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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 







■'? 



Public Doonment 



Ho. 48 



ebt Commontoeaiti) of ^a00ac()uiEiett0 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



CITY OF BOSTON 



Year ending November 30, 1923 




PUBUCATION OF THIS DOCUUENT 
APPBOVZD BT THE 

Commission on ADMnasTKAxioN and Finance 



CONTENTS. ' 



v^L*Lcv 






Lc„ortoO,r«nor . . . OAuI '^9^ .\^,V.f . - • • ""^^S 

The iJTtv* Situation . - # - • • 

Traffic i 1 

Cone*-*!*"! wi^pmu ........•■■ ^ 

Rflatir* to Caraen! ......... -6 

Inf<Trbanir of Poliro CommunicatioM ........ 6 

PajTiMut of death Ijcncfit on account ot officers killed in ix-rformaucc of duty 7 

St3ti'»o hMi.«c» and garages .,......•■ 7 

The rVpnnnx-ot | 

The I''.Jire Forte » 

.^^ienal -•^Trice ............ ° 

Kiuxi"yr*^ of the Dep.-u-traent ......... 8 

RecajiKuiMiria ............ 8 

Dbirifjati/^>n and Changes ........... 

Police officem injured wliile on duty ,.......- 8 

Work of tfie tVpartnK-nt ........... 9 

.^rrertJ ^ 

Dninkrtinw* ....... .... .9 

Bureau of Criminal In»vftigation .......... 9 

Officer flelaili^ to asitt Medical Examiners ........ 11 

Lost. .Af»ai>V/o«l and .Stolen Property ......... H 

Special Event* . . . .... . .... ' }i 

Missing Perj^/M ............. 12 

MisceIlar«-oa» Biuin*** ............ 13 

Inspector <4 claims ............ 13 

House of lArtentioo ............ 13 

Police Sienal .S»r»-i<:e ............ 14 

Signal IVnes ............ 14 

ML-K5cUan»r>us work ........... 14 

Harbor Service '............• 14 

Horses .............. 15 

Vchide .Service ............. 1^ 

XaU/tuimiMt ............. 15 

.\mlnilaiieni ............. 15 

List of vefcidc* uted by the Departmeirt ........ 16 

Public carnacm ............. 16 

Sight.«mii({ automobiles .......... 1' 

Wagon Lit»iiJ>*» ............. 17 

Listing wf<rk in fV>-ton ............ 17 

LLrting expen-«s ............ 17 

Sum\^r <k polirenien employed in liftioc ........ 18 

Police work oo jury litt* ........... 18 

.Special prXire ............. 18 

Railroad p'-Jiop ............. 18 

MisceHar>e<xx» Iicettje« ............ 18 

Musiciatw' Li«n."e» ............ 18 

Itinerant ............. 18 

CoJIectjve 19 

Carr>-ing d«n*>roa» weapons ........... 19 

Public lodant h'/tM* . . ." . .... .19 

Pensions and fcenefits ............ 20 

Financial ... . .... . . . . ■ . .20 

Statistical Talkie* : 

Di.<!triJ>aii<>n of PrJics Force, etp._ /■, ,- j • • • • .21 

list '<f P'/tice Offieori* in active; se^'ie*wlx> du^t .'.";.,.. , . 22 

List of offiren retired • •.; • • »'• •.,-,• *. . ; ' '. -. ' ' .' ! . . . .23 

List of eii»ploj'e*» retired ' '.'*.' '". ''."'.'''. . . . ■ 23 

list tA officer* promoted . . . . . 23 

Ntrojf*T o< men in active service ," :•:. . -'.J '• . . . . . .23 

Officer! diwehaneed and resigned ■ ■ ' ," " . .'• . . . • ^f 

Xurof^r o( days' alweoce fropj (July, b^/pason of EJckncss ..... 25 

Comptaints acaiiut otf/cers ■ *. /. :'l, •^_, .•■ •,•_.•.■,. . . . 26 

NaJiif*T and diftribution. of JioVWi. ,' ;'• . '; ',•; '•'..••.•. . .28 

Xuml^T lA airtnu by police divisioiis * . ' '. . ' " . ' . , .28 

-Arrest* and t^tntx» ........... 29 

.^ge SLui •«[ of persons arrested ......... 38 

Comparative >itat«tnent of police ci iiuii uJ work ....... 38 

\jamrf:* tA all dasKes issued . . . .. . . . .39 

I>og Ikvnaes iisorHJ ........... 40 

Waj5o« licTTMes isued ........... 40 

Finai»»ial ttatenent ........... 41 

P3}-ment« on account of signal service . . . . .41 

.\eeidmu 42 

Male and female residents listed ......... 44 



Cf)e Commonloealtb of a^a00acbu0ett$ 



» 



REPORT. 



HCACQUAKTEBS OF THE FoLIOS DePASTMSNT, 

Office of thb Police Commi8bio>-eb, 29 Pembebtox Squabs. 
Boston, December I, 1923. 

1 

To Hi* Excellency Ch.o.tcing H. Cox, Gonemor. 

YocB Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city of Boston I have 
the honor to present, in compliance with the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts 
of the year 1906, a report of the Police Department for the j'ear ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1923. 

The Liqcob Situatiox. 

The enforcement of the prohibition laws by this department did not abate dur- 
ing the year, and the fact that the number of liquor prosecutions decreased slightly 
was not due to inactivity, but can be attributed to several other causes, the most 
important of which were: that violators of the prohibitory laws are beooming 
more wary and cautious; that the sources of supply of intoxicating^ liquor are be- 
coming more various; the police today being confronted with the problem of stop- 
ping the illegal sale of liquor in restaurants, lunch rooms and caf^ holding licenses 
as common victuallers, fruit and confectionery stores, garages and gasoline stations, 
I cobbler, smoke and barber shops, o£5ce buildings, undertakers' rooms and even 

% more unconventional places; that some courts demand actual evidence of illegal 

I sales of liquor before grantiiig a warrant to search for intoxicating liquors; and 

|: also because many officers of the department specially assigned to liquor work 

?, have been withheld from this work during various periods of the last year for days 

jf at a time by their enforced attendance at the criminal session of the courts await- 

i ing the trial or disposition of liquor cases. Prosecutions for the sale or keeping 

of intoxicating liquors are futile, however, if the ofifenders do not ultimately receive 
jail sentences. The courts at the present time are dealing a little more severely 
with habitual offenders and violators of the liquor laws, but even today, misplaced 
clemency b extended to some deliberate violators. In my opinion, if it is the 
desire to enforce prohibition, violations of the liquor law should be punished by 
jail sentences and not by fines, because these offences are deliberate, planned in 
advance and not attributable, as are many other crimes, to inherent weaknesses 
which overpower and master some unfortunates. This department has been 
honestly, courageously and persistently prosecuting violators of the liquor law, 
but owing to the fact that many of the culprits never darken the doors of a jail 
but instead are fined, the result is that many of them are turned back into society 
to sell their noxious and nauseous wares. The repeated imposition of fines upon 
persons engaged in violating the prohibition laws is in its last analysis only a license 
to continue the illegal occupation. 
,■ Prohibition enforcement officers of this Commonwealth^ furthermore, are im- 

^ peded and obstructed because the i»esent state enforcement act contains wide 

^' and serious loopholes which can be and are readily used by this particular dass 

|; of liquor law violators. DeUbeiate violators, because of legal technicalities that 

t. are raised, often escape punishment. I believe that if any person conducting a 

I store or ;Aace licensed as a common victualler or to sell so-called soft drinks is con- 

I yicted of a violation of the liquor law, that the victualler's license as well as the 

\, license to sell these non-intoxicating liquors should be revoked upon the first 

offence and should not be restored to htm or to any person acting actually, al- 
though not apparently, in his behalf. 



4 P.D. 49 j 

Prior to my last report, although a, person coald be arrested under the state 
l:i\vs for iUfgally transporting intoxicating liqnons, yet no prosecution could be 
made for tlic act of transporting intoxicating liquor illegally, because there was 
DO state law prohibiting the same. The effect of the law, therefore, permitting 
the arrest of a person illegally transporting liqoor was thus absolutely nullified. 

In order to remedy this situation, the le^slaturc enacted legislation making 
the transportation of liquor without a permit a criminal offense, but pursuant to 
the pro^■ision5 of Article XLVIII of the Amendments to the Constitution of this 
Commonwealth, two petitions were filed afldng for a referendum on this subject, j 

and in con.'oqucnce of the filing of these petitioBts, the law was suspended pending ' 

its submission to the people on the baOot of Xovcmbcr 4, 1924, thus lea\-ing con- 
ditions .IS they were prior to the passage of this kgisLition. 

For the year ending November 30, 1923, this department made 270 prosecu- 
tions in the various state courts for violation of the various drug laws; and for 
the same period, not including arrests for drunkenness, 3,326 prosecutions in the ' 

state courts and 22 in the Federal court, a total of 3,.348 cases for violation of the I 

liquor law, as compared to a total of 3,464 cafes prosecuted for \-iolations of the ' 

Uquor laws in the various courts of this Cotnnsonwealth and the Federal court I 

for the year ending November 30, 1922. 1 

Tuxmc. ' 

A\ith an expected estimate of more than a half million automobiles to be regis- 
tered in this Commonwealth next jear, pbns are Ijcing carefully formulated by 
this department to absorb the increased burden of traffic in this city. 

A new Traffic Di\T.sion, designated Di\Tflon 21, was created, and the city so far I 

as traffic purposes are concerned has been divided into two di\'isions. This new 
di\-ision was made necessarj' by the fact that fifty more men haWng been assigned 
to traffic duty, the present quarters of Division 20 were inadequate to accommo- 
date the additional men. Many of the traffic posts were too far distant to be 
easily reached by the members of Diviaon 20 with headquarters in the downtown 
section, and a new traffic di\'ision ■Rith headquarters located in the immediate 
en\irons of the city was deemed advisable. The station house for Di\T£ion 21, 
located in a part of the Boston Arena property at 262 St. Botolph Street 
and equipped with all modem improvements for the protection and comfort of 
the men, has been leased to the city of Boston for police purposes. 

Inasmuch as the main trafiBc arteries of this city are being increasin^y loaded, 
and as pedestrian as well as vehicular traffic most be protected and controlled, a 
numljer of new fixed traffic posts has been created. Pedestrians must be stmi- 
marily educated to the fact that they caimot emss streets at random, but only 
at allocated points and on signal from txaffic offiews. A large number of accidents, 
some fatal, is solely and directly attributable to negligence, at times gross, on the 
part of pedestrians. 

Strenuoas efforts arc being made to impro\-e the control of traffic in the cit>" by 
eliminating imreasonable parking and by the adoption of one-way streets. Traffic 
at the present time in the downtown section is fairly fluid. 

This department is greatly handicapped by reason of an insufficient number 
of officers to enforce the rules and regulations ptomtilgated by the Board of Street 
Commissioners relating to the parking of pleasure cars and other motor vehicles. 
Many \iolating these rules escape punishment. In the downtown section, de- 
voted to business purposes, only vehicles which are used for business should use 
these streets in the day time, and in addition, pieastire vehicles parked or operated 
in the congested sections seriously impede the quick and rapid movement of the 
fire department. The time has now arrived when it is absolutely necessary to 
establish a night force to attend to traffic onlj', ss in many parts of downtown Bos- 
ton it is congested at night as in the day time. Numerous complaints reach this 
office daily relative to delays in reaching thes'res and other places of amusement 
caused by this congestion. This work of night traffic is now being done bj- route 
men to the detriment of proper pohcing of important sections of the city. 

Traffic conditions at the present time demand that at least one hundred patrol- 
men be added to this department. ^lany additional officers above the number . 



P.D. 49 5 

now ia the department, could also be emploj-ed in the enforcement of the Prohi- 
bition Act. 

A number of the traflBo officers having been injured, some seriously, in the per- 
formance of their duty by autwnobiles, lights, illuminating fixed posts, have been 
placed. At present there are about fifty of these lights in operation, and in time 
every important fixed post, wben necessary, will be illuminated. Traffic towws 
with semaphore equipment are under consideration, and if after study it is foond 
that the adoption of the same will result in a saving of man power to this depart- 
ment, some, undoubtedly, will be erected. 

As in my report of last year, I again urge that a traffic court be created in the 
Central Criininal Court of the city of Boston, to which a judge may be assigned 
to hear only cases invoh-ing violations of motor vehide laws. The magistrate 
assigned to this court, in my opinion, could accomplish much toward producing a 
more pleasant feeling between the police and the motorist, because the alleged 
offending operator not only could present his defence, if any, in more detail, but 
the magistrate because of the fact that this was the only type of criminal ease 
before him, could give much beneficial advice to the motorist and eventually 
balance the particular offence with an appropriate disposition- The adoption of 
such a court with weekly or bi-weekly sessions would diminate the present diffi- 
culty experienced by di%Tsion commanders of having some important routes or 
posts each day only partially covered because of the absence of officers attending 
court for automobile cases on different daj-s of the week. 

Although perhaps not entirely relevant to the main subject of traffic, I feel, 
however, at this tune that the residence of the owners of automobiles, as stated 
in the applications for registration, should be carefully verified before a re^stra- 
tion is issued, inasmuch as upon a recent examination of stolen and abandoned 
cars recovered by officers of this department it was discovered that in a number 
of cases a fictitious address was given to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles by the 
person to whom the number plates were assigned. 

Concealed Weapons. 

The need for di^tic Icgisbtioa punishing persons unlawfully selling or carry- 
ing firearms is urgent. 

Death and murderous assaults by irresponsible persons possessing firearms 
roust be checked, and an effectual means to that end is l^islation, both to reason- 
ably regulate the source of supply of firearms, and to forbid the issuance of per- 
mits to certain persons to carry fiirearms. 

Narcotic drugs under the present s>'stem of Federal distribution cannot be 
freely obtained and sup)eriTsory methods similar to those adopted by the Federal 
government in the release of drags from concerns licensed to {xissess and distribute 
the same could easily be employed by the various states, by enacting similar state 
laws, in the matter of the sale and distribution of firearms within the state. 

WhUe it may be admitted that legislation can be piassed affecting only the sale 
and distribution of firearms by concerns doing business within this Commonwealth, 
and that local legislation cannot forbid the sale and distribution of firearms by 
mail order houses outside this Commonwealth, yet laws should be passed imme- 
diately checking the* almost present promiscuous sale of firearms by concerns 
doing business within tliis state. 

Legislation forbidding the sale of magazines or periodicals advertising the sale 
of firearms would have a salutary effect upon the indiscriminate distribution of 
firearms by mail order houses, and this le^slation, together with the aid of rail- 
road, express and postal authorities, could do much to check up persons who 
receive firearms from tliis source outside this Commonwealth. 

I recommend legislation to remedy existing conditions surrounding the sale of 
firearms, which pro\-ide that a firearm cannot be delivered on the same day of 
the application for tlie purchase, rent or lease thereof to a person who has not a 
permit to carry the same. In the first place, I believe this law is being evaded 
and that firearms are being sold, on the same day the application is made, to per- 
sons who have no permits to earrj' concealed weapons, and that under the present 
sj-stcm, irresponsible persons are obtaining firearms by simply waiting a few hours 



6 P.D. 49 

after they tare made application for the same. Firearms should be sold only to 
a person with a permit to carry the same, as this insures safety to the public, inas- 
much as a f*r5on who has been Rranted a permit to carr>- firearms has been ad- 
judgr<l a piT-per person to carry dangerous weapons. All licensees to sell firearms 
should stamp upon the permit the time and date of the sale or lease, and the num- 
ber of the t^Tolver, so that no second firearm can be purchased or lca.«ed upon 
the same permit. The penalty for violating the terms of the license should \>e im- 
prisonment ind not as it is at the present time, a forfeiture of the license. 

A permit, in my opinion, should bear on its face the photograph and finger 
prints of tRe person to whom it is issued, and I respectfully recommend that no 
permit to carry a firearm should be issued to an unnaturalized person, or a person 
con\-ictcd of a felony, or as a user or purvej'or of drugs, or to a minor, except minors 
in the emptoy of banks, public ufUity corporations and businesses of a similar 
nature, where the application for the permit for the minor is endorsed by a proper 
authorized e^cial of the company by which the minor is emploj-ed. 

I recomniJHid legislation that in the trial of a person for the commission of, or 
an attempt to, commit a felony against the person of another, the fact that he 
was armed with a pistol or revolver and had no permit to carr>- the same should 
be considered as prima facie evidence of his intent to commit or attempt to com- 
mit the felocT for which he was apprehended. 

While I d& not care to appear fanatical or hj-sterical on this subject, yet, inas- 
much as sicds- my last report one officer of this department was murdered by armed 
thugs and seTtral others have been pitiably and permanently maimed by this class 
of criminal?. I feel that in justice to the men in this department and to the public 
in general, tiat their interests should be considered as carefully as those of the 
concerns wtiA manufacture and sell these deadly weapons. 

Relative to Garages. 

Some diffimlty has arisen in the matter of checking up cars which are suspected 
to have been nsed in robberies, holdups and other illegal ventures. In searching 
the records tspt at garages, an unsatisfactory system has been discovered. Owing 
to the prestBS law which does not require the owner or proprietor, or person in 
control of a girage to record cars which are brought into his garage by chauffeurs, 
that duty besag placed upon the chauffeur himself, and inasmuch as the chauffeur 
may not be a resident of the city or state, the system works out unsatisfactorily, j 

and immecfese legislation is neccssarj'. j 

At this tnn«i. a new method for the temporary and at times permanent storage } 

of cars in otfcer than garages, as garages are known by the public today, has been j- 

adopted, to i»it: in fields or open spaces; and I believe that legislation should be ' 

passed ameniffing the present law, so that persons controlling open-air parking j 

spaces, where motor vehicles are stored or kept for hire, should be required to [ ' 

keep the same records as the omiers, or persons in control, of garages at the present ; 

time are ob£^sd to keep. I ' 

i . 

I.VTERCHAXGE OF PoUCE C0.MMCXICATIOXS. ; 

The relatiraEs of this department with the police departments of the various 
cities and tft-ina are very cordial. All requests for information or action have 
been received with unhesitating courtesy. 

The automitibile figures today prominently in the commission of crime and at 
the same tnae affords an effective means of escape for criminals. \Mthin a few 
minutes after the commission of a crime, the offender maj- be miles from the scene 
of its comm^aoo. 

An accurate description of the criminal and of the crime should be received by 
the police oficials of the larger cities and towns in this state within a very short 
time after the commission of the crime, and while I believe that state broadcast- 
ing radio statKoa in various allocated sectors of this state might work out at times 
satisfactorily; yet because of atmospheric conditions, which at present at least, 
cannot be oT«er,me, it might fail in emergencies, and I therefore recommend the 
installation cf a. telephone sj-stem with its radii starting at the Department of 
Public Safety, with headquarters at the State House, and connecting the police 



P.D.49 . . 7 

departments of the principal cities and towns of the entire state, so that com- 
munications recei\'ed by telephone, at state headquarters in relation to crime 
mi^t be instantly released to these police units. 

The adoption of the system now known as the Morknim Teletype, which I 
understand is functioning satisfactorily in the city of Chicago, whereby communi- 
cations transmitted by telephone to a main distributing center and thence con- 
veyed instantly by means of a master typewriter or transmitting machine to the 
different cities and towns, the message being simultaneously received on the receiv- 
ing typewriter of the city or town notified, while expensive, is worth considering 
for state-wide work. 

Paymext of Death BEXirrr ox Account of Officers killed in Perforu- 
<'.- ance of their Dxnr. 

At this time I recommend legislation whereby Section 87 of Chapter 32 of the 
General Laws as amended by Chapter 178 of the Acts of 1923, grantmg a thousand 
dollars to the ececutor or administrator of any police oflBcer killed while in the 
performance of his duty, for the use equally of his widow and minor children, 
shall be so amended as to broaden the beneficiaries imder this Act, so that the 
immediate dependent family of the officer might benefit thereby. At the present 
time the provisions of the statute limit the pajinent of the thousand dollars solely 
to the widow and children of the oflBcer killed, and do not provide for the pay- 
ment of the money in case the oflBcer was unmarried but had dependent relatives. 
During the last year, two unmarried patrolmen of this departoaent were killed 
while in the performance of their duty: one a motorcycle oflBcer as a result of a 
collision, and the other murdered while apprehending persons whom he suspected 
of holdups and robberies. I therefore feel that dependent relati\'e3 of unmarried 
oflScers, stricken in the conscientious performance of their duty, should be included 
as beneficiaries under this law. 

Statio.v Houses a>t) Garages. 

During the year extensive repainting and cleansing have been done in many 
of the station houses and the house of detention, and sanitary equipment and 
heating apparatiis installed in a general effort to make these building clean and 
comfortable. Three of the stables formerly used for horse-drawn vehicles ha\-e 
been remodeled and reconstructed as fireproof garages, and several of the depart- 
ment garages have been cleaned and repiainted. 

Division 8 now occupies its new building on Commercial Street, adjoining North 
Ejid Park. The new Station 2 on Milk and Sears Streets to house Division 2, 
Traffic Division 20 and the Property Clerk's department, will probably be ready 
for occupancy in the Fall of next year. The Munidpwl Court House on Seavems 
Avenue, West Roxburj', is undergoing extensive alterations and soon will be added 
to the present police building of Station 13. Plans and specifications for a new 
poUce station in Hyde Park have been prepared and the contract for its construc- 
tion has been awarded. 

Many sites have been considered for the erection of a new building for Head- 
quartos and several plans have been submitted. I am pleased to state that I have 
the assurance of His Honor Mayor Curley that the location for the new Head- 
quarters building will be on the plot of land at the southerly comer of Berkeley, 
Stuart and Stanhope Streets. Plans will be drawn for an ei^t story building of 
architectural worth, which 'will eliminate the present inadequate Headquarters 
building in I^emberton Square. 

Several other station houses of this department are at present inadequate, out 
of date and stand in need of immediate replacement with new buildings, the most 
important of which I consider; Station 3 on Joy Street, Station 4 on LaGrange 
Street and Station 5 on East Dedham Street. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston, 



P.D. 49 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 

Pclk* CoomiissioDer. Secret ar>'- 



The Poliet Force. 



Superintendent 

Deputy SuperisteiuleDt* . 

Chief Inspector 

Captains 

Inspectors 

Inspector of ceira^es (Jiratenant) 



1 
3 
1 

24 

34 

1 



lieutenants 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 



Total 



Signal StTTxa. 



Director 
Foreman 
Signalmen 
Mechanics 



Linemen. 
Driver 



Total 



Employee! of the Department. 



Clerks .... 

Stenographers 

Matrons of hotise «( drtraiion 

Matrons of statico h«"»e» 

Engineers on police tte-autfrs 

Firemen on police jtesmeia 

Auto repair shop Inrvtaan 

Auto repair shop mecitamc 

Chauffeur 

Assistant propertx derk . 



Police Commiaaooer aod Secretarj- 
Police force ... 

Signal sen-ice .... 
Eniployees .... 



22 
S 
5 
5 
3 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Van drivers .... 

Foreman of stable 

HtKtIers . . . . 

Assstant steward of cit>' prison 

Janitors ..... 

Janitresses .... 

Telephone operators 

Tailor 



Total 



RecapittiJatum. 



Gmnd totjj 



DlSTRIBUnOX .*3fD Ch.\.\ges. 



42 

141 

1,717 



1.964 



o 
1 

17 



2 

1 

12 

1 

28 

18 

3 

1 

121 



2 

1,954 

17 

121 

2,104 



The distribntaryn *>f the police force is shown by Table 1. During the year 166 
patrolmen were appointed; 3 patrolmen rdnstated; 28 patrolmen were discharged; 
54 patrolmen resigned: 1 captain, 1 sergeant, and S patrolmen were retired on 
pension; 1 captiin, 1 inspector and 12 patrohnen died. (See Tables II, III, IV, 
M.) 

PoucE Officers ixjubed while ox Dctt. 

The following statement shows the number of police oflScers injured while on 
duty during the past year, the number of duties lost by them on account thereof, 
and the causes <if the injuries: — 



Etnr EtjcEED. 


Number of 
Men injored. 


Number of 
Duties lost. 


In arresting prbKsmv ... ..... 


S3 
9 
8 


795 




42 


By stopping runatis?* . 

By can and othtf T^&id^ 

Various other cauMi ..... 


666 
495 






Total 


iU 


2.005 



P.D. 49 9 

WOEK OF THE DePABTMENT. 

ArresU. 

The total number of persoos arrested counting each arrest as that of a separate 
person, was 76,732 as agaiiEt 77,653 the preceding year, being a decrease of 921. 
The percentage of decrease and increase was as follows: — 



Offence* against the person .... 

Offence* against property c m i mitt ed with violence 
Offence* against property oomoitted without violence 
Malidotu offences against propCTty 
Forgery and offences against tjbe currency 
Offences against the license lav . 
Offences against chastity, morafity. etc. 
Offences not included in the faneoing . 



Per Cent. 

Increase, 2.47 

Decrease, 14.74 

Decrease, 3.76 

Increase, 50.00 

Decrease, 31.81 

Decrease, 11.04 

Increase, 1.01 

Decrease, .54 

There were 11,667 persois arrested on warrants and 51,348 without warrants; 
13,717 persons were sunuocaed by the court; 72,853 persons were held for trial; 
3,879 were released from cjistody. The number of males arrested was 71,313; of 
females, 5,419; of foreignas, 28,693; or appro.ximately 37.39 pa- cent; of minors, 
7,766. Of the total number arrested 19,320, or 25.21 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines impwsed by the courts for the fire years from 1919 
to 1923 inclusive, was §132,513.39; in 1923 it was §270,357.1^ or §77,843.77 
more than the average. 

The average numher of days attendance at court was 36,772; in 1923 it was 
43,728, or 6,956 more than the average. The average amount of witness fees 
earned was $11,55-3.87; in 1923 it was S16,541.0I, or 84,984.14 more than the 
average. (See Table XIIL) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. There were 1,345 
more persons arrested than in 1922, an increa.se of 3.57 per cent; 25.59 per cent 
of the arrested persons went nonresidents, and 40.94 per cent were of foreign birth. 
(See Table XI.) 

Bunmi of Criminal Inresligalion. 

The "identification room" now contains 63,874 photographs, 54,652 of which 
are photographs with BertiDoa measurements, a system used by the Department 
for the past twentj'-four years. In accordance with the Pfevised Laws, chapter 
225, sections 18 and 21, we are allowed photographs viih BertiDon measurements 
taken of convicts in the State Prison and reformatory, a number of which have 
been added to our BertiDaa cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
sj^stem by the Department in 1898, is and will continue to be of great assistance 
in the identification of criminals. A large number of important identifications 
have thus been made during the year for this and other pwlice departments, through 
which the sentences in many instances have been materially increased. The 
records of 584 criminals bare been added to the records in this Bureau, which 
now contains a total of 44JM1. The number of cases reported at this oflBce which 
have been investigated during this year is 25,938. There are 37,588 cases reported 
on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports made on these cases 
are filed away for futtire reference. The system of indexing adopted by this Bureau 
for the use of the Departmsnt now contains a list of records, histories, photographs, 
dates of arrest, etc., of aboot 195,000 persons. There are also '"histories and press 
cUppings", now numbering 8,712 made by this Bureau, in envelope form, for police 
reference. 

The finger-print sj-stem of identification which was adopted in June, 1906, has 
progressed in a satisfactory manner, and with it the identification of criminals 
is facihtated. It has became very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing cor- 
roborating e%ndence in many instances. 

The statistics of the woA of this branch of the ser\'ice are induded in the state- 
ment of the general work of the Department, but as the duties are of a special 
character the following stxtement will be of interest: — 



3.1 
25.93** 
1.733 



10 P.D. 49 

Number of persons arrested, principally for f«Ion!n ...... 2,207 

Kueilivcs from justice {rem other States, arrested and delivered to oflScers from 
those Stales ... .......... 

Number of cases investigated .......... 

Number of extra duties performed . -.-..-.• 

Number of cases of homicide and suppooed homiciilc investigated and evidence pre- 
pared for trial in court ........... 172 

Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investigated and c\-idence pre- 
pared for court ............ 8 

Number of dajrs spent in court by officers ........ 3.C73 

Number of jTears' imprisonment imposed by court, 101 yearn, 5 months. 

.\mount of stolen property reco\-ercd ....... S2,0.J3,8S3.97 

Number of photographs added to identificatioo room . 014 



The nathity of the prisoners was as foUotv."?: 



United States 

British Pro\-ince3 

Ireland 

England 

France . 

Germany 

Italy . 

Russia . 

China . 

Greece . 

Sweden 

Scotland 

Spain 

Norway 

Poland 

.\ustralia 

.\ustria 

Portugal 

Finland 

Denmark 

Holland 

Wales . 

East Indies . 



48.039 

3.9M 

9,249 

747 

110 

307 

4,053 

4,775 

220 

540 

809 

42S 

106 

274 

965 

36 

2IS 

359 

175 

69 

33 

9 

16 



West Indies . 
TurlaTT 

Pouth .\iii*rica 
Switzerland . 
Belgium 
Armenia 
Africa . 
Hungary 
.\sia 
.Vrabia . 
Mexico 
Japan . 
."J>Tia 
Roumania 
Lithuania 
Sen-ia . 
Porto Rio 
India . 
Ee>-pt . 
Albania 
Hawaii 



114 

127 

36 

25 

50 

67 

18 

22 

11 

13 

6 

20 

178 

3 

498 

6 

1 

2 

2 

9 

1 



To«al 76.732 



The number of arrests for the year was 76,732, fx-ing a decrease of 921 over 
last year, and 6,070 less than the average for the ptLst five years. There were 
3S,9S8 persons arrested for drunkennes.*, being l^SiS more than last year, and 
5,997 more than the average for the past five years- Of the arrests for drunken- 
ness this }-ear there was an increase of 3.67 per cent in males and an increase of 
1.67 per cent in females from last year. (Sec Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (76,732), 646 were for \-iolation of 
city ordinances; that is to say that 1 arrest in US was for such offence, or .&4 
per cent. 

Fifty-eight and sevent3'-three hundredths per cent of the persons taken into 
custody were between the ages of twent.v and forty, (See Table XII.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 1S,226, and the lines amounted 
to $270,357.16. (See Table XIII.) 

Fifty-three persons were committed to the State Prison, 2,0SS to the Hou.sc 
of Correction, 17 to the Women's Prison, .30 to the Rcformator>' Prison and 972 
to other institutions. The total years of imprisonaietit were 1 life, 205 indefinite, 
1,483 j-ears, 7 months; the total number of daj-s" attendance at court by officers 
was 43,728 and the wtness fees earned by them' amonuited to 816,541.01. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and kdgers was §327,706.41. 

_TwentyK)ne witnesses were detained at station hotHes; 123 were accommodated 
with lodgings, an increase of 52 from last year. Tliere was an increase of 3-37 
per cent in the number of sick and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of 
about 12.07 per cent in the number of lost children eared for. 

The average amount of propertv stolen in the dtv for the five vears from 1919 
to 1923 inclusive, was SI, 742,867^32, in 1923 it was'«2,061,423.80', or 8318,556.48 
more than the average. The amount of property stolen in and out of the citv 
w hich was recovered by the Boston police w^s $3,00ii5,2a3.17 as against 81,616,819.99 
last year or 81,389,473.18 more. 



i 



P.D. 49 



Officer detailed to assist Medical Examiners. 



11 



The officer detailed to assist the medical examineis reports having investigated 
S8-1 cases of death from the following causes: — 



Abortion 
Aeroplane 
Alcoholism 
Automobiles . 
Burns . 
Drowning 
Electricity 
Ele\-ator 
Exposure 
Falling objects 
FalU . 
Kicked by horse 
Machinery 



5 


Motorcycle* 








2 


2 


Natural causes 








326 


24 


Poison . 








60 


2 


Railroad (steam) 








21 


22 


Railway (street) 








2 


43 


Staibom 








9 


1 


Suffocation 








1 


10 


Suicides 








84 


5 


Teams . 








2 


16 
78 

1 


Homicides 








164 


Total .... 


884 


4 













On 262 of the above cases inquests were held. 

Of the total number, the following homicide cases were prosecuted in the 
courts: — 



Automobiles . 

Drowning 

Ele\-ators 

Falls . 

Manslaughter 

Murder 



106 

I 

3 

1 

18 

11 



Railway (street) 
Shooting, accidental 
Shot by officer 
Teams . 



IS 
2 



Total 



164 



Lost, .\b.vndoxed .vxd Stolen Pkopertt. 

Qn December 1, 192.3, there were 2,069 articles of lost, stolen or abandoned 
property in the custody of the property clerk; 1,297 were received during the 
year; 833 pieces were sold at public auction and the proceeds $1,236.16 were 
turned over to the chief clerk; 2 pieces were sold as perishable property and the 
proceeds S30..30 turned over to the chief clerk; 307 packages were destroyed as 
worthless or sold as junk and the proceeds S336.50 turned over to the chief clerk; 
and 82 packages were returned to owners, finders or administrators, lea\'ing 2,142 
on hand. 

Speci.u. Events. 



The following is a list of special events transpiring during the year and 
the number of police detaUed for duty at each: — 



gives 



mx. 

Dec. 22, FunenU of Captain Thomas Ryan . . . . . 

Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration 
Dec. 25, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, ■•Midnight Mass" 

IttS. 
Jan. 10, Mechanics' Building. Police Ball . . . . . 

Jan. 27, Franklin Field, ice carnival ...... 

Feb. 3, Boston Arena, B. A. .\. athletic meet . . . . . 

Feb. 8, Jamaica Pond, ice carnival ...... 

Feb. 12, Mechanics' Building, Firemen's ball . . . . . 

Mar. 17, E\-acuation Day parade ....... 

Apr. 19, City Hall, flag raising exercises . . . . . 

.\pr. 19, Patriots' Day parade ....... 

Apr. 19. Marathon race ....... 

May 6, Franklin Field, bicyde meet ...... 

May 13, "Mother's Day," parade and exercises on Boston Commoa 
May 22, East Boston, band concert and fireworks . . . . 

May 23, Stadium, meeting of b<or scouts . . . . . 

May 31, Work horse parade 

June 2, Franklin Field, Dorchester Day celebration 

June 4, Parade, .\ncient and Honorable .\Ttillery Company 

June 13, Boston Common, Flag Day exercises . . . . 

June 13, Parade of Masonic dubs ...... 

June 14, Parade of Boston School Cadets . . . . . 

June 14, Boston Common, band concert and fireworks . . '. 

June 16, Parade of Veterans of Foreign Wars . . . . 

June 16, Charlestown, eve of Bunker Hill Day . . . . 

Jime 17, Charlestown "night before" Bunker Hill Day celebration '. 
June 18, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day, parade and concerts . ] 

June 22, Funeral of Inspector James D. (Jonboy . . . . 

June 25, \'isit of mo\ing pictin^ stars ...... 



Men. 



65 
22 

182 
32 
22 

104 
39 

268 
29 

402 

420 
56 
93 
22 
26 
37 
30 

186 
32 

552 

390 
31 
70 
21 
76 

400 
39 

311 



P.D. 



49 

22 

40 

15S 

191 

42 

31 

78 

176 

305 



12 

June 2S, Boston Common, rehearsal for July 4th ....... 

June 30. Boston Common, rehearsal for July 4th ....... 

July 4, Boston Common, Independence Day celebration ...... 

July 4, E-ist Bofton. parade and Independence Day celebration .... 

.\ug. 15, Msit of General Gauraud ......... 

.>*ept. 2, Franklin Field, athletic meet ......... 

Sept. S. Boston .\irport. East Boston ......... 

Sept. 30, Special Ru-ird at theatres and moring picture houses ..... 

Oct. 10-15. HuJlotin boards, baseball series ........ 

Oct. 12, Annual I>rcsa Parade and ReWew of the Boston Police Regiment, coniposcil 
of Superior Officers, Officers of Rank and Patrolmen. The regiment 
was di\-ided into three battalions, each with a militarj- band (one of 
wtach was the Boston Police Dcp.irtnient Traffic Band), and in com- 
mand of a Major, so designated. The regiment included skirmisher.s, 
twrntv mounted men on department horses, the Colonel, commanding, 
. with his Adjutant and Staff, officers from the respective Police Divi- 

rioos and Units in militarj- company formation, shot-gun companies, 
Piliiolmen with Thompson sub-macliine guns, a motorcycle unit, and a 
machine gun unit mounted on automobiles. The Regiment was reWewed 
at City Hall by His Honor, the Mayor; at the State House, by His Ex- 
ceflencj'. Governor Channing H. Cox, and on the Parade Grounds of 
the Common by His Excellency, the Governor, and the Police Com- 
misfaooer, Hon. Herbert A. Wilson 

Oct. 12, Detail on line of parade on Boston Common 

Oct. 12, Parade of Spanish War veterans 

Oct. 20, Stadium, Holy Cross football game . 

Oct. 21, Masonic parade ..... 

Oct. 24, Funeral of Patrolman Joseph E. Gonya 

Oct. 27, Stadium. Harvard-Dartmouth football game 

Oct. 27, Braves' Field, Boston College-Marquette University 

Nov. 3, Stadium. Hariard-Tufts football game 

Nov. 3, Braves' Field, Boston College-Georgetown football game 

Nov. 10, Stadium. Princeton-Harvard Freshman football game 

Nov. 10, Braves' Field, Boston College Centenary football game 

Nov. 17, Staditmi. Harvard-Brown football game . 

Nov. 17, Braves' Field, Boston College- Villa Nova football game 

Nov. 24, Stadium. Harvard-Yale football game 

Nov. 24, Braves' Field, Boston Col lege- Vermont football game 

Nov. 24, Evening eelebration, hotel and theatre districts 

Nov. 30, Visit of General Haller 

Missing Persons. 

The foUowing table shows the number of persons lost or run away during the 
year: — 



1,400 
87 

238 
98 

128 
60 
91 
24 
93 
24 
16 
23 
57 
17 

116 
24 

102 

283 



Total number reported 
Total number fnund 
Total number still missing 



838 

769 

69 



Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Missrxo. 


FOCND. 


Still Missixo. 




Uales. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Hales. 


Fe- 
males. 


Under 15 yesri 

Ovtx 15 yean, uadcr II years 

Over 21 yean 


228 
195 
179 


39 
107 
90 


224 
176 
159 


37 
95 
78 


4 
19 
20 


2 
12 
12 


Totals 


(i02 


236 


559 


210 


43 


26 



P.D. 49 



Miscellaneous Buseness. 



13 



Abandoned children cared for - 
AcddexiU reported ..... 
Auctioneer* investie****! .... 
Btiil'iincB foB-ind open &nd m^'Je ae«ure 

Cases inrerugated 

Oiingerout buildiii£s reportcu ... 

I>uieerous ehimnex'a r^nrted 

Data bodies cared for .... 

Dead bodies reoo\-«red .... 

Defective cesepoob reported 

Defective draioa and rault>« reported 

Defectire fire aljxma and clocks reporteJ . 

Defectire cm ptpea reported 

Defective hydrints reported 

Defective Uinpe reported .... 

Defective aewers reported .... 

Defective adewalks and streets reported . 

Defective bridges reported 

Defective wires reported .... 

Defective fenora refiortcd .... 

Defective trees reported _ . 

Defective water eatea reported . 

Defective water pipes rvported . 

Defective ftreet siens reported . 

Dbi ur toances suppreasra .... 

Extja duties performed .... 

Fire aUnn* given 

Fires estincuiflbed 

InsLDe persona taken in charge . 
Intoxieated perBon£ aasasted 
L-CKt children restored .... 
Pawnbrokera invesli^led .... 
Person* rescued from drowning " . 
Secoad-haikd automobUe dealers invvsticated 
Second-hand dealers i d vest iic:! ted 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Stray teajss reported and put up 
Street obstructions renaovwl 
Water nincins to wane reported 
Witnenes detained 



i»»-n. 


ini-a. 


un-a. 


10 


11 


II 


5,589 


6.199 


«,«n 


5 


- 


- 


6.033 


S.139 


4.4a 


61,145 


59.528 


S9,4a> 


12 


15 


IS 


10 


10 


« 


203 


324 


SM 


28 


26 


H 


89 


89 


U 


1 


9 


I 


3 


15 


4 


50 


3? 


a 


78 


90 


117 


11.067 


15.S70 


12.391 


62 


112 


M 


8.279 


8.975 


8.6IX 




6 


S 


- 


U 


< 


- 


1 


— 


. 


14 


.. 


- 


1 


• 


67 


114 


IS« 


- 


23 


17 


627 


676 


571 


41415 


43.412 


s'.sa 


2.155 


2.509 


2,8!» 


1J18 


1.404 


1.63a 


420 


434 


4M 


28 


19 


n 


1.967 


1.839 


1,617 


3 


- 


— 


6 


19 


N 


3 






2 . 


-. 


— 


6.159 


7.916 


8.214 


103 


2.087 


7% 


1.M7 


2,217 


1,747 


467 


566 


57t 


19 


24 


21 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the cominittee on claims and law department in 
investigating claims against the city for alleged damage of various kinds reports 
that he investigated 2,202 cases, one of wliich was on account of damage done 
by a dog. 

Other Services performed. 

Xninber of cases investigated .......... 2,302 

Number of witnesses examined .......... 13,143 

Number of notices served ........... 5,919 

Number of permisaoos granted . . . . . . . . , 7,GM 

Number of da>-s in court ........... 100 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office ..... 83 

Collected for damage to the city's property and paid bills amounting to . . 3907 J3 

House of Detextiox. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court house, Somerset street. 
An the women arrested in the city proper are taken to the house of detention in 
vans provided for the purpose, liey are then held in charge of the matron ontfl 
the next session of the court before which they are to appear. If sentenced to 
imprisonment, they are returned to the house of detention, and from there ooo- 
veyed to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the j-ear 3,15S women were committed for the following: — 



14 P.D. 49 

Drunkenness ............. 1,469 

Larecny .............. 407 

N'ight walking ............. 72 

Fornication ............. 152 

Idle and du-ordorly ............ .38 

,\ssault and Iwittcrj' ............ 25 

,\dultcr>' .............. 38 

Violation of liquor U« ........... 18 

Keeping houH? of ill-/jiine ........... 15 

County jail ............. 455 

Municipal eourt ............. 146 

Various other causr» ............ 323 

Total 3,158 

Police Signal Service. 

Signal Boxes. 

The tot.il number of lx)xre in iise is 507. Of these, 342 are connected with the 
underground systMU and Ifio with the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this sennce resixindcd to 1,0.32 trouble calls; 
inspected 507 signal boxes, IS signal desks and 955 lotteries; repaired 129 box 
movements, 33 rephlers, 62 polar box bells, 25 locks, 17 time stamps, 4 stable 
motors, 7 vibrator bells, 1 relay, 6 pole changers; 2 stable boards were rebuilt, 
2 electric clocks ■were repaired, beside repairing all Ix-ll and electric light work at 
headquarters and the varioas stations. There have been made 10 plimger?, 9 com- 
plete box fittings, -'JO line blocks, 15 automatic hooks, and a large amount of small 
work done that cannot be classified. 

In the earl.v part of the .vear, cable was laid and Iwxes numbered .3, 4 and 42 
on Di\T.sion 12 ia^talled underground. This was the 1920 prescribed dL»--trict. In 
the 1923 underground di.«trict, cable was laid and boxes numbered 24, 2.5, 26 and 
27 on Di\nsion 1.5. connected with the underground s.\-5tem. Ducts have been 
laid in India .square and Scars street in readiness for new Station hoa^c on Di^^- 
sion 2. Ducts and cables were installed to connect new Station hou.<m on Di\n- 
sion 8 with Con,«titution ANTiarf. 

During the year a new Ford one-ton truck was purchased for u.i^e of the Police 
Signal Ser\ice. TTjere are in use in the Signal Service 1 White truck, 1 Ford tour- 
ing car and 1 Ford truck. 

During the year the wagons made 48,472 runs, covering an aggregate distance 
of 81,505 miles. There were 36,828 prisoners conveyed to the .station hoiLses, 
4,783 runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station houses, hospitals 
or their homes; and 454 runs were made to take lost children to station houses. 
There were 2,193 runs to fires and 601 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 507 signed boxes in use arranged on 72 battery circuits and 70 telephone 
circuits; 5SS,S44 telephone messages and 3,974,945 "on duty" calls were sent 
over the lines. 

The foUowing li*t comprises the projierty in the sign.nl service at the present 
time: — 



18 signal desks. 

72 circuits. 

507 street signal bo»e». 

14 stable call boards. 

78 test boxes. 

95.5 cells of l)atteT>-, 

619,319 feet underpound cable. 

221,140 feet o\-erbe*d cable. 



21,220 feet of duct. 
66 manholes. 
1 White truck. 
1 Ford truck. 
1 Ford touring car. 
1 line \ragon. 
1 express wagon. 
1 mugvv'ump wagon. 



H-^RBOR Service. 



The special dutks performed bj' the police of Di\ision S, comprising the harbor 
and the islands therein, were as follows: — 

Value of property nnavered, consisting of boats, rii^ng, float stages, etc. . S1S,066.40 

Vessels from forei^cD i/'jrtt boarded . , 1,113 

Vessels ordered from the channel ......... 782 



P.D.49 13 

Vessels ranoTcd from the channel by police steamers 5 

Assistance reodend vessels .......... HI 

Assistance readeied wharfingers ......... 1 

Permits paBted to discharge cargoes from vessels at anchor .... 20 

Obstmctioas remorved from channel ........ 31 

Alarms of Gi» on the water front attended ....... 42 

Boats chaUeoced 237 

Sick and injtiml persons assisted ......... 2 

Dead bocSes recovered .......... 32 

Dead boifies cared for ........... 2 

Persons rescord btaa drowning ......... 2 

Vessels assigned to anchorage ......... 816 

Cases investigated ........... 421 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor .... 339 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port during the year was 8,791 ; 7,163 
being from domestic ports, 515 from the British Provinces and 1,113 from foreign 
ports. Of the latter, 1,105 were steamers, 4 schooners, 3 motor vessels and 1 barge. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from June 16 to October 20. 
The launch '"EL U. Curtis" cruised nightly from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge. 
Twenty cases were investigated, twenty-nine boats challenged, S2,611 worth of 
pTOf)erty recovered, one vessel ordered from the channel to proper anchorage, 
three ohstructions removed from channel, assistance rendered to twenty-one boats 
in distress by reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc. and towing them 
with persons on board to a place of safety, one dead body was recovered by grap- 
pling and oae dead body recovered found floating in the water. Only one case of 
larceny from vessels in Dorchester Bay was repwrted during the season. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1922, there were 32 horses in the service. During 
the year 4 were purchased, 2 humanely killed and 1 transferred to the State Depart- 
ment of Heahh. At the present time there are 33 in the service as shown by Table 

Vehicle Service. 

Autotnpbiles. 

There are 54 automobiles in the service at the present time: 14 at headquarters;" 
1 at the house of detention, used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 7 in 
the city proper and attached to Di\Tsions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; 4 in the South Boston 
district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 2 in the East Boston district, attached 
to Division 7; 4 in the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 2 in the 
Dorchester <fetrict, attached to Di\-ision 11; 2 in the Jamaica Plain district, at- ' 
tached to Diviaon 13; 2 in the Brighton district, attached to Division 14; 1 in 
the Charlestown district, attached to Division 15; 2 in the Back Bay and Fen- 
way, attached to Division 16; 2 in the West Roxbury district, attached to Divi- 
sion 17; 2 in the Hyde Park district, attached to Division 18; 2 in the Mattapan 
district, attached to Division 19; 2 assigned for use of the traflSc divisions and 5 
unassigned. (See page 16). 

Cost of Running Aviomobilef. 

Repairs $17,350 66 

Tires 5,550 67 

Gasoline ............. 7,626 16 

OU 1.442 79 

Storage 2,710 33 

License fees 168 00 

Total $34,848 61 

Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 1 and combination 
automobiles (patrol and ambulance) located in Divisions 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, II. 
12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year the ambulances responded to calls to convey sick and injured 
persons to the following places. 



c :iv !i 

fiiv li 

I : 
NT: 
1! : 



■n. ll;.ym:ii"K.i 
it riiiuiivil 



1 

1.: 



II- 



Ii.- 



I'h:- ■ : 
I):-.. , 
I'i-.- 
!> -. 
1>: 
i I ■ 

I'iv:-;.- i; 

:i:v:, '•:, i;; 
^•v;^i',^ ]■■ 

I>:vi-:'.;. !' 



Vvi.V.' C/.i.n:. :■;.■■. 

D:!'n.-s t!.-- y ■.- •].i:'- \\>;v ].:,22 <■:.::■:■ •:■ " ■ - - ■:■ ■ :.-!. 1 ■ 

(■i I'Jl ri- f<.::,;:;r.-'l v.i;h h.-X yt-.n: !.;;71 • : _ ic li^ 
ii:'rf-.''-'- '•] L'_'" <■•■:. .prsr'd ^^•:tll ]:ii-t y-.-r. 

Ti.f-rf- liiiv- ]■■■'■:. '.>() l;fii>f (!i:!\vn f-arri.i'."-- ";■•• •.-'•'l 'h:r::,'z tL'- y. 

'J"!.' ;-f' \\( •:■■ ;■! .'.rtifl'-?. (■fln^i.-til!:£ '.f ':ri : '■ '" .-. r-i'i.-;:-. Iiniii'il 

fiii-ri:! ■_'(•- 'liiri!.'_^ ^].i.■ y-Ay. wliicli wrrr- w •: tn •,]■.'■ in-ji(-i' 

wf-!-f- iv.-I(.|m! T'. ;!.'.- owiK-r.-, ami tl.'- !■! '•'•'! ;•: :'/• cw-- 
iir")":'iy l.iir'-:.':. 

Thf- Kill'iV;!.:: -;,'.T:i.f-!:t dvcs df. .!■ ■ l' : ■ > 
v.vll u- Ii'-'ii-<- ••■■ ('.ylv- ■],(■ -;iiiif: — 



P.D. 49 17 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received ....-• }>*f5 

Number of carriages licensed .......--- ' fi 

Number of licenses transferred ......•-•• 'j 

Number of licenses canceled or revoked ....••-• ™ 

Number of carriages inspected ......•-•• J'^Ji 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon ....-•• "'r?? 

Number of complaints against drivers investigated . ,...-- 'J* 

Number of warrants obtained •••--••••" is 

Number of days spent in court ■••-••■'*■ m 

.\rticles left in carriages reported by citizens ••-•••'■ 2? 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers ■-••■■•• ?i 
Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ......-•*' 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police CommissiionCT' has asa'pied to persons or cor- 
porations licensed to set up and use hackney camaRes places designated as special 
stands for such licensed carriages, and there have been bsued in the year ending 
November 30, 1923, 615 such special stands. 

Of these special stands, there have been 42 canceled and 11 transferred. 

Sighl-uciiig AvlonuJbile*. 

During the year ending November 30, 1921, there have been issued licenses 
for 41 sight-seeing automobiles and 24 spedal stands for them. There have been 
58 chauffeurs' licenses granted. 

W.^GO^• LirEX.<»ES. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corpwratitm* to set up and use trucks, wagons 
or other vehicles to convey merchandise from fJace to place within the city for 
hire. 

During the j'ear 4,942 applications for stich licenses were received; 4,936 of 
these were granted and 6 rejected. 

Of these licenses 104 were subsequently canceled for nonpaj-ment of licease fee, 
9 for other causes and 19 transferrwl to new locations. (See Tables XTV, XVI.) 

LiSTiNC Work in Bo»tov, etc. 



Yeah. 


Mar Can van. ; 


Yejui. 


MayCanvan. 


1903 


18I.0IS , 


19U» 


215.388 


I9(M 


193.I9S 


1»1«> 












219.364 


1905 


mjt; 


19I4« 












220^83 


1906 


ll>5.«l« 1 


19l»< 












-t 


1907 


19S,»00 


19l;i 












221.207 


1908 


MI4M 1 


19I8< 












221,011 


1909 


20U»l 


19lt> 












227.46» 


1910' 


»3,«n3 1 


\na* 












235.248 


1911' 


iat.fiv> 


19.1 » 












4W.783 


1912' 


:ii,i7S 


i»a» 












480,106 



1 Chansed U> April I. < Lamidc Jooc by assesaore. 

The following shows the total number of pcTtons listed in April of the present 
year: — 

Male 234,157 

Female 243,390 

Total 477,M7 

Lifting Expewt*. 

The expenses of listing residents, not inclnding the services rendered by mem- 
bers of the police force, were as foUows: — 

Printing *39,S98 12 

Clerical seriiccs 24,035 00 

Stationery ' US 45 

Interpreters , 80 13 

Telephone 302 

Total »64.131 72 



18 P.D. 49 

Xvmber of Policemen employed in LiMing. 

April 2 1.299 

Aprils 1.237 

ApriU 923 g 

April 5 004 K 

April C 300 V 

April 7 31 Q 

April 9 18 1^ 

Police Work ox Jury Lists. |" 

Tlie police department under the pro^^sions of chapter .348. Act? of 1007, as- ij 

fisted the Hection Commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons M 

proposed for jurj- service. The poUcc findings in 1923 may Ijc summarized as j 

follows : — I 

Desd, or could not be found ID IViatoa [ I.MO 

Ph>-»iciill.v innpacitated I 203 

Conricted of mme 410 

I'nfH for x^ariots rvosotis 82o 

ApparpntlT fit - . | 9fi4' 



Total U.925 

Speoal Police. 

Special police officers are appointed to ser\-e without pay from the city, on a 
written application of any officer or Ixiard in charge of a department of the citj- 
of Boston, or on the application of any responsible corporation or perxiii, such 
corporation or person to be liable for the official misconduct of the person ap- 
iwinted. 

During the year ending Nov. 30, 1923, there were 1,495 special pr»lico officers 
appointetl: 17 applications for appointment were refused for caa>e and 2 revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications receive*! as follows: — 

From Cnitpd States government .......... 40 

From State dejjartments ........... 7 

From city departments ........... 350 

From county of Suffolk ........... 18 

From railroad corporations ........... 1.35 

From other corporations or as.«ociationg ........ 083 

From theatres and other places of amust-ment ....... 223 

From private institutions ........... 22 

From churches .............11 

1.495 

R.ULRO.U) Police. 

There were 19 persons appointed railroad policemen during the year. 6 of whom 
were employees of the Boston &. Maine Railroad and 13 of the Xew York, New 
Haven and Hartford Hailroad. 

MiscELLOvEOu.s Licenses. 

The total numl^er of applications for miscelIaneou.s licenses received wa.s 24,072. 
Of these 2;},S77 were granted, of which 215 were canceled for nonpaj-ment, leav- 
ing 23,602. During the j'ear 6.30 licenses were tran.sferred, 770 canc-eled. 17 re- 
voked and 195 applications were rejected. The officers investigated 347 com- 
plaints arising under these licenses. The fees collected and paid into the city 
treasurj- amounted to S57,864..50. (See Table XIY.) 

MUSICI.VXS' LiCEN.SEa. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 61 apphcations for itinerant musicians' lieen.MJs re- 
ceived, four of which were rejected. Six licenses were subsequently canc-eled on 
account of nonpayment of license fee. 



P.D. 49 19 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are inspected before the license 
is granted, and it is arranged by a qualified musician, not a member of the Depart- 
ment, that such instruments shall be inspected in April and September of each 



year, 



During the j-ear 77 instruments were inspected, with the following results: — 



Kind of IssTRCME>rr. 



Number 
inspected. 



Number 
passed. 



Number 
rejected. 



Stroet pinnoe 

Hand orgaas 

Violina 

Harp . 

Banjos 

Flutes . 

Accordions . 

Guitars 

Mandolin 

Daepipe 

Vocalists 

Totals . 



3i 
8 
6 
1 
4 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 



63 



Colkdire. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bantls of persons over sixteen years 
of age to play on musical instruments in comjxiny with designated processions at 
stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for these licenses during 
the last five years, and the action taken thereon : — 



Year. 



AppCentions. 


Granted. 


iU 


220 


MS 


308 


»t 


292 


»« 


308 


2M 


245 



Rejected. 



1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 



• CuiRYtNG Dangerous We.\pons. 

The following return shows the number of applications made to the Police Com- 
missioner for Ucenses to carr>' loaded revolvers in this Commonwealth during the 
past five years, the number of such applications granted, the number refused and 
the number revoked: — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Revoked. 


1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 


5,00< 
2,793 
3.190 
3,100 
3,191 


4.S39 
2.481 
7M3 
3.91« 
J,0«7 


467 
312 
347 
184 
124 





Public LoDorxo Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses licensed by the Police 
Commissioner under chapter 242 of the Acts of 1904 during the year, the location 
of each house and the number of lodgers accommodated. 



20 






P.D. 40 


LOCXTIOX. 


Number 
lodged. 


Location. 


Number 
lodged. 


19 C»o«eway Strert 
164 CommercUl Street 
l»4 Commercial Strwjt . 


3.418 

7.868 

4S.188 

14.049 

37.269 


1051 Washington Slrwst . 
I?02 Woshinj^on Street . 
1025 Washington Street . 

Total 


42.735 
18.000 
34.732 


2^ Commercial Street 
17 IHris Street .... 


203,254 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1922, there were 2oS pensioners on the roll. During the year 
14 died, \-iz., 1 captain, 1 inspector, 1 sergeant and 11 patrolmen; and 10 were 
added, viz., 1 captain, 1 sergeant and 8 patrolmen, lea\-ing 254 on the roll at date, 
— 224 men and 30 women. 

The pa>TDents on account of pensions during the past year amounted to 
S200,967.43, and it is estimated that S201,45S.16 will be required for pensions in 
1924. This does not include pensions for 1 deputy superintendent, 1 captain, 
2 lieutenants, 1 sergeant and 13 patrolmen, all of whom are sixty-five years old 
or more, and entitlwl to be pensioned on account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the tliirticth day of Novem- 
ber last amounted to 8207,550. There are 61 beneficiaries at the present time, 
and there has been paid to them the sum of S6,970 during the past year. 

FiN.VXCI.U.. 

The total expenditures for police purjwses during the past year, including the 
pensions, house of detention and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but 
exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal service, were S4, 100,813.33. (See 
Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees from licenses over which 
the police have supervision, for the sale of unclaimed and condemned property, 
uniform cloth, etc., was 863,034.46. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the poUce signal service during the vear was S47, 788.70. 
(See Table XVIII.) 



P.D. 49 



21 



OS 



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•3 

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t^°x 




1- 




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-aa JoatnoH 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiii<oiiiiiiriniiiie«iii 


a 




■KtiAjsg t<tl>!S 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 *«->ttn*e-^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


s 




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XTiadoj^ 


1 1 1 1 iMi i^mM^^i I 1 1^1 1 |M| 1 iMMioneii i-^ 


;; 




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E 

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s 


.4 


••'•'' '-*S 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 f 1 1 


s 




a 


llfll-^llioaitlllllllinillllll 


2 




s 


Iilll— le^ooiiiiiiMlltllllllll-^-^lll 






^ 


lllll^le«>oc;jlllllllll|l| l-^illl 


w 




r- 


iilii-Nie^>aoiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiii-.iiii 


s 




•0 


1 1 I 1 1 -N 1 e^r*2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 r^MM i i i 


z 




» 


1 1 t 1 1 -■ 1 e>«o?« 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 t *-» 1 1 1 






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iilii— ic*oai 1 1 1 1 1 — iiiii 1 ir 1 1 i—i-^ii 1 


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•• 


l|lll-«IC4h-glllllt— lll(IJtltll-4-«lll 


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1 1 iiiMiMsni 1 inoei tllli I r I i I I i-«m| i i 


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e* 


iliti-^le^ooilllil— iiliiiiiiii«-4tll 


3 




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1 1 1 1 1 -4 1 «4'^^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 —^ 1 1 1 


OO 




w 


iiill»MC«o?«lliiliillliliilllie>)illl 


3 




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lllll-«l?«oaoilltllllllllllllii9«ii|i 


9 

at 




M 


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s 




M 


lllti'^ieiogi 1 1 1 1 1 It III 1 t 1 I 1 1 1— Ml 1 1 


r 




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«-«^-sr;« r-.* 1 1 1 1 1 . i 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 ,-i«„. 


o 




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o 
P 

g 

o 

< 




1 




c r * 

• ••. J •= &•- 

^ . .s .£ . . . .-s -s.e -s . 

.a -^-cs i'. "ijii 1 ■ 'ir 

£ -lil - £ 1 §5^5 . • || 

.? lib III nil li i £ s 11 HI i i'nl i|.i.ll|s 





22 



P.D. 49 



^'t 


1 
1 

e 


! ii II 

|||5»i|i°|||ij 


^ 


1 




?" 




1 


ffw — — — C< —CO CS^--* 

- 2 > - ^ ^-^ >. -i i >. £ > o 




i . d 

5 "" d 




1 




s» 




•-; 




"c 








P 




1 





.1 


t = > 2 ; s 's £ 2 •- = = 


N* 






-5 




"^ 




^ 










;« 1 

3C 1 

i 
i 














=?====£==SEEE= 

tlllltlllllllo 



P.D.49 



Table IIL 



23 



LUt of Oficers retired during (he Year, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the 
Number of Years' Service of Each, 



Ni«. 


Cause of ReUranwnt. 


Age at 
Time of 

Retire- 
ment 
(Yean). 


Yeamof 

Servioe. 


Eramt E. CltaodlCT' 
Fie&riek H. Coner 
Hei&tn L. Cnw . 
Tfapwaa* F. Drrine 
Wmam t. DrriK 
FVbha J. Draeoll 
PMUiirk 1. TKifmM 
Cbalgat 1. IlHkins 
G«lrxiF E- L*»T* , 
Jaami. Mtrrio . 














Aps . 

iDcapaduwd 
Age . . 
Incapacitaled 
Ago . 

Incapociuted 
Ago . 
Ago . 
1 capacitated 








63 
47 
SI 
48 
69 
49 
57 
62 
60 
55 


30 
20 
30 
22 
43 
21 
30 
33 
37 
22 



EmpU>yee$ of IhelDepartment retired ditring the Year under the Boston Reliremeni System, 
which vent into effect February 1, 1923. 



Xake. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retimnent. 


.\te. 


Date of 
Retirement. 


Yeareof 
Service. 


TfaoBM B. LaFarme . 
Catiojne B<3«aa 


Janitor 
Matron 


Incapacitated 
Ago 


5S 

70 


Nor. 30. 1923 
May 31, 1923 


20 
16 



Table IV. 

Ldtt of Ogxer* who were promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the Year ending 

November 30, 1923. 



Dare. 



Na^ub ^n-d Ra.vs. 



Vw, l». IK3 

F*i., S. IVU 
Kvr. U. ICn 

Svr. It. 1»3 
Xor. M. inn 
Dbc 2i.US 



Sergeant Louis E. Lutx to the rank of lieutenant. 
Patrolman Sbemuin \V. .\uguBta to the rank of sorgeant. 
Patrolman Charles Carlson to the rank of aergoant. 
Patrolman Robert Caverly to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael E. Fiugerald to the rank of vorceant. 
Patrolman Stephen J. Gillis to the rank of sergntnt. 
Patrolman Jeremiah S. Uealey to the rank of aergoant. 
Patrolman Frank J. Kuhlman to the rank of scrgoant. 
Patrolman Patrick H. Punxll to the rank of sergeant. 



Table V. 
Numfjer of Hen in Active Service at the End of the Present Year who were appointed on 



the Force in the Year stated. 







i. 




















& . 


3 


















cSS 


8, 




. 


s 




c 
o 
E 




Om ATTorxno. 


3 


.1 


S 


s 


1 


1 


i 

a 






i. 


M 


s 


3 


\ 


1 


1 




i 




3 


Q- 


5 




a 


;! 


S 


5 


ISTi 
















1 
I 
1 
2 

2 
5 
5 
8 
16 


I 

1 
I 

6 

1 


18» 


_ 














1»I 
















18B 

18SJ 

1W4 .... 


- 


2 


- 


I 


- 


2 


. 


IS» 

18M 

1«7 

int 


1 


- 


- 


1 

i 

1 


I 

I 
J 


2 
6 


1 
3 


6 

8 

14 

28 



24 



Table V — Concluded. 



P.D. 49 



NumbtT of ^fen in Active Service at the End of the Present Year who were appointed on 

the Force in the Year stated. 







, 





















K • 


3 
















15 
C 


^^ 


!J. 




^ 


3 








Date trrcTs-ivD. 


5 

1 

3 


5.5 




S 

5 

a 

3 


S 

i 

• 
c 


S 

J 


5 

c 

1 


o 

o 
a 




18S9 


_ 


. 


_ 


1 


_ 




. 


9 


10 


1890 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 




3 


2 


10 


1891 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 




4 


4 


15 


1892 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 




1 


9 


14 


1893 


_ 


- 


- 


4 


4 




U 


21 


48 


1894 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 




7 


4 


14 


1895 


- 


I 


- 


4 


3 




'M 


44 


81 


1898 


_ 




- 


. 


2 




2 


8 


13 


1897 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1898 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




8 


12 


22 


1900 


« 


- 


_ 


2 


1 




15 


22 


45 


1901 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 




8 


6 


19 


1902 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1903 


. 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


9 


17 


30 


1904 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


3 




7 


12 


22 


1905 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


6 


3 


10 


1906 


_ 




. 


. 


1 




3 


3 


7 


1907 


. 


- 




- 


1 


. 


9 


11 


21 


1908 


- 


_ 


- 


. 


3 


_ 


10 


10 


23 


1909 


. 


- 


- 


- 


•» 


- 


1 


5 


8 


I9I0 


. 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


3 


3 


7 


1911 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




2 


3 


5 


1912 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


. 


1 


2 


9 


13 


1913 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


2 


1914 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 




_ 


2 


2 


1915 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


— 


. 


- 


I 


I 


1916 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


4 


4 


1917 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


. 


1 


5 


6 


I9I9 


— 


- 


- 


- 


. 


_ 


- 


779 


779 


1920 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


— 


- 


. 


248 


248 


1921 


- 


- 


. 


- 


. 




- 


162 


162 


1922 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 




- 


94 


94 


1923 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


154 


154 


Totals 


I 


3 


1 


24 


34 


41 


,41 


1,717 


I.9M 



Table VI. 
Officers dixharged and resigned during the Year ending S'oremher SO, 1933. 



Raxe. 



X.OIE. 



Discbar^ed- 



Rfstened. 



Length of 
Service. 



Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman > 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 



William J. .\hern 
Percy M. .-Vtkina 
Edward F. Barrett 
LawTence J. Beck 
John J. Beime 
George F, Bergeron 
Frank G. Bird 
Darid K. Blair 
Harold F. Brackett 
Robert F. Briegs 
Phillip D. Bullock 
Thomas P. Biirke 
Robert M. J. Burns 
Or\Tlle E. Burnworth 
Francis D. Butler . 
Jeremiah J. Callahan 
Hubert L. Canada . 
William J. Condon . 
Peter Connor . 
milard R. Cook 
Herbert T. Corkery 
Peter V. Costello . 
Harry M. H, Currier 
James G. Doherty . 



Feb. 5, 1923 

Jan. 12. 1923 

Nov. 30. 1923 

.N'ov. 26. 1923 

Nov. 26, 1923 

j Oct. 4, 1923 

i Oct. 17, 1923 



Nov. 15, 1923 



Sept. 7, 

Nor. 10. 

AprU 9, 

Feb. 3, 

Amt. 7, 

Sept. 12. 
Mar. 6, 



Oct. 30, 

Sept. 12. 

Xor. 22. 

Mar. 9, 
June 29. 
June 1, 
Sept. 7. 

Aug. 17. 
Sept. 27, 



1923 
1923 
1923 
192'! 
1923 

1923 
1923 



1923 

1923 

1923 

1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 

1923 
1923 



6 weeks. 
2>yi. years. 
His years. 
1*^2 years. 
11 da>'s. 
2Ma years. 
2'%! ye.-us. 
3*^2 years. 
SiHs years. 
4 years. 

4 years. 
1 week. 
3»i2 years. 
2*12 years. 
3^Vi2 years. 

5 months. 
I 'Hz yours. 
2»/i» years. 
i'ii years. 
3'^! years. 
3"!^2 years. 
SU^j years. 
V"/i3 years. 
3**^2 years. 



Reinstated March 3, 1923, after public heariof. 



P.D. 49 

T.vBLE VI — Concluded. 

Offxen discharged and resigned during the Year ending November SO, 19SS. 



25 



Raxt. 



P&trnlman . 
PatrotmAn . 
P&trolmaa . 
Patrolman . 
PatrolmaQ . 
PatroImaQ . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman • 
Patrolman 1 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman' 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 
Patrolman . 



Njuie. 



John F. Donahue 
Charles £. DonoeUan 
Walter Donox-an 
Maurice K. Dugan . 
Frank P. Fitipatriek 
James F, Gaffney . 
William F. E. Gately 
Thomna F. Gleotkon 
Erochim Goldberg . 
Waller L. Gurney . 
Charles E. Harris . 
Roger A. Harris 
Clvdo n. Hari-ey . 
Edward J. Hayes . 
Edward P. Haves . 
Patrick F. Hejey . 
Henry M. Hewson . 
Charles L. Hurd 
James A . Jameson . 
Dennis Kelleher 
Patrick J. KeUeher . 
William P. KeUey . 
John P. Kennedy , 
Joseph J. Kittery . 
Geonro T. Little 
Neil F. Mac-\rthur . 
Leo P. Ma«uire 
Frank W. Melting . 
Frederick E. Miner - 
Leo M. Molioari 
William J. Moylet . 
John J. Mullen 
Timothy J. Murphy 
Alfred I. Murray 
Wlliam J. McCarthy 
Raymond J. McDonald 
Owen F. McEnaney 
Percy C. McFarUne 
James J. McGoldrick 
John T. McGovem . 
Thomas J. McGuire 
Michael B. Mclnemey 
Patrick McTiernan 
George G. Xacle 
Thomas J. O'Connor 
Louis D. Ol«D 
Ray E. Parker 
Charles F. Riordan 
George Roberts 
RobCTt C. Seoreie 
Jeremiah J. Shii>e 
Henry G. Sturgill 
John M. SulUxiia 
Matthew J. Sullivas 
John F. Sweeney 
Ira L. Walters . 
Harry Wasser . 
Harrison White 



Discharged. 



Sept. 21, 1923 
Dec. 1. 1922 
May 16, 1923 
April 16, 1923 



June 12, 1923 

May 16, 1923 

Nov. 30, 1923 

July 26, 1923 

Aug. 8, 1923 



Dec. 1, 1922 

Feb. 27, 1923 

Feb. 12, 1923 

Nov. 26, 1923 

Aug. 8. 1923 

Nov. 26. 1923 

Mar. 26, 1923 

Sept. IS, 1923 



April 13, 1923 
Feb. 12. 1923 



June 22, 1923 



Resigned. 



Aug. 18, 1923 
June 23, 1923 
Mar. 19, 1923 
July 31, 1923 
April 7, 1923 



Nov. 20. 1923 

Sept. 28, 1923 

Oct. 6, 1923 

July 22, 1923 

Mar. 29, 1923 

Oct. I, I»23 

July 10, 1923 

Mar. 22. 1923 



Nov. 2, 192J 



June 29, 1923 
Sept. 27, 1923 
Oct. 18, 1923 
Sept. 11, 1923 
Feb. 26, 1923 

April 20, 1923 
Feb. 19, 1923 

Jan. 15, 1923 

Dec. 28, 1922 

Feb. 2«, 1923 

Jan. 3, 1923 

Sept. 30, 1923 

Jan. 10. 1923 

Jan. 25, 1923 

July 11, 1923 

Feb. 19, 1923 

Aug. 9, 1923 

Oct. 13, 1923 



Oct. 5, 1923 
Sept. 28, 1923 
May 31, 1923 



July 28, 1923 
July 30, 1923 
Sept. 15, 1923 



Length o( 
Service. 



2Ms years. 
3»ij >-ear». 
3V1j >-e«rs. 
3>ij yesrs. 
3 months. 
3Mj years. 

3 years. 
3T^i years. 
3Mi years. 
3Vii year*. 
3'Mi years. 

4 months. 
l»ij years. 
3?Hi>-ears. 
3""ii years. 
2«ii years. 
li<hj years. 
3Hj yesrs. 
3^j years. 
4 j-ears. 

2 months, 
y^j years. 

10 months. 
STij years. 
3mj years. 
3'Hj years. 
9 months. 
3^1 years. 
l"ij years, 
yrij years. 
2*Sj years. 
3*Ht yon. 
3^ii years. 
3t^- years. 

11 months. 
3*^2 yvars. 
2'*ij years. 
3>Mi years. 
3Mi years. 
3»ii years. 
8 months. 

1 week. 
Mi J-esrs. 
IVii years. 
2f^i j-ears. 
3*jj years. 

3 months. 
3«^j years. 
3>^] years. 
3<Vi> years. 
3'M3 years. 
2^^j years. 
3^ij years. 
2!^j years. 
2'Vu years. 
3^11 years. 
3"nj years. 
3-ii >-c»rs. 



> Reinstated October 5, 1923, aft#r pubUc hearing. 
^ Reinstated February 27, 1923, after pubtic hearing. 

Table VII. 
Xumber of Days' Absence from Duty by Reason of Sickness during the Year ending 

Xocember 30, 1923. 



December. 1922 


M7 


July. 1923 ... 


MS 


Januarj-, 1923 .... 


. 1,602 


.\ugust. 1923 


J67 


Febniar>*. 1923 


. 1,403 


September. 1923 


. . 649 


March. 1923 .. . 


. 1,20 


October. 1923 . 


824 


April. 1923 .... 


. 1,011 


November. 1923 


. . m 


May. 1923 . . . . 


. 1,013 






June. 1923 .... 


633 


Total .... 


. 11.417 







Areraee number of men on the force 
Arer^ce number of men sick daily 



. 1,930. 
31, or 1.6 per cent. 



P.D. 49 



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Table IX. 
\ umber and Distribution of Horses used in the Deparlmenl. 



P.D. 49 



Dmsioxk. 


Wagon, 


Patrol. 


Riding. 


Ambu- 
lance. 


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Stable, 40 Joy Strert 


1 


I 


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7 


1 23 
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1 


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I 33 



Table X. 
Number of Arrests by Police Dirisions during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1923. 



Headquarters 
Di\-isjon 1 
Division 2 
Di\Tsion 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 8 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 12 
Division 13 
Di%ision 14 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Di\ision 18 
Division 19 
Di\Tsion 20 
Division 21 



Totals 



DlVlHlOXB. 



Males. 



1,876 
7.119 
2.817 
6,3,M 
3.505 
7.509 
5.360 
4,524 
32 
4.925 
5,012 
2.449 
2,730 
1.487 
2.242 
4,363 
3,080 
2,152 
512 
1,119 
3,137 
7 



7U13 



Females. 



331 
223 
477 
610 
268 
1.079 
314 
227 

289 

424 

76 

107 

35 

132 

247 

395 

29 

13 

66 

77 



5,419 



Total. 



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7;M2 
3,2VI 
5,»«« 
3,773 
«,VM 
5,674 
4.7SI 

n 

5,211 
5,43« 
2JS2S 
2JB7 
1,W2 
2;i74 
4.610 
3,47S 
2,l«l 
523 
l,IU 
3,214 
7 



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P.D. 49 



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P.D. 49 



Table XV. 
Sxtmbcr cf Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Xov. 30, 1933. 



DtTBooxa. 


Malm. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Totals. 


I 


42 


U 


1 


1 


38 


















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73 


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55 


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339 


140 


19 


1 


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158 


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4« 


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827 


10 
















387 


110 


13 


1 


511 


11 
















931 


217 


81 


3 


1,232 


12 
















310 


86 


13 


- 


411 


13 
















4111 


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14 
















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56 


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17 
















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19 








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53 


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411 


1 


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6.479 


1.897 


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19 


8.922 



Table XVL 
Total SvaAer of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Divisions. 



Dirison 1 . 




. 






906 


Division 2 . 




., 






1.573 


Dirision 3 . 




. 






194 


EHrision 4 . 




, 






345 


EHvision 5 . 




^ 






232 


EHrisioD 6 . 




, 






510 


Drrision 7 . 




. 






72 


Divison 9 - 




.. 






262 


DrrisioD 10 




, 






142 


DiTisoQ 11 




- 






68 



Di\ixiOQ 12 41 

Dit-ision 13 66 

Division 14 . _ 37 

Dirision 15 . ' 189 

Division 16 135 

Dii-ision 17 67 

Di\'uion 18 65 

Division 19 13 

TouJ 4,«3« 



P.D. 49 41 

Table XVII. 
Financial Stalaneni for the Year ending Xor. 30, 1923. 

ExPEXDrTL'RES. 

Pay of police and employcts $3,517,469 63 

Peoaioas * . 200,967 43 

Fuel and licbt 50.420 83 

n'stcraodkv 1,735 31 

Fumitore and bedding '. 9,456 12 

Priniine. etattooery, tcleprams, etc 21,889 92 

Oue and deatiing station bouties and city prison 11,463 10 

Refwirs to station houses and city prison 43,253 00 

Repairs and Mipplics (cr police boata 22.597 16 

Telephone reut^ls and toIU 10,005 95 

Purchase of horaes and vehicles 13,170 27 

Care and keeping ol horses, hnrncssos and vehicles 9,265 64 

Care and repair of automobiles 34,072 90 

Transportaiicm of prisoners, sick and insane persons 563 S3 

Feeding praooers 3,122 97 

Medical attendance on prisoners 7.158 2S 

Transportation 3,408 33 

Puiauii of criminals 9,961 94 

Vnifonns and nniform caps 68.926 17 

Badges. buxioDs, clubs, bells, insignia, etc 7,80100 

Traveiing expenses and food for i>olice 3,054 05 

Rent at bidldines 25,762 20 

Traffic signs and signals 7,807 57 

Lexal srrvices 25000 

Music for police parade 287 50 

Draping brandings 160 00 

Total $4,084,122 18 

Expenses of listing 64.131 72 

Expeiues oi bouse of detention 12,559 43 

Expenses erf signal service (see Table XVIII) 47.788 70 

Total 14.208,602 03 

Receipts. 

For an licenses issued by the Police Commissioner $33,892 50 

For sale of tindaimed and condemned property, itinerant musidaos' badges, junk collectors* 

badges, carnage maps, etc. 4,568 14 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 23,972 00 

Total $62,432 64 

For imiform doth, etc 601 82 

Total $63,034 46 



Table XVIII. 
Pat/menis on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending .Vor. 50, 19S3. 



Pay roDa . . • . • • •,.%•, $32,330 02 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supphea tbereior 7.395 45 

UDdergTo im d vires 4 703 ^ 

Rent o< stable \\qqq qq 

Purchase of troek 67120 

Care and repair of vehicles and sboeing horae * qqq 24 

Car fare '.'.'. 697 30 

Tot»l $47,788 70 

1 



42 



P.D. 49 





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Private earria«08 
Licensed carriages 
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BioycloB . 
Street cara . 
Automobiles 
Defect* in strcota 
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Falling objoot« . 
Fplls, various onuses . 
KxoavatioDs in strcota 
llailroad trains . 
Elevated trains . 
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Kicked by lioree 
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tiuow and loo on tlJowulk 
Coasting . . . . 
Tobogannlng . 
Cut by glass 
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Explosion . 
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Miacellaneoua . 


11 







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INDEX 

FaOE 

Accidents .13,42,43 

caused by automobile 42, 43 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares . .42, 43 

number of, reported 13 

Ambulance service 15 

Arrests . 9, 10, 2S, 29-38 

age and sex of 38 

comparative statement of 38 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . ... 9, 33, 37 

for drunkenness 9,10,14,35 

foreigners 9,29-37 

minors 9,29-38 

nativity of 10 

nonresidents 9,29-37 

number of, by divisions 28 

number of, ponished by fine 10 

on warrants' 9, 29-37 

summoned bj' court 9, 29-37 

Total number of 9, 37 

\iolatipn of city ordinance? 10, 34 

without warrants 9, 29-37 

Auctioneers 39 

Automobiles 11,15,16,17,42,43 

Accidents due to 11,42,43 

police 16 

public . . . . ' 16 

sight-seeing 17,39 

Benefits and pensions 7, 20 

Bertillon system 9 

Boston Retirement System 23 

employees retired under 23 

Buildings 13 

dangerous, reported 13 

found open and made secure 13 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 9 

Carriages, public 16 

articles left in 16 

automobile 16 

number licensed 16 39 

Cases investigated 10, 13,' 15 

Cesspools, defective, reported 13 

Chauff'curs 17 39 

Children 10,' 13 

abandoned, cared for 10 13 

lost, restored 13 

Chimneys, dangerous, reported 13 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 10, 34 

Claims, inspector of ' 13 

Collective musicians 19 39 

Commitments lo' 13 

Complaints ! IS, 26,' 39 

against police officers 26 

against misceUaneous licenses ... .... IS 39 

Courts . 9,10,13,29-37)38 

fines imposed by 9 38 

number of days' attendance at, by officers .... 9, 10, 13^ 38 
number of jjersons summoned by 9 29-37 



46 P.D. 49 

, PACB 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 9 

arrests by 10 

finger-print system 9 

identification r\x>m 9 

photograpljs 9, 10 

records 9 

Criminal work 3S 

comparative statement of 3.8 

Dangerous weajxins 5, 19 

Dead bodies, care*! for 13, 15 

recovered 13, 15 

Deaths 7,8,11,22,42,43 

by accident, suicide, etc 11 

of police officers ~. 8, 22 

Department, police 8 

Distribution of force S, 21 

Dbturbanccs suppressed 13 

Dogs 13,39,40,41 

amount receivcil for licenses for 39, 41 

damage done by 13 

number license*! 39, 40 

Drivers, hackney carriage 17, 39 

Drowning, persons rescued from 13, 15 

Drunkenness 9, 10, 14, 35 

i arrests for, per day 9 

{ foreigners arrested for 9, 35 

I increase in mmiber of arrests for 9, 10 

I non-residents arreste<l for 9, 35 

} total number of arrests for 10, 35 

I women committed for 14 

t Employees of tlie Departfncnt S, 21,23 

\ retired ' 23 

j Events, special 11 

I Expenditures 20,41 

} Extra duties perfonned by officers 10, 13 

Financial 20, 41 

I expenditures 20, 41 

. house of detention 20, 41 

[ pensions 20, 41 

[ receipts 20,41 

f miscellaneous license fees 20, 39, 41 

[ signal senico 20, 41 

'• Fines 9, 10, 38 

amount of 9, 10, 38 

average amount of 9, 38 

i numh«r punished by 10 

(. Finger-print s>'stcni 9 

$ Fire alarms 13 

I defective, reported 13 

^ number giA-en 13 

t- Fires 13, 15 

^ extinguished 13 

'r on water front attended 15 

r' Foreigners, number arrested 0, 29-37 

I Fiigitives from justice 10 

Gaming, illegal 35 

Garages 6, 7 

Hackney carriage drivers 17, 39 j. 

Hackney carriages 17, 39 I 

Hand carts 39 

Harbor ser\-ice, special duties performed 14 



4 



I 



P.D. 49 47 

Txam 

Horses 15, 28 

distribution of 28 

number in sen-ice 15, 28 

purchased 15 

House of detention 13, 41 

House of ill fame, keeping 14, 33 

Hydrants, defective, reported 13 

Identification room * 9 

Imprisonment 10, 38 

persons sentenced to 10 

total years of 10, 38 

Income 20, 41 

Inquests h^ld 11 

Insane persons taken in charge 13 

Inspector of claims 13 

rases investigated 13 

Intoxicated persoas assisted 13 

Itinerant musicians 18, 39 

Junk collectors 39 

Junk shop keepers 39 

Jury ILsts, police work on 18 

Lamps, defective, reported 13 

Licenses, miscellaneoas 20, 39 

Liquor situation 3 

Listing, police ,17,18,41,44 

expenses of 17, 41 

number listed 17, 44 

number of policemen emploj-cd in 18 

Lodgers at station houses 10 

Lodging houses, public 19, 20, 39 

applications for licenses 19, 39 

authority to license 19 

location of 20 

number of persons lodged in 20 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 11, 41 

Lost children cared for 13 

Medical examiners' assistants 11 

cases on which inquests were held 11 

causes of death 11 

Minors, number arrested 9, 29-38 

Miscellaneous business 13 

Miscellaneous licenses 18, 39 

amount of fees collected for 18, 39 

complaints investigated 18, 39 

number canceled and revoked 18, 39 

number issued 18, 39 

number transferred 18,39 

Missing persons 12 

age and sex of 12 

number found 12 

number reported 12 

Musicians, collective 19 39 

Musiciaas, itmerant 18' 39 

applications for licenses 18 39 

instruments inspected 19 

instruments passed ig 

Nativity of persons arrested . . . . • IQ 

Nonresident offenders 9 29-37 

Offences 9 29-37 

against chastity, morality, ete 9,' 33, 37 

against license laws 9' 32' 37 



r* 



4S PD- 49 

Offences — Concluded. page 

against the person 9, 29, 37 

against property, malicious 9,31,37 

against property, with \ioIcnce 9, 30, 37 

against property, without \"iolence 9,31,37 

forgery and against currencj' 9,31,37 

miscellaneous 9, 34, 37 

recapitulation 37 

Parks, public 42,43 

accidents reported in 42, 43 

Pawnbrokers 7, 13, 39 

Pensions and benefits 20, 41 

estimates for pensions 20 

number of persons on rolls 20 

payments on account of 20, 41 

Police 18 

railroad IS 

special IS 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries 20 

Police communications, Interchange of 7 

Police department 8 

distribution of S, 21 

horses in use in 15, 28 

how constituted 8 

officers appointed 8 

absent sick 25 

arrests by 10,28 

complaints agaiii.<t 26 

date appointc-d 24 

detailed, special events 11 

died 8,22 

discharged 8, 24 

injured . 8 

promoted 23 

resigned 8, 24 

retired 8,20,23 j 

vehicles in use in 15, 16 ' 

work of 8 1 ■ 

Police listing 17,18,41,44 j 

Police signal sennce 8, 14, 20, 41 

miscellaneous work 14 

pajinents on account of 20, 41 

property of 14 

signal boxes 14 

Prisoners, nati\itv of 10 

Property . . " 10,11,14,20,38,39,41 

lost, abandoned and stolen 11,39,41,42 

recovered 10, 14, 38 

sale of condemned 20, 39, 41 

stolen 10,38 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 10 

Public carriages 16 •] 

Public lodging houses 19, 20, 39 ) 

Plailroad police 18 \ 

Receipts 20,39,41 '; 

Revolvers 19,39 

licenses to carr>- loaded 19, 39 i 

Second-hand articles 39- 

feecond-hand dealers 13 

Sewers, defective, reported 13 

Sick and injured persons assisted 10, 13, 15 



P.D. 49 49 

paob 

Sickness, absence on account of 25 

Sight-seeing automobiles 17, 40 

Signal senice, police 8, 14, 20, 41 

Special events 11 

Special police 18 

Station houses 7, 10 

lodgers at 10 

witnesses detained at 10, 13 

Stolen property 10, 38 

recovered 10, 38 

value of 10, 38 

Street railways, conductors and motorir.cn liccn.scd 39 

Streets 13, 42, 43 

accidents reported in ' . . . . ^ . 42, 43 

defective, reported 13 

obstructions removed 13 

Teams 13 

strav, put up 13 

Traffic ■ 4 

Used car licenses 39 

Vehicles 15, 16, 17, 39, 40 

ambulances 15 

automobiles 15 

in use in police department 16 

public carriages 16, 39 

wagons 17,39,40 

Vessels 14 

Wagons 17,39,40 

number licensed by di%Tsions 40 

total number licensed 17, 39 

Water pipes, defective, reported 13 

Water running to waste reported 13 

Weapons, dangerous 5, 19 

Witnesses 9, 10, 13^ 38 

fees earned by officers as . . 9, 10 38 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 9^ lo' 38 

number of, detained at station houses 10, 13 

Women committed to House of Detention ' 13 



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