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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

onand 

N0XS09 



BOSTON 
i PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Public Document 



No. 49 



J 



SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Yeak endikg Nov. 30, 1912. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEB PBINTrNG CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Oitice Squaex. 

1913. 






Appeoved by 
The Statb Boabd of Publicatiok. 






CONTENTS. 



PACE 

Offences against the laws, ......... 5 

Nonresident offenders, ......... 6 

Police work on jury lists. ......... 7 ? 

Violations of the automobile law, ....... 7 = 

Traffic rules and crowded streets, ....... 13 

As to intoxicated persons, .... ..... 17 

The "third degree," 19 

Police department expenditures, ........ 20 

The department 22 J 

The police force, ......... 22 

Signal service, .......... 22 

Employees of the department, . . ..... 22 

Recapitulation, ..... ..... 22 

Distribution and changes, ... ..... 23 

Police officers injured while on duty, ....... 23 

Work of the department, .... ..... 23 

.Arrests 23 | 

Drunkenness, .......... 26 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation, ...... 26 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners, ...... 27 

Miscellaneous business, ......... 28 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ....... 29 

Special events, ........... 29 

Inspector of claims, . .... . .... 31 

House of detention, .......... 31 

Police signal serv-ice, . . . . . . . . . .32 

Signal boxes, .......... 32 

Miscellaneous work, ......... 32 4 ^ 

Harbor service, ..... ..... 33 .'.$ 

Horses 34 ; J 

Vehicle service, .......... 34 .3 

.\utomobiles, .......... 34 .'| 

Cost of running automobiles, . . ..... 34 • 3 

.Ambulances, .......... 35 i'J 

List of vehicles used by the department, ..... 36 i'i 

Public carriages, .......... 37 ; f 

Wagon licenses, .......... 37 41 

Listing male residents of Boston, etc., ....... 38 .31 

Women voters verified, ........ 38 '. 5 

Listing expenses, ......... 38 

Xumber of policemen employed in listing, ..... 39 

Special police, ...... ..... 39 

Railroad police, ..... ..... 39 

Miscellaneous licenses, ......... 40 

Musicians' licenses, ..... ..... 40 

Itinerant, ........... 40 

Collective, ...... . . , . . 41 



4 CONTENTS. 

PAca 

Public lodzjj:? bouses, .,,-,.... 41 

CaiTj-ing <liQ£»rcn» weapons, .,,,.... 42 

Penfions izA bei>e£ts, ......... 43 

Financial, ...........43 

Estimated tit^^nsf, .......... 44 

Distribution ofpoHee force, ........ 45 

list of officers in active service who find ifiizam; the year, . . .47 

List of officer! retired during the yesr. ...... 48 

Lift of officers vlio were promoted dttm^&it year, .... 49 

Xumber of taea in active ser\'ice, ....... 50 

Officers (Hfhrrffd and resigned durints 4S* ysar, ..... 51 

N'umber of dsTV atsence from duty by teasvM tA sickness, . . .52 

Complaints a^rzinst officers during tbe yxav, .53 

Ntunber and dstribation of horses, ....... 55 

Arrests by diriaoBi during the year, ....... 56 

Arrests and cf esee> for jear, ........ 57 

.\ge and sex of persons arrested, ........ 73 

Comparative Etatiecent of police criirrnnJ »'»i, ..... 74 

Licenses of an daescs issued, . . , . . ... .75 

Dog licenses isced. .......... 76 

Wagon linof^ issatA, ......... 76 

Financial stxtoiEent. .......... 77 

Pa>inents oo aeaytsnt of signal serrioe. ...... 78 

.Occidents, ........... 79 

ifale resideats }ai^uA by wards and presiefls, . J ... 81 
Male reridffTtf. sip^rlementary list, ....... 82 

Women roten lifted, ......... 83 



<lI)c ^ommonojcaltl) of illassacl)usctt0. 



REPORT. 



1 



headqnabters op the pouce department, 
Office of the Pouce Commissioner, 29 Pemberton Square, 
Boston, Pec. 31, 1912. 

To His Excellency Eugent; X. Foss, Governor. 

Your Excellexct: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
pronsions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a report of the 
work of the police department for the year ended Nov. 30, 
1912. 

Offences against the Laws. 
Statistics concerning offences against the laws, which are 
given in full detail in another part of this report, are here sum- 
marized. The total number of arrests in 1912 was 75,496, as 
against 70,442 in 1911. The eight general divisions under 
which offences are classed show the following numbers for five 
years: — 



OlTXNCIS. 


Arrests 
inlSOS. 


Arrests 
in 1909. 


Arrests 
in 1910. 


Arrests 
in 1911. 


Arrests 
in 1912. 


Offences against the person. 


3,591 


3,156 


3,326 


3,213 


3,423 


Offences against property with riolence. 


es2 


525 


479 


535 


510 


Offences against property without violence. 


i,oa 


3,783 


3,584 


3,701 


3,693 


Malicious offences against property, , 


185 


176 


137 


169 


165 


Foiseiy and offences against the currency, . 


76 


71 


69 


60 


67 


Offences against the license laws. 


828 


769 


533 


554 


665 


Offences against chastity, morality, etc, . 


I,U1 


1,409 


1,308 


1,294 


1,916 


Offences not included in the foregoing, in- 
cluding drunkenness. . 


57485 


61,623 


61,766 


60,916 


65,058 


Tirtuls, . . , , 


88,148 


71,512 


71,201 


70,443 


75,496 







6 POLICE CO^nnSSIOXER. [Jan. 

A summary of fines and imprisonments is shown as follows : — 





IMS. 


1M9. 


1910. 


ISll. 


1912. 


Persons fined 


15.735 


17.407 


14.949 


13.772 


12.733 


Totnl amount of fines. .... 


tl59,982 


$161,399 


S 138.140 


$129,432 


SI35,C34 


Peraona sentenced to imprisonment. . 


S.SS3 


9.478 


9.S33 


S.627 


8.559 


Total years of imprisonnoent. 


3.904 


4.130 


3.841 


3.039 


3.&n 



No.VRESIDENT OfFEXDERS. 

The proportion of nonresident offenders among the persons 
arrested for all causes showed a decrease in 1911 for the first 
time in ten years, but only one-hundredth of one per cent. 
In 1912 there was a further decrease of 1.70 per cent. When 
the first police commission was established, in 1S7S, the per- 
centage was 19.90; in 1910 it was 39.65; in 1911 it was 39.&4; 
and in 1912 it was 37.94. The statistics for the past ten years, 
covering arrests for all causes, are as follows: — 





Total 
Arrests. 


XOD- 

residenu. 


of Noi>- 
rcsidcnu. 


1903 

1904 

1905 

190« 


43,033 
50.263 

48.358 
49.906 


14.644 
18.030 
17.167 
18,001 
20.982 
26.113 
27.953 
2S.233 
27.613 
28.645 


29,38 
35.86 
35.50 
36.06 


1907 


57,078 


30 77 


1908 


68.146 


38.32 


1909 

1910 


71.512 
71.201 


39 03 
39 65 


1911 


70 442 


39 64 


1912 


75,496 


37.94 



In the arrests for drjnkenness the percentage of nonresi- 
dents increased steadily for many years, but in 1911 there was 
a decrease from 1910 of seventy-si.x hundredths of one per 
cent., and in 1912 a further decrease of 1.37 per cent. The 
following table gives the statistics for ten years: — 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 





Total 

ArresU 

for 

DninkeD- 

OCflfl. 


Percent- 
age of 

Nonresi- 
deDts. 




Total 
Arrests 
for 
Drunken- 
ness. 


Peroent- 
aiteof 

Nonresi- 
dents. 


1903 


27.757 


42 53 


1908 


42,468 


47.73 


1904 


33,511 


43.36 


1909 


45,321 


47.62 


190S 


32,29S 


43.14 


1910 


47,732 


47.86 


1906.. . . . 


32,380 


44.57 


1911 


46,394 


47.10 


1907.. . . 


37,389 


4J.C3 


1912 


49,846 


45.73 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
For the fifth year the police department, under the pro- 
visions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, has assisted the election 
commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons 
proposed for jury service. The police findings in these five 
years may be summarized as follows: — 





U08. 


UM. 


1110. 


mi. 


1»12. 


Totals. 


Dead or oould Dot be found in Boston, . 


780 


SOS 


1.055 


1356 


1324 


5323 


PhysicaUy ineapadtated. 


492 


223 


332 


499 


279 


1325 


Conrieted of erime. .... 


156 


SS 


183 


587 


32 


1.016 


Unfit for vaiioufl reasons. 


119 


266 


707 


466 


950 


2303 


Apparently fit. 


6.352 


6,870 


7465 


9.578 


9.991 


40,356 


Total of names submitted to police. 


7.899 


8,225 


9342 


12,486 


12,576 


51,028 



Violations of tue Automobile Law. 
The separate charges involving violations of provisions of 
the automobile law prosecuted in the year ended Nov. 30, 
1912, numbered 2,170. These do not include 22 charges against 
automobile drivers for violation of park rules, or 256 charges 
agamst automobile drivers for violation of trafiic rules, which 
were not violations of the automobile law. But they do in- 
clude charges against automobile drivers for violations of park 
or traffic rules which were at the same time violations of the 
automobile law. The details of the prosecutions were as 
follows: — 



■'I 



8 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Overspceding, 375 

I Failure to slow dowTi and give signal at in tersectmg street, . . 795 

i Making improper turns at comers, 107 

j Operating recklessly, '31 

-: Operating while intoxicated, 28 

Operating on wrong side of street or not as near as possible to 

right curb, 127 

Failure to stop for street cars or other vehicles or pedestrians, . 1 5 

Lamps lacking, not Ughted or not in proper condition, . . 330 

Operating while unlicensed, 24 

Operating without license on person, 78 

Operating an unregistered car, 17 

Operating a registered car without certificate of registration on 

person, 40 

Operating a registered car without numbers, or with wrong 

numbers, or with numbers improperly displaj'ed or not in 

proper condition, 28 

Cutting out muffler, 10 

Making an unreasonable noise with signalling apparatus, . . 15 

Allowing an unreasonable amount of smoke to escape, . . 98 

ilisccUaneous, 241 

Total, 2,170 

In the first part of this list, without making specific di\i- 
sions, I have placed the offences involving immediate danger 
to the public; in the second part, offences especially affecting 
means of identification; and at the end, offences against the 
comfort rather than the safety of the public. 

The first record of an automobile prosecution by the Boston 
i • police was made only eleven years ago, when the single offence 

of the year 1901 was the driving of a motor car in a public 
park without a permit. In 1902 there were 33 prosecutions; 
in 1903, 67; in 1904, 179; in 1905, 102; in 1906, 308; in 1907, 
961; in 1908, 1,865; in 1909, 2,196; in 1910,2,334; in 1911, 
1,899; in 1912, 2,170. 

Accidents to persons, due to the operation of automobiles, 
' are first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Begin- 
ning with that year their number to the present time is shown 
in the following table: — 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



Veab. 


Kni«i. 


Injimd. 


Yea«. 


Killed. 


Injured. 


1900» .... 


- 


19 


1907 


7 


105 


IMI. 










- 


8 


1S<B 


6 


127 


1903, 










- 


17 


1909 


9 


251 


1903. 










2 


2i 


1910, .... 


13 


280 


im. 










1 


So 


1911, .... 


14 


351 


19IS. 










2 


78 


Wli. - . . . 


22 


483 


1906. 










1 


110 ; 









After long and careful personal observation, the daily study 
of complete official reports of accidents and prosecutions, and 
an extensive experience \^^th complaints by and against owners 
and drivers of automobiles, I have formed opinions which I 
express as follows: — 

1. The leap in four years, from 6 killed and 127 injured in 
Boston in 1908 to 22 killed and 483 injured in 1912, cannot 
nearly be accounted for by the increased use of motor vehicles, 
large though that increase has been- The training in caution 
which the public has received in those four years ought in 
itself almost to have balanced the added number of auto- 
mobiles. Neither has there been a marked increase in what 
is termed "reckless dri\'ing," though one sensational accident 
imder that heading attracts more attention than a dozen ordi- 
nary- accidents involving many times the number of persons 
injured. 

2. I believe that the prindpal cause of the growth of the 
list of killed and injured is the increase in the average speed of 
motor vehicles. To the same cause may be charged an enor- 
mous amount of anxiety, inconvenience and delay suffered by 
the walking public. This phase of the case is incapable of 
statistical representation, but every person who attempts to 
cross a street or to enter or leave a street car where automobiles 
are numerous knows what it means. 

3. The effects of the increase in average speed are seen not 
only in open streets and avenues frequented by automobiles, 
but in parts of the city in which the vcJume of travel by vehicles 
and on foot is so great that a high rate of speed is impossible. 
The owner of an automobile, who rushes through the streets 



.■| 



10 POLICE C0:NDIISSI0XER. [Jan. 

and avenues leading to the heart of the city and thereupon 
finds that he must reduce his speed and take his turn with 
others, is quite likely to become impatient, to forget where he 
is, to revile in his heart and sometimes by word of mouth the 
policeman who holds him in check, and to regard all other 
vehicles and pedestrians, too, as merely obstacles to his prog- 
ress. Thus it is that Police Di\-ision 2, a purely business 
J section with headquarters in Court Square, c-overing a small 

I territory' in which high spctd in the daxtime, at least, would 

be out of the question, contributes 72 persons to this year's 
! list of those injured by automobiles. 

4. The automobile act of 1909 declared that in thickly set- 
tled places a speed above fifteen miles an hour for an eighth 
1 of a mile should be prima facie e\"idence of ^^oIation of the law. 

That provision is known to all drivers of automobiles and to 
a large part of the public; but the public has little knowledge 
of the difficulty of enforcing it. I think I am right in belie\ing 
i that any specific maximum of speed is sure to be treated by 

many drivers, if not a majority, as a minimum; and it is 
! hard to convince an owner or driver whose car is capable 

j of travelling forty or fifty miles an hour that he is not 

j extremely moderate when he runs it at a rate of twenty to 

thirty miles. 
; 5. In order to prosecute a driver for ovCTspeeding, and to 

take into court the e\'idence which the courts require, it is 
necessarj' to measure accurately an eighth of a mile at a par- 
j ticular place; to station two policemen with stop watches, one 

; at either end of the course; and to arrange that the officer at 

one end shall signal to the officer at the other end that a par- 
ticular car then passing appears to be overspeeding. The 
officer at the further end must take the time instantly at the 
signal, and must be prepared when the car reaches him to say 
whether or not the time of passage in seconds and fractions of 
j seconds has shown that the speed was excessive. \\'hen the 

I speed is so found the officer must stop the car, and from the 

j license or otherwise must ascertain- the name and address of 

I the driver. The officer must then apply at court for a sum- 

mons, and the summons, if granted, names a day in advance 
on which the charge will be heard ; he must ser\e the summons 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCIBIEXT — No. 49. 11 

upon the defendant, whether a resident of Boston or not; and 
he must attend at court on the day appointed and again for 
any continuances which may be ordered. 

6. Contrary to popular belief, it is not suflBdent to show to 
the court that the eighth of a mile was accurately measured, 
that the time of passage as shown by the stop watch was cor- 
rectly taken, and that the elapsed time proved that the speed 
Tas greater than the rate of fifteen miles an hour. After that 
the defendant has a right to show, if he can, and the officer 
must be prepared to meet the contention, that, nevertheless, 
the rate of speed was not in ^^olation of the general and over- 
ruling provision of the act of 1909, to the effect that no person 
shall run a motor vehicle at a rate of speed greater than is 
"reasonable and proper, having regard to traflSc and the use 
of the way and the safety of the public." 

7. The passage from the act of 1909 just quoted was intended 
to prevent a rate of speed, whether low or high, which in con- 
sideration of the immediate surroundings could be shown to 
have been dangerous. But as the proof of acute danger from 
an automobile travelling slowly would require an almost photo- 
graphic reproduction in court of the scene at the instant of the 
alleged \nolation of law, this particular pro\'ision of the act of 
1909 has served far more as a protection to drivers than as a 
means of calling them to account. 

S; Under these conditions it is not strange that the record 
in Boston for the past year shows but 375 prosecutions for 
overspceding as against 795 for a kindred offence, namely, 
failure to slow down and give signal at certain intersecting 
streets. As the court penalty on con\'iction in either case is 
usually the same, the officers detailed to automobile work 
naturally choose the offence which is the less diflScult of legal 
proof. This provision in the act of 1909, concerning inter- 
secting streets, was apparently intended as a means of pro- 
tection for the public, to make up for the greater freedom as 
to speed which was allowed by the same act. Already, how- 
ever, under the traffic rules the signal had been required in 
Boston; and as far as slowing down is concerned, it is not to 
be seen once in a hundred times, except when the immediate 
presence of the police, of veliicles or of foot passengers compels 



12 POLICE CO^BIISSIOXER. ^zn. 

obedience. The A-iolations of this proWsion and of other pro- 
\-isJons of the automobile law are so nmnerous that H xhe 
number of policemen assigned to automobile work couW be 
without limit, c\'ct>" municipal and district court in Bfislon 
might be kept bu3>' everj' day with automobile prosecntioos 
alone. But with the present force, no more men can be spared 
from their general duties for this particular work. 

9. Obedience to criminal laws of all kinds must be enforced 
as against jxr^ons who choose to violate them, by one of two 
means, — the actual presence of polic-emen or the deterrent 
effect of jjunishments inflicted by courts. The police nvethcd 
alone, even with a force ten times as large as the city axJd 
afford to maintain, would utterly fail. It is the moral eStct 
upon the community of the treatment by the courts of aoch 
offenders as the police can place before them upon whici tie 
enforcement of any law must almost wholly depend. In tie 
past five years the poh'ce of Boston have made more tLzn 
10,000 prosecutions raider the automobile laws. Xo one can 
say that they have been without effect. Doubtless they hare 
placed some restraint not only upon the persons proseaited, 
but upon many owners and drivers of automobiles whc Itxre 
never been before the courts. But to say that they have secnred 
a general obedience to the law, or even obedience in a rftaaoa- 
able degree, would be to say what everj-body knows to he not 
true. The small fines imposed by the lower courts are paid, 
or the cases, on appeal, disappear in the mass of business with 
which the Superior Court is required to deal. 

10. There can be no doubt that the use of motor veiodes 
win increase rapidly in the future. Their value for pleaaire 
and for business makes such increase a certainty; and to> ngo- 
late rather than to impede the movement is the proWein, la 
Boston the police will continue to prosecute offenders, despke 
the rather discouraging results heretofore obtained, to tie 
extent that prosecutions can be made by the number of men 
who can be spared for that exclusive purpose, and in aceord' 
ance with the authority conferred upon them from thnc to 
time by the laws. But in certain thoroughfares, espcaafly 
Bo\4ston and Beacon streets and Commonwealth Avtaae, 
eitraordinar}- measures will be required. In Beacon SuecC, 



I 

■ ( 

1913.] PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — No. 49. 13 

for example, from the State House to the cross roads, the 
situation even now is such during at least five or six hours of 
the day that to cross from one side to the other is difficult and 
I dangerous. Whenever the city can afford to furnish the men, 

I it will be necessarj' to assign them to fifteen or twenty street 

intersections in the thoroughfares just named, in addition to 
intersections already policed, for a duty in which they never 
before have been employed, — a duty corresponding more 
nearly to the use of block signals on railroads than to legiti- 
mate police work. In no way other than by the actual presence 
of policemen checking the speed of motor vehicles at short 
intervals will it be possible to secure for foot passengers the 
rights which are theirs or to save even the vehicles themselves 
from injuries mutually inflicted. 

Tr.\FFIC RtTLES .VXD CROWDED STREETS. 

The first prosecution under the street trafiic rules then 
recently passed by the Board of Street Commissioners, was 
made by the Boston police Jan. 26, 1909. In the three years 
and ten months which have intcr\"ened the prosecutions have 
nimabered -5,412. 

In my annual rej>ort for 1911 I devoted several printed pages 
to a statement of the relations of the police to the matter of 
crowded streets, and I shall not repeat. But as the situation 
in the congested parts of the city has become worse, and as 
there is occasionally an intimation that some undefined action 
on the part of the police would pro\'ide a remedy, it seems 
desirable to make some further coirmient. 

If we put aside for the moment all claims of relatively small 
importance we find in the crowded streets eight distinct inter- | 

ests of magnitude represented as follows: — 

The foot traveller. 

The truckman hauling materials and merchandise. 

The street railway company which wants quick passage for 
its cars. 

The expressman who wants to take on and to leave goods at 
stores and at express oflBces. 

The person who owns or occupies a motor car and wants to 
push through in a hurrj-. 

il 



i 



V 



14 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

The hotel man, the traveller and the casual passenger who 
want public carriages to be standing ready at hand. 

Tiie shopper who wants to be carried from store to store in 
carriage or motor car and to find the vehicle always waiting. 

The merchant who wants the foot passenger and the express- 
man to come to him; who wants the shoppers' vehicles to stop 
at his door; who wants his own deliver^' wagons to stand 
and load in front of his premises; who objects to delay in the 
receipt of his merchandise and supplies or in the removal of 
his waste. 

In a discussion of congested streets each of these interests, 
thus roughly designated, may be likened to a juggler's ball; 
and if such discussion is to be worth anything all the balls 
must be kept in the air all the time, — none allowed for an 
instant to be put out of play. Nothing short of that condi- 
tion will express the obligation placed upon the police in their 
street work. But I have never known a writer or any other 
unofficial citizen to discuss the subject of traffic c-ongestion in 
Boston without letting down one or two or three of the balls 
wJiile manipulating the others; and strangely enough, in the 
light of the fact that he is enormously in the majority, it is 
the ball that represents the foot traveller that is allowed to lie 
on the ground most of the time. 

The duty of Boston policemen at street crossings is to fadli- 
tate the movement of vehicles, and ^\ith respect to foot travel- 
lers not only to save them from injury but to see to it that 
their rights are respected by drivers. This last-mentioned 
obligation of the police represents not only courtesy and 
humanity but the actual law as embodied in a city ordinance 
passed thirty years ago and reproduced in the street commis- 
sioners' traffic rules in the following form: — 

No person ha\-ing charge of a vehicle shall allow the same to come 
within ten feet of any vehicles in front of him when approaching and 
passing over a crossing where a pedestrian is about to pass. 

The people know how little attention is paid to that rule 
except in the actual presence of a policeman; but they do not 
know that practically ever)' one of such few compldnts as 
have come to the Police Commissioner in the past year con- 



1913.) PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 15 

ceming police-crossing work has been the complaint of an 
occupant of a motor car who objected to being delayed in 
order that foot travellers might cross streets without running 
for their lives. One of them expressed his \'iew of the matter 
when he exclaimed angrily, "Let the women wait." Well, the 
attitude of the police department on this point is that when 
conditions so require, everj'body must take his share of wait- ' 
ing; that four persons in an automobile impatient to run 
through a street are not of tremendously greater importance 
than four persons on the sidewalk seeking to cross; and that if 
a particular bent is to be shown it is hkely to be in favor of 
the overwhelming majoritj' who walk, including the aged, the 
verj' young and the infirm. 

I recognize and have recognized for years, as shown in sev- 
eral of my annual reports, the increasing difficiJties of the 
street situation. The police who have created none of these 
difficulties are doing constantly for the relief of the public all 
that their numbers and authority permit them to do. They 
expect and receive hostile criticism from each of the conflicting 
interests in turn and but little approval from any. They are 1 



i 



in the position of a man with but one loaf of bread from which l 

he hands out single slices to eight hungrj' persons, each one of 

whom clamors for the whole loaf. He is sure to be impopidar, 

but without him the loaf would be spoiled in the hungry rush, 

or some of the claimants would get more than their share and 

others nothing. 

The police cannot widen or straighten the streets, and neither 
have they the power to reduce the nimiber of persons using 
them. Their task is to insure a fair di\'ision without waste, 
using their best judgment and supported on the one hand but j 

bound on the other by laws and rules which have been made I 

by other authorities. | 

Conditions in many parts of the city, especially that part 
into which the large retail stores have been crowded, may be • 

compared to a boat at sea built to carry five men and overloaded 
with ten, — all aware of the situation but not one willing to 
drop out or even to withdraw into smaller space. I 

A suggestion is occasionally heard concerning a subject j 

which was discussed fully in my last annual report, that is to r| 



' 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

sar. the so-called "traffic squad," and the value of what might 
be learned by Boston policemen from obsenation of what is 
dooe in New York. It is not provided, however, in these sug- 
gesoons that the Boston policemen should bring back the 
Xey York street conditions in which Xew York police methods 
are eanployed. 

TSae volume of street traffic in Xew York is, of course, far 
grexia than in Boston, and the traffic is admirably handled, 
bus almost the only difficulty which it presents lies in its 
massitude. The breadth and regularitj' of the streets and 
aresnaes, and the distribution of business over miles of 
tamoTr\; make it possible to regulate traffic in a wholesale 
iray and by means that are almost mechanical. To send a 
Boszoa policeman to Xew York on the supposition that he 
oocM observe and apply the Xew York methods to the nar- 
roT, crowded and irregular streets into which Boston business 
is packed would be very much as if a man who was required 
to ride a bucking bronco should try to train for the work by 
pracocing on a rocking horse. 

Certain military' actions in our historj- are sometimes spoken 
of as "soldiers' battles" for the reason that because of the 
naane of the ground, the absence of light or the inter\ention 
of fbrests or other obstacles, the private soldiers once placed 
woe compelled to meet the ever-changmg aspects of the con- 
ffict immediately before them according to their own judg- 
mest and experience. In the same sense the work of crossing- 
po&emen imder Boston conditions is a soldiers' battle. Eadi 
croeaEg has its own peculiarities, and except for the super- 
viacxi of officers of rank, \yho see that the men are at thdr 
jxsts and conducting themselves as they should, there is little 
or no opportunit}' for united action. The care of a crossing 
invciives no mysteries; there are no subtle lessons to be learned; 
the policeman who is civil, intelligent and attentive to his 
duQEs needs nothing further except actual experience in the 
places where his work is done. 

Finally, I may say that the best unprejudiced judges of the 
eSoenc}' of the Boston police traffic work are the street com- 
misaoners, who for years have closely studied the street situa- 
tioa and are the authors of the traffic rules which the police 



I 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

are required to enforce. Their opinion is expressed in their 
latest annual report, published wnthin a few months, in the 
following language: — 

The successful carrying out of the provisions of the traffic regula- 
tions depends largely on the police force of the city. A strict enforce- 
ment of the rules as laid down would result in inconvenkncc to bosness 
and great annoyance to the teaming interests. This the Board resEzed 
when it made the rules. It had faith, however, in the good sense of 
the police department, the men who patrol the congested badness 
district, who, it believed, would consider the spirit of the rules as well 
as their letter. The police have met the conditions wdL 

It is really remarkable how little complaint there is in tiie face of 
the extraordinary conditions which the police encconter on every 
business day. Doubtless there are countless but technical and unin- 
tentional violations of the rules every day. It would be foDy for the 
poKce to put men into court for such violations. XntSseriminate 
prosecutions woidd lead to the repeal of some <rf the mles which, in 
their general effect, are good. 

It was not the intention, when the rules were drafted, to make 
business for the courts, but to help in making traffic easier and more 
expeditious. An oflScer may now warn a driver when he is not exer- 
cising proper care. If he persists in his transgressi<H>s the officer has 
behind him authority to enforce his mandate. Exerdang hs author- 
ity in this way makes the ofiScer an aid to the larger and more coorenient 
use of the streets. 

As TO Intoxicated Persons. 
In October, 1912, an experimental investigation <rf the 
relations of drunkenness to places licensed for the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors was undertaken, and such notice as it received 
in the newspapers aroused so much inquiry that I reproduce 
here a statement of its purposes and effects as contained in 
General Order No. 655, issued October 25, as foDows: — 

For the information of the department I present herewitir a state- 
ment of some of the results obtained under a recent special order con- 
cerning drunkenness. The order directed that for seven poGee days 
of twenty-four hours each all persons arrested for intoxicatioa efaoold 
be questioned as to the places in which they had obtained Bqnor, 
especially the last places. The difficulties of the inquiries were reec^- 
nized in advance. Chief among them was the lack of lesal obGgation 
on the part of arrested persons to answer questions, eren when suffi- 
ciently sobered to understand and remember. 



IS POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The whole number of persons arrested for drunkenness as reported 
in the seren days was 1,050. Of these 954 were men, 96 women; 
536 were residents of Boston, 514 non-residents. 

The number of persons who refused to give any information as to 
the places in which they had procured liquor was 127. 

The number of persons who were unable, or professed to be unable, 
to give any information at any time during their confinement was 77. 

The whole number of p)ersons from whom no information was ob- 
tained was therefore 204. 

It is to be noted that not in a single instance was it reported that 
the persons questioned treated the inquiry as a matter for jest. 

The number of jjersons whose an-swers indicated that their liquor 
had been obtained and drunk wholly on the premises of licensed hotels 
and salooia in Boston was 644. 

The number of persons whose .iuswers indicated that their liquor 
had not been obluiiied in lieeused hotels or saloons and had not been 
drunk on Ecenscd premises in Boston was 202. 

The detaib making up these 202 answers were as follows: — 

Liquor obt^fDcd wholly outside of Boston, ...... 28 

Partly oatiule. partly in Boston, .16 

Partly in Mioons, partly in bottles, ....... 14 

Through fneocU, from bottles, source unknown, ..... 42 

In unlicensed places, .......... 3 

In licensed dob, .......... 1 

At home, (rota bottles, source unknown, ...... 27 

From bottba bought from licensed grocers or fourth-class wholesalers, 

names of Keensccs given, liquor not drunk on licensed premises, . 73 

Total. 202 

The 06 women who were arrested may be classified separately as 

follows: — 

Liquor drunk in saloons, ......... 15 

In hotels 14 

From bottles bought at places named, ...... 28 

At places not named, ......... 7 

Liquor obtained at home or from friends, source unknown, ... 13 

Unable or cnwilling to give information, ...... 19 

Total. 96 



Of the &44 persons whose answers indicated that Boston hotels 
or saloons were tljcir sole source of supply, 239 named single places in 
which aC ibeir liquor had been bought; 123 others named places in 
which tber had not bought all their liquor but had taken the last drink 
prior to arrest; and 169 named places in wliich they had bought liquor 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

but not exclusively and not the last drink. The whole number of 
hotels or saloons thus named was 289. 

A complete list of these hotels and saloons, with the number of 
persons in each of the three classes of customers who named each place 
has been forwarded to the Licensing Board for its information. 

Commanding oflBcers will be informed privately as to places within 
their respective di\'isions which statements made by persons arrested 
throughout the city within the specified seven days point to as improp- 
Cily conducted. They will be expected to see to it that the places 
thus designated are especiaUy kept under close scrutiny; and all im- 
proper actions therein, whether susceptible of legal proof or not, will 
be reported. 

\Mien six, seven, nine men, as shown by different returns which I 
have tabulated, state that in one saloon or another they obtained 
all the liquor that they drank, that they entered sober, were allowed 
to buy imtil they were drunk and then left the place to be arrested, 
a conunanding officer should watch for a great and prolonged change 
in the conduct of a place thus implicated before expressing any opinion 
favorable to a renewal of its license. When a man testifies that be- 
tween 7 o'clock in the morning and the time of his arrest, a little after 
noon, he drank three glasses of beer in one saloon, two in another, 
four in another and four in the last place visited, all being named 
by him, it is plain that some of those licensed places should be either 
improved or closed. The like is true in the case of a man arrested 
just after 11 o'clock, who said that in the course of the evening he had 
drunk four glasses of gin at one specified place, three at another and 
three at a third. The record of cases similar to these will be included 
in the information to be furnished privately to commanding officers; 
but they are not to Limit their vigilance to the places named. 

The "Third Degree." 
The "third degree" is a term in popular use which is sup- 
posed to represent mental and even physical torture to which 
prisoners are subjected by police officials in order to extort 
confessions. Whatever it may be and wherever it may be 
practiced it has no place in the Boston Police Department. 
The standing rule on the subject, Article 12 of Rule 44, b as 
follows: — 

In the examination of prisoners by question or otherwise for the 
purjKwe of obtaining confession or information, no police officer shall 
infringe upon their legal rights, nor shall he subject them to any pres- 
sure or procedure of which he would be unwilling to inform a court 
engaged in a hearing of the case. 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In the absence of any information or complaint to the con- 
trary ever received by me I believe that the rule is obeyed, 
and that therefore those who denounce the practice, some of 
Trhom are our own good citizens, should make it clear that 
their denunciations do not apply to Boston and its police. 

Police Depaktment ExpEXDrrcBES. 
The total expenditures on account of the Boston Police 
Department in the last five fiscal years of the dty, which end 
January 31, have been as follows: — 

1907-08 51,928,622 64 

1908-09, 2,052,671 66 

1909-10 2,099,363 59 

1910-11 2,155,518 07 

1911-12, 2,177,655 59 

It is generally supposed that the expenditures of the police 
department are just what the Pohce Commissioner chooses 
to make them. This mistake is due to tie circumstance that 
the statutes confer upon him the authority to call on the dty 
of Boston by requisition for such mone}3 as the department 
needs. But the truth is that the salaries of afl members of the 
sworn police force, the allowances to peaaoned policemen and 
to dependent beneficiaries and the salaries of police matrons 
now stand and for many years have stood at the rates estab- 
lished from time to time by the dty authorities; and the 
dty authorities have always determined the number of patrol- 
men to be employed. In the case of pensions the system has 
been established and regidated by l^idath-e acts which have 
been accepted by the dty authorities. With that imderstand- 
ing I give herewith the expenditures for the last five years on 
account of salaries of the sworn police force, pensions and 
annuities and salaries of police matrons, as follows: — 

1907-08 $1,642,199 28 

1908-09, 1,782,484 95 

1909-10, . ■. 1,818,485 40 

1910-11, 1,878,117 10 

1911-12, 1,909,730 M 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

In the last five fiscal years the expenditures on account of 
the department in excess of the amounts just given, have 
been as follows: — 



It is over these last expenditures alone that the Police 
Commissioner has exclusive control. It ^s-ill be observed that 
in 1911-12 they represented but 12.30+ per cent, of the total 
expenditures of the department. It will be observed further 
that they amounted in 1911-12 to $18,494.41 less than in 
1907-08, despite the increased cost within that period of labor, 
material and supplies and the additional expense of equipment, 
furnishings and care due to the increase of the force by about 
200 men. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN O'MEARA, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



) 



1907-OS $286,423 36 ( 

1908-09, 270,186 71 | 

1909-10, 280,878 19 j 

1910-11, 277,430 97 

1911-12, 267,924 95 » 



( 



22 



POUCE COMIMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows : — 



Police Cominissioner. 



Secretary. 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent, . 
Deputy superintendents, 
Chief inspector, . 
Captains, 
Inspectors, . 
Inspector of carriages (lieu 
tenant), . 



Director, 

Assistant director, 
Foreman, 
Signalmen, . 
ilechanics, . 



Lieutenants, 
Sergeants, . 
Patrolmen, . 
23 Reservemen, 
31 

Total, . 
1 

Signal Service. 



Linemen, 
Driver, . 



Total, 



Employees of the Department. 



aerks, 13 

Stenographers, ... 3 
Messengers, ... 2 
ilatrons of house of de- 
tention, .... 5 
Matrons of station houses, 7 
Engineers on police 

steamers, .... 2 

Firemen on police steamers, 8 

Van drivers, ... 2 



Foreman of stable, 

Hostlers, 

Assistant steward of city 

prison. 
Janitors, 
Janitresses, . 
Telephone operators, . 

. Total, . 



40 

100 

1,227 

132 

l,5oS 



19 



1 
13 

1 

17 

14 

3 



91 



Recapilulation. 

Police commissioner and secretary, 2 

Police force, 1,558 

Signal service, 19 

Employees, 91 



Grand total, 



1,670 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



23 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the force is shown by Table I. During 
the year 1 captain, 1 lieutenant and 11 patrolmen were ap- 
pointed, 68 patrolmen were promoted from the reserve men, 2 
patrolmen were reappointed and 98 reserve men were ap- 
pointed; 4 patrolmen and 1 reserve man were discharged; 6 
patrolmen and 2 reserve men resigned; 2 deputies, 2 captains, 
2 inspectors, 2 lieutenants, 2 sergeants and 12 patrolmen re- 
tired on pensions; and 8 patrolmen died. Of the above, 1 
captain, 1 lieutenant and 11 patrolmen, being the police force 
of Hyde Park, became a part of the Boston Police Department 
on Jan. 1, 1912. (See Tables III., IV., V., VI.) 



PoucE Officers injured while on Dutt. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the nimiber of duties 
lost by them on account thereof and the causes of the in- 
juries: — 



How vavszB. 


Namberof 
Uen mjuicd. 


Number of 
Duties lost. 


In arresting prisoners, 

In pursuing criminals, 

By stopping runaways, 

By cars and other vehicles at crossings, . 
Various other causes, 


39 

20 

4 

5 

45 


466 
383 

39 

37 

338 


Totals 


113 


1,263 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest 

as that of a separate person, was 75,496, against 70,442 the 

preceding year, being an increase of 5,054. The percentage of 

increase and decrease was as follows: — 



4 



24 



POLICE co:nemissioner. 



[Jan. 





Per Cent. 


Increase, 


6.50 


Decrease, 


4.67 


Decrease, 


.21 


Decrease, 


2.36 


Increase, 


11.66 


Increase, 


20.03 


Increase, 


48.06 


Increase, 


6.79 



Offences against the person, 

Offences against property committed with violence, 
Offences against property committed without vio- 
lence, 

Malicious offences against property, . 
Forgery and offences against the currency. 
Offences against the license laws. 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc., . 
Offences not included in the foregoing, 



There were 6,920 persons arrested on warrants and 62,020 
without warrants; 6,556 persons were summoned by the court; 
72,606 persons were held for trial and 2,890 were released from 
custody. The number of malei- arrested was 68,248; of females, 
7,248; of foreigners, 33,837, or appro.ximately 44.81 per cent.; 
of minors, 8,024. Of the total number arrested, 28,645, or 
37.94 per cent., were nonresidents. (See Tables X., XI.) 



The nati\-ity 

United States, 

British Pro\inces, 

Ireland, 

England, 

France, 

Germany, 

Italy, . 

Russia, 

China, 

Greece, 

Sweden, 

Scotland, 

Spain, 

Norway, 

Poland, 

Australia, 

Austria, 

Portugal, 

Fmland, 

Denmark, 

Holland, 



of the prisoners was as follows: — 



41,659 

5,676 

14,486 

1,676 

147 

521 

3,150 

2,900 

516 

391 

1,175 

1,022 

64 

357 

481 

35 

204 

131 

256 

117 

32 



Wales, 






31 


East Indies, 






21 


West Indies, 






99 


Turkey, 






103 


South America, 






34 


Switzerland, 






10 


Belgium, . 






40 


Armenia, . 






8 


Africa, 






10 


Hungary, . 






10 


Asia, . 






6 


Arabia, 






1 


Mexico, 






4 


Japan, 






7 


SjTia, . 






109 


Roumania, 






3 


Cuba, . 






1 


Philippines, 






1 


India, . 






2 



Total, 



75,496 



The number of arrests for the year is 75,496, being an in- 
crease of 5,054 over last year, and 4,137 more than the average 
for the past five years. There were 49,846 persons arrested 
for -dnrnkenness, being 3,452 more than last year, and 3,494 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUIMENT — No. 49. 25 

more than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests 
for drunkenness this year there was an increase of 7.69 per 
cent, in males and an increase of 4.87 per cent, in females over 
last year. (See Tables XI., XHI.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (75,496), 645 were 
for \'iolations of the city ordinances; that is to say, 1 arrest 
in 117 was for such offence, or .15 per cent. 
Fifty-five and twenty one-himdredths per cent, of the per- 

t sons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and 

I ■ forty. (See Table XU.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 12,793, and 
the fines amounted to $135,634.50. (See Table XIII.) 

Ninety-one persons were committed to the State Prison, 
5,620 to the House of Correction, 82 to the Women's Prison, 
145 to the Reformatory Prison and 2,621 to other institutions. 
The total years of imprisonment were 3,881 years, 10 months, 
20 days; the total number of days' attendance in court by 
officers was 46,408; and the witness fees earned by them 
amounted to 813,381.80. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$149,245.40. 

Sixty-three witnesses were detained at station houses; 115 
were accommodated with lodg^gs, an increase of 27 from last 
year. There was an increase of 4.67 per cent, from last year in 
the number of insane persons taken in charge, an increase of 

I about 9.06 per cent, in the number of sick and injured persons 

; assisted, and a decrease of about 4.52 per cent, in the number 

i of lost children cared for. 

i The average amount of property stolen in the city for the 

!. five years from 1908 to 1912, inclusive, was $159,967.81; in 

j 1912 it was $139,184.40, or $20,783.41 less than the average. 

I The amount of property stolen in and out of the city, which 

I was recovered by the Boston police was $291,674.57, as against 

f $282,126.48 last year, or $9,548.09 more. 

f The average amoimt of fines imposed by the courts for 

I the five years from 1908 to 1912, mclusive, was $144,918.10; 

\ m 1912 it was $135,634.50, or $9,283.60 less than the 

I average. 

I The average number of days' attendance m court was 45,873; 

[ m 1912 it was 46,408, or 535 more than the average. The 



26 POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. [Jan. 

average amount of witness fees earned was §13,220.95; in 
1912 it -Bras S13,381.80, -or $lGO£o more than the average. 
(See Table XIIL) 

DruTiimntgs. 

In airests for drunkenness the average number per day was 
136. These were 3,452 more persons arrested than in 1911, — 
an increase ol 7.44 per cent.; 45.73 per cent, of the arrested 
persoos -woe nonresidents and 48.19 per cent, were of foreign 
birth- rt^See Table XI.) 

Bureau of Criminal Inteitigation. 
The *'E<ognes' Gallery" now contains 3S,&46 photographs, 
31,795 df »ikh are photographs with Bcrtillon measurements, 
a sj-stem used by this department during the past fourteen 
years. In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, 
sectioiB 18 amd 21, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measarsjmoits taken of con\'icts in the State Prison and Re- 
formaton.-, a nmnber of which have already been added to our 
BertiBaa cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
sj-stem by tie department in 1808, b and will continue to be of 
great atf^Wamrp in the identificaticHi of criminals. A large 
number «f important identificatioDs have thus been made 
during niie jear for this and other pcJice departments, through 
which tSbe ietstenots in many instances have been materially 
increased- Tbe records of 513 criminals have been added to 
the records kept in this Bureau, wincfa now contains a total of 
34,733. Tlie number of cases rqxHted at this office which 
have been inrestigated during the year is 7,559. There are 
23,799 teasies recorded on the assignment books kept for this 
purposs^ asd reports made on these cases are filed away for 
future ine&ieoce. Letters and tel^rams to the number of 
about 3,/O0O yeariy are now filed with the numbered reports 
to whjdi daey refer, so that all the papers pertaining to a case 
can be found in the same envelope, thus simpli^ing matters 
when iulosxnation is desired on any case. The sv-stem of in- 
dexing adopted by this Bm^aa few the use of the department 
now cootdbs a Est of records, histories, photographs, dates of 
arrest^«te:.,of about 135,000 persoiB. There are also "histories 
and pceBB «fipping3," now numbering 6,590 by this Biu^au, 
in envdope form, for police reference. 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



27 



The finger-print system of identification, which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing cor- 
roborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 
ment; but as the duties are of a special character, the following 
statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . . . 957 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to oflBcers from those States, 45 

Number of cases investigated, . • 7,559 

Number of extra duties performed, 2,839 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial, in court, . . 123 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court, . . . . . 11 

Number of days spent in court by officers, 3,315 

Amount of stolen property recovered, .... $160,728.67 
Number of years' imprisonment LmpMJsed by court, 665 years, 8 months 

Niunber of photographs added to "Rogues' Gallery," . . 2,333 

OmCEB DETAILED TO ASSIST MeDICAL EXAMINERS. 

The oflScer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 901 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion, . 






3 


Accident, . 






26 


Alcoholism, 






9 


Asphyxiation, 






7 


Automobile, 






26 


Bum, . 






50 


Drowning, . 






52 


Electricity, 






4 


Elevator, . 






22 


Explosion, . 






1 


Falling objects. 




101 


Heat, . . . 






2 



Manslaughter, . 


22 


Machinery, 


6 


Murder, 


13 


Natural causes. 


315 


Poison, 


35 


Railway, . 


94 


Stillborn, . 


13 


Suffocation, 


5 


Suicide, 


76 


TpAvn, 


19 



Total, 



901 



On 241 of the above cases inquests were held, and on account 
of the circumstances attending them 110 cases were brought 
before the court. 



2S 



POLICE CO^BIISSIONER. 



Miscellaneous Business. 



[Jan. 





190»-10. 


UlO-ll. 


UU-12. 


Abandoned children cared for, . 


15 


5 


20 


Accidents reported, 


3,187 


3,315 


4,260 


Automobiles cared for, .... 


- 


12 


- 


Buildings found open and made secure, . 


2,707 


2,914 


2,971 


Cases investigated, 


27,9fr4 


25,617 


24,888 


Dangerous buildings reported, 


23 


31 


15 


Dangerous chimneys reported, . 


3 


12 


13 


Dead bodies cared for, .... 


368 


411 


351 


Defective bridges reported. 


3 


1 


- 


Defective cesspools reported, . 


152 


188 


255 


Defective drains and vaults reported. 


9 


4 


6 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported, 


4 


2 


8 


Defective gas pipes reported, . 


62 


58 


64 


Defective hydrants reported, . 


139 


215 


194 


Defective lamps report^^, .... 


36,502 


14,572 


15,172 


Defective fences, 


16 


17 


10 


Defective sewers reported, .... 


&i 


167 


74 


Defective signs, 


- 


- 


2 


Defective streets and sidewalk.s reported, 


9,048 


11,199 


9,829 


Defective trees, 


59 


52 


34 


Defective water gates 


S 


33 


3 


Defective water meters, .... 


11 


- 


6 


Defective water pipes reported, 


203 


180 


316 


Defective wires and poles reported, 


79 


24 


16 


Disturbances suppressed, .... 


767 


871 


781 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

Miscellaneous Business — Con. 



29 





1909-10. 


MlO-ll. 


19U-U. 


Extra duties performed, 




33,997 


35,292 


62,461 


Fire alarms given, 




2,045 


2,256 


2,750 


Fires extinguished, 




865 


899 


1,123 


Insane persons tiken in charge. 




366 


428 


448 


Intoxicated persons assisted, . 




29 


33 


23 


Lost children restored, 




2,247 


2,167 


2,069 


Missing persons reported, . 




346 


361 


469 


Missing persons found. 




178 


159 


158 


Persons rescued from drowning. 




33 


15 


20 


Sick and injured persons assisted, 




4,605 


5,188 


5,658 


Stray teams reported and put up, 




181 


230 


180 


Street obstructions removed, . 




- 


- 


1,686 


Water running to waste reported, 




345 


381 


654 


Witnesses detained, . 




78 


66 


63 



if 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On Dec. 1, 1911, there were 1,040 articles of lost, abandoned 
or stolen property in the custody of the property clerk; 573 
were received during the year, 495 were sold, and the proceeds 
($261.63), together with 76 packages containing money to the 
amount of $357.96, were turned over to the chief clerk, and by 
him paid to the city collector, and 38 packages were delivered 
to owners, finders or administrators, leaving 1,004 on hand. 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of special' events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each: — 



4. 






30 POLICE COISENIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

UU. Men. 

Jan. 9, Four-alarm fire at 91 Federal Street, . . . 81 

Jan. 18, Police ball, 95 

Jan. 31, Arrival of Cardinal O'ConneU from Rome, . 527 

Feb. 1, Services in honor of Cardinal O'ConneU at Cathedral, 175 

Feb. 14, Firemen's ball, 51 

Mar. 18, Evactiation Day parade, 492 

Mar. 18, Visit of President Taft, 254 

Mar. 19, Departure of President Taft, 119 

April 19, Marathon race, 457 

April 25, Arrival and departure of President Taft, . 140 

April 27, Visit of Theodore Roosevelt, 138 

April 29, Visit of President Taft 125 

Maj' 11, Parade of Fusillier Veteran Association, ... 54 

May 21, Parade of Sons of the American Revolution, . . 75 

May 27, Bamum & Bailey's circus parade, .... 134 

Ma}' 31, Parade of Boston School Cadets, 440 

June 3, Parade of Ancient and Honorable Artillery, 196 
June 6-July 28, Extra duties performed in Boston Elevated 

Railway strike 19,435 

June 8, Dorchester Day celebration, ...... 125 

June 16, "Xight before" in Charlestown, 125 

June 17, Amiiversary battle of Bunker Hill, .... 306 
July 1-Aug. 4, Extra duties performed in marine firemen's 

strike, 275 

July 2, Departure of Ancient and Honorable Artillery for 

London, 63 

July 4, Roxburj' Day celebration, 145 

Aug. 17, Roosevelt meeting on Boston common, . . 167 

Sept. 2, Labor Day parade, 777 

Sept. 15, Ettor-GJovannitti meeting on Boston common, . . 98 

Sept. 26, Visit of President Taft, 161 

Oct. 2, Msit of President Taft, laying comer stone t)f the 

Y. M. C. A., 396 

Oct. 8-16, World's Series baseball, bulletin boards, ... 694 

Oct. 8-16, World's Series baseball games, 949 

Oct. 12, Columbus Day celebration, 1,171 

Oct. 26, Harvard-Brown football game, 74 

Nov. 2, Harvard-Princeton football game, .... 119 
Nov. 2, WHson League and Progressive party torchlight 

parades, 523 

Nov. 5, State election, bulletin boards, 277 

Nov. 9, Har\-ard-Vanderbilt football game, .... 55 

Nov. 16, Har\-ard-Dartmouth football game, .... 127 

Nov. 16, Special detail at Di\Tsion 4, football night, . . 108 

Nov. 23, Harvard-Yale football game, bulletin boards, . . 77 

Nov. 23, Special detail at Division 4, football night, . . 306 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 31 



Inspector of Claims. 

s 

The oflBcer detailed to assist the committee on claims and i 

law department in investigating claims against the dty for | 

alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated t 

624 cases, 4 of which were on accomit of damage done by dogs. » 

Olher Services performed. 

Number of cases investigated, 624 

Number of witnesses examined, 4,737 

Number of notices 6er\'ed, 3,109 

Number of pictures taken, , . 152 j 

Number of permissions granted, 4,217 

Number of days in court, 51 , = 

. Number of daj-s at the committee on claims, .... 29 i 

House of DETE>fnoN. . 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper are taken to the house of detention in vans pro\ided 
for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the matron 
imtil the next session of the court before which they are to 
appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are returned to 
the house of detention, and from there conveyed to the jail or 
institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year there were 5,764 women committed for the 
following causes: — , ,' 

For drunkenness, 3,302 \ 

For larceny, 444 S 

For night walking, 305 .^ 

For fwnication, 323 J 

For being idle and disorderly, 61 j 

For assault and batterj', 28 ; 

For adultery, 29 

For violation of the liquor law, 20 

For keeping a house of ill fame, 38 , 1 

For witness, 1 I 

For county jail, 905 |, 

For municipal court, 70 ji 

For various other offences, 238 

Total, 5,764 



32 POLICE CO^BIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

PoucE Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 485. Of these, 285 are 
connected with the underground system and 200 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this sennce responded to 
1,108 trouble calls; inspected 485 signal boxes, 17 signal desks 
and 955 batteries; repaired 114 box movements, 14 registers, 
23 polar box bells, 27 locks, 1 time stamp, 4 gongs, 1 stable 
motor, 1 stable register, 6 \-ibrator bells, 5 relays, 6 pole changers, 
besides repairing all bell and electric light work at headquarters 
and the various stations. There have been made 10 line blocks, 
4 plungers, 6 complete box fittings, and a large amoimt of 
small work that cannot be classified. 

There are in use in the signal service 24 horses, 18 patrol 
wagons and 13 pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 44,396 runs, covering an 
aggregate distance of 41,403 miles. There were 48,046 prisoners 
conveyed to the station houses; 924 runs were made to take 
injiu-ed and insane persons to station houses, the hospitals or 
their homes; and 538 runs were made to take lost children to 
station houses. There were 757 runs to fires and 52 runs for 
liquor seizures. During the year there were 485 signal boxes 
in use arranged on 68 circuits; 533,117 telephone messages and 
3,330,698 "on-duty" calls were sent over the hues. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal service 
at the present time: — 



17 signal desks. 

68 circuits. 

4S5 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call boards. 

57 test boxes. 
955 cells of battery. 
463,188 feet underground cable. 
319,850 feet overhead cable. 

40,983 feet of duct. 



45 manholes. 
1 buggy. 
1 line wagon. 
1 express wagon. 
1 mugwump wagon. 

1 traverse pung. 

2 small sleighs. 
1 caravan. 



i 



1913.) PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 33 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, ,| 

comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as fol-. 
lows: — 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rig^ng, ; 

floa^^ages, etc., 526,860.77 I 

Number of vessels from foreign ports boarded, . . . 733 ,; 
Number of vessels ordered from the channel to proper 

anchorage, 1,446 

Number of vessels removed from channel by police 

steamers, 119 

Number of cases of assistance rendered, .... 245 
Number of cases of assistance rendered to wharfingers, . 2 
Number of permits granted vessels, in the stream, to dis- 
charge cargoes, 43 

Number of obstructions removed from channel, ... 106 

Number of alamjs of fire on the waterfront attended, . 102 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm, ... 2 

Number of boats challenged, 2,024 

Sick and injured persons assisted, 7 

Cases investigated, 1,146 

Dead bodies recovered, 30 

Dead bodies cared for, 1 

Rescued from drowning, 6 

Number of vessels ordered to put up anchor lights, . . 10 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage, .... 1,137 

The total number of vessels that arrived in this port during j 

the year was 10,751. Of this number, 9,225 came from domestic 1 

ports, 793 from ports in the British Provinces and 733 from j 

foreign ports. Of the latter, 689 were steamers, 7 ships, 16 s 

barks and 21 schooners. ^ 

5 
The police boat "Ferret" was in conunission from June 5 I 

to Nov. 1, 1912, in Dorchester Bay. She covered a distance of 1 

5,200 miles; made 2 arrests for larceny; recovered property f 

valued at $1,400; rescued 30 persons from disabled boats; ^ 

made secure 20 j'achts that had broken away from their moor- 
ings; quelled 8 disturbances; investigated 25 cases, and notified 
15 owners of power boats to have muflSers attadied to their 
exhausts. 



34 



POLICE CO^EMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Horses. 
On the Ist of December, 1911, there were 79 horses in the 
senice. During the year 7 were sold, 6 purchased, .3 shot on 
ac-count of being disabled, 1 died and 1 was given to Red Acre 
Farm. At the present time there are 7.3 in the ser\-ice as shown 
by Table IX, 

Vehicle Sesvice. 
AutomchUes. 

There are 7 automobiles in the sennce at the present time: 
1 for general use, attached to headquarters; 2 for the Back 
Bay and Fenways, attached to Di\Tsion 16; 1 in the Dorchester 
District, attached to Di\'ision 11: 2 in the West Roxburj' 
District, attached to Di\-ision 17; 1 in the Brighton District, 
attached to Di\'ision 14. 

The following return shows the extent and nature of the 
senice performed by the automoWes during the year: — 





Iters 

on 
Doty. 


MUeamn- 




rue 

Alarm, 

etc 


Persons 

cau- 
tioned. 


Loot 

cba- 

ct& 


Sick, 






etc 


35, . . . 

36, ... 
41, . . . 
40, . . . 
3S, . . . 


320 

276 
2S0 
236 
212 


11,200 
10,630 
12,000 
15,346 
8,500 


440 
221 

S3 

193 


6 
12 

26 
47 
15 


100 
173 
90 
127 
150 


2 

7 
6 
8 
3 


2 

3 
2 
4 
2 


Total, . . 


1,324 


57,676 


1,013 


106 


640 


26 


13 



Cott of Running Automobiles. 

Pay of officers, 51,534 16 

Repairs, 3,254 92 

Tires, 833 80 

Gasoline, 1,090 24 

OU, 114 4^ 

Rent of parage, 1,271 52 

License fees, 10 00 

Total, . . . . ■ 611,109 OS 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



35 



Ambulances. 

The department is now equipped with 10 ambulances, lo- 
cated in the following pohce di\'isions: 1, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 
15 and 16; also a combination automobile (patrol and am- 
bulance) located in DiA-ision 17. 

Dunng the year the ambulances responded to calls to con- 
vey sick or injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 1,133 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Ha3'market Square), . . . 693 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston), .... 326 

Calls where services were not required, 274 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 127 

Home, 118 

17 

17 

17 

16 

12 

6 

4 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 



Boston State Hospital, 

Carney Hospital, .... 

Grace Hospital, 

Morgue, 

Police Station Houses, 

Ljing-in Hospital, .... 

City Prison, 

From fires, 

Linwood Street Hospital, . 
Children's Hospital, .... 
Emerson Hospital, .... 
Faulkner Hospital, .... 
Bennett's Emergency Hospital, 
Charlesgate Hospital, 
Consumptives' Hospital, . 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 

Reid's Hospital, 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital, . 
St. Margaret's Hospital, . 
Charles Street Jail, .... 
Chardon Street Home, 



Total, 



2,781 



36 



POLICE CO^BIISSIO^'ER. 



[Jan. 



List Oj 


' Vehicles used by the Departmcni 








Divisions. 


3 
1 

e 


• 

e 

1 

o 

5 


J 
2 

< 


_5 


■ 


< 


J 

i 

a 


s 

■J 


s 


Headquarters, 




- 


- 


1 


'- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Dh-ision 1, 






- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 2, 






1 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Division 3, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 6, 








- 


- 






1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 7, 








- 






- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 8, 








- 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 


Division 9, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 10, 








- 


- 




" 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 11, 








" 


1 






1 


1 


1 


6 


Division 12, 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 13, 








1 


- 






1 


2 


1 


7 


Division 14, 








- 


1 




- 


1 


1 


1 


6 


Division 15, 








- 


- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 16, 








- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


Division 17, 






- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 18, 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Joy Street stable, . 




2 


5 


- 


1 


5 


2 


2 


5 


22 


Totals, 




IS 


6 


7 


13 




11 


7 


S 


75 



1913-] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 



37 



PtJBUC C.UIRL'VGES. 

Daring the year there were 1,630 carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 1 as compared with last year; 436 motor 
carriages were licensed, being an increase of 80 as compared 
with last year. 

ThCTC has been a decrease of 82 in the number of horse-drawn 
Ucenscd carriages during the year. 

There were 58 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were turned over to the 
inspector; 17 of these were restored to the owners, and the 
balance placed in the keeping of the lost property bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages as well as for licenses to drive the same: — 



Xumber of applications for carriage licenses received. 
Number of carriages licensed, . . . . 

Numbo- of licenses transferred, .... 
Numbw of licenses cancelled or revoked, 
Number of carriages inspected, .... 
.^ppbeaitions for drivers' licenses reported upon, . 
Number of complaints against drivers investigated, 

Numbe' of warrants obtained, 

Numbo' of days 8p)ent in court, .... 
ArticJes left in carriages reported by citizens, 
Artidea found in carriages reported by drivers, . 
Drivas' applications for licenses rejected. 



1,632 

1,630 

57 

45 

1,632 

1,592 

85 

7 

6 

18 

58 

9 



il 



Wagox Licenses. 

licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use tiudis, wagons or other vehides to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the dty for hire. 

During the year 5,434 applications for such licenses were 
receJTed, 5,429 of which were granted and 13 rejected. 

Of the licenses granted, 30 were subsequently cancelled for 
nonpayment of the license fee, 32 for other causes and 9 trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., XVI.) 



3S 



POLICE co:nlaiissioner. 



[Jan. 



Listing ISLat.e 


Residents of Boston, etc 




YtlB. 


May 
Caoras. 


Supple- 
mental Ap- 
plicationB. 


Certificates. 


Granted 
Certificates. 


Total Men 
listed. 


1903, . . . 


181,045 


3,412 


53 


3,359 


184,404 


1904, . 






193,195 


1,335 


55 


1,280 


194,475 


19a5, . 






194,547 


705 


8 


697 


195,244 


1906, . 






195,446 


775 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, . 






195,900 


782 


28 


754 


196,654 


190S, . 






201,255 


1,302 


57 


1,245 


202,500 


1909, . 






201,391 


804 


29 


775 


202,166 


1910, > 






203,603 


8C7 


47 


850 


204,453 


1911,' 






206,825 


762 


31 


731 


207,556 


1912, ' 






214,178 


1,635 


27 


1,609 


215,813 



I Changed to April U 

Women Voters terified. 

1903, 14,611 

1904, 15,633 

19a5, 14,591 

1906, 13,427 

1907, 12,822 

1908, 11,915 

1909, 11,048 

1910, 10,456 

1911, 9,935 

1912, 10,567 

(See Tables XX., XXI., XXII.) 



Listing Expenxa. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the sennces 
rendered by the members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Printing, 815,383 65 

Clerical senicc, 7,468 IS 

Stationery, 480 72 

Interpreters, 798 15 

Tables, etc 15 47 

Teaming, 47 10 

Total, 824,193 27 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 39 



Number of Policemen employed in Listing. 

April 1, 1,161 

April 2, 1,086 

Aprils 764 

April 4, 300 

Aprils, 84 

Speclu, Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to serve without pay 
from the city, on the written application of any oflBcer or board 
in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or on the appU- 
cation of any responsible corporation or person, such corpora- 
tion or person to be liable for the offidal misconduct of the 
person appointed. 

During the year ending Nov. 30, 1912, there were 841 special 
poUce officers appointed; 11 applications for appointment 
were refused for cause. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From State departments, 9 

From city departments, . .' 199 

From railroad corporations, 160 

From other corporations or associations, 170 

From theatres and other places of amusement, .... 236 

From private institutions, 58 

From churches, 9 

Total, 841 

Railro.u> Police. 
There were 9S persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 2 of whom were employees of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Raiht)ad, 88 of the Boston & iMaine Rail- 
road, 3 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lj-nn Railroad and 5 
of the Boston Terminal Company. 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



MlSCELL.\XEOUS LlCEXSES. 

The total number of licenses issued of all kinds was 30,509; 
transferred, 137; cancelled and revoked, 7,969. The ofBcers 
investigated 320 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collected and paid into the city treasurj' amounted to 
Si6,362.50. (See Table XIV.) 

McsiCLVNs' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 263 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 236 of which were granted, 3 
rejected, 24 are pending and 3 were subsequently cancelled 
on account of nonpaj-ment of the license fee. 

It is arranged that hereafter the instruments of itinerant 
musicians will be inspected semiannually, and for this purpose 
a musician who is not a member of the department will be 
employed for about ten days in April and September each year. 

During the year there were 82 instruments examined, as 
follows: — 



iNSTRtrUENTS. 




Street organs. 
Hand organs. 
Violins, . 
Harps, . 
Flutes, . 
Accordions, . 
Guitars, . 
Bagpipes, 
Banjos, . 
Totals, . 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



41 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over fifteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company w'th designated processions, at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five years and the action taken 
thereon: — 



Yeab. 



190S, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 



AppIicatioDA. 



172 
178 
226 
208 
268 



Granted. 



172 
176 
222 
207 
267 



Rejected. 



PuBuc Lodging Houses. 

By chapter 242 of the Acts of 1904 it is provided that in cities 
of over 50,000 inhabitants every building not licensed as an 
inn, in which 10 or more persons are lodged for 25 cents each 
per day of twenty-four hours, or for any part thereof, shall be 
deemed a public lodging house, and by chapter 129 of the Acts 
of 1911 this law is made to apply to all buildings in such cities, 
notwithstanding that no price is charged for lodging. 

In the city of Boston the Police Commissioner is authorized 
to grant Ucenses to such lodg^g houses after the inspector of 
buildings has certified that the building is provided with proper 
exits and appliances for alarming the inmates in case of fire 
and the Board of Health has certified that the sanitary con- 
dition is satisfactory. 

For these licenses 20 applications were received during the 
year, 17 of them were granted, 2 rejected and 1 \sithdrawn. 

The following shows the location of the lodging houses and 
number of persons lodged in each during the year: — 



./ 



42 



POLICE CO>BnSSIOXER. 



(Jan. 



Location. 



Xunber lodged. 



19 Causeway Street, 
164 Commercial Street, 
194 Commercial Street, 

234 Commercial Street, 

235 Commercial Street, 
242 Commercial Stteet, 
17 Da\-i3 Street, 

120 Eliot Street, 
37 Green Street, 
2 Hudson Street, 
67 Pleasant Street, . 
8S6 Washington Street, 
1025 Washington Street, 
1051 Washington Street, 
1093 Washington Street, 
1202 Washington Street, 
Total 



9,637 
24,026 
37,S59 
14,561 
31,533 
660 
32,S98 
49,960 
34,263 
20,094 
23,050 
67,174 
44^313 
41,S56 
27,865 
45,385 



z ton 



Carktixg Dangerocs Weapons. 
The following retxim shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to earn- loaded 
pistols or revolvers in this Commonwealth during the past five 
years, the nimiber of such applications granted and the number 
refused: — 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



43 



Yeas. 



1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912. 



Applications. 



1,020 
871 
931 
931 

1,069 



Granted. 



882 
800 
829 
844 
975 



Refused. 



138 
71 

102 
87 
94 



These licenses are granted, in a large measure, to express and 
bank messengers, watchmen, special policemen and others 
whose occupations and characters establish a prima facie case 
in their favor. 

Pensions and Benefits.. 

Dec. 1, 1911, there were 217 pensioners on the roll. During 
the year 18 died, viz., 1 sergeant, 1 assistant keeper and 16 
patrolmen; and 23 were added, ^^z., 2 deputy superintendents, 
2 captains, 2 inspectors, 2 lieutenants, 2 sergeants, 12 patrol- 
men and the widow of Patrolman Peterson, leaving 208 on the 
roll at date, including the widows of 13 and the mother of 1 
policeman, who died of injuries received in the service. 

The pajTnents on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to 8139,138.67, and it is estimated that $144,587.50 
will be required for pensions in 1913. This does not include 
pensions for 1 captain and 5 patrolmen, all of whom are sixty- 
five or over, and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age 
and term of ser^nce. 

The mvested fund of the police charitable fund on the thirtieth 
day of November last amounted to §207,550. There are 66 
beneficiaries at the present time, and there has been paid to 
them the sum of §7,569 during the past year. 

The invested fund of the Police Relief Association on the 
thirtieth day of November was §151,632.47. 

FiSXSCIXL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including the pensions, house of detention, station house 
matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but 



i; 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal senice, were 
S2,2S9,3S5.31. (See Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supemsion, and for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, etc., was §48,266.99. 
(See Table XR'.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal ser%'ice during the 
year was §59,091.62. (See Table XMII.) 

Estimated Expense. 

It is estimated that it will take S2,.500,297.42 to meet the 
expenses of the department for the coming financial year; 
the expense of the house of detention, station house matrons, 
police listing, police signal ser\ice and pensions being included. 



i 



'4 



1913; 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



45 







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46 



POLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 







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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



47 



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48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

List of Officers retired during the Year, giring Age at the Time of 
Retirement and Ike Xumber of Years' Serrice of Each. 



SjLitB. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at 
Time of Re- 
tirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Adams, George H., . 


Age, . . 


63 years. 


38 years. 


Brazer, Charles B., . 


Incapacitated, 


52 years. 


25 j-ears. 


Brock, Frank, .... 


Incapacitated, 


56 years. 


30 years. 


Cullen, James A., . 


Veteran, 


68 years, 


21 years. 


Dohcrty, Charles H., . 


Age, . . 


65 years. 


32 years. 


Dugan, Joseph, 


Age, 


68 }-ears. 


44 j-ears. 


Durgin, George A., . 


Veteran, 


65 years. 


17 years. 


Dyer, William H., . 


Age, . . 


64 years. 


39 J-ears. 


Ford, Herbert S., . . 


Age, 


60 years. 


31 years. 


Glawson, John B., . 


Incapacitated, 


55 years. 


24 J-ears. 


Harris, John H., 


Age, . . 


60 years. 


30 jears. 


Hayes, Jeremiah, . 


Age, 


62 years. 


31 years. 


Hooper, Charles F., 


Age, . . 


60 years. 


27 years. 


Howell, Frederick S., 


Incapacitated, 


38 years. 


11 J-ears. 


Jones, Frank I., 


Incapacitated, 


54 years. 


32 J-ears. 


Knowles, James, 


Age, . . 


63 years. 


29 years. 


Knox, Joseph H., . 


Age, 


70 years. 


32 years. 


Maxim, George B., . 


Age, . . 


60 years, 


33 years. 


McKenzie, James, . 


Incapacitated, 


51 years. 


21 J-ears. 


Perry, William F., . 


Age, 


62 years. 


37 J-ears. 


Hideout, William H., . . 


Age, . . 


65 j-ears. 


32 J-ears. 


Watts, WilUam B., . . . 


Age, . . 


61 years. 


35 J-ears. 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



49 



Table IV. 

List of Officers who were promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during 
the Year ending Nov. 30, 1912. 



Datb. 



Xame aod Rank. 



June 20, 1912 



Aug. 1 
May 28 
July 25, 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 
May 30, 
May 30, 
July 25 
Aug. 3 
Dec. 30, 



Jan. 27 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 6, 
Feb. 8, 

May 30, 

May 30, 
May 30, 

May 30, 
May 30, 
July 25, 



1912 
r912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1911 

1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1912 

1912 

1912 
1912 

1912 
1912 
1912 



Aug. 3, 1912 



Chief inspector Joseph Dugan to the rank of deputy 
superintendent. 

Capt. John R. McGarr to the rank of chief inspector. 

Lieut. Clinton E. Bowley to the rank of captain. 

Lieut. Thomas F. Goode, Jr., to the rank of captain. 

Sergt. Thomas F. Gleavy to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. George J. Farrell to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. John F. Linton to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. James J. Walkins to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. James F. Hickey to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Henry Hazlett to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. William J. Hennessy to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Patrick J. O'Neil to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Murray Munro to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Charies T. Reardon to the rank of lieutenant. 

Patrolman William A. Sayward to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Joseph A. Delaney to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John F. Murphy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Fred H. Bean to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Alfred H. Daniels to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Allen V. Nixon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman ilichael J. Trainor to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John J. Mullen to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Joseph L. Snow to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman George H. Mitchell to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Frank N. Harrington to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Jeremiah J. Riordan to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman John T. Clifford to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Michael J. Muldoon to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Dana W. Fisher to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John H. Sweeney to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William W. Livingstone to the rank of 
sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward A. Ryan to the rank of sergeant. 



50 



POLICE com:missioxer. 



(Jan. 



Table V. 

\ umber of Men in Each Rank in Active Serrice ai the End of t}ic Pretent 
Year who weri appointed on the Force in the Year staled. 





1 


i 


3 

















Datx appoixted. 


■o 
o 

» 

X 


3.; 


S 


J 

3 
a 

6 


E 
1 


1 
1 


i 

1 


1 

(2 


a 
i 
1 




1S69, . . . 




_ 


_ 


1 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1S70, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


3 


1873, 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


1874, 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1875, 






- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


7 


- 


< 


1876, 






1 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1878, 






- 


- 


— 


4 


1 


3 


1 


6 


— 


15 


1879, 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


6 


- 


10 


1880, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


8 


- 


10 


1881, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


16 


- 


21 


1882, 






— 


_ 


~ 




2 


6 


1 


11 


— 


24 


1883, 






_ 


_ 









2 


3 


6 


— 


12 


18&4, 






- 


- 


- 




— 


1 


- 


12 


- 


13 


1S85, 






- 


- 


- 




1 


3 


2 


12 


- 


19 


1886, 






- 


- 


— 




1 


2 


- 


8 


- 


12 


1887, 






- 


- 


- 




4 


1 


1 


15 


— 


21 


1888, 






— 


— 


- 




1 


a 


4 


33 


— 


44 


1889, 






— 


— 


- 




3 


1 


3 


13 


- 


22 


1890, 






- 


_ 


_ 




2 


2 


3 


19 


- 


27 


1891, 






- 


- 


1 




— 


2 


1 


15 


- 


20 


1892, 






- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


2 


6 


12 


- 


20 


1893, 






- 


- 


- 


— 


4 


6 


12 


57 


- 


79 


1894, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


8 


21 


- 


30 


1895, 






_ 


— 


— 


4 


a 


— 


22 


98 


— 


123 


1896, 






— 


_ 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


27 


— 


31 


1897, 






_ 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


2 


15 


— 


18 


1898, 






- 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


— 


3 


27 


- 


30 


1900, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


— 


11 


77 


- 


91 


1901, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


50 


- 


52 


1902, 






_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


9 


— 


10 


1903, 






— 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


4 


S3 


— 


87 


1904, 






_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


— 


1 


77 


- 


78 


1905, 






- 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


— 


- 


35 


- 


35 


1906, 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


33 


— 


33 


1907, 






_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


107 


— 


107 


1908, 






— 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


139 


— 


139 


1909, 






- 


— 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


87 


- 


87 


1910, 






— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


51 


— 


51 


1911, 






— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


20 


37 


57 


1912, 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


10 


95 


107 


Tot 


lb. 


• 


\ 


2 


1 


23 


31 


41 


100 


1,227 


132 !l,558 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



51 



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52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



53 






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S «5"S'3'3'3j«cs OS OS 



54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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3 






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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



55 



Table IX. 
Number and Distribulion of Horses used in the Department. 



Divisions. 


Tan. 


PatroL 


Ridin(. 


laoee. 


Dtfr- 
inc 


Toteb. 


Headquarters, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Dhision 1, 




- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 2, 




- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 3, 




- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4, 




- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 5, 




- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Division 6, 




- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Division 7, 




- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


Division 9, 




- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 10, 




- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 11, 




- 


2 


4 


- 


2 


8 


Division 12, 




- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Division 13, 




- 


1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


Division 14, 




- 


1 


4 


1 


1 


7 


Division 15, 




- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Di\Tsion 16, 




- 


1 


10 


- 


- 


11 


Division 17, 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Signal ser\'ice, repair de- 
partment, 40 Joy Street. 
House of detention, . 


3 

2 


: 


: 


: 


3 


6 
2 • 


Prison van, 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


, ; Totals, 


9 


24 


25 


7 


8 


73 



^1 



li 



56 



POLICE CO-M.MISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

SwfibtT oj Arrests by Police Dirisions during the Year ending Nov. 30, 

1912. 



Drrmoxs. 



Males. 



Females. 



TouU. 



HeaAjoarters, 

DiTBICKI 1, 

EKvHKua 2, 

DivHifio 3, 

DivsMO 4, 

IKvBUCio 5, 

DrTBiKO 6, 

DlTBKiO <, 

Krfeioa S, 
jyiMmea 9, 
IXvonxi 10, 
DmsiGia II, 
Dmsnoo 12, 
DivHKia 13, 
EHrsooa 14, 
Kroioa 15. 
Kt^oo 16, 
Kriraco 17, 
Dir^ea LS, 
Tc<4ls, 



S34 

13,602 

4,611 

6,9S9 

S,999 

7,034 

4,071 

2,330 

79 

3,093 

3,427 

2,092 

1,0S2 

1,336 

1,555 

4,2S6 

1,993 

595 

240 

68,248 



313 

901 

256 

l.OSS 

1,361 

1.33S 

302 

206 

346 

448 

73 

75 

SI 

53 

2&4 

85 

IS 

10 

7,248 



1,147 

14,503 

4,867 

8,077 

10,360 

8,372 

4,373 

2,536 

79 

3,439 

3,875 

2,165 

1,157 

1,417 

1,60S 

4,5S0 

2,078 

613 

250 

75,496 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. .49. 



57 






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58 



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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEN'T — No. 49. 



59 



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60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






s 



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^ 

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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCIIMENT — No. 49. 



61 





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62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1913.1 



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1913. 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



65 





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66 



POLICE CO^nilSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



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1913.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 67 

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1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



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71 






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1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



73 



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74 



POLICE CO-MMISSIOXER. 



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PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



srrtcvr^r-t-ri.-j-rtS'— oOOcr»o e^»30 — — op cte* 
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76 



POLICE CO.MMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Xumbcr of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Xot. 30, 1013. 



Divisions. 


sidles. 


Ferr.atea. 


Spsr«L 


Breeders. 


Totals. 


1 


86 


33 


1 


1 


121 


o 








12 


2 


- 


- 


14 


3. 








233 


74 


9 


6 


322 


4, 








105 


59 


3 


1 


16S 


5, 








385 


169 


24 


1 


579 


6, 








302 


63 


4 


- 


369 


7, 








575 


85 


10 


- 


670 


9, 








809 


164 


37 


2 


1,012 


10, 








607 


100 


19 


1 


727 


11, 








1,736 


297 


110 


4 


2,147 


12, 








530 


141 


31 


1 


7a3 


13, 








1,417 


222 


110 


1 


1,750 


H, 








611 


127 


47 


1 


7S6 


15, 








372 


115 


12 


1 


500 


16, 








507 


132 


39 


- 


678 


17, 








51 


13 


4 


- 


71 


IS, 


« 


t 




74 


14 


3 


- 


91 


Totals, 


8,412 


1,810 


466 


20 


10,708 



T.^LE XVI. 

Tolal Xumber of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Dirisiont. 



Dh-ision 1, 






. 1,130 


Di\ision 11, 






4S 


Di\Tsion 2, 






1,927 


Di\-ision 12, 






72 


Di\-kion 3, 






230 


Di\Tsion 13, 






34 


Di\Tsion 4, 






574 


Division 14, 






75 


Dirision 5, 






427 


Di\-ision 13, 






176 


Division 6, 






261 


Di^-ision 16, 






59 


Di\-ision 7, 






139 


Di\Tsion 17, 






11 


Di\-ision 8, 






- 


Di\-ision IS, 






- 


Di\Tsion 9, 
Di\Tsion 10, 






142 
124 








Total, .... 5,429 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 77 

Table XVII. 
Financial Slalement for the Year ending Nov. 30, 1912. 



Expenditures. 

Pay of police and emploj-ees, Sl,971,4&4 41 

Pensions, 139,138 67 

Fuel and light, 19,-154 72 

Water and ice 924 27 

Furniture and bedding, 5,403 27 

Printing and stationery, >. . 12,733 55 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison, . . 7,430 13 

Repairs to station houses and city prison, . . . 9,279 26 

Repairs and supplies for police steamers, .... 8,678 66 

Rent and care of telephones and lines, .... 5,868 63 

Purchase of horses and vehicles, 2,259 90 

Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles, . . 19,949 63 

Carting prisoners to and from stations and city prison, . 1,868 64 

Feeding prisoners, 3,187 94 

Medical attendance on prisoners, 8,225 51 

Transportation, * 2,055 58 

Pursuit of criminals, 3,102 79 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, .... 18,579 39 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc., . . , . 4,025 67 

Traveling expenses and food for police, .... 3,721 32 

Rent of buildings, 7,184 60 

Total, 82,254,556 54 

Expenses of listing 824,193 27 

Expenses of house of detention and station house matrons, 10,635 50 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII.), . . 59,091 62 

Total, $2,348,476 93 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner, . $19,031 50 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itinerant 
musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, carriage 

maps, etc., 1,904 49 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), . . 27,331 00 

Total, $48,266 99 

For uniform cloth, etc., 18,171 65 

Total, $66,438 64 



7S POLICE CO-ABIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Table XMU. 

Paymi-rS* on Account of tke Signal Scrrice during the Year ending 

XoT. 30, 19U. 

Labor, S2S,364 69 

Hay, Eica, shoeing, etc^ 7,334 S8 

Rent aori tare of buildings, 4,679 22 

Purchi=e of horses, Jiamesses and vehicles, . . . 3,503 00 

Stable Hipplks and fumiunre, 22 SS 

Repeis 001 baildings, 2,9S5 26 

Repahrfcj wagons, hamesas, etc., 2,764 59 

Fuel, as and water, 1,451 04 

Misceilirusoas, car fares, eSc, 66 95 

SignalSig apparatus, repais and supplies therefor, . . 4,537 27 

Underzrocciid -Kires, 3,034 93 

P*rintiE;5. Kationerj', etc^ 346 91 

TocaJ, S59,091 62 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



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INDEX 






INDEX, 



-A.. PAOB 

Accidents 8. 79, 80 

persorfs killed or injured in streets, parks and squares . . 79, 80 

number of, reported ........ 28 

Ambulance service ......... 35 

Arrests 5,6,7,23,27,56,67-72,73.74 

age and sex of ........ . 73 

comparative statement of ...... . 74 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . 5, 24, 63, 72 

for drunkenness 6, 24, 26, 31 

foreigners 24, 57-72 

insane persons . ... . ... . 25, 29 

minors 24,57-72 

nativity of ......... . 24 

nonresidents 6, 26, 57-72 

number of, by divisions ........ 56 

nimiber of, punished by fine ....... 25 

summoned by court ....... 24, 57-72 

total number of ........ . 23 

violation of city ordinances ....... 25, 65 

on warrants ......... 25, 57-72 

without warrants ........ 25, 57-72 

Auctioneers .......... 75 

Automobiles 8, 34, 79, 80 

accidents due to 8, 79, 80 

cared for 28 

laws ........... 7 

police 34, 36 

public ........... 37 

prosecutions .......... 8 

B. 

Benefits and pensions r" '....,... 43 

Bertillon system .......... 26 

Bridges, defective .......... 28 

Buildings 28 

dangerous, reported ........ 28 

foimd open and made secure ....... 28 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ....... 26 



Carriages, public .... 


37,75 


articles left in . . . 


37 


automobOe .... 


37 


number licensed 


37,75 


Cases investigated 


27,28.31 






88 INDEX. 



I PACE 

I Cesspools, defective, reported ....... 25 

I . ChUdren 23 

abandoned, cared (or ........ 28 

lost, restored .......... 29 

I Chimnej-s, dangerous, reported ....... 2S 

! City ordinances, arrests (or violation o( . . . . . . 25, 65 

j Claims, inspector o( ........ . 31 

.; Collective musicians . . ... . . . . . 41,75 

■ Commitments ......... . 25, 31 

i Complaints .......... 40, 53, 75 

' against police officers . . . . . . . ' . 53. 54 

t against miscellaneous licenses ....... 40, 75 

} Courts 25,27,31 

fines imposed by ........ . 25 

number o( days' attendance at. oy officers . . . 25, 27, 37, 74 

t number o( peisorxs summoned by ..... . 24 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau o( . ...... 26 

arrests ........... 27 

finger-print sj-stem ........ 27 

photographs .......... 26 

records ............ 26 

rogues' gallerj" ......... 27 

Criminal work .......... 74 

comparative statement o( ....... 74 

D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 43 

Dead bodies, cared for . . . . . . . . . 2S, 33 

Dead bodies, recovered ......... 33 

Deaths 27 

by accident, suicide, etc. ....... 27 

o( police officers ......... 23. 47 

Department, police ......... 22 

Detectives, private ......... 75 

Distribution o( (orce ......... 23, 45 

Disturbances suppressed ........ 2S, 33 

Dogs. . 31,75,76,77 

amount received for licenses (or ...... 75, 77 

damage done by ........ . 31 

number licensed ......... 75, 76 

Drains and vaults, defective reported ...... 28 

Drivers, hackney carriage . . . . . . . . 37, 75 

Drowning, persons rescued from . ... . . . . 29, 33 

Drunkenness 5,6,24,26.31,66 

arrests for, per day ........ 26 

increase in number of arrests for ...... 25 

nonresidents arrested for . . . . . 7, 26 

total number of atrests for . . . . . . . 7, 26 

E. . . . 

Employees of the Department . . ... . . . 22, 45 

Events, special ........... 29 

Expenditures 20, 43, 77 

£Utra duties performed by officers . ... . . . . 27, 29 



INDEX. 89 



r . PACE 

Fences, defective, reported ........ 28 

Financial 20.43.77 

estimated expense ......... 44 

expenditures ......... 20, 43, 77 

bouse of detention ......... 77 

pensions .......... 43, 77 

signal service . . . • - ... 43, 77, 78 

receipts ......... 43, 75, 77 

miscellaneous license fees ...... 43, 75, 77 

Fines 6, 25, 74 

average amount of ... . ..... 25, 74 

amount of ....•..•• • 74 

number punished by ....... . 25 

Finger-print system ......... 27 

Fire alarms . . . • . ..... • . 28, 29 

defective, reported .......... 28 

number given ......... 29 

number on water front attended . . . 33 

Fires • .29,33 

extinguished .......... 29, 33 

on water front extinguished without alarm ... . . 33 

Foreigners, number arrested ....... 24, 57-72 

Fugitives from justice ......... 27 

G. 

Gaming, illegal .......... 67. 68 

Gas pipes, defective, reported ....... 28 

H. 

Hackney carriage drivers . . . . . . . 37, 75 

Hackney carriages ......... 37, 75 

Hand carts ■ . . . . 75 

Harbor service, special duties performed ...... 33 

"Ferret" in commission ........ 33 

Horses 34,55 

bought, sold, etc. ......... 34 

distribution of .'....... . 55 

number in service . . • . . . . . . 34, 55 

House of detention . . . . . 31,77 

House of ill-fame, keeping . . . . . . .31,63 

Hydrants, defective, reported ....... 28 

I. 

Imprisonment .......... 6, 25, 74 1 

persons sentenced to ........ 6, 25 .,' 

total years of ........ 6, 27, 74 

Income .......... 44, 75, 77 V 

Inquests held .......... 27 ,i 

Insane persons taken in charge ....... 25, 29 ',\ 

Inspector of claims ......... 31 ij 

cases investigated ......... 31 --J 



90 INDEX. 

PAGE 

Intoxicated persons ......... 17 

assisted .......... 29 

Itinerant muficians ......... 40, 75 

J. 

Junk collectors .......... 75 

Junk shop keepers ......... 75 

Jury lists, police work OD ....... . 7 

L. 

Lamps, defective, reported ........ 28 

Licenses, miscellaneoui ......... 44, 75 

Listing male residents . . . . . . . . 38,81,82 

certificates refused ......... 38 

expenses of ......... . 38, 77 

number of male residents listed ...... 38, 81 

suppleuurolar}' lint of male naadeats ..... 38, 82 

women voters verified . . . . .' . .38,83 

numbci of policemen employed in ..... . 38 

Lodgers at station bouses ........ 25 

Lodging houses, public ......... 41 

applications for licenses ........ 41 

authority to license ........ 41 

location of ......... . 42 

number of person* lodged in ...... . 42 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property ..... 29, 75, 77 

M. » 

Medical examiners' assistants ....... 27 

inquests attended ......... 27 

causes of death ......... 27 

cases on which inquests were bdd ...... 27 

ilinors, number arrested ....... 24, 57-73 

Miscellaneous business ......... 28 , 

Miscellaneous licenses ......... 40, 75 

complaints investigated ....... 40, 75 ^ 

number issued ......... 40, 75 > 

number transferred ........ 40, 75 

nimiber cancelled and revoked ...... 40, 75 | 

amount of fees collected for ...... . 40, 75 [ 

Missing persons .......... 29 > 

number repiorted ......... 29 

number found ......... 29 

^lusicians, itinerant ......... 40, 75 

applications for licenses ........ 40 ^ 

instruments examined ........ 40 f 

instruments passed ......... 40 '• 

Musicians, a>lleeti\-e ......... 41, 75 j 

Nativity of persons arrested ........ 24 ij 

Nonresident offenders 6, 24, 57-72 i 



INDEX. 91 



"• PAGE 

Offences 5,24.57-72 

against the laws ..... .... 5, 24 

against the person 5, 24, 57, 72 

against property, with ^nolence ..... 5, 24, 69, 72 

against property, without violence . . . . . 5, 24, 69, 72 

against property, malicious . . . .5,24,61,72 

comparative statement of ......' -. 74 

forgery and against currency 5, 24, 61, 72 

against license laws ....... 5,24,61,72 

against chastity, morality, etc. 5, 24, 63, 72 

miscellaneous 5, 24, 65, 72 

recapitulation .■■...... 72 

P. 

Parks, public 79, 80 

accidents reported in . . . . . . . 79, 80 

Pawnbrokers .......... 75 

Pensions and benefits ......... 43 

estimates for pensions ........ 43 

number of persons on rolls ....... 43 

payments on account of ....... . 43, 77 

Police 39 

railroad .......... 39 

Ei>ecial ........... 39 

Police charitable fund, number of benefidaiies .... 43 

Police dei)artment ......... 22 

how constituted ......... 22 

distribution of ....... . 23, 45, 46 

officers appointed ......... 23 

date appointed ........ 60 

complaints against ......... 53 

died 23,47 

discharged . . . . . . . . 23, 51 

injured '. 23 

promoted ......... 23, 49 

resigned 23,51 

retired .......... 23, 48 

absent sick ......... 52 

arrests by ........ . 23 

detailed, special events ....... 30 

work of --........ 23 

horses in use in ........ , 34, 55 

vehicles in use in ........ . 34, 36 I 

Police Belief Association, invested fund of ..... 43 ^ 

Police signal service 22, 32, 44, 46, 78 i 

cost of maintenance ........ 44,78 

paj-menU 44,78 

signal boxes .......... 32 i 

miscellaneoiu work ........ 32 ■, 

property of 32 ! 

Prisoners. nati\-ity of ........ . 24 I 

Private detectives ......... 75 J 



92 LNDEX. 

PAGB 

Property 25, 27, 74, 75, 77 

lost, abandoned and stolen ....... 29. 73 

recovered ......... 25, 27. 74 

sale of condemned . . . . . . . . 44, 75, 77 

stolen in city . . . . . . ' . . . 25. 74 

taken from prisoners and lodgers ...... 23 

Public carriages .......... 37 

Public lodging-houses ......... 41,75 

R. 

Railroad police .......... 39 

Receipts . 44, 75, 77 

Registration (see Listing) ........ 3S 

Rogues' gaUerj- . « 26,27 

S. 

Second-hand articles ......... 75 

Sewers, defective, reported ........ 2S 

Sick and injured persons assisted ...... 25, 29, 33 

Sickness, absence on account of ...... . 52 

Signal sen-ice, police 22. 32, 44. 46, 78 

Special events .......... 29 

Special police .......... 39 

Station houses .......... 25 

lodgers at ......... . 25 

witnesses detained at ....... ■ 25 

Stolen propertj-, value of ...... . 25, 27. 74 

Street railways, conductors and motormen licensed .... 75 

Streeu 28.79.80 

accidents reported in . . . ..... 79, 80 

crowded .......... 13 

defective, reported ......... 28 

obstruction removed ........ 29 

traffic rules .......... 13 

T. 

Teams 29 

stray, put up ......... 29 

Third degree 19 

Traffic rules 13 

Trees, defective 28 

V. 

Vehicles ........... 34 

ambulances . . . . . ' . . . 35 

automobiles .......... 34 

in use in police department ....... 36 

public carriages ......... 37 

wagons ..... .... 37, 75, 76 

Vessels ........... 33 



INDEX. 93 

'V . PAGE 

Wagons .......... 37, 75, 76 

number licensed by di^-isions ....... 76 

total number licensed . . . . . 37, 75, 76 

Water pipes, defective, reported ....... 28 

Water running to waste reported 29 

Weapons, dangerous ......... 42 

Wires and poles, defective, reported 28 

Witnejses 25,29,31,74 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . 27,31,74 

fees earned by officers as 26, 74 

number of, detained at station houses ..... 25, 29 
Women committed to House of Detention ..... 31 

Women voters verified 38, 83 



BOSTON PUBLIC tlBBAR'' 



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