1 




s 




C5_ 


■■— < 




^ 


o" 


» 


—4 


US' 


co" 


o 


' 


o 




o 


3 


n 


« 


"•* 




a& 










^ 


g 




3C 


-I" 


r~ 


3 


M 


o 


^-^ 




s 


-V 




-JD 


t^ 


'— • 


^ 


•A!3 


.• 


o 


— 


2 


o 


o 




sqi JO ino pa» m 


C-l 


^^ 


K 




-^ 




_3 


iBjoiii 'puaiOJU 


r? 


o_ 


fc^ 


o^ 


^ 


^ 


_. = 


XvradoJj JO lanouiv 


3J" 


h-r 

n 


1-^ 


?r 


s" 


-5< 


[ J "^i* 




?l 




^i 


?i 


^5 


CJ 


j< 1 




Vi 










» 







r5 


_^ 


2 


r~ 


o 


S '^ 


i 


S 


-o 


1^ 




CI 


CI 


= i3 


I 


,^ 


.^ 


-J 


t"; 


a 


-)< 


< ei 


•X>i.-) «[> a oa|<n< 


^ 


*^ 


o 


2 




«--3 


r- ." 


X^jdoij ^ tniiDmv 


30 


o 


c< 


o 


o_ 


O 


^! 




r3~ 


•-';'■ 


o 


i~ 


-o" 


cf 


^ 


1 


2 


ro 


•-•5 


o 


r- 


o 


"^ 


1 


o» 




"• 


"^ 


'^ 


Vf 


*:^* 
















^ 




t 














i 


















c: 


o 


rj 


CI 




-1< 


o 


i -aat 


1 e>« 


ro 


o 


^» 


o 




s 


' -jy JO j^sujaj 


1 ^ 


Ci 


J, 


_; 


o 


o 
















^^ 


































'-C 




1 =» 


39 


o 


?i 


-^ 


oo 


p 




' o 


r^ 


-T 


v^ 


o 


o 


-t; 


■p»)»u» 


' =>. 


c>_ 




o 


CI_ 


o 


^ 


SII0U9J JO iaqiiin>; 


^ 


t>^ 


vj" 


^ 


H^ 


C-j" 


1 




"^ 


o 


o 


t^ 


r- 


o 


,5 


1 -aoq 


; 1 


1 


1 


1 


o 
S 


~5 




•>|n<)oj p>|itiii)>3 


c>r 


o" 


aT 


sT 


o" 


s" 














r-. 


c« 






! '^ 


o 


'^ 


o 


o 


o 




s 




• 


- 




• 


no" 




a 












tc 




1 > 


1 

1 


■ 


• 




• 


-< 






■s 


r>r 


'J^ 


^ 


o" 








o 


o 




o 












c^ 


5 












I 



i 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



sssssss'§sssf8ssssss;;^s ss s 
g-- - S «■ S-'w" -o 



121 



« — ejr-^ — o I Cir^-^a-^o-*** I I I I I I | | I 



;3— =2 



Ilooc«|«<«lie4i-"<«ll«lilill It I 



_B I t i<SBOe>4ooi>4i^l*~a 



111 II I 



-«iic4ll<—itoii>oeoioillili II I 



•Gfi I o> I 



I O I I I I I I II I 



SICB'^OOfO^I |W99e-«P«|0| I 



II It I 






3e«og I I I I I I 



J 

i 



^1 



B J 
S • E ■ 

i-i- 

fi..&. 

I =1 

* Si • 

I . "^j . 

fl .||. 

•••i.-i-0 ■ 

I 1^3 all 

I.|.-."S|W.'S|B . 

" 1-2 = 11 SI ita 

.^-- .. .V. .ii.^.-iil^sl^ si: 

.6-1 ..-fjl.^;? .1 J'-g^ll^ .=!s.2 . 
«B -u 8— »"«o«C ""3 — o -~ £ E£ 3 



122 



POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Sumher of Dog Licenses issved during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1910. 



DmsioNS. 1 Mala. 

1 


Fonalo. 


Swed. 


Brecdere. 


ToUfc. 


1. 








96 


31 


- 


2 


129 


o 

—I 








9 


6 




- 


15 


3, 








1 

272 


85 


11 


4 


372 


4, 








118 


46 


2 


1 


167 


5, 








457 


176 


19 


2 


654 


6, 








338 


102 


4 


- 


444 


". 








675 


103 


4 


- 


782 


9. 








854 


163 


40 


3 


1,060 


10, 








698 


149 


19 


1 


867 


11, 








1,913 


385 


107 


4 


2,409 


12, 








625 


131 


28 


- 


784 


13, 








1,245 


198 


SO 


2 


1,525 


14, 








595 


128 


39 


1 


763 


15, 








457 


126 


11 


- 


594 


16, 








612 


153 


32 


- 


797 


To( 


als, 




8,964 


1,982 


396 


20 


11,362 



Table XVI. 

Toto/ Sumher of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Dirisicns. 



Dh-ision 1, . . . 1,154 


Di^-ision 10, . . .122 


Division 2, 






1,878 


Di^ision 11, 






9S 


Division 3, 






216 


Di\ision 12, 






100 


Di\-ision 4, 






572 


Di\-ision 13, 






5S 


Di\-ision 5, 






410 


Di\-i£ion 14, 






56 


Di\-i5ion 6, 






287 


Di\Tsioa 15, 






169 


Di\ision 7, 






132 


Di\ision 16, 






»4 


Di\-ision 8, 
Division 9, 














145 


Total, . . 5,488 



1911.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 123 

Table XVII. 
Financial Staiemenl for the Year ending Not. SO, 1910. 



Expenditures. 

Pay of police and employees, $1,782,251 53 

Pensions, 131,515 00 

Fuel and light 18,271 84 

Water and ice, 301 61 

Furniture and bedding, 3,737 20 

Printing and stationery, 14,617 72 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison, . . 7,219 35 

Repairs to station houses and city prison, . . . 15,659 49 

Repairs and supplies for police steamers, .... 11,268 54 

Rent and care of telephones and lines, .... 5,734 91 

Purchase of horses and vehicles 2,395 08 

Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles, . . 18,109 81 

Carting prisoners to and from stations and city prison, 1,140 50 

Feeding prisoners 3,060 98 

Medical attendance on prisoners, 7,419 04 

Transportation, 1,988 29 

Pursuit of criminab, 2,748 22 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, .... 16,893 90 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc., . . . 2,910 51 

Traveling expenses and food for police, .... 158 65 

Rent of buildings, 6,999 60 

Total, $2,054,401 77 

Expenses of lifting, $24,302 72 

Expenses of house of detention and station house matrons, 10,123 46 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII), . . . 62,993 38 

Total, $2,151,821 33 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner, . $21,129 00 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned prop)erty, itinerant 
musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, carriage 

maps, etc., 1,160 64 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), . . 29,155 00 

Total, $51,444 64 

For uniform cloth, etc., 17,659 66 

Total, $69,104 30 



124 rOLICE C0>OIISSI0NER. [Jan. 



Table XMII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Seirice during the Year ending Xor. 

30, 1910. 



Labor, $28,067 67 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., 7,261 20 

Rent and care of buildings, 5,012 30 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and vehicles, . . . 1,302 00 

Stable supplies and furniture, 36 50 

Repairs on buildings, 2,397 21 

Repairing wagons, harnesses, etc., 1,526 27 

Fuel, gas and water, 1,180 51 

Miscellaneous, car fares, etc., 113 69 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor, . 6,057 89 

Underground wires, . . : 9,960 S2 

Printing, stationery, etc., 77 29 

Total 862,993 38 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



125 





s 

1 


-pamrni 


r-r« lilt tsr^«4 — r-j;^ 1 1 1 1 N I | | I M 1 I 


'S 


I 




•p»inH 


— lltlllllC4 — OIIIIIIII-«lll 


= ' 






o 

s 

Q 


■pajnfni 


leo'vi 1 ioraot*oc3**i i i i i i i^i i i 


'R 


1 

1 


o 


•i»mH 


Ml 1 1 -« 1 -^-« t t 1 1 1 1 1 -« 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


e 1 




1 
1 


K 
O 

S 

> 


'poznrii] 


r^aoilll'^oii— r-xiiiiiiiiiil 


■s 




•p»inx 


c« 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


n 1 


1 


9 

a 

> 


•pwnfiJi 


c»a» — — 1 'gJS'"'""^' ' ' ' ' ' • * ' ' ' ' 


■s 




•p»inH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


-' 






> 


'pajnhii 


or- — — ««« — « 1 ■^5» 1 1 1 1 e*-^ — e« 1 i i i 


1 2 




^ 

? 


■p>mH 


— — till — — 1 1 1 p< 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 t 1 


e 1 








-punrv] 


ee» 1 e9c«c«g^ra 1 ^jo 1 i i i e« i i i i i i i 


1 c« 


i 


Taule 
, Parks and 


•p'ffiH 


iiiiii»»*<itfrieiit(iiiiiiii 


2 ' 




i 

> 
a 


'punfoT 


S2*'2'**'J;'*2 1 Sg» • -"^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■i 




s 

g 

^ 


p»inH 


1 1 1 t 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 C4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 t 


« 1 




e 


1 


'punFax 


:;S"««-Sg"«2« — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


'S 




.2 

s 


•PTDH 


«« 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ t 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 


to 1 




S 












•5> 












OS 














"ii" ;i ■ Ji|l=- ■ [di ■ ■ : 
lilil iliflpllllii 


it 

u 
II 





126 



POLICE COAEMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



fa=inni«iox 






e 






2 : 'poinruj 



<se^e4-« I — •«» I t »oa I I I 



- ■p'n'M I 



I I I I I I « I I I I -4 I I I 



C -pojnrni 



eaio-^t I io-3-*i f^( I I 



'P»mH 



-^ I -* I -* I •♦-* I I I M I I I 



Z \ -painfai 



CO I ^— I rtcirt I I — e»»« I I 



■p^mx 



I I I I I -•» I I I r I I t 



I 

I. -pampq 



eoM-*l I— •'irsMrMr^l I | 



■p»inH 



llllil-^ie^l-^ill 



2 'p3jnrn| 



<N-^l 1— I— oi (— r-i I I 



'PIDH 



lllllllll'^llllllllilll -wl 



I I ( f I i I I 



I I I I « I I w% \ 



I I I I I » I >9 



I I I I I ■ I I 



r t I I J ■— I I I m 



I ( « ■ < I 



I I I ■» — sa f I 



t I I f f I n I « I 



I I I I I ■ I I I 



H 'punrDj 



tsne^i i*rr«*iTMt lo«i ie>f i i f <■ i i 1 i 



'p»n!M 



'«iiiii-«niii-«iit<4'iiliii*l 



: X 'pajntoi 



OO— I I— *3 !•-•«■*■« I I I I I I—— I I I 



•p»n!M 



M I I 1 I I <«« ll<-i|-"llllll4IIVI 



1^ 



'^ 



li 



r 



11 

1^ 



1.^ 



. .-5 ...... Jg e . . . --.^ 



-■§ 




1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



127 



M S5. 



^ 5> 



i s 

OS ^^ 

•5" -^ 



1 



n 



2 o 

3 I J 

-I 

^^ 

K ■** 

§■2 
s ^ 

•g 05 
I -- 



■^«>ox 



•5n»»y 



** ™ w cs_w oo « 35 — — rs •o o o» o» "* « o ■♦. — •- » «e o> — 
K r* Vw Ve>« «o o oTaii^^oo w o "O t^t* »* ao «s oTqooo o r'i' 



lllllllllllllllllll^l'll' 



MPopwj 



CIP<««J 



•nP«aMJ 



HPopMJ 



OIP«»M 



•fiVonud 



-gp«a<j 



I > I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I £« I I I I I 



I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t I 2 I ( I I ■ 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I t I I f I I e^«o I 1 a I 

o3 e> 



lllllltlllllll||||imoil«9l 



• itllllliliiiiiiiiioeKiioi 

o^ S 









■Z»»»« 



■gpnuj 



Spnaij 



■H»!»Hi 



■evopwj 



Xtnauj 



•IP«'?»»J 






PisiaiSliiSBgigiliisSsSS 



i§aS5sliiIlHissiliS2ip.ii 



o OD r* <0 '^ oo — r* M « a6 9 oo r- «> <-• O CO Qo c^ r» «« cS »o -S 



iliiisMiSSSigsggssigsss 



iisiSi2iiss2sisis2Rigpii 



•-•-^Cl-* -• — 



§giiSigiiii=sisS£i5iiai=i 



■• e>« n *v «>« r« flo Ok o •■»«•« ^ «« (s, oe oTo*— 



N C>4^MC^I S 



IHIIIUIHHIIIIIIIIIII 



■j 



-1 



12S 



POLICE CO.ADIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



- i 



7 >s 



5 ^ 






•=» £ 



as C 



•3 



J^l 






1 

1 '^^OX 




s 




■CI parMJj 


' 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 r- 1 1 1 1 I 






tl ptnMJj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 t ts 1 1 1 I 1 


, 




j £1 j3tn»jj 

1 


I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 






Zl paj33Jj 


Illlliiiliiliiillll7:^ii<vi 


. ; 




11 poiMJd 


lliilililllliiiilli*c— Ite^l 


, 1 
1 




i 

1 01 POTMJJ 


■ llllliilliilliltlis— iini 


i 
i 




•5 paiMjj 


C4' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii-Iiiiini3Cv«si i-«i 






•g pmoajj 


fjxi r loi 1 ir>3ciNk3-«i0ic-* = ro-«'vi 






-i pciMij 


— o( I 1*3 1 lwejOMM-*«'v^i'»r5 — -^Mne* 






•9 poijajj 


e^w*p 1 «e>^«sr-^oorae«<Qnr«'^ vnM-«e4eqr« 






•5 POTMOJ 


rtM «sc«apo»at^Ort est- — «««««•»»« -vr^Mrt 






■fVrtn^iJ 


•e35C»«««(M'Oo030oo.2"'On-*' — -^-^-a — -^^aM — 






•£ pm»jj 


ct X t»e*rt<ciO'»"*'«o»o«rt«ee>io?; — •^^•■^ 1 « ■^ 


i 




'S pi!»J<I 


«^ — ff«^«D«f*c2««P2«eM«^ — «« — «« — « — 






1 pm»ij 


— -^ 1 XMrtxXM — -scrto — rt — r-««s — rt — e^M 






3 




• 1 

i 
























"H "H "H c c "H "H "H "H "H "E "2 c "H "H "H "E "H "c "E c "H T "H "H 

_e .0 .c .« .« .* .e .e .e .a .e .a ."S .« .= ,s .e .<= .= .= .« .^s e a a 





1911.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



129 



fc. 



•a 



as 






•2 . 
■§S5 

fiS -s-s 



■H^l 



■ei^joau^ 



fHxpuj 



■n»*=»y 



HVnpuj 



n*»»M 



Oltsopuj 



■•v««»wj 



1^ 









o 

to 



^r — "VMC* — <-• — pace- 






IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIII 



I'iiiilliilifliiilipiiii 



ii'iilililiiiiliiiiraiiiii 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I r«.3o 119 1 



Al I I 1 I I I I030I I I I (ainr«oi-«oi 
«-■ oo-^ « —■on e«eo 



-gfaopuj 



*X>»pwj 



■9%3mu^ 



•$93»ajj 



y^jBoAX^ 



■CP»"J 



•Ztaopajj 



-f vopaij 






5:« I I . r^ i , 2?:?S5=S53S • SSSSSSS 



« 2 S i3 S S2 2 S « 2 S 2 S 2 2»~ •= ?2 S a»«^ ►- e*«^ « 









S=Sg«2gg'?;Sg=*5S2SSSSg'-::S2 






ssssg-s^r-ssz^ss-asssRsss 



m V •a e to w a o ~ e« m V^^i 



— — — — — — — — — — ^e,cMe, 



*^ 



^■£»-e»»» 



INDEX 



i 



I 

'i. 
I 

I 



I 



INDEX. 



A. 

PACE 

Accidcnta 75, 125, 126 

persons killed or injured in streets, parks and squares . 125, 120 

number of, reported ........ 75 

Ambulance service ......... 82 

Arrests 25-39, 71, 75, lO.S, 104-118 

age and sex of ......... 119 

coraparatire statement of ...... . 120 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. .... 109, 1 10 

for drunkenness 25-39,73,113 

foreigners 72. 104-118 

insane persons 73,76,104-118 

minors ........... 72 

nativity of ......... . 72 

nonresidents 72, 104-118 

number of, by divisions . . . . ' . . . 103 

number of, punished by fine ....... 73 

summoned by court . . • . . . . .72, 104-118 

total number of ........ . 71 

violation of city ordinances ....... 72,112 

on warrants 72, 104-1 18 

without warranta 72,104-118 

Auctioneers ........... 121 

AutomobOes 8, 81, 125, 126 

accidents due to ........ . 9 

laws ........... 9 

police 81,82 

public ........... 84 

prosecutions .......... 8 

B. 

Benefits and pensions ......... 90 

Bcrtillon s}-5tem .......... 74 

Bridges, defective ......... 75 

Buildings ........... 75 

dangerous, reported ........ 75 

found open and made secure ....... 75 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ....... 74 

c. 

Carriages, public .......... 84 121 

articles left in ......._ _ g4 

automobile ••-...... 84 

number licensed ••....... 84 121 



\ 



134 INDEX. 



FACE 

Cases investigated ........ To, 78. 81 '■ 

Ceafpools. defective, reported ....... 75 f 

Children ........... 11. 75 ,- 

abandoned, cared for ........ 75 • 

lost restored .......... 76 ' 

juvenile offenders ......... H 

Chimneys, dangerous, reported ....... 75 

City ordinances, arrest* for violation of ...... 72,112 _ 

Claims, inspector of ........ . 77 

Coal holes, defective ......... 75 

Collective musicians ......... 87, 121 • 

Commitments .......... 73, 79 

Complainta 87, 100 ' 

against police officers ........ 100, 101 i 

against miscellaneous licenses ....... 87, 121 

Courts 7.3, 120 

fines imposed by ........ . 73 

number of days' attendance at, by officers . . 73, 75, 78 

number of persons summoned by ..... . 72 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of . . .... 74 

arrests .......... 75 

finger-print system ........ 74 

photographs .......... 74 

records ........... 74 

rogijes' eallery ......... 74 

Criminal woik 5, 120 

comparative statement of ...... . 120 



D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 89 

Dead bodies, cared for ......... 73 

Dead bodies, recovered ......... 75, 81 

Deaths 78 

by accident, suicide, etc. ....... 78 

of police officers ......... 70 .1 

Department, police ......... 71 ! 

Department expenses ......... 12 | 

Detectives, private 121 I 

Distribution of force ......... 71, 92 j 

Disturbances suppressed .... .... 76, 81 

Dogs 78, 121, 122 i 

amount received for licenses for ...... 121,123 ; 

damage done by ........ . 78 

number licensed 121, 122, 123 

Drains and vaults, defective reported ...... 75 Ij 

Drivers, hack or cab ... ...... 84, 121 

Drowning, persons rescued from ....... 76, 81 

Drunkenness 25, 39, 73, 79, 81 ' 

arrests for, per day ........ 73 , 

increase in number of arrests for ...... 73 } 

nonresidents :?rrcstcd for ....... 34,73 J 

total number of arrests for ....... 72,113 J 



INDEX. 135 

E. 

PAOB 

Employees of the Department ....... 70 

Events, special .......... 77 

Expenditures 90,123,124 | 

Extra datics performed by ofiBcers . ■ 75, 76 ' 



F. 

Fences, defective, reported ........ 76 

Financial ........*•• 90 

department expenses ........ 13 

expenditure .......... 90, 123 

house of detention ......... 90, 123 

pensions .......... 90, 123 

gignftl ser\'ice ......... 91, 123 

receipts 91,121,123 

miscellaneous license fees ...... 91, 121, 123 

Fines 73, 120 

average amount of ........ 73 

amount of ......... 73 

number punished by ........ 73 

Finger-print system ......... 74 

Fire alarms ........... 75, 81 

defective, reported ......... 75 

number given ......... 76 

number on water front attended . . . . . . 81 

Fires 76,81 

extinguished 76, 81 

on water front extinguished without alarm .... 81 

Foreigners, number arrested . . . ' . . . . 72, 104-118 

Fugitives from justice ......... 75 



Gaming, illegal 113, 114 

Gas pipes, defective, reported ....... 75 



H. 

Hack or cab drivers ......... 84,121 

Hackney carriages ......... 84, 121 

Hand carts ........... 121 

Harbor service, special duties performed ...... 80 

"Ferret" in commission ........ 81 

Horses 81, 102 

bought, sold, etc. ......... 81 

distribution of ........ . 102 

number in service ... ..... 81, 102 

House of detention ......... 79 

Houses of ill-fame, etc. ......... 15-25 

Hydrants, defective, reported ....... 75 



136 



INDEX. 



I. 

PACE 

Impiiioaracnt. number of yoara of . . . . . . "5, 120 

Income 91.121,123 

laqursta held .......... '8 

Ins&oe persons taken in charge ....... '3, *6 

Inspector of claims ......... " 

rases investigated ......... «7 

Intoxicated persons assisted ........ "6 

Itiaeraut musicians ......... 87, 121 

J. 

Junk collectors .......... 121 

Junk shop keepers ......... 121 

Jury work by police " 

Juvenile offenders ......... 11 



L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 

I.aw and the police 

Law and rx'I'c>- in use of special policemen 

Licenses, miscellaneous 

Listin; male residents 

certificates refused 

expenses of 

number of male residents listed 

supplementary list of male residents 

iromen voters vei ified 

number of policemen employed in 
Loans, small 

I>od^ens at station bouses 
Lodging hou-«es, public . 

applications for licenses 

authority to license 

location of 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 

M 

Medical examiners' assistants 

isquests attended . 

causes of death 

ca^cs on which inquests were held 
Minors, nuDil>er arrested 
^fisc«ilaneouB business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

complaints investigated . 

number issued 

number transferred 

Dumber cancelled and revoked 

amount of fees collected for 
Missing pcriwins .... 

numljer refM^rted 

numlx-r found 



S5 





4b 




20 




-•» 


86. 


121 


127, 


12S 




S3 


So. 


123 


85. 


127 


85. 


128 


85. 


129 




86 


90, 


121 




73 




SS 




S3 




SS 


8S 


,89 


8£ 


,S9 


76, 


131 




78 




78 




78 




78 


104-118 


75 


."6 


S6. 


121 


87, 


121 


SC, 


121 


86. 


121 


i!6. 


121 


87, 


121 




76 




76 




76 



INDEX. 137 

PAOB 

Musicians, itinerant ......... 87, 121 

applications for Ucenses ........ 87 

instruments examined ........ 87 

instruments condemned ........ 87 

instruments passed ........ 87 

Klusicians, coUectire ......... S7, 121 

Xatirity of persona arrested ........ 72 

Nonresidents, number arrested 34.72.104-118 

o. 

Offences, tables of . . . 104-118 

against the person ........ 71. 104, 105 

against property, with violence ..... 71, 105, 106 

against property, without violence ...... 71, 106 

against property , malicious ....... 71, 107 

comparative statement of ...... . 120 

forgery and against currency . . . . . .71, 107 

against license laws ........ 71, 108 

against chastity, morality, etc. .... 14.71,109,110 

juvenile .......... 11 

miscellaneous ........ 71. 111-117 

recapitulation ......... 118 

P. 

Parks, public 125, 120 

accidents reported in ....... . 125. 126 

Pawnbrokers .......... 121 

Pensions and benefits ......... 90 

estimates for pensions ........ 90 

number of persons on rolls ....... 00 

payments on account of ....... . 90 

Police 86 

railroad .......... 86 

special ........... M 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries .... 90 

Police department ......... 70 

how constituted ......... 70 

distribution of ........ . 7i, 92 

officers appointed ......... 71 

date api>ointed ........ 97 

complaints against ........ 100, 101 

died 71.94 

discharged ......... 98 

injured .......... 71 

promoted 71, 96 

resigned 71. 98 

retired 71,95 

absent sick ......... 99 ii ! 

arrests by ........ . 71 

detailed, special ei'ents .... 77 ■/? 



13S INDEX. •! 

■1 

4' 

rAcK i 

Police depaztmeat, wurk of ....... . 71 • 

horses in me in ........ . SI, 102 

vehicles in u»e in. ........ i3 ^ 

Police Relief .Association. inv«»<«l fowl 'A .... . 'M 

Police signal sen-ice 70,79,91,93.123,134 '| 

cost of maintenance ....... 91,123.124 1 

payments .......... 124 

signal boxes .......... 79 

mifcellaneoos work ........ 79 

property o( ......... . 60 j 

Private u^e of public streets ........ 

Pri\-ate deteirtives 121 

Property 73.76,121.123 ' 

lost, abandoned and stolen ...... 75. 76, 121 

recovezvd 73, 75, 80, 120 

sale of condemned 91,121,123 

stolen in city 73, 120 

taken frwn prisoners and Ifxiif-n ...... 73 

Public carriai^es .......... M 

Public lod«ia«-bousc8 .... ..... 88, 121 ;j 

Railroad police ,.,,...... 86 

Receipts 91, 123 

Registxatioo (sec Listing) ........ 8.5 

Rogues' faOery .......... 74, 75 

s. 

Second-hand artielcs ......... 121 

Scwera, defective, rcijorted ,,,..... 76 

.Sick and injored pcruoas assistitd ...... 73, 76, 81 

Sickne^. absence on account <of ...... . 99 

Signal servioe. pc4ice 70,79,91.93,123.124 

SmaU loan licenses 90, 121 

Special events ..,.....-. 77 : 

Special pfiitx .......... 86 j 

Station inasa .......... 72 i 

lodeers at ......... • 73 <■. 

witnreasea detained at ....... - 73 

Stolen property, value of ...... . 73, 75, 120 

Street raiiwaya, conductors airl tfi/Aiinafra licensed .... 121 

Streets 76,125.12* 

accidenif reported in . ...... 125, 126 

defective, repmited ........ 76 

private ose of ......... 9 

(1 
M 

T. 

Teams ...,,...-.. '6 

stray, pat np ......... 76 

Trees, defective .......... 76 * 



INDEX. 139 

V. 

PAOC 

Vehicles 81-83 

ambulances .......... 82 

automobiles .......... 81 

in use in police department ....... 83 

public carriages ......... 84 

wagons 84, 121, 122 

Vessels 80 J 

) 

w. j 

Wagons 84, 121, 122 j 

number licensed by divisiona ....... 122 ^ 

total number licensed 84, 121, 122 

Water pipes, defective, reported 76 

Water running to waste reported ....... 76 

Weapons, dangerous ......... 89 

Wires and poles, defective, reported ...... 76 j 

Witnesses 73,76,78 

number of daj-s' attendance at court by officers as . . .73, 120 1 

fees earned by officers as ....... 73, 120 t, 

number of, detained at station houses ..... 73, 76 .j 

Women committed to House of Detention ..... 79 ; 

Women voters verified ......... 85, 129 



I 



■i 



1 



'>,. 









BOSTON PUBLIC UBRABY 



■111 
3 gSoesiS 944 6