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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

N0J.S09 



BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Public Document No. 49 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON 



Year ending November 30, 1919 




♦ BOSTON 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTLVG CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE street 

1920 



I'CBLICATJOS or THIS DOCTMEKT 

APPaOTXO BT THE 
SCTEBTIBOB OF AdMINTSTBJITIO^. 



Mass. S^cfetao' o: tns C;::rr.jnv;ealft 



CONTENTS. 

/ 

PAQE 

Abandonment of duty by the police force 5 

Measures taken for the protection of the eity. .... 18 

Present situation, . .... ... .20 

The .superintendent, ........-• 20 

The secretary, ......-..■■ 21 

Coun-sel, .....---•••• 21 

Re<rpect for the s>inbol of the law, . . 23 

Pensions, .....-.-•-•• 22 

Bills submitted 24 

The department, . . .... ... .27 

The police force, ......... 27 

Signal service. .......... 27 

Employees of the department, ....... 27 

Recapitulation, . . . . . . . . . .27 

Distribution and changes, . ... . ... .28 

Police officers injured while on duty, ....... 28 

Work of the department, ......... 28 

Arrests, ........... 28 

Drunkenness, .......... 31 

Bureau of criminal investigation, ....... 31 

OflBcer detailed to assist medical examii>er<, ...... 32 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property, ....... 33 

Sperial events, ........... 33 

Miscellaneous business, . ' . . - . . .36 

Inspector of claims, .......... 38 

Houne of detention, . . . . . . . . .38 

Police signal service, .......... 39 

Signal boxes, .......... 39 

MLscellaneous work, ......... 39 

Harbor scr^^ce, . . . . - . . . .40 

Horses, ............ 41 

Vehicle scri-ice, .......... 41 

Automobiles, .......... 41 

Ambulances, .......... 42 

List of vehicles used by the department, ..... 43 

Public carriages, .......... 44 

Sight-seeing automobiles, ........ 44 

Wagon licenses, .......... 45 

Listing male residents of Boston, etc., ....... 45 

Women voters verified, ........ 45 

Listing expenses, ......... 46 

Number of policemen employed in listing. ..... 46 

Speciil police, ........... 46 

Railroad police, .......... 47 

MwccUaneous licenses, ......... 47 

Mu-iicians' licenses, .......... 47 

Itinerant, ........... 47 

Collective 48 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Carrying dangerous weapons, . . .... .49 

PaUie kxJging houses, ......... 49 

Pensons and benefit*. ......,,. 49 

Fimmrinl, ...........50 

6lsti5tical tables. 

Distribution of police force, ........ 51 

List of police officers in active ^e^-ice who died. .... 53 

List of officers retired, ........ 55 

List of officers promoted, ........ 56 

Number of men in acti\"e service, ....... 57 

Officers discharged and resigned, ....... 5S 

Xombcr of days* absence from duty by ruoeon of oickiaaa*. , 62 

Complaints against officers, ........ 63 

Number and distribution of horses, ...... 66 

Number of arrests by police di\-i'-ioni!, ...... 67 

-Vrrests and offences, ......... 6S 

.4ge and bcx of persons arrested, ....... 86 

Comparative statement of police criminal work, .... 87 

Licenses of all classes issued, ....... 88 

Dog licenses issued, ......... 89 

Wagon licenses issued, . . .... .89 

Financial statement, ......... 90 

Payments on account of signal »er\'ice, . . . . . .91 

AeddenU 92 

Male residents listed, ......... 94 

Women voters listed, ......... 95 



«II)c €ommontDcalt[) of iltas0acl)usctt0. 



REPORT. 



HZADQUABTERS Or THB POUCE DePARTMC>'T, 

Office of the Police Coumission-eb, 29 Pemberton Squjirs, 
Boston, Nov. 30, 1919. 

To His Excellency Cal^tx Coolidge, Governor. 

YovR Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the 
City of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance 
with the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, a 
report of the police department for the year ending Nov. 
30, 1919. 

Ha\'ing been appointed PoUce Commissioner by Governor 
Samuel W. McCall, I assumed the ofBce on Dec. 30, 1918, 
succeeding the late Stephen O'Meara. This report, the first 
that I have the honor to make, must of necessity deal prin- 
cipally with the greatest crisis the police deptartment of 
Boston has ever passed through, — namely, the so-called 
strike of the police. This occurrence was so unprecedented 
in this country, so antagonistic to the fundamentals of gov- 
ernment, and had such a revolutionary effect upon the police 
department itself that it seems fitting that the circumstances 
should be reviewed in considerable detail. 

Ab.vndonmext op Duty by the Police Force. 
At 5.45 P.M. Tuesday, Sept. 9, 1919, 1,117 patrolmen out 
of 1,544 in the department abandoned their office as police, 
or, as it is more commonly termed, "struck." The sole 
issue involved in the "strike," — and the issue never 
changed, notwithstanding there was much public discussion 
of other questions not involved, — was whether the Boston 



6 lOLICE COABnSSIONER. [Jan. 

poEce force as a body should be allowed to affiliate with 
the American Fctleration of Labor. The matter of improve- 
meni of the conditions of the station houses was not an 
issue, for the men thoroughly understcxxl that the Commis- 
siontT had taken all steps possible to relieve these conditions. 
Chapter 291, Acts of 1906, pro\ides that "the city of Bos- 
ton shall provide all such accommcxlations for the polic-e of 
said city as said police commissioner m^- require." Within 
ten weeks of my assuming office I appointed a committee, 
consajting of a captain, lieutenant and sergeant, to examine 
evenr station house in this department, and report to me 
fuUy in regard to each station. The committee performed 
its duties and gave me a detailed report on the condition 
of everj- station house in the city of Boston, the city prison 
and the house of detention. On .April 10, I forwarded to 
hb bonor the mayor a copy of said report, together with my 
reroiiimendations and suggestions. His honor is, no doubt, 
proeeeding with all the expedition possible, to obtain the 
necessary approfmations. This the patrolmen knew. 

Tbe question of wages was not an issue, because wages of 
patrolmen are fixed by concurrent acrtion of the mayor and 
tbe Police Commissioner. The Policre Commissioner is re- 
spoisblc for the S200 increase in salaries that was given this 

I year, and which was all the men asked for, and it was under- 

stood that that increase was not final, but that no further 
increases would \>e made until the superior officers, whose 
salaries have ncit been increased, were also taken care crf. 

,' Tbe absurdity of giAing the patrolmen more than a sergeant 

1 is perfectly apparent. This the men understood. 

! InabOity to obtain a hearing on grievances or obtain acces 

to tbe Commissioner was not an issue, because the Police 
Commissioner had established an additional avenue by which 
tbe men could reach him independent of their superior 
officers. At the suggestion of the Commissioner a delegate 
from each station was elected for the purpose by ballot by 
the men themselves. These delegates met, organized and 
appointed a grievance committee. How well that worked b 
.shown by the following copy of a letter from the grievance 
committee, dated as late as July 16: — 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. . 7 

Boston, Mass., July 16, 1919. 

Hon. Ed\stx U. Curtis, Police Commissioner, Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — We take this opportunity to thank you sincerely in 
behalf of all the patrohncn of the Boston police department for the 
many ^^tal and important benefits obtained and which were championed 
by you, including the non-contributory pension, corrections in the 
rule relating to the unnccc<<.«(ar}' reporting by night men on their off 
days, and excuses from different roll calls. We desire to express our 
deep scn.se of gratitude for your efforts in our behalf in obtaining the 
increa.se in salarv'. 

With assurance of our highest considerations and esteem, we remain, 

Vcr>' respectfully, 

Grievance CoMMrrxEE, 
Michael Lynch, 

President. 
John J. ILwinet, 

Secretary. 

That the men had no grievance or quarrel with the Com- 
missioner, and their relations were apparently very friendly, 
appears from a letter of the Boston Social Club, as follows: — 

Boston Social Clttb, May 13, 1919. . 

E. U. Curtis, Police Comm{**ioner for the City of Boston. 

Dear Sir: — At a meeting of the Boston Social Club, held at In- 
ternational Hall, 67 Warren Street, Roxbury, Friday evening. May 9, 
by unanimous vote, a vote of thanks is hereby extended to you for 
your kind consideration in furnishing at your personal expense re- 
freshments to the police oflBcere detailed for duty at the parade of the 
26th Di\Tsion of the American Expeditionary Forces on April 25 last 
past. 

This kindness, as well as many others for their welfare put into 
active operation by you since assuming j-our important oflBce, is highly 
appreciated by the patrolmen of the police department, for which we . 
sincerely thank you. 

Yours very respectfully, 

Joseph J. McGillivrat, 

Secretary. 

As has been stated, the sole issue in this matter was and is 
whether the Boston police force as a body should be allowed 
to affiliate with the American Federation of Labor. The 



S rOLICE COMMISSIONER, [Jan. 

only possible ground a Police Commissioner, duly appointed 
and responsible to the Commonwealth and bound by his 
oath of office, could take forbade his recognizing any divided 
allegiance in the police force. It was clearly pointed out by 
the entire press of Boston, with the exception of one paper, 
that there should be no unionization of the police force. The 
one newspaper that did not at that time condemn editorially 
the project did not support it. Its editorial columns were 
silent. Moreover, the project received the express con- 
demnation of my predecessor in office, Mr. O'Meara, and 
there are herewith submitted extracts from a General Order 
on the subject, which he issued under date of June 28, 1918. 

It is probable that the printed rumors to the cfTcwt that members 
of the police department are discussing the advisability of organizing 
a union to be jiffiliated ■nith the American Federation of Labor repre- 
sent no substantial sentiment e.\isting among thein. Under ordinary 
conditions no attention would be paid to such nimoni, b«t e\-en though 
unfounded they are so likely to injure the discipline, efficiency and 
even the good name of the force, and the times arc » favorable to the 
creation of discontent among men who are bearing their share of the 
war burdens, though still at home, that I feel it to be my duty to make 
the situation clear. 

There is no substantial disagreement as to the wisdom and even 
the necessity of maintaining unions among persons following the same 
industiinl uccupatioius. 

Though a unioi) of public employees, as distinct from those com- 
posed of employees of private concerns, is in itself a matter of doubtful 
propriety, such union in any case and at the worit could affect the 
operations only of a particular branch of the dty serrice. The police 
department, on the other hand, exists for the impsrJ^ enforcement 
of the laws and the protection of persons and property imder all con- 
ditions. Should its members incur obligations to an oatside organiza- 
tion, they would be justly suspected of ab&ndoning the impartial 
attitude which heretofore has vindicated their good faith as against 
the complaints almost invariably made by both sides in many con- 
troversies. 

It is assumed erroneously that agents of an outfide organization 
could obtain for the police advantages ir pay and regulations. This is 
not a question of compelling a private employer to jwrrcnder a part of 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

his profits; it has to do with police sen-ice, which is wholly different 
from any other senice, public or private, — a service regulated by 
laws which hold to a strict responiibilitj' certain ofiBcials, of whom the 
Police Commissioner is one. The policemen are their own best advo- 
cates, and to suppose that an ofiBcial would j-ield on points of pay or 
regulation to the arguments or threats of an outside oi^aniz&tion if 
the policemen themselves had failed to establish their case wTJQld^be 
to mark liim as cowardly and unfit for his position. 

I cannot believe that a proposition to turn the poUce force into a 
union, subject to the rules and direction of any organization outside 
the police department, vdW ever be presented formally to its members, 
but if, unfortunately, such a question should ever arise, I trust that it 
will be answered with an emphatic refusal by the members of the 
force who hnve an intelligent regard for their own self-respect, the 
credit of the department, and the obligations to the whole public which 
thev undertook with their oath of office. 



In the early spring rumors again began to arise that the 
movement to unionize the force, which apparently had been 
stopped by ]Mr. 0']\leara's clear disapproval, was starting 
up again. I am informed that the matter was brought 
before the men's organization, and the proposal defeated. 
It was then reported that papers were being circulated for 
signatures in everj- station house, making application for a 
charter in the American Federation of Labor. A statement 
was at once issued to the press by the Commissioner dis- 
approving the movement. It soon became apparent, how- 
ever, that the men back of the movement were disregarding 
the Commissioner's views thus made public. It became 
necessary, therefore, to issue a General Order on the subject, 
which was done on July 29, 1919, in the following words: — 

I note that a movement among the members of the Boston police 
force to affiliate with the American Federation of Labor is actively on 
foot. I had hoped that the older men in the service who have sen-ed 
under my predecessor, Stephen O'Meara, who understood his attitude 
on such matters would have speedUy and effectuaHy terminated such 
a movement. Mr. O'Meara issued a General Order to the police force 
on June 2S, 1918. I repeat to the members of the force what he said 
in that General Order, and trust that every member of the force will 
weigh ever}' word carefully. 



10 POLICE CO>DIISSIOXER. [Jan. 

The portion of Mr. O'Meara's order appearing in the first 
part of this report was then quoted, and the order was con- 
cluded as follows: — 

I desire to say to the members of the force that I am firmly of the 
opinion that a iX)Hcc ofBcer cannot consistently belong to a ajii/^»n and 
perform his sworn duty. I am not an opponent of labor anifirm, and 
neither was Mr. O'Meara. He pointed out in well-choeen langiLigc 
that there is no question in the police dejwrtmcnt as to how natch of an 
employer's profits should be .'hared with the workers. PoKccmen are 
public officers. They liave taken an oath of office. That oath rtfjuircs 
them to carrj' out the law with strict impartiality', no matter what 
their personal feeling may \je. The laws they carry out are law.* made 
by the representatives of tlie people assembled in the I^egtrlature. 
Therefore it should be apparent tliat the men to whom the canying 
out of these laws is entrusted should not be subject to the orders or the 
dictation of any organization, no matter what, that compri'ts only 
one part of the general public. A man who enters the police force, a.s I 
have stated, takes an oath of office, and he should realize that his work 
L- sharply differentiated from that of the worker in pri\-ate emplo>'. 
It is difficult to see, under these circumstances, what a poKeetnan can 
hope to gain by the proposed affiliation, although it is ea.'^' to see how 
the other affiliated bodies may gain a great deal. Mr. O'Meara put it 
well when he said that " the policemen are their own best advocates, 
and to suppose that an official would j-ield on points of pay or regnlation 
to the arguments or threats of an outside organization if the policemen 
themselves had failed to establish their case would be to mark him as 
cowardly and luifit for his position." 

A.S Police Commissioner for the City of Boston I feel rt my duty to 
say to the police force that I disapprove of the movement on foot; 
that in my opinion it is not for the best interests of the men them- 
selves; and that beyond question it is not for the best interest erf the 
general public, which this department is required to serve. 

When it became evident that no attention was paid to 
the disapproval of both the present and former Cozutn'is- 
sioner, I was compelled to promulgate the rule, which with 
its preamble is herewith set forth: — 

Boston, Ang. II, 1919, 

General Order No. 110. 

It ii or should be apparent to any thinking person that the prjiice 
department of this or any other city cannot fulfil its duty to the entire 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 11 

public if its members are subject to the direction of an organization 
e>dstlng outside the department. It is a well-recognized fact that a 
p<jlice officer is not an employee but a State officer. He is charged 
with an impartial enforcement of the laws under the direction of a 
commissioner who is himself a statutory officer. The following rule 
interferes in no wise in a policeman's interests and acti^ities as a man 
and a citizen. It does, however, forbid him and the department from 
coming under the direction and dictation of any organization which 
represents but one element or class of the community. If troubles and 
disturbances arL«e where the interests of this organization and the 
interests of other elements and cla--ses in the communitj* conflict, the 
situation immediately arises that always arises when a man attempts to 
serve two masters, — he must fail either in his duty as a policeman, 
or in his obligation to the organization that controls him. Tlierefore 
the following is hereby added to and made a part of Rule 35 of the 
Rules and Regulations, and designated as section 19 of said rule: — 

19. Xo member of the force shall join or belong to any organization, club 
or body composed of present or present and past members of the force which is 
affiliated with or a part of any organixation, dab or body outside the depart- 
ment, except that a post of the Grand Army of the Republic, the United Spanish 
War Veterans and the .American Legion oC World's War Veterans may be formed 
within the department. 

Xo attention was paid to the rule; it was deliberately dis- 
regarded. The men met, organized and elected officers 
August 15. 

The men reported to have been elected officers were ques- 
tioned as to their connection with the organization, and 
charges of having violated the rule were then brought against 
them. 

Eight men were placed on trial August 26; eleven men on 
August 29. 

By request of counsel for the men the Police Commissioner 
heard the cases himself. 

There was no denial of the facts. Counsel for the de- 
fendants argued that the rule was invalid, unreasonable and 
contrary to the express law of Massachusetts. 

Counsel quoted in support of the men's position a Massa- 
chusetts statute. Acts of 1909, chapter 514, section 19, but 
neglected to state, which is the fac-t, that a like statute had 
been declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the 
United States in Coppage r. Kansas, 236 U. S. 1. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Counsel also quoted an Illinois decision of a lower court 
which decided that the school board could not pass a rule 
forbidding school teachers to join a union and refusing to 
employ those who did so (Appl. CD. 111. 199 111. Appl. 856), 
but also neglected to state that this was a lower court de- 
cision which had been overruled by the Supreme Court of 
Illinois, and was not and never has been the law of Illinois. 
(See People r. City of Chicago, 278 111. 31S.) 

On September 4 the Police Commissioner was ready to 
hand do^vn his decision, and notified the men's counsel to be 
at his office to receive the decision. While they were there, 
and before the decision had been announced, a letter arrived 
from his honor the mayor, asking a continuance of the Com- 
missioner's finding. This request was communicated to the 
defendant's counsel, and the Commissioner stated to the 
counsel that the request was one which should properly 
come from them, and asked if they requested the continu- 
ance. They replied that they were indifferent, and refused 
to request the continuance themselves. They even refused 
to say that they assented to the continuance. 

Although sitting in judgment in this case, and feeling that 
requests having to do with the case should come from the 
parties interested, the Commissioner continued his findings 
until September 8, counsel for the men having reluctantly 
agreed to say that they did not object to the continuance. 

It must be observed that there was ample opportunity 
between August 11, the day the order against affiliation was 
promulgated, and September 8 for these men and the other 
patrolmen in the department to give up their affiliation 
with the American Federation of Labor had they desired to 
do so. But it cannot be emphasized too strongly that at no 
time was it ever even intimated to the Commissioner that 
the men would abandon their union. 

So much has been said about a certain plan proposed for a 
settlement of the trouble that the Commissioner's position 
should be made dear on this point. The plan, in substance, 
was this: — 

1. That the policemen's union should not affiliate with 
any labor organization, but should retain its independence 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 13 

and maintain its organization for the purpose of assisting 
its members concerning all questions relating to hours, pay 
and physical conditions. 

2. That the present wages, hours and working conditions 
should be investigated by a committee of three citizens 
selected by the concurrent action of the mayor, the Com- 
missioner and the policemen's union, and their conclusions 
communicated to the mayor, and that thereafter any dif- 
ferences which might arise between the Commissioner and 
the union relative to hours, wages and physical conditions 
of work which could not be adjusted should be submitted 
to three citizens of Boston, selected by agreement between 
the Police Commissioner, the mayor and the policemen's 
union, and that the conclusions of this committee should be 
submitted to the mayor, the Police Commissioner and the 
citizens of Boston. 

?>. That nothing should be done to discourage any members 
of the Boston police force from becoming or continuing to be 
members of the policemen's union, and that no discrimination 
should be made on account of such membership. 

4. That there should be no discrimination on the part of 
the members of the policemen's union, or any of them, 
against a police officer who refused to join the union. 

5. That no member of the union should be discriminated 
agaiAst because of any previous affiliation with the American 
Ferleration of Labor. 

In the first place, this plan was merely brought to the at- 
tention of the Commissioner and was not prepared by the 
men, and the attitude of the men in regard to it was in 
no way indicated. It must be borne in mind that at the 
time this plan was presented I was sitting in judgment on 
the cases of nineteen men charged with violating the rule. 
^NTiile the attitude of these men as to future violation of the 
rule was of importance, it was of importance only, in the 
event of their being found guilty, in mitigation of the sentence 
to be imposed. So far as the men on trial were concerned, 
the plan gave no e*idence whatever of any change of heart 
or attitude, and if such had been its object, it should have 
been urged by the men themselves, or their counsel speaking 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

for tlicm. I have never been able to understand why any 
one who approved the rule and condemned the violation of 
it could have expected me to dicker with its violators, or > 

that I, rather than they, should make the offer of com- I 

promise. The suggestion would have been impossible enough, j 

even if the men or their counsel had asked me to agree to 
drop the proceedings and put the plan into operation on the 
agreement of the union to surrender its charter. 

So far as the plan itself was concerned, if it was not in- 
tended as a basis of compromise of the cases on trial it had 
no connection with these cases, and its merits could properly 
come up for discussion only after the men on trial had 
purged themselves of their violation of a rule of the depart- 
ment. As to the arbitration features of the plan, it should 
be said that nowhere in the statute by virtue of which the 
Police Commissioner holds office is there any language that 
authorizes or permits him to divide hb authority and re- 
sponsibility with any one. The proposal that he should do 
so is both novel and fundamentally incompatible with the 
responsibility to the public which the law casts upon the 
Commissioner for the government of a police force, and 
with the sense of responsibility to the Commissioner which 
the members of the force must feel if proper discipline 
and efficiency are to be maintained. The plan was a rever- 
sion to the state of divided responsibilitv. vacillatin g-pblicy 
and dilatory action, which prompted the Legislature to first 
take the control of the police force of Boston from three 
commissioners appointed by and subser\ient to the mayors 
of Boston, and to place that control in a board of three ap- 
pointed by the Governor; and then, later, to still further 
concentrate responsibility by transferring the control to a 
single commissioner, under the present law. 

The Commissioner rendered his decision on the nineteen 
men on trial on September 8. They were found guilty and 
were suspended. It should be especially noted that they 
weic suspended and not discharged, because if they had 
been discharged they could not have been thereafter rein- 
stated on the force. An opportunity to retract, if they had 



Si / ^"^ 



19-20.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 15 

the inclination, was still left open to them and the other 
members of the force. This opportunity was flouted; the 
men persisted in their course; a secret ballot was taken; 
and, in pursuance of the vote, the majority of the patrolmen 
abandoned their oflice, when and with what results now so 
well known. 

As criticism has been made because the State Guard was 
not in readiness to patrol the streets the evening and night 
of the desertion of the police, it may not be inadvisable to 
call attention to facts which apparently are not generally 
known. 

The maintenance of law and order under ordinary condi- 
tions is imposed by law almost exclusively upon the au- 
thorities and police departments of the cities and towns of 
the Commonwealth. A few years ago a bill was reported to 
the Legislature by a commission appointed to study the 
question, which, if it had passed, would have provided a form 
of police reserve throughout the State capable of being 
assembled and held in readiness at points where conditions 
such as those in Boston existed. This bill, however, did not 
become law, so that each community was left for protection, 
as before, to its own resources in its ofrn {>olice department, 
or to such citizens as might temporarily be invested with 
police power. It is only when "tumult, riot or mob is 
threatened, or in case of public catastrophe when the usual 
police provisions are inadequate to preserve order and 
afford protection to persons and property," that St. 1917, 
chapter 327, section 26, allows the mayor of a city for his 
community, or the Governor of the Commonwealth for the 
State, to call upon the State Guard to aid the civil au- 
thorities. Xo authority at all is given the Commissioner him- 
self, nor can the Governor or mayor invoke this aid merely 
because there is possibility of rioting. If it were otherwise 
it would make the State Guard subject to be- called by the 
mayor of a city on every occasion when a more than usual 
CTowd was collected, or when, for the moment, the resources 
of the local police force seemed overta.xed. As the court has 
said in regard to this law in an earlier form, it does not even 



IG POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

enlarge the power of the civil officers by giving them any 
military authority, but only places at their disposal, in the 
e.iiercise of their appropriate and legal functions, an organized 
and equipped body of men "capable of more efficient action 
in an emergency, and among a multitude, than an ordinary 
poUce force." (Ela r. Smith et ah., 5 Gray, 121.) To invoke 
this statute the mayor or the Governor must at least have 
reasonable grounds for the belief, not only that rioting 
actualh' threatens, but that the usual provisions for policing 
are inadequate. 

At 5.45 P.M. September 9, when the policemen of Boston 
deserted, neither of the conditions under which the law 
authorizes the calling of the State Guard existed. The 
streets of Boston were quiet, there were no threats of rioting 
or disorder, and ho part of the population, except, perhaps, 
the policemen themselves, were in that state of excitement or 
stirred by those passions which are the precursors of rioting. 
Furthermore, up to the very moment the policemen deserted, 
the "usual police pro^-isions" which the statute refers to 
could not be called inadequate, because until that moment 
the Boston police department was at full strength and per- 
forming its full duty. Not only this, but up to that moment 
there was no certainty, even, that the police force of Boston 
would actually desert that duty. Most diligent inquiries 
had been made throughout the department by the superior 
officers who, through personal contact with the men at the 
stations, many of whom they had known for years, were in 
the best position to size up the situation. Yet this most 
careful canvass did not produce any definite information 
either in respect to the number of members of the union, 
or whether a strike had been determined upon, or, if so, 
when it would probably take place, or how many of the 
men, if any, would desert. It was known with certainty that 
many of the men would remain loyal in any event- Such 
information as the Commissioner and others had been able 
to obtain in this and other ways tended to show that, in 
case a strike was called, 700 or 800 patrolmen would refuse 
to desert. This number, reinforced by State and metropoli- 
tan park police, would have left a substantial force adequate 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 17 

to tide over the emergency. In a strike against a private 
concern the strikers generally name a date when they will 
walk out if their demands are not granted. In this "strike" 
against public safety, however, no such amenity was ob- 
served. The time fixed was suddenlj' and secretly deter- 
mined upon. The Commissioner was given no notice. It 
was the obvious policy on the part of the deserters to conceal 
their intentions to the last moment. Their success depended 
upon deception, secrecy and surprise. The meetings of the 
union were in secret. The press could get no definite in- 
formation, and every time it quoted an officer or member of 
the union as to what was done in the meetings, that officer 
or member was quoted as saying that the word "strike" had 
never been mentioned. This state of uncertainty had ex- 
isted some days before September 9. These facts were 
known by the mayor and the Governor, and obviously were 
not sufficient to warrant them, under the law, in calling out 
the State Guard Tuesday, any more than on several of the 
preceding days. AVhen disorder broke out the mayor was 
notified and then called on the State Guard. It is unfor- 
tunate that there were no provisions of law adequate to meet 
the circumstances of this extraordinary situation. But prior 
to the events of the evening of September 9 a suggestion that 
a law was needed creating a reserve of police officers who 
could be assigned anywhere at a moment's notice to take the 
place of striking police officers would have excited ridicule. ! 

As the law did not permit holding the State Guard in 
readiness to take up the pohcing of Boston at a moment's 
notice at any time during the week or ten days of suspense i 

immediately preceding the "strike," the Commissioner was 
left to the ordinary resources provided by the law. This con- 
sisted almost solely of authority to appoint special or tem- 
porary police who might be substituted for the regular police. i 
The diflSculties with which this limitation of authority ham- j 
pered the Commissioner are apparent on slight reflection. I 
It is not every man who is fitted to perform police duty, i 
and few men who are so fitted can afford to give up their \ 
jobs or occupations to become special police for a short time, 
either with or without pay. The Commissioner was, there- 



IS POLICE C0M:MISSI0XER. IJan. 



fore, compelled by force of circumstances to organize a 

resene police force from those public-spirited men who were 

so situated as to be able to afford to volunteer to take up i 

police duty at a moment's notice. Some time before the strike 

actually took place measures were taken to organize such a 

force. 

Measures taken for the Protection of the City. 

First. Volunteer Policemen. — Former high police officials i 

headed by former Superintendent Pierce, on pension, were 1 

called to duty and put in charge of enrolling a volunteer ■ 

police force. At the time of the abandonment of duty there * 

was a substantial number of volunteer police. As the patrol- ; 

men who are now out carried on their purpose in secret, how- j 

. ever, it was not possible to put these men in the station ' 

houses at once. Such a force, composed of men who had 
their ordinary duties to attend to, could not have been kept 
mobilized during the time that rumors of "strike" were in 
the air, nor would it have been expedient to put them in the 1 

station houses while the regular force remained. It can be 
readily seen that to put a volunteer police force into a 
station before the regular police officers had abandoned their [ 

positions would have given the regular men an opportunity ! 

to say that they were distrusted by the Commissioner. 
Moreover, the volunteer police officers could not be furnished 
with arms until they had been surrendered by the regular 
patrolmen. 

Second. — For some time previous the police department 
was busy swearing in special policemen among the em- ji 

ployees of business houses of Boston for the protection of 
property where they were emplojed. The Police Commis- j 

sioner never had any power to call the State Guard, but had 
consulted with His Excellency, and by reason of such con- 
sultation the Adjutant-General prepared for the most prompt | 
mobilization of the troops if the emergency should arise. 1 

Third. — The Police Commissioner also arranged, through 
the Governor, for the largest possible number of the metro- 
politan park police force and of the State police force. That r 
resulted in over 60 State police being on duty and 100 park j 
police. 



■-f-a-'+A 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

Subsequent events liave shown that the metropolitan 
park police did not render the efficient service the Police 
Commissioner had the right to expect. 

Fourth. — On September S, the day before the policemen 
abandoned their duty, the commanding officers of the several 
police divisions, in conference with the Commissioner and 
superintendent, gave it as their best judgment that nearly 
800 patrolmen would remain on duty. As a matter of fact, 
somewhat over 400 did remain on duty, and were on duty 
that night. Vacations and days off were suspended, and 
there were also in the police department 225 superior officers 
who remained on duty and who did police work. 

Fifth. — Section 2G of chapter 327 of the Acts of 1917 
justifies the calling out of the troops only when there is "a 
tumult, riot or mob, or body of persons .acting together by 
force to violate or resist laws of the Commonwealth or when 
such tumult, riot or mob is threatened." No such condi- 
tions contemplated by the statute appeared until the night 
of the 9th or the morning of the 10th, when the Commis- 
sioner notified the mayor that in his judgment the troops 
should be called, and the mayor made the call. Subsequently 
His Excellency took charge of the entire situation, calling 
out all the troops and assuming control and direction of the 
troops and the police department. 

The secrecy of the proceedings on the part of the men, 
and the frequently reiterated statement that the word 
"strike" had never been mentioned, made it impossible to 
have the troops on the scene before they actually got there. 

A call can be made only when the riot or tumult is in 
existence or threatened, and it was not intended by the 
perpetrators of the betrayal of duty that there should be 
any notice given or. any time for preparation for the emer- 
gency. The disorder that came that night was planned and 
intended, in order that the city might be so terrorized that 
a demand would come to recall the faithless officers on their 
own terms. 

At the present time, when there is more or less talk about 
the men having been punished enough, it must be remem- 
bered that the men themselves still cling to their organiza- 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

tion, show no indication of giving up their affiliation, and are 
doing everything in their power to prevent the recruiting 
of a loyal police force, and to sow the seeds of disloyalty 
among the men who are now being taken. 

Present Situation. 

The Police Commissioner is filling his police force as 
rapidly as possible. He has sent to the Civil Ser\ice Com- 
mission for a non-competitive examination a sufficient num- 
ber of men to fill the vacancies. Every possible method 
has been used to prevent the recruiting of this force. Mis- 
apprehensions were created. Men were deterred from apply- 
ing because they were made to think that the position was 
not going to be permanent, and applicants have been hounded 
both at the place of examination and at their homes. Every 
method has been employed to prevent the manufacture of 
uniforms, and time has necessarily been lost by the actions 
of these former patrolmen and their supporters who have 
succeeded, not in preventing the uniforms being made, and 
made by well-paid labor, but in a certain amount of delay 
and the sending out of the State of Massachusetts the money 
and the work that should be kept here for Massachusetts 
concerns and Massachusetts employees. 

I have realized that the salaries in this department need 
revision, and I therefore make the following recommenda- 
tions in regard to salaries that are fixed by statute: — 

The Superintentjent. 
Since the salary of the superintendent was fixed in 1906, 
there has been no change, yet the duties have become ardu- 
ous and will increase rather than diminish in the years to 
come. If S5,000 was considered a proper compensation in 
1906, a much larger salary must be paid to-day commen- 
surate with the requirements and responsibilities of the 
office. I therefore recommend such increase, appending to 
this report a bill as required by chapter 131 of the General 
Acts of 1919. 



1920] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 21 



The Secretary. 
The secretary to the Commissioner has many duties be- 
yond the ordinary secretarial position. Not only has he 
those duties, but a large part of the administration of the 
Commissioner's office devolves upon him. He must be not 
only a good executive, but also a well-equipped attorney, 
for it is to him that the department must go for all legal 
services and legal advices. He must appear in various kinds 
of litigation, as, for instance, the disposition of property 
coming into the possession of the police by process of law 
where there are many claimants and frequent suits. He 
defends poUce officers sued civilly for causes arising out of the 
performance of their duty. He must sometimes appear for 
the prosecution in cases where the decision is of importance 
to the department. He has to hear and cause to be in- 
vestigated and report on all cases where there is discussion 
concerning any license that the department issues. He must 
conduct cases before the trial board where the accused 
patrolman comes with counsel. The salary as fixed by the 
act of 1906 is inadequate, and feeling that it should be in- 
creased, I recommend legislation accordingly and append 
to this report a bill as required by chapter 131 of the Gen- 
eral Acts of 1919. 

Counsel. 
The Commissioner may spend S3,500 per year for legal 
counsel. The events of the past few months have demon- 
strated that it is possible for that sum to be inadequate in 
certain contingencies, and the department should not be so 
crippled. In the matter in which the Commissioner was 
obliged to seek outside counsel this j'ear, the counsel secured 
considered it so vital to the whole State and Nation that 
he felt it his duty as a citizen to give his ser\'ices for a 
mere nominal fee. The Hon. Herbert Parker charged but a 
nominal fee of -SoO, and charged that merely because he felt 
that it was necessary in order that the relation of counsel 
and client be established. Nevertheless, he postponed all 
his other affairs to the matter in which the department was 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

conccmctl, and was constantly available for any senice 
required. This report would not be complete or just with- 
out the grateful acknowledgment of the Commissioner and 
the department to him. The city and State are under a 
debt to him. The sum allowed for counsel fees, however, 
might easily in any one year be inadequate for the exigencies 
of this department, and I recommend that there be allowerl 
the sum of S7,000, and append to this report a bill as re- 
quired by chapter 1.31 of the General Acts of 1919. 

Respect for the S'i'iiBOL of tiie Lxw. 
It is regrettable that the following recommendation is 
necessarj-, but when men wearing the uniform of the law- 
showed it disrespect it is hardly to be wondered at that 
others in the community should do likewise. I find it in- 
cumbent on me to ask that there be incorporated into the 
statute law a provision compelling a respect for the uniform 
and office of a policeman. In the General Acts of 1917, 
chapter 327, Part I, section 56, the soldier is protected from 
abuse and insult. I ask for the same safeguard for the 
members of all the police forces of the State, and append 
to this report a bill as required by chapter 1.31 of the Gen- 
eral Acts of 1919.. 

Pension's. 
The Police Commissioner may at the present time retire 
from active service and place upon a pension any member of 
the police department who has served for twenty years and 
who is incapacitated for any cause. He cannot do so, how- 
ever, without the request of the member himself, so that 
in c-ases which may arise where the member is clearly in- 
capacitated and declines to make the request the only 
method of dispensing with his ser\ices is to remove him for 
inefficiency, — a rather harsh method. I therefore recom- 
mend that chapter .353 of the Acts of 1892 be so changed 
that the Polic-e Commissioner may retire a man so incapac- 
itated, and submit a bill as required by chapter 131 of the 
General Acts of 1919. 



f 



.'■ 

I 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

The Commissioner gratefully acknowledges the efScient 
and important services gratuitously rendered to him in 
matters of law by Thomas W. Proctor, Esq. 

It would hardly be fitting that this annual report should 
be submitted without due and proper acknowledgment made 
to the individuals and organizations serving to protect the 
city when the police force was depleted. A splendid body of 
citizens enrolled themselves as volunteer policemen, serving, 
and willing to serve, without compensation or expectation of 
any; willing to undergo the hardships and the dangers of 
such service, and neglectful of their own interests and pur- 
suits. To them this department owes a debt of gratitude 
for the ser\ice so unselfishly undertaken and splendidly per- 
formed, and for the department I thank them. 

The whole community is now aware of the promptness 
with which the ^Massachusetts State Guard was mobilized, 
and the effectiveness with which it worked when it came into 
the city. I cannot add anything to the universal chorus of 
commendation that has greeted their work. But I can and 
do express the gratitude of the police department and the 
citizens of Boston to the citizen soldiery that preserved law 
and order here. It was indeed a pleasure to be in daily 
official communication with the leader of the troops, Brig.- 
Gen. Samuel D. Parker. He gave unsparingly of his time 
and his talents, and was of the greatest possible assistance 
to me throughout the whole situation. I desire to express to 
him publicly my appreciation of his admirable handling of 
the situation. He co-operated with this department in every 
particular, and with the fullest harmony, and from him, his 
officers and his troops the department has learned many 
things of value which will make for a more efficient and 
better-equipped police force. General Parker and the Massa- 
chusetts State Guard can rightly claim no little share in 
building up and starting on its road the police force that 
now protects the city. 

ED\VIN U. CLTRTIS, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



24 rOLICE COMMLSSIOXER. [Jan. 



BILLS SUB^IITTED. 



Ax Act relative to the Salary of the Superivtexdext 
OF Police of the City of Bostox. 

Section' 1. Section thirteen of chapter two hundred and 
ninety-one of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and six 
is hereby amended by striking out, in the tenth line, after the 
word "police", the comma, and inserting in place thereof a 
period; by striking out, in the tenth and eleventh lines, the 
words "which shall not exceed five thousand dollars j)er an- 
num", and by inserting in the ninth line thereof, after the 
word "action", the words: — with the approval of the gov- 
ernor, — so that the same may read as follows: — Section 13. 
Except as authorized by the mayor of said city said commis- 
sioner shall not appoint any greater number of patrolmen 
than the present board of police of the said city is now au- 
thorized to appoint, nor shaD the pay of the members of the 
police force other than said police commissioner and super- 
intendent of police be increased or diminished, except by the 
concurrent action of the said mayor and the said police com- 
missioner. The police commissioner may, without such con- 
current action, with the approval of the governor, fix the 
salary of the superintendent of police. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Ax Act relative to the Salary of the Secretary of 
THE Police Commissioxee for the City of Boston. 
Section 1. Section eight of chapter two hundred and 
ninety-one of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and six, 
as amended by chapter three hundred and seven of the Special 
Acts of the year nineteen hundred and seventeen, is hereby 
amended by striking out, in the third line, the words "three 
thousand dollars", and inserting in place thereof the words: — 
an amount which shall be fixed by the police commissioner 
with the approval of the governor, — so that the same may 
read as follows: — Section 8. The annual salary of the police 
commissioner shall be eight thousand dollars, and of the sec- 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

retary an amount wliicli shall be fixed by the police commis- 
sioner with the approval of the governor, which shall be paid 
in monthly instalments by the city of Boston. Subject to the 
approval of the governor and council the police commissioner 
shall be provided with such rooms, which shall be suitably 
furnished, as shall be convenient and suitable for the per- 
formance of his duty, the expense of which shall be paid by 
the city of Boston. 

Section' 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Ax Act relative to the Employmext of Legal Assist- 

AN'CE BY the PoLICE CoMMISSIOXER FOR THE CiTY OF 
BOSTOX. 

Sectiox L Section nine of chapter two hundred and 
ninety-one of the acts of the jear nineteen hundred and six is 
hereby amended by striking out in the fourth line thereof the 
words "thirty-five hundred dollars", and inserting in place 
thereof the words: — seven thousand dollars, — so that the 
same may read as follows: — Section 9. Said police com- 
missioner may employ such legal assistance as he may deem 
necessary in the performance of his duty, and may incur 
expense therefor to an amount not exceeding seven thousand 
dollars in any municipal year, which expense shall be paid 
by the city of Boston upon the requisition of said police com- 
missioner. 

Sectiox 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Ax Act to provide a Pexalty for Ixterruptixg, Molest- 

IXG, LVSULTING OR ObsTRCCTIXG \ PoLICE OFFICER 
WHILE IX PeRFORMAXCE OF DUTY. 

Whoever interrupts, molests or insults, by abusive words or 
behavior, or obstructs any police officer while on duty or in 
the performance of his duty shall be punished by imprison- 
ment for not more than six months or by a fine of not more 
than one hundred dollars. 

Ax Act rel.\tive to the Pexsioxixg of Members of the 
PoucE Department of the City of Bosto.v. 
Sectio.V \. Section one of chapter three hundred and 
fifty-three of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
two is hereby amended by striking out in the second line 



i 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

thereof the words "at his own request", so that the same 
may read as follows: — Section 1. The board of police of the 
city of Boston may retire from active service and place upon 
a pension roll any member of the police department who has 
performed faithful ser\-ice in said department for a period not 
less than twenty years, if in the judgment of the board said 
officer is incapacitated for useful service on said force, and 
said board shall retire from such service and place upon a 
pension roll any member of said force who has arrived at the 
age of sixty-five years, or any member who shall be certified 
to said board in writing, by the physician to the board of 
health of said city, as being permanently incapacitated, either 
mentally or physically, by injury sustained in the actual per- 
formance of duty, from further performing duty as such mem- 
ber: provided, howcrcr, that no officer shall be retired under 
the provisions of this act unless such action is approved in 
■WTiting by the mayor of the city of Boston; and provided, 
that soldiers and sailors who served during the war of the 
rebellion and who have received an honorable discharge shall 
not be retired at the age of sixty-five years except at their 
own request. 
Section' 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



27 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



•The police department is at present constituted as fol- 
lows: — 

Police Commissioner. Secretary-. 2 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent, . 
Deputy superintendent, 
Chief inspector, . 
Cai)t.iin.s, 
laspector?, . 
Ini^pcctor of carri.iges (lieu- 
tenant), . . . . 



1 

1 

1 

27 

2S 



Lieutenants, 

Sergeants, 

Patrolmen, 

Total, 



41 

125 

1,343 

l,oGS 



Director, 
Foreman, 
Signalmen, 
Mechanics, 



Signal Scrricf. 



Linemen, 
Driver, . 



Total, 



18 



Employees of the Deparlmeiil. 



Clerks, 

Stenographers, . 

Matrons of house of de- 
tention, .... 

Matrons of station houses. 

Engineers on police steam- 
ers, 

Firemen on police steam- 
ers, 

Van drivers. 



IS 
4 

5 

7 



Foreman of stable, 

Hostlers, 

Assistant steward of city 

prison, 
Janitors, 
Janitresses, . 
Telephone operators, . 

Total, . 



1 

9 

1 
17 
16 

3 



93 



Recapitulation. 

Ptilicc Commissioner and sccretar>-, 2 

Police force, l,o6S 

Signal Knicc IS 

Employees, 93 



Grand total, • 1,GS1 



2S 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



Distribution axd Cn.vxGEs. 
The distribution of the police force is shown by Table 1. 
During the year 98 patrolmen were promoted from reserve 
men; 12 patrolmen and G resene men were reinstated; 
1,018 patrolmen were appointetl; 41 patrolmen were dis- 
charged; 1,117 patrolmen abandoned their positions; 43 
patrolmen and 2 reserve men resigned; 1 inspector, 2 lieu- 
tenants, 1 sergeant and 9 patrolmen were retired on pension; 
1 captain, 2 inspectors, 2 lieutenants and 11 patrolmen died. 
(See Tables II, III, IV, VI.) 



Police Ofhcers injured while on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police oflBcers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries: — 



How nJTBED. 


Number of 
Men injured. 


Number of 
Duties lost. 


In arresting prisoners, 

In pursuing criminals, 

By stopping runaways, 

By cars and other vehicles at crossmgs, . 
Various other causes, 


39 

15 

1 

9 

62 


626 

237 

44 

54S 

440 


Totals, 


12? 


1,895 



Work of the Department. 
Arrests. 
The total number of persons arrested, counting each arrest 
as that of a separate person, was 67,947 as against 90,293 
the preceding year, being a decrease of 22,340. The per- 
centage of decrease and increase was as follows : — 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



29 



Offences against the person, 

Offences against property committed with \ioIence, 
Offences against property committed without vio- 
lence 

Malicious offences r.g-ainst property, .... 
Forgery and offences against the currency, 
Offences against the license laws, .... 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc., . 
Offences not included in the foregoing. 



Per Cent. 

Decrca.««, 5 . 03 
Increase, 13. &3 



Decrea.'C, 

Increase, 

Increase, 

Increase, 

Decrease, 

Decrease, 



5.19 
10.60 
43.55 
22.51 
40.76 
27.03 



There were 7,402 persons arrested on warrants and 49,25.3 
witliout warrants; 11,292 persons were summoned by the 
court; 04,715 persons were held for trial; 2,595 were re- 
lea.sed from custody; and G-'i7 were delivered to United 
States authorities. The number of males arrested was 
G2,2S0; of females, 5,607; of foreigners, 24,770, or appro.xi- 
niatcly 30.46 per cent; of minors, 9,060. Of the total 
number arrested, 27,325, or 40.21 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



TTnited States, 




. . 43,171 


East Indies, 


6 


British Province 


s, 


. 3,7S0 


West Indies, 


83 


Ireland, 




. . 7,694 


Turkej-, 


125 


England, 






. . 973 


South America, . 


41 


France, 






1.52 


Switzerbnd, 


9 


Germany, 






262 


Belgium, . 


63 


Italy, ." 






. 3,210 


Armenb, . 


32 


Russia, 






. 4,700 


Africa, 


8 


China, 






272 


Hungarj', . 


17 


Greece, 






400 


Asia 


19 


Sweden, 






SS7 


.\rabia. 


1 


Scotland, 






591 


Mexico, 


6 


Spain, . 






78 


Japan, 


10 


Norway, 






239 


S\-ria, .... 


121 


Poland, 






20S 


Roumania, 


7 


Australia, 






2S 


Lithuania, . , , . 


3 


Austria, 






1S7 


Eg>-pt, . . . . 


2 


Portugal, 






195 


Philippine Islands, . 


1 


Finland, 






235 


Cuba, 


2 


Denmark 






70 
44 






^-^ \, ^ 1 1 1 ALA 1 XV * 

Holland, 






Total, . . . . 


67,947 


Wales, 






15 







30 POLICE C0>OIISSI0XER. [Jan. 

The number of arrests for the year was 07,947, being a 
decrease of 22,346 from last year, and 2G,731 less than the 
average for the past five years. There were 35,540 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 19,408 less than last year, 
and 20,533 less than the average for the past five years. 
Of the arrests for drunkenness this year there was a decrease 
of 35.40 per cent in males, and a decrease of 34.26 per cent 
in females from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (67,947), 525 
were for violations of the city ordinances; that is to say, 
1 arrest in 129 was for such offence, or .77 per cent. 

Fifty-four and fifty-six one-hundredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty 
and forty. (See Table XII.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 12,225, and 
the fines amounted to §107,325. (See Table XIII.) 

Sixty-two persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,240 to the House of Correction, 73 to the Women's Prison, 
104 to the Reformatory Prison and 1,2-35 to other institutions. 
The total years of imprisonment were 1 life, 428 indefinite, 
2,214 years, 8 months; the total number of days' attendance 
at court by officers was 30,274; and the witness fees earned 
by them amounted to 88,493.35. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was 8226,262.62. 

Thirty-five witnesses were detained at station houses; 
56 were accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 21 from 
last year. There was a decrease of 5.04 per cent from last 
year in the number of insane persons taken in charge, a 
decrease of about 17.80 per cent in the number of sick and 
injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 6.91 per 
cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the 
five years from 1915 to 1919, inclusive, was $.536,066.52; 
in 1919 it was 81,415,485.79, or 8879,419.27 more than the 
average. The amount of property stolen in and out of 
the city which was recovered by the Boston police was 
$1,238,206.26, as against 8578,890.63 last year, or §659,315.63 
more. 



1920] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 31 

The average amount of fines imposed by tlie courts for 
the five years from 1915 to 1919, inclusive, was $113..3()4.o0; 
in 1919 it was §107,325, or -50,039.50 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
41,973; in 1919 it was 30,274, or 11,099 less than the av- 
erage. The average amount of witness fees earned was 
§11,771.74; in 1919 it was S,493..35, or $3,278.39 less than 
the a\crage. (See Table XIII.) 

DruiiLenncss. 

In arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 97. 
There were 19,408 fewer persons arrested than in 1918, a 
decrease of 35.32 per cent; 50.99 per cent of the arrested 
persons were nonresidents, and 40.58 per cent were of foreign 
birth. (See Table XI.) 

B^ircau of Criminal Inrcsiigatiou. 
The "identification room" now contains 57,801 photographs, 
50,003 of which are photographs \\ith Bertillon measure- 
ments, a system used by the department for the past twenty 
years. In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, 
sections 18 and 21, we are allowed photographs with Ber- 
tillon measurements taken of convicts in the State Prison 
and reformatory, a number of which have already been 
added to our Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the 
adoption of the system by the department in 1898, is and 
will continue to be of great assistance in the identification 
of criminals. A large number of important identifications 
have thus been made during the year for this and other 
police departments, through which the sentences in many 
instances have been materially increased. The records of 
735 criminals have been added to the records in this Bureau, 
which now contains a total of 41,836. The number of cases 
reported at this office which have been investigated during 
the year is 7,528. There are 32,927 cases reported on the 
assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports made 
on these cases are filed away for future reference. The 
s\stem of indexing adopted by this Bureau for the use of the 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



<lepartnieiit now contains a list of records, histories, photo- 
graplis, dates of arrest, etc., of about 175,000 persons. There 
are also " histories and press clippings," now numbering 
S,12G, made by this Bureau, in envelope form for police 
reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was 
adopted in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory man- 
ner, and with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. 
It has become verj- useful in tracing criminals and furnishing 
corroborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the depart- 
ment, but as the duties are of a special charac-ter the follow- 
ing statement will be of interest : — 



Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies, . . . 1,573 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to officers from those States, 41 

Number of cases investigated 7,528 

Number of extra duties performed, •. 2,.503 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and e\adence prepared for trial in comt, .... 192 
Number of cases of abortion and supjwsed abortion investigated 

and e\-idence prepared for court, 6 

Number of days spent in court by officers, 3,065 

Amount of stolen propert}' recovered, .... S417,759.6S 
Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, 164 years, 10 months 
Number of photographs added to "identification room," . . 2,S9S 



Officer det.viled to .\ssist Medic.\l Ex.\mixer.s. 
The oflScer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 844 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



.Abortion. 






5 


Drowning, 






32 


.\eroplane, 






1 


Electricity, 






2 


Alcoholism, 






5 


Elevators, 






9 


Asphyxiation, 






2 


Falling objects, 






11 


Automobiles, . 






12 


Falls, 






53 


Bums, . 






25 


Heat, . . 






2 


Collapse of tank, 






19 


Kicked by horse. 






1 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 



33 



Ladder truck, 
Mnchinen', . 
Natural causes, 
Poison, . 
Railway (street), 
Railroad (steam). 
Stillborn, 



1 

6 

267 

S4 

3 
33 

8 



Suffocation, 
Suicides, 
Teams, . 
Homicides, 



Total, 



6 
66 

8 
183 

844 



On 330 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number, the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts: — 



Aeroplanes, . 








Neglect, .... 


1 


.\sphyxiation, 








Poison, .... 


2 


Automobiles, . 






111 


Railway (street), . 


18 


Boxing matches, 








Shooting (accidental), . 


2 


Burns, . 








Shot resisting officer, . 


2 


Collapse of tank. 








Shot in riot, . 


S 


Elevators, 








Suicides, 


1 


Falls, . . 








Stick throwTi, 


1 


Manslaughter, 






14 


Teams, .... 


3 


Motorcycle, . 












Murder, . 






10 


Total, . 


183 


Natural causes. 






1 







Lost, Ab.\ndoned and Stolen PROPERTi'. 
On Dec. 1, 191S, there were 1,0S8 articles of lost, stolen 
or abandoned property in the custody of the property clerk; 
1,117 were received during the year; 663 pieces were sold 
at public auction and the net proceeds, S955.78, were turned 
over to the chief clerk; 53 packages containing money to the 
amount of S239.02 were turned over to the chief clerk; one 
horse and wagon were sold at public auction and the net 
proceeds, S23.14, turned over to the chief clerk; 87 packages 
were delivered to owners, finders or administrators, leaving 
1,401 on hand. 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year, and gives the number of police detailed for duty 
at each: — 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



UU. Men. 

Dec. 7, Boston Opera House and Sj-mphony Ilall, British jubi- 
lation meeting, 70 

Dec. S, Meeting of Friends of Irish Freedom, .... 26 

Dec. 11, Hoosac Dock, return of soldiers 28 

Dec. 12, North Station, Home Guard returning to Camp 

Devens, 94 

Dec. 14, Funeral of Lieut. William J. Irwin, .... 45 

Dec. 17, Funeral of PoUce Commissioner Stephen O'Meara, 135 

Dec. 18, Boston arena fire, 38 

Dec. 19, Faneuil Hall, Italian American Red Cross meeting, . 24 

Dec. 21, Dancing on Boston Common, auspices of Red Cross, . 18 

Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration, . 42 

Dec. 24, Beacon Hill, Christmas Eve celebration, ... 32 

Dec. 24, Holy Cross Cathedral, midnight Mass, .... 22 

Dec. 25, Beacon Hill, Christmas carol singing 27 

Dec. 31, Boston Common, New Year's Eve celebration, . . 17 



ISH. 

Jan. 3, Faneuil Hall, meeting of Independent Workmen's 

Circle, 107 

Jan. 15, North End, explosion of molasses tank, .... 190 

Jan. 16, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 93 

Jan. 17, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 93 

Jan. 18, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 93 

Jan. 19, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 93 

Jan. 20, Scene of molasses tank explosion 45 

Jan. 21, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 45 

Jan. 22, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 45 

Jan. 23, Scene of molasses tank explosion, 45 

Jan. 29 to Feb. 10, inclusive, special duty to district attorney's 

office, .260 

Jan. 30, North Station, return of Harvard Unit from war, . 46 

Feb. 3, Crawford House fire, 46 

Feb. 5, Funeral of Inspector Thomas H. Lj-nch, .... 40 

Feb. 5, South Station, returning wounded soldiers, ... 40 

Feb. 8, South Station, returning soldiers, 21 

Feb. 9, South Station, returning soldiers, 8 

Feb. 11, Naval parade, 342 

Feb. 12, Jamaica Pond, ice carnival, . . - . . . . 42 

Feb. 24, Visit of President Wilson, parade and receptions, . . 1,542 

Mar. 9, Wilbur Theatre, women's suffrage meeting, ... 18 

Mar. 19, Symphony Hall, Lodge-Lowell debate, .... 95 

Mar. 23, Faneui! Hall, Ci\-ic Federation meeting, ... 19 

Apr. 3, Reception and parade, returning colored soldiers, . . 268 

Apr. 4, Commonwealth Pier, returning soldiers, .... 30 

Apr. 5, Conrunonwealth Pier, returning soldiers, .... 94 






1920) 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



35 



191*. 

Apr. 6, Commonwealth Pier, debarkation of soldiers, 
Apr. S, Commonwealth Pier, debarLition of soldiers, 
Apr. 15 to 21, inclasive, strike of telephone operators, 

Apr. 19, Marathon race, 

Apr. 20, Boston Common, reception to officers of 26th Diusion 
Apr. 20, Boston Opera House, Friends of Irish Freetlom, 
Apr. 21, Boston Common, Liberty Loan drive, . 
Apr. 25, Parade of 2Cth Division, .... 
Apr. 2S, Franklin Field, airplanes arri\-ing, . 
Apr. 29, Funeral of Inspector .\lfred X. Douglas, 

May 1, Roxburj' riot, 

May 3, South Boston, parade of returned soldiers, 

May 5, Liljerty Loan drives, 

May 5, Funeral of Capt. Hugh J. Lee, . 

May 6, Franklin Field airplanes, .... 

May S, East Armorj', school cadet drill, 

May 10, Boston Common, Liberty Loan drive, . 

May 10, Parade of Girl Scouts, .... 

May 15 and 16, Charlestown, reception to returned soldiers. 

May 28, Parade of Jewish Conference, .... 

M.ay 30, Fire in Graham Paper Factorj-, South Boston, 

June 7, Brighton's reception to returned soldiers and sailors, 

June 7, Boston Common, Junior Red Cross Field Day, 

June 7, Dorchester Day celebration, .... 

June 8, Parade of National Polish Department of .\merica, 

June 10, Mechanics' Building, meeting of Friends of Irish 

Freedom, 

June 14, Boston Common, Flag Day exercises, 

June 16, Charlestown, night before the 17th of June, 

June 17, Anniversary of Battle of Bunker Hill, 

June 19, Funeral of Patrolman .\dolph F. Butterman, 

June 2S to 30, inclusive, x-isit of President of Irish Republ 

June 30 to July 1, inclusive, visit of President of Brazil, 

July 2 to 11, inclusive, Market Teamsters' strike, 

July 4, Celebration, Independence Day, 

July 9, Funeral of Lieut. Albert F. Lovell, 

July 17, Strike of Boston Elevated Railway employees, 

July IS, Strike of Boston Elevated Railway employees, 

July 19, Strike of Boston Elevated Railway employees, 

July 20, Strike of Boston Elevated Railway employees, 

Aug. 26, Parade of Italian sailors, 

Aug. 29, Xorth End reception to Italian sailors, . 

Sept. 1, Labor Daj* parade, 

Oct. 5 and 6, Visit of King and Queen of Belgium, and visit of 

Cardinal Mercier, 

Oct. 11, Soldiers' Field, Harvard-Colby football game, 



ic. 



Men. 
48 

48 

385 

437 

21 

19 

25 

1,372 

51 

40 

248 

297 

86 

67 

62 

17 

16 

43 

155 

364 

34 

42 

60 

87 

370 

63 

47 
175 
373 

56 
277 

80 
153 
620 

40 
637 
540 
568 

76 

57 

39 
336 

321 
20 



36 



rOLICE CO^IMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



Ul>. Men. 

Oct. 13, Columbus day parade, 146 

Oct. IS, Soldiers' Field, Ilanard-Brow-n football game, . . 25 

Oct. 25, Soldiers' Field, IIar%-ard-Penn football game, . 25 

Nov. 1, Soldiers' Field, Han-ard-Springfield football game, . 28 

Nov. 4, State election, 240 

Xov. 22, Stadium, Harvard-Yale football game 128 

Xov. 22, Braves' Field, Somer\-ille-Everett high school football 

game, 22 

Xov. 27, Stadium, lOlfit Engineers and 101st Field Artillerj* 

football game, 28 

MlSCZLL.\NEOUS BUSIXESS. 





UU-IT. 


1917-11. 


ISU-U. 


Abandoned children cared for, . 


11 


15 


14 


Accidents reported, 


5,114 


4,555 


4,009 


Buildings found open and made secure, . 


2,790 


3,034 


3,459 


Cases investigated, 


26,857 


26,804 


29,482 


Dangerous buildings reported, , 


19 


32 


16 


Dangerous chimneys reported, . 


6 


23 


26 


Dead bodies cared for, .... 


435 


384 


303 


Dead bodies recovered, .... 


64 


30 


28 


Defective bulkheads reported, . 


- 


- 


11 


Defective cesspools reported, . 


232 


124 


90 


Defective catch basin reported, 


- 


1 


- 


Defective drains and vaults reported, 


18 


15 


28 


Defective fences reported, .... 


3 


1 


- 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported. 


4 


4 


1 


Defecti\c gas pipes reported, . 


- 


- 


47 


Defective hydrants reported, . 


151 


173 


88 


Defective lamps reported, .... 


5,592 


050,906 


29,148 


Defective water meters reported, 


1 


7 


- 


Defective scwera reported. 


162 


85 


75 



1920] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



37 



Miscellaneous Bcsin'ess — Concluded. 





191(-1T. 


UlT-lI. 


1918-19. 


Defective signs reported, .... 


8 


16 


- 


Defective streets and sidewalks reported, 


8,812 


8,192 


8,545 


Defective wires reported, . . . . 


- 


9 


1 


Defective trees reported, . . . . 


27 


4 


1 


Defective water gates and shutofis re- 
ported. 
Defective water pipes reported, 


10 

182 


19 
244 


119 


Defective water fountains reported. 


- 


1 


- 


Disturbances suppressed, . . . . 


G.>1 


424 


565 


Extra duties performed, 




50,S10 


43,175 


42,057 


Fire alarms given. 




2,056 


2,449 


2,076 


Fires extinguished. 




991 


1,232 


974 


Insane persons taken in charge, 




477 


436 


414 


Intoxicated persons assisted. 




27 


15 


12 


Junk dealers investigated, . 




- 


- 


1 


Lost children restored. 




1,821 


1,977 


1,859 


Missing persons reported, . 




.506 


529 


567 


Missing persons found, 




191 


250 


262 


Pawnbrokers investigated. 




- 


- 


4 


Persons rescued from drowning. 




22 


16 


12 


Private detectives investigated. 




- 


_ 


5 


Second-hand dealers investigated. 




- 


- 


4 


Sick and injured persons assisted. 




7,.>33 


6,320 


5,195 


Stray teams reported and put up, 




l.SS 


130 


82 


Street obstructions removed, . 




2^377 


1,854 


1,185 


Water running to waste reported, 




562 


984 


485 


TT-:* „^ j„t„;„„^ 




«n 


71 


.9.T 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
allied damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
1,497 cases, 7 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 

Other Serrices performed. 

Number of cases investigated, 1,497 

Number of witnesses examined, 7^5-37 

Number of notices served, 4,38.3 

Number of permissions granted, 5,679 

Number of days in court, 122 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office, . 5.3 
Collected for damage to the city's property and paid bills 

amounting to, $474,50 

House of Detektiox. 

TTie house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper are taken to the house of detention in vans pra\-wled 
for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the matron 
until the next session of the court before which they are to 
appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are retumefl to 
the house of detention, and from there conveyed to the 
jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year there were 4,055 women committed for 
the following: — 

Drunkenness, 1,921 

Larceny 388 

Nightwalking . 68 

Fornication, 208 

Being idle and disorderly, 103 

A-S-sault and batterj', II 

Adultery, 35 

\'ioliition of the liquor law, 2 

Keeping a house of ill fame, 8 

Witnes, 2 

Count>- jail, S52 

Municipal court 137 

A'arious other oflencos 320 

Total, 4,a55 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 504. Of these, 325 
are connected with the underground system and 179 with 
the overhead. 

, Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this sen-ice responded 
to l,-334 trouble calls; inspected 504 signal boxes, 18 signal 
desks and 955 batteries; repaired 64 box movements, 11 
registers, 17 polar box bells, 43 locks, 20 time stamps, 4 
gongs, 1 stable motor, 2 stable registers, 4 vibrator bells, 
besides repairing all bell and electric light work at head- 
quarters and the various stations. There have been made 5 
plungers, 10 complete box fittings, 8 line blocks, 15 old style 
box movements, and a large amount of small work done 
that cannot be classified. A new register was built from an 
old "Boston style" register for Station IS, so that theirs 
might be repaired. 

The following boxes have been installed imderground: 1 at 
Station 10, 1 at Station 11 and 1 at Station 14. Again this 
department had to rearrange the fourth circuit at Station 11, 
to clear the 1919 underground district on Pleasant and 
Hancock streets, as there were no ducts, and an extra cable 
was laid in Adams Street from the station to Eaton Square. 

There are in use in the signal service 3 horses, 5 patrol 
wagons and 1 pung. 

During the year the wagons made 35,772 runs, covering 
an aggregate distance of 43,851 miles. TTiere were 35,353 
prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 1,942 runs were 
made to take injured or insane persons to station houses, 
the hospitals or their homes; and 438 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were 947 runs 
to fires and 24 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 504 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 
circuits and 70 telephone circuits; 568,731 telephone mes- 
sages and 3,522,508 "on duty" calls were sent over the 
lines. 



40 rOLICE COMlVnSSIOXER. [Jan. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
sennce at the present time: — 



IS signal desks. 

72 circuits. 

504 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call boards. 

SI test boxes. 

955 cells of batterj'. 

5S9,044 feet underground cable. 

239,550 feet overhead cable. 



47,923 feet of duet. 
61 manholes. 
1 buggj-. 
1 line wagon. 
1 express wagon. 
1 mugwump wagon. 
1 traverse pung. 
1 caravan. 



Hasbor Service. 

The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as fol- 
lows: — 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float- 
stages, etc., S59,0S1.S9 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded, 516 

Vessek ordered from the channel, ' 734 

Vesels removed from the channel by police steamers, . . 11 

Asistance rendered vessels, 85 

Assistance rendered to wtarfingers, 2 

Permits granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at anchor, . 4S 

Obstructions removed from chaimel, 46 

Alarms of fire on the water front attended, 35 

Fires extinguished without alarm, 2 

Boats challenged, 1,177 

Sick and injured persons asasted, 10 

Dead bodies recovered, 23 

Dead bodies cared for, 3 

Persons rescued from drowning. 2 

Vessels assigned to anchorage, 470 

Cases investigated, 1,393 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port during the 
year was 7,241, 6,-318 being from domestic ports, 407 from 
the British provinces and 516 from foreign ports. Of the 
latter, 485 were steamers, 2 ships, 18 barks and II schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 2.3 to October 16. The launch "Alert" cruised nightly 
from Castle Island to Xeponset bridge. Three hundred and 



1920.] rUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

twenty-nine boats were challenged; 122 cases investigated; 
and assistance rendered to 9 boats in distress by reason of 
disabled engines, stress of weather, etc. From these boats 
23 persons whose lives were in jeopardy were rescued, and 
property to the value of S3,S00 was saved from destruction. 

Horses. 
On the 30th of November, 191S, there were 3S horses in 
the service. During the year five were purchased, five deliv- 
ered to the State Department of Health, four sold and three 
humanely killed. At the present time there are 31 in the 
service, as shown by Table IX. 

Vehicle Service. 
Avtomobiles. 
There are 3S automobiles in the service at the present 
time: four attached to headquarters; one at the house of 
detention, used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 
si.K in the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 
and 5; four in the South Boston district, attached to Divi- 
sions 6 and 12; two in the East Boston district attached 
to Division 7; five in the Ro.xburj' district attached to 
Divisions 9 and 10; three in the Dorchester district, at- 
tached to Division 11; two in the Jamaica Plain district, 
attached to Division 13; three in the Brighton district, at- 
tached to Division 14; one in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; two in the Back Bay and Fen- 
way, attached to Division 16; two in the West Ro.vbury dis- 
trict attached to Division 17; two in the Mattapan district, 
attached to Division 19; and one unassigned. 

Cost of Running AiUomobiles. 

Repairs, S11,S19 33 

Tires, 6,777 99 

Gasoline, 7,507 60 

Oil, 641 11 

Rent of garage, 467 55 

License fees, 9S 00 

Total, S27,311 58 



42 POLICE CO^OnSSIONER. [Jan 

Ambulances. 

The department is equipped with combination automo- 
biles (patrol and ambulance) located in Divisions 1, 3, 4, 5, | 
6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 19; also ambu- j 
lances located in Divisions 1 and 13. * 

During the year the ambulances responded to calls to 
convey sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital, 1,598 I 

City Hospit-il (Relief Station, Haj-market Square), . 764 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston), .... 202 J 

Calls where semces were not required, 189 s 

Home, 113 j 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 97 ! 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 57 j 

Morgue, 49 ] 

Boston State Hospital (including 40 to Psj-chopathic Dejiart- • 

ment), 41 , 

Police station houses, 18 j 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 10 ! 

Forest Hills Hospital, 6 j 

Faulkner Hospital, 4 j 

Lj-ing-in Hospital, 4 

Carney Hospital, 2 i 

Homoeopathic Hospital, 1 j 

Massachusetts Eye and E^ar Infinnar>', 1 I 

St. Mary's Infant Asj-lum, 1 j 

State Armory (south), 1 .; 

Total, 3,158 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCOEEXT — No. 49. 



43 



List 


f Vehicles used by the Department. 










Divisions. 


<|l , 
llil 

|1! 1 
§3. -3 

U 1 a- 


m 

5 


i 

1 
1 

< 


5 


CO 

c 
a 


8 

C 

1 
E 

< 


i 

3 

C5 


'3 
53 


> 

1 

s 


6 



o 




3 
e2 


Headquarters, 
Division 1, 
Division 2, 
Division 3, 
Division 4, 
Division 5, 
Division 6, 
Division 7, 
Division 9, 
Division 10, . 
Division 11, . 
Division 12, . 
Division 13, 
Division 14, 
Division 15, 
Division 16, . 
Division 17, 
Division IS, 
Division 19, 
Joy Street stable, . 
Unassigned, 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
2 


6 


4 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 


4 


1 
1 

3 


2 


1 


1 


2 
2 

6 
2 


1 

3 


4 
2 
1 
1 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

3 
4 
4 
5 
6 
1 

11 
2 
1 
4 

IS 
1 


Totals, . 


19 


5 


6 


IS 


1 


4 


5 


2 


1 


1 12 

1 


4 


78 



u 



POLICE CO^fMISSIOXER. 



[Jan. 



PUDUC Cauriaces- 

During the ye.ar there were 1,631 carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 12 as compared with last year; 1,132 
motor carriages were licensed, being an incTease of 87 com- 
pared with last year. 

There has been a decrease of 320 in the number of horse- 
drawn licensed carriages during the year. 

There were 73 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., left in c-arriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the inspector; 48 of these were restored to 
the owners, and the balance placed in the keeping of the 
lost property bureau. 

The following statement gives detafls concerning public 
hacknej' carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 



Number of applications for carriage licenses received. 

Number of carriagos licensed, 

Number of licenses transferred, . . . . 
Number of licenses canceled or re\-oked, 
Numberof carriages inspected, .... 
Applications for dri\-ers' licenses reported upon, . 
Number of complaints against drivers investigsteJ, 

Number of warrants obtained, 

Number of days spent in court, .... 
.\rtieks left in carriages reported bj' citizens, 
.Articles found in carriages reported by drivers, , 
Dri^•ers' applications for licenses rejected. 



1,642 

1,631 

158 

62 

1,631 

1,867 

192 

14 

17 

43 

73 

9 



Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commisaoner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hack- 
ney carriages places designated as special stands for such 
licensed carriages, and there have been issued in the year 
ending Xov. 30, 1919, 495 such special stands. 

Of these special stands there have been 42 canceled and 
2 transferred. 

Sightseeing Automdbila. 

During the year ending Xov. 30, 1919, there have been 
issued licenses for 24 sight-seeing automobiles and 21 special 
stands for them. There have been 42 diaaffeurs' licenses 
granted. 



i; 



1920.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



45 



Wago-V Lice.vses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey mer- 
chandise from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 5,204 applications for such licenses were 
received; 5,201 of these were granted and 3 rejected. 

Of these licenses 70 were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 22 for other causes, and 25 trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

LisTiXG Male Residents of Bostox, etc. 



Year. 



May Canvass. 



Veab. 



I MayCanvaas. 



1903, . . . . 


1 

181,045 


1912, « 


214,178 


1904, 








193,195 


1913,' . . . 


215,3S,S 


1905, 








194,547 


1914,' . . . 


219,3W 


1906, 








195,446 


1915,' . . . 


220,SS3 


1907, 








195,900 


1916, .... 


_s 


1908, 








201,255 


1917,' . . . 


221,207 


1909, 








201,391 


1918,' . . . 


224,012 


1910,' 








203,603 


1919,' . . . 


227,466 


1911,' . 








206,825 







Women Voters renfied. 



1903, 








. 14,611 


1912, 






. . 10,567 


1904, 








. 15,633 


1913, 






. 9,68-3 


1905, 








. 14,591 


1914, 






. 8,963 


1906, 








13,427 


1915, 






. 8,253 


1907, 








12,822 


1916, 






_i 


1908, 








11,915 


1917, 






. 9,291 


1909, 








11,048 


1918, 






. 18,950 


1910, 








10,486 


1919, 






. 17,289 


1911, 








9,935 






iCha 


ngedt 


o Apr 


ill. 


* Luting do 


ne by 


asses. 


tore. 



1 i 



46 POLICE CO^DIISSIONER. [Jan. 

Lisling Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the serv- 
ices rendered by members of the police force, were as 
follows: — 

Printing, . 814,569 4S 

Cerical seriice, 12,250 00 

Rtationen-, 308 SO 

Interpreters, 480 63 

Teamicg, 24 00 

Telephone, 14 66 

Total, 827,647 57 

Nwnber of Pdicemen employed in Listing. 

Aprfl 1, 1,227 

April 2 1,086 

Aprfl 3, . . • 730 

Aprfl 4, 290 ]{ 

Aprfl 5, 53 i.f 

Aprfl 7, 5 ' ; 

Aprfl 8, 1 I 

Speci.\l Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to serve without pay 
from the city, on the written application of any officer or 
fjoard in charge of a department of the city of Boston, or 
on the application of any responsible corporation or person, 
sach a corporation or person to be liable for the official 
misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending Nov. 30, 1919, there were .3,142 
^)ecial police officers appointed; 15 applications for ap- 
pointment were refused for cause and 2 revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received, as 
follows: — 

From United States government, 193 

From State departments, 32 

From city departments 395 

From county of Suffolk, 20 

!« 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

From railroad corporations, 220 

From other corporations or associations, 1,954 

From theatres and otiier places of amusement 256 

From private institutions, 60 

From churches, l-" 

Total 3,142 



Railroad Police. 

There were 1.3G persons appointed railroad policemen 
during the year, 78 of whom were employees of the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 55 of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, 1 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
Railroad, and 2 of the New York Central Railroad. 

Ml.SCELLAXEOVS LiCEXSES. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 20,3.39; of these, 20,245 were granted, of which 
117 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 20,128 issued. 
During the year 227 applications were transferred, 94 re- 
jected, 1,956 canceled and 30 revoked. The officers investi- 
gated .306 complaints arising under these licenses. The fees 
collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
841,179.50. (See Table XIV.) 

MVSICI.VXS' LiCEXSES. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 63 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted. 
Three licenses were subsequently canceled on account of 
nonpayment of the license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged by 
a qualified musician, not a member of the department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each vear. 



4S 



rOLICE COM^IISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



During the year lOS instruments were inspectwl, with the 
following results: — 



Kl>T) or I.NSTBITMEXT. 



Street pianos, 
Hand organs. 
Violins, 
Harps, 
Flutes, 
Accordions, 
Guitars, 
Banjos, 
Mandolins, 
Totak, 



Number 
inspected. 



Number I Number 
pacaed. t rejected. 



60 
21 
8 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
2 



108 



50 
13 
8 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 

o 



10 

8 



90 



18 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of 
persons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instru- 
ments in company with designated processions at stated 
times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the last five years, and the action taken 
thereon: — 




1 



/ : 



i .' 



1920.1 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 49. 



49 



Caruyixg Dangerous Weapons. 
Tlie following return .shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry loaded 
])istols or revolvers in this Commonwealth during the past 
five years, the inimher of such applications granted, the 
innnbcr refused and the number revoked: — 



Yeah. 


.Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Revoked. 


1915, .... 


1,55G 


1,425 


131 


- 


191C, .... 


1,3S4 


1,301 


. S3 


- 


1917 


2,719 


2,5S3 


136 


- 


191S, .... 


2,403 


2,374 


S9 


3 


1919, .... 


5,006 


4,539 


467 


4 



Public Lodgi.vg Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of 
the Acts of 1904 during the year, the location of each house 
and the number of lodgers accommodated: — 



Location. 


Number 
lodged. 


LOCATIO.V. 


Number 
lodged. 


19 Causeway Street, 
164 Commercial Street, 
194 Commercial Street, 
234 Commercial Street, 


6.779 
16,752 
36,0S3 
18.655 
31.959 
37,347 


120 Eliot Street 

1025 Washington Street, . 
1051 Washington Street, . 
1202 Washington Street, . 

Total 


52,999 
36,499 
68.581 
55.0S4 


233 Commercial Street, 
17 Davis Street, 


360,738 



Pensions and Benefits. 
On Dec. 1, 191S, there were 2.32 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 14 died, viz., 1 inspector, 2 lieutenants, 10 
patrolmen and a signal service driver; and- IS were added, 
viz., 1 inspector, 2 lieutenants, 1 sergeant, 9 patrolmen, the 
director of the signal service, a signal ser\ice painter, and 



FlX.VN'CIAL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including tlie pensions, house of detention, station 
house matrons and listing persons twenty years of age or 
more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal 
service, were S2,S32,675.S8. (See Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees 
from licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, 
etc., was S60,.39S.G4. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was §72,111.59. (See Table XVIII.) 



50 rOLICK COMMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

the widows of Patrolmen Brcnnan, Butterman and Dcin- \\ 

•inger, leaving 236 on the roll at date, including the widows !, 

of 24 policemen and the mother of 1 policeman who died of );. 

injuries rcccivctl in the service. J- 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 'j 

amounted to S152,4:?9.24, and it is estimated that §168,- 1 

G09.16 will be required for pensions in 1920. This does not ■ 

include pensions for 2 captains, 1 sergeant and S patrolmen, <j 

all of whom are sixty-five or over, and are entitled to be jj 

pensioned on account of age and term of service. 3- 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the l' 

thirtieth day of November last amounted to §207,550. There j! 

arc 72 beneficiaries at the present time, and there has been ' 

paid to them the sum of §7,940 during the past year. ) 

The investcil fund of the Police Relief Association on the 
thirtieth day of November was §203,532.97. 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCU^IEXT — Xo. 49. 



51 



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1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 49. 



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1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



55 



Table III. 

List of Officers retired during the Ycnr, giving the Age at the Time of 

Retirement and the Xwniicr of Years' Scrviee of Each. 



Xame. 


CaiLsc of Uctircnicnt. 


Age at 
Time of 

Kctire- 

mcnt 

(Years). 


Years of 
Service. 


Bowers, Charles A., 


Incapacitated, 


5i 


23 


Burke, John H., ' . 


Age, . . . 


74 


22 


Burr, Le\-i W., 


Age, 


62 


32 


Colbert, James, 


Age, 


65 


34 


Duke, Patrick J., . 


Incapacitated, 


57 


26 


Hazlett, Henry, 


Incapacitated, 


53 


30 


Homer, Horatio J., . 


Age, 


71 


40 


Keenan, Thomas M., 


Incapacitated, 


52 


26 


Mahonej-, Jeremiah J., Jr., . 


Incapacitated, 


39 


11 


Merritt, Frank L., . 


Incapacitated, 


50 


23 


Morgan, Elam W., . 


Incapacitated, 


44 


IS 


Orr, James S., . 


Age, 


64 


34 


Sanford, James E., . 


Age, 


63 


37 


Shaw, Thomas J., . 


Age, 


60 


34 


Weigel, John, - . 


Age, 


72 


31 



• Employee in police signal service. « Director in police sisnal service. 



56 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



T.VBLE IV. 

List of Officers vho were promoted above Uie Rant of Palrohnan during 
the Year ending Xov. 30, 1019. 



Date. 



Xauc akd Rucs- 



Jan. 31, 
Mav 24, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 22, 
May 24, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 22, 
Mar. 22, 
iNlar. 22, 
Sept. 15, 
Nov. 2S, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 15, 
Sept. 15, 
Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 
Mar. 29, 
Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 

Mar. 29, 
Mar. 29, 



1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 
1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 
1919 
1919 

1919 

1919 

1919 
1919 



Lieut. William L. Dexntt to the rank of captain. 

Lieut. Perlej- S. Skillings to the rank of captain. 

Sergt. Michael J. Burke to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. James R. Claflin to the rank of ia?pector. 

Sergt. James H. Eagan to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. John F. Mitchell to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. Patrick J. O'Neill to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. Thomas M. Towie to the rank of inspector. 

Sergt. John F. .\hcam to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Frank .\rnoId to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Bernard J. Hoppe to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Mathe>v Killen to the rank of heutenant. 

Sergt. Jeremiah J. Riordan to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergt. Frank H. Thompson to the rank of lieutenant. 

Patrolman Benjamin Alexander to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Delbert R. Augusta to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Joseph W. Comerford to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman William F. Crawford to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Timothy F. Donovan to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman John A. Dorsey to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Frederick ^L Pinn to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Stephen J. Flaherty to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Francis P. Haggertr to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Edward G. Kennedy to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman John F. McCarthy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Thomas F. Mulrey to the rank of sergeant. 



1020.1 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 19. 



0/ 



Table V. 

Xunibcr of ^fen in Active Scnicc at the End of the Present Year who 

were appoinlcd on the Force in the Year ntnlcd. 







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1920.1 



PUBLIC DOCUiMEXT — No. 49. 



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60 



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John C. O'Connor, . 
John II. O'llaro, . 
Tliomas 11. O'Neil, . 
Jamc^ G. Peters, 
Nicholas H. Prempas, 
Harry Quirk, . 
James llafferty, 
Patrick lUiftery, 
Thomas F. Robinson, 
Stephen J. llyder, . 
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PUBLIC D0CLT:\IE.\T — No. 49. 



Gl 



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1920. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 





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66 



POLICE CO^BIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1 



Table IX. 
Xumber a?id DistribiUi/m of Hotsc* vxd in Deparlment. 



Dtvisioxs. 


1 


• 

i 


i 
i '■ 


3 


e 

J 

3 
Si 

S 

< 


M 
[> 

Q 


J5 

e2 


Di\-ision 1, . . . . 

Di\'iiion IG, 

Signal sernce repair de- 
fc partment, 40 Joy Street. 
Prison van, .... 


3 


4 


I 


16 
5 


1 


1 


1 
16 
10 

4 


TotaU, .... 


.3 


4 


1 


21 


1 


1 


31 



) 



1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



67 



Table X. 

.V )/••)./- r of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending Nov. 

SO, 1010. 



Divisions. 



Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1,152 


426 


1,578 


8,079 


492 


8,571 


4,575 


592 


5,167 


11,019 


1,115 


12,134 


5,914 


426 


6,340 


5,214 


953 


6,167 


3,025 


169 


3,1W 


2,563 


ICO 


2,723 


19 


1 


20 


3,745 


250 


3,995 


3,772 


355 


4,127 


2,155 


68 


2,223 


1,044 


48 


1,092 


851 


34 


SS5 


1,153 


S4 


1^7 


2,861 


194 


3,055 


3,055 


222 


3,277 


955 


18 


973 


345 


14 


359 


788 


42 


S30 


62,284 


5,663 


67,947 



Headquarters, 
Di\-iiion 1, 
Diusion 2, 
Di\-ision 3, 
Di\'ision 4, 
Didsion 5, 
Di\'ision 6, 
Di\Tsion 7, 
Division S, 
Diusion 9, 
Division 10, 
Division 11, 
Division 12, 
Division 13, 
Division 14, 
Division 15, 
Division 16, 
Division 17, 
Division IS, 
Division 19, 
Totals, 



6S 



roLicE co]m:\iissioxer. 



[Jan. 



» 



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1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 49. 



G9 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


r 


1 


1 


, 


1 
































• 










^^ 


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5 


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^ 


« 


t^ 


r^ 


•r 


^ 


Cl 


^ 


i-O 


CO 


_, 


»-l 






n 






ei 




i^ 


CO 


(N 




o 


i-O 


CO 




o 




I- 
































co" 


n 


o 
71 


1 


' 


I 


C) 


1 


•' 


1 


n 


M 


'T 




1» 


Cl 


Cl 

o 




2 


JO 


c; 


1 


o 


»-* 


1* 




■T 




^5 


o 


M 




r* 

^ 


Cl 


s 


Cl 


Cl 

o 


o 


, 


j^ 


^ 


n 


r^ 


1 


^ 


1 


rt 


1* 


CO 


CO 


to 


1.0 


to 


„^ 


o 




5 




-o 




Cl 








o 








CO 




o 




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■ 


:a 


1 


- 


1 




1 


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1 


1 


ci 


1 


1 


1 


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Cl 


1 


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1 


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1.0 


CO 


o 
o 


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Cl 


CO 




t» 


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cc 


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i 


^ 


— 


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CO 


o 


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x 




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r4 




1- 


n 


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o 


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CO 
Cl 






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1 


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r3 


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CO 


1 


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S 


^ 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



-■ t 



■3 t 



^1 





M<i 


1 


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1 


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ling by 
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building, 


i 





















c 








14 


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o 


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k 










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u 


tx 








b 






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a 

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2; 


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and 
tc<l. 
and 


and 
ted. 
and 


hi 


5 


l-i 




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tt 


Mj-M 


M 2. M 


MS a 


u 


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e 






c 




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c ■S = 




c 3^ 




o 






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12 5:2 


IS^jZ 


caki 
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c 


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1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 



o 



1 




1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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71 


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n 


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n 

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rOLICE C03DIISSI0NER. 



[Jan. 



Il 



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1920.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



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1920.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



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1920.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Table XV. 
Kumher of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1919. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Totals. 


1, .... 


23 


2 


_ 


_ 


25 


O 










7 


2 


2 


- 


11 


3, 










147 


59 


15 


2 


223 


4, 










90 


51 


2 


1 


144 


5, 










277 


114 


16 


2 


409 


6, 










99 


25 


1 


- 


125 


7, 










392 


75 


13 


- 


4S0 


9, 










452 


12S 


24 


1 


605 


10, 










343 


hi 


22 


- 


452 


11, 










1,077 


211 


95 


3 


1,3S6 


12, 










33S 


JnO 


27 


- 


445 


13, 










412 


101 


37 


- 


550 


14, 










4S7 


127 


06 


2 


6S2 


15, 










2S2 


101 


14 


- 


397 


IG, 










492 


130 


4S 


- 


670 


17, 










053 


135 


S7 


- 


S75 


IS, 










313 


5S 


IS 


- 


389 


19, 










333 


54 


37 


- 


424 


Tot 


al.s, 








0,217 


1,540 


524 


11 


S,292 



T.\DLE X\'I. 

Total Xumber of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Divisions. 



Dinsion 1, ... 900 


Divi.Mon 12, 


75 


Di\Tsion 2, 






1,509 


Division 13, 


74 


Division 3, 






1S9 


DivL«ion 14, 


70 


Division 4, 






519 


DivL«ion 15, 


169 


Di\Tsion 5, 






440 


Division 16, 


113 


Di\ision 6, 






442 


Division 17, 


54 


Di\-ision 7, 






130 


Division IS, 


79 


Di\-ision 9, 






179 


Division 19, 


15 


"r)i\nfi;ion 10 






145 

99 






Di\-ision 11, 






Total, . 


5,201 



90 rOLICE CO^DIISSIOXER. (Jan. 

Table XVII. 

Finatwial Stalevtent for the Year ending Xov. 30, 1919. 



EXPEN"DITURES. 

Pav of police and employees, S2,359,45S 6S 

Ppn>ions, . . . ' 152,439 24 

Fuel and light, 37,906 05 

Water and ice, 1,001 16 

Furniture and bedding 4,123 23 

Printing and stationery, _ . . 31,971 92 

Care and cleaning station houses and city priica, . 9,342 71 

Repairs to station houses and city prison, . . . 8,764 13 

Repairs and supplies for police steamers, . . . 30,736 97 

Rent and care of telephones and lines, .... 6,59S 87 

Purchase of horses and vehicles, 15,237 40 

Care and keeping of horses, harnesses and vehkles, . 10,485 09 

Care and repair of automobiles, 14,717 17 

Transportation of prisoners, sick and insane pesons, 1,146 10 

Feeding prisoners, 2,800 57 

Medical attendance on prisoners, 5,660 36 

Transportation, 4,466 22 

Pursuit of criminals, 6,217 81 

Cloth for uniforms and uniform helmets, . . . 36,296 27 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc., . . 23,898 60 

Traveling expenses and food for police, . . . 10,100 24 

Rent of buildings, 17,522 00 

Legal services, 50 00 

Total, $2,790,940 79 

Expenses of listing, .... .... 27,647 57 

Expenses of house of detention and station hoose ma- 
trons, 14,087 52 

Expenses of signal ser\nce (see Table XVIII), . . 72,11159 

Total §2,904,787 47 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissiooer, . §19,722 50 
For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itin- 
erant musicians' badges, junk collectors' bodges, 

carriage maps, etc., 2,956 11 

For dog licenses (credited to school department), . 21,457 00 

Total, §44,135 61 

For uniform cloth, etc. 8,285 83 

Citizens' contribution to furnish arms for the depart- 
ment, 7,977 20 



Total, §00,398 64 



1920.] PUBLIC DOCIIMEXT — No. 49. 91 

Table XVIII. 

Paymenls on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 

Xoc. SO, 1919. 

Labor, 831,916 41 

Hay, grain, shoeing, etc., 4,10S 56 

Rent and care of buildings, 5,071 04 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and veliie'.es, .... 627 00 

Stable supplies and furniture, 44 

Repairs to buildings, 732 9S 

Repairing wagons, harnesses, etc., 17,625 49 

Fuel, Ught and water, 1,454 34 

^liscellaneous, car fares, etc., 660 71 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor, . . 7,0S1 20 

Underground wires, 2,791 63 

Printing, stationerj', etc., 41 79 

Total, §72,111 59 



92 



rOLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1920.) PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



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1,400 
1,308 
1,311 
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713 
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830 
852 
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785 
781 
804 
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740 
017 
773 
775 
720 
8S2 
704 
OUl 
837 
807 






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804 

1,288 

77.1 

077 

1,817 

1,0110 

1,800 

1,823 

1,003 

032 

804 

841 

808 

.811 

830 

1,002 

OHO 

733 

1,028 

1,000 

001 

801 

702 

1,037 

1,080 

017 






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771 

1.587 

823 

702 

2,018 

1,487 

1,400 

001 

1,004 

802 

073 

747 

1,085 

758 

017 

007 

700 

801 

805 

800 

018 

017 

813 

U78 

2,042 

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821 
700 
.1,178 

1,840 

1,002 
705 
870 
817 
801 

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708 

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1.118 
087 

1,212 
020 
800 
080 

1,450 

1,048 


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1,140 

710 

804 

4,383 

1,042 

1,744 

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757 

857 

800 

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770 

014 

704 

744 

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1,388 

773 

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1920.] PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 49. 



95 



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INDEX 



INDEX. 



etc. 



Abandonment of duty by police force 
Accidents ..... 

caused by automol)ile 

persons killed or injured in streets, parks and sfjuares 

number of, reported 
Ambulance sor\'ico . 
Arrests .... 

age and sex of 

comparative statement of 

for offences against chastity, morality, 

for drunkenness 

foreigners 

minors 

natiWty of 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions 

number of, punished by fine 

on warrants 

summoned by court 

total number of 

■violation of city ordinances 

without warrants 
Auctioneers . 
Automobiles . 

accidents due to 

police 

public 

sight-seeing 



30, 32, 



30, 



PAGE 

4 

36, 92, 93 

. 92. 93 

. 92, 93 

36 

42 

67. G8-S5. 87 

86 

87 

29. 75, 85 

31,32,38,79 

29, 68-84 

29, 68-85, 86 

29 

29. 6a-85 

67 

. 30,87 

29, 68-85 

29, 08-85 

28 

. 30, 78 

29, 68-85 

88 

92,93 

92,93 

41 

44 

44,88 



41 



B. 



Benefits and pensions 
Bertillon system 
Bills submitted 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported . 

found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 



49 
31 
24 
36 
36 
36 
31 



C. 



Carriages, public 

articles left in . 

automobile 

number licensed 
Cases investigated . 
Cesspools, defective, reported 



44 
44 
44 
. 44, 83 
32, 38, 40 
36 



ICO 



INDEX. 



C'hnufTcurs .... 
Children .... 

iK-jikIoiiccI, cared for 

lost, restored . 
Chimneys, dangerous, reported 
City ordinances, arresU for \noIation of 
Claims, inspector of 
Collective nmsiciaas 
Commitments 
Complaints .... 

against police officers 

against miscellaneous licenses 
Counsel .... 

Courts ..... 

fines imposed by 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 

number of persons simimoned by 
Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 

arrests 

finger-print system 

identification room 

photographs 

records 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 



30, 



PAce 
44. fc> 

30. 30, 27 

27 

zo 

. 30, T> 

. 48. &S 

. .30, 3S 

47, 63, fe9 

. 47,85 

. 21, S 

31..38, 68. fe7 

. .30, S7 

2» 
21 
22 
22 
21 
21 
21 
S7 
87 



D. 

Dangerous weapons ......... 49 

Dead bodies, cared for . . . . . . . 36, 40 

recovered .36, 40 

Deaths 22 

by accident, suicide, etc. ......,". 22 

of police officers ......... 28, *J 

Department, police ......... 33" 

Detectives, private ......... S8 

Distribution of force ......... 28, i\ 

Disturbances suppressed ........ !n 

Does ZS.k'i.Vi 

amount received for licenses for ...... 88, iO 

damage done by ........ . 3^ 

number licensed ......... fe9 

Drivers, hackney carriage ........ 44, Si 

Drowning, persons rescued from ....... 37. 40 

Drunkenness '. 30. 31. 32. 38, 7* 

arrests for, per day . . . . . . . . , 21 

decrease in number of arrests for ...... 30, 21 

nonresidents arrested for ....... . 31, 74 

total number of arrests for ....... 30, 79 

E. 

Employees of the Department . . . . . . . 27, 52 

Events, special ..... ..... 33 

Expenditures ..... .... 50. 90, M 

Eiira duties performed by officers . . ..... 22 



INDEX. 



101 



F. 



Firiincial .... 
eipcnrfiturcs 
hou.^ of detention 

frfTi-iOIU .... 

rfceipli .... 
m^ccll.ineous license fees 

■•iKnal service . 
Tizt^ ..... 

amount of . . . 

average amount of . 

num>XT punished by 
FIr;?er-f>rint system 
Fire alarms .... 

defective, reported . 

numljcr piven . 

numl<or on water front attended 
Fires ..... 



cxtingtii.-'hed 

on water front attended 
Foreigner.", number arre.^ted 
Fugfiives from juitice 



oO, 



50, 
49, 
30, 



■20. 



PAGE 
00.91 

50.90 

50,90 

49,90 

.V). 90 

88,90 

90,91 

.31.87 

.30,87 

31.87 

30 

32 

30, -10 

30 

37 

■10 

.37. 40 

37,40 

40 

GS. 85 

32 



G. 



Canine, illegal 



H. 



Ilar-fcney carriage drivers 
Ilattncj- carriages .... 
Hat>i carts ..... 
IIarf)or ^er^^ce. .-special duties performed 

■'.Mcrt' in commission 
Hordes ...... 



distribution of 
number in service 
fold, etc. 
Ilonic of detention 
llr/a^c of ill-fame, keeping 
Hydrants, defective, reported 



44. SS 

44,88 

SS 

40 

40 

41. CG 

GG 

41, GG 

41 

38. 90 

38. 75 

36 



I. 

Ifkttification room -•-...... 31 

Iit»;.ri--onment ......... .30. 32. 87 

persons sentenced to ........ 30 

total years of ........ , 30, 32. 87 

Iti«,me .50,90 

In^piests held .......... 33 

Iniinc persons taken in charge ....... 30, 37 



102 INDEX. 



PAGE 

Inspector of rfainu ,....,... 3S 

cafc« imeitisaterl ......... 3S 

lDtoiic3te«l ferfons aaat-ted ........ 37 

Itioenot m-a -an ini ......... 47, 8S 



J. 

Juak coUcrt/'xt .......... SS 

Juzk shop keepers .......... 88 

L. 

Lamp?, deferore, n^xxed ........ 36 

Leeal osa-'-Turi'jf. aet i>* «npIoy ....... 25 

Li«-n.-'««. mij<«flane<Kia ......... 47, 88 

Litiins:. pciirie ......... 45,94,95 

cxpen»«* cf .......... 46,90 

male rM^leiitj ......... 45, 94 

number 'A i^Ait-ecuszi employed in . . . . - . . 46 

women T'»rs ,,....,... 45, 95 

lyolzers at s^JtxifXi hotaes ........ 30 

Lodging hoose*. ptihGir: ......... 49, 88 

applicatXiCtf for futfttiiea ........ 49, 88 

aothority to lirenae ......... 49 

loratioa <;f ......... . 49 

numVjer 'jl persona todged in ...... . 49 

Los:, abandcoed and xrXea property ...... 33, 88 

M. 

Medii^ exanar^n' a«c«ants ........ 32 

ea^es oo -w^arb ioyoesW were held ...... 33 

caorcs of death ......... 32 

Miwjr", nuini««' arrest*! ........ 29 

Miscenancoaf irasineas ......... 36 

MiKellaneoo* Sntoses ......... 47 

amount 'A fc«a prJJerted for ....... 47 

complaiit*.* inrestiirated ........ 47 

number caartled aad revoked ....... 47 

number tesoed ......... 47 

number traatferrerJ ......... 47 

Mifi^ng per»*ieit .......... 37 

number itnzA .......... 37 

number reixjrt«d ......... 37 

Ma*iciana, crXeetive ......... 48 \ 

MuaHan?, iaiifTtxA ......... 47 | 

applicatkicic fe« lieeaae» ........ 47 | 

inMnimeau tx^aiaeA ........ 48 ' 

instnimerrtt paaserJ ......... 4S I 

N. j 

Nativity of frfnooii am»ated ......... 29 

N'oDre«idrnt oCea^ler-i ........ 29, 08-85 



IXDEX. 



103 



0. 



Offencies ..... 

acairut chastity, morality, etc. . 
against license laws . 
against the person 
against property, ninlicious 
against property, with violence . 
against property, without \-iolence 
comparative statement of . 
forgerj- and against currenc>- 
miscellaneous .... 
recapitulatioD .... 



29, 
20, 
29, 
29, 
29, 
29, 
29, 



29. 
29, 



PAGE 

6S-S5 
75, 85 
73, &5 
C8, 85 
72.85 
70,85 
71,85 

87 
73,85 
80,85 

S3 



P. 



Parks, public 

a«ifients reported in 

PaTrnbrokers .... 

Pensions and becefits 

estimates for pcnsion.s 
number of persons on rolls 
pajincnts on account of . 

Police ..... 



railroad ...... 

Fpecial ...... 

Pcdice charitable fund, numljer of beneficiaries 
Police department ..... 

distribution of .... 



92,93 

92, 93 

37. 8S 

, 25. 49 

50 

50 

50.90 

46 

47 

46 

50 



horses in use in ..... 

how constituted ..... 
officers appointed ..... 

absent sick ..... 

act to pro\-ido penalty for interrupting, et;;. 

arrests by ..... 

complaints against .... 

date appointed ..... 

detailed, special events 

died ...... 

discharged ..... 

injured ...... 

promoted ...... 

resigned ...... 

retired ...... 

vehicles in use in .... . 

work of . 
Police listing ....... 

Police Relief .Xssociation, invested fund of 
Police signal service ..... 

cost of maintenance .... 

miscellaneous work ..... 

paj-ments ...... 

property of ..... . 

sioial boxes ...... 

Prisoners, nati\'it3- of ..... , 



28.51 
41,66 



45, 



27, 39, 50, 



2S 

62 

25 

28,67 

63 

57 

33 

28.53 

28,58 

28 

28,56 

2S, 58 

28,55 

41,43 

2S 

94. 95 

50 

90.91 

50.91 

39 

50,91 

40 

39 

29 



104 



INDEX. 













PACE 


Private detectives 88 


Property ..... 








30, 33, 50, 88, 90 


lost, nbandoned and slolen 








33, 8-S, 90 


recovered .... 










30, 40, 87 


sale of condemned . 










50, 88. 90 


stolen in city .... 










. 30, 87 


taken from prisoners and lodgers 










30 


Public carriages .... 










44 


Public lodging-houses 










. 49, 88 



R. 



Railroad police 
Receipts 



47 
50,90 



S. 

.Second-hand articles ......... 88 

Secretary to the Commissioner ....... 21, 24 

Sewers, defective, reported ........ 36 

Sick and injured persons assisted ...... 30, 37, 40 

Sickness, absence on account of ...... . C2 

.Sight-seeing automobiles . . . . . . 41, 8S 

Signal service, police 27, 39, 50, 90, 91 

Special events .......... 33 

Special police .......... 46 

Station houses .......... 30 

lodgers at ......... . 30 

witnesses detained at ........ 30,37 

Stolen property 30, .32, 87 

recovered 30, 32, 87 

value of 30, 87 

Street railways, conductors and motormen licensed .... 88 

Streets 37,92,93 

accidents reported in ....... . 92, 93 

defective, reported ......... 37 

obstructions removed ........ 37 

Superintendent of police . . . . . 20, 24 

T. 

Teams ............ 37 

stray, put up ......... . 37 



V. 

Vehicles ........... 41 

ambulances ........... 42 

automob'Ics .......... 41 

in use in police department ....... 41,43 

public carriages ......... 44, 88 

wagons 45, 88, 89 

Vessels ............ 40 



INDEX. 105 

W. 

PACE 

Wagons 45, SS, SO 

number liccn5o<l by di\Taoii» ....... S9 

total nunil)or licensed ........ 45, SS 

Water pifO;', defective, rei>orte<i ....... 37 

Water runnins to waste reported ....... 37 

Weapons, dangeroos ......... 49 

Witne.s.'-cs 30.31,37,87 

fees earned by officers as ...... . 30, 3 1 , S7 

numljor of day?' attendance at court by ofHcers as . . 30,31,87 

numlx-r of, detained at station houses ..... 30, 37 

Women, committed JO Houie of Detention ..... 33 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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