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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

0'i3nd 
NOisoa 



BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Public Document • No. 49 



XINTH ANNUAL KEPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Year ending Nov. 30, 1914. 



* •m -, a 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT * POTTEB PBINTINO CO., STATE PEINTEBS, 

32 DEKNB 8TBEET. 

]915. 



I 



1^ - 



Appboved bt 
Thk State Boaho op Pcbucatios*. 



Ic^^lr.- Vc^'-^'-<-'- ' 



;^/ r-"* 



-^ {' 






CONTENTS. 



PAOB 

Offences against the laws, ......... 6 

Noaresident offenders, ......... 6 

Police work on jury lists, ......... 7 

Violations of the automobile law, ....... 7 

Murders and homicides, ......... 9 

Arrests in eeneral, .......... 12 

Personnel of the force, ... . .... 14 

Method of recruiting the force, ........ 17 

Injuries to prisoners, .......... 22 

Police abuse, . . . ... . ... .26 

Police salaries, ...........29 

The department, .......... 45 

The police force, ......... 45 

Signal service, .......... 45 

Employees of the department, ....... 45 

Recapitulation, .......... 45 

Distribution and changes, ........ 46 

Police officers injured while on duty, ....... 46 

Work of the department, ......... 46 

Arrests, ............ 46 

Drunkenness. .......... 48 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation, ...... 49 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners, ...... 50 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ....... 51 

Special events, ........... 51 

Miscellaneous business, ......... 52 

Inspector of claims, .......... 53 

House of detention, .......... 54 

Police signal service, .......... 55 

Signal boxes, .......... 55 

Miscellaneous work, ......... 55 

Harbor service, .......... 56 

Horses, ............ 56 

Vehicle service, .......... 67 

Automobiles, .......... 57 

Ambulances, .......... 57 

List of vehicles used by the department. ..... 58 

Public carriages, .......... 59 

Wagon licenses, .......... 59 

Listing male residents of Boston, ....... 60 

Women voters verified, ........ 60 

Listing expenses, ......... 60 

Number of police employed in listing, ...... 61 

Special police, ........... 61 

Railroad police, .......... 61 

Miscellaneous licenses. ......... 61 



l-l 



4 CONTENTS. 

rtiem 

Musiciaos' licenses. . . . , . . . . .63 

Itinerant. .......... 62 

Collective, ..... ...... .62 

CaiTj-ing dangerou* veapoos, ........ 63 

Public lodging houses, ......... 63 

Pcojioos and beae&ts, ......... 64 

Financial, ........... 65 

Estimated exjiense. ......... 65 

DistributiOQ of police forre, ........ 66 

List of police officers in arrive service who died, ..... 68 

List of officers retired. ......... 69 

List of officers who were pcx>motcd, ....... 70 

Number of men in active scr»-ice, ....... 71 

Officers discharged and resigned, ....... 72 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness, .73 

Complaints against officers, ...... 74 

Number and distribution of horses, ....... 75 

Number of arrests by police divisions, ....... 77 

.Vrrests and odenoes, .......... 78 

.\ge and bci of persons arrested. ........ 96 

Comparative statement of police criminal work. ..... 97 

Licenses of all classes issued, ........ 98 

Number of dog licenses isfued, ........ 99 

Wagon licenses issued. ......... 99 

Financial statement, .......... 100 

PajTnents on account of signal scr\-ice. ...... 101 

Accidents 102 

.Male residents listed. 101 

Male residents, sui.plementary list, ....... VOo 

Women voters listed, ......... 106 



<5l)c ^ommontucalth of ilXassac^usctts. 



REPORT. 



Headquabtebs op tee Pouce Depabtke>-t. 

Office op the Fouce Coumissioneb, 20 Pembebtox Squabe, 

Boston. Dec. 31, 1914. 

To His Excellency David I. Walsh, Governor. 

Your Excellency: — As police commissioner for the city 
of Boston, I have the honor to present, in compliance with 
the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a report 
of the work of the police department for the year ended 
Nov. 30, 1914. 

Offences against the L.vws. 
Statistics concerning offences against the laws, which are 
given in full detail in another part of this report, are here 
summarized. The total number of arrests in 1914 was 
89,205, as against 81,767 in 1913. The eight general divi- 
sions under which offences are classed show the following 
numbers for five years: — 



OlTEKCES. 


Arau 
in 1«10. 


Arrest* 
in 1911. 


ArrtaU 
in 1912. 


Ancst* 
in 1913. 


Arrest* 
in 1914. 


Offence* acaiiut the penon, 

Oflenoee Ac^inst property with violence. 

Offence* acsinit property witboat violenoe, 

Malicioa* offences against property, . 

Fortery and offence* against the currenc}-, . 

Offence* acainst the license laws. 

Offence* acainst chastity, morality, etc., . 

Offence* not included in the foregoinE, in- 
cluding drunkenness 


479 
IfiM 

137 

M 

532 

I.J08 

<1,7M 


3,213 

Hi 

3,701 

169 

M 

SM 

I.2W 

M,9lt 


3.422 

SIO 

3,693 

Its 

67 
6«S 

1,916 
tJ.O» 


3.7U 

S04 

3,858 

222 

85 

723 

1,884 

70,627 


3.87» 
C89 

5,03« 
217 
10* 
767 

1.889 
76,622 


Totals, 


71,201 


70,443 


7S,4M 


81,767 


89.205 



6 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



A summary of fines and imprisonnwnts is shown as fol- 
lows : — 



UK. 



1*11. 



«2. 



uu. 



mt. 



Peraona fio«d j H.W9 

Total amount of fino, . ., IIV.UO 

Pcnonj acDt«nccd to iropfijr ^fn**i l, . 0.&33 

Total years of impriaoniueDt, . . • 3^1 



ij.m ii.r*i 

tl29.U2 tIB;tU 

8/r !.iS9 

3>U» l.UI 



S.i7S 
3X1 



3;q« 



.\'0XtE.<IDKNT OkFEXWIES. 

The proportion of nonresident ofTcnrlfTa among tlie persons 
arrested for all causes showed a decrea.vt in 1911 for the first 
time in ten years, but only one-lnindrfitli of one per c-ent. 
In 1012 there was a further decrease ci 1.70 per cent.; in 
1913 an increase of .(»-> per cent.; and in 1914 a decrease of 
.27 per cent. When the first police cf<oimiisicn was estab- 
lished in 1S7S, the percentage was I'JSK); in 1914 it was 
.3.S.61. The statistics of the past ten year?, covering arrests 
for all causes, are a? follows: — 



Total 



Nott* 



Pererataca 



1901, 
ISM, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910. 
I9II. 
1912. 
1913, 
1914, 



48,tM 
494M 
S7j07» 
«8.IM 
71,112 
7IJM 
70,443 
7S,t» 
81,7(7 
89,»S 



17,1*7 
UjDOl 

a),3s: 

3«.1I3 

r>a 

31.211 

27 Alt 

aMi 

3IJ00 

u.uo 



ISM 
3*M 
3«77 
IS .2! 
29M 
396 
I».M 
17*4 
3SS> 
38 « 



In the arrests for drunkenness tlic f>erc*ntape of nonresi- 
dents increased steadih" for many years, but in 1911 there 
was a decrease from 1910 of sevcnty-r'ct-hundrcdths of one 
per cent., and in 1912 a further decrease of 1..37 per cent. 
In 1913 the percentage rose 1.1.5, and in 1&14 fell 1.22. The 
following table gives the statistics for ten years: — 



1915.] 



PUBUC DOCUIVrENT — No. 49. 





Total 

Arats 

U* 

DnmlEca- 

nea. 


Pcnent- 
acEof, 

Nonresi- 
dents. 


t 


ToUl 

Airestt 

for 

Dronken- 

ncn. 


Percent^ 
ace of _ 

Nonresi" 
dents. 


1905. 

1806. 

1907. 

190S. ... 

1009. 


32JS0 
37 J» 
42.«8 


OH 
«57 

43 £3 

*7.n 

47.«2 


1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 


47,732 
4«.394 
49.846 
54,951 
59.159 


47.M 
47.10 
45.73 
46.8S 
45.66 



PoucE Work ox Jury Lists. 
For the seventh year the police department, under the 
provisions of chapter 34S, Acts of 1907, has assisted the 
election commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of 
persons proposed for jury service. The police findings in 
these seven years may be summarized as follows: — 



UM. 


IMS. 


ISlt. 


mi. 


ISU. uu. 

1 


ISU. 


Totala. 


Dead or could not be found ia 

Boston, 
Ph)-8icaUy incapacitated. 


-SO 


808 


1.055 


1.356 


1,324 


1,238 


1,483 


8,044 


4se 


223 


332 


499 


279 


379 


304 


2,508 


Convicted of crime, . 


IX 


58 


183 


587 


32 


58 


87 


1,161 


Unfit for rariona reaaona. 


lis 


266 


707 


466 


950 


774 


765 


4,047 


Apparently fit. . 


6.352 


6,870 


7,565 


9,578 


9,991 


10,278 


9,836 


60,470 


Total of namea submitted to 
police. 


7.S9J 


8.225 


9342 


12,486 


12.576 


12,727 


12,475 


76,230 



ViOLATIOXS OF THE AUTOMOBILE LaW. 

The separate charges involving violations of provisions of 
the automobile law prosecuted in the year ended Nov. 30, 
1914, numbered 3,829- These do not include charges against 
automobile drivers for violation of park rules or charges 
against automobile drivers for violation of traflSc rules which 
were not violations of the automobile law; but they do 
include charges against automobile drivers for violations of 
park or traflBc ndes which were at the same time violations 
of the automobile law. The details of the prosecutions were 
as follows : — 



8 POLICE CO>rMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

Overspeeding, 1,671 

Failure to slow dovra and give signal at intersecting street, 1,123 

Making improper turns at comers, 153 

Operating recklessly, 29 

Operating while intoxicated, 29 

Operating on wrong side of street or not as near as possible to 

right curb, 63 

I-amps lacking, not Ughted or not in proper condition, 318 

Operating while unlicensed, 34 

Operating without hecnse in posassion 77 

Operating a registered car without certificate of registration 

in possession, 63 

Operating a registered car without numbers or with wTong 

numbers or with numbers improperly displayed or not in 

proper condition, -19 

.\llowing an unreasonable amount of smoke to escape, . . 73 

Miscellaneous 147 

Total, 3,829 

The first record of an automobile prosecution by the 
Boston police was made only thirteen years ago, when the 
single ofTence of the year 1901 was the dri%ing of a motor 
car in a public park without a permit. In 1902 there were 
33 prosecutions; in 1903, 67; in 1904, 179; in 1905, 102; in 
1906, 30S; in 1907, 961; in 190S, l,S6o; in 1909, 2,196; in 
1910, 2,334; in 1911, 1^99; in 1912, 2,359; in 1913, 3,190; 
in 1914, 3,S29. 

Accidents to persons due to the operation of automobiles 
are first recorded in the department reports in 1900. Begin- 
ning with that year their number to the present time is 
shown in the following table: — 



YCAB. 


KUIed. 


Injured. Ykam. 


Killed. 


Uiand. 


.m . . .1 - 


U :\ ISOS. 


C 


137 


1901. 




■ 1 


S r 1S0. 






9 


ZSI 


uoe. 




■ i - 


17 : 1910. 






13 


2» 


1903. 






J« ■' IMI. 






14 


UI 


I'M. 






Si j 1*11. 






22 


4S 


i9as. 




.i t 


71 j 1913. 






22 


495 


ISOS. 






110 : 191«. 






28 


619 


itaa. 






lOS 1 







1915.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



"Murders" axd "Homicides." 
The number of "murders" or "homicides" in the United 
States is a subject of frequent comment in the newspapers. 
The statistics seem to be gathered annually by an uno£5ciaI 
publication in a western citj', and sent out through the press 
associations with comments verj* much to the discredit of 
this country as compared with the countries of Europe. The 
compiler of the statistics usually finds that from 4,000 to 
5,000 "murders" or "homicides" are committed in the 
United States each year, with an absurdly small percentage 
of arrests and punishments. I do not know the original 
sources of these figures or the analyses, if any, to which they 
are subjected before publication; neither do I know the 
number of such crimes attributed to Boston; but I feel sure 
that, without the closest scrutiny and classification of cases, 
no publication purporting to inform the people of this 
country as to the number of "murders" committed among 
them can be of any real value. 

I have thought it worth while to make such scrutiny of 
cases arising in Boston. The records show that in the police 
year ended Nov. 30, 1914, the Boston police made 63 arrests 
of persons charged with manslaughter and 17 arrests of per- 
sons charged with murder. With this total of SO tested by 
the supposedly small percentage of arrests throughout the 
countrj', the distant tabulator might probably attribute to 
Boston a number of "murders" much in excess of 80. The 
truth is that almost all the arrests on the charge of man- 
slaughter involved drivers of vehicles or persons engaged in .(5 
other operations through which accidental deaths have oc- 
curred. Such persons are placed under arrest, actually or 
technically, to await investigation by the courts, and they 
are usually discharged without delay. 

Another small group of manslaughter charges is based on 
cases in which an ordinarj- fist fight, without weapons and 
usually between drunken persons, results in the death of one_ 
participant, not directly from blows but from fractures of 
the skull following falls. All persons charged with man- 
slaughter or with assault and battery under these conditions 



10 POLICE COM.MISSIONER. (Jan. 

were cither (iistliarged by the lower courts or were freed on 
the finding of "No bill" by the grand jury. 

Leaving aside such matters as the foregoing, an analysis 
of the records shows the following to be the cases within the 
year in which murder or a crime of like character could be 
charged: - — 

Dec. 2, 1913. — Edward Howc-ott was found dead with his 
throat cut. Wheeler Mills was charged with the crime as a 
consequence of a dispute over a girl. Aug. 6, 1914, ^Jills 
was arrested at St. Paul, Minn., and brought to Boston. 
He is under indictment and awaiting trial. 

Dec. S, 1013. — John Francisco was stabbed, and on the 
11th died, llic wound was said to have been received in an 
argument with Rayfieid Martello, who escaped to Italy, 
which refuses extradition in such cases, requiring that trials 
shall take place in that countrj". 

Jan. 22, 101/,. — Kairaclle Covino died as a result of a 
blow on the head with a club. RafTaele Grillo, charged with 
striking the blow, disappeared, but on September 21 sur- 
rendered himself. lie pleaded guilty to manslaughter, and 
was sentenced to State Prison for five to ten years. 

Jan. 23, 191 4. — .\ftcr a fight between Michele Marata 
and Giuseppe Singarelli, in which both men were injured, 
Marata died of a stab wound. Singarelli was indicted for 
manslaughter, but on trial was found not guilty. 

April 13, 1014. — John A. Collins shot and killed his wife 
and was arrested. lie was indicted for murder in the first 
degree, but pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sen- 
tenced to State Prison for eight to eleven years. 

April 10, 1014. — Graham Cox was shot and killed by 
Willis C. Cottrcll, who was arrested and indicted for man- 
slaughter. .\t the trial, the circumstances of the shooting 
were shown to be such that after consultation between the 
court and the .\ssistant District Attorney, on motion of the 
latter the court instructed the jury to return a verdict of 
not guilty. 

.ipril 22, 1014. — Harry Cataldo was shot by .Alfred Rosa 
and died .April 2G. Rosa pleaded guilty to manslaughter and 
was sentenced to State Prison for eight to twelve years. 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

May 2, 1914. — Lewis Gold was killed by a shot fired by 
!Maria Geraminia at another person. She pleaded guilty to 
manslaughter and was sentenced to the Women's Reform- 
atory. 

Jvne 4, 1914- — Rosie Rosenberg was shot by her hus- 
band's brother Jacob, and died. Jacob shot himself at the 
same time, but recovered and was indicted for murder in the 
second degree. Committed to Psychopathic Hospital. 

June 9, 1914. — Thomas J. Norton, inspector of police, 
was shot and killed by Laurence Robinson, whom he was 
arresting on a charge of murder committed in another State. 
Robinson killed himself in jail after trial for murder in the 
first degree had been begun. 

July 20, 1914- — Frank Esposito was shot, and on July 22 
he died. Salvatore De Naldi and Savonia Cataldo were 
indicted for murder in the second degree. They were found 
not guilty, but De Naldo was convicted of assault with 
intent to kill, and was sentenced to the State Prison for six 
to nine years. 

July 27, 1914. — Thomas H. Dalton shot and killed his 
daughter, aged five weeks. At the same time he shot and 
wounded his wife and a son, and shot and killed himself. 

Aug. 6, 1914. — ^largarito Zalistrino was found dead in 
her tenement, with her husband missing. August 7 he was 
arrested and later was indicted for murder in the Brst degree. 
He pleaded guilty to murder in the second degree and was 
sentenced to State Prison for life. 

Aug. 27, 1914. — Maria Mercatante was shot by her hus- 
band Luigi, who also shot himself. Luigi died the same day 
and Maria on September 2. 

Sept. 7, 1914. — Leon Rahwan died of stab wounds sup- 
posed to have been received in a fight with Joseph Arvechek, 
who was indicted for murder in the first degree, but up to 
November 30 had not been arrested. 

Sept. 17, 1914. — Antonio Sanzino was shot and killed. 
Giovanni Caggiano, charged with the crime, Was arrested 
September IS. He was indicted for murder in the first 
degree, and the wife of the man killed was indicted as 
accessory before the fact. Awaiting trial. 



1 1 

■I 



12 POLICE C0M:MISSI0XER. [Jan. 

Sept. 22, JOI4. — Ruben Pclrine was killed by stabbing. 
His wife, Mary Pelrine, was indicted for manslaughter and 
is awaiting trial. 

Oct. S, 1914. — Charles R. Brown, an inmate of the Boston 
State Hospital, died as a result of violence. Two male 
nurses were indicted for manslaughter, but the case against 
one was .no! pross'd and on trial of the other the jury dis- 
agreed and he was released on bail. 

Not. 30, 1914. — Santo Cugno died, and Gaetano Buc- 
chicri was arrested, charged with having caused the death 
by striking Cugno on the head with a bottle. Case awaiting 
trial. 

It is to he observed that — 

1. The deaths for the year numbered 19. 

2. The identity of all persons responsible, if responsibility 

■ e.\isted, was discovered by the police. 

I 3. The persons guilty of three of the crimes committed 

suicide, — two at the time and one while on trial. 

I 4. Of the persons charged with causing the other 16 

' deaths, all were arrested with the exception of two; one is 

t beyond reach of trial here and the other has been missing 

■ since September 7, but his photograph and description have 
; been widely circulated. 

I 5. Of the 17 persons arrested, 2 having been placed under 

I charges in each of three cases, 5 are awaiting trial and the 

( cases of the other 12 have been dbposed of as follows: State 

Prison, 1 for life and 4 for long terms; sentenced to the 
Women's Reformatory, 1; committed to Boston State Hos- 
pital, 1: found not guilty, 3; case nol pross'd, 1; jurj' 
. disagreed, 1. 

I 6. In no case was the element of "mystery" present, nor 

was any homicide c-ommitted in connection with another 
crime, such as robbcrj' or burglar^-. All were the results of 
insanity, angry quarrels or manifestations of the cruder 
passions. 

Arre-sts IX Gexer.\l, 1904 .\xd 1914. 
In the police year ended Xov. 30, 1914, the number of 
arrests, actual or technical, excluding arrests for drunken- 
ness, was .30,040. In the police year ended Xov. 30, 1904, 



1915.1 



PUBLIC DOClBfENT — No. 49. 



13 



the corresponding arrests numbered 16,754. Of these two 
totals representing miscellaneous prosecutions, 9,725 in 1914 
and 2,376 in 1904 were on summonses, as distinguished from 
those following peremptory' arrests. 

The increase in population in ten years has been 25 per 
cent., and the increase in miscellaneous prosecutions in the 
same period has been 79 per cent. A tabulator in another 
city would assume that there had been a growth of "crime" 
in Boston far in excess of the growth in population. An 
examination of details, however, discloses the fact thnt the 
apparently disproportionate increase in prosecutions is due 
largely, if not exclusively, to the following conditions: — 

1. An increase in the number of arrests not involving 
original offences committed in Boston. The principal items 
under this head arc: — 



1914. 



uet. 



Inereaae. 



On capia*. 
On default i 
Fugitives from patiett 
Violation o( eoodttioa* o4 pArdon, 
Violation o( eootHtiotM of pvotMition, 
RunawsT^ ..... 

Total. 



406 

56 

20 

234 

356 



1,127 



29 
152 
30 
15 
5 
ITS 



40« 



26 
254 

2S 

S 

229 

178 



718 



2. Prosecutions under laws or regulations either estab- 
lished since 1904 or much extended, as, for example, the 
following: — 





Ull. 


UOL 


Increaae. 




3,4M 


86 

213 


3,410 


Street tralBe mica. 


1,170 


1,170 


R«fuais( to Htpfiort Cunilx. 


1,089 


876 


TnnfOMt 


1,001 


196 


805 




479 


479 


Railroad Inr. 


399 


194 


205 


Horse-drsvn nhidet wittMOt licbU at ntcbt, . 


252 


- 


252 


Carryinc damnum weapon*. 


241 


6 


235 


Park rulea, 


205 


113 


92 


Spittinc in pabGe place*. 


&8 


- 


88 


Obttructinc Bre CKapea, 


20 


- 


20 


Labor lawn, 


17 


2 


15 


Total 


8,427 


810 


7,617 







14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



3. The foregoing classifications involve not only nev or 
more fully developed laws but increased activity on the part 
of the police. In the following ofTenc-es such activity, com- 
bined with the natural increase in crime, is the principal 
element: — 



uu. 



on. 



roniieatioa. 

Suo<Uy Uv. 

Pock«t picliac and ottoropt4xl. . 

Cocaine aod oth«r drug Uvi, 

Levd aad laacirioui cobAbiUtioa, 

Profaoe and obscene lancuacr tn public places. 

Common Diiisaocc*. ..... 

Robberj' 

Receiving atolcn coods 

Intimidation. iLrcal-^, etc. 

Aaaault on police, 

Aasault iritb intent to murder. . 

Lolteo*. etc., 

Rescue or attempt to rescue priaooer, 
Deri\-int (upport from proatitule. 

Total 



M* 

S7 
J77 
i7$ 
T71 
VA 
Wt 

i;i 
la 

IM 

va 
;« 

SI 

3 



va 

303 

Ul 

7 

SI 

128 

9 

131 

39 

M 

42 

37 

41 

9 



va> 



1.269 



St* 
IS« 

I2« 

2e* 

222 
lil 
IM 

M 

42 
*1 
43 

a 

43 



2,070 



Perso.vxel of the Fokce. 

Citizens at home and officials of other cities often inquire 
as to the sources from which the police force is recruited, — 
nationality, age, occupation, when appointed, etc. A sum- 
mary made as of a day on which the forc-c numbered 1,5S6 
officers of all grades shows a record of birthplaces as f(4- 
lows: — 

United States: — 

Boston, 004 

Elsewhere in Massachusetts, 191 

Maine, 117 

New Hampshire, 26 . 

Vermont, 20 

Rhode Island, 8 

Connocticut, 7 

Other States, 45 

Total for United States, 1,1(B 



1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCIBIENT — No. 49. 



15 



Great Britain and its dependencies: — 

Ireland, 

Nova Scotia, .......■• 

New Brunswick, 

Prince Edward Island, 

England, 

Newfoundland, 

Caiada in general, 

Scotland, . . . . . 

Cape Breton, 

Malta, 

Total for Great Britain and its dependencies, 

Non-English-speaking countries: — 

Sweden, 

Germany 

Italy 

Denmark, 

Greece, 

Norway, 

Russia, 

At sea, 

Total non-English-speaking countries, . 



264 

72 

29 

23 

20 

13 

10 

8 

8 

1 



12 

10 

3 



448 



30 



Grand total, 1,586 



The records show by analysis occupations of members of 
the force when appointed as follows : — 

From mechanical trades and other skilled handwork, 523 men, as 

follows: — 

Machinists, 50 

Workers not otherwise specified in iron, brass, copper, Britannia, 

tin and other metals, 50 

Locomotive and stationary engineers and firemen, ... 47 

Carpenters and other workers in wood, 42 

Foremen, managers and superintendents, 30 

Electrical workers, 26 

Steam and gas fitters, 22 

Printers, 21 

Plumbers, 19 

Painters, 18 

Blacksmiths, housesmiths, carriagesmiths, shipnniths, . . 18 
Makers of cigars, blacking, mandolins, mattresses, patterns, 

trunks, gas, rope, glass, cornices, spars, 15 

Boilermakers, 13 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Cuttcrsof glass, letters, paper, clothing, files, leather, rubber, 13 

Shocm.akers 11 

Bookbinders, . 11 

Masons and bricklayers, 10 

Meat cutters, 10 

Butchers, 9 

Stone cutters, 8 

Furniture makers and upholsterers, 7 

Bakers and confectioners, 6 

Barbers, 6 

Electrot>Tx?rs, lithographers, photo-engravers, stereot>'pers, 5 

Boat, sliip, wagon and car builders, 5 

Marble workers, ■ . . 4 

Jewelers and watchmakers, 4 

Tailors, 4 

Roofers, 4 

Piano workers, 4 

Pavers, 2 

Gilders, 2 

Buffers, 2 

Hatters, 2 

Cooper, lapidarv-, sailinaker, rigger, paperhanger, loom fixer, 
fish curer, decorator, picture framer, fitter, polisher, rubber 

turner, laundrjTnan and helpers, 23 

From transportation in various forms, 516 men, as follows: — 

Street railway motormen, 161 

Street railway conductors, 91 

Steam and street railway employees, miscellaneous, ... 37 

Teamsters, 140 

Kxprcssmen, 33 

Drivers, coachmen, chauffeurs, etc., 54 

From mercantile and manufacturing pursuits, 263 men, as follows: — 

Clerks, 118 

Salesmen, • 32 

In business for themselves, 31 

Shippers, 29 

Packers, 15 

Bookkeepers 8 

Stock pickers and handlers, 7 

Collectors, 6 

Checkers and timekeepers, 5 

Weighers, 5 

Agents 4 

Stenographers, 2 

Treasurer, 1 



t 
-I 



1915. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



17 



From public or semi public sen-ice of various kinds, 116 men, aa 



follows: — 
Boston fire department. 
Police service, . 
Officers of institutions, 
Soldiers and sailors, . 
Inspectors, . 
Lamplighters, 

Boston protective department, 
Nurses and attendants, . 
Woodman, tree climber, letter carrier, drawtender. 



50 

19 

10 

10 

7 

6 

5 

4 

5 



From occupations not mechanical but requiring unusual bodily vigor, 
SO men, as follows: — 

Laborers, 30 

Milkmen 12 

Longshoremen, 11 

Freight handlers, 11 

Icemen, 7 

Stablemen, 6 

Farmers, 5 

Gardeners, 4 

From miscellaneous occupations, S2 men, as follows: — 

Porters 23 

Watchmen, 16 

Janitors, 8 

Waiters, 7 

Employees of theatres, 5 

Operators ' . . 4 

Doorkeepers, 3 

Caretakers, 2 

Athlete instructors, 2 

Elevator man, steward, footman, butler, musician, ball player, 
rectifier, sexton, student, meter reader, bill poster, photog- 
rapher, one each, 12 



Method of Rf.cruitx.vg the Force. 

No man can enter the Boston police force except in the 
lowest grade, as a reserveman; and no appointment of re- 
servcmcn can be made except from lists certified by the 
Massaclnisctts Civil Service Commission. Although this 
procedure lias been a matter of law for nearly thirty years, 
it is understood by comparatively few citizens. 

A man who wishes to enter the force must be a citizen of 



IS POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

the I'nite*! States ami must have lived in Massachusetts 
imnie*Iiatcly preceding his application at least one year and 
in IV»^trm at least six months. lie must l>e not less than 
iweniy-five nor more than thirty-tlirce jears of age, though 
if oacv qualified in all respects and placed upon the eligible 
list he may he apiwinted up to the age of ihirty-fi\"e. He 
must lie at least five feet eiglit inches in height and must 
weigh at least 140 pounds. Failing as to any of the fore- 
going <T>nditions, or as to any of some others not here speci- 
fie<l, bis application will not be received by the Ci\ il Service 
Commif-ion. 

The application itself is a formidable document filled and 
sworn to by the applicant and embodying answers to scores 
of questioas bearing upon his moral, mental and physical 
({ualiS^-ations for iK)lice service. It is a document such as 
no private employer would jilace before an applicant, and 
yet frj-r pr»lice j)iirposes it contains nothing .-nperfluous. The 
name? of all persons whose apjilications on their face appear 
to enthle them to further consideration are sent by the Civil 
Ser\'i<-e Commission to the police commissioner for c-areful 
and trxifidential inquiry. Those inquiries are made by 
officers of rank in the jioiice di\ isions in which the candidates 
respertivdy live, and the rejjorts in writing which arc re- 
tume»i to the Civil Service Commission relate to the char- 
acter, habits and associates of the applic-ants. Should any 
matter be disclose<l which, in the opinion of the Civil Service 
Commisrion, <lisqualifies the candidate, his application is re- 
jected. 

Once or twice annually persons then eligible arc called by 
the Civfl Service Commission for a mental, written exami- 
nation which, though searching in character, is designed 
mainly to asc-ertain the general intclligente of the person 
respr>i!»iing. Should he receive a mark not lower than C5 
per ctnt- he is passed on for a particularly rigid physical 
examination. The first requirement is tliat the candidate 
shall he in a condition of perfect health, and that he shall be 
free from physical blemishes, such as flat feet, crooked spine 
or even i>ad t*»eth, unless capable of being so restored as to 
secure prr»per mastic-ation. A second jwrt of the physical 
e.xamination consists of elaborate tests of muscular strength 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMEXT — Xo. 49. 19 

as employed in different ways, of agility, etc. The strenuous 
nature of these physical tests will be better understood when 
it is known that in eight and a half years, a period within 
which more than a thousand of these picked men have been 
examined, only two secured 100 per cent. 

A candidate who has met every requirement and has 
passed both mental and physical examinations with marks 
above 65 per cent, is placed on an eligible list. To determine 
the order in which candidates shall be entered on the list, 
each man's marks in the mental and physical examinations 
are added together and divided by two. The quotient is his 
average percentage, and the man securing the highest 
average goes to the top of the list, with otliers following in 
the order of average. It may as well be said that the pass 
mark of 65 per cent, is of no possible value, the percentages 
credited to the men who are ultimately appointed being far 
above that figure. 

When the police commissioner desires to appoint reserve- 
men he applies to the Civil Service Commission for the 
certification of names from its list. A graded surplus of 
names is always certified. For example, on a call for 10 
men, the number is IS, and so on, in an established pro- 
portion. With the names the police commissioner receives 
the original applications and examination papers of the 
certified men. These are scrutinized in detail, and for con- 
venience a summary of the special points in each case is 
prepared. ^leanwhile, a list of the names has been posted 
in each station hou.se of the department, witli the require- 
ment that police officers who have information derogatory 
to any candidate shall so report. Such reports are often 
made, but usually apply to some long-past misdemeanor 
acknowledged by the candidate himself in his wTitten ap- 
plication to the Civil Service Commission. When no such 
acknowledgment is found, investigation follows; ard should 
it become clear that the truth was intentionally concealed, 
the candidate receives no further consideration under any 
circumstances. Any testimony from police or other sources 
tending to show undesirable qualities or conditions, such as 
temper, laziness, domestic troubles, etc., is carefully weighed. 

After the names have been displayed about ten days, the 



20 rOLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

candidates are notified to appear at tiie commissioner's 
office at a certain time, bringing with them, if they wish, any 
written rect>mmendations which they can secure. As new 
men it is <ie~irahle that as much as possible should be 
learned abfKit them, but no attention is given to rec-ommen- 
dations from citizens who are unable to say that they 
personally kiK>w the candidate. A letter from a pastor, a 
grocer, a Undlorxl or an employer who knows the man has 
weight, bat letters from a score of distinguished citizens 
without personal knowledge of the candidate would have not 
tlie slightest effect. 

The assemiJe*! candidates are questioned and inspected one 
by one ami separately by the commissioner and the superin- 
tendent, and after all have been seen the men to be ap- 
pointed are selectetl. It is rarely a matter of rejection, — 
almost always of selection in accordance with the letter and 
the spirit of the law. Those who are to be appointed are 
notified to I* present at a specified time, when they are 
sworn in as reser\emen. The title is old and slightly mis- 
leading; tbif men are not held in reserve but are incorporated 
as prohatiffOtrn in the police force, giving up all outside 
work. The ji<ay the first year is at the rate of $2 a day for 
3G.J tiay.s, and the second year, S2.25 a day; but soon after 
the middle of the second year a reserveman who has shown 
his fitness is usually appointed a regular patrolman, at 
§1,000 a year. This rate increases in successive years to 
•SI, 100, $1^**. .$1..300 and .?1,400, which is the ma.ximum. 

A man certified by the Civil Service Commission and not 
appointe*! is certified twice again, unless meanwhile a new 
eligible li.^t has been made up. !Men are often appointed on 
their second certification and sometimes on their third, for 
the reason iLat each candidate in each squad is judged, not 
only on his orn apparent personal merits, but with reference 
also to the merits of all the other applicants. Should a new 
e.xaminatirro }^ ordered while a candidate is awaiting action, 
he may at his option take rank according to his former mark 
or enter the i>ew examination and abide by its result. 

.\n idea fA the quality of the men secured may be obtained 
from the foDf^wing list of the first 20 men certified by the 
Civil .Scr\'iee Commission in 1914: — 



1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



21 



OccoPAHOS. 


Age 
(Years). 


Per Cent. 
Physical. 


Per Cent. 
Kenul. 


Per Cent. 
Avcrase. 


Height 
(Feet and 
Inches). 


Weight 
(Pounds). 


Shipping clerk, . 


31 


91.56 


S9.39 


90. 4S 


5.9Ji 


169 


Fireman, 


26 


100 DO 


80 63 


90 32 


6 6 


220 


Teamster, 


27 


01 95 


8S.37 


90.17 


5 lOH 


144 


Piano tuner, . . 


30 


97. U 


82.27 


89.71 


5 8 


149 


Exprr 39 clerk. 


23 


93 90 


85 25 


89.50 


5.8H 


170 


Real estate, . 


30 


93 16 


S4 60 


88. 8S 


5 11 


148 


Pattern maker. 


26 


96.12 


81 34 


88.73 


5.8J4 


166 


Fireman, 


31 


MM 


81.09 


87.97 


5.11H 


157 


Pressman, 


2S 


93 6S 


82 17 


87,93 


5 8H 


150 


Fireman, 


27 


89.12 


8601 


87.57 


oWA 


153 


J^mplixbt«r, 


33 


97.02 


77.51 


87.27 


5.9H 


145 


Metropoliun park police 


2S 


92 10 


82 33 


87 22 


S.IO'A 


156 


Elertrician, . 


23 


91 96 


82.32 


87.14 


6 


188 


Fireman, 


26 


98 04 


75 53 


86.79 


5.9K 


1S3 


Chauffeur, . 


27 


96 26 


76.63 


80.45 


5.8;i 


141 


Teamster, 


32 


96 74 


74.44 


85 02 


5.10K 


153 


Salesman, 


30 


89 72 


81 20 


85.46 


5.11»4 


185 


Electrical inspector. 


26 


95 32 


75 39 


85 36 


5.8H 


152 


Leather sorter. 


2S 


90 10 


80 59 


85 35 


S.9H 


183 


Shipper, 


27 


92.48 


77.56 


85.02 


5.10 


167 



In the light of these figures it is not surprising that 
Richard H. Dana, Esq., probably the most conspicuous living 
advocate of civil service reform methods, should have de- 
clared in a public address that the Boston policemen "are 
physically finer than the West Point cadets." 

There is a gradual though not marked falling off in some 
respects as the lists are drawn upon, but as the number of 
appointments in a year seldom exceeds 50, excellent material 
can always be had. Without attempting perfect accuracy, it 
may be said broadly that of 200 young men who believe that 
they are fit in all respects, 100 reach the eligible list, and 50 
chosen from the hundred become policemen. If any methods 
other than those now followed can produce better results, I 
do not know what they are. 



22 rOLICE COMMISSIONKFJ. [Jan. 



• 



t IXJLRIES TO PrISOXEIW. 

After a tliorough test of cliapter 2.%, Acts of 1013, as 
amended l)y cliapter 72S of the same year, rc-<jiiiriiij; "reports 
of injuries of persftns arrested," I deem it my duty to call 
attention to the cumhrous .-nul unprofitaMe o[H-ration of that 
statnte. Tiic histor>- and purport of the orij;inal act, 
chapter '2'->C>, was presented to the I5o>ton iK>liee department 
in General Order No. 707, issued March 27, 1013, as fol- 
lows : — 

The department is hereby informed of the itt'^ase of cliapter 23G, 
Acts of 1913, entitled "An Act to provide for reports of injuries of 
persons arrested," which takes cfTjct April 3, and is as follows: — 

Section' I. Whenever a [kt^od i» arresleil f<jr a rriminal ofTcnec ari'l ia 
taken to or confirietl in a jail. jHtlire ^lalion. I*>ckup "r Mbor place, the o(Bc-er 
ID charpe thereof >haU immetliatelj' 4-xamine the pri***iyT. and if he finds any 
bruises, euts or other injuries !-hall f>,rth»"ilh make a wriilen report thereof, 
to the ehief of poliee of the city or town concerned. »Trrpt that in Boston the 
report shall l>c made to the r»'»lirc cr»nimi«?ioner, ai*<l id towns where there U 
no chief of police the refK,rt ^hall 1* made to the M{#^^iz»ea. 

Section- 2. Failure to comply with the prelvi^<iou» «»f ihtJ act thall be pun- 
L«hed by a fine of not more than ten dollars for eaib off»i>ce. 

I am unable to ad\Tsc the dejKirtmcnt as to ll<c manner in which 
tiiis act is to be olx-ycd. .ludgini; from the record <A its pas-sagc through 
the legislature, it rc^juircs tlu-it cver>- prisoner nrt-ivrtl at a station 
house or a lockup shall \>c examined innnc-diatcly by llic officer in 
charge, and that the examination shall I)e ct/mjAclc and therefore 
with the clothing of the prisoner removed. The n-coni is as follows: — 

The bill as originally introduced by a citizen |>bce<l no limit upon 
the injuries to Ix- re[X)rte<l. 

The conmiittee on legal alTa'rs, to which it was referred, reported 
the bill back to the Legislature nnth an ameivlment Umiting the in- 
juries to be reix)rte<l to those "which may Ix; vl-iblc." 

The I.egislaturc change<l in several respect* the language of the 
bill as rcix)rted, and removed l!ic limitation by Mriking out the words 
"which may Ix; visible." 

With such a legislative record there could Ix; do doubt of the inten- 
tion of the Legislature and the duty of the j^^lice if the case were 
that of an ordinan.- statute, literal obedience Ut which would be hu- 
manly possible. If the words "which may Ix; ^-fc-iUe" were intended, 
as they apparently were, to exclude from examination parts of the 
botly usually covered, the removal of those woerls by the I>egislature 
would m.akc the meaning of the statute to Ix; that the entire body of 
each prisoner should be examined by the officer in charge, and tliat all 
injuries, new or old, should be reported. But in Boston the persons 



1915.) PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

arrested annually exceed 70,000, of whom more than 7,000 are women; 
and of the whole number almost 50,000, including more than 4,000 
women, are intoxicated. It cannot be doubted, moreover, that if 
the law were obeyed accoriling to its terms it would require that the 
36,000 men transferred annually to the City Prison to await arraign- 
ment in court or a release by probation officers, and the 6,000 women 
transferred to the House of Detention for women for like purposes, 
though pre\'iously examined at the station houses, should again be 
examined when received at those establishments, which officially 
are " lockups." 

If the act were limited to "visible" injuries the examination would 
be confined to parts of the body usually uncovered, to the face and 
hands as a rule. Injuries to the face and hands as found on prisoners 
are almost always trivial, such as scratches, bruises ::nd black eyes; 
it is concealed injuries, broken bones, fractured skulls and the like 
which are of real importance, and such injuries arc disclosed, in so far 
as the}- can be disclosed without medical examination, by the general 
appearance or the complaints of the prisoner. It b because of such 
disclosures largely, as well as for visible injuries, that calls for physi- 
cians to attend sick or injured prisoners and other persons are made 
by the Boston police almost three thousantl times a year. 

The examination of the entire body of each prisoner, even if it were 
possible for the officers in charge of tiie station houses and lockups 
to perform such a task, would create a condition of disorder and in- 
decencj' which would be preposterous. But to confine examinations 
to the "visible" parts, besides being apparently contrarj' to the inten- 
tion of the Legislature, would result in the preparation by nonmedical 
police officers, and the accumulation at headquarters annually, of thou- 
sands of reports which would be of no benefit to the pubUc or to the 
police department. 

It has been my practice to advise the department from time to 
time as to the manner in which the provisions of new statutes or 
ordinances affecting police administration should be carried out; but 
in this case, not knowing what to advise, I can do no more than give 
notice of the passage of the act, with its accompanj-ing legal penalty 
for failure to obej*. 

Because of the situation disclosed in tlie foregoing order 
the Legislature amended chapter 2.30 by the passage of 
chapter 72S, the practical effect of which was to remove 
certain minor objections and to provide tiiat "the require- 
ment that the prisoner be examined shall not be deemed to 
compel the removal of clothes." 

In accordance with the amended statute full instructions 
were issued to the Boston police department, together with 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

printed fcrms f()r rcpfirts calling for tlic n-nmc, age, residence 
and offence of the prisoner found to he injured; the name of 
the arresting officer, with the date and hour of arrest; the 
date anil hour of examination; the name of the piiysician 
calietl, if any, witii the time of the call and the time of the 
respon:<e; the nature of the injury; and the disposition made 
of the prisoner. 

Tliis system of reiKirts has been in operation seventeen 
full months, from July 1, 1913, to Nov. :5(), 1914, and the 
whc.Ie number of reports made in that time has been 7,G76. 
In compliance with the apparent intent of the statute, these 
7,G70 reports have Ijeen received and read by the com- 
missioner and filed under his direction. I believe that they 
have added nothinp to the safety of prisoners or to the 
metiical attention which they received, both of which had 
already been fully pmvitled for in the long-established rules 
rif the department. I may say, further, that I have no 
knowledge of a single instance in which a report has been of 
any servic-e to tlie j)ublic or to the polic-e. If the police de- 
partments throughout the .State are obeying the mandate of 
this statute as carefully as it is obeyed in Boston, it is un- 
doubte<lly true that from ten thousand to fifteen thousand 
reports of the character indicated arc annually i)repared, read 
and filed. 

Entering further into the detail of the subject, it may be 
said that in October, 1914, taken as a sample month for close 
analysis, reports of injuries were made as to 452 arrested 
persons. Of those, 42G were men, 2G women; 269 were 
residents of Boston, 1S.3 nonresidents. The offences charged 
against these persons were as follows: — 

Intoxication, 432 

Assault and bjittcrj", 10 

Assault and baltcrj- with intent to kill 2 

Assault and batter)' with dangerous weapons or implement, . 2 

Breaking and entering buildings, 2 

Assault on police officer, 1 

Larceny, 1 

Violating peddling law, 1 

DcUnquent, 1 

Total 452 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 25 

It will be seen that of the prisoners reported with injuries, 
95.57 per cent, were arrested in a condition of intoxication, 
which accounted in almost all cases for their mishaps. 

The injuries found upon these 452 persons, in so far as they 
can be classified, were as follows: — 

Cuts, scratches, abrasions, contusions of face, .... 323 

The same as to otiicr parts of head, 64 

Old injuries not fully healed, 42 

Cuts on arms, legs, hands, back, . 14 

Fracture of nose 5 

Fracture of ankle, 2 

Fracture of arm, 1 

.\nkle sprained, 1 

Total 452 

Information as to the causes of the injuries is obtained by 
observation on the part of the arresting officers when present, 
through inquiries made by them of bystanders, or from the 
statements of the arrested persons; but as nearly 96 per 
cent, of the persons arrested with injuries are intoxicated, 
clear accounts from them can hardly be expected. The 
causes of the injuries, as given in the reports, were as fol- 
lows: — 

Old Injuries, causes of no immediate interest, 42 

Causes not ascertained, prisoners refusing or unable to explain, 112 

Fell in streets and other public places, 168 

Street fights, 55 

Family fights, 14 

Fell in station houses, esjjeciaUj' cells and In patrol wagons, 1 1 

Fell in other buildings, 11 

Fell from street cars and in railway stations, 8 

Fell through windows, breaking glass, 3 

Fell upon bottles carried upon the person, 2 

Miscellaneous accidents, 7 

Miscellaneous assaults, 6 

In resisting arrest, 13 

Total, 452 

Of the 13 men who were injured while resisting arrest, 5 
were struck with clubs by policemen, who submitted written 
reports, under the department rule long in force. There was 



2G POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

DO serious injury. One of the men had been caught in the 
act of breakiiij; and entering a building, .\iiother was one of 
five men who had beaten a police officer, for wliich lie was 
sentenced to si.v months* imprisonment. The sixth man fell 
and injured his nose. The seventh bit the hand of a j)olice 
officer, wlio tlicreupon struck him with his other hand, in- 
fiicting a cut in the face. The eighth received a slight sprain 
in a struggle in which <iffic-cr and prisoner fell to the ground. 
The ninth and tenth fell in struggling and cut their faces. 
The eleventh received abrasioos of the skin through the use 
of "twisters." The twelfth struck a police officer with a 
dub, received in return a cut on the face, and the officer went 
to a ht)spital. The thirteenth bletl at the nose as a result of 
his struggle. 

In only three cases did prisoners brought to station houses 
make statements as to the causes of tlieir injuries which 
were in the nature of complaints against polic-emen. .\ man 
arrested for assault and batter>- and a man and a woman 
arretted for lirunkenness assertwl that their injuries, which 
consisted of slight cuts or scratches, had been c-aused by the 
arresting officers. The arresting officers stated that the 
injuries were upon those j)ersons when they were found by 
the police. In no case did the prisoner renew the complaint 
when sobered or afterwards. 

"Police Abuse." 

Legislation such as the >tatute which requires that all 
injuries found on prisoners >hall be reported is based on two 
erroneous theories. BilLs of that ciiaracter have been pro- 
pcserl in varying forms and considerable numbers at the 
two or three most rec-ent .sessions of the Legislature; and 
though I have official knowIe<lge to the contrarj- as affecting 
at least three of the pn>ponents, I shall assume that all bills 
were presented for humanitarian reasons, without private 
feeling again>t the policic or a desire to secure the benefit of 
personal publicity. 

The first errt)neous thef)r>- is that the police are guilty of 
wanton abuse of citizens; the second is that such abuse, if 
existent, can be stopped by statute. The truth is that the 
character of the men who compose a police force, the rules 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

by which they are governed, and, above all, the spirit per- 
vading the whole police body are the only means by which 
the security of citizens from police abuse can be guaranteed. 

The rules of the Boston police department have carried 
for eight years six printed pages of instructions to police 
officers as to the use of revolvers and clubs, and the con- 
ditions under which force may be employed. Those in- 
structions have been open to the public from the beginning; 
and as they have not been criticized, it is fair to assume that 
they prescribe a line of conduct on the part of police officers 
which secures the protection of citizens as well as the mainte- 
nance of the dignity of the law! All instances of police use 
of revolvers with fatal results in the past eight years have 
been submitted to the courts, and such use has been justi- 
fied. In two cases police officers were brought to trial for 
fatal shooting, and in both cases they were acquitted by 
juries in accordance with charges by the presiding justices, 
which not only sustained the department rule as to the use 
of revolvers, but went even further in declaring the lawful 
right of action by police officers. 

\\'hether or not the Boston police have obeyed those rules 
is a question which can be fairly tested. In the past eight 
years about half a million arrests have been made in Boston, 
not counting cases in which juveniles or adults were merely 
summoned to court. These arrests were made by about 
1,500 policemen on duty at all hours of the day and night, 
armed with clubs and loaded revolvers. Of the men arrested 
more than half were drunk, and in thousands of cases violent 
and abusive; and a large percentage of all persons arrested 
were dangerous criminals. 

As a consequence of these arrests, and of the relations of 
the police with the whole population, two policemen have 
been convicted of unjustifiable assaults and have been dis- 
charged from the department; and two others have been 
discharged for offences believed to have been the outgrowth 
of an assault upon a prisoner. In none of these cases was a 
club, revolver or other weapon used, and in all instances the 
acts of the policemen resulted from outbursts of temper pro- 
voked by abusive language. 

It may be said that this remarkable record is due to 



2S POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

leniency on tlic part of the department towards such of- 
fenders, that a citizen who is assaulted hy a policeman cannot 
secure justice from the police authorities; on the contrarj', 
no other ofTencc is pursued more rigorously or punished more 
severely. But U) this suggestion there is a perfect answer in 
addition to the denial. A citizen who is assaulted by a 
policeman has a right to go to the courts for redress, either 
with a criminal complaint for assault or with a civil suit for 
damages. But in eight years n(» Boston policeman has been 
convicted in any criminal court of assault or any other form 
of violence committed upon a citizen, and no Boston police- 
man has paid a <lollar in civil damages by order of a court 
for any act of virdence committed by him within those eight 
years. There have been a few instances, perhaps eight or 
ten, in which fKilicemen have paid small sums in settlement 
of cases involving technical assault or unlawful arrest, but 
not actual bodily injury- to the piaintifTs. 

What is the other side of the case? In eight years four 
policemen have Ijeen shot dead by criminals and a dozen 
have been cripj)Ied for life by shooting or other violence. In 
the same perifnl .V»0 persons, not counting those who escaped, 
have been arreste*! for assaulting pr>licemen, and 222 police- 
men while arresting criminals, and ftS other policemen while 
pursuing criminals have been injured to such an extent as to 
cause them to \<rse 0,047 days from duty. No account is 
made of the innumerable cases in which the injuries did not 
necessitate absence from duty. 

Such is the record of eight years as between the individual 
citizen and the individual policeman, with the policeman 
possessing the legal as well as the moral right, often of 
necessity exercised, to use all neetled force in effecting an 
arrest and overcoming resistance. 

The notion, for it deserves no more dignified designation, 
that prisoners or other citizens are maltreated by the Boston 
police, owes its exbtcnce to tradition, to the popular reading 
of works of fiction, to the news reports from other cities 
which readers mistakenly apply to Boston, to the "third de- 
gree" dramas and similar nonsense presented by theatres and 
moving-picture houses, and especially to the circumstance 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 29 

that some of our own daily newspapers are quick to print 
and enlarge upon charges of police violence which simple 
investigation proves to be groundless. 

Police Salaries. 

Certain increases in the rates of payment to Boston police 
officers became a subject of public discussion in March and 
April, 1914. Hb honor the mayor requested the police 
commissioner in a personal interview to concur with him in 
rescinding all increases granted to officers of rank in 1913 
and 1914, the increased maximum granted to patrolmen to be 
allowed to stand. To this request the police commissioner 
declined to accede, on the ground that the injury' to the 
morale of the department would be much greater than could 
be balanced by the comparatively small percentage of sav- 
ing. 

His honor thereupon, by agreement, sent to the police 
commissioner a written communication, to which a reply in 
form was made, but without change in the result. 

Following this correspondence a bill was presented to the 
Legislature pro\nding that the mayor should have the power, 
without the concurrence of the police commissioner, to reduce 
police salaries to the rates in effect before October, 1913. 
The time for the admission of new business, except under 
suspension of the rules having expired, the Legislature de- 
clined to admit the bill. It is proper to say that the police 
commissioner took no action and expressed no opinion as to 
the bill. 

In the meantime the Boston Finance Commission had 
begun an investigation, which resulted in a report as fol- 
lows: — 

BOSTO:* FlXANXE COMMISSIOX, 

410-416 Themo.nt Bviloi.nc, Boston, April 8, 1914. 
Hon- J.UIES AI. CrRLET, Mayor. 

Sir: — The Finance Commission submits the following report as 
a result of its investigation into the increases in salaries of the police, 
fire and penal institutions departments during the final two j'cars of 
the last administration. 

The first increases in the police and fire departments were voted 
in Ma}-, 1912, and the last increases took effect Jan. 16, 1914, seventeen 



30 I'OLICK COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

days Ijt-forc tlic end of tlic last administration. The increa.>H; in the 
penal in-stitutions department was made in .\ugust, 101.3. 

TTic Finance Commission doc-s not pas.s at this time ufxjn whether 
the increases arc warranted. It has coasidered only the time when 
the incTca.sos wore made and the methods used in obtaining them. 

The Police Department. 

1. The Police Commissioner's Responsibility to the City. — Under 
the Acts of lOOC, eliaptcr 291, the pay of the polio* force shall not 
be incTea.-io<l or diminished except by concurrent action of the mayor 
aikl the ptjlice conimis.-'ioncr. The [Kdicc commissioner, at the public 
hearing.^ pvcn before the Finance Commission, stated that in his 
opinion it was the duty of the mayor to decide whether the city was 
able to pay the increases asked for, and his to acquiesce, provided the 
men were entitled to it and discipline was not impaired. On the ques- 
tioa of decreasing pay, however, he did not feel tliat lie should be 
cotttrt>Ile<l by the mayor's statement of the city's finances, but must 
miinly be governed by tiie efTect of such a change upon the morale of 
the department. 

2. Reinining Counsel. — In order to obtain increases in salar>' the 
mtmbers of the police department retained a bwj-cr to represent them 
before the mayor and the police commissioner. In 1912 they paid 
for his .senices 89,44.3. He testified that in 1913 he was to receive 
not ka than the same amount. In all he was paid, or expected to be 
pail, for the two increases not less tlian $lS,5vS6. It is fair to conclude 
frtun the other testimony given before the commission that even laiger 
remimtration was expected. 

The police commissioner testified that he did not object to the 
cmpkl>^nent of couasel by the men, and was not especially concerned 
about the amount of the fee. 

The services rendered by the lawyer consisted in the main of urging 
the tl^m mayor and the police commi:i<ioner to do that which they 
had brjth .'■aid woulil Ik; done when financial conditions would allow 
it. It appears tliat neither the commissioner nor the then mayor 
needed to be convinced that the salaries in the police department 
should be raised. 

In the absence of knowledge to the contr3r>', or facts creating 
reasonable grounds for l)elieving the contrarj% it would be fair to 
beBcve that the commissioner had a right to assume that the mayor, 
as chit-f financial officer of the city, would not have recommended the 
increases, or concurred in the order establishing them, if he had not 
prtvioa-Iy satisfied himself that the city would be able to pro\nde 
neeessarj' funds in accordance with existing statutory- requirements. 
If, boirever, the police commissioner had knowledge or notice that 
the city would be unable to provide for the increases in the police de- 
partment without impairing the efficiency of other branches of the 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

city's senice, or that the proposed increases were unnecessary or 
improper under the circumstances, it was his duty to refuse to concur. 

The Finance Commission finds that the last increase in the poUce 
department, that of Januarj', 1914, appears to have been based on 
nothing more than a small unappropriated balance, sufficient to 
pay the increases in salaries for the remaining days of the former 
mayor's administration. The city's ability to pay the increase for 
these few days has been made the basis for an increase which must 
be borne bj' the present administration. In the opinion of the Finance 
Commission an appropriation made unilcr the above conditions should 
have been notice to the police comniissioncr, and it was his duty 
under the law to liave refused to concur with the former mayor, and 
to suggest that the question of increases should go over and be settled 
by the incoming administration. 

^Miile there may be occasions when the men of the pwlice depart- 
ment should employ counsel before the Legislature, and in other 
special instances, the Finance Conmiission believes that the police 
conmiissioner is in error (b allow attorneys to appear before him on 
questions like increases of pay, or other matters of a purelj' depart- 
mental nature. The law compels publicitj' when attomej's apjjear 
before the Legislature. They must register and later state the com- 
pensation they receive. The wisdom of this is apparent. Publicity 
prevents fees from being of such a size as would cause just grounds 
for suspicion as to the compensation not being properly used. The 
emplojTncnt of counsel who are paid large fees for explaining to a 
mayor and a f)olice conmiissioner well-knouTi facts, such as the high 
cost of living, is dcmoraUzing to discipline, and may lead to grave 
financial abuses. 

It cannot be said that the scr\-ices given in securing an Increase 
of salary where no involved legal question was to be decided required 
the paj-mcnt or promise of SIS,SS6 or more. 

Some idea of the demoralizing effect of such means for obtaining 
salarj- increases may be had from the records of Jan. 11, 1914, of the 
Boston Social Club, comiX)scd of the patrolmen of the police depart- 
ment. At this meeting one of the members thanked his associates for 
their efforts in the campaign for the increase of salaries, and stated 
that the then mayor was their "staunch and true friend," and urged 
all the members to vote at the coming election, "in order to show their 
strength at the polls." 

The Finance Commission commends the members of the police 
department for the frankness with wliich thej* gave their testimony. 

The Fire Dcpartmcnl. 
1. The Altitude of the Fire Commissioner. — The former fire com- 
missioner had no concurrent power of checking the salar>' increases, 
as liad the police commissioner. In liis testimony he stated that the 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

cniploynifiit of counstl to obtain increases in salarj* was unneccs-san', 
and that lie so advised the members of the force. The increases in 
Januarj', 1914, were made nith only a few days left of the outgoing 
administration, but he believed they could be made within the appro- 
priation. To accomplish this he had to defer improvements which 
he previously had intended to make. He knew of the emplojinent 
of counsel and did not object. 

2. Retaining Countel. — Counsel was employeil by the firemen 
through the Russell Fire Club, and by the officers throuph the Officers' 
Club. He was paid in all SC,125. He stated that he did other work 
for the men in the department, such as adjusting difficulties between 
the fire commissioner and the men, and presenting grievances and 
complaints in behalf of the members of the club. In the incrcasca 
obtained in January-, 1914, just before the close of the last adminis- 
tration, no coun-sel was employed. 

The officers of the fire department hired counsel on or about .Vpril 
20, 1912, and paid liim S-3,325 for obtaining their increase, which was 
recommended by the then mayor three days after the counsel was 
employed. The counsel stated that he had been working for the 
officers for some time, and tliat it was tacitly understood that he 
would be paid by them. 

3. Demoralization in Oie Department. — Notwithstanding the much 
smaller pajTnents for legal services in connection with salary increases 
in the fire department than in the police department, there was e\i- 
dence of more demoralization witliin the lire department. 

One fact which strongly illustrates this is the action of the Russell 
Fire Club, composed of privates of the fire department. In their 
records of Jan. 13, 1910, was found a motion to the effect tliat for 
the " affair" in charge of one of the members the sum of S400 be paid 
to that member. That this appropriation of S400 did not go through 
was solely due to the refusal of the president to sign the cheque unless 
he knew to whom and for what purpose the money eventually was to 
be paid. The commission finds evidence to wanant the belief that 
the S400 was to Ix; used improperly to obtain the interest of some 
unknown jx^rson to have an ordinance enacted which would give 
e.^tra time for meals to the members of the fire department. Because 
the books of account were burned and the witnesses made untruthful 
statements or testified, "I forget," "I don't remember," or "I do not 
recall," the commission is forced to believe that the "affair" which 
was to cost S400 was apparently in direct violation of law. 

In the opinion of the Finance Commission the emplojTnent of 
counsel by the men in the fire department for increases in salaries 
is as much to be avoided as is similar emplojinent in the police depart- 
ment. The commission is convinced that the attempt to pay S400 
for unknown senices by the Russell Fire CTub should be further 
investigated by the present fire commissioner, and also by the police 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCU:\IEXT — No. 49. 33 

commissioner, as one of the men who testified is at present connected 
with the police department. 

The testimony of the varioas persons, members of the fire and the 
police departments, affected is hereto armexed and made a part of this 
report, for the guidance of the fire commissioner and the police com- 
missioner. 

The Finance Commission lias refrained from making any recom- 
mendation as to what action should be taken bj* these officials, believ- 
ing that the evidence is so con\nncing that it speaks for itself. .\s 
compared with the frankness of certain members of the Russell Fire 
Club, notably the president and the secretarj' of the club in 1910, 
the remarkable forgetfulness of those actually in charge of the -SlOO 
"affair" leaves a strong impression that their testimony was untruthful. 

The Penal Institutions Department. 

1. Retaining Counsel. — The officers of the penal institutions 
department, following the example of the police and fire departments, 
employed counsel who received a retainer of SlOO and an agreement 
to paj' him the first month's increase, which would have amounted 
to S757 more. The counsel waited on the mayor, and later a graded 
system of salaries was instituted. Immediately afterwards certain 
indi\idual officers received additional increases of pay outside of the 
graded scale. The men who agreed to pay their first month's increase 
refused to do so, with the exception of four, claiming that their increases 
had been received through the influence of their union, rather than 
through the lawyer employed. 

2. Conelusions of the Commission as to the Penal Institutions De- 
partment. — The employment of counsel by the jjenal institutions 
department should be avoided, as in the case of other departments. 
The increase of the indi\ndual salaries of certain men after the graded 
increases had been granted was indefensible from an executive point 
of \new, and seems to have had an unsettling effect upon the depart- 
ment as a whole. ' 

^^'hile the members of the police, fire and penal institutions depart- 
ments are to be criticized for retaining counsel and agreeing to pay 
such large fees in purely departmental matters, it b to be said in 
their justification that the emploj-mcnt of counsel was known to the 
then mayor and the heads of their respective departments, and that 
these officials did not object. 

Recommendatiojis. 

The commission recommends: — 

1. That increases of salary should be considered at the beginning 
of the fiscal year, and should be pro\ided for in the budget, and not 
be made a matter of maneuvering at the close of one administration 



34 rOLICK COM.MISSIONEIl. [Jan. 

and close to the end of a fiscal year, so as to embarrass the succeeding 
administration. 

2. That the effect of ui^ing out.«idc influence, as shomi in the furtive 
and apparently unlawful means of cfTeeting changes in the attempted 
approi)riation of SJOO liy the Ras-^ell Fire Club of the fire department 
for the purixise of changing the meal hours. .«houlil lie rrferre<J to the 
fire and |Kjlice commissioners for further inquin,- ami for action on 
their part. 

.3. That tlie mayor take such action as is neces.sar>- to prevent the 
emploxinent of counsel in the future on matters tliat arc witliin the 
province of the mayor and the heads of (le|>artmcnts on one side, 
and the men on the other, to settle, e.\ce])t in the case of hearings on 
charges, etc. 

4. That rule .'). paragraph .3, of the Police Department Regulations, 
which states that "McmlxTs of t'lc force desiring promotion, transfers 
or a.ssigmnents to particular duties arc free to make their desires 
known through the proixr channels; and at suitable times members 
in person will Ijc received by the commissioner at his office. But should 
a meniljcr caasc a |H-rson not his superior in the force to intervene or 
to make representation in his Ix'half to the commissioner or to any 
superior officer, ]Krsonally, or by letter, or by ix'tiiion, he shall be 
deemed guilty of conduct uiilx-coming an officer,'' Ijc so amended as 
to prevent the employment of counsel in deiKirtmental matters, be- 
tween the mayor, the [xjlice conmii.«sioner and the nu-mbers of the 
force. 

5. That in all departments a rule, whether existing now or not, 
permitting the men to intcr\-icw the head of the department on any 
question of grievance should Ix; maile a reality. Grievance committees 
of the men and the men individually should be welc-ome at all times 
to lay their retjuesls and grievances before the heads of the several 
departments and the mayor. 

Resix-ctfuUy submitted. 
The Fi.naxce Commissiox, 
By JoH.v R. Mlhphv, 

Chairman. 

The forcgoinj; report wa.s made public through the news- 
papers and by other means. The police commissioner pub- 
lished no reply, but filed officially certain comments on the 
report of the Finance Commission which, now that the 
matter has ceased to be one of active controversy, he believes 
should be made part of the accessible records of the police 
department. Tiie comments were as follows: — 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 35 

Comment by the Police Commissioner for the Citt of Boston 
ON" A Report of the Fixanxe Commission dated April 8, 
1914. 

This investigation was first heard of pubHcly after an order had been 
passed by the city council, Jan. 22, 1914, making inquiry of the fire 
commissioner and the [wlicc commissioner as to whether or not the 
members of those departments had been "assessed directly or indi- 
rectly lor campaign funds in belialf of any candidate for office at the 
municipal election held in this city on Jan. 13, 1914." The investi- 
gation was further stimulated bj' newspaper reports suggested by the 
order. The fire conmiissioner and the police commissioner replied in 
writing that thej' had no reason to believe that such an assessment 
had been made or attempted. Thereupon the question of poUtical 
assessments, though apparently the original incentive to investigation, 
disappeared from the case, and is not mentioned in the repwrt of 
April 8. 

The political assessment rumor was replaced by a surmise printed 
in the newspapers, though othennse of unknown origin, to the eflfect 
that large fees paid to attorneys for preparing and presenting the 
claims of the firemen and poUccmen for salarj* increases had been 
used corruptly to further that purpose. Inquiry as to the employ- 
ment of attorneys constituted a large part of the investigation, but 
ultimately the matter slmink to the small dimensions of a recom- 
mendation which will be considered later. The shrinkage was caused 
by lancontradicted testimony that the employment of counsel had been 
without concealment, had Iwcn knowni from the beginning to the 
officials clothed with authority in the matter of salaries, and for a long 
time to the public through the newspapers and to the Finance Com- 
mission; by the candid testimony of the persons who paid and those 
who received the fees; by the absence of even an attempt to show 
that contributions had been made under coercion of any kind; and 
by the reminder to the Finance Commission that inasmuch as the 
authority to raise salaries was exclusively in the hands of the mayor 
and the police commissioner, no corrupt use of money could have been 
possible except to bribe one or both. It was shown in the case of the 
policemen, to whose attorney the largest fee was paid, that the bene- 
ficiaries numbered approximately 1,200; that a small contribution 
from each would make a large aggregate; and that in the law as in 
some other professions the amount of a fee is often determined, not 
by the work or even by the knowledge required, but by the benefits 
secured and the ability of the clients to pay. 

At the public hearing an attempt was made to discredit the emploj-- 
ment of attorneys by pointing to the fact that no legal question was 
involved in the movement for increased salaries. The Finance Com- 
mission was thereuix)!! reminded that although three of its members 



36 rOLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

TTOrc lawyers, and tLough I lie commission had [x^mianont counsel, 
an attorney of L%h jianding liad been s|xtially retained to con/Juct 
the investigation, ahbough it involved no legal question whate^■e^. 
It was pointcfl ocn iLat his enlplo^^nent was doubtless due, as in the 
ca5e of the firt-mea ai»l the ]X)licemen, to the fact tliat a legal training, 
even in the ab«*nf* of legal questions, fits a man peculiarly for the 
preparation and presentation of causes. 

The matter (A poEtical assessments ha\ing disappearetl, the sug- 
gestion of corrupt tt« of money having lx<-n rhomi to be afwurd, and 
the objection to iht «npIo.\Tiient of attorneys having shrunk to small 
proportions, ruir aaat^rial was fumishcil to the Finance Commission 
March 5, throusL i r«-quf->t made by the pres<-nt mayor that the police 
commissioner tlwcald concur with him in re<lucing the salaries of all 
officers of rank to tL*- rates in force Ix'fore the increases of 1913 and 
1914. .\s it wi5 uA proposed that the new ma.vimum of salaries of 
patrolmen shouW k<? Pfiluced, and as the increase in their case ha*! been 
procured by the iame- means, and had been allowed on the same date 
aa in the case iJ the officers of rank, even.- areiiment for reiluction 
l>as<:-d on eithtT '< llrtre considerations fell to the ground. Nothing 
remained cxcep* tLe plea that the money to be paid to the officers of 
rank — less than coe-ihird of the whole amount of the recent increases 
— was needed {*jr other departments. The police commisioner's 
first answer to tL» mayor was as follows: — 

The ftalutc prrrriinn that the pay of the mtinbcrs of the police force thai! 
not tic incrcarol oc "frnJni-hcd except by the concurrent action of the mayor 
and the police c/a^siif^iai-T. In all increases I have accepted the itidi^nirat 
of the m.iyor in f^Cirtt M the time on the question of the ability of the city to 
p^y. and nt the tatut laae have seen to it a.« my particular duty that the effi- 
ri#-nry of the focnt »^j nr^t injured by unwise adju>tmcnt3 as betwem the 
f*veral grades in tte sM-rjre. No propo!alioD for an increase irhirfa would 
have injured the effi-ifsry '>f 'he department — and some were at dnte* pro- 
poM.fl — would har^- be*a concurred in by me. All salaries having been estab- 
IL-he<l, the questioQ zryw prevnted to me is whether or not they may be rwlured, 
as alTecting atfoox SCO officers of rank, without injury to the efficieorjr (A the 
department. I am tX tie opinion that serious injury would follow io a police 
service which can t* aafasured neither by hours t>or by \-isible resalts. which 
depends for its eCwrCTtseas largely upon the energy and ical of the tum whom 
it employs. I b*6e-re tlat the saving of about one and a half per cent. o( the 
total annual cxpexi&sre of the department which the proposed reducticzi would 
effect would be a arrois which the department could not afford to make. I 
feel therefore that I fTr.Tr>t concur in the proposed reductions, much as I cboold 
<le>ire to assist tlvt may-r. 

In a letter to tie police commissioner March 6, the ntiyor gare in 
great detail his re±£<!jQS for requesting concurrence in the proposed 
reductions, and tLe pcGce commissioner replied in like detaiL Neither 
k-tter has been nstde public, though the police commissioner would 
have welcomed tLe pablication. 

The Finance Coocsmission in the meantime had summooed and 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 49. 37 

privately examined the books of the Russell Fire Qub and of the 
Boston Social Club, composed respectively of privates of the fire de- 
partment and patrolmen of the police dep>artment. Its attorneys 
had also obtained from the police commissioner a full statement of 
his information on the subject, together with copies of all documents 
in his possession relating to the continuous efforts of the pwlicemen 
from 1910 to date to secure increases in their sabries. The witnesses 
were thereupon examined at a series of ojjen hearings, and the informa- 
tion which reached the public was such only as might be given by frag- 
mentarj' newspaper reports in which every incident that could serve 
to cast suspicion upon anj' man or bodj- of men was made the subject 
of large display. 

The Finance Commission's report of April S followed, and from 
this point on I shall deal only with matters affecting the police. It is 
proper to call attention to the fact that tlie commission disclaims 
consideration of the merit of the increases, and that it "commends 
the members of the police department for the frankness with which 
they gave their testimony." There was no reason why they should 
not have been frank; they had nothing to conceal. 

The Finance Commission makes five recommendations which may 
fairly be taken as representing the net return from the investigation. 
They are given as follows, with conmicnt attached: — 

First Recommendation. — '"That increases of salar>" should be con- 
sidered at the beginning of the fiscal year, and should be pro\'ided for 
in the budget, and not be made a matter of maneuvering at the close 
of one administration and close to the end of a fiscal year, so as to 
embarrass the succeeding administration."' 

Comment on First Recommendation. — It will be observed that the 
commission here recommends that "increases of salary should be 
considered at the beginning of the fiscal year," and that it also recom- 
mends that they should not be considered "close to the end of a fiscal 
year." I submit that consideration which is ^ven "close to the end 
of a fiscal year" is given also at the beginning of the next succeeding 
fiscal j'car. For cxami^le, the increases in the police department to 
which the commission particulariy objects look effect Jan. 16, 1914; 
the new fiscal year began February 1; the city budget was submitted 
to the city council March 3; its consideration was finished April 22, 
and it was approved by the mayor April 23, It appears, therefore, 
that the increased payments falling within the old fiscal year were 
provided for in the unexi>ended balance of the police appropriation 
for that year, and that officials charged with the duty of making ap- 
propriations for the new fiscal year were informed as to the increases 
before entering upon any part of their work, and three months before 
their work was finished. \Miat, then, is the bearing of the recom- 
mendation? Perhaps it is to be found in the final sentence, but with 
any attempt "to embarrass the succeeding administration" the police 
commissioner has no concern, personal or official. .-Vs a State officer, 



3S rOUCE COM.MISSIOXER. (Jan. 

urhk-T a jxruliar otjli(;3tk>o to sustain courtoou* and helpful relations 
\n;h cbi' iditliorities of the city, he takes no note of the individuality 
of the citi/in lioldipR tJrf- position of mayor of Boston; he regards the 
adn-iristniUoii of that (i&ee in so far as he is concerned as continuous. 
It wvxild have been a strange reversal of thoso rt-Iations if the police 
c<>n.iri£ssiiin("r, confonnirrs to tlie ez i>ost facto opinion of the Finance 
Comniso-iiMi as to his dtny, had told the mayor of Boston that he was 
uTvcc in his statement that the city could afionl the police salary 
irir:\-i.-*-:>; if the conimt— ioner, knowing that tlie increases were just 
and »vr\' so arranged as to preserve and promote the efficiency of the 
foitt\ hsd assumed to }^ be-tter informed than the mayor as to the 
city's dn-nnris, had rcfav-.L U-cause of his claim to supc-rior knowledge 
of lb(tr ctiiidition, to fv<triir wiiii him, and liad told him that "the 
(jucssxtt of incn-as<-s,"' as th.e Finance Conuuission expresses it, "should 
go owr and 1k" settled l<y the incoming adniiiustrjtion." 

Ncv\T was there a iiiiLii<-ipal year an<l never will there Ix- a munici- 
pal VYUT in which all I fie dfcHrable or even the w-cessar>- exix-nditures 
c.'iji W r.iade. It is a rna~:-r of the division of availahle moneys among 
tlx- ijffwrtnuiits. WU-n t}.f Ijf-gl-lature dccidol twtnty-ninc years 
ago Ti:»t the Boston P^iGce depariment should be administered by 
con.Rj>>ii>iu'rs ap]>oint<-d by the (lovemor. it was found necessary- to 
jiroxiiSf that its ex[xtiv-i rhr-uld Ix- paid by rc<iuisition. The purpose 
Wis ■Jx> s:ive the deicrttaeat from possible starvation through the 
refusal itf a eily council to make appropriations for its support. The 
city a: the same time wt* i-)roi<-ctc-<l from extravagant exjK'nditurc on 
tl)e pjxt of the conimL-r-aowrs. In the form in which that mutual 
safesTinril was i)eqx-tuatM in diapter 201, Acts of HOC, and in which 
it EOTT rxisls, it providf-s- that the numlx-r of patrolmen shall not be 
inrTT3t<\i without the rfjCK-nt of the mayor, and that the salaries of 
tlie jviici- siiall ix- neitfrf-r incrt-aM-d nor dimini^h(d except Ijy concur- 
ntt actkui of the mayf»r arwl the police cominisMonrr. The city has 
thtjs <v>*itnilled expcndi:iirers which amount to CO pc-r cent, of the 
annua! cvu-t of the departtif-nt. In the consideration of salary increases 
tlx-n- t> tmdcr this siatme a natural antl logical apixtrtionment of 
n>^\cs*l>ilily, the mayor as the n-presentativc of the city looking to 
tlje rvb<, anil the police rt>mmis.sioner safeguarding the efficiency of 
tlie »l(j-wrtiiicnt in s<^» far as it might be afTe<-lt-d by the grading <rf 
-salaries in the several rati.-. This rule of conduct on the part of the 
jtoEop cvtnmi.s-ioner wa.- (-rrJained publicly by lum as early as 1907; 
was ntsjated in an ofTiciil ktter written in 1010 and printed in a city 
dc<tar<f«t; and has lx<-c repeate<l again and aciin Ix'forc legislative 
eonmrttivs, to the mayor? of Boston and to the representatives of the 
l)oIice fcirw, .\ vigilaM Finance Commission, familiar wth city 
docuioents and with k-pslative proceedings, m'ist have been long 
a^raie i<i the attitude of iLe iXrlicc conmiissioner in this respect, and 
mighi wt'll have exprc-s.-<-d its dissent otherwise than as an item in the 
findincs of an ineffectual investigation. 



1915.1 PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 39 

In any event, the recommendation here made by the commission 
is without practical effect in so far as the police department is con- 
cerned, for the members of the force after ha\-ing waited twenty-five 
yeais for increased salaries, after ha\-ing kept their claim continuously 
for four years before the mayor, and after having had it granted in 
two instalments, are not likely to be successful applicants for further I 

increase in the next twenty-five years. The continuous effort and ' 

the substantial acquiescence of the mayor early in 191.3, which were ; 

matters of evidence presented publicly to the commission, were wholly 
ignoretl in its findings, in order, seemingly, that it might be made to 
appear that the increase, though really timed to take actual effect in 
accordance with the condition of the existing appropriation, was 
ordered with the intent " to embarrass the succeeding administration." 

Second Recommendation. — "Tliat the effect of using outside influ- 
ence, as shown in the furtive and apparently unlawful means of effect- 
ing changes in the attempted appropriation of -SlOO by the Russell 
Fire Club of the fire department for the pury)osc of changing meal 
hours, should be referred to the fire and police commissioners for 
further inquin,- and for action on their part." 

Commcnl on Second Recommendation. — The investigators for the 
commissionfound in the books of the Russell Fire Club, an unofficial 
organization composed of privates in the Boston fire department, 
after a search reaching back to IttOS, an entr>- which indicated that 
.?400 was voted to one of the directors for a purpose not specified. 
They found, also, that the vote was almost immediately rescinded and 
that the money was not paid. It is upon this discover}" tliat an extended 
examination of firemen was based, pnxlucing as one result fifty pages 
of testimony. The firemen mentionctl denied all remembrance of the 
incident, and it is uix)n this "attempted appropriation of $400" four 
years ago by the fire club that recommendation No. 2 is based. The 
police commissioner is brought into the matter l)ocause the director to 
whom the money was not paid was appointed three years ago as a i 

patrolman in the jiolicc department on certification of the Civil Service ' 

Commission. 

The Finance Commission refers this matter to the police commis- 
sioner "for further inquir>' and for action." I liave no intention of 
adding to the volume of trivialities which this incident has already 
produced. The legal members of the commission and the two at- 
torneys employed as counsel must know that not even a charge has 
been made against tliis man; that he is merely suspected by them of 
having intended four years ago to use the money, which was not paid 
to him, for the purpose of influencing a person unknown to assist in 
securing for firemen more time for meals; that whatever happened 
antedated by a year his appointment to the police department; and 
that the civil service laws provide that a policeman, in common with 
other public employees whom those laws protect, "shall hold such 
office or emploj-ment and shall not be removed therefrom, lowered in 



40 POLICE COMMISSION'KR. [Jan. 

rank or compensation, or suspended, or, ^rh^lrHJt his consent, trans- 
ferred from sucli office or employment to any other except for just 
cause and for reasons given s|KcificaUy in iriting;" and furthermore, 
that "the jx-rson souglit to Ix; remove<l, sit^-tvlc»l, lowered or trans- 
ferred shall 1)0 notified of the proposo<l action and sliall be furnished 
with a copy of the reasons reciuired to lx> piven hy .-cction 1, and shall, 
if he so ref|uests in writing, l>c given a puWwr l*^ring, and be allowed 
to answer the cliarges preferred against him cither personally or by 
counsel.'' 

Thin] and Fourth Rccomiiiciulallonf. — '•That the mayor take such 
action as is necessar\' to prevent the emptoxiwni of counsel in the 
future on matters that arc within the provinre of the mayor and the 
heads of departments on one side, and the in*-n on the other, to settle, 
except in the case of hearings on cljirges," etc. 

"That rule ii. paragraph 3, of the Police- Department Regulations, 
which states that 'MemlK-rs of the force itstrirt* promotion, transfers 
cr assignments to particular duties are free to aukc their desires known 
through the proi>er channels; and at suita^ifc- times memlx»rs in person 
will be received by the commissioner at his office; but should a mem- 
ber cause a [lerson not his sui)erior in the focre to intenenc or to make 
representation in his behalf to the comniisirjonfr or to any superior 
officer, personally, or by letter, or by petition, he .-hall Ijc deemed guilty 
ct conduct unlxK-oming an officer,' \ye so arnen^ie^l as to prevent the 
emploNTiient of coun.<el in departmental niatten', between the mayor, 
ihe police conmiissioner and the members ot the force.'' 

Comment on Third and Fourth Recomnu'nd/jiion.f. — These recom- 
mendations advise the n>ayor in the first iitrCin/*, and the police com- 
missioner in the second, "to prevent the «np!<-)\Tiicnt of counsel in 
departmental matters" of a certain character. The mayor «t11 choose 
his own course; but as mayors for many yi«xs and up to the present 
lime have often and freely reccive<l and ne-^tbted with business 
agents, committees, and walking delegates not employed by the 
city but represontitig unions of city employets, the action ad\ised by 
the Finance Commission would require e'liher that mayors hereafter 
should discontinue that practice or shoulil announce that members 
of the Bar only were excluded from ser\-ice is .-Hjfh representatives. 

The police conmiissioner has always rfceived with civility and 
attention, and will continue so to receive, any respectable person, 
whatever his profession or occupation, r^^;cE~#:nting voluntarily or 
by request any interest of the ix)lice department or of its memlx-rs as 
a body. I know of no reason, and sliall not i:r«-pt the Finance Com- 
mission's advice as such reason, why policemen should be debarred 
from the right e.\ercised by all Ixxlies of prh'ate employees — and 
in so far as I am aware, by all bodies of empiortts in the ser\"icc of the 
city of Boston — to engage iktsous :-killeil in such work, whether 
attorneys or other agents, to prepare and pcer**it to the Legislature, 
the city council or any other controlling aathority the reasons for 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCLTMEXT — No. 49. 41 

urging particular claims. The question of the right of private employees 
to be represented by attornej's and other agents not dependent upon 
the emploj-ers whom they approacii has been decided aflSrmatively 
in Boston within the past few years, and the results have left no doubt 
as to the character of legal, pubhc and legislative opinion with refer- 
ence thereto. A body of public employees cannot be logically or 
permanently refused the same right of representation before public 
officials temporarily in authority over them. These are times of 
organization and federation among public as well as private employees, 
in which a police commissioner, so timid and shortsighted as to be 
capable of taking the course advised by the Finance Commission in 
more than one of its recommendations, might easily create a condition 
in the police department which better men following him in the same 
oflBce would be unable to remedy. 

Fifth Recommendation. — "That in all departments a rule, whether 
existing now or not, permitting the men to interview the head of the 
department on any question of grievance, should be made a reality. 
Grievance committees of the men and the men indi\idually should be 
welcome at all times to laj- their requests and grievances before the 
heads of the several departments and the maj-or." 

Comment on Fifth Recominendaiion. — In so far as the pohce depart- 
ment is concerned this recommendation is superfluous. All policemen 
and employees who ask to see the poUce commissioner are received 
by him with courtesy and in a helpful spirit. It is both the rule and 
the practice, and in the past eight years hundreds of members of the 
department have discussed privately with the commissioner their 
troubles and their aspirations. 

The recommendations of the Finance Commission ha\Tng been 
considered, I feel that I ought to revert to the closing paragraph of 
its general observations on the emplojTuent of attorneys, which is 
as follows: — 

Some idea of the demoralizing effect of such means for obtaining salary- 
increases may be had from the records of Jan. 11, 1914, of the Boston Social 
Club, composed of patrolmen of the police department. At this meeting one 
of the members thanked his associates for their efforts in the campaign for the 
increase of salaries, and stated that the then mayor was their "staunch and 
true friend," and urged all the members to vote at the coming election, '"in order 
to show their strength at the polls." 

It will be noted that tliis entry represents not a vote of the club or 
even a committee of the club; it is an exuberant cjcpression of grati- 
tude bj- "one of the members," which the secretary included in liis 
minutes. The reference is to a citizen who was not a candidate for 
anj- office at the coming election, and the e.xprcssed desire that all 
members should vote was in conformity witK the rule of the police 
department, which specifies voting at primaries and elections as the 
only form of poUtical activity permitted to the police. The attomei's 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

and investigators of the commission examined the books of this club 
for a .fries of years; and tliisentn', the only one found by them which 
could Ix' turned to their uses, is set uj) as if it were an example among 
many which would give "some idea of the demoralizing effect of such 
roeaa-.'' I fear that the Finance Commission faile<l to realize the 
insignificance of the incident, to understand tlie force of the word 
"demoralizing," or to appreciate the injustice of its application to the 
polict? department of Boston, which alone among all the cities of the 
Unitt-il .States of nearly its size has a police service to which no scandal 
attaches. 

Stephen' O'Meara, 
Police Coiiimistioncr jor the Cil>j of Boston. 
.\PEIL 28, I9U. 

In coinpliaiKC with its roc|Ucst I called at the nffice of the 
Finance Commission Friday, June 19, 1914, at 2.:J0 p.m. 
The chairman an(I two other meml>ers of the c-ommission 
were pre>ent; also the junior counsel and a stenographer for 
the ci>mmi>sion. The chairman read extracts frr)m testimony 
fnven In-fore the commission in .\pril l)y a i)atrc>lman in the 
pf>lic-e department, concerning a vote in 1910 of the Russell 
Club of the Boston fire dei)artmcnt, (jf which he was then a 
member, and asked wliat could Ix; done to procure his re- 
moval as a policeman. I answere<l that the vote disclosed 
no <»ffence; that in any case it was taken a year before the 
patrolman was ap|)()inted a policeman on certification of the 
Civil .Service Commission, and that therefore it could not 
be made a subject of charges against him as a pf)lice officer. 
The chairman explained tiiat the offence which the com- 
mission had in mind was untruthfulness on the part of the 
patnjlman in his testimony in .\i)ril. and that the proof of 
untruthfulness consisted in his repeated answers under exam- 
ination that he did not rcmcml)cr any of the circumstances of 
the vote of 1910. I sugj;cstetl that denials of a witness, 
however often repeated, that he rememtxred incidents of 
four years before would not constitute proof of untruthful- 
ness, and the chairman answered that the c-ourts had decided 
that it would. I then explained the statutory provisions, 
and the rules of the police department ba^ed thereon, as 
eitabli>hing the right of an accused polic-e officer to written j 

specifications of alleged offence and to a fair hearing. I ' 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

explained further tliat before ordering a hearing on a com- 
plaint the police commissioner must satisfy himself that the 
charge is of sufficient importance, and that there is reason- 
able ground for believing that evidence adequate for con- 
viction can be produced; that untruthfulness on the part of 
a policeman was a serious offence; and that therefore in this 
case the only question in doiibt was the sufficiency of proof. 
I expressed the opinion that if the commission had evidence 
to substantiate a charge of false testimony under oath, con- 
stituting perjury, the better way would perhaps be to proceed 
under the law, thus eliminating the possible suspicion on the 
l)art of persons interested that a trial board of three captains 
would show favor to a ])()lice defendant. As the commission 
expressed disinclination towards this course, I said that if 
the commission or any person representing it would make a 
formal complaint, with a summarj- of the sustaining evidence 
which could be produced, I would give the matter full con- 
sideration. This the commission undertook to do, and in 
order that its work might be facilitated I sent to the chair- 
man, after my return to my office, a copy of the Police 
^lanual, in which the procedure in such cases is fully ex- 
plained. I have since heard nothing further on the subject 
from the commission. 

It is proper to add to the foregoing these memoranda: — 

1. The "City Record" of Aug. 29, 1914, published a 
general order from the fire commissioner of Boston, announc- 
ing that a hearing had been held on a charge preferred by the 
Boston Finance Commission against a lieutenant, alleging 
conduct unbecoming a member of the fire department. The 
charge was based on the circumstances of the vote of the 
Russell Fire Club just described, but the case was stronger 
than any that could have been brought against the police 
patrolman because of the fact that the lieutenant had con- 
tinued to be a member of the fire department. Neverthe- 
less, the finding of the fire commissioner was: "It appearing 
to the commissioner that sufficient evidence had not been 
adduced to sustain the charges brought, the charges are 
hereby dismissed." 

2. It was announced in November, apparently by au- 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

thority, that the salaries of officers of rank in the fire depart- 
ment, wliich had been increased when police salaries were 
increased, and reduced when the reduction of polic-e salaries 
was proposed, would be restored at the beginning of the new 
fiscal year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN O'MEAUA, 
Police Committioner for the City of Botlon. 



( 



1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



45 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police departnient is at present constituted as fol- 
lows : — 

Police Commissioner. Secretan'. 2 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent, ... 1 

Deputy superintendent, . 1 

Chief inspector, ... 1 

Captains, .... 25 

Inspectors, . . . . 2S 
Inspector of carriages (lieu- 



tenant), 



Director, 

.\ssistant director, 
Foreman, 
Signalmen, . 
Mechanics, . 



Lieutenants, 
Sergeants, 
Patrolmen, . 
Reser\e men, 

Total, . 



Signal Service. 



Linemen, 
Driver, . 



Total, 



Employees of the Deparlmciil. 



Clerks, 

Stenographers, . 

Messengers 

Matrons of house of de- 
tention, .... 

Matrons of station houses. 

Engineers on police steam- 
ers 

Firemen on police steam- 
ers, 



13 
3 
4 

5 

7 



38 
101 

122 

1,-596 



6 
1 



Van drivers. 
Foreman of stable. 
Hostlers, .... 
.\sslstant steward of city 
prison, .... 
Janitors, .... 
Janitresses, .... 
Telephone operators, . 



19 



2 

1 

12 

1 
17 
15 

3 



Total, 



Recapitulation. 

Police commissioner and secretarj', 

Police force, 

Signal Ser\'ice, 

Employees, 



Grand total, 



93 



2 

1,596 

19 

93 

1,710 



4G 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



DlSTRlBLTIO.V .\.\D ClIA.\CE.S. 

Tlic (listrihiition of the force is shown by Table I. During 
tlic year 9'i patrolmen were pronu)te(l from the reserve men 
and (V-i reserve men were ajipointed; 7 patrolmen and 1 re- 
serve man were discharged; 4 patrolmen anrl G reserve men 
resigned; 1 dei)iity buperintendent, 1 captain, 1 inspector, 2 
lieutenants, G sergeants and H) j)atrolmen retire<i on pensions; 
2 inspect<»r.s, 9 patrolmen and 1 reser\e man diet!. (See 
Table, in.. IV.. v.. VI.) 

PoLicK Officeks i.nmlked wim.r. on Ditv. 
The following .statement shows the number of police 
f)fficers injured wJiile on duty during tlie past year, the 
number of duties lo>t by them on acxount thereof and the 
causes f(f the injuries: — 



IIOW I.Vil'RCD. 



Numtjrr of 



Number <rf 
Duties lost. 



In .irrc-sting prisoners, .... 
In piirsuini; criininaU, .... 
By >toppitiR runaways. 
By cars and other vehicles at crossings, 
Various other causes 

TotaU, 




2,149 



WoFtK OF THE Dep.\ktme.nt. 

Arrests. 

The total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest 

as that of a separate person, was S0,'2()^, against S1,7G7 the 

prece<ling year, being an increase of 7,4:J.S. The percentage 

of inerea.sc and decrease was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Oflcnces against the person, Increase, 3.05 

Offences against property, committed with violence. Increase, 36.70 
Offences against property, committed without vio- 
lence, Increase, 27.23 

Malicio'is offences against property, .... Decrease, 2.25 

Forgerv- and offences against t lie currency, . Increase, 24.70 

Offcncc-s against the license laws, .... Increase, COS 

Offcncc-s against cha.stity, morality, etc., . . Increase, .26 

.Offences not included in the foregoing, . Increase, S.4S 



1915.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



47 



There were 8,750 persons arrested on warrants and 70,730 
without warrants; 9,725 persons were summoned by the 
court; 87,980 persons were held for trial and 1,225 were 
released from custody. The number of males arrested was 
81,501; of females, 7,704; of foreigners, .39,156, or approxi- 
mately 43.89 per cent.; of minors, 8,579. Of the total num- 
ber arrested .34,4.50, or 38.01 per cent., were nonresidents. 



(See Tables X. 


XI-.) 






The nativity 


of the prisoners was as follows: — 




United Ptatc.«, . 


. 50.049 


Ea.st Indies, 


10 


British Provinces 


, . . C,243 


West Indies, 


109 


Ireland, 


. . 1G,S47 


Turkey, 


133 


England, 


. . 1,803 


South -America, . 


.30 


France, 


. . 127 


Switzerland, 


23 


Germany, . 


. . 527 


Belgium, 


70 


Italy, . . . 


. . 3.213 


.\rmenia, 


15 


Russia, 


. . 4,626 


Africa, 


21 


China, 


. . 420 


Hungarj-, . 


16 


Greece, 


331 


.•Lsia, . 


12 


Sweden, 


. . 1,430 


.\rabia, 


1 


Scotland, . 


. . 1,065 


Mexico, 


9 


Spain, . 


. . 49 


.Japan, 


15 


Norway, 


. . 40S 


.SjTia, . 


SI 


Poland, .. 


. . 524 


Roumania, . 


3 


Australia, . 


. . 34 


Bulgaria, . 


1 


.Austria, 


. . 248 


Cuba, . 


2 


Portugal, . 


. . 160 


EgJTt, 


2 


Finland, 


. . 356 


Brazil, 


1 


Denmark, . 


. . 113 


Philippine Island?, 


1 


Holland, . . 


. . 40 








Wales, . . 


. . 31 


Total, . 


. 89,205 



The number of arrests for the year was 89,205, being an 
increase of 7,4.38 over last year, and 11, .583 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 59,159 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 4,208 more than last year, 
and 7,543 more than the average for the past five years. 
Of the arrests for drunkenness this year there was an in- 
crease of 8.01 per cent, in males and an increase of 3.74 per 
cent, in females over last year. (See Tables XI., XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (89,205), 
775 were for violations of the city ordinances; that is to 
say, 1 arrest in 115 was for such offence, or .86 per cent. 



roi.i" 1-: ( oMMi.-.-ioNKi:. 



lJ:in. 



r"iit\'-rniir Mill! ; riy-t'iMir liiiiiilniith- jk r iciit. i:i tlir 
T'tT-i'l;.- Takiij iiiTu • i-T"c|y wrrv \ii\\\((i. tlir- :i'_v- df tuciity 
• rty. I Sic 'I'-.t'lr Xll.i 

; ..•• IillJlllilT I'f ['• ■-"•!l- |iillli-lk'>l \,y fi:;C- U;i< 1:1. Is:;. :i|m1 

::.-• fi!.e> jiiii..ii;ni'l :■< >li'ii.!i:!.-,..-,ii .-,-,• 'l";,l,|i- XIII.) 

.■-t vt'.ity--t'Vr-ii [M.--M!i-i were coiiuiiiTto! in tlir Statr 
]'r:-"::. ''.irJ t'l t!.>- Il'^n-c of" l'(irriTTi"ii. ^'■' !"• tlif Wipimii'-i 
I'r'-i'H. I'.'l t" tl.i- !;.:'i.nii:it<"ry l'ri-<-:i iiii'l 2.''>''<U m kiUvt 
::.-::tiiii(>iis. ']"]]«■ "■•tal _\c.ir~ i>l' ini['n-i'!iirn-iit vrrc '''N 
':..'> ri:.ii<'. ;!.:'i.'ti \rar-. '.' iimiuli^. 2'> <lay-: tin- ti>tal iiiiiiilitT 
: :ay^■ attiii"hiii« 1 \u <i>iir; li\- nliior- -a- V.K'-\'i'); aixl 
■' • '.^■iti!»>< ftc- iiiT'i;] liy tlicin aiiii>;;:i:iil to sl!.:!7'i.s"i. 

'.":.<■ -.aliir of j.r.T.n.v takm tVniii |>H-r.iuT- ami |(Mli:iT-i 
- ;.- >]:;!t.l'.<'.i.(«j. 

y rTy-fiiii- \viTii< .-. - -.-.trf ilriaiiiol ;;t -tatii.ii linu-i--: Iii7 
,i'<iijiiiii<'<!aT<-.i •y'.\\\ |inIi;iiiL:-. .-i:! iricri-a-f i>f 22 ovir 
•:-: yt-.ir. 'I'iiin- ':.- a 'i«i rca-i- of 2. '•'■'< i>i r i-.-nt. frfun la-t 
I ' ..T ill till- iiurii!" : ■•: iii«aiio ])iT-fii.- takiii in cliari;*-. a 
,'.,■. .--ii-i- i.|' aViotit .-!••• [iiT <»-iit. ill tl.f • iii.'ilii r <<i -ick ami 
:;.; ."I'i ]irr-iiii» a--:-"''!, ainl a i!«(n.:-' <•' almsit ■i.]^ ]mt 
• -. !;i ilic iiiiiiif.i r ■•!' l"-t iliililnii car- 1 J'^r. 

',..<• avcrairc aii.'' .iii c.|' jiruiHrty -li-i'ii in tin- city f">r 
•,'.'■ :iv.- yi-ar< in-Ui '.■•]<> \i> l;U4. iii<lii-i\-.'. -.va- sit;:!.!' IM.sl ; 
;•; '.'.'M it wa« >1 7- .1 "^I'.-'iT, or >lL'.'';i-.7i'> Jii>irr tiiaii tin- 
;"ir.i::'-. 'I'lic ai.i''"' : 'I' )irii|iirty -tol,.;. ii, au"! mit ni' tin- 
< iry v.liidi wa- r">-tri.i liv ilic Hn-to:; j,..Ii(i- wa- >^li:!.- 
'■7^.41. a- a-ai!;-t >: I i. :;7'.i.'.i_' la-t year, ir >!''.'.l".in.4'.i iiion-. 

Till- avcrai'i- all." t ••!' line-. iiiijtn->-l l>y tin- ••(Hirt- for 
--.r- nvc y(ar> from : 'In in I'.tn. incln-i' .-. -.va- si:!l.:;4J.s:;; 
\r. ;'.'14 it wa- >i_'.: ':;.".. "iH, or sln.4ii7.;:;; Ii-s tliaii the 
i- I rau'-. 

I;. I- a\»TaL'f i:i;';. • r of .lay-' airct.iiam •• in court wa- 
47.- .*>4: ill 1014 it ■.•..- j'.i.:i.'>"i. or 2.'.\l>] ir.on- than the avcr- 
K_-c. 'J'hc avcrairc ;:i;ioiiiit of witii--- ffc- cariicl \va< 
>;:;.JJ^.7f.: in 1!'!? it \\a- s) l.:;7i;.^." -r >1.14n.ii'.i more 
t:.:::. th«- a\crai:c. -• •• Tal.lc XIII. 



J)riiiil:i II NI sx. 

I:. arrc-t< for <'riir.r;c!iiic-s the a\cr;:i:i- jht 'lay \va> I'lJ. 
'];..:-• v.crc 4.2'^^ ::. ?<■ iicr-on-; arrc-t*-.! than in 101:;, an 



191.5.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

increase of 7.0.) per cent.; 45.<i(> per cent, of the arrested per- 
sons were nonresidents and 4S.l)7 per cent, were of foreign 
birth. (See Table XI.) 

liurcau of Criminal fncf.itifiation. 

The "Identification Room" now contains 43,771 photo- 
eraphs, oG,007 of whidi are photographs with Bertillon 
measurements, a system use*! by the department for the 
pa.-t fifteen years. In acxonlance with the Revised Laws, 
chapter 22'), sections IS and 21, we are allowetl photo- 
sraphs with Bertillon measurements taken of convicts in the 
State Prison and Reformatory", a numWr of which have 
already been added to our Bertillon cabinets. This, together 
with the adoption of the system by the department in 1S9S, 
i5 and will continue to be of great assistance in the identi- 
fi<-ation of criminals. A large number of important identifi- 
cations have tlius been made iluring the year for this and 
other police departments, through which the sentences in 
many instances have been materially increased. The records 
of S71 criminals have been a<lde<l to the records kept in this 
Bureau, which now contains a total of 3G,9SS. The number 
of cases reported at this offic-e which have been investigated 
during the year is G,-507. There are 2G,.7G3 cases reported 
on the assignment books kept for tliis purpose, and reports 
made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
I>ctters and telegrams to the number of about 3,.500 yearly 
are now filed witli the numberetl reports to which they refer, 
so that all the papers pertaining to a c-ase can be found in 
the same envelope, thus simplifying matters when informa- 
tion is desired on any case. The system of indexing adopted 
by this Bureau for the use of ilie department now contains 
a li:-t of records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., 
of about 150,000 persons. There are also "histories and 
press clippings'' now numbering 7,13-5 by this Bureau, in 
envelope form, for police reference. 

The finger-print system of idcntific-ation, which was 
a<Iopted in June, 1900. has progresses! in a satisfacton.' 
manner, and with it the identification of criminals is fa- 
cilitated. It has become verj" useful in tracing criminals 
awl furnishing corroborating e\"i<lence in many instances. 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Tlie statistics of tlie work of this hrancli of tlie service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 
ment; but as the duties are of a special character, the fol- 
lowing statement will he of interest: — 

XunilKT of |KTs<m.s arrested, principally for felonies, I,3C5 
Fugit Ives from justice from otlicr States, arrestc-<l and delivered 

to ofTic-ers from those .States, 41 

Number of cases investigated, G,507 

NumlxT of extra duties performed, 3,072 

NumIxT of cases of homicide and sujiposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared fo"- trial, in court, . . 116 
Nimil>cr of cases of alwrtion and supp<jsed atoriion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court 9 

NumlxT of days spent in court by officers, .... 3,018 
.\moimt of stolen property recovered, .... S11S,1S2.01 

NumlxTof y»-ars' imprisonment imposed by court. 340 years, 7 months 

Nunilx-r of photographs added to "Rogues' ClaUen-," . . 2,G33 

OFFICEFt DET.VILED TO .VSSIST MkDICAL E.\.VMINT.R.S. 

The officer <letaile<l to assist the me<lical examiners reports 
having invotigateil K'.IO eases of death from the ff)llowing 
causes: — 

Abortion, 4 

-Vlcoholism, 4 

.\sphyxiation, 5 

-Xutomobiles 2 

Bums. 68 

DrowTiing 61 

Klc-ctricity, 5 

Klevator^, 23 

E.\plosion 7 

Falling objects, 19 

.\ccidcntal falls 113 

Heat prostratioiL--, 2 

Homicides, 116 

Kicked by horse, 3 

Machincrj-, 7 

Natural cau.=*s, 362 

Poison 42 

Railroad (steam 1 44 

Railway (street) 2 

.^tiUbom, 15 

.Suffocation 3 



1915. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



51 



Strangulation 1 

Suicides, S6 

Teams, 5 

Total, 990 



Of the total iiumhiT the UAlosrin^ homicide cases were 
prosecuted in tJie courts: — 



Murder, 


7 


. Xaiural causes, . 


Manslaughter, 


. . 20 


Ralh«T (street), 


Automobiles, 


. . 39 


. RaSrcjad (steam). 


Conflagration, 


2 


[ Ila3nja»l tie thrown. 


Elevators, . 




-Sijki^fcs. 


Falling wall. 




Tt-ant*. 


Fall (accidcnt-alV 




Woodta terse tlirown 


Gas poison, 






Motor cycle, 




TmaL . . 



1 

17 
2 

I 

3 

18 

1 



116 



On 270 of tlie above cases inquests were held. 



Lo.sT, Ab.\xdo.\ed avd Stoixv Property. 

On Dec. 1, 1913, there were 1,079 articles of lost, aban- 
doned or stolen property in the cn^texly of the property 
clerk; 5G1 were received during the year, 491 pieces were 
sold, and the net proceeds {$27Z.2S>), together with 47 pack- 
ages containing money to the amount of S2.39.40, were 
turned over to the chief clerk, ami 61 packages were de- 
livered to owners, finders or administrators, leaving 1,041 
on hand. 

Spfxial E\-rvr5- 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police tietailed for duty 
at each : — 

""• Men. 

Jan. 7, Police ball, 95 

Jan. 31, Laying corner stone, city hill inc*x. .... 52 

Feb. 2, Inaugural exercises, Tremont Temple, .... 78 

Feb. 12, Firemen's ball, 51 

Mar. 17, Evacuation Day parade, 495 

.\pril 13, Funeral of Ex-Governor Drapsr 52 

.\pril 20, Marsjhon race, 495 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



1914. 

Max- 
May 
May 
May 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Xov 
Nov 
Xov 
Xov 
Xov 



2, Mas.-achuietts Women's Suffrage .\ssociation parade, 
21, ."^pariUh war veterans' parade, 
29, Parade of Boston School Cadets, . 
.30, Work-l.orse parade, 

I, Ancient and Honorable .\rtil]cry parade, 

6, Boston Post EHephant parade, 

6, Df)rcht-ster Day celebration, . 
Elephant exhibition. Franklin Park, 
"Xieht bt-fore" in Charlcstown, 

, Anniversary, battle of Bunker Hill, 
, Fun/ral of Inspector Thomas J. Xorton, 
29, Detail to .'^alem, M.t5s., fire, 
27, .South Boston carnival, .... 

7, Ijlx»r Day parade, 

26, Chrttian Endeavor meeting, Boston common, 
9-1.3, Wori/l's series baseball games, bulletin Ijoards. 

12-13. Wori/i's series baseball games, 

7, Harvard-Princeton football game, 

7, Harvard-Princeton football game, bulletin Ixjards, 
14, Hanarrl-Broim football game, 
21. Hanaril-Vale football game, bulletin boards, 
21, .SiK-cial detail at Division 4, football night, . 



16, 
IT, 
2.3. 



(Jan. 



Meo. 

S54 
236 
4.33 

S4 
1S5 
149 
101 

SG 
161 
420 

54 
ISO 
115 
718 

52 
297 
315 

74 

72 

S7 
117 
l.i7 



MlS^-ELUVXXOU.S Bisixfj^s. 





i*n-u. 


uu-u. 


uu-u. 


.Abandoned children cared for, . 


.X. 


14 


15 


.\ccidents reijorttd, 


4,260 


3,7S9 


3,958 


Buildings found open and made secure, . 


2,971 


3,337 


3,641 


Cases investigate], 


24,SSS 


23,975 


24,642 


Dangerous buildinB reported, . 


15 


20 


23 


Dangerous cliiiniveys reported, . 


13 


6 


4 


Dead bodies cartfJ for, . . . . 


.351 


.T25 


3S3 


Dead bodies recovered, .... 


- 


41 


56 


Defective cesspoofc reported, . 


255 


•200 


204 


Defective drains and vaults reportetl, 


6 


17 


4 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reporteii, 


s 


2 


4 



191.3. 



PUBLIC DOCUilEXT — Xo. 49. 



53 



^Miscellaneous Bcsintiss — Con. 



ISlt-U. 



Defective gas pipes repoitetl, . 

Defective hydrants reiiortetl. . 

Defective lamps reportwl. . _ . 

Defective sewers reported. 

Defective streets and sidewalks reported, 

Defective water i)ipes reported, 

Disturbances suppressed, . 

Extra duties perfonncd, 

Fire alarms given, .... 

Fires extLnguished, .... 

Insane persons taken in cliargc. 

Into.xicated persons assisted. 

Lost children restored, 

Missing persons reported, . 

Missing persons found, 

Persons rescued from drowning. 

Sick and injured persons assisted, . 

Straj- teams reported and put up. 

Street obstructions removed. 

Water running to waste reported, . 

Witnesses detained, .... 



04 

194 

1.5,172 

74 

9,S29 

I 316 

I 7S1 

i 

j 02,461 

i 2,750 

I 

! 1,123 
44S 
23 
2,009 
409 
15S 
20 
5,65S 
ISO 
1,050 
0.54 
63 



1912-U. 



1913-14. 



5/ 

244 

11,S76 

82 

9,613 

193 

66.S 

42,467 

2,476 

1,003 

512 

36 

2,170 

421 

143 

27 

6,469 

159 

1,770 

5-20 

76 



54 

206 

S,160 

45 

10,495 

176 

857 

40,866 

2,916 

1,248 

499 

18 

2,101 

319 

121 

13 

6,439 

115 

1,731 

512 

41 



I.VSPECTOR OF ClALMS. 

The offit-er detailetl to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
S.51 cases, 7 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



54 POLICE CO.MMISSIONER. [Jan. 



OtIuT Serrictn ptrforirud. 

Number of cases invcsiigaUtl S.51 

Number of witnesses examined, 5,9S2 

Nuniljcr of not iecs served, 5,135 

Nunilier of i)icturcs taken 15.3 

Nuniljcr of [K-mu'sions printed, 0,902 

Number of days in court SO 

Number of days bcfon? the committee on claim.*, ... '24 
Number of cases settled by the insurance comionieson recom- 
mendation from this off.ce, 35 

Collected for damage to the city's propc-ny, and iiai<l bills 

amounting to, ?1.>5 03 

Hoi'.SE OF Detentiox. 

The hou.*e of <Ietcnt:on for women is Io<-ate<l in the c-ourt 
hou--e, Somerset Street. .MI the women arrer-le<l in the city 
proper are taken to tlie hou.-e of detentifm in vans provided 
for the purpose. Tliey arc then held in charjie of the matron 
until the next ^e.-^ion f>f the court beff.rc whicli tJiey are to 
appear. If senten<-e«i to impri^)nment, they are returned to 
tlie liou?e of detention, and from there eonveyed to the jail 
or institution to which they have heen sentenced. 

Durins the year there '.vere G,1G4 "src men committe<I for 
the followinj; causes: — 

For drunkenness, 3,.>34 

For larceny, 451 

For nijlit walking 152 

I"or fornication, 299 

For being idle and disorderly, 97 

For assault and batten.-, 20 

For adulter.-, 26 

For violation of the lic|Uor law, 7 

For keeping a house of ill fiir.e, 21 

For witness, 3 

For county jail, 1,157 

For municipal court, Ill 

For various other offences, 2S6 

Total, 6,104 



1915.1 PUBLIC DOCOIP:NT — No. 49. 55 

Police Signal .Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of l)oxes in use is 4SG. Of these, .300 
are connected witli tiie underground system and 1S(3 with 
the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Worl:. 

Durinj; tlie year tlie employees of this service responded 
to 1,11:5 trouble calls; inspected 4SG signal boxes, 17 signal 
desks and 955 batteries; repaired 71 box movements, 14 
registers, 21 polar box bells, IS locks, 3 time stamps, S gongs, 
2 .-table motors, 3 stable registers, 7 vibrator bells, besides 
repairing all bell and electric light work at headquarters and 
the various stations. There have been made IG plungers, 
20 complete box fittings, 13 line blocks, 3 desk Sttings, 
.3 stable board fittings, 2 signal desks wired and fitted, .3 
stable boards wire<l and fitted and a large amount of small 
work done that cannot be classified. 

There are in use in the signal service 17 horses, 12 patrol 
■wagons and $ pungs. 

During the year the wagons made 52, SIS runs, covering 
an aggregate distance of 71,7oG miles. There were 5G,75S 
prisoners conveyed to the station Jiouses, 1,954 runs were 
made to take injured or insane persons to station houses, 
the hospitals or their homes; and 544 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were S-35 runs 
to fires and 23 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 4SG signal boxes in use arranged on GS battery 
circuits and G4 telephone circuits; 573,475 telephone mes- 
sages and 3,415,235 "on duty"' calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
ser\ice at the present time: — 



17 signal desks. 




.53 numholes. 


S4 circuits. 




1 bugg>'. 


4S6 street signal boxes. 




1 line wagon. 


14 stable call boards. 




1 express wagon. 


77 test boxes. 




1 niug->\-uinp wagon. 


95.5 colls of batterj'. 




I traverse pung. 


-507,723 feet uadergroun 


(1 cal'le. 


2 small sleighs. 


2*15,5.50 feet ovcrlicad c; 


iblc. 


1 cara\an. 


4.3,483 feet of duct. 







-,G POLICE CO.M.MISSIONKK. (Jan. 

Harboii Sf.hvice. 
The >p<.ci:il rlutics performed l)y tlie police of Division S, 
comprising the harbor and islands therein, were as follows: — 

Value of property recovered, consisting of Iwats, rigginR, 

float stages, etc., $21,351 

Wssels from foreign ports boarded, 759 

Vessels ordcrctl from the chanael, 1,0S3 

Vessels removed from channel by police steamers, ... 91 

Assistance rendered vessels, IGS 

Assistance renderoj to wharfingers 2 

Pemiits granted to (li.s<-Iiargc cargoes, 48 

Obstructioits removed from channel 49 

.\ianiis of fire attended, Go 

Fires extinpiislifd without alami. 2 

Boats challenged 1,269 

Sick and injured persons as.«istecl, 7 

Cases investigated, 1,213 

Dead Ixidics recovered, 43 

Dead bodies cared for, 2 

Persons rescued from drowning 4 

Vessels ordered to put up anchor lights 5 

Vessels assigned to anchorage, S12 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port during 
the year was 11,307; 9,700 being from domestic ports, 75S 
from the British Provinces an<I 7o9 from foreign ports. Of 
the latter, 737 were steamers, G ships, S barks and S schoon- 
ers. ' 

The police boat "Ferret" was in commission from June 25 
to Xov. 1, 1914, in Dorchester Hay. S!>e covered a rlistance 
of ."),200 miles; made •) arrests for vagrancy; recovered 
property valued at $1,.500; rescued 30 persons from disabled 
boats; made secure IS yachts that had broken away from 
their moorings; quelled S disturbances; investigated 2.5 
cases, and notified 12 owners to ha\e mufflers attached to 
their exhausts. 

Houses. 

On the 1st of December, 1913, there were 72 hor.^es in the 
service. During the year S were Juimanely killed, 4 pur- 
chased and 3 were .sold at public auction. At tlie present 
time there are O-j in the service, as shown bv Table IX. 



1915.1 PUBLIC DOCOFEXT — Xo. 49. 57 

Veuicle Service. 
Automobiles. 
Tliere are 1 1 automobiles in the service at the present 
time; 1 for genera! ii?e attached to iiea<lqiiarters; 1 in the 
East Boston District, attached to Division 7; 2 in the Rox- 
biiry District, attaclitfl to Divisions 9 and 10, respectively; 
2 in the Dorchester District, attaclied to Division 11; 2 in 
the Brighton District, attached to Di\ision 14; 1 in the 
Back Bay and Fenway, attaclied to Division IG; and 2 in 
the Wot Iloxhiiry Di.-trict, attached to Divi>ion 17. 

Co>t of Running Anlomobile^. 

Repair-, §1,257 62 

Tires 1,456 95 

Gasoline 1,090 27 

Oil, ISS 93 

Rent of garage 576 00 

License fees 70 00 



Total, -S4,639 77 

Ambtihiiicoi. 

The department i.s now equipped with ambulances located 
in the following police divisions: 1, 4, 0, \'> and 15; also 
combination automobiles (patrol and ambtdance) located in 
Divisions 7, 9, 10. 11. 14, IG and 17. 

During the year the ambulances respondcMl to calls to 
convey sick and injured persons to the follcuviiig places: — 

City Hospital, 1,319 

City Hospital Relief .Station (ITajTnarkct Square), . . . SIS 

Calls where ?cr\'ices were not required, 264 

City Hospital Relief .Station (East Boston) 256 

Massachu-setts General Hospital, IIS 

Home, 110 

Psj-chopathic Hospital 94 

Police station houses, 27 

Morgue, 21 

St. Elizal>ctirs Hosi)iial, 21 

Carney Hospital, 1.3 

Lying-in Hospital, 10 

Forest Hills Hospital, 4 



JS 



POLICE COM-MISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



From fires, .... 
Homriopathic Ho.-^pital. 
Pkct Hint IJrigliam Hc^piial, 
Ikrr'.on .State Hospital, 
CLaries Street Jail, 
FsrilkncT IIos|)ital, 
llia^-r-'tn Hospital, 
Hr.k Park Hospital, . 
Mi=sacliu.<etts Eye and Kar Infirauir\-, 
XtT England Lying-in Hospital, 
St- ^[arparc't's Hospital, 
Msi-acliiisett.s Women's Honu", 
Nwrth Station 



4 
4 
4 
2 
>> 



Total, 



.3,100 



List of Vchirlrji utrd hi/ the Dei/arhiioit. 



i = £ '■ 

"ii i i 

DivuioNs. ; il ^ • .= 


1 
1 

1 1 
i i 

= 3 

< 1 - 


i 

i 

s 

• ' - 

3 : 4 


.1 
i 


s 

2 


4 


HftiHquarters 
Drririon 1 , 
Drrision 2, 
DiTision 3, 
DiiTsion 4, 
Division 5. 
Drrision C, 
Dri-L-ion 7, 
Division S, 
Dirt-ion 9, 
Division 10, 
Division 1 1 , 
Divt-ion 12, 
Drrtdon 13, 
Division 14, 
Division 15. 
Diviaon 16, 
Divison 17, 
Diviaon IS, 
Jov Street stab 


* 


- 

- 

- 

- 

: 

_ 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 


1 1 

} ! : 
li - 

Z' z 

1 ! - 
1 1 1 

I- - 

2 i 5 


1 
_ 

_ 

1 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


- 


1 

1 
1 

~ 

1 
1 

1 

3 


1 

1 
1 

1 


1 

1 
1 

5 


1 

3 

1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 

1 
1 
5 
2 

6 
5 
3 

1 

2 

1 

21 


Totals, 




S 


12 1 6 i 3 

i 


s 


4 9 


4 


S 


62 



lOlo.l PUBLIC DOCUMFA'T — Xo. 49. 59 



Public CAnRiACES. 

Durinj; tiie year there were 1,.529 carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of G4 as compared with last year; 529 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of 27 com- 
pared with last year. 

Tiiere has been a decrease of 91 in the number of horse- 
drawn licensed carriages during the year. 

TJiere were 20 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, etc., 
left in carriages during the year, which were turned over to 
the inspector; 5 of these were restored to the owners, and 
the balance placed in the keeping of the lost property bureau. 

TJie follo\\ing statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages as well as for licenses to drive tlie same: — 

Xumlx^r of applications for carriage licenses received, . . . 1,532 

Number of carriages licensed, 1,529 

Xuinber of licenses traasfcrred, 51 

XuniixT of licenses cancelled or revoked, 5S 

XunilKT of carriages inspected, 1,529 

-Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon, .... 1,536 

XumlxT of complaints against drivers investigated, ... 42 

Xuinljcr of warrants obtained, 17 

X'unibcr of days spent in court, 12 

.Articles left in carriages reported by citizens, .... 14 

.Articles found in carriages reported by drivers, .... 20 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected, 7 



a 



AV.^GOX LiCXXSES. l 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up I 

nd use tiucks, wagons or other \ chicles to convey mer- t 

chandise from place to place within the city for hire. ^ 

During the year 5,595 applications for such licenses were i 

received, 5,594 of which were granted and 1 rejected. 

Of the licenses granted, 45 were sidisequently cancelled for 
nonpayment of license fee, 23 for other causes and 2S trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV., XVI.) 



60 



POLICE CO>rMLSSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



LisTixo Male Residents of B«>>tox, etc. 







Mav 


Supplc- 


Krfyuri 


Cranird 


Total McD 




pttcatiootf. 


C<Tti&cm:ci. 


Cenificaiefc. 


liilrd. 


1903. . . . 


181,045 


.3,412 


.VJ 


3,-359 


184,404 


1904, . 




193,195 


l,:i:i.> 


O-J 


1,2S0 


194,475 


1905, . 




194,547 


7aj 


s 


697 


195,244 


1906, . 




195,440 


( i.t 


24 


751 


196,197 


1907, . 




195,000 


7.S2 


2n 


754 


196,654 


190S. . 




201,25.5 


1,302 


.-)« 


1,245 


202,500 


v.m. . 




201,391 


SW 


29 


775 


202,166 


1010,' 




203,603 


S»7 


47 


S.50 


204,453 


1911,' 




206,825 


762 


31 


731 


207,556 


1012.' 




214,178 


i.avj 


■2fi 


1,009 


215,787 


19i;5.' 




215,3SS 


1..396 


23 


1..373 


216,757 


1914,' 




219,304 


1,042 


SO 


1,S02 


221, 226 



I Chanced b> A^icil I. 

Women VoUrt rerificd. 

v.m, 14,011 

1004 15,633 

100.) 14,591 

1006 13,427 

1007, 12,822 

100\ 11,915 

1009, 11,048 

1010 10,486 

1011, 9,935 

1912, 10,567 

1013 9,686 

1014, 8,963 

(Soc T.-iblcs XX-, XXL, XXIL) 

Lifting KxyenJies. 

The e.xpcn.-ies of Ii.sting re.-;i(leni5, not intluding the sendees 
rendered hy the members of the polic-e force, were as fol- 
lows: — 

Printing 814,780 81 

Clerical .service, 8,075 99 

Stationer.-, 1,672 65 

Interpreters, 825 90 

Teaming, 45 25 

Telephone, 13 12 



Total. 



S25,413 72 



1915.] rUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. Gl 

Xumber of Policemen employed in Lifting. 

April 1, 1,233 

.\pril2, 1,0S4 

.\pril3 699 

April 4, 239 

April 5, 5 

Special Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to sei^e without pay 
from the city, on the written application of any officer or 
board in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or on 
the appiic-ation of any responsihle corporation or person, 
such a corporation or person to he liable for the official 
misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending Nov. 30, 1914, there were 95S 
special police officers appointed; 19 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause and 2 revoked. 

.Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From .State departments, 12 

From c-ily departments 228 

From railroad corporations, 171 

From other corporations or associations, 226 

From theatrt-s and other places of amusement, .... 262 

From private institution.* 53 

From churches, 6 

Total, 958 

R.\ii.uo.\D Police. 
There were 248 persons appointed railroad policemen 
during the year, 10 of whom were employe.s of the Xew 
York, Xew Haven & Hartford Railroad, 23.5 of the Boston 
& Maine Railroad, 1 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad and 2 of the Boston Terminal Company. 

Miscell.\.\eous Lice.\se.s. 
The total number of licenses issucil of all kinds was 21,992; 
transferred. 132; cancelled and revoked, 1,30-3. The officers 
investigate*! 221 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collecteil and paid into the city trcasurj' amounted to 
S43,f>03..V). (See Table XIV.) 



62 



rOLICP: COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 1.52 applications for itinerant 
nni>ici;ins' licenses received, 141 of which were j;rantc<l, 1 
rcjectc-ti, 10 are pending and 4 were subsequently canc-elle<l 
on account of nonpajTnent of the license fee. 

All the instruroents in use by itinerant musicians are in- 
spected before tlie license is granted, and it is arranged by a 
qualified musician, not a member of the department, tliat 
such instruments will be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 19.3 instruments were inspt-<-te<l with the 
foilou'iiig results: — 



Kind or iMrrcrvcxT. 



Number 
insprctc<L 



NumV*"^ 



Street pianos. 

Hand organs. 

Molias, 

Harps, 

Flutes, 

Accordions. 

Guitars. 

Flageolet. . 

Banjos. 

ilandolia-i. 

Clarionet, . 

Totals, 



193 



173 



Noonbrr 
rejected- 



S2 


71 


11 


.38 


29 


9 


23 


23 

f 


- 


oo 


22 ' 


- 


9 


9 


- 


7 


7 


- 


G 


*■• i 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


o 


t 


- 


1 


• 1 


- 



20 



AU those rejected were put in order and subsequently passed. 

Collcciire. 
Collective musicians' licenses are grante<i to bands of 
persons over fifteen years of age to play on mu.-ical instru- 
ments in company with designated procession.s, at stated 
times and places. 



1915. 



PL'BLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 49. 



63 



The followin;; shows tJie number of applications made for 
these licenses rluring the last five years and the action taken 
thereon: — 



Ycis. 



I Applications. Granted. 



Rejected. 



1910, . 

1911, . 

1912, . 
191.3, . 
1914, . 



•2-26 
20S 
2GS 
24.5 
26.5 



222 
207 
267 
244 
26.3 



4 
1 
1 
1 

o 



C.\j'.iivis(; D.vxGEKor.s We.vpoxs. 
The following: return shows the number of appHcations 
made to the pr>lice commissioner for Hcenses to carry loaded 
pistols or revolvers in tJiis Commonwealth during the past 
five years, the number of such applications granted and the 
number refuserlr — 



Vets. .applications. 

1910, 931 

1911, 931 

1912 1,069 

191.3, 1,10S 

1914, 1.054 



Granted. 



Refused. 



S29 
S44 
975 
97S 
952 



102 

S7 

94 

1.30 

102 



I'muc LoDGi.vG IIor.sEs. 
By chapter 212 of the Acts of 1904 it is provided that in 
cities of over -Vl.fiflfl inhabitants every building not licensed 
as an inn, in which 10 or more persons are lodged for 25 
cents per day of twenty-four hours, or for any part thereof, 
shall l>e decme»I a public lo<lging house, and by chapter 129 
of the Acts of VJl 1 this law is made to apply to all buildings 
in such cities, notwithstanding that no price is chargerl for 
lodging. 



M 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Ill tlic tity of Bfr-ton the police commi-isioner is authorized 
to praiit lic-en.-<-s to ?uch lodging liouses after tJie iiL-pector 
f)f buildings has ttrtified tliat the building is provided with 
proper exits and apjJiances for alarming the inmates in case 
of fire, and the Injanl of healtli has cirtifie<l that the .-anitary 
condition is >ati.->factorA\ 

For the;* licea~es 19 applications were received during 
the year; l-'> <>{ them were granted, 2 rejected and 2 with- 
drawn. Of the liceriK-s granted, 7 were revoked, .5 of wliich 
were subsequently grantcfl wlien the premises were altered 
so as to conform to the law. 

The following shf/a"s the location of the Io<lging houses 
and the numlx-r of per.-ons loilgeil in each during the year: — 



LOC tT105t- 



NuniVxT 
kKJcrcJ. 



l» Causeway Stnct, 


i 4.US 


I'A CommFrcisl Scnu. 


;2.9;o 


IM Commcrrial itntt. 


M.S99 


TA Commcrrukl itnrt. 


12.039 


3S Commercial s<twc. 


IS,4S9 


H2 Commercial Sirert. 


rijrs 


i; Davis Siren. 


33.031 


ia> Eliot Sirwt. . 


j;j33 


IT Green Street.' 


367 



LWATIOX, 



Number 
lodced. 



S Hodnn Scncx. . . | 11.(31 

67 Pleaaant StnM. . XM* 

63 Warreatan Stnct.- 6.U9 

&S< Washinctoo Stmt.' . i.iTt 

I02o Washinctoo .Street. 34,334 

103 1 Watbinctoo Street, 13,42S 

1093 Wasbuiitoo Street.: . . 10J38 

1202 Washinctoa Street, . 6.S27 

Total S;«.S70 



' .Vcs.b!7 'r^jor.i from Dec. 1 to Dec. 4. 1*13. 

: .Vcn.l>r lrylv<l from Dec. I. 1913. to April 30. 1914. 

• Smul^i luiiT'l from Dec. 1 to Dec. 19. 1913. 



Pexsio.n'.s .\nd Benefits. 

Dec. 1. }'J]'.', there were 220 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 2^4 died, viz., 1 lieutenant, 'i sergeants, 
IS patrolmen and the widow of Patrolman Harris; and 
3-3 were added, aiz., 1 <Ieputy superintendent, 1 captain, 
1 inspector, 2 lieutenants, C> sergeants. 19 patrolmen and 
the widows <•{ la-pector Norton, Patrolman Callahan and 
Patrolman O'Xeil, leaving 230 on the roll at date, including 
the widows of 10 arvl the mother of 1 polic-emen, who died 
of injuries retieive«l in the service. 

The pajTnenLs on account of pensions during the past 



191.3.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49; 65 

year amounted to .'?1.")4.21.^A), hikI it is estimatcil that 
.Sl.")8..').jS.33 will l)e reqiiire<l fr»r jjcnsions in 191.). Tliis 
does not include pensions fr»r 1 superintendent, 1 captain, 
1 sergeant and 7 patrolmen, all of whom are sixty-five or 
over, and are entitled to f»e pensioner! on aec-ount of age 
and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the 
thirtieth ilay of November la.-t amountefl to -S207,.5oO. 
There are TiS l)eneficiaries at tlie prex-nt time, and there has 
l)cen paid to tliem tlie sum of -^7,02.).12 during the past 
year. 

The investc<l fund of the I'tiluv Utlief Association on tlic 
tliirtieth day of November wa^ .*172.f>4."?.S2. 

FixAjrriAL, 

The total expenditures for r^il'uv purp<^>ses during the past 
year, including the pension*, hou.-c of detention, station 
house matrons and listing ptTMin-i twenty years of age or 
more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal 
service, were .S2,.V)9,2()2.(X>. f>te Table X\II.) 

The total revenue ])aid into the city treasure' from fees 
for licenses over which the ptifice have .--upervision, and for 
tlie sale of unclaimed and cr»ndemne<l property, etc., was 
.S4:),(i91.90. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal ser\'ic-e during 
the year was .s74,.s(>4.42. (.See Table XVIII.) 

K.stimnted KxpeiiJ^. 

It is estijnated tliat it will take s2.74<;.S4:?.S:? to meet 
the expenses of the department for the coming financial 
year; the expense of the hooie- of detention, station house 
matrons, police listing, police signal .-er\ice and pensions 
i>eing included. 



66 



rOLICK COM.MISSIONEFt. 



|.Jan. 







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1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCU.\rEXT — No. 49. 



67 



ta r. ^ 



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lUSIIIIIIII^III — II 


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6S 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1915.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



69 



Table III. 

Li^t of Officers retired during the Year, giving the Age at the Time of 
Rcliremeiil and the \ umber of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Oiuse of 
Retirement. 



.\ge»t 
Timeof Re- 
tirement. 



Years of 
SerWce. 



Adams, James H., . 
Aubeas, Wllliaiu F., 
Bates, Albert N., 
Blazo, William G., 
Busby, Thomas F., 
Cumings, William S 
Erskine, Stoddard C 
Fallon, Thomas J., 
Fitzpatrick, Frank, 
Flanigan, Edward T 
FojTies, John T., 
Gaddis, Patrick J. 
Healy, W illiam J. 
Hensej', Thomas, 
Keefe, John J., 
Knight, William X. H., 
Lee, Cornelius J., 
LjTich, John J., 
^Iorse, John H., 
McFarland, James, 
Norton, William A., 
O'Xeil, Michael, 
Peare, Oscar H., 
Smith, Peter K., . 
Vinal, Harrison B., . 
Walsh, John F., 
Warren, Philemon D 
Watts, George W., . 
WiUis, Fred A., 
Yeaton, George D., 



Age, 

Disabilit 

Age. 

Disability 

Disabilit 

Disabilit 

Age, 

Disabilit 

Age, 

Age, 

Disabilit 

Age, 

Disabilit 

Age, 

Age, 

Disability 

Age, 

Age, 

-■Vge, 

Disabilit 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Age, 

Disabilit 

Disabilit 



65 
50 
62 
55 
49 
58 
65 
59 
65 
65 
46 
65 
55 
60 
61 
59 
65 
65 
61 
57 
64 
65 
60 
65 
64 
65 
63 
61 
54 
54 



years, 
j'cars, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
j-ears, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
j-ears, 
years, 
years, 
years, 
j'ears, 
years, 
years, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
years, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 
J'ears, 



43 j-ears. 

24 J'ears. 

40 years. 
32 years. 

25 J'ears. 

31 years. 

32 j-ears. 

33 J'ears. 
32 years. 
37 years. 
19 years. 
32 years. 
21 J'ears. 

34 years. 

35 J'ears. 

29 J'ears. 

35 J'ears. 

41 J'ears. 

31 J'ears. 

32 J'ears. 

36 years. 
36 J'ears. 

30 J'ears. 
34 J'ears. 
43 years. 

39 J'ears. 

40 J'ears. 

31 J'ears. 
21 years. 

32 J'ears. 



POLICE CO.M.MISSIOXER. [Jan. 



Table IV. 

Lift of Officers uho vert jiromoted above the Rank of Palrulman during 
the Year ending Sor. 30, 191 J,. 



Dati. 



Name and Rank. 



Dec. 20, 1913 Lieut. Michael J. Goff to the rank of captain. 

Aug. S, 1914 Lic-ut. Patrick F. King to tlie rank of captain. 

Aug. S, 1914 Lieut. JcTemiah F. Gallivan to the rank of captain. 

Dec. 20, 1913 Sergt. Palej' L. Skillings to the rank of lieutenant. 

.\ug. S, 1914 I Sergt. Joseph F. Hurley to the rank of lieutenant. 

Aug. S, 1914 Sergt. Hiny P. Bums to the rank of lieutenant. 

Oct. 7, 1914 i Sergt. Httiri' F. Barrj- to the rank of lieutenant. 

I 

Aug. S, 1914 i Patrolnun William J. Carey to the rank of sergeant. 

Aug. S, 1914 I Patrolman Edward J. Murphy to the rank of sergeant. 

Aug. S, 1914 I Patrolmin John C. E. Clark to the rank of sergeant. 

Aug. S, 1914 I Patrohntn John T. O'Dea to ihe rank of sergeant. 

Aug. S, 1914 Patrolmui George H. Dickinson to tlic rank of ser- 

I gcant. 

Aug. S, 1914 I Patrolnuji Orrington \Vaugh to the rank of sergeant. 

Aug. 8, 1914 ' Patrolnuji Xomian S. Ramsay to the rank of sergeant. 

Aug. S, 1914 Putrolmtn Patrick J. Fitzgerald to the rank of ser- 
geant. 



1915.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



Table V. 

Xumber of Men in each Rank in Active Seirice at the End of the Present 
Year who were appointed on the Force in the Year stated. 



Date appointed. 


1 
•Z 


1 

II 

2~ 


i 
1 

-2 


s 

1 


E 

2 

1 


5 

c 
d 
e 

3 


5 

1 


9 

1 






1S69, . . . 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 




i 
1 


1 


1S70, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 - 


1 


1873, 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 - 


3 


1S75, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 




2 


1876, 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1878, 






- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


2 


1 


3 


- 


11 


1879, 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


3 


- 


6 


ISSO, 








- 


1 - 


- 


- 


1 


1 


5 


- 


7 


ISSl, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


12 


_ 


17 


1SS2, 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


- 


6 


- 


13 


18S3, 






- 


- 




1 


- 


1 


1 


5 


- 


8 


1SS4, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


12 


- 


13 


1885, 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


10 


- 


16 


1886, 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


8 


- 


12 


1887, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


15 


- 


21 


1888, 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


5 


4 


•29 


- 


41 


1889, 






- 


- 


- 


o 


3 


1 


2 


11 


- 


19 


1890, 






- 


- 


~ 


1 


2 


2 


2 


17 


_ 


24 


1891, 






- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


o 


12 


. — 


18 


1892, 






- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


6 


11 


- 


19 


1893, 






— 


- 


- 


2 


4 


4 


14 


50 


— 


74 


1894, 






- 


- 


- 


1 




3 


5 


21 


- 


30 


1895, 






- 


- 


- 


4 


5 


2 


20 


94 


- 


125 


1896, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


27 


— 


31 


1897, 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 1 


2 


15 


— 


17 


1898, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 1 


3 


27 


— 


30 


1900, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


14 


69 


— 


86 


1901, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


45 


— 


49 


1902, . 






- 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


1 


7 


— 


8 


1903, . 






- 


- 


- 




- 


_ 1 


5 


77 


- 


82 


1904, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 1 


3 


72 


- 


75 


1905, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 1 


1 


32 


- 


33 


1906, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


31 


- 


32 


1907, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


104 


- 


104 


190S, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- i 


- 


138 


- 


138 


1909, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


S3 


- 


s;i 


1910, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


49 


_ 


49 


1911, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


- 


55 


1912, . 

1913, . 

1914, . 






- 


- 


1 


1 


— 


1 


- 


101 
17 


65 
57 


103 
82 
57 


Tola 


lis,. 




1 


1 


1 


25 


28 


39 ] 


101 1,278 


122 '1.596 



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1915. 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



73 





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1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IENT — No. 49. 



75 



i- V <^ y 

X X 5 S 
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IJan. 



Tadi.k IX. 
XiiiiiUr iiKil Diflribulion of Horfcs u*ed in Itie Deinirliiimt. 



DlVL<>IO\>. 



Vin. 



P.lroL Ri«i« )^ 



Driv- 
ins. 



Toub. 



Headquarters. 



Di\i:ion 


1, 


DixTiion 


2. 


DixTiion 


3. 


Di\T;ion 


4, 


DixTsion 


•1. 


Di\"iiion 


6, 


Di\Tiion 


7, 


Di\Tsion 


9, 


Di\-iiion 


10, 


Di\Tsion 


11. 


DixTiion 


12. 


Division 


1.3, 


DixTsion 


14, 


Di\"tion 


15, 


Division 16, 


Division 17, 


Division IS, 


Signal service, 

partment,40. 
House of detent 


Prison van. 


Totals. 



pair de- 
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29 



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65 



191.>.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 49. 



77 



Xiimber of Arrests by Police 



Table X. 

Divisions during the Year ending Xov. 30, 
1914. 



Di 


ISION 


S. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters, 










1,045 


320 


1,365 


DuTsion 1, 










13,S74 


S26 


14,700 


DivTsioD 2, 










5,222 


368 


5,590 


Division 3, 










10,365 


1,252 


11,617 


Dirision 4, 










S,35S 


918 


9,276 


Division 5, 










7,504 


1,654 


9,158 


Division 6, 










7,374 


471 


7,845 


Division 7, 










2,SS5 


220 


3,105 


Division S, 










S7 


- 


• 87 


Division 9, 










3,4SS 


379 


3,867 


Division 10, 










4,351 


472 


4,823 


Division 11, 










3,264 


95 


3,359 


Division 12, 










1,1S1 


96 


1,277 


Division 13, 










904 


60 


1.054 


Division 14, 










1,650 


3, 


1,681 


Division 15, 










5,079 


367 


5,446 


Division 16, 










2,702 


121 


2,823 


Division 17, 










1,565 


35 


1,600 


Division IS, 










513 


19 


532 


Totnis, 


81,501 


7,704 


89,205 



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1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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1915.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



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POLICE COMMLSSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1915.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



99 



Table XV. 
Xximber of Dog Licenses issuer! during the Year ending Xor. 30, 191/,. 



I 


JiVlSI 


1 

DNS. ] Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Totals. ' 


1, 


. . 07 


.5 


2 


1 


95 


2, 








6 


2 


- 




8 


3. 








220 


68 


15 


4 


.307 


4, 








127 


70 


4 


1 


202 


5, 








337 


112 


13 


1 


463 


G. 










211 


50 


2 




263 


7, 










536 


77 


15 


- 


628 


9, 










750 


157 


34 


4 


945 


10, 










532 


102 


15 


- 


649 


11, 










1,612 


293 


115 


5 


2,025 


12, 










462 


134 


27 


1 


624 


13, 










514 


93 


47 


- 


654 


14, 










591 


131 


ot 


2 


7S1 


15, 










332 


119 


17 


" 


46S 


16, 










519 


1^ 


41 




714 


17, 










628 


113 


64 


1 


S06 


18, 










354 


54 


31 


- 


439 


Tot 


ab. 








7,798 


1,754 


499 


20 


10,071 



Table XVI. 
Total Xunibcr of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Dirisions. 



Division 1, . . 1,065 


Division 12, . . . 68 


Divbion 2, 






1,909 


Division 13, 






36 


Di\-ision 3, 






218 


Division 14, 






37 


Divioion 4, 






534 


Division 15, 






186 


Division 5, 






436 


Division 16, 






168 


Di\nsion 6, 






305 


Division 17, 






12 


Di\Tsion 7, 






143 


Division IS, 






64 


Division 9, 






150 








Dividon 10, 






129 


Total, .... 5,594 


Division 11, 






134 











ion I'OLICK COM.MISSIONFJ{. (Jan. 

Table XVII. 
Financial Stalctufiit for the Year ending \or. V), 1914. 



EXPEXDITLRES. 

Pay of police and employees, S2,225,a24 IS 

Poniions 154,215 So 

Fuel and light, 21,732 25 

Water and ice, 73S 34 

P'urniture and bedding, 3,G9S 01 

Printing and stationery, 12,788 05 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison, . 7,895 15 

Repairs tc station houses and city prison, . 10,S7G 32 

Repairs and 5upplies for police ste.imers, . . 11,222 30 

Rent and care of telephones and lines, .... 5,750 26 

Purchase of horses and vchidi'S, 1,G46 20 

Care and keeping liorses. lianiesses and vchiclc-s. . 14,S00 25 

Carting prisoners to and from stations and city prison. 1,700 52 

Feeding prisoners, 3,048 14 

Medical attendance on prisoners, S,SS4 86 

Transportation, 1,068 51 

Pursuit of criminals, 3,904 44 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, 16,S31 62 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc., . . 2,757 31 

Traveling expenses and food for ix)lice, .... 118 15 

Kent of buildings, 13,.302 00 

Total S2,523,20S 71 

Expenses of listing, 25,413 72 

Expcnsescf house of detention and station house matrons, 10,579 63 

Expenses of signal senice (see Table X\TII.), 74,804 42 

Total $2,634,006 48 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the PoUce Commisiooer. . 818,039 50 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itiner- 
ant musicians' badges, junk collectors' badges, 

carriage maps, etc., 1,788 40 

For dog licenses (credited to school department). . 25,804 00 

Tot-al, 845,691 90 

For uniform cloth, etc., 16,718 33 

Total, 862,410 23 



1915.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 101 

T.^BI.E XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 

Xof.SO, 1914. \i 

Labor, .S29,398 59 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., 6,377 19 

Rent and care of buildings . . 4,822 43 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and vehicle:^, . . . 12,632 56 

Stable supplies and furniture, 150 58 

Repairs on buildings, 617 39 

Repairing wagons, harnesses, etc., 3,477 31 

Fuel, gas and water, 943 57 

Miscellaneous car fares, etc , 490 35 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor, . . 5,434 79 

Underground wires, 10,021 64 

Printing, stationery, etc., 438 02 

Total, .?74,S04 42 



10:3 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1915.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 49. 



105 



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XXI. 

, who ivcre Residents 
xincts of Said City, 


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I-OLICK COMMISSIOXEH. (Jan. 1915. 



•jci^ 



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'91 IXXXMJJ 



51 UCUMiJ 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 9 I I I 9 I I 



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INDEX, 



4 



INDEX. 



A. 

PACE 

Accidents S, 52, 102. 103 

persons killed or injured in streets, parks and squares . . . 102, 103 

number of, reported ......... 52 

.Ambulance sen-ioc .......... 57 

Arrests 5, 6. 12, 46, 77, 7S-95, 97 

age and sex of ......... . 96 

comparative statement of ....... . 97 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . .5, 40, 85, 95 

for drunkenness ........ 5, 6, 47, 48, 89 

foreigners 47, 49, 78-95 

insane persons .......... 48, 53 

minors .......... 47, 78-95 

nati\itj- of .......... . 47 

nonresidents ......... 6, 47, 78-95 

number of, by divisions ........ 77 

number of, punished by fine . . . . . . . 7, 48 

summoned by court ........ 47, 78-95 

total number of . . . . . . . . . . 6, 46 

violation of city ordinances ........ 47, 88 

on warrants ......... 47, 78-95 

without warrants ........ 47, 78-95 

.\uctioncer3 ........... 98 

Automobiles 7, 57, 102, 103 

accidenU due to 8, 102, 103 

laws, violation of ..... . . . 7 

police . ......... 57, 58 

prosecutions .......... 8 

public ........... 59 

sight-seeing .......... 98 

B. 

Benefits and pensions ......... 64 

Bertillon s>-stem .......... 49 

Buildings ............' 52 

dangerous, reported ......... 52 

found open and made secure ....... 52 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ....... 49 



c. 



Carriages, public ..... 


59 


articles left in .... . 


59 


automobile ..... 


59 


number licensed ..... 


. 59,98 


Cases investigated 


50,52,53 


Cesspools, defective, reported 


. .... 52 



110 



INDEX. 













PAGE 


Chauffeurs 9S 


ChilHrcn 








•VJ 


ahantloncd, carcU f''r 








,52 


lost, restored 








5.-J 


Chimneys, HanRerous, reported . 








52 


City oriiinancea, arrests for \-iolation o 








47. 8S 


Claims, in?peetor of . 








.VI 


Collective musicians . 








02. as 


Commitments .... 








48, »1 


Cc*mplaints .... 








til. 74.9k 


against police officcn . 








74 


aKainst miscclIaDeoiis lireoses 








61.98 


Courts ..... 








48, .W, ■)3, 59, 97 


fines imposed by 








48. 97 


numlx-r of days' attendance at. by 


officers 






48. 50, 5.3, 50. 97 


numl>er of persons summoned by 








47 


Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 








49 


arrests .... 








50 


finper-print siy.steiii 










49 


photopraphs 










49 


records 










49 


ronies' callcry 










49 


Criminal work . 










97 


compiirativc statement of 










97 



D. 



Danperous weapfins . 
Dead liodies. cared for 
Dead l»odies. reeo\-cre<i 
Deaths 

by accident, suicide, etc. 

of police officers . 
Department, police 
Detectives, private 
Distribution of force . 
Disturbances suppres-se*! 
Dogs ... 

amount received for licvnscs for 

damape clone by . 

numl)er licensed . 
Drains and vaults, defective, reported 
Drivers, hackney carriace . 
Drowiiinc. [wrsons rescued from . 
Drunkenness .... 

arrests for. per day 

increase in number of arrests for 

nonresidents arrested for 

total nunil>er of arrests for 



0.3 

52,56 

52,56 

50 

50 

40,08 

45 

98 

46.66 

53, 56 

.%3. 98, 99 

. 98, 100 

53 

98 

52 

59. 98 

53,56 

47. 4S, 54. 89 

48 

48 

0.49 

6,47 



E. 

Employees of tlio Departnieiit ........ 45, 60 

Events, special ........... 51 

Expenditures ........... Oo, 100 

Extra duties performol by officers ....... 50, 53 



INDEX. Ill 

F. 

PAGE * 

Fences, defective, reported ......... 53 

Financial Go, 100 

estimated exi>cn5e ......... 65 

expenditures .......... 65, 100 

house of detention ......... 65, 100 

pensions ....---.--' 65, 100 

signal semce 65,100,101 

receipts - . • . 65, 100 

miscellaneous license fees ...... 65, 98, 100 

Fines 7.48,97 

average amount of ........ • ■IS, 97 

amount of . . . . . 7, 97 

number punished by , . . . . . . 7, 4S 

Finger-print sj-stem .......... 49 

Fire alarms ........... 52, o3 

defective, reported ......... 52 

number given .......... 53 

number on water front attended ....... 56 

Fires ............ 53; 56 

extinguished .......... *^t oG 

on water front extinguished without alarm ..... 56 

Foreigners, number arTeste<l ....... 47, 49, 78-95 

Fugitives from justice ......... 50 

G. 

Gaming, illegal ........... 90 

Gas pipes, defective, reported ....... 33 

H. 

Hackney carriage drivers ......... 59, 98 

Hackney carriages .......... 59, 98 

Hand carts ........... 98 

Harbor serrice, special duties performed ...... 56 

'* Ferret " in commission ........ 56 

Horses ............ 56, 76 

bought, sold, etc. ......... 56 

distribution of .......... 76 ij 

number in serrice ......... 56, 76 

House of detention .......... 54, 100 

House of ill-fame, Keeping ......... 54, 85 

Hydrants, defective, reported ........ 53 

I. 

Identification room .......... 49 

Imprisonment .......... 6, 48, 50, 97 

persons sentenced to . . . . . . . . . 6, 48 

total years of 6, 48, 97 

Income 65, 98, 100 

Inquests held ........... 51 

Insane persons taken in charge ........ 48, 53 



112 



INDEX. 



iQSjxjclor of rlaiins 

ca.»ci iiive^tiBaled 
Intoxic3tc<l iiTf^jiis as^iistcd 
Ititicniil niu.-iciaii9 



I'AGE 

53 

53 

53 

02.98 



J. 

Junk collectors ..... 
Junk jhop koci>trs .... 
Jur>- IL'tJ. police work on . 



QS 
98 



Laiii;>.<, defective, reported 
License*, raisecllaiieoui 
Li'tini; male residents 

rcrtificalcs refused 

ixiicn!«3 of 

iiumlxT of male residents listed 

^Tjpplement.iry list of male readcnts 

women voters verified . 

uumJicr of policemen emplo>«l in 
JjxlKCTi at station houses . 
I-olcing houses, public 

applications for licenses 

authority to license 

location of . 

numlxr of persons lodged io 
Lnst. abandoned and stolen property 



GO 



53 

61,98 

104. 105 

CO 

00, 100 

00, 104 

00, 105 

CO, 106 

01 

-18 

63 

64 

63 

G4 

64 

1.98. 100 



31. 

MedicaJ examiners' assistants ........ 50 

causes of death .......... 50 

cases on which inquests \rere b^l-i ...... 51 

Minors, number arrested ........ 47, 78-95 

Miscellaneous business ......... 52 

Miscellaneous licenses ......... CI, 98 

complaints investigated . . . . . .61,98 

number issue<l . . . . . - .61,98 

number transferred ......... 01. 98 

number cancelled and revoked ....... 61.98 

amount of fees collected for . . . . .61.98 

Missing persons .......... 53 

number reported ......... 53 

number found .......... 53 

Murders and homicides ........ 9 

Musicians, itinerant ......... 62, 98 

applications for licenses ........ 62 

instruments examined ......... 62 

instruments passed ......... 62 

Musicians, collective . .... . .... 62, 98 

N. 

Nativity of persons arrested ........ 47 

Nonn-sidcnt oflenders . . . . . . . . 6, 47. 78-95 



INDEX. 113 

O. 

PACE 

Offences 5. 46, 78-95 

against the laws ......... 5, 46, S3 

against the person ........ 5, 46, 78 

against property, with violence ...... 5, 46, SO 

against property, without violence ..... 5, 46, SO 

against property, malicious ....... 5, 46, 82 

cor parative statement of ...... . 97 

forgery and against currencj- ...... 5, 46, 82, 95 

against license laws ........ 5, 46, 83, 95 

against chastity, morality, etc. ...... 5, 46, 85, 95 

miscellaneous ......... 5, 46, 87, 95 

recapitulation .......... 95 

P. 

Parks, public 102, 103 

accidents reported in . . . . . . . . . 102, 103 

Pawnbrokers ........... 98 

Pensions and benefits ......... 64 

estimates for pensions . ... . . . . . . 65 

number of persons on rolls ........ 65 

paj-ments on account of ....... . 65, 100 

Personnel of the force ......... 14 

Police 61 

railroad ........... 61 

special ........... 61 

Police charitable fund, ntimber of beoe6riaries ..... 65 

Police department ........... 45 

method of recruiting force ........ 17 

how constituted .......... 45 

distribution of ......... . 46, 66 

oflScers appointed ......... 46 

date appointed ......... 71 

complaints against ........ 74 

died 46,68 

discharged .......... 46, 72 

injured .......... 46 

promoted . . . . . . , , . . 46, 70 

resigned 46i 72 

retired .......... 46, 69 

absent sick .......... 73 

arrests by ......... . 46, 77 

detailed, special events ........ 51 

salaries ........... 29 

work of .......... , 46 

horses in use in ......... . 56, 76 

vehicles in use in ......... 57, 58 

Police Relief Association, invested fund of ..... . 65 

Police signal ser\'ice 45, 55, CO, 100, 101 

cost of maintenance ......... 65, 101 

pa>-mcnts 65, 101 

signal boxes .......... 55 

miscellaneous work ......... 55 

propert)-of 55 



114 



INDEX. 



Pii'njtjtr^. nativity of 

Privx;<?- 6tritrn\yi-* 

Vrrr^M-ny ..... 

V^-s, a^«3a'lon*•<I ari'l stolon 

r**r/Terf^l .... 

■^altf tA e*»Tyi*-nino*l 

rvAtzi in «-iiy 

txkra frr<cn pri<r>npr:< anrl lodccr* 
I'uliiiif rarriacrr" 
Vu^KV' tr^cirir-hou-ic-s 



<'• 



TAOE 

47 



.V>. .>! 



.■>! 



OS 

9n. 100 

51, 9S 

4S. 50 

9S. 100 

4S 97 

4S 

59 

03. 9S 



R. 






01 

100 



s. 

.->ecoii4-?iaEyl art idea .......... 98 

.'"Ctctr^ (Vfr-nivc. rrp^#rto*l ......... 53 

.""ick i^A injured \M-T^tn^ aj-^i-itcl ...... 4^. .>3. 56 

.»irti>«:*. aF>r<mre on .icroiint of ....... . 73 

."■icLi-^^^iir autorriohilf"* ......... 9S 

.SjgiaJ ;»Tvir«-. police ........ 45. .So. fir. 100, 101 

.special event* ........... 51 

.~pe»ial ^Aie« ........... Gl 

.■>tati<ja \fia.'<r* ........... 48 

VfistTf at 46 

■KTiners.-*.^ ^l*-iaino<l at ........ . 48 

Stolen prr*p^Tl>', \-alue of ....... . 4N. 50, 98 

.^trt*^ railvay?. conductors and motonnrn lirrn..*-*! .... 9S 

.-:tr«eu .>1. 102. 103 

amdenii reported in 102, 103 

deiiectrre, r»-portcd ......... 53 

oiKCTTjction removi-"! ......... 53 

T. 

Team* ............ 53 

tvxy, put up ......... . 53 

V. 

Vehida 57 

aiB><aIaiu-eT> .......... 57 

iaarKorAiiil:S .......... 57 

in C5« in f^iUce department ........ 58 

J^irJir carriages .......... 59 

■nsots 59, 9S, 99 

Ves»eis ............ 56 



INDEX. 115 

W. 

PAGE 

Wagons 59,98.99 

number licensed by di\-isions ....... 99 

total number licensed ......... 59, 98 

Water pipes, defective, reported ........ 53 

Water running to waste reported ....... 53 

Weapons, dangerous .......... ^ 63 

Witnesses 48, 53, 97 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 48, 53, 97 

fees earned by officers as ... . . ... 48, 97 

number of, detained at station houses ...... 48, 53 

Women committed to House of Detention ..... 48 

Women voters verified ......... 60, 106 



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