(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

N0XS09 



BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Public Document 



No. 49 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Year ending ;N'ov. 30, 1911. 




V 

BOSTON: 

\VTIIGHT & POTTEB PRINTING CO., STATE PBINTEBS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1912. 




JT- fc *- 



Apfsoved by 
Thi State Board or Pubucation. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Repobt: — 

First — The Boston police free from politics 6 

Second — The Boston police and asMults on citixens 7 

Third — The Boston police and "oomiption," 9 

Fourth — The Boston police and th«"Boolal evil," .... 10 

Fifth — The Boston police and the liquor laws 11 

Sixth — The Boston police and gsmbling 12 

Serenth — Law the only police guide 12 

Offences against the laws. ,13 

Nonresident ofTendera, 14 

Police work on jury U*ta, 15 

Automobile laws 15 

Charges against policemen, • . .16 

Police trial boards 17 

Persons who have served as police commissioners, .... 18 

Street traffic and traffic roles 21 

The Depabtuent: — 

The police force 26 

Signal service 26 

Employees of the department 26 

Recapitulation, 26 

Distribution and changes, 27 

Police officers injured wh0e on duty 27 

Work of the department, 27 

Azresta 27 

Drunkenness 29 

Bureau of criminal investigation, 30 

Officers detailed to assist medi<al examiners, 31 

Miscellaneous business, 32 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, 32 

Special events, 33 

Inspector of claims 33 

House of detention 34 

Police signal service 34 

Signal boxes 34 

Miscellaneous work, 35 

Harbor service, 35 

Horses, 36 

Vehicle service, 37 

Automobiles 37 

Ambulances 38 

List of vehicles used by the department 39 

Public carriages 39 

Wagon licenses, . .40 



CONTEXTS. 



PAGE 

Listing male residents of Boston, etc., . . ... . .41 

Women voters vcri6ed, ........ 41 

Listing expenses, 41 

Number of policemen employed in listing, ..... 42 

Special police 42 

Raaroad police, 42 

Miscellaneous licenses, ......... 42 

Musicians' licenses, .......... 43 

Itinerant 43 

Collective 43 

PMblic lodging houses, ......... 44 

Carrj-ing dangerous weapons, ........ 45 

Small loan licenses, .......... 46 

Pensions and benefits, ......... 46 

Financial, ........... 46 

Distribution of police force, ........ 48 

List of officers who died during the year 50 

List of officers retired during the year, ...... 51 

List of officers promoted during the year 52 

Number of men in active serrice, ....... 53 

Officers discharged and resigned during the year 54 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness, . . .55 

Complaints against officers daring the year, ...... 56 

Number and distribution of horses, ....... 58 

Arrests bj- di\-isions during the year, ....... 59 

.\rrests and offences for year, . . . . . . _ . .60 

Age and sex of persons arrested, ........ 76 

Comparative statement of crime as to population, .... 77 

Licenses of all classes issued, ........ 78 

Dog licenses issued, .......... 79 

Wagon licenses issued, ......... 79 

Financial statement, .......... 80 

Payments on account of signal ser%-ice, ...... SI 

.\ccident9, ........... 82 

Male residents listed by wards and precincts, ..... S4 

Male residents, supplementary list, ....... 85 

Women voters listed, ......... 86 



Sl)e CotnmontDcaltl) of inassocl)usctt0. 



REPORT, 



Headqcabteu or the Poucb Department, 

Office or the Poucs CoutunoNEs, 29 Feubebtox Sccabe, 

Bonox, Dec. 30, 1911. 

"To His Excellency Eugene N. Foss, Governor. 

YocR Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a report of the 
work of the police department for the year ended Nov. 30, 1911. 

Ha^^ng completed a term of five years as Police Commis- 
sioner and entered upon a second term I may describe with 
knowledge some conditions of police work and organization in 
Boston which are peculiar, beneficial and creditable to the city. 
The people of Boston are daily readers of news which affects j: 

unfavorably in turn the police departments of other American J 

cities, large and small; and it therefore seems to me to be well 
worth while that they should receive such information as 
shall save them, in so far as the facts justify, from judging their 
own police ser\'ice by what they read of the service which is 
given to other communities. ^i 



First — The Boston Pouce Free from Politics. 
The Boston Police Department is wholly free from politics — 
the root of all evil in the policing of American cities and towns. 
A police department without politics may yet be inefficient, 
but a police department controlled or even influenced by politics 
is sure to be inefficient and worse, to just such a degree as it is 
affected by the political taint. In the five and a half years for 
which I can answer, no appointment, promotion or transfer of 
a police officer, no expenditure of a dollar, no grant or refusal 



6 POLICE CO.ADIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

of a single one of the tens of thousands of licenses and permits 
which the Police Commissioner controls has been influenced 
by any poEtical i)ersonage or political consideration. The 
public acceprancc of this as the actual condition is shown by 
the fact that in all the critidsm to which a police department 
and its cocDmissioncr are sure to be subjected, not one person 
and not one newspaper has even alleged in five and a half years 
that the dej«artmcnt as a whole or any members of it were 
concerned in any way with politics, except as voting citizens. 
Technically, the commissioner himself might have been regarded 
in his firt.! term as n i)olitical appointee, but even that suspicion 
is lost in his reappointment by a Governor not of his own party. 
It may be added, moreover, as emphasizing the peculiarity 
of this situation, that by law and for lawful purposes the Boston 
Police Deparancnt is brought into closer relation with voters 
and elections than is any other police department in the world. 
It is to the police that the statutes have entrusted the annual 
house-to-liotcte canvass of men and women whose names con- 
stitute the hisis of the lists of voters prepared by the election 
commissioDecs. It is to the police that supplementary inquiries 
as to new CMxlidates for r^istration as voters are assigned. 
It is to the pcJice that all the ballots for use in the city on elec- 
tion days aw entrustctl for prompt and safe deliverj- at the 206 
voting place?. It is a policeman who hands the key of the 
ballot box to the warden, witnesses and certifies the number 
registered, and is the custodian of the key throughout the 
day. A po5«man watches the proceedings of election officers 
from the opening of the polls until the final returns are handed 
to him for «3elivcry to the election commissioners. He must 
be informal as to all the conditions under which voting should 
proceed and the ballots be handled and counted, for it is his 
duty to act instantly should any condition l>e nolated. He 
has printed instnictions from his own superiors and from the 
Board of EWtion Commissioners. He holds in hb hand a list 
of voters in the precinct whose confinement in hospitals or 
penal institutions makes it impossible that their names should 
legally be voted upon. He holds also a printed descriptive list 
of all voters in the precinct, and uses it constantly as a means 
of checking attempts at fraud. And when the polls are closed 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 7 

and the count is begun, it is a policeman who must watch every 
movement of the election officers, with a full knowledge of the 
tilings which they should or should not do; see to it that a 
dozen details are obsened in sealing and otherwise preparing 
the returns, and then take them for personal delivery to the 
election commissioners. 

I may add that as Police Commissioner I have found it easy 
to keep the department out of politics. The members of the 
force want none of it, and when once convinced that no political 
influence can help or hurt them they gladly base their hope of 
promotion wholly upon the proper performance of their duties. 
The "politicians," so called, whatever their party, have given 
no trouble.'^ department head who is himself independent of 
political control creates his own atmosphere and is not im- 
portuned for improper favors which wise politicians soon learn 
are not to be had. As the Governor of the Commonwealth is 
the only public official, other than the courts, to which the 
Police Commissioner of Boston is responsible, it is proper for 
me to say that in five and a half years of ser\-ice under three 
Governors representing the two leading political parties, I 
have never received from one of them a request or an intimation 
designed to influence my official action through favor towards 
them or their friends, on any subject whatever. On the con- 
trarj', they have uniformly assured me of their desire that I 
should maintain the independence of judgment and conduct 
which was the basic condition of my acceptance of office. 

Secoxd — The Bostox Pouce .oid Assaults on Citizens. 

Violent and abusive treatment of citizens is a common and 
probably much exaggerated cause of complaint against the 
police throughout the country. Let us see what information 
can be given as affecting Boston. 

In the past five and a half years about 300,000 arrests have 
been made in Boston, not counting cases in which juveniles or 
adults were merely summoned to court. These arrests were 
made by about 1,500 policemen on duty at all hours of the day 
and night, armed with clubs and loaded revolvers. Of the 
men arrested more than half were drunk, and in thousands of 
cases \iolent and abusive; and a large percentage of all persons 
arrested were dangerous criminals. 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

As a consequence of these arrests and of the relations of the 
police with the whole population two poGoemen have been con- 
victed of unjustifiable assaults and have been discharged from 
the department; and two others have been discharged for 
offences believed to have been the outgrowth of an assault 
upon a prisoner. In none of these cases vas a club, revolver or 
other weapon used, and in all instances the acts of the police- 
men resulted from outbursts of temper provoked bj- abusive 
language. It may be said, that this remaiiable record is due 
to leniency on the part of the department towarxls such offenders, 
that a citizen who is assaulted by a poTkanan cannot secure 
Justice from the police authorities. On the contrarj-, no other 
offence is pursued more rigorously or punished more severely. 
But to this suggestion there is a perfect answer in addition to 
the denial. A citizen who is assaulted bj- a policeman has a 
right to go to the courts for redress, either ■trjth a criminal com- 
plaint for assault or with a civil suit for damages. But in five 
and a half years no Boston policeman has been convicted in 
any criminal court of assault or any other form of Anolence com- 
mitted upon a citizen; and no Boston pcEoeman has paid a 
dollar in civil damages by order of a court for any act committed 
by him within those five and a half years. There have been a 
few instances, perhaps four or five, in Trtoch policemen have 
paid small sums out of court in settlement of eases invohing 
technical assault or unlawful arrest, but not actual bodily in- 
juTA- to the plaintiffs. 

Five men while engaged in violations <A law and in conflict 
with policemen have received injuries whiti resulted in death, 
but in all such cases the courts, after full investigation, have 
declared the policemen to be blameless. 

What is the other side of the caseT In fire and a half years 
two policemen have been shot dead by oiBiinals and a dozen 
have been crippled for life by shooting or other \-iolence. In 
the same period 305 persons, not counting those who escaped, 
have been arrested for assaulting policemen; and US policemen 
while arresting criminals and Go other pdBcemen while pur- 
suing criminals have been injured to such an extent as to cause 
them to lose 3,696 days from duty. Xo aooount b made of the 
innumerable cases in which the injuries <fid not necessitate 
absence from duty. 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 9 

Such is the record of five and a half years as between the in- 
dividual citizen and the individual policeman, with the police- 
man possessing the legal as well as the moral right, often of 
necessity exercised, to use all needed force in effecting an arrest 
and overcoming resbtance. As to the presers-ation of order in 
its broader aspect, this may be said to the credit of the people 
and of the police: in the fifty-seven j-ears of its existence the 
Boston Police Department has kept order in the city without 
once calling for military aid. In the draft riot of 1S63 soldiers 
were employed imder orders of their own officers to prevent 
resistance to laws which were themselves of a military character; 
and at the time of the great fire of 1S72 the militia were called 
out as a precautionary guard for the extensive burnt district. 
With these exceptions, if they can be called exceptions, no 
soldier has done police duty in Boston in fifty-seven years, a 
record which I feel sure cannot be matched by any city of its 
size in the world. 

Thhu) — The Boston Pouce and "Corruption." 
In five and a half years one Boston policeman has been con- 
victed of bribery. He accepted $2 in a crowded street, in open 
day and in the presence of three witnesses who were strangers 
to him, on his promise that he would refrain from prosecuting 
one of the witnesses for a violation of the street traffic rules. 
The case was reported at once at headquarters, the policeman 
was questioned and suspended and charges were preferred 
against him. He offered his resignation, which was refused, 
and on failure to appear for trial he was discharged and the 
case was reported to the district attorney. Judging from his 
conduct at the time and since I am of the opinion that the 
man, who had ser\'ed two years, was mentally unbalanced. In 
another instance a policeman who was discovered by his superiors 
to have given information of an intended search of a house 
was discharged from the department. The e\'idence against 
him disclosed no briber}', but indicated rather that he had 
acted through friendliness. In a third instance the names of 
certain police officers with figures against them representing 
money were found in a diary in a house raided with a search 
warrant. The matter was investigated with the greatest 



10 POLICE COMMLSSIOXER. [Jan. 

thoroughness and no reason could be discovered for doubting 
the honesty of the officers named, who had done and are still 
doing the best possible work for the suppression of \'ice in their 
di\-ision. I do not doubt that there are persons in Boston who 
pay money to third parties on the suppoation that it goes to 
the police, but that it does go to them or to any of them has not 
been shown by a particle of credible testimony. A cordial wel- 
come at police headquarters has always awaited any person who 
could give such testimony, and the whole force knows that 
any member con^•icted of corrupt practices will be not only dis- 
charged but presented for criminal prosecution. Such is the 
discovered extent of "corruption" in the Boston Police Depart- 
ment in five and a half years; and though no man can say that 
no policeman is corrupt, it is fair to assume that the fire under- 
hing so small a quantity of smoke must itself be small. 

Fourth — The Bostox Pouce and the "Socl\.l Evil." 

For four successive years, contrary to all precedent in the 
department, I have given in my annual reports elaborate sta- 
tistics, with liberal comment thereon, concerning crimes against 
chastity and morality. I find that this matter covered in the 
aggregate 50 printed pages. As I supposed that mj- report for 
1910 would be my last, no feature of the proWem that seemed 
worthy of public consideration was neglected; and for that 
reason and because there is nothing new to be said I return to 
the former practice of the department, which is to include 
the statistics of these offences against the laws with the statis- 
tics of all other offences. For the purpose of this summary I 
may repeat briefly what I have before given in detail, that: — 

1. The Boston police make no compromise with the "social 
e\-il." 

2. That rejecting the method followed in practically all large 
dties, including the capital of the United States, they refuse to 
designate certain districts in which the laws against sexual 
\-ice may be broken with impunity. 

3. That their prosecutions, carried on by lawful and decent 
methods, are aimed against persons who \-ioIate the laws of 
chastity and rnorahty because they are law breakers and the 
police are sworn to enforce all laws to the best of their ability. 



1912.1 PUBLIC DOCIBIEXT — Xo. 49. 11 

4. That the Boston police have not exterminated sexual \'ice, 
even of the commercial kind, an accomplishment which no 
police and no people have ever yet achieved; but their work 
m that direction in the past five years has been greater than 
any that the city ever before knew, and will be continued by 
all means at their command and in the face of all forms of 
public hostility and indiife 



Fifth — The Boston* Pouce axd the Liquor Laws. 

The laws concerning the sale of intoxicating liquors are en- 
forced by the Boston police and are lived up to by licensees in 
a manner which I feel sure is unequalled in any other large 
city in the United States. The laws themselves are strict, 
elaborate and complicated, and the further conditions imposed 
by the licensing authorities are numerous. Licensed places 
are closed within the hours and on Sundays and other days 
prescribed by the laws. The "back door" of the saloon, which 
in other large cities is recognized and tolerated by the authorities 
in \-iolation of their own laws, is not known in Boston, and the 
saloon itself is exposed to inspection by the public and the 
police at all hours of all days. Molations of law by licensees 
are' confined almost exclusively to sales made to minors and to 
intoxicated persons, and to sales made on Sundays and pro- 
hibited holidays by hoteb operating under the law which per- 
mits the serving of liquors to persons resorting to such hotels 
for food or lodging. The minor b not easily identified, especially 
when he lies as to his age; the degree of inebriation which 
brings a person under the law as to intoxication has not been 
and cannot be defined by the bw itself; and the pro%dsion con- 
cerning Sunday and holiday sales by hotels is susceptible of 
many evasions. I believe it to be safe to say that wherever the 
law is so specific as to afford a reasonable basis for enforcement, 
it is enforced; and that the line of incomplete enforcement runs 
through those provisions of the law which are themselves un- 
certain and cannot be made dear and effective at all times. 

The sale of intoxicating liquors by unlicensed persons has 
long been carried on only in ways so cautious and places so 
obscure that in order to obtain entrance and e\ndence the 



12 POLICE CO:MiMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

police are compelled to resort to strategem and disguises. Un- 
der those conditions the prosecutions number from 150 to 200 
annually. 

Sixth — The Bostox Police .iXD GAiiBixNc. 
No professional gambling house exists in Boston and none 
has existed for a dozen years. This is a remarkable situation, 
for the presence of many such houses in other cities and the 
futile efforts of the authorities to suppress them are notorious. 
Fifteen years ago Boston, with a much smaller population, con- 
tained perhaps a score of houses fitted, furnished and carried 
on by professional gamblers for gambling on a large scale. All 
have long since been forced oat of business by police prosecu- 
tions, and they have no successors. The gambling of to-day 
in Boston is carried on spasmodically and on a pettj- scale in 
laundries, lofts, barns, kitchens, tailor shops and like places, 
and in open lots, by men and boys who go into it as an occasional 
amusement, not as a means of living. A few men are concerned 
in it who try to live without work by this or any other method. 
They hire a room in one part of the citj- or another from time 
to time, but soon the police appear, strip the room of its poor 
fittings, seize a few chips and plajing cards, arrest all present 
and that is the end of that particular place. Gambling of the 
character which alone b found and prosecuted in Boston re- 
ceives practically no police attention in other large cities. 

Seventh — Law the Only Pouce Gctde. 
Obedience to law, with the use of none but lawful methods, 
is the rule of action in the Boston Police Department. To such 
obedience policemen are required to hold themselves as well as 
to hold others. They are not allowed to follow unlawful methods 
for the sake even of an apparent advantage to the community, 
ioT the community will suffer in the long run far more than it 
can possibly gain through disregard for law by its police. In 
the siunmary which I have given under the seven preceding 
headings I have not touched the broad, general work of the 
Boston Police Department; I have attempted merely to give 
some useful information concerning certain subjects which are 
always discussed when police work in the L'nited States is un- 
der consideration. 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 49. 



13 



Offenxes against the Laws. 
Statistics concerning offences against the laws, which are 
given in full detail in another part of this report, are here 
summarized. The total number of arrests in 1911 was 70,442, 
as against 71,201 in 1910. The eight general divisions under 
which offences are classed show the following numbers for 
four vears: — 



Offesces. 


ArresU 
ID 1903. 


(^. 


ArresU 
ID 1910. 


Arrests 
io 1911. 


Offences against the person, . 

Offences against property with violence. 

Offences against property without vio- 
lence. 
Malicious offences against property, 

Forgery and offences against the cur- 
rency. 
Offences against the license laws, . 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc., 

Offences not included in the foregoing, 
including drunkenness. 


3,591 

692 

4,043 

185 

76 

82S 

1,141 

57,585 


3,156 

525 

3,783 

176 

71 

769 

1,409 

61,623 


3,326 

479 

3,584 

137 

69 

532 

1,308 

61,766 


3,213 

535 

3,701 

169 

60 

554 

1,294 

60,916 


Totab, 


68,146 71,512 


71,201 


70,442 



A summary of fines and imprisonments is shown as follows: — 





i««. 1 »«. 


MIO. 


1911. 


Persons fined, .... 


15,735 


17,407 


14,949 


13,772 


Total amount of fines. 


$159,982 


8161,399 


§138,140 


S129,432 


Persons sentenced to imprison- 


8,883 


9,478 


9,533 


8,627 


Total years of imprisonment, . 


3,904 


4,130 


3,841 


3,639 



14 



POLICE COiDIISSIOXEPL 



[Jan. 



XOXRESIDEXT OFFENDERS. 

The proportion of nonresident offenders among the persons 
arrested shows a slight decrease for the first time in many 
years — but only one-hundredth of one per cenL When the 
first police commission was established in 1S7S, the percentage 
was 19.90; in 1910 it was 39.65, and in 1911 it was 39.64. The 
statistics for the past ten years, covering arrests for all causes, 
are as follows: — 





Total 


x<«- 


^^Sc'i"' 




J Arresu. 


rese«iu. 


1 "^^"- 


1902, .... 


. . .1 34,732 


10,631 


30.61 


1903, .... 


. . -i 43,033 


14,644 


29.38 


1904, .... 


. . .: 50,265 


1S,030 


35.86 


1905, .... 


. . -1 48,358 


17,167 


35.50 


1906, .... 


. . .1 49,906 


IS.OOI 


36.06 


1907, .... 


. . .1 57,078 


20,9<S2 


36.77 


1908, .... 


. . -i 68,146 


•26.113 


38.32 


1909, .... 


. . .1 71,512 


27,953 


39.08 


1910, .... 


. . .; 71,201 


^,233 


39.65 


1911, .... 


. . . 1 70,442 


27.613 


39.64 



In the arrests for drunkenoes the percentage of nonresidents 
increased steadily for many years, but in 1911 there was a de- 
crease from 1910 of seventj'rax hundredths of one per cent. 
The following table gives the statistics for eleven years. 



1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 



19,4SS 


29.90 


19,167 


39.35 


27,757 


42.53 


33,511 


43.36 


32,28S 


43.14 


32,3SO 


44.57 


37,3S9 


45.63 


42,468 


47.73 


45,321 


47.62 


47,732 


47.86 


46.394 


47.10 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



15 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
For the fourth year the police department, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 34S, Acts of 1907, has assisted the election 
commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons pro- 
posed for jury service. The police findings in these three years 
ma\ be summarized as follows: — 





1905. 


1909. 


1910. 


19U. 


Totals. 


Dead or could not be found in 

Boston. 
Phj-sically incapacitated, . . 


7S0 
492 


SOS 
223 


1,055 
332 


1,356 
499 


3,999 
1,546 


Con\-icted of crime, 


156 


58 


1S3 


587 


9S4 


Unfit for various reasons, . 


119 


266 


707 


466 


1,558 


Apparently fit, . . . . 


6,352 


6,870 


7,565 


9,57S 


30,365 


Total of names submitted to 
police. 


7,899 


8,225 


9,812 


12,486 


38,452 



Automobile Laws. 

The automobile prosecutions in 1911 numbered 1,S99, as 
against 2,334 in 1910. The reduction in the number is due 
largely to the repeal of the pro\-ision of law which required 
professional chauffeurs to wear badges when driving, and to 
the precise character of the evidence which must be presented 
in a prosecution for overspeeding. These figures include 
prosecutions in parks as well as in streets, for \nolation of the 
State law or the park rules, but they do not include prosecutions 
of drivers of automobiles for violations of the street traffic 
regulations. To this circimistance may be ascribed any ap- 
parent variance with the figures given in the tables of arrests 
in detail. 

The first record of an automobile prosecution by the Boston 
police was made only ten years ago, when the single offence 
of the year 1901 was the dri\'ing of a motor car in a public 
park without a permit. In 1902 there were 33 prosecutions; 
in 1903, 67; in 1904, 179; m 1905, 102; in 1906, 308; in 1907, 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Ja 



961; in 190S, 1,S65; in 1909, 2,196; in 1910, 2,334; in 1911, 
1,S99. 

Accidents to persons, due to the operation of automobiks, 
are first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Begummg 
at that year their number to the present time is shown in tic 
following table: — 



YiHR. 


Killed. 


Inja«.i. 


1900, . 




- 


19 


1901, . 




- 


S 


1902. . 




2 

1 


17 


1903, 


24 


1901, . 




55 


1905, . 




2 


7S 


1906, . 




1 


110 


1907, . 




7 


105 


190S, . 




6 


127 


1909, 




9 


251 


1910, 




13 


2S0 


1911, 




14 


351 



Of the 14 persons killed in 1911, 3 were riding in automobOs 
and 11 were struck by automobiles. Of the 351 persons injured 
in 1911, 52 were riding in automobiles and 299 were struck bjr 
automobiles. 

Charges agaixst Poucemex. 

Many c-itizens, especially those of high social or busines 
standing, seem to believe that any charge made by them to the 
Police Commissioner against a policeman should be accepted 
as proven, and that thereupon the commissioner, at his dis- 
cretion, should inflict punishment. They sometimes sbarr 
irritation when the commissioner declines to take a course whkA 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 17 

would be contrary to the simplest rules of fair play, would be 
in \'iolation of statute law and would be condemned and re- 
versed by any court ha\-ing jurisdiction. Every member of the 
Boston Police Force is subject to the civil service laws and is 
protected by them. Acts of 1904, chapter 314, provides that a 
policeman, in common with other public servants similarly em- 
ployed, "shall hold such office or employment and shall not • 
be removed therefrom, lowered in rank or compensation, or 
suspended, or, without his consent, transferred from such office 
or employment to any other except for just cause and for reasons 
specifically given in writing." The act provides further that 
"the person sought to be removed, suspended, lowered or 
transferred shall be notified of the proposed action and shall be 
furnished with a copy of the reasons required to be given by 
section one, and shall, if he so requests in writing, be given 
a public hearing, and be allowed to answer the charges pre- 
ferred against him either personally or by counsel." The rules 
of the department under which charges are heard are a careful 
amplification of this basic law. 

PoucE Trux Bo.vrds. 

A misunderstanding seems to exist as to the relations estab- 
lished by law between a trial board and the Police Commissioner. 
Section 10, chapter 291, Acts of 1906, pro\'ides that the Police 
Commissioner "shall from time to time appoint a trial board 
to be composed of three captains of police, to hear the evidence 
in such complaints against members of the force as the com- 
missioner may deem advisable to refer to said board. Said i 
trial board shall report its findings to said commissioner, who l| 
may review the same and take such action thereon as he may | 
deem advisable." 9 

Because of the foregoing provision many seem to suppose i| 

that when a trial board has heard a case and reported to the It 

commissioner he may do with it as he pleases. This b an error. 

^^'hen a trial board reports a finding of not guilty the com- 
missioner has no authority to change it and of course can im- 
pose no penalty. 

WTien a trial board reports a finding of gxiilty, the commis- 
sioner has the right to decide what the penalty shall be, to sus- 
pend sentence or to place the case on file. 



IS POLICE CO-ADIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Recommendations as to penalties or other disposition of 
cases of convicted persons are made by trial boards, not under 
the law, but at the request of the commissioner. He is there- 
fore free to accept or to modify them according to his judgment 
and information. 

Though the commissioner has no power to change the find- 
ing of a trial board as to guilt or innocence, he has the right, 
for specific and sufficient reasons, to set aside a finding and or- 
der a new hearing, which he may hold himself or may order to be 
held by the original trial board or by another. 



Persons who ilu-e Ser\tj) .\5 Pouce Coiemissioxers. 

Because of frequent inquiries from within and without the 
department I have had prepared a list of all Police Commis- 
sioners who have ser\-ed since 1S7S, with the dates on which 
they assumed and reUnquished office; also a schedule which 
gives the names of commissioners in office at any given time 
since that year. The police department was controlled prior 
to 1S7S by the major and aldermen. The commissioners who 
sen'ed from July, 1S7S, to Jidy, 1SS5, were nominated by the 
mayor and c-onfirmed by the board of aldermen and the common 
council by concurrent vote. The commissioners who ser\-ed 
from July, ISSo, to June, 1906, were nominated by the Governor 
and confirmed by the Executive Council. The act substituting 
a single commissioner for a board of three was passed in 1906 
and became effective in June of that year, the commissioner 
being nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

The following are the names of persons who served as Police 
Commissioners in the city of Boston from July S, 1S7S, to June 
4, 1906: — 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCIDIENT — No. 49. 



19 



Xame. 


Appointed. 


Retired. 


Henr>- S. RusseU, 


July 


8, 1S78 


Marcl 


1, 1880 


Samuel R. Spinnej', . 


July 


8, 1S7S 


May 


3, 1880 


James M. Bugbee, 


July 


8, 1878 


May 


5, 1879 


Henry Walker, . . . . 


^lay 


5, 1879 


April 


21, 1882 


Edward J. Jones, 


March 26, 18S0 


April 


21, 1882 


Thomas J. Gargan, . 


May 


3, 1880 


April 


21, 1882 


Thomas L. Jenks, 


AprU 


22, 1882 


July 


24, 1885 


Nathaniel Wales, 


April 


22, 1SS2 


July 


7, 1885 


Benjamin D. Burle)', . 


April 


22, 1882 


M&Y 


6, 1883 


Michael P. Curran, . . . 


May 


7, 1S83 


July 


24, 1885 


Albert T. Whiting, . . . 


July 


24, 1885 


May 


6, 1895 


WiUiam H.Lee, . . . . 


July 


24, 1885 


May 


28, 1894 


WiUiam M. Osborne, . 


July 


24, 1885 


April 


30, 1893 


Robert F. Clark 


May 


1, 1893 


May 


4, 1903 


Augustus P. Martin, . . . 


May 


28, 1894 


ilay 


1, 1899 


Charles P. Curtis, Jr., . . 


May 


6, 1895 


May 


1, 1905 


Harry F. Adams, 


May 


1, 1899 


June 


4, 1906 


William H. H. Emmons, . 


May 


4, 1903 


June 


4, 1906 


Charles H. Cole, Jr., . . . 


May 


1, 1905 


June 


4, 1906 


Stephen O'Meara, . . . 


June 


4, 1906 


- 


- - 



The following schedule shows the commissioners in office 
by periods, the name of the chainnan appearing first in each 
group: — 



July 8, 1878, to May 5, 1S79, .... RusselL 
May 5, 1879, to March 1, 1880, . . . 



tspmney. 
Bugbee. 



Walker. 



20 POLICE CO:\DIISSIONER. [Jan. 

March 1, ISSO, to March 26, ISSO, Spinney. 

Walker. 

March 26, ISSO, to ilay 3, ISSO, Walker. 

Spinnej-. 
Jones. 

May 3, ISSO, to April 21, 1SS2, Walker. 

Jones. 
Gargan. 

April 22, 1SS2, to May 6, 1SS3, Jenks. 

Wales. 
Burlcy. 

May 7, 1SS3, to July 7, ISSo, Jenks. 

Wales. 
Curran. 

July 7, ISSo, to July 24, ISSo, Jenks. 

Curran. 

July 24, 1SS5, to April 20, 1S93, Whiting. 

Lee. 
Osborne. 

May 1, 1S93, to May 28, 1894 AMiiting. 

Lee. 

Clark. 

May 28, 1S94, to May 6, 1895, Martin. 

Whiting. 
Clark. 

May 6, 1S95, to ilay 1, 1899 Martin. 

Clark. 
Curtis. 

May 1, 1899, to ilay 4, 1903, Clark. 

Curtis. 
Adams. 

May 4, 1903, to May 1,1905, Emmons. 

Curtis. 
Adams. 

May 1, 1905, to June 4, 1906 Cole. 

Adams. 



June 4, 1906, to date, O'Meara. 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 49. 



Street Traffic axd Traffic Rules. 

As street traffic is carried on before the whole public the 
enforcement or the failure to enforce the traffic rules is a sub- 
ject upon which almost all citizens feel competent to express 
themselves. Towards the end of the third year of the existence 
of the rules made by the street commissioners to be enforced 
by the police, it is worth while to examine the situation, following 
lines laid down in a typical criticism lately published. 

The writer affirms that the traffic rules are good but the 
drivers do not know them; that "waj-faring men learn the 
rules of the road by their enforcement, and these regulations 
are not enforced." 

The first prosecution under the street traffic rules was made 
by the Boston police Jan. 26, 1909. In the thirty-four months 
which have intervened, the prosecutions have numbered 4,297. 
These are distinct from some thousands of prosecutions in Bos- 
ton under the automobile laws of the State. 

For each street traffic prosecution a policeman must find an 
offence which he believes he can prove before a judge — not a 
mere technicality, but a substantial offence; he must take the 
name and address of the driver, often subject meanwhile, to 
the complaints of people who abuse him for " holding up traffic; " 
he must explain the case to a court, and a summons for the 
driver, if granted, names a day in advance on which the charge 
will be heard; he must serve the summons upon the defendant, 
whether a resident of Boston or not; and he must attend at 
court on the day appointed and again for any continuances 
which may be ordered. In the light of the fact that there have 
been more than 4,000 prosecutions under these conditions it is 
fair to ask whether or not this particular kind of police duty, 
among the thousand other kinds, has been neglected. It may 
be said, moreover, that for every prosecution, probably twenty 
warnings and explanations have been given to drivers by the 
police. 

The critic errs when he assumes that drivers do not know the 
rules. When adopted by the street commissioners, nearly 
three years ago, the rules were advertised in the newspapers at 
at cost of about S3,000; a first edition of 40,000 copies in a 



22 POLICE C0.M:>IISSI0NER. [Jan. 

convenient form was printed and distributed, and subsequent 
issues have carried the total well up towards 100,000; for three 
weeks before the first prosecution was made the policemen on 
duty in the crowded parts of the city, re-enforced by 50 men 
brought in from outside di\Tsions, stood in the streets and ex- 
plained to drivers what was required of them; and through 
that periofl and long after the prosecutions were begun, all the 
daily newspapers, as a matter of news, gave much space to the 
operation of the rules. Drivers who are accustomed to working 
in Boston know the rules, but, like many other citizens, even 
of the best quality, some do not hesitate to do what is con- 
venient for themselves whenever they think thej' will not be 
called to account. Drivers coming to Boston irregularly from 
a whole cxiuntryside which has no rules, are frequent though un- 
intentional offenders. 

The critic further asserts: "It is a matter of everj'day knowl- 
edge that whole stretches of public highway are rendered im- 
passable at times by the rows of deliverj* vans which stand 
there for hours in clear contravention of the citj-'s ordinances." 

I walk the streets a good deal and I have not seen one of 
them "impassable" for a longer time than the two or three 
minutes required to straighten out a crush — something mo\-ing 
all the time. 

That does not prove that the writer of the artic-le has not 
seen streets "impassable," but I still may doubt that he knows 
whether the vehicles standing at the curbstone were or were 
not ^^oIating the trafBc rules, — there are now no "ordinances" 
which apply. 

Does be know, for instance, that the rules themaelves make 
reasonable and necessary pro\Tsion for the standing, loading 
and uxJoa/ling of all vehicles? 

Does he know that not only by traffic ndes but under statute 
law wagons in great numbers arc allowed to stand in the market 
district, the most ciovvded in the city, and that if thej- were not 
so allowed the handling and distribution of much of the food 
supply of Boston and the suburbs could not be carried on? 

Does he know that nearly 6,000 vehicles, offered for hire, are 
laA\-fully licensed to stand in particular places in the streets, half 
of them at least, in the nature of things, in the crowded and 



1912.) PL'BLIC DOCU-MEXT — Xo. 49. 2.3 

comparatively small section of the city proper lying north of 
Boybton Street and east of Treniont and Court streets? Does 
he know that those vehicles, practically none of which can be 
housed in the section in which they work, transport the goods 
of thousands of mercantile and manufacturing establishments 
which could not exist without the facilities thus afforded? 

Does he know that there are other thousands of vehicles 
which cannot be licensed to stand in particular places in the 
streets, because they are not at the service of the whole public, 
but yet must be on hand to do the work of their owners and 
the customers of their owners? 

If all the policemen on day and night duty in the whole citj' 
were concentrated in the business section in the daytime, and 
their number were then doubled, they would hardly be enough 
to watch and time the standing, loading and unloading of all 
vehicles, but they would be enough, if they prosecuted every 
\iolation of the traffic rules observed by them, to paralyze busi- 
ness, and to carrj' loss, discomfort and even suffering through- 
out the community. I do not hesitate to say that the police 
even as now organized could so enforce the traffic rules as to 
make ahnost impossible the continuance in business of hun- 
dreds of our largest establishments employing tens of thousands 
of persons, and serxing hundreds of thousands of customers. 
This is especially true of the large department stores and the 
daily newspapers, whose hundreds of wagons must stand at 
the busiest times of the day and in the most crowded streets if 
they are to be loaded with the goods and the newspapers which 
supply the city and the suburbs. 

If the police had not enforced the traffic rules promptly and 
intelligently, and continued the enforcement in the face of all 
kinds of opposition, the rules would have been forgotten in 
thirty days. But if the enforcement had been narrow, technical 
and blind to the absolute necessities of business, the merchants, 
manufactmcrs and consumers would have suffered such loss 
and inconvem'ence that as soon as the rules could have been 
reached through the Legislature they would have been torn 
to pieces. X'either the street commissioners nor the Police 
Commissioner will soon forget the manner in which their offices 
were besieged in the early days of the rules by merchants and 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

others who declared that unless they secured some relief they 
would be forced out of business. ^lany amendments were 
made and much discretion was allowed to the police by formal 
action on the part of the street commissioners. 

The regulation of street traffic is under constant study by 
the public officials whom the law has made responsible. They 
started with as much natural intelligence certainly as the 
average citizen, and to that they have added years of practical 
experience. They know the difficulties of their task, and have 
knowledge of legal and other limitations affecting action that 
can be taken or even attempted which are unknown to critics 
and ad\'isers. 

In the narrowness and crookedness of the streets, and the 
variety and extent of the uses to which they must be put, the 
business section of Boston bears not the remotest resemblance 
to anvthing that can be found on the American continent or 
perhaps in the whole world. To look for guidance, as some 
have, to the policing of Fifth Avenue, New York, a thoroughfare 
of splendid width, free from car tracks and crossed at right 
angles for mile after mile by wide, straight streets, is absurd. 
Speaking more broadly, Boston bears the same relation to New 
York financially and in population that the city of Cambridge, 
for instance, bears to Boston. The New York "traffic squad," 
so called, to which attention is often directed, consists of about 
1,000 men, nearly 200 mounted, and of the whole number more 
than 150 are officers of rank. The cost of this so-called " squad " 
must be nearly $1,300,000 a year for salaries alone, or about 
three-fourths as much as the total pay of all members of the 
Boston Police Force, covering the whole city, day and night. 

The plan of a " traffic squad" has been tested twice in Boston, 
in each case for several years, and twice the squad has been 
abolished by Boards of Police, ^^'hen I became commissioner 
the idea was dead, and because of respect for the judgment of 
my predecessors in the beginning, and afterwards in conformity 
with my ovm study and experience, I have never sought to 
re\-ive it. An arrangement which may be justified at great cost 
in a city of 5,000,000 population with 11,000 policemen is not 
likely to fit even proportionately in a city of 700,000 population 
with a police force of less than 1,500 men of all grades. I could 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 25 

give reasons in great detail, but I will say only that to establish 
a "traffic squad" would not add one man to the police force; 
its Uicmbers would simply be taken from police di\-isions where 
they are badly needed for general police purposes, and the fact 
that to them was assigned a particular duty which now rests 
upon all policemen would have the effect practically of leaving 
to them alone work which is now done by hundreds of different 
men. 

Situated as Boston is, especially in the crowded section, 
business can exist and develop only under the policy of give 
and take, live and let Uve. Foot passengers and vehicles, 
pleasure drivers and merchants must share the streets, each 
class \-ielding something to the others, and all subject to wise 
traffic rules enforced without favor but with intelligence and 
reasonableness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN 0'.MEARA, 

Police Commissioner for the Cily of Boston. 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner. 



Secretary. 



Superintendent, . 
Deputy superintendents. 
Chief inspector, . 
Captains, 
[nspectors, . 

Inspector of carriages (lieu- 
tenant), . 



The Police Force. 

\ I Lieutenants, 
3 Sergeants, . 
1 Patrolmen, . 
23 I Reser\-e men, 
30 I 

Total, . 
1 ' 



36 

95 

1,193 

105 

1,4SS 



Director, 

Assistant director. 
Foreman, 
Signalmen, . 
Mechanics, . 



Signal Service. 

Linemen, 
Driver. 



Total, . 



Employees of the Department. 



Clerks 

Stenographers, 
Messengers, 

Matrons of house of deten- 
tion, 

Matrons of station houses. 
Firemen on police steamers. 
Van drivers. 
Foreman of stable, 



Hostlers 13 

Assistant steward of city 

prison, .... 1 

Janitors, . . . . 16 

Janitresses, .... 12 

Telephone operators, . 3 

Total, .... S6 



Recapilvlatio 
Police Commissioner and sccretar>', 

Police force, 

Signal Service, 

Emploj'ees, 



Grand total. 



1,4SS 
IS 



1,594 



1912.] 



FVBUC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



DlSTRIBCTIOX AXD CnAXGES. 

The distribution of the force is shown by Table I. During 
the year 57 patrolmen were promoted from the reser\'c men, 
1 patrolman was reappointed, and 55 reserve men were ap- 
pointed; 4 patrolmen discharged; 6 patrolmen and 3 resen-e 
men resigned; 3 captains, 1 inspector, 3 lieutenants, 2 sergeants 
and 10 patrolmen retired on pension; 2 captains, 1 sergeant 
and 9 patrolmen died. (See Tables III., IV., V., VI.) 

PoucE Officers en-jojed while ox Ditty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof and the causes of the 
injuries: — 



Hot Ixjcbed. 


Number of 
Men injured. 


Xumberof 
Duties lost. 


In arresting prisoners, 

In pursuing criminals, 

By stopping runaways, 

By cars and other vehicles at crossings, . 
Various other causes, 


29 
18 
8 

2 
37 


304 
427 
54 
243 
415 


Totals, 


94 


1,443 



Work of tiie Dep.\rt.ment. 

Arrests. 

The total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest 

as that of a separate person, was 70,442, against 71,201 the 

preceding year, being a decrease of 759. The percentage of 

increase and decrease was as follows : — 

Per. Cent. 

Offences against the person, Decrease, 

Offences against property, committed with %-iolence, Increase, 
Offences against property, committed without vio- 
lence, Increase, 

Malicious offences against property, .... Increase, 

Forgen,- and offences against the currency, . . Decrease, 

Offences against the license laws, .... Increase, 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc., . . . Decrease, 

Offences not included in the foregoing, . . . Decrease, 



3.39 
11.69 

3.26 
23.35 
13.04 
4.13 
1.07 
1.37 



28 



POLICE CO:\i:\IISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



There were G,57S persons arrested on ■narrants and 57,695 
without warrants; 6,109 persons were summoned by the court; 
67^6 persons were held for trial and 2,595 were released from 
custody. The number of males arrested was 63,774; of females, 
6,66S; of foreigners, 31,979, or appro.vimately 45.39 per cent.; 
of minors, 7,656. Of the total number arrested, 27,613, or 
39.19, per cent, were nonresidents. (See Tables X., XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follow 
West Indies, 



United States, . 


38,463 


British Provinces, . 


5,611 


Ireland, . 


13,758 


England, . 


1,617 


France, 


1.36 


Gennanv, . 


509 


Italy, .... 


2,734 


Rassia, 


2,841 


China, . . . 


522 


Greece, . . . 


275 


Sweden, . 


1,111 


Scotland, . 


942 


Spain, . . . 


64 


Norway, 


341 


Poland, . . . 


384 


Australia, . 


31 


Austria, 


187 


Portugal, . 


107 


Finland, . . . 


244 


Denmark, . 


87 


Holland, . . . 


33 


Wales, . . . 


16 


East Indies, 


11 



Turkey, 
South -\merica, 
Switzerland, 
Belgium, . 
.\rmenia, . 
.\frica, 
Hungary-, . 
.\sia, . 
.\rabia, 
Mexico, 
Japan, 
SjTia, . 
Roumania, 
Egj-pt, 
Cuba, . . 
Pnissia, 
Lithuania, . 
Bulgaria, 
New Zealand, 

Total, 



111 

1 



70,442 



The number of arrests for the year is 70,442, being a de- 
crease of 759 from last year and 2,765 more than the average 
for the past five years. There were 46,3W persons arrested 
for drunkenness, being 1,338 less than last year, and 2,534 
more than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests 
for drunkenness this year there was a decrease of 2.S9 per cent, 
in males and a decrease of LSI per cent, in females from last 
year. (See Tables XL, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (70,442) 552 were 
for \-iolations of the city ordinances; that is to say, 1 arrest 
in 127 was for such offence, or .78 per cent. 

Fifty-four and si.xty-three one-hundredths per cent, of the 



1912.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 29 

persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty 
and forty. (See Table XII.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 13,772, and 
the fines amounted to 8129,432.96. (See Table XIII.) 

Eighty-three persons were committed to the State Prison, j 

5,470 to the House of Correction, 110 to the Women's Prison, . 

ISl to the Reformatorj- Prison and 2,783 to other institutions. I 
The total years of imprisonment were 3,639 years, 7 months, 

1 day; the total number days' attendance in court by oflBcers [ 

was 45,766; and the witness fees earned by them amounted to ' 

§13,326.32. j 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was i 

§115,771.75. I 

Si.Kty-six witnesses were detained at station houses; 88 were ! 

accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 71 from last year. j 

There was an increase of 16.93 per cent, from last year in the \ 

number of insane persons taken in charge, an increase of about j 

12.G6 per cent, in the number of sick and injured persons ; 

assisted, and a decrease of about 3.56 per cent in the number j 

of lost children cared for. j 

The average amount of property reported stolen in the city ' 

for the five years from 1907 to 1911, inclusive, was 8159,253.87; •. 

in 1911 it was 8166,812.71, or 87,558.84 more than the average. I 

The amount of property stolen in and out of the city, which • 

was recovered by the Boston police, was 8282,126.48, as against i 

§354,466.73 last year, or 872,340.25 less. • 

The average amount of fines imposed by courts for the five ? 

years from 1907 to 1911, inclusive, was 8139,817.12; in 1911 ! 

it was 8129,432.96, or 810,384.06 less than the average. I 

The average number of days' attendance in coiul was 43,947; { 

in 1911 it was 45,766, or 1,819 more than the average. The ' 

average amount of witness fees earned was 812,774.59; in 1911 | 

it was 813,326.32, or 8551.73 more than the average. (See \ 

Table XIII.) j 

Drunkenness. 1 

In arrests for drunkenness the average number per day was | 

127. There were 1,3.38 less persons arrested than in 1910, — j 

a decrease of 2.80 per cent.; 47.10 per cent, of the arrested ] 

persons were nonresidents and 48.56 per cent, were of foreign I 
birth. (See Table XI.) 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Bureau of Criminal Inrestigaiion. 

The "Rogues' Gallerj-" now contains 36,313 photographs, 
29,474 of which are photographs with Bertillon measurements, 
a system used by this department during the past ten years. 
In accordance with the Re\Tsed Laws, chapter 225, sections IS 
and 21, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon measure- 
ments taken of con\icts in the State Prison and Reformatory-, 
a number of which have already been added to our Bertillon 
cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the system by 
the department in 1S9S, b and will continue to be of great 
assistanc-e in the identification of criminals. A large number of 
important identifications have thus been made during the 
year for this and other polic-e departments, through which the 
sentences in many instances have been materially increased. 
The records of 1,844 criminals have been added to the records 
kept in this Bureau, which now contains a total of 34,220. The 
number of cases reported at this office which have been in- 
vestigated during the year is 10,424. There are 22,60S cases 
recorded on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and 
reports made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
Letters and telegrams to the number of about 2,750 yearly are 
now filed with the numbered reports to which they refer, so 
that all the papers pertaining to a case can be found in the 
same envelope, thus simplifying matters when information is 
desired on any case. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of about 
130,000 persons. There are also " histories and press clippings," 
now numbering 6,373, by this Bureau, in envelope form, for 
police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification, which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory- manner, and with 
its development it is expected that the identification of crimi- 
nals will be facilitated. It has become verj- useful in tracing 
criminalsand furnishingcorroborating e\idence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the ser\ice are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 
ment; but as the duties are of a special character, the following 
statement will be of bterest: — 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — No. 49. 



31 



Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . . . 1,005 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to officers from those States, 53 

Number of cases investigated, 10,424 

Number of extra duties performed, 1,698 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and e\idence prepared for trial in court, ... 55 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and e\-idence prepared for court, 6 

Number of days spent in court bj- officers, 3,062 

.\mount of stolen property recovered, .... S19S,I94.68 
Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, 569 years, 7 months 

Number of photographs added to " Rogues' Gallery," . . 2,000 

Officers det.viled to .assist Medic.\l E.x-^mlxers. 



Causes of Death in Cases inrcstigakd. 
Homicides, . 
Manslaughter, 
Murders, 
Natural causes, 
Poison, . 
Railroads, 
Railwaj' (street). 
Stillborn, 
Suffocation, . 
Suicides, 
Teams. . 



Abortion, 


2 


-Occidents, 


111 


.■Ucoholism, . 


6 


Asphj-xiation (gas). 


5 


.Automobile, . 


IS 


Bums, .... 


32 


Drowning, 


61 


Electricity, . 


2 


Elevators, . . . 


14 


E.\haustion, . 


74 


Explosion, 


2 


Exposure, 


2 


Fire engine, . 


1 



Total, 



Causes 
.\bortion, 

Asphj-xiation (gas), 
.■Accidents, 
Automobile, 
Bums, . 
Drowning, 
Elevators, 
Electricity, 
E.vplosion, 
Exposure, 
Falling burlap. 
Falling lumber, 
Falling stone, 
Falling derrick. 



of Death where Inquests were held. 



Falling iron 
Falling tree, . 
Fall", . . 
Fire engine, . 
Machinery, . 
I Natural causes, 
Poison, . 
Railroads (steam), 
Railway (street), 
Suicides, 
Teams. . 



3 

14 
11 
324 
33 
60 
24 
13 
1 
SS 
21 

922 



Total. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



M1SCELL.V.VEOUS Business. 





19»-0». 


19W-H. 


uvt-n. 


AbandoEcd children cared for, . 


8 


15 


5 


Accidents reported, 


2,978 


3,187 


3,315 


Automobiles cared for, .... 




_ 


12 


Buildings found open and made secure, . 
Cases investigated, 


3,420 


2,707 


2,914 


25,656 


27,9frt 


25,617 


Dangerous buildings reported, . 


11 


•23 


31 


Dangerous chimneys reported, . 


6 


3 


12 


Dead bodies caredVor, . . . . 


343 


36S 


411 


Defettire bridges reported, 




3 


1 


Defective cesspools reported, . 


199 


152 


ISS 


Defective coal holes, 


1 


5 


4 


Defective drains and vaults reported, 


3 


9 


4 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported. 


S 


4 





Defective gas pipes reported, . 


79 


62 


58 


Defectire hydrants reported, . 


104 


139 


215 


Defccti\-e lamps reported, .... 


13,247 


36,502 


14,572 


Defective fences, 


10 


16 


17 


Defective sewers reported. 


103 


84 


167 


Defective streets and sidewalks reported. 


9,669 


9,04S 


11,199 


Defective trees, 


16 


59 


52 


Defective water gates, .... 


20 


S 


33 


Defective water meters, .... 


3 


11 


— 


Defective water pipes reported. 


177 


203 


ISO 


Defective wires and poles reported. 


30 


79 


24 


Disturbances suppressed, .... 


1,253 


767 


871 


E-Vtra duties performed, . . . . 


31,S74 


33,997 


35.292 


Fire alarms given, 


1,962 


2,045 


2,256 


Fires extingnishe<l, 


735 


865 


899 


Insane persons taken in charge. 


385 


366 


428 


Intosdcatcd i>ersons assisted, . 


_ 


29 


33 


Lost children restored, . . . . 


2,189 


2,247 


2,167 


Missing persons reported, . . . . 


305 


a46 


361 


Missing persons found, . . . . 


140 


17S 


159 


Persons rescued from drowning. 


61 


33 


15 


Sick and injured persons assisted, . 


4,397 


4,605 


5,188 


Stray teams reported and put up, . 


132 


181 


230 


Water running to waste reported, . 


377 


345 


381 


Witne^cs detained, 


57 


7S 


66 



Lost, Ab.\nt)o.ved .vxd Stolen Propertt. 
On Dec. I, 1910, there were SIS articles of lost, abandoned or 
stolen property in the custody of the property clerk; 710 were 
received during the year, IIS were s^^ld, for which S373.13 was 
received and paid over to the city collector, and "0 delivered 
to owners, finders or administrators, leaving 1,040 on hand. 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. aS 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the nuinFxr of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 

mi. Men, 

Jan. 19, Police ball 95 

Feb. 15, Firemen's ball, 51 

Mar. 17, Evacuation Day parade, 360 

Mar. 17, Hibernian parade, 69 

April 19, Marathon race 439 

May 26, High school cadet's pamle, 423 

May 29, Ringling Bros, circus parade 100 

May 30, Work horse parade, 73 

June 5, ,\ncient and Honorable Artillerj* parade, . . 150 

June 10, Dorchester Day celebration, 171 

June 11, Ninth Regiment parade, 52 

June 16, "Xight before" in Charlesftown, 231 

June 17, Anniversarj', battle of Hunker Hill, .... 620 

Jul3' 4, Roxburj' Day celebration, 207 

July 4, Fireworks, Charles River Basin, 98 

Julj- 14, Funeral of Capt. Edward F. Gaskin, .... 68 

Sept. 4, Labor Day parade, 810 

Oct. 12, Columbus Day celebration, 1,247 

Nov. 7, State election, bulletin Ixards, 367 

Nov. S, Funeral of Capt. George W. Wescott 67 

Nov. 11, Har%ard-Carlisle foot-bail game, 96' 

Nov. 11, Departure of Archbishop O'Connell for Rome, 73 

Nov. 18, Har%-ard-Dartmouth foot-ball game, .... 123 

Nov. IS, Special detail at Division 4, foot-ball night, ... 97 

Nov. 25, Harvard- Yale foot- ball game, 122 

Nov. 25, Special detail at Division 4, foot-ball night, . . 272 

IxsPECTOB OF Claims. 

The officer detailed to assi.^t the committee on claims and 

law department in investigating claims against the city for 

alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 

051 cases, 4 of which were on account of damage done by dogs. 



34 POLICE C0:\I:MISSI0NER. [Jan. 



Other Services performed. j 

Number of cases investigated, Col f 

Number of witnesses examined, 4,410 '' 

Number of notices ser\ed, 2,440 

Number of pictures taken, 221 

Number of permissions granted, 3,693 

Number of days in court, 4S 

Number of da}-s at the conmiittee on claims, .... 29 

i 
HorsE OF Detextio.x. ; 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper are taken to the house of detention in vans provided 
for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the matron 
until the ne.vt session of the court before which they are to j 

appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are returned to ; 

the house of detention, and from there conveyed to the jail or ; 

institution to which they have been sentenced. \ 

During the year there were 5,313 women committed, viz.: — | 



For drunkenness, 3,142 

For larceny, 499 

For night walking, 277 

For fornication, 140 

For being idle and disorderly 25 

For assault and batterj', 30 

For adultery, 23 

For %iolation of the liquor law, 11 

For keeping a house of ill fame, 24 

For witneses, 4 

For county jail, S40 

For municipal court, 90 

For various other offences, 208 

Total, 5,313 

PoucE SiGXAL Service. 

Signal Bores. 
The total number of boxes now in use is 4&4. Of these, 279 
are connected with the underground system and ISo with the 
overhead. 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 49. 35 



Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this senice responded to 
1,001 trouble calls; inspected 464 signal boxes, 15 signal desks 
and 921 batteries; repaired 100 box movements, 9 registers, 
35 polar box bells, 27 locks, 1 time stamp, 4 gongs, 1 stable 
motor, 1 stable register, 6 -sibrator belb, besides repairing all 
bell and electric light work at headquarters and the various 
stations. There have been made 27 line blocks, 14 plungers, 
12 complete box fittings, and a large amount of small work 
that cannot be classified. 

The underground work done during the year consisted of 
laj-ing about 13,808 feet of 7 conductor cable on Division 11 
and placing 5 underground post boxes on Di\ision 11. 

There are in use in the signal sennce 28 horses, 19 patrol 
wagons and 13 pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 42,06-5 runs, covering an 
aggregate distance of 35,212 miles. There were 44,380 prisoners 
conveyed to the station houses; 1,000 runs were made to take 
injiu-ed and insane persons to station houses, the hospitals or 
their homes; and 501 runs were made to take lost children to 
station houses. There were 706 runs to fires and 52 runs for 
liquor seizures. During the year there were 464 signal boxes 
in use, arranged on 60 circuits; 531,969 telephone messages 
and 3,281,724 "on-duty" calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the propertj- in the signal service 
at the present time: — 



15 signal desks. 

60 circuits. 
464 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call boards. 

57 test boxes. 
921 cells of batter}'. 
446,580 feet underground cable. 
332,950 feet overhead cable. 

40,670 feet of duct. 



45 manholes. 
1 buggy. 
1 line wagon. 
1 express wagon. 
1 mugwump wagon. 

1 traverse pung. 

2 small sleighs. 
1 caravan. 



H.VRBOR Seraice. 
The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the blands therein, were as follows: — 



36 POLICE COADIISSIOXER. [Jan. }j 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float- J 

stages, etc., §12,893.04 '] 

Number of '.-esscls from foreign ports boarded, .... 742 | 

Number of vessels ordered fromi the channel to proper anchorage, 1,429 'j 

Number of vessels removed from channel by police steamers, 80 il 

Number of cases of assistance rendered, 135 '.t 

Number of cases of assistance rendered to wharfingers, . . 5 ' • 
Number of permits granted vessels, in the stream, to dis- 
charge cargoes, 50 i 

Number of obstructions removed from channel, ... 45 i ■ 

Number of alarms of fire on the waterfront attended, . . 95 !' 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm, .... 1 

Number of boats challenged 2,146 ; 

Sick and bjured persons assisted, 15 

Cases investieated 1,042 I; 

Dead bodies recovered, 40 i' 

Rescued from drowning, S 1 

Number of vesels ordered to put up anchor lights, ... 9 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage, 1,429 

The total number of vessels that arrived in this port during 
the year was 11. 444. Of this nunaber, 9,926 came from domestic ;' 

ports, 776 from ports in the British Pro\-inces and 742 from 
foreign port«. Of the latter, 702 were steamers, 12 ships, IS 
barks and 10 schooners. 

'\ 

The police boat "Ferret" was in commission from June 11 

to Xov. 1, 1911, in Dorchester Bay. She covered a distance of jj 

.5,000 miles; made 5 arrests for assault and battery; recovered ;[ 

property valued at S1,30S; rescued 40 persons from disabled .] 

boats; made secure IS yachts that had broken away from their j 

moorings; quellefl 10 disturbances; investigated 20 cases, and i| 

notified 12 owners of power boats to have mufflers attached to jj 

their exhausts. j 

Horses. j 

On the 1st of December, 1910, there were SO horses in the ! 

ser\ice. During the year 1 was sold, 9 purchased, 7 shot on 
acc-ount of Ijeing di.sabled and 2 died. .\t the present time there 
are 79 in the service as shown bv Table IX. 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



37 



^'EHICXE SeR\1CE. 

Automobiles. 

There are 7 automobiles in the senice at the present time; 2 
for general use, attached to headquarters; 2 for the Back Bay 
an^i Fenways, attached to Di\-ision 16; 1 in the Dorchester 
District, attached to Division 11; 1 in the West Roxbury 
District, attached to Division 13; 1 in the Brighton District, 
attached to Division 14. 

The following return shows the extent and nature of the 
service performed by the automobiles during the year: — 



XCJIBETl. 


r^yson 
Duty. 


MUes ran. 


Arrests. 


Fire 

Alarm, 

etc 


Persona 

cau- 
tioned. 


Lost 

Children. 

etc. 


Sick, 
etc 


35, . . 

36, 

3S, . . 

40, 

6,774, . . 


277 
2S9 
300 
283 


9,595 
10,115 
15,000 
18,500 


500 
260 
92 
78 


5 

6 

21 

53 


475 

175 
300 
67 


2 
4 
3 
9 


3 
5 
14 
9 


Total, . 


1,149 53,210 


930 1 85 


1,017 


18 


31 



Cost of Running Automobiles. 

Pay of officers, S3,777 50 

Repairs 2,883 92 

Tires, 912 72 

Gasoline, 622 21 

Oil S7 02 

Rent of garage, 1^238 09 

License fees, 20 00 

Total, S9,541 46 



38 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 



Ambulances. j 

The department is now equipped with 10 ambulances, located \ 

in the following police divisions: 1, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 ' 

and 16. i, 

During the jear the ambulances responded to calls to convey | 

sick or injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital, 991 

City Hospital (Relief Station, HajTnarket Square), . . . 715 

Calls where ser\-ices were not required, 237 I 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Eajt Boston) 233 \ 

Massachusetts General Hospital 130 f 

Home, 103 \ 

Grace Hospital, 63 -, 

Carney Hospital, 27 \ 

Morgue, 22 ' 

Police station houses, 21 

From fires, 7 j 

Lj-ing-in Hospital, 7 j 

Homoeopathic Hospital, 5 | 

Faulkner Hospital, 4 j 

Emerson Hospital, 2 : 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 2 

Boston State Hospital 1 J 

City Prison, 1 > 

Fenway Hospital, 1 ; 

Frost Hospital, 1 j 

Total, 2,573 



191i 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT- 



39 



Ust of Vehicles used by the DepartmeiU 








Divisions. 


1 

1 
<2 


1 


< 


1 


3 

> 


< 


J 
1 


1 


1 


Headquarters, 
Division 1, 
Division 2, 
Di\-ision 3, 
Division 4, 
Di^^sion 5, 
Di\-ision 6, 
Division 7, 
Di\-ision S, 
Dinsion 9, 
Di^-ision 10, 
Dinsion 11, 
Di\Tsion 12, 
Di%-ision 13, 
Di\-ision 14, 
Division 15, 
Division 16, 
Joy Street stab 


e, 






1 
5 


2 

1 

1 
1 

2 


1 


5 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

2 


1 

2 
1 

i 

2 


_ 
_ 

- 

1 

1 
1 

4 


2 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 

2 
3 
6 
2 
8 
6 
3 
4 
23 


Totals, 




19 


6 


7 


13 


5 


11 


7 


7 


75 



Public Carruges. 
During the year there were 1,631 carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 83 as compared with last year; 356 motor 
carriages were licensed, being an increase of 39 as compared 
with last year. 



POLICE com:missioxer. 



[Jan. 



There has been a decrease of 122 in the number of horse- 
drawn licensed carriages during the year. 

There were 72 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were tiu-ned over to the 
inspector; 20 of these were restored to the owners, and the 
balance placed in the keeping of the lost property bureau. 

The following is a detailed statement concerning licenses for 
public carriages and for drivers of hacks and cabs: — 



Xumbcr of applications for carriage licenses received, 

Xuniber of carriages licensed, .... 

Number of licenses transferred. 

Number of licenses cancelled or revoked, 

Number of carriages inspected, 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon. 

Number of complaints against drivers investigated, 

Nimiber of warrants obtained. 

Number of days spent in court. 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens, 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers. 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected. 



1,632 

1,631 

69 

94 

1,632 

1,520 

36 

10 

14 

23 

72 

4 



W.\GO.\ LlCEXSES. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 5,254 applications for such licenses were 
received, 5,241 of which were granted and 13 rejected. 

Of the licenses granted, 60 were subsequently cancelled for 
nonpayment of the license fee, S for other causes and 20 trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., XVL) 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Listing 3L\le Residents of Boston, etc 




Yeab. 


May 
Canvass. 


plications. 


Refused 
Certificotes. 


cfrlS^ 


Total Men 


1903, . . . 


181,045 


3,412 


.3 


3,359 


184,404 


19(y, . 


193,195 


1,335 


55 


1,280 


194,475 


1905. . . 


I lM,5i7 


705 


8 


697 


195,244 


1906, . 


1 195,446 


775 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, . . . 


195,900 


782 


28 


754 


196,654 


1908, . . . 


1 201,255 


1,302 


57 


1,245 


202,500 


1909, . . . 


' 201,391 


8(M 


29 


775 


202,166 


1910,' . . 


203,603 


897 


47 


850 


204,453 


1911,1 . . 


i 206,825 

1 


762 


31 


731 


207,556 



1903, . . 


• Changed to April 1. 

Women Voters Verified. 


14 611 


1904, . . 




15 633 


1905, . 




14 591 


1906, . 




13 427 


1907, . . 




12 822 


1908, . 




11 915 


1909, . . 




. . 11,048 
10 486 


1910, . . 




1911, . . 




. . 9,935 



(See Tables XX, XXL, XXII.) 

Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by the members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Printing, 813,880 00 

Clerical scr^^ce, 6,449 46 

Stationery 1_S51 49 

Interpreters, 917 77 

Filing cases, tables, etc., I44 28 

Telephone, S6 68 



Total. 



S23,329 68 



42 POLICE CO-ALMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Xwnber of Policemen employed in Listing. 

April 1, 1,137 

AprilS, 1,094 

April 4, 6.50 

April 5 224 

April 6, 2 

Special Pouce. 

Special police officers are appointed to serve without pay 
from the city, on the written appUcation of any officer or board 
in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or on the 
application of any responsible corporation or person, such cor- 
poration or person to be liable for the official misconduct of 
the person appointed. 

During the year endmg Nov. 30, 1911, there were 678 special 
police officers appointed, 7 applications for appointment were 
refused for cause. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From State departments, 9 

From city departments, 119 

From railroad corporations, 159 

From other corporations or associations, 163 

From theatres and other places of amusement, .... 157 

From private institutions, 64 

From churches, • . . 7 

Total, 678 

R.ULRO.\D Police. 
There were 153 persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 3 of whom were employees of the New York, Xew 
Haven & Hartford Raiboad, 136 of the Boston & IMaine Rail- 
road, 9 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lj-nn Raih-oad and 5 
of the Boston Terminal Company. 

MlSCELLVNEOUS LICENSES. 

The total number of licenses issued of all kinds was 23,.567; 
transferred, 146; cancelled and revoked, 3,153. The officers 
investigated 191 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collected and paid into the city treasurj' amounted to 
$44,125.75. (See Table XIV.) 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



MusicuNs' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 
During the year there were 193 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 149 of which were granted, 19 
rejected and 25 are pending; 1 was subsequently cancelled on 
account of the nonpayment of the license fee, Iea\-ing the num- 
ber in force November 30 last, 148. 

The officer detailed for this special ser\-ice reports that during 
the year he examined 110 instruments, as follows: — 



Instrumexts. 



Inspected, 



Street organs, 
Hand organs, 
Molins, 
Harps, 
Flutes, 
Accordions, 
Guitars, . 
Bagpipes, . 
Banjos, 
Ocarina, . 
Totals, 



47 


45 


IS 


IS 


12 


12 


12 


12 


6 


6 


7 


6 


4 


4 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 



Collectire. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over fifteen years of age to play on musical instruments in com- 
pany with designated processions, at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five years and the action taken 
thereon : — 



44 



POLICE CO-AIMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Year. 


ApplicatioM. 


Graoted. 


Rejected. 


1907, 


154 


152 


2 


190S 


172 


172 


- 


1909, 


178 


176 


2 


1910, 


226 


222 


4 


1911, 


208 


207 


1 



PCBUC LOLGING HotTSES. 

By chapter 242 of the Acts of 1904 it is pro\-ided that in 
cities of over 50,000 inhabitants every building not licensed as 
an inn, in which 10 or more persons are lodged for 25 cents 
each per day of twentj'-four hours, or for any part thereof, shall 
be deemed a public lodging house, and by chapter 129 of the 
Acts of 1911 this law is made to apply to all buildings in such 
cities, notwithstanding that no price is charged for lodging. 

In the city of Boston the Police Commissioner is authorized 
to grant licenses to such lodging houses after the inspector of 
buildings has certified that the building is pro^^ded with proper 
exits and appliances for alarming the inmates in case of fire, 
and the Board of Health has certified that the sanitary con- 
dition is satisfactory. 

For these licenses 26 applications were received during the 
year, 17 of them were granted, 5 rejected, 1 was withdrawn and 
3 are pending. 

The following shows the location of the lodging houses and 
number of persons lodged in each during the year: — 



19 Causeway Street, . 
164 Commercial Street, 
194 Commercial Street, 
234 Commercial Street, 



Number lodged. 



22,855 
32,401 
13.611 



1912] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



45 



Xamber Lodged. 



2aS Commercial Street, 
17 Da\-is Street, . 
39 Edinboro Street, . 
120 Eliot Street, 
37 Green Street, . 
187 Hanover Street, . 
2 Hudson Street, 
67 Pleasant Street, . 
SS6 Washington Street, 
1025 Washington Street, 
1051 Washington Street, 
1093 Washington Street, 
1202 Washington Street, 
Total, . . . • 



27,365 
35,174 
15,650 
47,867 
36,76i 
54,313 
2,635 
21,276 
77,499 
37,485 
40,590 
20,687 
41,971 



537,251 



C.UIRTIXG D.VN'GEROUS We.VPOXS. 

The follo\\'ing return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry loaded pistols 
or revolvers in this Commonwealth, during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted and the number re- 
fused: — 



Yeab. 


ApplicatiOM. 


Greeted. 


r^tiued. 


1907, 


CSl 


625 


56 


190S, ■ . . 


1,020 


SS2 


13S 


1909, 


871 


800 


71 


1910, 


931 


829 


102 


1911 


931 


814 


87 



46 POLICE CO:\BIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

These licenses are granted, in a large measure, to express and 
bank messengers, watchmen, special policemen and others 
whose occupations and characters establish a prima facie case 
in their favor. 

Small Lo.vn- Licenses. 

From Dec. 1, 1910, to July 19, 1911, 11 applications for small 
loan licenses were received. Seven of these were granted, 2 
rejected and 2 cancelled. 

By chapter 727 of the Acts of 1911 the regulating of the busi- 
ness of making small loans was placed in the hands of a super- 
^■isor whose appointment is provided for by the act which took 
effect July 19, 1911. 

Pensions .vnt) BEN-xnTS. 

Dec. 1, 1910, there were 211 pensioners on the roll. During 
the year 13 died, \-iz., 2 captains, 2 sergeants and 9 patrolmen; 
and 19 were added, viz., 3 captains, 1 inspector, 3 lieutenants, 
2 sergeants and 10 patrolmen, lea^^ng 217 on the roll at date 
including the widows of 12 and the mother of 1 policeman, who 
died of injuries received in the ser\-ice. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to 8135,290.42, and it is estimated that $1.37,.54S.75 
will be required for pensions in 1912. This does not include 
pensions for 1 chief inspector, 1 captain, 1 inspector and 5 
patrolmen, all of whom are sixty-five or over, and are entitled 
to be pensioned on account of age and term of ser\ice. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the thir- 
tieth day of November last amounted to $207,.5oO. Tliere are 
66 beneficiaries at the present time, and there has been paid 
to them the sum of 87,641.50 during the past year. 

The invested fund of the Police ReUef Association on the 
thirtieth day of November was 81.37,845.38. 

FlX.VNCI.VL, 

A requisition was made on the cit>- council for the sum of 
82,252,400.20 to meet the running expenses of the department, 
including the pensioned police officers, house of detention, 
station house matrons, listing persons twenty years of age or 
more, and police signal service for the financial year. 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCIDIENT — No. 49. 47 

The total cxpenditiires for police purposes during the past 
year, including the pensions, house of detention, station house 
matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but 
exclusive of the maintenanc-e of the police signal sernce, were 
S2,l 17,768.92. (See Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasmy- from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, and for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, etc., was $45,287.47. 
(See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was 854,055.68. (See Table X\UI.) 



48 



POLICE CO-^BIISSIO^•ER. 



[Jan. 







•stciox 


~ ' 


■ " " ■ 


-SRS3|i2-- 




-o^iaa JO '^noH 






> ■ , 1 I 1 > 1 ■ 




■«l.\jas P:°»!3 










1 

5 


a 






- ■ •- " s " ' ■ ' 




S 






- ' " ' s - ' ' ' 


^ 


S 






- ' ^' ' 5 " ' ' ' 




3 






_ , c « 2 :; ' ' ' 


a 






"'"''=' ' ' 


%Z 


= i ' 




- ■ .. ^ g , . , , 


•f. 


s 1 




- ■ e, , 3 r- , , , 




- 1 ' 




- ' " ' S ' ' ' ' 


5 


- ' 




- . - = o , , , » 


^ -g 


" 1 ' 




- ■ c , g = , 1 . 




<s 






- 1 ' 




- . c o , = , , . 


1 


- ' 




-:..«_=,,. 


2 


" 1 ' 




"■""'"' • ■ 




" h 






I 

•i 


" 






-.cog,. , . 




•sjJumbpoaH 


"--g = = S'2"' 


c; 




o 

A 
Z 


1 

J i 
I i 


. i 

lii.ii.K;!. 

uunsnsn 



912.] 


PUBLIC DOCT.mENT — X 


0. 4 


9 


" ....,-,. 


CO 




, , _ _ _ o fl ■- - 1 - c^ 1 1 . 1 


S3 




' ' 


,,,,i...-r--,, 


i 




' - 


,,,,,.,...-,, 


2 




' ' 


1 . c. 1 - 1 1 


- 




' - 


''■'''''"■""'' 


2 




' - 


- . 1 


s 




' - 


1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 o 1 n r 1 


g 




' - 


' ' ' ' _ , , , 


i 




' - 


'■'''''•'"''' 


§ 




' ' 


' ,,_,,, 


s 




' - 


..,,. t ,.,,-, , 


- 






'■''•'''' '^ '' ' 


s 






1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 c^ , 1 , 


s 






,,,,,,,,, ^ ,, , 


o 






" " ' ■ 


- 








2 






....... 1 ,».,. , 


2 








s 




ii; 

in 

s s c 


llllllilHli! 


J 





49 



50 



POLICE co-m:\iissioxer. 



[Jan. 





: 


._. 
























~Z i 


















■-~ . 1 




-S 


t;_ o 






> c 2 




■ ~ 


"3 >— = X .3 r i 




: 




1 1 


III .iiitiii i 




:5 






; 


•^ 5»3*i*^~-s i: ■^■'~ 'is 1 


5 


1 


illlllllflll i- 








?; 






5 




SSoSSS=;=;Sr^ = =5 


i? 


S 








cT— -ccT— "-r-r~c-r-r --ceTrf-o" i 




"3 


-• « ^ -, — M «i 


"2 


1 








.^ 


1 


1 




i 








^ 


=■ 




2 


•i 


o ^ n ?i c-i ^ -^ ri — n r: c-i 1 




- 




? 


5 


■ 






^1 






1 


■s 




" 


i^ 




1 


j 




; 














g 










s 






_3 


. 








.1 


-2 










"S 


' 


ftifiiil 


.-1 




Sfe-i'^Si^S-^^^ > 






|lllilil==1i 


i? 




llllagi^lill 








•^ 










"S 






^ 









1 


■ j 






=£a ££ ==== 1 










csclcj -cJcJ^cSSSii . 






= SSC = = s = = = = = , 










lllillllllll j 










;a^^a;2ig-^;5iiia 1 







1912. 



PUBLIC DOCU.AIENT — Xo. 49. 



T.^BLE III. 

List of Officers retired during the Year, giving Age at the Time of 
Retirement and the Xumber of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retiri-mcnt. 


Age at 
Time of Re- 


Sen-ice. 


Ahem, John L., . . . 


Incapacitated, 


46 years, 


21 years. 


Carlstein, Carl, 


Incapacitated, 


46 years. 


16 years. 


Clark, Ashton D., . . . 


Incapacitated, 


4S years, 


20 j'ears. 


CoUins, James.T., . 


Age, . . 


65 years. 


34 years. 


Danforth, Benjamin F., 


Incapacitated, 


54 years. 


23 years. 


Fottler, William, . . . 


Age, . . 


65 years, 


40 years. 


Frohock, Millard M., . . 


Age, . . 


60 years. 


29 years. 


Good, John J., ... 


Incapacitated, 


50 years, 


26 years. 


Hawthorne, George E., . 


Incapacitated, 


45 years, 


17 years. 


Mahonej-, Dennis, . 


Age, . . 


65 years, 


34 years. 


McAdams, Charles W., . . 


Incapacitated, 


39 years. 


10 years. 


O'Xeill, James, . . . 


Age, . . 


65 years. 


30 years. 


Pease, Edward A., . 


Incapacitated, 


57 years. 


27 years. 


Rich, Hiram H., . ". . 


Age, . . 


65 years, 


33 years. 


Rile}', James, .... 


^'etcran. 


61 years. 


18 years. 


Ritter, Daniel A., . 


Age, . . 


61 years, 


38 years. 


Shannon, Andrew, . 


Veteran, . | 6S years, 


33 j'cars. 


Tighe, Charles H., . . . 


Age, . . 65 years, 


38 years. 


Waldron, Edwin A., 


Age, . . 60 years. 


27 years. 



52 POLICE COiOIISSIOXER. (Jan. 



TiBLE IV. 

List of Offxers who were proirUiUd abote the Rank of Patrolman during 
the Tear aiding Xor. 30, 1911. 



DiTZ. 



Xame and Rank. 



Jan. 5,1911 I Lieut. James P, Canney to the rank «rf captain. 
April 18, 1911 i Lieut. CharieE W. Searles to the rank of captain. 
April 2S, 1911 i Lieut. Fraacif J. Hird to the rank of captain. 
July IS, 1911 I Lieut. Herbert W. Goodwin to the rank of captain. 
Nov. 16, 1911 i Lieut. Uu^ J. Lee to the rank of captain. 
Feb. 2, 1911 i Sergt. Joseph F. Loughlin to the rank of inspector. 
Jan. .5,1911 ' Sergt. Jeremiiii F. Galli van to the rank of lieutenant. 
Feb. 22,1911 ' .Scrgt. Joh= W, Riordan to the rank <rf Eeutcnant. 
April 18, 1911 ; Sergt. Jaxops E, Hines to the rank ot Keutenant. 
April IS, 1911 Sergt. Arthar B, ifcConnell to the rank of lieutenant. 
July 18,1911 '. Sergt. PhiEp E- O'Xeil to the rank CM Keatenant. 
Nov. 16, 1911 Sergt. John J, Eooney to the rank ch Beotenant. 
Dec. 22, 1910 \ Patrolman Thozaas ^IcTieman to the rank of ser- 

! geant. 
Jan. 5, 1911 : Patrolman Fcsnk 31. Magee to the rank of sergeant. 
Feb. 2, 1911 Patrolman Civkzs J. Farrell to the rank of sergeant. 
Feb. 2, 1911 Patrolman Join F. Linton to the rank of sergeant. 
Feb. 14, 1911 \ Patrohnan Patrick J. McDonougfa to the rank of 

I sergeant. 
Feb. 22, 1911 ' Patrolman Tiraothy 3L Ferris to the rank of ser- 

\ geant. 
April 1,1911 Patrohnan itstshew Killen to the rank of sergeant. 
April IS, 1911 ' Patrolman WlDkm J. Flynn to the tank of sergeant. 
April 18, 191 1 Patrolman .\nbiir J. Putnam to the rank of sergeant. 
April 18, 1911 Patrolman Jo&ifl ilcGrath to the rank of sergeant. 
May 9, 1911 Patrolman Frederick J. Swendeman to the rank of 

sergeant. 
July 18,1911 ' Patrolman Sassjoei Dunlap to the rank of sergeant. 
July 27, 1911 Patrolman WHEam J. Irwin to the rank of sergeant. 
July 27, 1911 i Patrolman Tbomas W. O'Donnell to the rank of ser- 

j geant. 
Oct. 11, 1911 ' Patrolman JoSai W. Kilday to the rank of sergeant. 
Oct. 11, 1911 Patrohnan Patrick J. O'Neil to the r.»iJ: of sergeant 
Oct. 31,1911 Patrohnan Jo&n F. Mitchell to the rank of sergeant. 
Oct. 31, 1911 Patrolman Qifto Farley to the rank of sergeant. 
Nov. 16, 1911 Patrolman CLaries B. Ryan to the rank of sergeant. 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



53 



Xwnber of Men in Each Rank in Actire Service at the End of the Present 
Year icho were appointed on the Force in the Year slated. 



Date ajtoi-vted. 


Hi 


1 


1 I 


1 


1 
1 
S 


2 


1 


1 
(2 


1S68, . . . 

1869, . . . 

1870, . . . 

1873, . . . 

1874, . . . 

1875, . . . 

1876, . . . 

1877, . . . 

1878, . . . 

1879, . . . 

1880, . . . 

issi! . . . 

1882, . . . 

1883, . . . 

1884, . . . 

1885, . . . 
1SS6, . . . 

1887, . . . 

1888, . . . 

1889, . . . 

1890, . . . 

1891, . . . 

1892, . . . 

1893, . . . 

1894, . . . 

1895, . . . 

1896, . . . 

1897, . . . 

1898, . . . 

1900, . . 

1901, . . . 

1902, . . . 

1903, . . . 

1904, . . . 

1905, . . . 

1906, . . . 

1907, . . . 

1908, . . . 

1909, . . . 

1910, . . . 

1911, . . 


1 
- 


1 - 

i - 

1 

1 

1 


1 

z 
-1 

- 1 

- 

1 


1 

!■ 

i 1 
- 

4 

1 

1 
4 

1 

I 

1 

2 

1 
2 

- 

2 

~ 1 

- i 

- 1 

- 1 


1 
1 

1 

1 

4 
1 
3 
2 

4 

4 

1 
1 

2 

: 


1 
1 

3 

1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
1 
2 

1 
5 

1 
1 
1 
5 

1 
2 


1 

1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 

3 
2 
1 
4 
4 
4 
2 
6 

10 
7 

20 
3 

1 
8 
1 
1 
4 
1 


! 2 
3 

_ 
8 

1 

6 

7 

8 

19 

12 

7 

14 

12 

9 

15 

35 

13 

19 

16 

13 

60 

22 

104 

28 

17 

30 

83 

52 

i 

77 
37 
34 

108 
140 

87 

1 
1 


_ 
_ 
- 

- 

50 
55 


1 
1 
3 
5 

2 
9 
1 

15 
13 
10 
25 
25 
14 
15 
19 
14 
21 
46 
22 
27 
21 
20 
79 
30 
132 
32 
18 
31 
93 
53 
10 
88 
78 
37 
34 
108 
140 
87 
51 
56 


Totals, 


1 


3 


1 1 23 30 37 


95 


l,193j 105 


1.488 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





i 

""3 


tittttttttttt 

'' -J -I 






'2 '2 '2222 '2^2 

2* ?f ::2""¥ gf2"2 
6 < ^■2<< s<< 


5" 


1 

■X. 


2'2'2' ' ' '«' ' ' 
2" 2~ ^~ ^'" 

S S S -^ 


= 


1 




2 




>:-? 




5 4 

i 

1 


.=" .jf = . 

>^ _- sic - -S-r C 2 - 

IflSHilliiJ} 




1 

1 

i 
1 




f- 














(illliliiliii 

lilllllllHH 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 49. 



55 









r^ 















= 




<M 








<M 






■ = 




o 






o 








i t 












co" 
























~ 


















\ t 


t- 


c^ 




CO 




i 










^ 










5 


i 


















— 
















cT 


















GO 


















;^ 


















o 


















^ 




































_5 




































-s 






















































5 




































c 




































>, 




































^ 




































tj, 








_ 




_ 










































■§ 






_ 


o 


_^ 


C5 
























_^- 


s 


^,- 


Ca 


tT 


^' 




.1 
if 






1 


-5 
1 

A. 


j_ 


i 


1 




: 












^'^^'^ 






. 


Q 


(^ 


_^ 


^ 


o 








s 




r^ 


O- 








E-i ^ 


1 


c> 


=o 


CO 


t^- 


10 


■V i 




















Ss 


















•o 


















5) 




































3 


















> 


t^ 


o 


^ 


t^ 


•* 


^ 





a 


1 


IN 


CO 


^ 


<M 


eo 


M 


<N 




















o 


























































































■^ 






















































Si 


















o 


















C| 


















"o- 




































1 


















$: 


















S 


















^ 


I 




^ 


S 
















o 






















C5 












1 


>; 


1" 




o 


s 


s 






1 


1 


= 


■£ 


_- 


^ 


cT 






1 






J 


■5 


c 






4 


C^ 


s 


< 


^ 


■-9 






5 ^ 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 





















>> 


c 




















































3 
























-s 


-= 












































































1 


3 


















































[x 


:i 


■3 


>. 
















>> 


>, 


'S 






















_3 


_3 


3 


1 


^ 


"3 










































_t 


" 


2 


m 


2 


3 


















S 


3 




3 


















i 


% 


.2 


J 


1 


J 






























i 












r| 


:| 


3 


> 


5_ 


3 




•3 


.1 

2 


1 


i 

•3 
J 

2 


1 

J 

2 


2 


1 
i" 


>> 


■2 
5 

1 

•2 
3 


i 

J 


2 

i 

1 
















£!. 




^ 




CI 





.^ 






s 


= 


S 


= 


s= 


g 




s 





5 


s 






2 


J 


2 


2 


-g 


5 


3 





s 


S 


2 


»; 




1 


1 


1 


5 


.r 
3 


1 


1 
5 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


O 




M 


M 






~_ 














::: 






^ 


^ 


•-= 




g 


i 


i 


1 


1 


.1 


d .§ 




^ 


IjT 


jT 


X 


c 


j^ 


>i 


>; 


^ 


>^ 


>^ 


^ ~ 




^ 


::; 


_:^ 


= 






^ 


= 




;5^ 


£^ 


> S" 




'5 


•= 


'5 




^ 


3 


'3 


'3 


'3 


■ = 


■3 


3 c 




U 


6 


^ 


^ 




O 


^ 


CJJ 





C3 


u 


1 -5 


























^ 2 






















_ 


. 


8 






















3 


5 


^ 




. 


. 
















s 


3 


o 














f 

o 








S 




1 

i 


i 

8 


1 
to 




J 




3 
O 


. 






§ 
1 


2 


i 

s 
!3 




1 


£ 


>> 


J 


15 


■g 


"o 

1 


>; 


>i 


1 

•3 


1 

■3 






3 


•2 


S 


J 


-2 


3 


.2 


"0 


"0 












o 


c! 






■g 




^ 














"2 


.2 

2 


4 


4 


1 


3 


J 


•i 


J 


■1 






o 












.2 














O 


►= 


/c 


S; 


►5 


O 


3 


2; 


z 


Z 


2 






; 


T 


T 


"T 


-T 






"T 


T 


T 


c" 




■^ 


g 


1 


1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


i 


1 


i 


g 




1 


E 


= 


= 




s 






3 


3 










1 


s 


2 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


"2 


s 


2 






"S 


"tj 


1 


^ 


^ 


"3 


^ 


1 


1 


"rt 


"rt 






'"' 


'^ 








"^ 








"^ 


■"• 




T 


- 


~ 


~ 


"^ 


~ 


- 


~ 


~^ 


"^ 


~ 


~ 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — Xo. 49. 



57 







> 


















3 


















-3 








































































« 






















































































>, 




:2 














3 


>. 


s 

3 














-3 


3 


•a 














~i 


-3 
















5 




3 














5 


3 


2 
































J2 


S 


>. 


































.a 
















1 


.2 














E 


1 


i 














3 




CJ 














_2 


3 


-3 



















£ 


















-3 
















>, 


e 














-f 




3 














>. 


§ 





_c3 








_2 






















o 


g 





(S 








i3 












s 












.s 


.s 


.2 











= 




— 


.^ 


-3 


-3 








■5 




g 


1 


1 


1 


\ 








1 


J 


3 


1 


■E 


1 






"5^ 


\ 


i 


1 


1 


-g 


>. 


i 


>. 


= 


^ 


X 


J^ 


J^ 


1 


1 


1 


S) 


^ 


1 






















■3 


■3 













3 





o 





a 


U 


^ 


iz; 


^ 


U 


^ 


cT 


















JS 




































o 


















L. 












^- 






= 












s 






1 












e 

























o 




































= 


_ 


_^ 


_ 






C3 






1 





0" 


S 


2 




= 






c: 






d 




■| 












^ 










^ 












>> 


s^ 




















"3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


^ 


3 

-3 


3 

T3 


"5 


2 


p 


2 


.i 


i 


3 


"3 


"o 


1 


g 


i 


1 


s 




1 


1 

-a 


1 


1 


? 


!f 


■^ 


'd 


J 


^ 


a 


g* 


g" 


^ 


^ 


iz; 


^ 


< 


< 


6 


^ 


^ 
















T 


3 


c 


c 


c" 






a 








c 


CS 


C3 






c! 












S 


_s 


s 


S 


g 





a 


*£ 


e 


J 


"o 


"o 


2 





1 


1 


"e 


^ 


"S 


•g 


■5 


-3 


■g 


P-. 




p., 


'^-i 


p" 


f2 


(2 


=i 


s^ 


" 


(N 


- 


- 


- 


~ 


»o 


- 


M 



POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. 



Table IX. 
y umber and Distribution of H or$es used in the Department. 



Divisions. 


Van. 


PatrtJ. 


Riding. 


.\mbu- 
lance. 


Driv- 
ing. 


Totali. 


Headquarters, . 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


DU-i£!on 1, . . . 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 2, . . . 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 3, . . . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di\-ision 4, . . . 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 5, . . . 




3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Di^-ision 6, . . . 




1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Di^ision 7, . . . 




1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Division 9, . . . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 10, ... 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 11, . . . 


- 


2 


6 


- 


1 


9 


Division 12, . . . 




1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Di^■isionl3, . . . 




2 


4 


- 


1 


7 


Di\Tsion 14, 




1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


Di\-ision 15, 




2 


- 


- 




2 


Division 16, 


- 


1 


11 


- 


- 


12 


Signal sen-ice, repair de- 
partment, 40 Joy Street. 
House of detention, . 


3 
2 


3 


1 


- 


3 


10 
2 


Prison van, 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Totali?, 


9 


28 


28 


6 


8 


79 



ii 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



Number of Arrests by Police Ditdsions during the Year ending Nov. 30, 
1911. 



Females. Totals. 



Headquarters, 
Division 1, 
Division 2, 
Di\Tsion 3, 
Division 4, 
Di\Tsion 5, 
Di\Tsion 6, 
Di\Tsion 7, 
Di\-ision 8, 
Di\Tsion 9, 
Di\-ision 10, 
Di%-ision 11, 
Di%Tsion 12, 
Division 13, 
Di%Tsion 14, 
Di\Tsion 15, 
Di\T.sion 16, 
Totals, 



770 
12,302 
4,363 
7,256 
7,2S2 
6,572 
3,753 
2,477 
41 
2,596 
3,507 
1,851 
1,072 
1,520 
1,324 
5,016 
2,072 
63774 



349 
857 
204 

1,234 
954 

1,154 
313 
197 
1 
268 
465 
76 
76 
52 
51 

335 
82 



1,119 
13,159 
4,567 
8,490 
8,236 
7,726 
4,066 
2,674 
42 
2,864 
3,972 
1,927 
1,148 
1,572 
1,375 
5,351 
2,154 
70.442 



POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. 



3 ^ 



I -1 







^ 






















^1 






















"5 






















fj 


T 


¥ 


T 


~ 


2 


T 


rs » TK 


~ 


" 3 




|h 






«■ 






































. 


« 


00 


_^ 


~j~ 


~«~ 


^ 


1 1 1 


"~j~ 


« o 




£ 






















1 






« 
















S 






















i = 


~^ 


M 


t- 


~r 


« 


T 


St 1 1 


v 


-^ 2 




eJi 






eo 
















Z| 






















i- 






















h 


T 


1" 


r- 


~r 


00 


s 


ei — « 


~ 


„ 3 




■l\ 






"''. 
















,c 
























3 


~ 


o 




~~~" 


~~~" 


« 


~~~" 


o 


1 


iIJi 






s 




































Ph 


= ^ 


O 


O 


00 


"7~ 


■"TT 


"^ 


n » 1 


~~l~ 


rt « 


w 


i| 


;; 








"* 


" 








p 


iS- 




















p> 


•^■s- 




















S 






























o 




t- 


CO 






" fe 


5 


-A 




CI 


3. 






C5 






o 


o 


Oi 




















< 


5 




















i 


5 


S 


s 


T 


~ 


T 


s 


" " ' 


~ 


" 3 




,= 






CI 














ih 


r" 




















A 






















o 






























«3 








1 




1 -^ t 


1 


1 o 






" 




















- 










c 














o 


^ 


■^ 




















I^; 


.jj 






























CI 


o 


1 


00 




r; o •<• 










i 


« 


n 




)±1 


o 






»~ 






























■s. 








































• o 






















s 






















Q 




g 


















J 




7, 






















■A 








J 










• = 




1 


£ 




£? 


1 






• 3* 1 

^ 2 




1 

-i 1 




a 






e 

S 


2 


-- 


g 


- i 2 




1 ^ 






3 

^ 


\ 


II 


.S 
1 
3 

1 


i 

i 

< 


1 

i 

< 


111 


j 





1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 



61 







1 1 


1 


1 1 1 1 








^S2S"82"§g2- 


n 


"-'=-<=' ' 2 S ' ' 


i 


' 


O CO O . „ CO , CO . . , 


-^ 2 S - 2 2 « § 5 " ' 




I 1 1 1 1 r 1 I 1 <N 1 1 


3 


'i:2§ ico^ 'SSo" ' 


i 


"2°g"S2^aS'-- 


i 


"SSg^gS'^SSS-^ 


i 


««MOMI 1 I.01 1 1 


n 


-si^g-^as^sss- 


X 

e 




t 


1 s 


Murder, nssoult with intent to, . 
Murder, conspiring to commit, . 
R»no 


2 

\ 

CS ei 


Rob, assault to 

Robbery 

Sodomy and other unnatural practices. 
Wife, abandonment of, . . . 


1 





POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. 



I i 





if 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 


u 


o-.go5--«» 


13 


^ 1 


2- ' S ' S 2 ' - "= 


s 


Ml 


2 ' g -§•»'- « 


a 


1 r 


O , g - 5 * , -H „ 


•«■ 




,...-.... 


" 


ill 


o^»c.-o-.-o 


s 




g , g « g u, . , ^ 


i 


1 


o . g . 5 - . . o 


3 


1 


1 


1 1 « 1 - 1 1 1 1 


CJ 


1 


S " 2 " S ^ " ° 


S 


1 
! 


i 
1 


? ? .1 .= =5 1 1 1 i 

iijjjijjj 

1 III III 1 J i i 

1 III III ill 1 1 
E m m th 1 1 

ncscapaooe 


1 

1 





'- 1 




o o 








S ' 




ao _ 


'ri 




r-. 












2 


I- 1 






b 


■» 1 


H 




5: 




g 




a 




s 








o 


o » 



i i § 



■5 
5 a 

!i 

l« 

a ° 3 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



1 


' 


1 


' 


' 


' 


1 


1 


' 


1 


I 


1 


' 


1 


' 


1 


~ 


11 


? 


X 


t- 


1 


f. 


t: 


S 


" 


t~ 


' 


"^ 


' 


o 


2 


§ 


i 


1 


t» 


' 


s 


i 


3 


S 


^ 


o 


n 


■ 


" 


' 


' 


1 


"■ 


a 


N 


n 


t~ 


' 


g 


o 


^ 


o 




" 


■ 


" 


' 


" 


' 


t» 


s 






_ 


, 


^ 


f-l 


~ 


rr 


<-i 


f^ 


1 


^ 


^ 


r-i 


i-i 


rt 


^ 


-^ ■ 








^ 
























" 




' 


' 


"^ 


1 


" 


' 


' 


' 


1 


1 


'^ 


' 


' 


' 


at 


? 


^i 


n 


' 


^ 


o 


p. 


g 


^ 


o 


2 


" 


n 


" 


' 


' 


§ 


a 


2 


c 


rr 


_ 


,-1 


_ 


o 


« 


^ 


^ 


1 


n 


1 


in 


D 




_ 


n t 








s 


























S 1 

-"1 




m 




^ 


(-> 




f-T 








m 








§ 


§ 


- ! 


-T 






^ 


S 






••■< 










'^ 


« 


g 








" 


























"■| 


to 


' 


' 


t- 


5 


" 


1 


' 


' 


' 


' 


' 


CO 


M 


" 


« 


1 1 


s 


t- 


r- 


i 


§ 


§ 


§ 


« 


s 


- 


o 


- 


2 


O 


s 


1". 


§1 








« 




























1 




i 


i 






R 








2 
1 








1 


1 




i 




S 


i 








= 


1 




- 




s 


1 


.a 


1 




f 


1 


i 


J 
5 




I 


1 


2 


s 
J 

1 


1 

i 


1 
g 

§ 


1 


1 


1 


lif 




1 
1 

I 




In 




1 


1 


1 




1 


s 

1. 


J 


1. 


ifli 




■5 





I i 1^ 



I i-! 



1 i ill 1 

^ u ^ J >3 






64 



POLICE COAOIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 





-I 


1 1 1 


' 


3^ 


" 1 - 


i 


i 


1 t- o 


£J 


A 


^ g „ 


S 


■■I 


« 5 2 


s 


m 


1 - o 


5 


II 


<N - O 


2 


A 

s 


- S .' 


2 


1 


" § s 


1 


i 


■z 


^ « « 





J 


" 3 ?5 


g 




i 


1 1 

ill 

£■35 

< S is 


1 




1912.] PUBLIC DOCIBIEXT — No. 49. 65 



I I I 



(N 


" 


(N .-" rt 


"^ 


g 


° ^ 


'^ 


5 


S 


M 


N 


n r^ 


" 


'^ 


"^ 


'^ 


1 


' 


"" 


1 1 1 


' 


"* 


1 r~ 


' 


M 


t2 


' 


' 


' ' 


' 


' 


' 


' 


§ 


' 


' 




n 


' 


1 o 


1 


■ 


' 


■ 


" 


1 1 


■ 


" 


1 


1 


S 


CI 


^ 


- - CI 


o 


S 


" i 


" 


5! 


S 


M 


M 


" 


n 


' 


' 


' 


5 


" 


g 


M 1 « 


Cl 


3 


t- 


' 


?3 


o 


' 


' 


n 1 


^ 


' 


' 


' 


g 


1 


' 




n 


s 


' 1 


' 


2 


5 


' 


' 


1 1 


' 


' 


' 


' 


'' 


'^ 


M 




' 


g 


S " 


" 


•o 


M 


M 


M 


1 -H 


' 


"^ 


■^ 


'^ 


>o 


M 


" 


M -i M 


o 


2 


° is 


^ 


' 


S 


« 


N 


CO « 


■<:< 


'^ 


" 


"" 


1 


' 


>o 


1 1 « 


1 


5 


" 


' 


' 


' 


' 


' 


1 1 


1 


' 


" 


1 


§ 


N 


?; 


M - f 


o 


S 


"' 


'^ 


■* 


5 


CI 


« 


n ^ 


•* 


" 


' 


"^ 


•* 


s 




■4 : • 






■ ^ 










i 


•^ = 


i 






^ 


• 



OS = .c s = .a >. 



= >> .2 3=5 .o^SSS-S-> 



.3 a 



lj.2 i '^ g : J i -2 = 1 ^ -J -a -gri --s 3 o .2 
|s| I f 1 i I i ^ I J I I I |.|i ^ ^ -^ 1 

M-r c o .= .- S .s o £ •- 2. •- -a c 3 



ii 111 I 1 II III I 1 I iliHIIll I if 



66 



POLICE CO-MMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



I I I I I 





h- 


- § 3 g - 5 


- S - g o ^ - 


1 




' :: ° 2 ' S 


1 1 , « o o , 


i 
= 1 


•9 


-^222 ' g 


' ^ " 2 u S - 




n 


- 5 ?J § -^ S 


- S " 2 ? § -^ 


m 


' 


.,«,,, 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•0 


. s - • ' 1 


, „ . . « g . 


A 


" 


- s s I - ?? 


0. o « - g « o 




'' 


" 2 " 1 " ? 


- s - g o s - 



j Mlt-IIIOIMII—gl 

I ^ M -^ " g 

g ' I ' ■ 

2 a,. 

%%•-%■% 

i . . . 1 . . =■ J I . } J i I 
I i i I i J I :il i 11 1 1 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



67 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 


-fCOt^C^-^Tit~Ct 


1 


r- 1 - 1 rj r» t- - 


a 


1 ^ N 1 t- 1 IT 


§ 


r^ ,3 t~ 'S <S - 1 -? 


i 


1 1 1 1 — n o 1 


« 


-H « rt N O 1 Id 


i 


" *" S 2 *" ' -* " 


1 


■«'*i:;22^''S:j 


1 




i 


"'-222:=^'- = 


3 


. . . . . . . . 1 


Open and gross lewdness, . 

Polygamy 

Prostitution, enticing to. . 
Prostitute, receiving procueds from. 
Publio oonveyanoo. being disorderly in, 
Ucllgious worship, disturbing, . 
Schools, disturbing, . 
Unnatural and liisuivious nets. 


1 





' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


' 


' 






„ 


n 






^ 


us 










5 










1 


1 




-» 


-^ 


1 


CO 




































M 


, 


. 


_ 




. 






































13 


- 


- 


t^ 


1 


1 


M 


d 
































































s 


IN 


-H 


?J 


3: 


_ 


^ 


« 










































































r-> 






C4 


















g; 
































§ 






























































































Z, 
















1 


2 


-^ 


M 


» 


=0 


- 





m 
































^ 


I" 


1 


1 


, 


_ 


1 


1 


u 
































u. 

































06 


00 


- 


M 


2 


t^ 


- 


10 


















^ 


















S 



i 










• 




1 


;a 














,3 


^ 




. 










n 


^ 















P 


.9 





-= 




•* 








^ 


'f. 













1 
.1 


li 


2 

? 

— 


1 






^ 


i 

1 




1 


P 


= 

i. 
< 


t 


i 
1 




J 
1 



POLICE CO-MMISSIOXEE. 







-: 


, 


, 


, 


, 


^ 


, 




, 




, 








































•J? 


























































































= . 


- 


- 


ca 


- 


2 


?! 


n 


"S- 


x 


- 


3 


Cl 


§ - 


































■fi 




























































,- 


1 


__i 


1 




_ 


Cl 


. 




X 


^ 


N 


1 


n 1 


































1 






























^ 
































^ 










__ 


. 




^ 


, 


o 


. 






i = 






















•^ 








zl 




























"g 


c 




























g 


i 


, 


o 


M 


•s 


-, 


,, 


n 


, 


^ 


- 


>a 


M 


cJ - 


•^ 


a ^ 










■-i 


















§ 


St 




























o 






























1 




, 


-a 


, 


, 


^ 


U9 


^ 


rt 


^ 


- 


f? 


« 


1 1 




= i=? 










o 












^ 






z 


= 1 >..? 




























9 






























i 


=1 


, 


, 


, 


-, 


2 


1 


1 


1 


=; 


1 


? 


1 


t- I 


o 


-z 






























:^S 




























a 


* = 




























? 


1 


- 


o 


C^ 


i2 


o 


r- 


M 


- 


- 


. 


s 


1 






= s 






























-5 




























a 


i: 




























a 




- 


- 


« 


- 


- 


%\ 


n 


^ 


« 


- 


3 


« 


2 - 


•3 


^ 










— . 


















2 


H 




























— 






























S 

















_ 




, 


- 




„ 


, 




Z 
















'"' 






" 




" 






f^ 




1 






























































.; 












a 


-i 






r. 




a 




— 


^ 




J 




- 




o 


§ 












3 




t- 


O 




= 




























00 








s 




















• s 


o 




























s 


^ 


O 




"3 


J 

o 

! 








i 






3 


•3 

f 




• i 

o" 1 




^ 


« 


s 


• 








4 






^ 




3 






i 


1 


•| 


» 




1 




5i" 


i 


S 
it 


1 


>■ 


1 


1 i 




5 


f 




1 




i 


1 


1 


s 


f 


1 


2 


1 


1 ! 




z 


•is 


■.? 


\ 


= 1 




i 


1 




1 


2: 


1 


1 


ih 








1 


■| 


i 


O 


3 
O 


:= 


6 


6 


2 


1 


5 


J a 3- 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



1 1 1 1 


• ' s 


§ ' ' 


1 1 1 


' 


' 


' ' 


' 


' 


1 


" ' 2 " 


'^ s - 


, 3 -, 


" i "^ 


N 


« 


1 s 


o 


" 


o 


1 1 O '^ 


1 r- i^ 


h- = 1 


1 t~ rH 


. 


. 


rs o 


^ 


1 










C5 




















1 1< -H 


^ 


1 




, 


, 


, 








a. 






3 ^ 










^ 


M O -H 


„ „ 


^ 






1 


^ 




" 






g 














o - -« - 




' § -- 




M 


' 


2 " 


T!< 


■^ 


CO 




1 1 M 


a o 1 


1 CO M 




1 


t~ -H 


__! 




n 




























1 






00 








2 « ? " 


' § ' 


^ C> 1 


g ;? " 


' 


M 


i 3 


"^ 


' 


'* 


« - g ' 


-^ s s 


§ 3 - 


O ^ U5 


ri 


n 


S 5 


O 


_ 


o 








§■ 






H o 








CJ •«« -i 1 


' S ' 


S S ' 


^S ' 


' 


' 


1 « 


' 


' 


' 


, ,-. 


" i ^ 


S 3 - 


2 1 - 


N 


n 


i s 


o 


'^ 


e 


• - • • 


? • • 


• • 2 




i 






^ 


























It' 

i ■ i ■ 

8 2 1 1 


1 . . 

■= 
J ■ ■ 

i 

•3 . . 


S J 
. S 2 


1" 
§ 'I 


1 

n 

1 

1 


s 

1 


if 


B 

S 

g 


i 

H 
3 


1 

4 

3 


ill? 


itL 


2 8_ 
■^ .1 -J 


1 i i 


11 


II 


■? 

u 

s 


1 
1 


1 

•3 






















Jill 


HI 1 


nil 


11-^ 
5 2 § 


1'^ 

g-5 




if 




2 


O Q Q 


Q Q fl 


Q Q W 




14 


a fci 


(:^ 


P^ 


S 



70 



POLICE co:ndiissioxer. 





■z 


, 


, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


, 


, 


1 




, 


1 


, 


is 

- s 






























u 






























J^ 


s 


~T 


s 


f> 


i 


= 


"^ 


"^ 


~ 


^ 




g 


~ 


■«" 


— .5 






























^ > 


























































































— 
































~" 


___ 


___ 


1 




~" 






~~ 


1 




C5 


~ 


~ 


t 










^ 






r5 








o 






= 
















r: 














5 






























i = 


~T 


1 


s 


T 


T 


~ 


T 


^ 


"T" 


"^ 




o 


T" 


T 


5 j 






























'i 






























|e 


s 


M 


s 


" 


§ 


X 


T 


1 


" 


2 




s 


'* 


" 


£ 






























iill 


T" 


T" 


T" 




^ 


r~ 




" 


^ 


cs 






' 


~ 
















J:; 




CO 










ii^c 






























■i- 


~r 


~^ 


c 


~~^ 


3 


"Y" 


^, 


"-T 


~Y" 


_ 


_ 


g 


1 


~ 


r = 




























-= ': 
















o 














- t 






























5^ 






























» 


X 


n 


T 


1 




o 


_ 


_ 


~ 


n 


r~ 




^ 


» 




o 






t» 






=> 














5 £ 
























"^ 






i 
































s 


"7" 


B 


M 


2 


CS 


"^ 


"i~ 


~ 


7 


~ 


g 


"TT 


"^ 


1 






























































i 


~r 


"^ 


"^ 


1 


"Y" 


^Y^ 


"^ 


^M^ 


^^ 


r- 


"^ 


o 


~y 


^ 




s 
































.5 






























g 


^ 






























5 




X 




^ 




3 


o 






^ 


2 


_ 


t~ 


_^ 


~ 






t5 




o 
















rj 
























00 
















7, 












































s 


~ 


























































1 


3 


= 












p 




"3 




S 


-J 




1 


1 


1 




•5 




•3 




i 


1 

= 

1 


1 
1 

2 
1 


1 

1 


1 

a. 


1 


1 

1 


1 
■J 

i 

.5 


I.I 


•5 
J 

1 


J 


.^ 


1 






i 


1 




1 


.1 


.1 


•ill 11 


— 


3 

1 


i 


1 


1 




c 






a 


c 


B 


il = 




•2 




o 


a 








■^ 


e 


! 


1 


a 


a 


o" 


■<3-a 


o 


^ 


2 


s 


J 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUilEXT — Xo. 49. 71 



I •! t I 



I 1 I I I I 'H I 



O [ -» I 






s i 
1 I 



■i I -^ 



lllll^ill^^iil 



5 'i 



S ^ 3 3 ^ S z 



72 



POLICE com:missioxer. 



[Jan. 



_: 


1 1 1 1' 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 


i 


^s^ss-^g-^ssssss 


H 


,o,-, 'S-'^o^JISg 


^1 


-,,OC,^.^J,.,J-0| 


p 


'«- .ocj-'' '2S^?;g3 


m 


' - ■ ■ S ' ' - ' - " S S 2 


il 


<=«'"' 'Ii'22C:?3SS 


5 


.......,„ g . o - o 


1 


'=n^22'^S'^S2SSS§ 


i 


1 


«o,-. ,«-,,^„^„ 


^ 


" 2 « = 2 - 2 ' ;; g s K 1 S 


1 

o 

Z 




illiil!!!! 

iJillilllllii! 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



s ' 1 1 ' s • s: 



t: ' "■ = :S ' - 



■JO » ea 



■* C» 00 CT O O O 



^ 


M 1 


^ 
















~ 


~ 







- ^ 








S 








S 






M- 












i ■ 












H 1 


tf 












§ • 




•2 












* "5 


g 














l" 

1 

1 

5 


1 i 
1 1 

1 I 

"! 1 
III 


>> 

1 

.5 

1 

i 


p; 


"3 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

i 


1 

I 


II 

- s" 

11 

PI 

tn CO 


1 ■ 

11 

Hi 

tn. 


1 

i 

1 


1 


•3 
1 

i 

1 


.= 

1 
§ 
1 


"3 

1 
> 

i 


11 

1 1 

0} 1 



74 



POLICE CODIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






i 


1 





«- 


■ii 


g ^ a -' - 


1 


1 


;?--■' ' 


o 
1 


4 


f."''' 


1 


p 


2 •= o ; 1 


i. 


ill 


' ' - ' ' 


i 


ll 

j=5 


^ a " ' ' 


i 


1 i 


V. -= - ^' - 


1 


i 1 


g S ?5 — 


2 
S 
i 


'I 


I 


= . 1 1 , 


1 


1 


i - = " - 


1 


1 

I 
! 1 

1 ^ 

— 

I i 


II 


■ ■ i ■ ■ 

■ • « •• 

•5 

•Ml 

tin 

> > s: -s S: 


1 

c2 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



75 





4 


' ■ " ' ' ' ' 1 


13 




ii 


si 1 1 s 3 g 3 


i 




i 


i i 1 - " 5 B 2 


i 

t-" 




il 


§ e ^ S ^' ?? o I 


1 




I: 

P 


^2 i s ^ ? i i 


1 




m 


3 " 2 5 ' -S ^ 1 


5 




1! 


c= s H — il i i 


i 




5 


5| |S52|| 


1 




1 


n 3 1 1 S S g 1 
- 8 


i" 




s 


i 

s 


§ " s 2 " s e 1 


F 




1 


1 3 1 a is 1 i 1. 


3 






o 
i 

1 
3 

< 


J ilflii 

f liilil 

If. ill HI 

1 11 III ° J J .1 

s 2| s:: 1 1 1 1 • 
i 11 ill ^ I I I 
i i| ip lii i i, 

- cJ.| «.-^-^«|o ,>: 00.= 

1 1' ri"i°^ 1 1^ 


■ i 

. 1 

4 





POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






'^ L- 



s 

o 




— = ••"-§'!) 






. ^ . ^ . = M|| 




1 

1 


b 


=.,.,.-=, 2 i = 




S 


S " g " — = Ij^ 




sis 

i 




= ■- '-i- 


1 


S 


S - S - ' 2 2 gig 




I 

SIS 


:>: 


n ■ = " ■ H S =JV 




;;; 


5 2 5 2 ' 5 g III 




i 

1 


— 
"" 


? ■ S — = ^ =1= 

1 




:^ 


1- - g ^ " — |;n 




1 




5 ■ 2 " ' 2 S g|= 




=^ 


...3=.. Ill 




1 i 

si. 


:4 


.-."-=.§, II 




:; 


s 3 a - = - ^ nJH 




1 


'^ 


==="='="•' M y 11 




^. 


^ ^ - " " ^ = Bii 




s^a 


i 


s ' s " " - i iji 




S 


n e g s c= s 5 III 




1 
5 


s.' 


=-. . . -..:h 




:? 


il H 2 " " '— III 




sis 


t: 


"" ^i= 




s 


2 = g - ■ ■ ' ija. 1 






b 


s;^ 




Z 


r 1 1 1 1 1 1 - j- 




o 
z. 

5 


1 






- c.- c- w «■ o ,~ trr •§ 1 





1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — Xo. 49. 







o 


o K 


3 


?5 


1 _ 






n 






o 






TSWirSS S30J 




1.-5 — 


?1 


?» 






f«T;i\Y fo ianoni\ 


—•_ 


IN M 


=i 


" 


K 






— r 


2 ~' 


.-" 




Cl" 






^ 








3> 






ST 


^ ,~ 


fi" 










t^ 


rj 


O 






■l.Tioo-.Ta.-:sp<iai 


S' 


a t 




S" 


i^ 




-IV .iAv<i ^ «quinx 


^ 






.- 


.- r.- 


"TT 


^«" 


^2 






1 


i 


- 


-3 


S 


3 


-nofijiai JO Kjcs^^ 




"' -~ 


d- 


~- 


?? 


"g 




o 


_ „ 


_ 


o i .. il 


■"' 




o 


O QC 


3 


c: 


i-. 


rf 


•UI103 .Cq f^wodmi 


§ 


i 1 


2 


§ 


t^ 


CJ 


MOij; _K> innouiv 


"- 


-- 




X 






c 




:o" 




— - 


_2 






5 2 


r-3 


ci 








r; 








r3 


?- 










1 OS- 


% 




-f 


r^ o 


r? 


CO M 






-3> 


o cc 


t- 




-y" 


•/CiO 


(-J 




o 


o 


o 


^ 


s^i }o in« pa^ ni 






■£ 


CI 


•~ 


nsjois •paw,03Sj 


1 




sf 


g- 1 








M C-1 




CI 


-i 1 


><■ -1 




«' 






^[ '» il 














-.. .= 




o 


— O 


b- 






:2 :e 




o 


i> c: 




t^ 


55 


= o 


•-•r-.iO 5^ a aajwis 


:2 


g s 


2 


CI 


r? 


c- .^ 


AUadojj >:> sanouiv 


o_ 


(M O 


o 


X 


CI 
















:^ 






o" r," 


o" 


o" 


cT 






L-3 c:; 


1- 


o 


















"■r^ 




60 








'/> 




•nsai 


N 


^ ^ 


3 


« 


t? 


1 


-rv JO BT:n»j3j 


C5 


-^ « 


c: 


d 


d 










































^ 














_g 




00 


o c^ 




S? 


1.-5 




j^ 


•* — 


3 








-pwwaijo 


■= 


— o 


(M_ 


-r 


5 


g 


raoRiaj JO jsqmnx 


ti 


» -T 




c" 


rsT 






o 


^ t^ 


t^ 




=J 


s. 










































o 


-uou 


1 


1 i 


1 


1 


1 




-nindoj pwrerniisa 


o" 


cc" o~ 


o- 










o 


3 S 


5 


i 


s 




»- 












= 








s 




> 








1 






1 


1 i 


o* 


i 





POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



3 5 








sssssss 


ssss^ 


gi3SsHgs=5 S 8S| 


5 


i 


if l^pi-pip^i'"'^^ s =•= 


S 


1 


« 


< 




"• 


ir: 


o ,^^ - _ , , , , 


_ 








M3 




"* 


"11 








,,«,,„„ c , , , , 


2 


i 






























il 


o - "5. 
















, , ,0 , ,00 , ,., , ,^., ,= , , . , 




ll 


o to ?1 




il 






.; 


., ,.,_ ,«c.- = ^.xor-=.. ,« . . . 


- 


i 






1 il 












III 


•^'2|5J.^S'3S^::g-'» li 


|s 


— 


1 


\t.i 


-£2Spp:s§si=-^=rH 


§ 


-m 


£— 


%i 




' II 










i 1 ■ ■ ■ 










e J 










§ = 










•••• 1? •■ ■ 












1 








§ J ° . 




















= — 2" 


1 








■ ■ ■ = ■ (? -s 


1 s 








..|....i..!.«i . 


s 








-l-lfjlil ■ 










::i:;::li : 
















ir- 


III 

it 


riill : 








■JiyiiiHwii 

illillllliiWy 


1 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



T.UBLE XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Sov. SO, 1911. 



Di^ioss. 1 SlalM. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


1 Biwdcra. 


Tools. 


1, 






99 


30 


2 


1 


132 


2, 








11 


7 


- 


- 


18 


3, 








24S 


S4 


" 


4 


347 


4, 








lOS 


37 




1 


146 


5, 








426 


172 


•22 


2 


622 


6, 








322 


79 


4 


- 


405 


7, 








616 


93 


6 


- 


715 


9, 








824 


160 


40 


1 


1,025 


10, 








656 


133 


21 


1 


Sll 


11, 








1,765 


314 


97 


5 


2,181 


12, 








490 


101 


27 


1 


619 


13, 








1,212 


172 


S9 


1 


1,474 


14, 








595 


122 


42 


1 


760. 


15, 








454 


123 


10 


- 


587 


16, . 








491 


107 


3S 


- 


636 


Tot 


als. 


_ 


8,317 


1,734 


409 


IS 


10,478 



Table XVI. 
Total Number of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Dirisicns. 



Division 1, 






. 1.122 


Division 2, 








1,729 


Di\ision 3, 








208 


Di^^sion 4, 








550 


Di\Tsion 5, 








455 


Di^-ision C, 








252 


Di\ision 7, 








144 


Dinsion 8, 










Division 9, 








150 



Division 10, 
Di\Tsion 11, 
Division 12, 
Di\Tsion 13, 
Division 14, 
Division 15, 
Division 16, 

Total. . 



105 
95 
79 
45 
38 

172 
97 



80 POLICE COM-MISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Table XVII. 
Financial Slalemcnl for the Year ending Xot. 30, 1011. 

EXPEXDITCRES. 

Pay of police and employees, -51,819,775 40 

Pensions, 135,290 42 

Fuel and light, 1S,741 49 

Water and ice, 605 69 

Furniture and bedding, 2,090 22 

Printing and stationerj-, 12,346 38 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison, . . 7,603 72 

Repairs to station houses and city prison, . . . 9,844 96 

Repairs and supplies for police steamers, . . . . 8,071 00 

Rent and care of telephones and lines 6,046 53 

Purchase of liorses and vehicles, 2,235 79 

Care and kcei^ing horses, harnesses and vehicles, . . 18,581 40 

Carting prisoners to and from stations and citj- priMin, 2,043 95 

Feeding prisoners 3,083 21 

Medical attendance on prisoners, 3,788 15 

Transportation, 1,689 49 

Pursuit of criminals, 2,782 24 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, .... 14,797 57 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc., . . . 2,533 05 

Traveling expenses and food for police, .... 175 90 

Rent of buildings, 6,-359 60 

Total -S2,0S3,6S6 16 

Expen=€s of listing, $23^29 68 

Expenses of house of detention and station house matrons, 10,753 08 

Expenses of signal ser\ice (see Table X\'III), . . 54,055 68 

Total S2,171,S24 60 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Pohce Commissioner, . -517,528 75 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itinerast 
musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, carriage 

maps, etc., 1,161 72 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), . . 26,597 00 

Total, $45,287 47 

For uniform cloth, etc., 12,363 97 

Total, S57,651 44 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 81 

Table XVIII. 

Paymerds on Account of the Signal Service during llie Year ending .Vop. 
30, 1911. 



Labor 828,706 94 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., 6,322 65 

Rent and care of buildings, 4,809 14 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and vehicles, .... 1,414 55 

Stable supplies and furniture, 101 92 

Repairs on buildings, 818 52 

Repairing wagons, harnesses, etc., 1,621 32 

Fuel, gas and water, 1,317 58 

Miscellaneous, car fares, etc., 591 69 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor, . . 3,419 93 

Underground wires, .......... 4,668 55 

Printing, stationerj-, etc., 262 89 

Total §54,055 68 



POLICE CO:NBnSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 





= -r«»?a 


,x-,_c,_«.^go., =,.,,. 






1! T«^ 


' — ..." 


If 




■^■panf-il rs— '"S-^^SE'-'-' ■ • 


■^ 




f "ff^tEH 


-".'-'-" 


"1 


5 




2"' • ■ Ti-' "•§-• • 


■" 


i 


|; -»«iEH 


- .....,..,. 


-• 


t-f«itoi — . . .-s-'-?."" " • ' - 'ell 

1 


^ 
R 


='^r - rt[ 




i-*'i "*""-""■=• 


'g |[ 


2 


1 -.!■ -- hi| 


1 


:^ ---«=— i'=! 


1 

o 


1 -p«nrH 


■" •-■■ 


" it 


^-^ 


2?.— — :;ss-2S- 


■i '1 


1 


£ "P»nrH 




"•■: 


i-- 


1 




1 WH 




1 

i 


2 
» 

^ 




iijjiii 


li 

feiiiiJIaii 


1 
-. ! 

••1 

^-- ! 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



1 pajnrn! 




S5S!S-ggS-gSS« — - 


!'- 


■paini I=>oX 


«, , ,-.02, ,«=. ,^, , . , , Ig, 


1 =• 

ji 


•pajntni 


"'""'"-""=^'^"""-|'i 


Mnn 


iliiiiiniiniiiiiiii, .oi 




■pajntai 


= o, ,^-g,^.. ,o j ,g 


■painH 


- " 1- 


i 


•pajtifoj 


«0«. .C-g-, ,0, , , g 


■i«inx 


— , , ,- I„, 

1 


11 


■paintai 


■=— ' '--^' '"S!-' ' •—■1 .R 


•i»mM 


- — ,,,-,, 


" 


5 


•p*iT.fai 


- "- -iH 


•F«mH 






1 


■pajiifui 


"^•■-s^-"S-'- \'Z 


•p*mH 


«..c...., 


«, 


s 


•pajntai 


22— '"SS"'"?;'- 


•g 


■p'rax 




" 


o 




— II 


5 

1 




















fii-iJi 


il 

II 



84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 












■5" I 



11 



=2 s 



1^ 



•fFWX 


IEIII|l|ffilll»l|lll|l 


li 


•91 »™.«uj i ' " " " 1 " " ' 


,■ ■! 


SI lOTIDJJi ] 5 


' j 


n iMiMij 1 =. 


i 


£1 WtI.MiJ =. 


•nwap«j| " p"|' 


' 1 


■ur^^,\ P"§' 


■ i 
!l 


•01 walM^j X- Z- 


.^^,\^^ !! i'lP'il' ■ 


.-.«^ji5'"i""p'§p'!'ippr 


1 


•,^,^j m"'r'mmm'^mm ' 


.^^,^J psiiSi55PpHiiippip|| • 


•c vmiMjj 




•H«r«y 


i5lil||||5i|g£li.|pil|p| 


' 


•EWmMij 


lii=i|||ppii=ppiSiiii 


' 


•ZVWIMIJ 


i5iii|||p||sii|ii.s|55p| 




•t jOTiaay 


iligg§S|p§|il§iifi.pggi5 


' 


i 

i 
















HJHJlHIIIHHIIIljiffi 


i 



1912.] 






1^ 



.-2 3 
S:2 

II 

3 «''l 
= :-! 



2 I 

tl 

^"t- 1 



^5 



1^- 



PUBLIC 


DOCmiENT — No. 49. 


85 


•91 iDuioaij 






1 -ci loniDAlj 






•tl "UIMJJ 


" " '" 




•£I unioaJJ 


' ..I.I- 




■Zl vaiDOJj 


II'. 




•11 tOU]03Jd 






■01 i:>°!3a'd 


..,,.,■,.. ._,. .«. 




•6 1--11WJJ 


' • £= -.-"-. .-. 




•8 l^ipwj 


„.,, ...,, , ,«.o.=,^.o,^-.c-^-. 




■I IDOIOOJd 


CI ■ i-i ,«2''2-' •"-"=.'"-'- ' ." 




•9 loaioaia 


^^^-c.s-o"-"^-" — — — -« 




•S iDaiMJj 






•f loaiMJj 


" 




•£ lOOIMJJ 


-.«.«-.»,„«„, o,„«„-_«-,„ 




•J lonioajj 






•I lanioaij 






S 


















mmmmmmui 


1 



POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. [Jan. 1912. 



-g 

^ 


•sinox 


iil3i-52SIi§ISSgHHipiig| 


! 




•9, }oa;Mij 


'■''''''■''''''■'' 'S 




1 


•SI jom»i<i 


' 


' 


.3 


H joaiMJj 


''''''■'''■''' 3 


' 


.? 

o 


•£t jaaiMjj 


' 






Zi loaioaij 


• ' ' ' '23 ' 'K ' 




1 


liwaro-ij 


^^"S- 


" i 


5^- 


•01 loa.oaij 


""■ 2"' ■-' 




IS 


C J^alMiJ 


2 ...... ■ .23 1 • ' ' "3 'Sgg 'SS ' 






-g ^JUIMld 


S2' • •=• • 'Sg '255'2 'Sg2535 ' 




•i jooiaaij 


32- ' •-' '3^^5 = 35513 'S2S = S3S 






•9 joaiMJa 


•"SSSSSZSSSSSSSSg-SSSgSSSS ' 


5 


•S loaiMJj 


SHS252S2S'=3?.:::.=;sg?:=5;5n£3s 


' 


•» loaiMJ,! 


S=,t5S" = 2=22^ = Sg5-2?ggS332 


' 


1 


•£ joatsaij 


S2S2«2l5S-'3£r.=5;S3;:igS'='2gg 


■ 


c 


■Z v>n!Mij 


S'-3?!52S'-22-.-3«SSS = ='3g;gS53 ' 


3 


•I lontoaij 


S23sg = 2'==Sg = 525'«?S;:S2SS ' 










^ 












^ 






f 


-"»-- = -=>'=2"=22f2S'::"22"gVS3?55a 

1111111111111111111111111 


1 



Ij^DEX. 



IN-DEX. 



A. 

PAGE 

Accidents 16.82,83 

persons killed or injured in streets, parks and squares . . 82, 83 

number of, reported 32 

Ambulance service ......... 38 

Arrests 14,27,31.59,60-75,76,77 

age and sex of 76 

comparative statement of ...... . 77 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. ... 27, 66, 75 

for drunkenness 14, 29, 69 

foreigners 28, 60-75 

insane persons ......... 29, 32 

minors 28, 60-76 

nativity of ......... . 28 

nonresidents 14, 28, 60-75 

number of, by div-isions ........ 59 

number of, punjshed by fine ....... 29 

summoned by court 28, 60-75 

total number of ........ . 27 

\-ioIation of city ordinances . ■ . . . . . . 28, 68 

on warrants 28, 60-75 

without warrants 28, 60-75 

Auctioneers 78 

Automobiles 15, 37, 82, 83 

accidents due to . • 16, 82, 83 

cared for 32 

laws 15 

police 37, 39 

public 39 

prosecutions . . ^ 15 

B. 

Benefits and pensions 46 

Bertillon sj-stem 30 

Bridges, defective 32 

Buildings 32 

dangerous, reported 32 

found open and made secure ....... 32 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 30 

c. 

Carriages, public .......... 39, 78 

articles left in ........ . 40 

automobile .......... 37 

number licensed 40, 78 



90 DfDEX. 

PAGE 

Cases inre=tigated 31, 32, 36 

Cesspools, defecti^-e, reported 32 

Children 32 

aboBdoned, cared for 32 

lost restored .......... 32 

Chimnej-s, dangerous, reported ....... 32 

City ordinances, arrests for \-iolation of 28, 68 

Claims, inspector of ........ . 33 

Coal holes, defective 32 

Collective musicians 43, 78 

Commissioners, police 18 

Commitments .......... 29, 34 

Complaints 42, 56, 78 

against police ofEcera ........ 56, 57 

against miscellaneous licenses ....... 42, 78 

Courts 29. 31. 34 

fines imposed by ........ . 29 

number of days' attendance at, by offirers . . 29. 31. 34 

number of persons summoned by ..... . 28 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 30 

arrests 31 

finger-print sj-stem 30 \ 

photographs 30 J 

records ........... 30 

rogues' gallery ......... 30 

Criminal work .......... 77 

comparative statement of ...... . 77 



D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 45 

Dead bodies, cared for ......... 32 

Dead bodies, recovered ......... 30 

Deaths 31 

by accident, suicide, etc. ....... 31 ^ 

of police officers 27, 50 

Department, police 26 

Detectives, private 78 

Distribution of force 27, 48 

Disturbances suppressed ........ 32, 36 

Dogs 33, 78, 79 

amotint received for licenses for 78, 80 

damage done by 33, 80 

number licensed 78, 79 

Drains and vaults, defective reported 32 

Drivers, hack or cab 40, 78 

Drowning, persons rescued from ....... 32, 36 

Drunkenness 14, 29, 34, 69 

arrests for. per day 29 

decrease in number of arrests for ..... . 29 

nonresidents arrested for 14, 29 

total number of arrests for 14, 69 



51 

h 

INDEX. 91 ■ : 



E. 

PAGE 

Employees of the Department 26, 48, 49 

Events, special .......... 33 

Expenditures 46, 80, 81 

Extra duties performed by officers 31, 32 



F. 

Fences, defective, reported 32 

Financial ........... 46 

expenditures 47, 80 

house of detention SO 

pensions ......... 46, 80 

signal service 47, 80, 81 

receipts 47, 78, SO 

miscellaneous license fees 47, 78, SO 

Fines 13, 29, 77 

average amount of . . . . . . 29, 77 

amount of ......... . 77 

number punished by . . . . . . . . 13, 29 

Finger-print system ......... 30 

Fire alarms ........... 32, 36 

defective, reported .......... 32 

number given ......... 32 

number on water front attended 36 

Fires 32, 36 

extinguished 32, 36 

on water front extinguished without alarm .... 36 

Foreigners, number arrested 28, 60-75 

Fugitives from justice 31 



G. 

Gaming, illegal 12, 70 i 

Gas pipes, defective, reported 32 } 

1 

H. :- 

Hack or cab drivers 40, 78 

Hackney carriages 39, 78 

Hand carts ' . . . 78 

Harbor service, special duties performed ...... 35 

"Ferret" in commission ........ 36 

Horses 36,58 

bought, sold, etc 36 

distribution of gg 

number in scrvnce 36, 58 

House of detention 34, 80 

House of ill-fame, keeping 34 

Hydrants, defective, reported 32 



92 INDEX. 

T. 

PAGE 

Imprisonment 13, 29, 77 

persons sentenced to . . . . , , . . 13, 29 

total years of 13, 29, 77 

Income 47.78,80. 

Inquests held .......... 31 

Insane persons taken in charge 29, 32 

Inspector of claims .....,,.. 33 

cases investigated 34 

Intoxicated persons assisted 32 

Itinerant musicians 43, 78 

J. 

Junk collectors ......-,.. 78 

Junk shop keepers ......... 78 

Jur}' lists, police work on 15 

L. 

Lamps, defective, reported ....-,.. 32 

Licenses, miscellaneous . . . . . - , , . 42, 78 

Listing male residents ........ 41, 84, 85 

certificates refused .....-,.. 41 

expenses of .•. . . . . . ■ . .41,80 

number of male residents listed 41,84 

supplementary list of male residents 41,85 

women voters verified 41, 86 

number of policemen employed in . . , . , . 42 

Loans, small .....,,... 46, 78 

Lodgers at station bouses ........ 29 

Lodging houses, public .....,,.. 44 

applications for licenses ....,,.. 44 

authority to license ........ 44 

location of ......-., . 44, 45 

number of persons lodged in 44, 45 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 32, 78, 80 

:\r. 

Medical examiners' assistants 31 

inquests attended 31 

causes of death ......... 31 

cases on which inquests were held ...... 31 

Minors, number arrested 28, 60-75 

Miscellaneous business 32 

Miscellaneous licenses ......... 42, 78 

complaints investigated ........ 42, 78 

number issued 42, 78 

number transferred ........ 42, 78 

number cancelled and revoked ...... 42, 78 

amount of fees collected for . . . ... 42, 78 

Missing persona 32 

number reported 32 

number found ......... 32 



INDEX. 



PACE 

Muddans, itinerant 43, 78 

appIicaUona for licenses 43 

instruments examined ........ 43 

instnimenta condemned ........ 43 • 

iastrumenta passed ........ 43 

Musjcianj, coUectire 43, 78 



X. 

Nativity of persons arrested 28 

Nonresidenta, number arrested 14, 28, 60-75 



0. 

Offences . 13, 27. 60-75. 77 

against the laws 13 

against the person 27, 60, 75 

against property, with violence 27, 62, 75 

against property, without violence 27, 62, 75 

against property, malicious 64, 75 

comparative statement of ...... . 77 

forgery and against currency . . . . . . 27, 64, 75 

against h'cense laws 27, 64, 75 

against chastity, morality, etc. 27, 66, 75 

miscellaneous ........ 27, 67, 75 

recapitulation ......... 75 



P. 

Parki, pubUc 82, 83 

accidents reported in . . . . " . . . . 82, 83 

Pawiibrokers 78 

Pensions and benefits ......... 46 

estimates for pensions ........ 46 

number of persons on rolls ....... 46 

payments on account of 46, 80 

Police 42 

lailroad .......... 42 

special ' 42 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries .... 46 

Police department ......... 26 

free from politics ......... 5 

assaults on citizens 7 

corruption ........... 7 

social evil 10 

bquor laws .......... H 

Samblihg 12 

law 12 

tharges against 16 

trial boards 17 

commissioticfa ......... 18 

how constituted ......... 26 

distribution of 27, 48, 49 



91 INDEX. 



PAGE 

Police department — andixutd 

officers appointed ......... 27 

date appointed ........ 53 

complaints against ........ 56 

died 27.50 

discharged 27, 54 

injured 27 

promoted 27, 52 

resigned 27, 54 

retired 27.51 

absent sick ......... 55 

arrests by ........ . 27 

detaiJed, special erents ....... 33 

work of 27 

horses in use in ........ . 36, 58 

vehicles in use in ....... . 37, 38, 39 

Police Relief Association, inrested funa of .... . 46 

Police oigual service 26, *4, 47. 4&, SO, 81 

cost of maintenance ....... 47, SO, 81 

pajinents .......... 81 

signal boxes .......... 34 

miscellaneous work 35 

property of 35 

Prisoners, nativity of ........ . 28 

Private detectives ......... 78 

Pro.nerty 29,-32,77,78,80 

lost, abandoned and ^olen .32, 78, 80 

fecovcred 29, 31, 36, 77 

sale of condemned 47, 78, SO 

stolen in city 29, 77 

taken from prisoneii and lodgers 29 

Public carriages .......... 39 

Public lodging-bouses ..,.,.... 44, 78 

R. 

Railroad police 42 

Receipts 47, 78 

Registration (see Listing ........ 41 

Rogues' gallery .......... 30, 31 

s. 

Second-hand articles 78 

Sewers, defective, reported 32 

Sick and injured persons ssasted ...... 29, 32, 36 

Sickness, absence on acoomnt of ...... . 55 

Signal service, police 2«, *4, 47, 49, SO. SI 

Small loan licenses ' . 46, 78 

Special events .......... 33 

Special police 42 

Station houses .......... 29 

lodgers at ......... . 29 

witnesses detained at ....... . 29 

Stolen property, value of 29,31,77 

Street railways, conductcss and motormen licensed .... 78 



rS'DEX. 95 



PAGE 

Streets 32, 82. 83 

accidents reported in ....... . 82, 83 

defective, reported ......... 32 

traffic and rules 21 

T. 

Teams 32 

stray, put up 32 

Trees, defective 32 

V, 

Vehicles 37 

ambulances 38 

automobiles .......... 37 

in use in police department 39 

public carriages ......... 39 

wagons 40, 78, 79 

Vessels 36 

w. 

Wagons 40, 78, 79 

number licensed by divisions 79 

total number licensed 40, 78, 79 

Water pipes, defective, reported ....... 32 

Water running to waste reported ....... 32 

Weapons, diingerous ......... 45 

Wires and poles, defective, reported ...... 32 

Witnesses 29, 31, 32, 34, 77 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 31, 77 
fees earned by ofEcers as ....... 29, 77 

number of, detained at station houses 29, 32 

Women committed to House of Detention 34 

Women voters verified 41, 86