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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Public Document 



No. 49 



C&e Commontoealtb of a^sac&usetts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 






CITY OF BOSTON 



Year ending November 30, 1921 



• •• • * • 




• ' . • • 



C/ 

BOSTON 

WRIGHT 4 POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS 

32 DERNE STREET 



Public Document 



No. 49 



31j? (Uninmaittitpalti) of MoBBOtlpxBtttB 



ii/-r^ i"y 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1924 




Publication of this Document atpbotsd bt the 
Commission on Administration and Fotancb 



O^ 



MASS. SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH ( 

Oil ruS* t 'VXsf* 

W&t Commontoealtf, of iflassartjusetts 



REPORT. 
c/ 

Headquarters or the Police Department, 

Office or the Poucx Commihsiovcr, 20 Peubebton Square. 

Boston, Deoember 1, 1924. 

To Hit Excellency Channing H. Cox, Governor. 

Youh Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city of Boston I have the 
honor to present, in compliance with the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of 
the year 1906, a report of the Police Department for the year ending Novem- 
ber 30, 1924. 

Relative to the Sale and Carrying of Firearms. 

The need of immediate legislation to remedy the present evils arising from the 
almost indiscriminate selling and promiscuous carrying of fire arms is apparent. 
The yearly increase in killings, murderous assaults and hold-ups by persons using 
revolvers or pistols demand both the attention of the Legislature and the public 
in general. Since my recommendations of last year for legislation upon this sub- 
ject, the increase in homicides and assaults with dangerous weapons has been 
alarming. In this department alone since November 30, 1923, one officer was 
murdered and five others murderously assaulted, and even while this recommenda- 
tion is being written, two of these officers are lying at the point of death from pistol 
wounds received at the hands of a criminal who escaped after holding up with a 
revolver and brutally assaulting the proprietor of a store. 

If the sale of newspapers, magazines and periodicals which contain advertise- 
ments of firearms was made a criminal offence, much of the business in firearms 
now being done by mail order houses outside this Commonwealth could be elimi- 
nated. From newspaper reports one of the largest mail order houses in this country 
has discontinued the sale of firearms through the medium of the post office. This 
is a step in the right direction and should be followed by other firearms distributors 
outside this state, but until this practice becomes universal, some legislation is 
necessary to prevent the easy delivery of dangerous weapons by mail to irresponsi- 
ble persons in this state. Legislation, therefore, forbidding newspapers, periodicals 
or magazines containing advertisements concerning firearms being sold in this 
Commonwealth would have some effect at least in checking this interstate distribu- 
tion of deadly weapons. 

In relation to the sale and distribution of firearms within this Commonwealth, 
legislation is also necessary to tighten up the present loose methods of the sale and 
distribution of firearms by retail dealers. Legislation forbidding the sale of revolv- 
ers or pistols to any person who has not received a license from the proper licensing 
authorities to carry the same is necessary in my opinion, inasmuch as under the 
present method which requires the lapse of one day from the date of application 
before a firearm can be sold to a person who has not a permit to carry the same, 
fraud can be and is perpetrated, and firearms are being sold and delivered on the 
same day to persons who have not a permit to carry a firearm. A permit to carry 
a firearm in my opinion should not be granted to any unnaturalized person or one 
who has a criminal record, and the present law in relation to the granting of fire- 
arms should be amended to that extent. 

I believe that if the Legislature of Massachusetts should pass legislation tending 
to remedy the conditions under which firearms are being sold and distributed in 
this Commonwealth, that it would have a salutary effect on the Legislatures of 
other states to pass similar legislation, and would eventually impress upon Congress 
the necessity of passing laws relating to firearms, which would have binding effect 
upon all the states of this Union. 



2 P.D. 49 

Assaults upon Police Officers. 

A police officer being essentially a state officer represent* in hk dfieiaA position 
as a guardian of the peace and a servant sworn to enforce law axtd Atr&er, toe state 
itself. Respect for authority, if not obtained by education, mu*t be catted by 
fear of punishment. Disrespect or interference with the pohee in due performance 
of their duty strikes at the root of government. The growth <*£ we idea, that 
personal liberty must not be abridged or curtailed will bring alarming remits. An 
examination of cases of assaults upon police officers since my mstaQkCDca in office 
in April, 1922, and the disposition of the same by the court*, eumjete tme to recom- 
mend that legislation be passed making an assault or attempt to ates&oit % police 
officer or interference with him in the performance of his doty, a aeriona criminal 
offence, carrying with it a jail sentence. The gravity of such an offemte is that it is 
a direct attack upon the state itself is not fully comprehended by tfbe poblie. As 
the present law stands, a differentiation is not made bet-seen as .ussu.uk upon a 
police officer and an assault upon an ordinary citizen. The law-alnrfihg dement of 
this community will understand that if a deliberate assault upon % yM<x officer is 
disposed of either by a nominal fine or some disposition other that imprisonment, 
the disorderly element of society becomes emboldened and eventually State to respect 
or even fear the police. The morale of a Police Department is aflss a£eeted by 
such dispositions of cases of assaults against police officers maaxradk tn it fives the 
Police Force itself the impression that the public does not stand sgnaatlrr behind it 
or believe in the importance of its work. In my opinion, the crime <ctf deliberate 
assault upon a police officer in the performance of his duty should be punished not 
by a fine, but by a substantial jail sentence. 

Traffic. 

Boston, as well as every other large city in this country, is £aeed wfitb (the difficult 
problem of solving its traffic control. A study of the traffic eituatir,m xsA methods 
adopted to regulate the same in other municipalities is both mtenertSng and en- 
lightening, but the traffic problem in every city is peculiarly indrrnrfhttJ to it. 

In the solution of this problem three features must be carefully ecuaioed: the 
safety of the pedestrian, the creation of vehicular mobility and the puttoeJioo of the 
traffic officer and equipment. 

Semaphores and other mechanical devices have already been in+fjJkfd at several 
important traffic points in this city and at the present time are wurinnc wiwessfully. 
The installation of mechanical devices for traffic control, however, isuuur.4 c&ninate 
the necessity of man power for this work. With the increase is tfibe number of 
schoolhouses, additional crossings must be guarded by police {d&oarx, inasmuch 
as it would be impracticable and unwise to force children to rehr wfidr rapem sema- 
phores or beacons for protection in crossing the streets. It is itsaeaBtej also to 
place traffic officers at the junctions of many streets in thk city, mraimieth as the 
width and contour of the same do not permit the placing of traffic dterntw to regu- 
late traffic. 

In my report of last year I emphasized the fact that the lack *£ psSte officers 
handicaps this department in enforcing the laws relating to the cpsrstaaa of auto- 
mobiles and especially the rules and regulations promulgated by the B«Bs>d of Street 
Commissioners relative to the parking of pleasure cars and other nwiu* vehicles 
in violation of law, and I again desire to reiterate that this department needs at 
leasr^200 additional police officers to be assigned specifically far taif&t daty. 

With these officers, the increasing number of demands made Iby merchants, 
parents and others of this city for better police protection at amBa%p could be 
satisfied and traffic continuously controlled. A traffic force eodHl be organized 
to control traffic at night and on Sundays, a condition which, at ttbe present time, 
owing to lack of police officers, does not obtain. With these a^tStaceaJ police 
officers, unnecessary and illegal parking, which today is one <of we most serious 
obstacles in the way of traffic control, could be eliminated by the aiaajgunent of a 
number of traffic officers to this particular line of work. 

Although not pertinent to the subject of traffic, I belieTe it a*ri«ibfe to state 
that in view of the recent increase in the number of hold-ims, nAAesntes and crimes 
of similar nature, that 100 more men in addition to the 200 poEoe imroecc previously 
mentioned, should be added to this department in order that Huey amy be dis- 
tributed in the various police divisions which at the present time see mndormanned. 



P.D. 49 3 

Auction Sales. 

Under existing law, the Police Commissioner of Boston has authority to license, 
as auctioneers, suitable persons who have resided in Boston during the six months 
next preceding the date of application for such license, which license may be, for 
cause shown, revoked or suspended without a hearing. Under this power, the 
authority of the Police Commissioner to regulate auction sales in Boston would 
seem to be controlling, but inasmuch as, by statute, an auctioneer may sell goods 
and merchandise in any place within his county, and when employed by others in 
any place within this Commonwealth, if such sale is made where the property is 
situated, many auctioneers, licensed by authorities outside the city of Boston, 
and over whom the licensing authority in Boston has no supervision, do sell goods 
in this city. 

Auction sales in this city of jewelry, watches, diamonds and other articles of 
personal use or ornament, much of which is sent from outlying cities to be sold in 
Boston in stores leased for the purpose, seem to be on the increase and, despite the 
fact that reports have been received from investigating officers of this Department 
that at many of these auction sales questionable methods have been adopted and 
false representations made, yet the Police Commissioner often is unable to imme- 
diately remedy these abuses because the auctioneers committing the offences are 
licensed by authorities outside of Boston and by subterfuge are often able to con- 
ceal the source from which the merchandise was purchased. Resort must be made, 
therefore, to criminal prosecution which, with its entailing delays, technicalities 
and sometime inconsistent verdicts, has not yet produced favorable results in 
checking this type of fraud. 

This Department, at present, has prosecuted and has now under surveillance, 
several of these auction establishments where jewelry and small wares are being 
sold, and complaints are being received almost dairy from persons who have been 
defrauded into buying articles of practically no intrinsic value. 

To remedy this situation, I recommend legislation whereby the building or 
establishment in which these auction sales are held, shall be licensed by the same 
authorities of the cities or towns which at present license auctioneers. The licensing 
authority then, if convinced upon bona fide complaints that fraud has been com- 
mitted, can summarily revoke or suspend the license both of the auctioneer com- 
mitting the offence and of the place where the offence was committed. This 
system was in practice prior to the Volstead Act in regulating places where intoxi- 
cating liquor was sold and could readily be applied to these auction establishments 
mentioned where tons of cheap bric-a-brac are dumped to be auctioned off and 
unloaded upon a gullible public needing protection against itself. 

Liquob Traffic. 

Enforcement of the prohibitory laws still stands out as one of the salient features 
of police work in which the majority of the people of this Commonwealth is inter- 
ested. In the last state election, an important legislative act amending the state 
liquor enforcement laws, then in effect, was placed upon the ballot for the con- 
sideration of the electorate. This amendment, which in brief forbids the manu- 
facture and transportation of intoxicating liquors without a Federal permit, was 
ratified by popular vote. Transportation of liquor by aircraft, watercraft or 
vehicle without a proper permit, therefore, is now a criminal offence. Passage of 
legislation of this nature was recommended by me in a prior report and after its 
passage by the Legislature, ratification of the same by the people was also advised. 

Although the statistical data in this report cover the police year from December 
1, 1923 to November 30, 1924, yet inasmuch as this report is not submitted until 
the end of the_ calendar year, interesting information concerning the effectiveness 
of this new legislation, approved by the people of this state, can be given. 

In effect less than a month, the results from the operation of the new law have 
been instantaneous. The price of intoxicating liquor, as well as other lawful 
commodities, is determined by the economic law of demand and supply and the 
reputed sudden rise in the price of intoxicating liquor, especially of alcohol, since 
this act went into effect, strengthens the conviction that the supply of liquor has 
considerably decreased. Furthermore, the steady flow inland of liquor from the 
seaports has been considerably arrested, and interurban traffic in liquor now appears 
to be negligible. The police of the towns and cities bordering the coast line have 



4 P.D. 49 

taken advantage of this new legislation and are seizing considerable quantities of 
liquor smuggled ashore. Those engaged in illegal liquor traffic are forced to adopt 
ingenious schemes and artifices to even bring small amounts of liquor into this 
citv, inasmuch as police officers of this department are successfully discovering and 
exposing all such ruses- The harbor police, in conjunction with the Federal 
Internal Revenue Department, have seized thousands of gallons of intoxicating 
liquors which were being smuggled into this city through its harbor. 

Another indication that the new law is checking liquor traffic is the fact that 
amateur distilling and bnwring has again started, as this method of supplying the 
demand would not be adopted if liquor was readily obtainable elsewhere. 

Liquor traffic will continue just as long as the business itself is profitable. Re- 
peated seizures of liquor m the part have caused financial distress and subsequent 
withdrawal from this type of business of persons whose property was confiscated. 
A steady unfaltering and persistent crusade against those who are selling, manu- 
facturing or transporting liquor, much of which, although labeled with the trade 
marks of most distingm*tied and eminent foreign and domestic brands of liquor, 
is nothing but a rank cowooetion of artery hardening poison, will result eventually 
in the general education af the public to the fact that it has been bilked long 
enough. 

Jail sentences should be meted out to offenders who care nothing as to the direful 
consequences resulting from the absorption of their wares. Persons who deliber- 
ately or with reckless abandon fell poison are not entitled to sympathy even from 
the courts. The imposhwn of fines for liquor violations simply spurs on this class 
to increase its business in order to meet this peculiar form of overhead expense. 
Inteeobaxge op Police Communications, 

Although the adoption td a syrtem of rapid police communication bctwcen_the 
cities and towns of this rtarte was outlined in my last report, I believe that this is 
a matter of sufficient importance to stress again this year. 

I again urge and recommend the installation of a central communicating station, 
either at Police Headquarters, Boston, or at the Department of Public Safety, 
State House, to which aid important criminal matters could be communicated 
either by telephone, telegraph or other communicating device, and thence relayed 
throughout the Commonw*alth. 

It is an accepted fact tlbat the commission of serious crimes such as hold-ups, 
burglaries, hi-jacking, etc., is facilitated by the use of the motor vehicle and it is 
important that the police net only keep abreast, but ahead, of the present criminals 
by having at its disposal tlbe most modern methods of detecting crime and appre- 
hending violators of the law. 

Publication of Rjegistkation Numbers of Motor Vehicles. 

The publication of the names and addresses of owners of motor vehicles in 
Massachusetts, with the aligned registration numbers, will be discontinued next 
year by the private concern which has, for some time, been publishing this informa- 
tion in pamphlet form, awl as a substitute for this published list, the Registrar of 
Motor Vehicles will (urnhh information in response to telephonic inquiries. 

In police work it is absohtteJy imperative that a list of the owners of automobiles, 
with assigned registration numbers, be available day and night for immediate 
service, and the proposed wubt-titution of telephonic service for this printed list will 
seriously cripple the polww, especially when, as today, the automobile figures so 
prominently in crime. 

A list of owners and registration numbers of motor vehicles registered in Massa- 
chusetts should be printed and published by this Commonwealth and distributed 
to the Police Department* *A 'tis various cities and towns. 

Police Property. 

Continuing the adopted policy of making both police stations and houses of 
detention sanitary and halntable and police garages fireproof as far as possible 
with the money allotted Ut this work in the annual budget, considerable recondi- 
tioning, repairing, painting and cleansing have been done in several of the police 
buildings during the past year. 

In the early part of nert year, two new police stations will be ready for occu- 
pancy: Station 2, a ten-*«ory rtructure located at Milk and Scars streets, the 



P.D. 49 5 

completion of which has been delayed for some time because of unforseen difficul- 
ties, will house Division 2, now located in an ill-ventilated and poorly equipped 
building in City Hall Avenue, and also Division 20, Traffic, and the Property 
Clerk's Bureau, now located in Quincy Hall Market. Station 18, Hyde Park 
District, wfll probably be ready for occupancy before the first of March, 1925, 
replacing an old and inadequate station house with a modern police building. 

The former Municipal Court House of Seaverns Avenue, West Roxbury, has 
been reconstructed and added to Station 13, furnishing a new guard room, wash 
and toflet rooms and library, together with modern cell rooms for men and women. 

The steamer Guardian, the largest of the four boats assigned to the harbor 
patrol, has been thoroughly overhauled and replaced in service in first class con- 
dition. 

Since my last report, the site for the new Police Headquarters for which the 
Legislature give the city of Boston the right to borrow one million dollars outside 
of the debt limit and for the construction of which the city of Boston also appro- 
priated the additional sum of S50,000, was selected at the corner of Berkeley and 
Stuart streets. The plans for the completion of this seven-story building have 
been drawn, submitted and approved and excavating work already has been 
started. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON. 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 

THE DEPARTMENT 

The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 

Police Commissioner. Secretary. 2 

The Police Force. 



Supaifitendettt , 
LVpmy Superintendent! 
(lati Inspector . . 

Captains ... 



1 

3 
1 

28 
32 



Inspector of carriages 

(lieutenant) . 
Lieutenants 
Sergeants 
Patrolmen 



1 

38 

147 

1.715 



Total 



1,966 



Director 
Foresnas 

Signalmen 
Me 



Siffnal Serriee. 



Linemen . 
Driver 



Total 



Clerb . 

Stenographers 

Matties (boaae of detention) 
Matrons Ctstioo houses) 
E nsjgMjssB j on pohec steamers 
Firemeo, on police steamers . 
Auto repair shop foreman 
Auto repair shop mechanic . 
CThssflcoT . 

Asristaat property clerk 
Van drJfs sBj ... 



Employee* of the Department. 



Foreman of stable 

Hostlers 

Assistant steward of city prison 

Janitors . 

Janitresses . 

Telephone operators 

Tailor . 

Painters . 



Total 



17 



1 
13 

29 

19 

3 

1 

4 



Police Cocmsissiooer and Secretary 

Police Uree • 

Signal 

Employees 



Recapitulation. 



133 



1.966 

17 

133 



Grand total . „ . . * . m # .2 118 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. During the year 105 
patrolmen were appointed; 2 patrolmen reinstated; 36 patrolmen were discharged; 
46 patrolmen resigned; 1 captain, 2 sergeants and 6 patrolmen were retired on 
pension; 1 captain, 1 inspector, 1 lieutenant, 3 sergeants and 8 patrolmen died. 
(See Tables II, III, IV, VI.) 



6 PD. 49 

Police Officers Injured While on Dutt. 
The following statement shows tie number of police officers injured while on 
duty during the past year, the numter of duties lost by them on account thereof, 
and the causes of the injuries: 



How lNjrcRjn>. 



Number of 

Men Injured. 



Number of 
Dulles lost. 



In arresting prisoners 
In pursuing criminals 
By stopping runaways 
By cars and other vehicles 
Various other causes 

Total 



92 
24 

4 

60 

122 



302 



813 
403 
t 
0.10 
030 



2,700 



Work or vsz Department. 

Airesis. 
The total number of persons arreted counting each arrest as that of a separate 
person was S3.917 as against 76,732 tie preceding year, being an increase of 7,1S5. 
The percentage of decrease and increase was as follows: — 

Ter Cent. 

Offences against the person . . . - ...... Increase, 7.4 1 

Offences against property committed with Tidssire ...... Increase, 34. S3 

Offences against property committed without -salience ...... Increase, 8. Ho 

Malicious offences against property .......... Increase, 2.00 

Forgery and offences against the currency ........ Increase, 10.06 

Offences against the license law .......... Increase, 10.25 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. ........ Increase, 0.05 

Offences not included in the foregoing ......... Increase, 8.08 

There were 12,626 persons arrested! on warrants and 54,459 without warrants; 
16,832 persons were summoned by tie court; 79,44S persons were held for trial; 
4,469 were released from custody. Toe number of males arrested was 78,244; of 
females, 5,673; of foreigners, 29,304; or approximately 34.92 per cent; of minors, 
8,995. Of the total number arrested 21,263, or 25.33 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the five years from 1920 
to 1924 inclusive, was S215.363.82; in 1924 it wasS221,577.15; or $6,213.33 more 
than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 39,320; in 1924 it was 
43,014, or 3,694 more than the average. The average amount of witness fees 
earned was $12,697.14; in 1924 it was $14,059.70, or $1,362.56 more than the 
average. (See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness tLe average per day was 10S. There were 548 
more persons arrested than in 1923, ax increase of 1.40 per cent; 24.14 per cent of 
the arrested persons were nonres-idezru, and 38.92 per cent were of foreign birth. 
(See Table XI.) 

Bureau of Odbonal Investigation. 

The "identification room" now otatains 65,021 photographs, 55,081 of which 
are photographs with Bertillon mouKrements, a system used by the Department 
for the past twenty-six years. In acxnrdance with the Revised laws, chapter 225, 
section 18 and with the General Less, chapter 127, sections 27 to 29 both inclu- 
sive, we are allowed photographs widL Bertillon measurements taken of convicts 
in the State Prison and reformatory, » number of which have been added to our 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together wink the adoption of the system by the Depart- 
ment in 1898, is and will continue to le of great assistance in the identification of 
criminals. A large number of important identifications have thus been made 
during the year for this and other pofce departments, through which the sentences 
in many instances, have been matertaljr increased. The records of 1,139 criminals 
have been added to the records of tlw Bureau, which now contains a total of 
45,180. The number of cases reported at this office which have been investi- 
gated during this year is 40,062. Ttere are 39,174 cases reported on the assign- 
ment books kept for this purpose, and reports made on these cases are filed away 



P.D. 49 7 

for future reference. The system of indexing adopted by this Bureau for the use 
of the Department now contains a list of records, histories, photographs, dates of 
arrest, etc., of about 200,000 persons. There are also "histories and press clip- 
pings," now numbering 8,856 made by thi? Bureau, in envelope form, for police 
reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted in June, 1906, has 
progressed in a satisfactory manner, and with it the identification of criminals is 
facilitated. It has become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing corrobo- 
rating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are included in the state- 
ment of the general work of the Department, but as the duties are of a special 
character the following statement will be of interest: — 

Number of person arrested, prinri pally for felonies ........ 2^484 

Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered to officers from tnose States . 40 

Number of eases investigated ............ 40,062 

Number of extra duties performed ........... 1,796 

Number of eases of homicide and supposed homicide investigated and evidence prepared for trial 

in court ............... 203 

Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investigated and evidence prepared for court 7 

Number of days spent in court by officers .......... 2JM3 

Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, 215 years, 6 months. 

Amount of stolen property recovered ........ $1,079,093 43 

Number of photographs added to identification room ........ 1.H7 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 

United States 54.613 

British Provinces ..... 4.073 

Ireland 9X00 

England 702 

France . . . . . 115 

Germany ...... 410 

Italy 4.682 

Russia 4,527 

China 15« 

Greece ....... 751 

Sweden ....... Sol 

Scotland 458 

Spain . 118 

Norway ...... 276 

Poland 1,061 

Australia ...... 33 

Austria ....... 173 

Portugal 329 

Finland ...... 186 

Denmark ...... 80 

Holland ...... 37 

Wales 6 

East Indies 21 

Total 83^X7 

The number of arrests for the year was 83,917, being an increase of 7,185 over 
last year, and 10,061 more than the average for the past five years. There were 
39,536 persons arrested for drunkenness, being 548 more than last year, and 5,746 
more than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness this 
year there was an increase of 1.23 per cent in males and an increase of .23 per cent 
in females from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (S3.917), 693 were for violation of 
city ordinances; that is to say that 1 arrest in 121 was for such offence, or J82, 
per cent. 

Fifty-nine and fourteen hundredths per cent of the persons taken into custody 
were between the ages of twenty and forty. (See Table XH.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 22,604 and the fines amounted to 
§221,577.15. (See Table XIII.) 

Eighty-eight persons were committed to the State Prison, 2,482 to the House of 
Correction, 31 to the Women's Prison, 101 to the Reformatory Prison and 1,271 
to other institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 87 indefinite, 1,655 
years, 3 months; the total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 
43,014 and the witness fees earned by them amounted to $14,059.70. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was $278,021.89. 

Fifteen witnesses were detained at station houses, 204 were accommodated with 
lodgings, an increase of 81 from last year. There was an increase of .38 per cent 
in the number of sick and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about .37 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 



West Indica 95 

Turkey 102 

South America ..... 50 

Switserland ...... 16 

Belgium ...... 37 

Armenia ...... 110 

Africa . 8 

Hungary ...... 8 

Asia 4 

Arabia ....... 6 

Mexico 14 

Japan ....... 5 

Syria 192 

Roumania ...... 17 

Lithuania ...... 540 

Servia ....... 3 

Jugoslavia ...... 1 

India 1 

Egypt 1 

Albania ...... 7 

Bohemia ...... 1 

Cuba 3 



I 



8 P.D. 49 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the five vears from 1020 
to 1924 inclusive, was $1,825,659.35, in 1924 it was S1.S29.435.95 or S3.776.60 
more than the average. The amount of property stolen in and out *A the city 
•which was recovered by the Boston police was $2,547,376.29 as against 83,006,* 
293.17 last year or $45S ( 91G.S$ less. 

Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports having investigated 
S50 cases of death from the folk/wing causes: — 

Abonion ...... 3 



Accidental shooting .... 1 

Alcoholism ...... 24 

Asphyxiation ...... 5 

Automobile* ...... 4 

Burns 28 

Drowning ...... 48 

Electricity ...... 1 

Elevator ...... S 

Explosion ...... 1 

failing objects ..... 7 

Falls 91 



Machinery ...... 4 

Natural causes ..... 201 

Poifton ....... .11 

Kail road (steam) . . . . 17 

Railway (street) ..... 1 

.Stillborn* 

Suicides ...... 04 

Homicides ...... 101 

Teams ....... 1 



Total 830 



On 317 of the above cases inquests were held. 

Of the total number the following homicides were prosecuted in the counts: — 

Railway (street) 17 

Shot by officer 1 

Stone thrown ..... 1 



Automobiles ...... 127 

Boxing match ..... 1 

Burns ....... 1 

Elevators ...... 1 

Manslaughter 22 

Murder ...... 5 

Poison ....... 3 

K m] road (steam) ..... 3 



Suicides ...... 2 

Teams ....... fl 

Wrestling match ..... 1 



Total 101 

Lost, Aba.vdoxtd and Stolen- Propertt. 

On December 1, 192.3, there were 2,142 articles of lost, stolen or abandoned 

property in the custody of the property clerk; 1,257 were received during the year; 

797 pieces were sold at public auction and the proceeds SS95.G0 were turned over 

to the chief clerk; 192 packages containing $1,002.02 were turned over to the chief 
clerk; 492 packages were destroyed as worthless or sold as junk and the proceeds 
S4&5.70 turned over to the chief clerk; and 93 packages were returned to owners, 
finders or administrators, leaving 1,825 packages on hand. 

Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during the year and gfves the 
number of police detailed for duty at each: — 

1»&. Mm. 

Dee. 1. Braves Field. Boston College-IMy Cross football game 05 

Wee. 11, City Election 847 

!>«. 24, Bosv/n Common, Christmas Ev. celebration ........ 41 

Dee- 25, Cathedral of the Holy Cross. Midnight Mw 18 

Jan. 0. Mechanics Building, Police Ball 184 

Feb. 14, Mechanics Building, Firemen's Ball 30 

Mar. 5, Funeral of Lieutenant William F. Manning 30 

Mar. 8, Protection of "chain stores" 352 

Mar. 15, Protection of "chain stores" ........... 352 

Mar. 17, Evacuation Day parade ..... ..... 273 

Mar. 17, Funeral of Sergeant Thomas M. Mullen 23 

Mar. 21. Funeral of Inspector Michael M. Cronin 30 

Mar. 31-Apr. 2. Threatened strike of nsDi wagon drivers 00 

Apr. 12, Cathedral road race 28 

Apt. 10, Marathon race ............. 420 

Apr. 29, Preiidenlial primary .......... 484 

May 6, Dedication Edwin 0. Curtis Meaaorial '. 20 

May 1 1 , Mothers' Day exercises 82 

May 15, Ikying comer stone of Station W . . . . ' 67 

May 17, Boston Common, Boston 7"r*»s**Vs marble cutest ....... 10 

May 18, Memorial services at Navy Yasrl .......... 28 

May 18, Braves Field, open olr mass) 23 

May 19, East Boston, band concert and fireworks ........ 24 

May 25, Fenway Park, memorial serrie* ....... .58 

May 30, Work bone parado ............ 37 

6, Parade of Boston School CaoV«s ..... . .... 410 

16. Charlestown. evo of Bunker Hal Day 75 

17, Bunker Hill Doy norode and ouvxrts 305 

30, East Boston, bond concert and treworks 40 

Jt}j 1, South Station, arrival of distiaw-mhed rabbis . .... 25 

isoy 2. Boston Common, rehearsal of Jtsfy 4th pageant ....... 45 

>aly 3, East Boston, block party .......... 30 

*nly 4. Brighton, Independence Day rarade. .....' 52 



P.D. 49 



JulV 


4. 


July 


7. 


July 


8. 


July 


8. 


July 


10. 


July 


11. 


Aug. 


12. 


Aug. 


30. 


Aug. 


31. 


Sept. 


3. 


Sept. 


5. 


Sept. 6-7. 


Sept. 


6. 


Sept. 


7. 


Sept. 


8. 


Sept. 


9. 


Sept. 


12. 


Sept. 


2o. 


Oct. 


•> 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 4-10. 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


13. 



9 

Boston Common, Independence Day celebration ....... 185 

Mechanics Building, Elks' Convention ......... IS 

Boston Common, Elks' exercises .......... 36 

Braves Field, exhibition drill by Elks ......... II 

Elks" parade 1,005 

Funeral of Sergeant Michael E. Fitzgerald ........ 2 4 

Parade of the Grand Army of the Republic ........ 630 

Removal of First National Bank 3G9 

Franklin Field, athletic games .......... 31 

Funeral of Captain Charles T. Rcardon ........ 67 

East Boston, expected arrival "around the world airplanes" ..... 134 

Continued removal of First National Bank . ....... 184 

East Boston, arrival of "around the world airplanes" ...... 301 

Guarding airplanes and reception to officers ........ 66 

Departure of airplanes ........... 54 

State primary ............. 481 

Observance of Defence Day ........... 110 

Funeral of Patrolman, Albert Motroni ......... 54 

Parade of Military Order of World War 229 

Stadium, Harvard- Virginia football game ........ 51 

Bulletin Boards, baseball series ... ...... 461 

Mechanics Building, visit of Governor Smith of New York ...... 51 

Stadium. Harvard-MidcDebary football game ........ 69 

Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police Regiment, composed of Superior Officers, 
Officers of Rank and Patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three battalions, each 
with a military band (one of which was the Boston Police Department Traffic Band), and in 
command of a Major, so designated. The regiment included four mounted skirmishers, a 
sergeant and twenty men mounted on department horses, a Colonel commanding, with his 
Adjutant and Staff, officers from the respective Police Divisions and Units in military 
company formation, soot -gun companies. Patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns, 
a motorcycle unit, nod a machine gun unit mounted on automobiles. The regiment was 
reviewed at City Hall by His Honor the Mayor; at the State House by His Honor, Lieuten- 
ant-Governor Alvan T. Fuller, and on the Parade Grounds of the Common by His Honor 
the Lieutenant-Governor and the Police Commissioner, Hon. Herbert A. Wilson, . 1,458 
Detail on line of parade on Boston Common ........ 78 

Parade of Knights of Pythias .......... 453 

Harvard-Holy Cross football game ......... 88 

Parade 21 1th Coast Artillery, First Corps Cadets . 76 

Parade of Women s Christian Temperance Union ....... 169 

Stadium. Harvard- Dartmouth football game ........ 98 

Braves Field, Boston CoOege- Allegheny football game ...... 27 

Republican torchlight parade .......... 398 

Stadium. Harvard- Boston University football game ....... 103 

Braves Field, Boston CoQege-Hasketl football game ....... 43 

Stadium. Harvard-Princeton football game ........ 94 

Braves Field. Boston Couege-Marquette football game ...... 33 

Stadium. Harvard- Brown football game ......... 97 

Braves Field, Boston College-Centenary football game ...... 38 

Bulletin Boards, football returns ... ........ 45 

Braves Field. Boston College- Vermont football game ...... 33 

Braves Field, Boston College-Holy Cross football game . . . . . 117 

Bulletin Boards, football returns .......... .39 

Missing Persons. 

The following table shows the number of persons lost or runaway during the 
year:— 

Total number reported ............. 907 

Total number found .............. 799 

Total number still missing ............. 108 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 



Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


13, 


Oct. 


IS. 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


2.5, 


Oct. 


25, 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 




Nov. 


«. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


29. 


Nov. 


29, 





Mi&sixa. 


Focxd. 


Sttlz. Missing. 




Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 

males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Uoder 15 Tears 

Over 15 years, under 21 years . 

Over 21 years 


214 
206 
198 


65 

141 
83 


204 
173 
163 


61 
127 
72 


10 
33 
36 


4 
14 
11 


Total* .... 


618 


289 


539 


260 


79 


29 



10 



P.D. 49 



MiwKi.i-ANEOus Business. 





lOtt-SZ 


191S-S3 


lBSS-ti 


\imssixjo*A ezeldren cared for ..... 


11 


18 


10 


AffvVnu reported 








6.196 


6.671 


6.761 


B<rr lrS-tigs foecd open and marl* seeurr 
Ciars Korewticatea .... 








5.139 


4.439 


3,592 








59,528 


59,400 


89,559 


£>a&0>roas bsMinfcs reported . 








15 


15 


29 


DMyW ciamneys reported . 
Dead bodies eared for . 








10 
324 


8 
336 


11 

25K 


Dead bodies recovered 








26 


54 


55 


DeierxiTe cesspools reported 








69 


52 


76 


Defenuve drains and vaults rep*.rtc«J 








9 


8 


3 


DefeeErre fire alarms and clocks reported 








15 


4 


13 


HeUrzjxe ca* pipes reported 








32 


28 


24 


rMrr-jv# brdraata reported 








90 


117 


61 


Defeexxre lamps reported . . 








15.S70 


12,393 


10,797 


DeiWxrre sewers reporter! . 








112 


56 


114 


Defeesrre sidewalks and streets rrportcd 








8.975 


8,612 


8,012 


Defeesrve bridges reported 








6 


5 


- 


Deferxrre wires reported 








11 


8 


— 


Defecsrre fences reported 








1 


— 


— 


Defeesrve tree* reported . 








14 


- 


- 


Dc^eezrre water Kates reported . 








1 


9 


— 


Deierxrre srater pipes reported 








114 


156 


104 


Defejscrre street signs reported 
Discjgrbarjras suppressed 








23 


17 


— 








676 


571 


425 


Extra duties performed 








43.412 


37,843 


3S.157 


Fire lomi even .... 








2.509 


2.829 


3,420 


Fire* *-s3injrttt*L>d .... 








1.404 


1,626 


1.UH4 


Ida***- persotft taken in charge 








434 


424 


439 


Ixtxoxsmed persons assisted . 








19 


33 


21 


Lose '-adldreti restored . . 








1,839 


1,617 


1.611 


Fersoais rescued from drowning 








19 


10 


20 


rack aoad injured persons assisted 








7.946 


8.214 


8,246 


rtrar teams reported and put up 








2.087 


78 


71 


r«tre*s •ubstrortioas removed 








2.217 


1.747 


949 


w ater nmfuLf to waste reported 








566 


570 


608 


*jux*» detained 








24 


21 


16 



Inm'jxtor of Claims 
The officer detailed to aw-ist the committee on claims and law department in 
irivor.igating claims agairi»t the city for alleged damage of various kinds, reports 
that be investigated 2,20S cases, one of which was on account of damage done by 
a dojg. 

Olhtr Services Performed. 

S "omL-r of eases investigated ............ 2.208 

Somr>r of witnesses examined ............ 13,627 

NomLer of notices served ............. 6,623 

VvaCer of permissions granted 'to slicak Ui police officers regarding accidents and to examine 

polooe records) .............. 8.074 

Sssjsjc&ssj of dars in court ..... ....... 110 

S jmUi of eases settled on reeoautuelidutioii from this office ....... 90 

C"-oCe»-.»d f-<r fiimjge to the nty » proper!) and Mils paid to repair ititi.c .... $1,40000 

IIoLriK of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court house, Somerset Street. 
AH the women arrested in the city proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston 
and Boxbury Crossing dwtricta are taken to the house of detention in vans provided 
for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the matron until the next session 
«f the court before which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they 
are returned to the howe of detention, and from there conveyed to the jail or 
institution to which they have Ik*»i (sentenced. 

Doring the year 3,518 were committed for the following: — 

Dnmk*meam ............... 1,718 

Lareesnjr , '394 

N'i<ba walking ............... si 

Fornscaajon ....,.......!! 148 

Idle ssud disorderly ............. 86 

Assa m and tsxttery 27 

A-dulaerjr -....,,...,. 48 

Violaaxas of Isrfaor law .....'....'.'.'. 30 

K**pm«t Lotsse of ill fame ....'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 16 

\ aryvus mo*t eaoaea 303 

T,uul 2,941 



P.D.49 11 

Re-commitments. 

From Municipal court ...... ....... 138 

From County jail .............. 439 

Grand total 3,518 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boies. 

The total number of boxes in use is 508. Of these, 343 are connected with the 
underground system and 165 with the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this service responded to 1,605 trouble calls; 
inspected 508 signal boxes, 18 signal desks and 955 batteries; repaired 153 box 
movements, 38 registers, 62 polar box bells, 53 locks, 27 time stamps, 3 stable 
motors, 7 stable registers, 12 vibrator bells, 9 relays, 6 pole changers and 8 electric 
fans, besides repairing all bell and electric light work at headquarters and the various 
stations. There have been made 48 plungers, 34 complete box fittings, 42 line 
blocks, 39 automatic hooks, 3 stable boards, 1 charging board and a large amount 
of small work done which cannot be classified. 

A new police signal box has been installed at Columbus Park, Police Division 12. 

The Police Signal Service has underground cable laid and jointed ready to change 
over to meet conditions when the new building for Police Division 2 is ready for 
occupancy. 

When the new building for Police Division 18, Hyde Park district, is completed, 
the Police Signal System at that place will be changed to conform to the system 
used in the rest of the Department. The system in use in the Hyde Park district, 
since its annexation to Boston, has been different from that in other sections of the 
city. 

In 1924 underground prescribed district ducts have been installed in Porter 
Street, East Boston district. Police signal box 31 located in the latter district 
will be connected with the underground system. 

In South Boston a duct has been laid and Box 45, Police Division 6 will be 
connected with such underground system. 

Since the introduction of motor vehicles in this Department, it has been neces- 
sary to install additional service connecting the sleeping quarters of "wagon men" 
so-called (isolated from the garages), with the stations. As new garages are com- 
pleted new and improved call boards are installed. 

The Police Signal Service now has charge of 83 reflector spotlights, which have 
been installed by the Commissioner for the regulation of traffic. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 Ford sedan and 1 Ford 
truck. 

During the year the wagons made 52,702 runs, covering an aggregate distance of 
81,360 miles. There were 39,897 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 4,684 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station houses, hospitals or 
their homes and 406 runs were made to take lost children to station houses. There 
were 2,701 runs to fires and 551 runs for liquor seizures. During the year there 
were 508 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery circuits and 70 telephone cir- 
cuits; 579,435 telephone messages and 3,937,422 "on duty" calls were sent over 
the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal service at the present 
time: — 



18 signal desks 

72 circuits 
508 street signal boxes 

14 stable call boards 

78 test boxes 
955 cells of battery 
622,017 feet underground cable 



224,140 feet overhead cable 

21.220 feet of duct 

66 manholes 

1 White truck 

1 Ford truck 

1 Ford sedan 



12 P.D. 49 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the police of Division S, comprising the harbor 
and the islands therein, were as follows: — 

Value of property recovered, consistinc of boats, rigging, float stages, etc. . . $31,700.73 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded .......... D78 

Vessels ordered from the channel ........... 341 

Vessels removed from the channel by police steamers ....... 3 

Assistance rendered vessels ............ S2 

Assistance rendered wharfingers ........... 1 

Permits grunted to discharge cargoes from resseis at anchor ...... II 

Obstructions removed from channel .......... 2H 

Alarms of fire on water front attended .......... 23 

Boats challenged 2.331 

Sick and injured persons assisted ........... 4 

Dead bodies recovered ............ 39 

Dead bodies eared for ............. 3 

Persons rescued from drowning ........... 2 

Vessels assigned to anchorage ...... ..... 7.VI 

Cases investigated ............. 3GK 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor ...... 1H0 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was S.C66; 7,203 being from 
domestic ports, 4S5 from the British Provinces and 97S from foreign ports. Of 
the latter 955 were steamers, 5 schooners and IS motor vessels. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from June 1G to October 25. 
The launch *'E. U. Curtis" cruised nightly from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge. 
Fifteen cases were investigated, one hundred forty-seven boats challenged for 
contraband, $500 worth of property recovered, one obstruction removed from 
channel, assistance rendered to fourteen boats in distress by reason of disabled 
engines, stress of weather, etc., and towing them with persons on board to a place 
of safety, one dead body recovered, found floating in the water, four arrests made 
for violation of United States Cu-tom Laws, two motor boats seized with their 
cargoes of liquor and turned over to U. S. Custom Guards. Only three cases of 
larceny of small amounts from vessels in Dorchester were reported during the 
season. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November 1923, there were 33 horses in the service. During 
the year 2 were purchased, 1 received as a gift, 1 sold and 1 transferred to the 
Public Works Department. At the present time there are 34 in the servico as 
shown by Table IX. 

Vehicle Service. 
A uiomobiles. 

There are 55 automobiles in the f«rvice at the present time: 14 at headquarters; 

1 at the house of detention, used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; S in 
the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; 4 in the South Boston 
district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 2 in the East Boston district, attached to 
Division 7; 4 in the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 2 in the 
Dorchester district, attached' to Division 11; 2 in the Jamaica Plain district, 
attached to Division 13; 2 in the Brighton district, attached to Division 14; 1 in 
the Charlestown district, attached to Division 15; 3 in the Back Bay and Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 2 in the West Roxbury district, attached to Division 17; 

2 in the Hyde Park district, attached to Division 18; 2 in the Mattapan district, 
attached to Division 19; 2 assigned for use of the traffic divisions and 4 unassigned. 
(See page 13.) 

Cost of Sunning Automobiles. 

5' Dail » $22,417 45 

I ,re V 3.023 69 

Gasoline. 7 M7 33 



Oil 



1,738 K8 



Morale 3,410 07 

License fee. _ 240 00 

ToUl $39,383 10 

Ambulance*. 
The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 1 and combination 
automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2,* 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 
13, 14, 15, 10, 17, 18 and 19, and there are 4 unassigned. 

• Not yet in commission. 



P.D. 49 13 
During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey sick and injured persons 
to the following places: 

City Hospital 3,«J> 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) 1.379 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Borton District) 328 

Calls where services were not required . ....... 119 

Psychopathic Hospital ............. 84 

Home ................ 80 

MassachusetU General Hospital ............ 70 

Monroe ................ 54 

St. Elisabeth '■ Hospital 42 

Police station bouses .............. 29 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 24 

Carney Hospital .............. 12 

Homeopathic Hospital ............. 9 

Forest Hills Hospital * 

Beth Israel Hospital .............. 2 

Chelsea Naval Hospital ............. 2 

New England Hospital for Women and Children ......... 

Cambridge Rebel Hospital ............. 1 

Deaconness Hospital .............. 

Dudley Hospital 

Eliot Hospital 1 

Lying-in Hospital .............. 

McLean Hospital .............. 1 

Public Health, United States Service Hospital 1 

Trumbull Hospital 1 

Total 5,693 









List of Vehicles used by the Departmeni 










6 
a 


« 
















j3 
*3 


5*3 


a 

o 


i 


A 


a 


2 










a 








> 1 




Dn- is loxs. 


2 


-< 


£ 


a 


»•* 


a 


O " 
























o 

3 


~ 3 

3 3 


© 


o 

3 


i 


o 

s 


•S3 

Z X 


3 

o 




< 


w< 


O 


< 


3 


A 


s 


H 


Headquarters 


_ 


_ 


_ 


13 


i 


_ 


_ 


14 


Division 1 






1 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Division 2 . 






- 


1* 


- 


1 


— 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 . 






— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Division 4 






— 




— 


— 


l 


— 


— 


2 


Division 5 






- 




— 


1 


— 


l 


— 


3 


Division 6 






— 




— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


2 ' 


Division 7 






- 




— 


1 


— 


l 


1 


4 


Division 9 . 






— 




— 


1 


— 


2 


1 


5 


Division 10 . 






— 




— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Division 11 






— 




— 


1 


— 


2 


_ 


4 


Division 12 . 






- 




— 


1 


~ 


3 


1 


6 


Division 13 






— 




— 


1 


— 


4 


1 


7 


Division 14 






- 




— 


1 


_ 


5 


2 


9 


Division 15 . 






— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Division 16 






— 




— 


2 


— 


8 


3 


14 


Division 17 






- 




— 


1 


_ 


5 


1 


8 


Division 18 






— 




— 


1 


— 


2 


1 


5 


Division 19 






— 




— 


1 


— 


S 


1 


8 


Division 20 . 






— 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


• 3 


Division 21 






— 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


3 


Joy Street Stable 






- 


- 


2 


— 


— 






2 


Unaasigned . 






~ 


4 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Totals . 






1 


22 


2 


30 


2 


40 


14 


111 



* Not yet in com mission. 

Public Carriages. 

During the year there were l,762t carriage licenses granted, being an increase 
of 239 as compared with last year; 1,410 motor carriages were licensed, being an 
increase of 39 compared with last year. 

There have been 37 horse-drawn carriages licensed during the year. 

There were S8 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., left in 
carriages during the year, which were turned over to the inspector; 34 of these 
were restored to the owners, and the balance placed in the custody of the lost 
property bureau. 

t Or* canceled for nonpayment. 



14 P.D. 49 

The following statement Rives details concerning public hackney carriages, as 
well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Number of application* for carriage, licenses received ........ J '21, 

Number of carriages licensed ,,....•••■•• JJA 

Number of licenses transferred ,...••• ..... w# 

Number of licenses canceled or revoked ....-•••■■ *** 

Number of carriages inspected ,....■••'••■ i*xI2 

Applications for drivers licenses reported upon rS 

Number of complaints against drivers Investigated ........ *>' 

Number of warrants obtained ......•••-■• _S 

Number of days spent in court ,,...•••-••• *■ 

Aruclea left in carriages reported by rlllsena ......-••• •>■' 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers ........•■ » 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ......--•• ' * 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned to persons or corpora- 
tions licensed to set up and use liackney carriages, places designated as special 
stands for such licensed carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1924, 60S such special stands. 

Of these special stands, there have been 120 canceled and 26 transferred. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
During the year ending November 30, 1924, there have been issued licenses for 
50 sight-seeing automobiles and 33 special stands for them. There have been 54 
operators' licenses granted. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and use trucks, wagons 
or other vehicles to convey merchandise from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 5,227 application* for such licenses were received; 5,218 of 
these were granted and 9 rejected. 

Of these licenses 110 were subsequently canceled for nonpayment of license fee, 
10 for other causes and 49 transferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Lisiino Wohk is Boston, etc. 



Year. 


Cnnvuas. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903' 

1004 

IMS 

190*1 

1907 

1908 

1009 

1910> 

191 1 




181,04 5 
103,19.'. 
101, .'.47 
10.'.,44O 

19.'.,0OO 

201,2.'.5 
201.301 
203.003 
2O0,B2fi 
214,178 


1014 

1015 

1010' 

1017 

1018 

1010 

1020 

I021< 

1022 

1023 












210.364 
220,883 

221.207 
224.012 
227.460 
235.248 
480.783 
480,106 
477,547 



> 1903 to 1909. both inclusive. listing una on May 1. 

< 1910 listing changed to April I. 

1 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 law changed to include women In listing. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in April, of the present 
year: — 

Male 239.001 

Female 246,586 

Total 485,077 

Lixtinq Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services rendered by members 
of the police force, were as follows: — 

Printing »40.484 80 

Clerical service* 20,940 00 

Ktatiooery 287 30 

Interpreters 180 68 

Telephone 25 20 

Table 18 38 

Total $01,030 32 






) 



! 



P.D.49 ' 15 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 1 1.288 

April 2 1.260 

April 3 1.J06 

April 4 JOo 

Aprils 333 

April 7 16 

April 8 * 

Police Work ox Jury Lists. 
The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, as- 
sisted the Election Commissioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons 
proposed for jury service. The police findings in 1924 may be summarized as 
follows: — 



1924 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Convicted of crime . 
Un6t for various reasons 
Apparently fit . 



1,183 
318 
253 
544 

5,924 



Total 



8,222 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the city, on a written 
application of any officer or board in charge of a department of the city of Boston, 
or on the application of any responsible corporation or person, such corporation or 
person to be liable for the official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending Nov. 30, 1924, there were 1,446 special police officers 
appointed; 8 applications for appointment were refused for cause. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows: — 

From United States Government ............ 25 

From city departments ............. 371 

From county of Suffolk ............. 25 

From railroad corporations . . . . . . . . . . . . Ill 

From other corporations or associations .......... 697 

From theatres and other places of amusement ......... i96 

From private institutions ............. 10 

From churches ............... II 

1.446 

Railroad Pouce. 
There were 180 persons appointed railroad policemen during the year, 139 of 
whom were employees of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 40 of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad and 1 of the Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 
The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses received was 24,844. 
Of these 24,490 were granted, of which 163 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 
24,327. During the year 444 licenses were transferred, 931 canceled, 27 revoked 
and 278 applications were rejected. The officers investigated 624 complaints 
arising under these licenses. The fees collected and paid into the city treasury 
amounted to §61,319.25. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 

Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 
During the year there were 55 applications for itinerant musicians' licenses 
received, two of which were rejected. Five licenses were subsequently canceled 
on account of nonpayment of license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are inspected before the license 
is granted, and it is arranged by a qualified musician, not a member of the Depart- 
ment, that such instruments shall be inspected in April and September of each year. 



16 PD. 49 

During the year S2 instruments were inspected, with the following results: — 



Kind or I.saTnrMEKT. 


Number 


Number 


Number 




inspected. 


passed 


rejected. 




30 


28 


8 




16 


11 


6 




8 


8 


— 




2 


2 


- 




4 


4 


- 




1 


1 


- 




3 


3 


- 




2 


o 


- 




o 


2 


- 




4 


4 


— 




4 


4 


- 




82 


69 


13 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licences nre granted to bands of persons over sixteen years 
of age to play on musical instruments in company with designated processions at 
stated times and places. 

The following shows the niim!>cr of applications made for these licenses during 
the last five years, and the action taken thereon: — 



Yeah. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 






308 




1921 


294 


292 


2 


19" 


309 


308 


1 




246 


245 


1 


1924 


231 


231 


"" 



Cawcyino Daxgerous Weapons. 
The following return shown the number of applications made to the Police Com- 
missioner for licenses to carry loaded revolvers in the Commonwealth during the 
past five years, the number of such applications granted, the number refused and 
the number revoked: — 



Y'eah- 


Application*. 1 Granted. 


Rejected. 


Revoked. 


1920 

1*21 

1922 

1923 

1924 


2.793 
3.190 
3,100 
3.191 
2,«M 


2.481 
2.843 
2.916 
3.067 
2.879 


312 
347 
184 
124 
119 


4 

4 
8 
6 

7 



Pl'BLiC I/jdging Houses. 
The following shows the numl)er of public lodging houses licensed by the Police 
Commissioner under chnptcr 2-12 of the Acts of 1904 as amended, during the year, 
the location of each house and the number of lodgers accommodated. 



Location. 


NunilxY 
lodged. 


Location". 


Number 
lodged. 


19 Caowway Street 
194 Commercial Street 


l.r.H* 

45.MI 
14.910 
36.1.19 
40. 140 


1202 Washington Street . 
1025 Washington Street . 

Total .... 


25.000 
30.500 


17 Daria Street 
1Q51 WaaLinffton Street . 


200.154 



• [>it'.miiiij«| buaineas April, 1924. 

Pensions and Benefits. 



TENSIONS AND 15ENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1923, there were 254 pensioners on the roll. During the year 
19 died, viz.: 3 captains, 2 inspectors, 1 sergeant and 13 patrolmen; and 11 were 






P.D. 49 17 

added, viz.: 1 captain, 2 sergeants, 6 patrolmen and the widows of Patrolmen 
Albert Motroni and Thomas J. Quinan who died from injuries received in the per- 
formance of duty, leaving 246 on the roll at date, 214 men and 32 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year amounted to $195,- 
304.26, and it is estimated that $196,970.66 will be required for pensions in 1925. 
This does not include pensions for 1 deputy superintendent, 1 captain, 4 lieuten- 
ants, 2 sergeants and 17 patrolmen, all of whom are sixty-five years old or more, 
and entitled to be pensioned on account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the thirtieth day of November 
last, amounted to $207,550. There are 62 beneficiaries at the present time, and 
there has been paid to them the sum of S7.484.10 during the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past year, including the 
pensions, house of detention and listing persons twenty years of age or more, but 
exclusive of the maintenance of the police signal service, were $4,551,542.51. (See 
Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees from licenses over which 
the police have supervision, for the sale of unclaimed and condemned property, 
uniform cloth, etc., was $67,147.76. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the year was $50,454.46. 
(See Table XVIII.) 



18 



P.D. 49 



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20 



P.D. 49 



Table III. 



Lid of Officer* Retired during the Year ending Xovcmticr 30, 1924, giving the Age 
the Time of Retirement and the Sumter of Years' Strrite of Each. 



at 



Name. 


Cause of Retirement . 


Age at 
Time of 
Retire- 
ment. 
(Years). 


Years of 
Service. 


Milton E. Bailey . . 
Jrai.lt A. BanbolnifcM 
Clinton E Bowley 
Mi/Li^! J. Cumin 
Thorn** II. Flaherty . 
William II. Gordon . 
Patrick J. I>«xd 
Ed»aH J. Murphy 
WUlian* E Wiaetaan . 










Incapacitated 
Age . 

Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Me 

Ace 

Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 


58 
CO 
50 
35 
G3 
64 
32 
5S 
50 


32 
29 
29 

6 
30 
35 

3 
31 
31 



Table IV. 
Lvi of Officer* who were promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the Year ending 

X member .TO, 102.',. 



Date. 



May 13. 
May 13. 

J.ri «. 

May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
May 13. 
Slay 13. 
May 13. 
June 21. 

June 2 4. 
June 21. 
May 13. 



1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1924 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1924 
1924 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 



Naue and Rank. 



Inspector Gustaf Gustafson to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John F. Aheam to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant James Laffey to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Louis E. Lmz to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John W. Pyne to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant James P. Smith to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant Archibald F. Campbell to the rank 'if Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Michael Hcaly to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Cornelius Brennan to tne rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John T. Clifford to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William R. Connolly to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Dennis F. Desmond to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John E. Geary to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank E. Gilman to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Timothy F. Kellard to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael A. Kelley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Elkannh W. D. LeBlanc to the rank of Sergeant- 
Patrolman John F. Montague to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles C. Ridlon to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Cornelius Shea to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Walter D. Thompson to the rank of Sergeant. 



Table V. 

XurrJjer of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year who were appointed 

on the Force in the Year stated. 





*j 


i 

3 J, 
00 g 


5 
9 






% 








Date ArrotsrrED. 


a 




I 


5 


i 

c 


S 


3 

d 


s 






I 

3 
X 


a 


]5 


5 


i 

■ 

c 


E 
Z 


& 

B 

e 

DO 


c 


25 
a 


r- 


1«75 .... 












_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1*K0 










— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


18*1 










— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


1SX2 










_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


— 


2 


— 


2 


6 


una 










_ 


— 


_ 


1 


— 


- 


— 


— 


1 


ISM 










— 


- 


_ 


— 


- 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1SH5 










_ 


— 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


— 


5 


6 


HvKO 










— 


- 


_ 


2 


I 


- 


- 


f 


8 


1S«7 










_ 


- 


— 


1 


3 


- 


2 


7 


13 


ISM 










1 


_ 


_ 


i 


1 


G 


1 


15 


25 


1SM» 












_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


H 


9 


lfXj 










_ 


_ 


_ 


] 


*» 


2 


3 


2 


10 


ISM 








- 


- 


1 


1 


~ 


1 


3 


7 


13 



il 



P.D. 49 21 

Table V.— Concluded. 
Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year icho were appoint- 
ed on the Force in the Year ttaled. 







L 


b 
















c 


2 


o 














Date appointed. 


g 

3 

e 


B 

ha 


B 

2. 


■j 


« 


i 

a 
a 
a 


c 


E 






B 

s 
to 


B* ~ 




O 


£ 

8 


3 
fa 


5 

X 


£ 


3 

s 

o 
h 


1S92 .... 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


2 


7 


13 


1S93 








— 


— 


— 


5 


3 


4 


11 


22 


45 


ISM 








— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


1 


7 


4 


14 


1S95 








- 


1 


— 


7 


2 


4 


23 


40 


77 


1896 








- 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


2 


8 


13 


1S97 








- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1S98 








- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


7 


11 


21 


1900 








— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


5 


14 


22 


45 


1901 








— 


- 


— 


— 


2 


3 


9 


5 


19 


1902 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


1903 








— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


3 


10 


16 


30 


1904 








— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


9 


10 


22 


1905 








- 


— 


— 


— 


I 


— 


7 


-» 


10 


1906 








— 


- 


— 


— 


1 


— 


4 


2 


7 


1907 








- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


9 


10 


20 


1903 








— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


- 


10 


10 


23 


1909 








- 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


4 


8 


1910 








- 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


3 


3 


7 


1911 








- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


4 


1912 








— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


3 


S 


13 


1913 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


2 


2 


1914 








— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1915 








- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


1916 








- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


4 


4 


1917 








— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


a 


1919 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


737 


737 


1920 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


233 


233 


1921 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


LSI 


151 


1922 








- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


» 


88 


1923 








- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


146 


146 


1924 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


101 


101 


Tota 


la 






1 


3 


1 


2S 


22 


39 


147 


1.715 


1,966 



Table VI. 
Officers Discharged and Resigned during the Year eroding November 30 f 192$. 



fUan 



Xame. 



DucrjargedL 



Resigned. 



Length of 
Service. 



Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolnian 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 
Patrolman 



Harold F. Alexander 
Ralph I. Bailey 
Edward X. Baker 
George F. Bergeron . 
Thomas E. Benningham 
Joseph H. Bird 
William J. Boyd 
William J. Bradley . 
Edward J. Carroll 
George A. Chalmers 
Leslie M. Chubbuck 
Daniel J. If. Cleary 
Roy Clifford . 
John J. Coffey 
James R. Connaughton 
John D. Corbett 
Stephen L. Cosgrove 
James J. CosleUo 
Leo G. Coetello 
Francis L. Cotter 
LawTence P. Cronin . 
George R- Day 
Quentin L Dever 
Frank L. Dolloff 
Millard F. D. Eldredge 
James Farren , 
John J. Foley . 
Martin F. Foley 
James P. Fox . 
Gerald F. Garten 
Rocco Giurannucci . 



June 14. 1924 
Aug. 21, 192* 
May 27. 1924 
Apr. 1$. 1*24 

Sept. 24. 1924 

Sot. 10. 1924 
Apr. 26. 1924 
Mar IS, 1924 

Feb. 11. 1924 



May 2S. 1924 

Apr. 17,19*4 
May 3, 1924 



Sept. 27, 1924 
Mar. 25. 1924 

Feb. It 1924 



May 1, 1924 
Dec. 22, 1923 
Mar. 13. 1924 
Dec. 21. 1923 
Apr. 14, 1924 



Dec. 27, 1923 
July 18, 1924 

May 9, 1924 

Nov. 20. 1924 
Sept. 10, 1924 

Xov. 22. 1924 



May 21. 1924 

July 9, 1924 

Jan. 9, 1924 

Dec. 22, 1923 

Jan. 14, 1924 



3 Vts years. 

1 Ve years. 

2 Ve years. 

3 Ve y*ars. 

4 */fc years. 
3*/e years. 
4 Ve years. 

2 Ve years. 
4 */e years. 

3 years. 

4 Ve years. 

4 months. 

5 years. 
4 Ve years. 

3 Ve years. 

4 Ve years. 

4 Ve years. 

3 Vis years. 
4" It: years. 
2 J Ve years. 

5 Ve years. 

4 Ve years. 
4 Ve years. 
4 Ve years. 

3 Ve years. 

4 Vis years. 
4 Ve years. 
4 Ve years. 
1 month. 

6 ■aonths. 
3 */e years. 



22 



P.D. 49 





Table VI - 


-Concluded. 








KaSK. 


Name. 


Discharged. 


Resigned. 


Length of 
Service. 


Paxrobcan 


John J. Gorham 


_ 


_ 


Apr. 


26. 1924 


3 Vu years. 


Patrofcnan 


Joseph A. Grimes 


Nov. 10, 


1924 


— 


— 


5 years. 


Patrolman 


Chris Hammeralottgb 


Mar. 15. 


1924 


— 


- 


4 Vu years. 


Patrobnan 


Walter O. Hastings . 


Mnr. 14. 


1924 


— 


- 


4 Vu years. 


Patrofenan 


Frederick G. Hicrm? 


- 


- 


Jan. 


1. 1924 


25 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Lester D. Hill . 


- 


- 


May 15. 1924 


3 years. 


Patrobnan 


Melvin A. Hooper . 


— 


— 


Feb. 


25, 1924 


7 months. 


Patrolman 


Vincent M. James 


- 


— 


Dee. 


3, 1923 


3 »/i« years. 


Patrolman 


Edward F. June 


Nov. 21. 


1924 


— 


— 


4'Vn years. 


Patrolman 


Anthony W. Kahler . 


Mar. 14. 


1924 


- 


— 


3 Vu years. 


Patrol-nan 


Martin A. Keeley 


May 15. 


1924 


— 


— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


James F. Kelly 


Mar. 15. 


1924 


— 


— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


John T. Kevin. Jr. . 


— 


— 


Apr. 


24, 1924 


4 yeans. 


Patrolman 


Bernard F. Keougn . 


Sept. 12. 


1924 


— 


— 


3 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


William H. F. Kin* . 


- 


— 


Feb. 


16. 1924 


4>/u years. 


Patrolman 


Henry J. Lane 


Nov. 21. 


1924 


- 


— 


5 years. 


Patrolman 


Walter L. Leonard . 


— 


— 


Apr. 


8, 1924 


1 Vu years. 


Patrolman 1 


Frank P. Lurinsld . 


Mar. 14, 


1924 




— 


9 months. 


Patcpiawa 


Edward G. Lynch . 
Wilfred N. MarfieJd 


Mar. 15. 


1924 


— 


— 


3 years. 


Patrolman 


Mnr. 15. 


1924 


- 


- 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


George R. Mitcheil . 


- 


— 


Aug. 21. 1924 


4 */u years. 


Patrolman 


John J- Moriarty 


— 


— 


Oct. 


24, 1924 


2 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Matthew J. Moylan 


- 


- 


Apr. 


17, 1924 


21 days. 


Patrolman 


Antony Mulligan 


— 


— 


Get. 


1. 1924 


4 10 /u years. 


Patrolman 


James McCarthy 


Feb. 15. 


1924 


- 


— 


7 months. 


T*t*.rr ^TTjan 


Walter E. McEntw . 


— 


— 


Apr. 


10, 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Charles E. McN'ally 


— 


— 


Apr. 


3, 1924 


2 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Arthur E. Nadreaa . 


Feb. 12. 


1924 




— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Charles J. Olirenberzer 


- 


— 


July 


30. 1924 


2 months. 


Patrolman 


Arthur B. Olson 


- 


- 


June 


16. 1924 


3'/u years. 


Patrolman 


Peter J. OMailey 


- 


— 


June 20, 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Harr>' M- Otto 


- 


— 


Oct. 


25, 1924 


10 days 


Patrolman 


Clarence A. Pierce . 


- 


- 


Not. 


26, 1924 


5 years. 


Patrolman 


Harold W. Petersen . 


Mar. 19. 


1924 


— 


— 


2 ! /u years. 


Patrolman* 


Edward J. Quijdey . 


Aug. 1, 


1924 


— 


— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Robert L. Reid 


— 


— 


Nor. 


29, 1924 


2 months. 


Patrolman 


George Roberts 


— 


— 


Feb. 


20, 1924 


4 Vu yenrs. 


Patrolman 


Patrick J. Ryan 


Mar. 19. 


1924 


— 


— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Joseph Schwartx 


- 


— 


Feb. 


28. 1924 


4 */u years. 


Patrolman 


Stephen J. Sheehan . 


— 


— 


July 


14, 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


James R. Small 


Apr. I, 


1924 


- 


— 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


James J. Stacey 


- 


— 


June 


27. 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Albert A. Stober 


— 


— 


Dee. 


8. 1923 


4 months. 


Patrolman 


Joseph Sullivan 


Aug. 14. 


1924 


- 


- 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Matthew J. Sullivan 


Dec. 26. 


1923 


— 


— 


3Vu years. 


m atrocsnan 


Peter F. Sullivan 


Feb. 13. 


1924 


— 


- 


4 Vu years. 


Paxrotman 


James Tagliarino 


- 


— 


July 


21. 1924 


4 */u years. 


Patrolman 


Henry M. Van Patten 


— 


— 


July 


7. 1924 


3 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Roy E. Varouro 


- 


— 


Jan. 


21. 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


Martin C. Welch 


- 


— 


May 


26, 1924 


4 Vu years. 


Patrolman 


William H. White . 


- 


- 


Apr. 


19, 1924 


4 Vu years. 



1 Reinstated afur public hearing March 24, 1924. 
3 Reinstated after public hearing August 4, 1924. 

Table VII. 
Sumber of Days' Absence from Duly by Reason of Sickness during the Year ending 

Sorember 30, 1924. 



December. 1923 
Juunrr. 1924 
February. 1924 
Muck. 1924 
ApriL 1924 . 
Mar. 1924 . 
June. 1924 . 








1.003 
1.407 
1.243 
1.160 
1.107 
l.ii.i.' 
*S5 


July. 1924 .... 
August. 1921 
September. 1924 . 
October. 1924 
November. 1924 . 


914 
725 
7G4 
760 
836 





Average number of men on the force 
Average number of men sick daily . 



33, or U 



. 1.963 
I per cent. 



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Table DL 
Xumber and Distribution of Horses in the Department. 



P.D. 49 



Dmaoxi 


Wagon. 


Patrol. 


Killing. 


Total. 




1 


1 


24 

8 


24 


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10 


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1 


32 


31 







Table X. 

Xumber of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending Nov. SO, 192/f. 



Total. 



Headquarters 










2.099 


385 


2.484 


Division 1 . 










7.436 


182 


7/138 


Division 2 . 










3.014 


430 


3.444 


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5,665 


533 


6.198 


Division 4 . 










3.257 


299 


3.550 


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8.692 


1.235 


9.927 


Division 6 . 










5.S2S 


337 


6.165 


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5.167 


228 


5.395 


Di vision 8 . 










60 


3 


63 


Division 9 - 










5.330 


3S9 


5.719 


Division 10 . 










5.434 


483 


5.917 


Division 11 . 










2.6S2 


84 


2.706 


Division 12 . 










2.66S 


113 


2.781 


Division 13 . 










1.964 


34 


1.998 


Division 14 










2.760 


157 


2.917 


Division 15 . 










4.46S 


236 


4.701 


Division 16 . 










3 J 13 


359 


3.672 


Division 17 . 










1.959 


31 


1.990 


Division IS 










523 


16 


539 


Division 19 . 










1.180 


51 


1.231 


Eh vision 20 . 










4,377 


67 


4.444 


Division 21 . 






- 




34S 


21 


369 


Totals 










78.244 


5,073 


83.917 



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3C P.D. 49 

Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses issued during the Year ending Nob. 30, 1021,. 



Dmsiosi. 


Mala. 


Females. 


Spnycd . 


Brewli-n. 


Total. 


1 


25 


11 


1 




37 


2 


3 


1 


1 


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3 


205 


95 


18 


1 


319 


4 


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3 


1 


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302 


122 


14 


'1 


439 





148 


49 


2 


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7 


488 


151 


12 


2 


ess 


9 


632 


197 


40 


2 


871 


10 


389 


86 


21 


1 


COO 


11 


812 


173 


80 


2 


1487 


12 


331 


80 


15 


— 


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421 


105 


55 


>2 


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U 


624 


150 


03 


2 


739 




341 


ICO 


15 


- 


510 




470 


146 


04 


- 


080 


17 


822 


139 


94 


1 


\ju:a 


IN 


324 


76 


32 


— 


4.12 


10 


329 


67 


20 


1 


423 


Tut:.ls .... 


6,019 


1.833 


559 


17 


9.028 



■1 @$50. 

'2 $950. 

Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses issued in the City by Police Divisions. 



Oi vision 


1 . 


997 




92 


Division 


2 






70 


Division 








120 


Division 


4 . 


434 




133 


Division 


5 . 


245 




121 


Division 










Di virion 


7 . 


175 




77 


Division 


. 


245 




30 


Division 
Division 


10 . 

11 . 


123 
149 











? 






P.D. 49 37y 

Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending Nov. 30, 1924- 

Ex PEVormiEB. 

Pay of police and employees S3.822.770 92 

Pensions 19.1.304 26 

Fuel and light i3.49« 04 

Water and ice 003 40 

Furniture and bedding 8.624 48 

Printing, stationery, telegrams, ete. .... ...... 22.974 64 

Care and cleaning nation bouses and city prison ....... 12.708 32 

Repairs to station houses and city prison 43,317 82 

Repairs and supplies for police boat* .......... 30,429 37 

Telephone rental and tolls 11,290 48 

Purchase of horses, harnesses and vehicles ......... 22.816 83 

Care and keeping horses, harnesses and vehicles ........ 10,688 65 

Care and repairs of automobiles .......... 36,716 99 

Transportation of prisoners, sick and insane persons ....... 493 32 

Feeding prisoners ............. 4,205 78 

Medical attendance . 7,617 37 

Transportation 3.822 90 

Pursuit of criminals 11.272 37 

Uniforms and uniform caps 103.851 79 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc. ......... 13,406 15 

Traveling expenses and food for police ......... 3,277 91 

Rent of buildings 29J0SO 35 

Traffic signs and signals 34,690 86 

Sen-ices of engineer, architect and attorney ........ 630 00 

Music for police parade ............ 310 00 

Total S4,476.4«0 96 

Expenses of listing |C, 1.936 32 

Expenses of house of detention . 13,145 23 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII) 50,454 46 

Total S4.A01.996 97 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner ....... S37.323 25 

For sale of unclaimed and condemned property, itinerant musicians' badges, junk collectors' 

badges, ete S4.14S 24 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) ........ 23,99600 

For uniform cloth, etc. ............ 424 25 

For refunds 911 87 

For dama g e to police property ........... 344 15 

Total S67.147 76 

Table XVIII. 
Payments on account of the Signal Sen-ice during the Year ending Nov. SO, 1921,. 

Pay rolls . .•„•.•, S33.370 98 

.Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies tLerefor ....... 13.971 20 

Rent of stable 1,000 00 

Care and repair of vehicles and shoeing horse ........ 923 33 

Carfare , 784 65 

Purchase of Ford car --•'-........ 394 00 

Underground plans ............. 10 40 

Total S50.454 46 



1 



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P.D. 49 



! 



INDEX 



PACE 

Accidents 10. 38. 39 

caused by automobile . . . - . . • • " • • • . 38, 39 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares . . . . . . .38,39 

number of, reported ............. 10 

Ambulance service .............. 12 

Arrests 6.7,24,25-31 

ape and sex of.............. 34 

comparative statement of ........... . 34 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . . . . . . .6, 29, 33 

for drunkenness . . . . . . . . . . 6, 7, 10, 30 

foreigners ...............6, 25-33 

minors ............... 6, 25-33 

nativity of .............. 7 

nonresidents .............. 6, 25-33 

number of, by divisions ............ 24 

number of. punished by fine ........... 7 

on warrants ..............6, 25-33 

summoned by court ............. 6, 25-33 

Total number of 6, 33 

violation of city ordinances ............ 7, 30 

without warrants ............. 6, 25-33 

Auctioneers ............... 35 

Auction sales ............... 3 

Automobiles 8. 12, 13. 14, 38, 39 

Accidents due to 11. 38, 39 

police ............... 12 

public 13 

sight-seeing 14, 35 

Benefits and pensions •--.......... 16 

Bertillon system .............. 6 

Buildings , 10 

dangerous, reported ............. 10 

found open and made secure ............ 10 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ........... 6 

Carriages, public 13 

articles left in ............. 13 

automobile .............. 13 

number licensed .............. 13, 35 

Cases investigated . . . . . . . . . . . 7, 10, 12 

Cesspools, defective, reported ............ 10 

Children ! 7, 10 

abandoned, cared for ............. 10 

lost, restored ............. " 7, 10 

Chimneys, dangerous, reported ............ 10 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of ...... 7, 30 

Claims, inspector of ...... ..... . . 10 

Collective musicians .............. 16, 35 

Commitments .............. 7, 10 

Complaints . , "l5, 23, 35 

against police officers ............. 23 

against miscellaneous licenses ........... 15, 35 

Courts . 6, 7, 10. 25-33^ 34 

fines imposed by ............. 6, 34 

number of days* attendance at. by officers . . . . . . . 6. 7, lo! 34 

number of persons summoned by . . . . . , . , . . g* 25-33 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of... .....„.! 6 

arrests by .............[ . 7 

finger-print system ••-.......... 7 

identification room .--.........! 6 

photographs •••-.......... 6 

records ............... 6 

Criminal work .............. 34 

comparative statement of....... ...... 34 

Dangerous weapons . . . . p _ * ! 1, 16 

Dead bodies, cared for ••-.......... lo! 12 

recovered * ! 10 12 

Deaths -. • ..5 5,8,19.38,39 

by accident, suicide, etc. ........... 8 

of police officers ............ | ] 5 19 

Department, police .............I * 5 

Distribution of force ........... I ] ] 5 18 

Disturbances suppressed -..........[" 10 

Doe* -.v.- % - - 10.35.36,37 

amount received for licenses for .......... 35 37 

damage done by jq 

number licensed •-.-.......*[ 35 36 

Drivers, hackney carriage -•-......!! 14* 35 

Drowning, persons rescued from .... ..,'.'... 10* 12 



42 



Drunkenness 

arrest* for, per day 

foreigners arrested for . 

merease in aamber of arrests for 

nan -residents arrested for 

total number of arrests for 

women conuni tied for . 
Employees of the Department 
Events, special . 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial ... 

expenditures 

bouse of detention 

pensions 

receipts 

miscellaneous license fees 

signal service 
Fines 

amount of . 

average amount of 

number punished by 
Finger-print system . 
Fire alarms 

defective, reported 

number given 
Fire-arms, relative to sale of, etc 
Fires . . 

extinguished 

on water front attended 
Foreigners. Dumber arrested 
Fugitives from justice . 

Gaming, illegal ... 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages 
Hand carts 
Harbor service . 
Horses .... 

distribution of 

number in service 

purchased ... 
Ho us e of detention 
House of ill fame, keeping . 
Hydrants, defective* reported 
Identification room . . 

Imprisonment . 

persons sentenced to . 

total years of 
Income .... 
Inquests held 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians . 
Junk collectors ... 
Junk shop keepers 
Jury lists, police work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Liquor traffic ... 
Isstfasfc police ... 

expenses of 

number listed 

mxmber of policemen employed In 
Lodgers at station houses . 
Lodging houses, public 

applications for licenses 

authority to license 

location of . 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 

causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous businesa 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated 

number canceled and revoked 

■ramber issued 

number transferred 
Missing persoos 

ace and sex of 

number found 

n amber reported 
Musicians, collective . 



P.D. 49 



ft 



6.7 



14, 



15. 



PAGE 

10.30 
6 

e. 30 

6.7 

6.30 

7.30 

10 

5. 18 

8 

17.37 

7. 10 

17.37 

17.37 

17.37 

17.37 

17.37 

17. 35. 37 

17,37 

6.7.34 

6.7.34 

6.34 

7 

7 

10 

10 

10 

1 

10. 12 

10 

12 

>. 25-33 

7 

31 

14,35 

14.35 

35 

12 

12.24 

24 

12,24 

12 

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10.29 

10 

6 

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7 

7.34 

17.37 

8 

10 

10 

10 

10 

15,35 

35 

35 

15 

10 

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14.40 
15 
7 
16,35 
35 
16 
16 
16 
8.37 
7. 16 
8 
8 
8 
25-33 
10 

17, 35. 37 
15,35 
15.35 
15.35 
15.35 
15.35 
» 
9 
9 
9 
16.35 



I 






P.D.49 



M asinaruL itinerant . 

applxasiana for license* 
inslnznents inspected . 



Nativity <jt persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences . 

ngnirag dkaatity. mcraJity. etc 

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against property, malicious . 
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forgoy and against c ur rency 



Operators 
Parks, pt&fic . 

Amd*iiii reported ia 
Pawnbroker* 
Pensions uui benefits 

estimates (or pensions . 
DumUr of persons on roQs 
payne&t* oo sccount of 
Police - 

railrukd ... 
special 
Police ebnreiafcle fund, number cf beneficiaries 
Police eonaamiratiopm, laflnTnwsssnj «f 
Police department 
diFtrii»«w-0 of 
horses ia aae in . 
how ovnacrtnted . 
officer* appointed 
absent sick . 
arrests by 
bwtdw upon 
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eied . 
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work fA 
Police listtaasc 
Police signal serrice 

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paynent* oo account of 

property of 

signal boxes 
Prisoners, aatrrity of 
Property - 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

polioe ... 

recontreo ... 

sale <A e»csl«mnrd 

stole* ... 

takes from prisoners and ^^ffr— 
Public can T Sssj al 
Public lo6eiac booses 
Railroad pe&c* . 
Receipts , 

Regisixatawa aambers of motor ▼taarJJB, publication of 
Re vol rem ... 

license* to carry loaded 
Second-band article* . 
Sewers, dt&rsrre, reported 
Sick and awared persons ai 
Sickness, absence oo acco unt of 
Sight ■aceTipg aaxtomobtlea . 
Signal semwe. ponce 
Special entaaa . 
Special pcoVe . 
Station husse* . 

lodges* at . 

witnesse* detained at 
Stolen property 

reooiwed . 

vaJw 'A 
Street railways, rood odors and tmaarmen licensed 
Street* 

sceicVnt* rrportcd ia 

def eearre, rrportcd 

obatrtsetioaa removed 
Tea ms - 

stray, pa* op 



4,7 



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44 



Traffic .... 

Used ear license* 

Vehicles .... 

ambulances 

automobiles 

in use in police department 

public carriages . 

wagons 
Vessels . 
Wagons .... 

number licensed by divisions 

total number licensed . 
Water pipes, defective, reported 
Water running to waste reported 
Weapons, dangerous . 
Witnesses 

fees earned by officers as 

number of days* attendance at court by 

number of. detained at station houses 
Women committed to House of Detention 



P.D. 49 



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Public Document No. 49 

(Hfjp (Emmnflmnralih nf iHaHaartjuaptta 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1925 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



■Jd 



) 



r- 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Letter to Governor .......... 5 

Enforcement of the Prohibition Laws 5 

Traffic control .......... g 

Firearms ........... 10 

Relative to the theft, concealment and misappropriation of motor 

vehicles ........ 11 

Need of more police officers ...... 12 

Rapid communication of police news ..... 14 

Police property ......... 15 

Census taking ........ 15 

The Department ........ is 

The police force ........ ig 

Signal service ........ ig 

Employees of the department ...... lg 

Recapitulation ........ ig 

Distribution and changes ..... 19 

Police officers injured while on duty ..... 19 

Work of the department ...... 19 



Arrests 



19 



Drunkenness ....... 

Bureau of criminal investigation ..... 20 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners . . . . . . 23 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property ..... 24 

Special events ........ 2* 

Missing persons ....... 26 

Record of automobiles reported stolen ..... 26 

Record of used cars reported ..... 27 

Miscellaneous business ... 27 

Inspector of claims ....... 29 

House of detention ....... 29 

Police signal service ....... 30 

Signal boxes 30 

Miscellaneous work ...... 30 

Harbor service ...... 31 

Horses 32 

Vehicle service ....... 32 

Automobiles ....... 32 

Ambulances ....... 33 

List of vehicles used by the department .... 34 

Public carriages ..... 35 

Sight-seeing automobiles ....... 3ft 

Wagon licenses 3^ 

Listing work in Boston 3j 

Listing expenses ....... 37 

Number of policemen employed in listing .... 37 

Police work on jury lists ..... 37 

Special police ....... 30 

Railroad police ...... as 

Miscellaneous licenses ...... 28 



CONTENTS. 



Musicians' licenses . 

Itinerant . 

Collective . 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
Public lodging houses 
Pensions and benefits 
Financial 
Statistical tables, 

Distribution of police force, etc. 

List of police officers in active service who die 

List of officers retired 

Employees of the department retired 

List of officers promoted 

Number of men in active service . 

Officers discharged and resigned . 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason 

Complaints against officers . 

Number and distribution of horses 

Number of arrests by police divisions 

Arrests and offences .... 

Age and sex of persons arrested 

Comparative statement of police criminal we 

Licenses of all classes issued 

Dog licenses issued .... 

Wagon licenses issued 

Financial statement .... 

Payments on account of signal service . 

Accidents ...... 

Male and female residents listed . 

Men on the police force and year born . 



f sicki 



rk 



PAGE 

39 
30 
30 
40 
40 
41 
41 

43 
45 
40 
40 
47 
48 
40 
53 
54 
57 
58 
59 
78 
79 
SO 
82 
82 
83 
84 
85 
87 
89 



Sty* (Ciratnunnwaltff of fHaBsarljuarttH. 



REPORT. 



HEAborxjnxna of the Police Department. 

Office or the Police Cojooshoxxe, 29 Pemberton Square, 

Bostox, De*. 1, 1925. 

To His Excellency Alva* T. FrLLER, Gottnor. 

Your Excellexct; — As Police Commissioner for the 
city of Boston I hare the honor to present, in compliance 
with the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 
1906, a report of the Police Department for the year ending 
November 30, 1925. 

EXFORCEMEST OF THE PbOHIBITCOX LAWS. 

Since my last report upon this subject., I am pleased to 
state that the general Equor situation in this city has been 
greatly improved. The source of supply of contraband liquor, 
either from caches in outlying cities and towns or from stills 
within this city, due to the vigilance and activities of the 
police, has been noticeably reduced. Many large operators 
in the illicit liquor business have been not only driven out of 
this particular occupation but have been actually reduced to 
penury. The problem of intelligent enforcement of the 
prohibitory laws is of a two-fold nature; first, liquor must be 
prevented from flowing into this city from adjacent terri- 
tories, and the manufacture of so-called "moonshine" elimi- 
nated within the city itself ; and second, the illegal distribution 
of liquor at various points within the city must be curtailed. 

This Department by its unceasing efforts has stopped 
the steady flow of liquor into this city and has reduced 
the amount of liquor illegally transported within its 
borders to practically a negligible quantity. In regard to the 
distribution of liquor from stores, dwelling houses and various 
places of business in this city, the situation is as tense as 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

it was a year ago when legislation placing criminal responsi- 
bility upon owners of property where liquor was illegally sold, 
was defeated by the legislature of this Commonwealth, 
although this legislation was supported and urgently requested 
by the police departments of many of the cities and towns of 
this State. A general outline of the liquor problem, while 
interesting, seldom gives the public a real conception of actual 
conditions. An actual pen picture of liquor conditions in 
this city, conditions which the police are faced with, demon- 
strates that some legislative aid must be given to those officers 
of this Commonwealth who, sworn to the performance of their 
duty, are attempting to enforce the prohibition laws despite 
the many obstacles placed in their path. 

The following figures compiled in the office of the Police 
Commissioner, comprising the period from December 1, 1923, 
to November 30, 1925, may be interesting. One place in this 
city where liquor was illegally sold was raided 25 times; one 
place, 24 times; one place, 23 times; one place, 21 times; 
four places, 20 times; one place, 19 times; one place, 18 
times; four places, 17 times; one place, 16 times; eight 
places, 15 times; six places, 14 times; five places, 13 times; 
nine places, 12 times; fourteen places, 11 times; sixteen 
places, 10 times; twenty-six places, 9 times; twenty-two 
places, 8 times; forty-five places, 7 times. Figures on places 
where liquor was sold and which were raided less than seven 
times were not computed. 

Because of the difficulty experienced with continued viola- 
tions of the liquor law at these various establishments which 
operate in violation of the law, I recommend legislation which 
will empower me to proceed much the same as is now provided 
for in prosecutions of houses of prostitution under General 
Laws, chapter 139, sections 6 to 12, inclusive, and which will 
afford a means that will authorize the police to seek a per- 
manent remedy against the place where such liquor is sold in 
violation of law. Such legislation is urgent, because the 
Police Department has found from experience that although 
many prosecutions have been made with resulting convictions, 
these violators of the law continue to operate in the same 
premises until a further search and seizure is made, when it is 
found that a different defendant appears and assumes the 
burden of defending the subsequent prosecution. This prac- 
tice prevails to a large extent, so that one establishment may 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

be raided several times and a different defendant appear in 
each instance. I, therefore, recommend legislation that will 
provide a remedy which will authorize the police to close, for a 
substantial period of time, premises which are found to be 
continually operating in violation of law. With this legisla- 
tion, the municipal police could attain the same results as 
the Federal authorities now are accomplishing by means of the 
padlock law under the Volstead Act. 

Another feature of the liquor situation that requires remedial 
legislation is that no criminal responsibility rests on persons 
transporting methyl alcohol or so-called wood alcohol in con- 
tainers or receptacles not marked to denote that wood alcohol 
is contained therein. Under the present law of this Common- 
wealth, it is a criminal offence to sell, exchange or deliver 
methyl alcohol not properly labeled; yet the transportation 
of the same without being labeled as such, to places where it 
may be redistilled, and the redistilled product placed on the 
market, is not a criminal offence. 

Large quantities of methyl alcohol — or wood alcohol so- 
called — or denatured alcohol, are now being distributed 
throughout the Commonwealth in containers bearing false 
labels, such as linseed oil — rubbers — molasses — fish oil. 
This alcohol is shipped from place to place, redistilled and then 
distributed for beverage purposes. In order to prohibit this 
practice, I recommend that the law now requiring such alcohol 
to be properly labeled when sold, exchanged or delivered, 
require it to be so labeled when transported. In other words, 
to insert the word transport into the Act covering such sale, 
exchange or delivery. 

This type of law violator, the redistiller of wood alcohol, 
is one of the meanest in the criminal category, inasmuch as 
the article, wood alcohol, which he attempts to redistill, he 
has no hesitancy in placing on the market, although the 
poisonous substances contained in the original liquid are not 
fully eliminated in the redistilled product. He can be aptly 
classified as a potential murderer, and every assistance possible 
in the enactment of law by the legislature should be given the 
police to help them in their efforts to track to its destination 
the transported wood alcohol so that the illegal receivers of 
the same may be prosecuted and punished by the courts. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Traffic Control. 

The control of vehicular and pedestrian traffic in this city 
is now and has been for some time a very difficult problem. 
With the increasing yearly number of registrations, additional 
plans, studies and preparations have been made in order to 
keep the flow of traffic continuous; at the same time, in work- 
ing out the problem, serious consideration must be given to 
our merchants whose money is invested in department stores 
and other lines of business. At the present time, one of our 
large department stores is building a garage for the accom- 
modation of its customers. There is also one other garage 
located in this city, whereby customers of certain department 
stores may park their automobiles free, for two hours in the 
forenoon. 

The solution of the traffic problem in Boston, because of the 
width and peculiar contour of the streets, is one which must be 
worked out to meet actual conditions which arise from time 
to time. These conditions differ greatly from those which 
confront the police in other cities, where traffic control can 
be accomplished largely by means of a synchronized lighting 
system. The use of semaphores cannot eliminate entirely 
the necessity of man power in the control of traffic. Since 
my last report a permanent semaphore has been installed at 
the intersection of Boylston and Tremont streets. The opera- 
tion of this signal has solved the traffic problem which con- 
fronted the police at this busy and dangerous corner. Through 
the courtesy and kindness of Louis E. Kirstein, Esq., of the 
William Filene's Sons Company, and of William L. Shearer, 
Esq., of the Paine Furniture Company of this city, similar 
towers have been donated to the city of Boston and will soon 
be erected at the junction of Summer and Washington streets 
and at the intersection of Boylston and Arlington streets. 
In addition, it is proposed during the coming year to place 
traffic semaphores at the intersections of Commonwealth 
and Massachusetts avenues and of Massachusetts Avenue and 
Beacon Street. A large number of flashing beacons and other 
signalling devices have been installed at dangerous street 
intersections throughout the city and they help in no small 
degree to eliminate accidents at these places. During the 
year 15 spotlight poles were installed, in addition to those 
already in service in different locations throughout the city, 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

to guard traffic officers on fixed posts. This makes a total of 
99 spotlights now in use in the city. 

The same constant demand for traffic officers to protect 
school children and adult pedestrians, at places now unpro- 
tected, has been met by the response that many dangerous 
traffic points could not be covered because of the lack of police 
officers. In certain sections of the city, some of the main 
highways at different times during the day become practically 
impassable to pedestrians at unpoliced crossings because of 
what may be called the barrage of automobiles passing along 
these streets. In order to properly police this city, three 
hundred additional police officers should be added to this 
Department. These men would be apportioned to the two 
traffic divisions and to the other police divisions. It should 
be understood that while primarily it is the duty of a traffic 
officer to direct vehicular and pedestrian traffic, yet he may 
and often does, in addition, undertake the same type of work 
as an officer attached to a division, of maintaining peace and 
protecting property. 

Another feature of traffic control, the adoption of which 
has proved successful in several western cities, and which I 
advocated in 1924, before the Joint Special Committee on the 
Control, Supervision and Regulation of Motor Vehicles, is 
the so-called "right-of-way or boulevard stop." It requires 
vehicles to come to a full stop before entering or crossing a 
boulevard. This "boulevard stop" has distinct advantages 
inasmuch as operators of through traffic with the right of 
way can move rapidly without fear of side street traffic enter- 
ing unexpectedly into the main traffic current. At this time 
the Board of Street Commissioners has proposed to put this 
"boulevard stop" into operation on Shawmut Avenue, and 
the same could advantageously be adopted on several other 
boulevards of this city. If this regulation is universally 
adopted, repealing General Laws, chapter 89, section 8, which 
gives a vehicle on the right, approaching an intersecting street, 
the right of way, in my opinion a great number of unnecessary 
and serious accidents would be eliminated. 

Considerable more study must be given to the subject of 
traffic control in Boston. Sacrifice of valuable mercantile 
property in the widening of streets, resulting in the creation 
of additional parking spaces in the highways of this city, is 
both expensive and futile. A large portion of the traffic now 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

passing through the (congested area of Boston is so-called 
"through traffic," and suitable routes should be marked out 
to "by-pass" the same. In other cities such "by-passing" 
has worked successfuly, and merchants of Boston will find 
that the use of such "by-passing" will increase their business, 
inasmuch as it gives jgreater facility of approach to a larger 
number of those who desire to trade in the city. 

Gifford LeCIair, Esq., Chairman of Committee on Street 
Traffic and Municipal and Metropolitan Affairs of the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, and Ellcrton J. Brehaut, Esq., 
Assistant Secretary of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, have 
rendered this Department valuable assistance in giving much 
of their time and effort to the study of the adoption of beacons 
and semaphores as affecting traffic control, and their counsel 
and judgment have b«n of exceeding value. 

Firearms. 

I recommend that farther legislation be enacted to prevent 
the sale or use of sikneers or any instrument, attachment, 
weapon, or appliance for causing the firing of a gun, revolver, 
pistol or other fireanai to be silent, or intended to lessen or 
muffle the noise of the firing of the same. Such devices are 
now being manufactwed and placed on sale. This instru- 
ment has recently beea used in other cities outside this Com- 
monwealth and legislation in this direction is necessary to 
assist the police in apprehending offenders who use this 
device in the commission of crime. 

I again recommend for consideration, such legislation as 
will forbid in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts the sale 
of magazines or periodicals, published cither in Massachusetts 
or other places outside of the Commonwealth, advertising the 
sale of firearms. If such legislation were enacted into law, it 
would, in my opinio^ help to stop the indiscriminate dis- 
tribution of firearms by mail order houses, many of such 
firearms now finding ftheir way into the hands of youths and 
other irresponsible people. 

\Yhile I agree that sieh legislation would be more effective 
if passed by the Congress of the United States, yet until this 
is done I believe thus this Commonwealth should lead the 
way and do all possiMe to curtail such sales. If laws can be 
enacted to prohibit tie sale of magazines containing obscene 
pictures and stories mot fit for publication, and forbidding 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

licensed persons to display in their windows any gun, pistol 
or other firearm, they can likewise be passed to stop the adver- 
tising of these death-dealing weapons. 

Some legislation was passed last year relative to the regula- 
tion of the sale of firearms, but the recommendation relative 
to the purchaser of a firearm, that he first procure a license to 
carry the same, is of the utmost importance and should be- 
come a law. 

I therefore recommend the passage of such legislation as 
will require all persons purchasing, renting or leasing fire- 
arms, to first procure a license to carry the same. Such 
license should hare stamped thereon the time and place of 
such sale, rental or lease, and no subsequent sale, rental or 
lease of a firearm should be made to any person whose license 
to carry a firearm shows that he had previously purchased, 
rented or leased the same. 

Relative to the Theft, Concealment and Misappropria- 
tion of Motor Vehicles. 

Owing to the large number of automobiles being stolen, 
not only in Boston but throughout the Commonwealth, I 
believe that the statute covering this offence should be 
amended. At the present time, most of these offenders are 
being charged with "unlawful appropriation of automobiles" 
and are being prosecuted under the old statute (General Laws, 
chapter 2G6, section 63), which was intended to apply to the 
unlawful taking of horses and carriages, and consequently a 
nominal fine is usually imposed in such cases and which has no 
deterrent effect upon the so-called automobile thief. In 
1919, a law was placed upon the Statute Books known as 
chapter 249, relative to the thefts of motor vehicles, which 
imposed a penalty of imprisonment in the State Prison for 
not less than five nor more than ten years. This Act remained 
in force for a period of only eleven months, during which time 
but few automobiles were stolen. This Act was amended in 
1920 by chapter 322, changing the penalty to imprisonment in 
the State Prison for not more than five years or imprisonment 
in jail or the House of Correction for not less than one year. 
Few cases are now being prosecuted under this Act. 

I therefore recommend that chapter 266, section 63, of the 
General Laws be amended by adding at the end of said sec- 
tion, the following: that the word "vehicle" in this section 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

shall not apply to a motor vehicle or motor cycle; that chapter 
322 of the acts of 1920 be repealed; and that a new Act be 
passed, making the penalty for stealing a motor vehicle or 
motorcycle, imprisonment in the State Prison for not less 
than five years. 

Need of More Police Officers. 

The number of police officers in this Department «amnot 
be increased except by concurrent authorization of the Mayor. 
The present quota is 1,724 patrolmen and 8 policewomen. 
Since February 1, 1920, a period of practically six year? r this 
quota has been increased only by the addition of 150 police 
officers and 8 policewomen. The argument that, inasmuch as 
the population of Boston has increased in the last ten years 
only 35,000, the present police force is sufficient, is not tenable, 
because this Department is obliged yearly to take tare of 
millions of persons coming in from outlying cities and towns, 
and a glance at the table of arrests will show that a large 
percentage of those arrested by the police officer.* of this 
Department are not residents of Boston. 

The National Prohibition Act, prohibiting the sale, manu- 
facture and distribution of intoxicating liquor, went into 
effect on July 1, 1919, and constantly from that period, the 
Federal government has been appropriating yearly increasing 
sums of money and providing additional men to enforce this 
Act. Liquor-law enforcement in this city is becoming more 
burdensome each year, and additional officers should be piven 
to this Department if this work is to be continued in a busincss- 
like manner. 

Control of automobile traffic, and incidentally of pedestrian 
traffic, as previously stated in my report, is of enormous 
importance. With over a half a million automobiles regis- 
tered yearly in this State, most of which find their way at 
some time or other into Boston, a day and night, Sunday and 
holiday traffic force is required, but on account of the insuffi- 
cient number of men, these additions to the traffic divisions 
cannot be made. Consequently, route men arc taken from 
the various station houses to work at traffic posts. 

Officers attached to divisions other than traffic should l>c 
patrolling routes, protecting the lives and property ol citizens. 
Hundreds of police officers attend court every day and, while 
in court, substitutes should be on their respective rr/utes. 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

Unfortunately this cannot be done and many times officers 
must cover two routes, a condition which should not exist as 
the citizens are entitled to the fullest protection possible 
consistent with economy. 

Many additional street rules and regulations have been 
passed by the Board of Street Commissioners, thus placing 
more work upon this Department in seeing that the same are 
enforced. These rules and regulations are put into effect to 
expedite traffic conditions in this city, and to allow them to 
become nugatory through lack of enforcement would seriously 
embarrass the traffic situation, for traffic must be kept fluid 
so that property may be protected and business continued. 

With the number of schoolhouses in this city increased, 
necessarily the number of crossings where children should be 
guarded has correspondingly increased; in fact today on the 
main boulevards and highways practically all crossings should 
be policed, inasmuch as a pedestrian is entitled to the same 
protection as the operator of an automobile. 

As the number of licensed motor hackney carriages in this 
city has increased since 1910 from 317 to 1,738, with a cor- 
responding decrease for the same period in horse-drawn 
hackney carriages from 1,714 to 28, it is apparent that the 
control of these vehicles necessarily demands an increased 
number of officers to take care of this particular traffic. 

Many of the outlying districts which a few years ago did 
not have or need the same number of officers apportioned to 
them as the intown divisions, now, owing to the fact that the 
population of these outlying districts has greatly increased, 
require as many, and in some instances more officers than the 
downtown stations. In many divisions it is practically Im- 
possible for an officer to try the doors of stores and mercantile 
establishments and "pull" his duty calls on time. Routes must 
be shortened and more officers added to take care of them. 

The number of available police officers in this Department 
at times is also seriously reduced by sickness and disability, 
vacations, details at libraries, public buildings, public parks^ 
parades, conventions, expositions and strikes, and also by 
many investigations, such as jurors' lists, club incorporators, 
etc. 

The question of adding additional officers to the Depart- 
ment I intend to take up with the incoming Mayor, as soon as 
practicable after his inauguration. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

Rapid Communication of Police News. 

As stated in a previous report, in order to cope with the 
present day criminal the police must have at their disposal 
the most speedy means and mechanism for communicating 
news of the commission of a crime to the various police de- 
partments of outlying cities and towns within a radius of 
twenty-five miles. 

The automobile today is an important factor in the com- 
mission of crime and because of the speed and celerity with 
which the crime can be committed and the get-away of the 
criminal accomplished, it is also absolutely necessary that all 
information in relation to the commission of a crime be in- 
stantly communicated without delay to outlying cities and 
towns, so that the offenders may be captured before they have 
a chance to leave the borders of this State, and thus force upon 
the police the burden of extraditing them, if captured later. 
A central station from which police news could be broadcast, 
situated either at the new Headquarters of the Boston Police 
Department or at the State House, should be immediately 
installed. It now takes forty minutes to transmit information 
to all cities and towns within a radius of ten miles of Boston. 
When as many as thirty cars are stolen in a day, one can readily 
see the necessity of a system that will communicate all informa- 
tion in a much quicker way. With a central radiating station 
at either of these points, many culprits can be apprehended 
who now are able to accomplish their escape because of the 
slow and antiquated methods at present in use to notify cities 
and towns adjacent to Boston of_a crime committed in this 
city. 

I am not at this time advocating any particular system of 
intercommunication, but such useful information may be 
obtained by an investigating committee, which would inspect 
the various systems which have been adopted in other cities 
outside this State. 

Such a communicating system would also be very useful in 
notifying the various police departments of the registration 
numbers of stolen automobiles, and other news items of 
importance to the police. 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 15 



Police Property. 

The new Station House on Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park 
District, for Division 18, was dedicated on December 31, 1924, 
and on March 4, 1925, the old and unsanitary building for- 
merly used as a police station was abandoned for this new, 
commodious and modern police building. 

On February 14, 1925, the new ten-story police building at 
229 Milk Street was dedicated, and in the following month 
police division 2, then at the old quarters on City Hall Avenue, 
traffic division 20 and the Property Clerk's office, the two 
latter having been located in temporary quarters in the Quincy 
Market Hall building, were transferred to permanent quarters 
in this new building. 

These two new buildings embody the latest architectural 
features in the construction of police buildings and are the 
fulfillment of a long-felt need in this Department. 

On August 25, 1925, the corner stone of the new Police 
Headquarters building, situated on the corner of Berkeley and 
Stuart streets, was laid with fitting ceremonies. This building 
will probably be completed and ready for occupancy in the 
early part of next j'ear, and the present ill-adapted, unsanitary 
and over-crowded Headquarters building now in Pemberton 
Square, abandoned. 

Five new motor patrol wagons were bought and placed in 
commission during the year and considerable repair work was 
done on the four harbor police boats. 

Stations 9 and 17 were repainted throughout, and general 
repairs were made in several of the other station houses. In 
stations 1 and 3, new heating plants were installed and all 
station houses have been kept in good order. 

There are, however, several station houses of this Depart- 
ment that are unsanitary, antiquated and overcrowded. 
Among them are station 5 on East Dedham Street, station 4 
on LaGrange Street and station 3 on Joy Street. 

I intend to make an effort during the ensuing year to obtain 
an appropriation from the City Government to replace one or 
more of these old buildings with new and modern station 
houses. 

One of the most important needs of this Department at the 
present time is the erection of a garage large enough to store 
at least one hundred cars, with a repair shop attached. 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The law requires that all lost, stolen and abandoned motor 
vehicles, recovered by the police, shall be carefully stored until 
returned to their rightful owners. 

At the present time many abandoned and stolen cars, 
recovered by officers of this Department, are now stored in 
private garages, storehouses!, and police division garages and 
yards adjoining them. These should be stored in one central 
garage, which could be utilized both as a clearing house for 
missing cars and as a place where both the spare and other 
cars in use by this Department could be stored, and where 
also all the repair work on the rolling stock of this Department 
could be done. 

New court-houses are being constructed in the Dorchester 
and Brighton districts and when completed the courts will 
vacate the quarters now occupied for court purposes at 
police division 11, Dorchester, and police division 14, Brigh- 
ton. It will then be possible to take over the quarters thus 
vacated and aDV/w of increased facilities for police business in 
both of these buildings. 

Cexkc» Taking. 

In April of this year, the Department, at the request of His 
Honor the Mayor, performed the work of taking a census of 
the inhabitants of this city residing therein as of March 31, 
provided for by section 7, chapter 453 of the Acts of 1924. 

The work was done according to the new ward lines effec- 
tive April 1, whereby the number of wards in the city was 
reduced from 26 to 22. 

The result of the work of the Department in such census 
taking was as follows: — 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 17 

Ward No. Inhabitant*. 

1 . 66,793 

2 37,943 

3 73,813 

4 34,373 

5 37,237 

6 39,573 

7 35,062 

8 35,612 

9 37,908 

10 30,723 

11 29,668 

12 33,933 

13 29,319 

14 46,490 

15 27,859 

16 26,574 

17 26,663 

18 32,095 

19 24,229 

20 23,016 

21 26,483 

22 26,163 

Total 781,529 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as fol- 
lows: — 

Police Commissioner. Secretary. 2 





The Police Force. 




Superintendent . 


1 


Lieutenants 


40 


Deputy superintendents 


3 


Sergeants 


146 


Chief inspector . 


1 


Patrolmen 


. 1,683 


Captains . 


30 








Inspectors 


29 


Total 


. 1,934 


Inspector of carriages 






(lieutenant) . 


1 








Signal Service. 




Director . 


1 


Linemen . 


6 


Foreman .... 


1 


Driver 


1 


Signalmen 


6 








Mechanics 


3 


Total 


18 


Employees of t 


he Department. 




Clerks 


?2 


Assistant property clerk 


1 


Stenographers 


13 


Van driver 


1 


Matrons (house of detention 


1 5 


Foreman of stable . 


1 


Matrons (station houses) 


5 


Hostlers . 


13 


Engineers on police steamers 3 


Assistant steward, citj 


r 


Firemen on police steamers 


8 


prison . 


1 


Firemen . 


3 


Janitors . 


30 


Auto repair shop foreman 


1 


Janitresscs 


19 


Auto repair shop mechanic 


1 


Telephone operators 


3 


Repairmen 


2 


Tailor . 


1 


Superintendent of building 


1 


Painters . 


4 


Elevator operators 


2 








Chauffeur 


1 


Total 


141 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary ..... 2 

Police force 1,934 

Signal service ......... 18 

Employees .......... 141 

Grand total 2,095 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



19 



Distribution and Changes. 

The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 73 patrolmen were appointed; 2 patrolmen 
reinstated; 37 patrolmen were discharged; 40 patrolmen 
resigned and 1 patrolman was transferred to the Department 
of Public Utilities; 1 inspector, 3 sergeants and 10 patrolmen 
were retired on pensions; 1 inspector, 4 sergeants and 10 
patrolmen died. (See Tables II, III, IV, VI.) 

Police Officers Injured while on Duty. 

The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries. 



HOW IxjrHED. 


Number of 
Men Injured. 


Number of 
Duties Lost. 


By cars and other vehicles .... 


45 
13 
9 
57 
73 


379 
778 
21 
650 
433 


Total . . . • . 


197 


2,261 



Work of the Department. 
Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 83,145 as against 83,917 the preceding 
year, being a decrease of 772. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person Decrease 5.76 

Off ences against property committed with violence . Decrease 25.48 

Offences against property committed without violence Decrease .51 

Malicious offences against property . . Decrease 14.21 

Forgery and offences against the currency . Increase 34.28 

Offences against the license law .... Increase 15.39 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . Increase 6.42 

Offences not included in the foregoing . , . Decrease 1 .82 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were 13,480 persons arrested on warrants and 52,288 
without warrants; 17,377 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 79,101 persons were held for trial; 4,044 were released 
from custody. The number of males arrested was 77,813; of 
females, 5,332; of foreigners, 27,766; or approximately 33.39 
per cent; of minors, 8,445. Of the total number arrested, 
20,353, or 24.47 per cent, were nonresidents. (See Tables 
X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1921 to 1925, inclusive, was $272,891.12; in 
1925 it was $442,404; or $169,512.88 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
45,252; in 1925 it was 58,562, or 13,310 more than the average. 
The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,644.45; 
in 1925 it was $17,354.16, or $2,709.71 more than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 104. 
There were 1,592 less persons arrested than in 1924, a decrease 
of 4.02 per cent; 23.29 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 39.32 were of foreign birth. (See Table XI.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The "identification room" now contains 66,007 photo- 
graphs, 55,359 of which are photographs with Bertillon 
measurements, a system used by the Department since 
November 30, 1898. In accordance with the Revised Laws, 
chapter 225, section 18, and with the General Laws, chapter 
127, sections 27 to 29, both inclusive, we are allowed photo- 
graphs with Bertillon measurements taken of the convicts in 
the State Prison and Reformatory, a number of which have 
been added to our Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the 
adoption of the system by the Department in 1898, is and 
will continue to be of great assistance in the identification of 
criminals. A large number of important identifications have 
thus been made during the year for this and other police 
departments, through which the sentences in many instances 
have been materially increased. The records of 928 criminals 
have been added to the records of this Bureau, which now 
contains a total of 46,108. The number of cases reported 
at this office which have been investigated during the year is. 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 21 

42,208. There are 41,349 cases reported on the assignment 
books kept for this purpose, and reports made on these cases 
are filed away for future reference. The system of indexing 
adopted by this Bureau for the use of the Department now 
contains a list of records, histories, photographs, dates of 
arrests, etc., of about 205,000 persons. There are also "his- 
tories and press clippings" now numbering 9,037 made by 
this Bureau, in envelope form, for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing cor- 
roborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties are of a special character the following 
statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies . . 3,058 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and delivered 

to officers from those States ...... 58 

Number of cases investigated ...... 42,208 

Number of extra duties performed ..... 2,261 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court . 201 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investigated 
and evidence prepared for court ..... 10 

Number of days spent in court by officers .... 3,168 

Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, 207 years, 6 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $537,918.39 

Number of photographs added to identification room . 986 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The nativity of the prisoners was as follows 

West Indies 

Turkey . 

South America 

Switzerland 

Belgium . 

Armenia . 

Africa 

Hungary 

Asia 

Arabia . 

Mexico . 

Japan 

Syria 

Roumania 

Lithuania 

Servia 

Philippine Islands 

Egypt . 

Albania . 

Cuba 

Total 



United States 






55,379 


British Provinces 




. 3,057 


Ireland 




8,763 


England 








. 732 


France 








102 


Germany 








257 


Italy 








4,258 


Russia 








4,141 


China 








370 


Greece 








709 


Sweden 








736 


Scotland 








457 


Spain 








84 


Xorvray 








313 


Poland 








958 


Australia 








32 


Austria 








175 


Portugal 








359 


Finland 








161 


Denmark 








69 


Holland 








46 


Wales 








6 


East Indies 








18 



115 

71 

36 

11 

31 

112 

8 

9 

1 

4 

10 

22 

253 

4 

647 

4 

1 

3 

19 

2 



83,145 



The number of arrests for the year was 83,145, being a 
decrease of 772 from last year, and 4,424 more than theaverage 
for the past five years. There were 37,944 persons arrested 
for drunkenness, being 1,592 less than last year, and 925 more 
than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests for 
drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of 3.33 per cent 
in males and a decrease of 17.27 per cent in females from last 
year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (83,145), 543 
were for violation of the city ordinances; that is to say that 
one arrest in 153 was for such offence, or .05 per cent. 

Fifty-nine and forty-nine hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were lx;twcen the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table XII.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 24,447 and the 
fines amounted to $442,404. (Sec Table XIII.) 

Sixty persons were committed to the State Prison, 2,882 to 
the House of Correction, 42 to the Women's Prison, 119 to the 
Reformatory prison and 1,777 to other institutions. The total 
years of imprisonment were 2,430 (224 sentences indefinite); 
the total number of days' attendance at court by officers 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



was 58,562 and the witness fees earned by them amounted 
to $17,354.16. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was 8264,822.92. 

Eight witnesses were detained at station houses, 213 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of nine over last 
year. There was a decrease of 11.32 per cent in the number of 
sick and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 
19.73 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the 
five years from 1921 to 1925 inclusive, was $1,972,845.38, in 
1925 it was §2,366,939.23 or $394,093.85 more than the 
average. The amount of property stolen in and out of the 
city, which was recovered by the Boston police, was $2,804,- 
798.15 as against $2,547,376.29 last year or $257,421.86 more. 

Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examinees. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 852 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 

Abortion . 

Accidental shooting 

Aeroplane 

Alcoholism 

Automobiles 

Burns 

Collapse of building 

Coasting . 

Drowning 

Elevators . 

Falling objects . 

Falls 

Kicked by horse 

On 291 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicides were prose- 
cuted in the courts 

Accidental shooting 

Automobiles 

Burns 

Collapse of building 

Elevators . 

Falls 

Manslaughter 

Murder 





6 


Machinery 


5 




1 


Motorcycles 


1 




2 


Natural causes . 


. 289 




24- 


Poison 


41 




6 


Railroad (steam) 


17 




23 


Stillborn . 


5 




44 


Suffocation 


3 




1 


Suicide* . 


67 




35 


Teams 


5 




8 


Tractor 


1 




S 

73 

1 


Homicides 
Total 


186 


852 













1 

133 


Motorcycles" 
Poison 


1 
1 




2 
2 
1 
1 
10 
12 


Railroad (steam) 
Railway (street) 
Team* 

Total 


1 

20 

1 




. 186 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On December 1, 1924, there were 1,825 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the property 
clerk; 1,297 were received during the year; 836 pieces were 
sold at public auction and the proceeds $1,503.62 were turned 
over to the chief clerk; 379 packages were destroyed as worth- 
less or sold as junk and the proceeds $106.32 turned over to the 
chief clerk ; and 82 packages were returned to owners, finders, 
or administrators, leaving 1,825 packages on hand. 

Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each: — 

1*24. M.n. 

Dec. 24, Bohton Common, Christmas Eve exercises ... 56 
Dec. 25, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight mass ... 18 

IKS. 

Jan. 7, Mechanics Building, Boston Police ball . . 200 

Jan. 8, Jamaica Pond, ice carnival ...... 108 

Jan. 11, Jamaica Pond, hockey game ..... 28 

Jan. 31, Funeral of daughter of Mayor Curley .... 41 

Feb. 15, Commonwealth Pier, departure of Cardinal O'C'onnell 55 

Feb. 18, Mechanics Building, Boston Fireman's ball ... 35 
Feb. 21-23, Moving of Atlantic National Bank . . .260 

Feb. 23, Mismon Church, special service ..... 26 

Feb. 24, Mismon Church, special service 26 

Mar. 1, Parade Sacco-Vanzetti defence committee 124 

Mar. 17, South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . 288 

Apr. 19, Patriots' Day, to Concord and Lexington . 116 

Apr. 20, Parades in Concord and Lexington .... 241 

Apr. 20, Marathon race . . . . . . 432 

Apr. 20, Patriotic events in Boston ...... 93 

Apr. 2.5, Cadet Armory, Spring gambol, aid Children's Hospital . 10 

May 20, Parade of Women's Municipal League .... 25 

May 22, Stadium, exhibition race by Xurmi . . .141 

May 24, Franklin Field, N. E. A. A. U. women's athletic rr.eet 54 
May 24, Fenway Park, memorial services .... .35 

May 30, Work Horse parade 41 

June 1, Parade Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 184 

Jane 5, Braves Field, boxing carnival 195 

Jane 10, Parade of Boston School Cadets 418 

June 16, Charlestown, eve of Bunkei Hill Day .... 126 

Jane 17, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade and fireworks 514 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



25 



IMS. 

June 22, Funeral of Police Sergeant John V. Foley 

July 3, Cambridge, visit of President Coolidge . 

July 4, Charles River bank, swimming races 

July 4, Boston Common, 4th of July celebration 

July 7, Funeral of Police Inspector Benjamin Alexander 

July 8, Funeral of Patrolman Paul F. Halleran 

July 11, Stadium, international athletic meet 

Aug. 25, Laying corner stone, new Police Headquarters 

Aug. 30, Franklin Field, athletic meet 

Aug. 30, Chinatown, police raid .... 

Sept. 5, 6, 7, Moving State Street Trust Company 
Sept. 12, Parade of American Legion .... 

Oct. 7-15, Bulletin boards, baseball series . 
Oct. 10, Stadium, Harvard-Middlebury football game 
Oct. 12, Braves Field, Boston College-Haskell football game 
Oct. 12, Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battalions of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned 
a military band, one of which was the Boston Police 
Department Traffic Band. The regiment included a ser- 
geant and twenty men mounted on department horses, a 
colonel commanding, with his adjutant and staff, officers 
from the respective police divisions and units in military 
company formation, shot-gun companies, patrolmen 
with Thompson sub-machine guns, a motorcycle unit, 
and a machine gun unit mounted on automobiles. The 
regiment was reviewed at City Hall by His Honor the 
Mayor; at the State House by His Excellency Governor 
Alvan T. Fuller and on the Parade Grounds of the Com- 
mon by His Excellency the Governor and the Police 
Commissioner Hon. Herbert A. Wilson 
Oct. 12, Detail on line of parade on Boston Common 
Oct. 17, Braves Field, Boston College-Boston University football 
Oct. 17, Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game . 
Oct. 19, Boston Common, review of First Corps Cadets 
Oct. 24, Braves Field, Boston College- Allegheny football game 
Oct. 24, Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game . 
Oct. 31, Theodore Glynn auto parade and rally . 
Oct. 31, Stadium, Harvard-William & Mary's football game . 
Oct. 31, Braves Field, Boston College-Providence football game 
Nov. 1, Dedication of chimes on Park Street Church . 
Nov. 3, City election ....... 

Nov. 4-16, Strike of Checker taxi drivers .... 

Nov. 11, Armistice Day parade ...... 

Nov. 14, Braves Field, Boston College-W. Va. Wesleyan football 
game ......... 



23 

106 

50 

196 

60 

38 

56 

69 

73 

124 

281 

347 

437 

45 

43 



1,451 

66 

22 

71 

38 

22 

77 

92 

67 

17 

109 

1,040 

499 

327 

38 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



IMS. Men. 

Xov. 14, Stadium, Harvard- Yale, freshman football game . . 28 

Xov. 14, Stadium, Harvard-Yale football game .... 82 

Xov. 14, Bulletin boards . . 66 

Xov. 14, At hotels and in theatre district ..... 84 

Xov. 28, Holy Cross-Boston College football game ... 77 

Missing Persons. 

The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported . . . . . . . . ;917 

Total number found ........ 843 



Total number still missing .... 
Age nwl Sex of Such Persons. 



74 





Mmaino. 


Forso. 


Still Missing. 




Male.. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, 

under 21 yean- 
Over 21 years . 


233 

178 
199 


42 

176 
89 


225 

159 
180 


40 

157 
82 


s 

19 
19 


2 

19 

7 


Totals 


610 


307 


564 


279 


46 


28 



R'tord of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year ending 
November 30, 1025. 





Stolen. 


Recovered 
during 
Montb. 


Recovered. 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1)34. 










December 


303 


237 


21 


45 


ins. 










January 


20S 


172 


14 


22 


February 


238 


191 


20 


27 


March . 


338 


287 


18 


33 


April .... 
May . 


656 


566 


35 


55 


487 


421 


19 


47 


June 


484 


416 


14 


54 


July 


428 


3.50 


24 


54 


August 


445 


363 


19 


63 


September . 


562 


484 


8 


- 70 


October 


774 


684 


18 


72 


Xovembcr . 


567 


500 




67 


Total 


5,490 


4,671 


210 


609 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



27 



Record of Used Cars Reported to this Department by 
Licensed Dealers in the Same. 





1923-1924 
Bought by 
Deafen. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


1924-1925 
Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


December 


1,572 


1,260 


622 


1,902 


1,530 


719 


January 


1,675 


1,326 


704 


1,670 


1,336 


652 


February 


1,336 


1,132 


570 


1,845 


1,617 


520 


March . 


2,254 


1,705 


752 


2,814 


2,439 


1,036 


April 


3,037 


2,901 


1,192 


3,581 


3,059 


1,325 


May . 


2,824 


2,851 


1,183 


3,228 


3,359 


1,326 


June 


2,274 


2,449 


1,161 


4,363 


3,197 


1,260 


July . 


2,543 


2,552 


1,139 


3,386 


3,095 


1,203 


August . 


2,327 


2,107 


937 


2,892 


2,378 


1,000 


September 


2,045 


1,824 


879 


2,731 


2,028 


1,045 


October 


2,162 


1,996 


873 


3,178 


2,333 


1,153 


November 


2,151 


1,694 


630 


2,814 


2,155 


843 


Total . 


26,200 


23,797 


10,642 


34,404 


28,526 


12,0S2 



Miscellaneous Business. 



1922-23. 



1923-24. 



1924-25. 



Abandoned children cared for 
AccidenU reported .... 
Buildings found open and made secure 
Cases investigated . 
Dangerous buildings reported 
Dangerous chimneys reported 
Dead bodies cared for 
Dead bodies recovered 
Defective cesspools reported 
Defective drains and vaults reported 



18 

6,671 

4,439 

59,400 

15 

8 

336 

54 

72 

8 



10 

6,761 

3,592 

89,599 

29 

11 

258 

55 

76 

3 



18 

6,154 

3,070 

83,333 

11 

14 

321 

54 

46 

16 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



[Jan. 





1923-23. 


1923-24. 


1924-25. 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 


4 


13 


6 


Defective gas pipes reported 


28 


24 


25 


Defective hydrants reported 


117 


61 


78 


Defective lamps reported 


12,393 


10,797 


8,919 


Defective sewers reported 


56 


114 


789 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 


8,612 


8,042 


7,510 


Defective bridges reported 


5 


- 


- 


Defective wires reported .... 


8 


- 


- 


Defective water gates reported . 


9 


- 


-' 


Defective water pipes reported . 


156 


104 


1,013 


Defective street signs reported . 


17 


- 


- 


Disturbances suppressed .... 


571 


425 


308 


Extra duties performed .... 


37,843 


38,153 


43,386 


Fire alarms given ..... 


2,829 


3,429 


3,268 


Fires extinguished ..... 


1,626 


1,684 


1,502 


Insane persons taken in charge . 


424 


439 


383 


Intoxicated persons assisted 


33 


21 


15 


Lost children restored .... 


1,617 


1,611 


1,293 


Persons rescued from drowning 


10 


20 


11 


Sick and injured persons assisted 


8,214 


8,246 


7,312 


Stray teams reported and put up 


7S 


71 


46 


Street obstructions removed 


1,747 


949 


3,304 


Water running to waste reported 


570 


608 


574 


Witnesses detained ..... 


21 


15 


8 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 29 

Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds, reports that he investigated 
2,303 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 

Other Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ....... 2,303 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 17,065 

Number of notices served ....... 6,655 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers regard- 
ing accidents and to examine police records) ... 8,085 
Number of days in court ....... 192 

Number of cases settled, on recommendation from this office . 93 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to 

repair same ........ $1,934.43 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the House of Detention in a 
van provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge 
of the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are 
returned to the House of Detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 3,290 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness ......... 1,416 

Larceny 373 

Night walking ....... 64 

Fornication 184 

Idle and disorderly . . . . 101 

Assault and battery ........ 17 

Adultery .......... 35 

Violation of liquor law 27 

Keeping house of ill fame 22 

Various other causes 402 



Total 2,641 

Recommitments. 

From Municipal court 210 

From County jail 439 



Grand total 3(2 go 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 510. Of these 343 are 
connected with the underground system and 167 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this service responded 
to 1,692 trouble calls; inspected 510 signal boxes, 18 signal 
desks and 955 batteries; repaired 180 box movements, 54 
registers, 81 polar box bells, 60 locks, 33 time stamps, 7 stable 
motors, 9 stable registers, 7 vibrator bells, 6 relays, 8 pole 
changers and 5 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and 
electric light work at headquarters and the various stations. 
There have been made 37 plungers, 43 complete box fittings, 
51 line blocks, 45 automatic hooks, 4 stable boards and a 
large amount of small work done which cannot be classified. 

Two new police signal boxes have been installed at Police 
Division 17. 

The police signal service now has charge of 99 reflector 
spotlights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for 
the regulation of traffic, also 2 signal towers. 

Most of the prescribed district for 1925 affecting this 
Department was in South Boston. Cable has been bought 
but has not been installed as the necessary ducts that were 
to be laid by the telephone company have not been completed 
and the work cannot be done until 1926. 

New signal desks were fitted and equipped for Stations 2 and 
18. Rebuilt and renewed desks have been installed at Sta- 
tions 10 and 13. Greatly increased use of the automatic 
answer-back signals has put added strain on register contacts 
and other working parts and the registers have to be constantly 
repaired. Measures arc being taken to prolong their life 
until such time as some one can be found to build new and 
suitable ones. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 
Ford sedan and 1 Ford truck. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 52,233 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 73,628 miles. There 
were 36,692 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,904 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 507 runs were made tQ 



1926.J PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 31 

take lost children to station houses. There were 2,673 runs 
to fires and 703 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 510 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 
circuits and 70 telephone circuits; 590,316 telephone messages 
and 3,779,992 "on duty" calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time: — 

IS signal desks. 

72 circuits. 

510 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call boards. 

78 test boxes. 

955 cells of battery. 

622,017 feet underground cable. 



224,140 feet overhead cable. 

21,220 feet of duct. 

66 manholes. 

1 White truck. 

1 Ford truck. 

1 Ford sedan. 



Harbor Service. 

The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows :— 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, 

float stages, etc. ....... $42,615 00 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded ..... 865 

Vessels ordered from the channel ..... 266 

Vessels removed from the channel by police steamers . 3 

Assistance rendered vessels ...... 68 

Assistance rendered wharfingers ..... 8 

Permits granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at anchor . 7 

Obstructions removed from channel ..... 42 

Alarms of fire on water front attended .... 25 

Boats challenged . . 2,246 

Sick and injured persons assisted ..... 9 

Dead bodies recovered ........ 22 

Persons rescued from drowning ..... 4 

Vessels assigned to anchorage . . . . . • 800 

Cases investigated ........ 263 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor . 197 

Boats searched for contraband ..... 2,246 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,854, 
6,415 being from domestic ports, 568 from the British Prov- 
inces and 871 from foreig* ports. Of the latter 867 were 
steamers and 4 were motor vessels. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 15 to October 15, 1925. 

The launch "E. U. Curtis" cruised nightly from Castle 
Island to Neponset Bridge. Twenty-nine cases were investi- 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

gated, 33 boats were challenged for contrabrand, 18 obstruc- 
tions removed from the channel, assistance rendered to 17 
boats in distress by reason of disabled engines, stress of 
weather, etc., and towing them with the persons aboard to a 
place of safety, one dead body recovered from the water, 10 
arrests made for violation of United States custom laws, 3 
motor boats seized with their cargoes of liquor and turned over 
to United States custom guards. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1924, there were 34 horses in the 
service. During the year two were purchased, one humanely 
killed and two delivered to the State Health Department. 
At the present time there are 33 in the sen-ice as shown by 
Table IX. 

Vehicle Service. 
Automobiles. 

There are 63 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
16 at headquarters; one at the house of detention, used as a 
woman's van and kept at Division 4; 10 in the city proper 
and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; four in the South 
Boston district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; two in the 
East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; three in the Back 
Bay and Fenway, attached to Division 16; two in the West 
Roxbury district, attached to Division 17; two in the Hyde 
Park district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan 
district, attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the 
traffic divisions and seven unassigned. (See page 34.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

Repairs $23,148 54 

Tires * . 5,652 45 

Gasoline 10,469 38 

Oil 2,003 45 

Storage 2,685 72 

License fees 266 00 

Total H4.225 54 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 33 



Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 

Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are seven unassigned. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 2,686 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . 1,222 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston District) . . 197 

Calls where services were not required ..... 189 

Home ......... 76 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital ....... 76 

Psychopathic Hospital ...... 74 

Massachusetts General Hospital ..... 53 

Morgue .... 47 

Carney Hospital ....... 27 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 20 

Faulkner Hospital ....... 9 

Boston State Hospital ...... 6 

Commonwealth Hospital ..... 4 

Chelsea Naval Hospital ...... 3 

Forest Hills Hospital ...... 3 

Police station houses ... 3 

Beth Israel Hospital .... 2 

Children's Hospital ...... 2 

Homeopathic Hospital ...... 2 

McLeod Hospital ....... 2 

Bay State Hospital ...... 

Emerson Hospital ....... 

Hull Street Dispensary .... 

McLean Hospital ....... 

New England Hospital 



Total 



4,708 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

LUt of Vehicles Used by the Department. 



[Jan. 



Divisions. 


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3 

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5 


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Headquarters 


- 


- 


- 


15 


1 


- 


- 


16 


Division 1 


1 




- 




- 


- 


- 


3 


Division 2 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


o 


Division 3 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5 


- 




- 




- 


i 


- 


3 


Division 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 7 


- 




- 




- 


i 


1 


4 


Division 9 


- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 11 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 12 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 13 


- 




- 




- 


.5 


1 


S 


Division 14 


- 




- 




- 


5 


2 


9 


Division 15 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 16 


- 




- 


2 


- 


8 


3 


14 


Division 17 


- 




- 




- 


6 




9 


Division 18 


- 




- 




- 


2 




5 


Division 19 


- 




- 




- 


5 




S 


Division 20 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 




3 


Division 21 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 




3 


Joy Street Stable 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Unassigned 


- 


7 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Totals 


1 


25 


3 


3-5 


o 


42 


16 


124 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 35 

Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 1,769* carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 7 as compared with last year; 1,741 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of 331 com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 28 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 315 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the inspector; 54 of these were restored to the 
owners, and the balance placed in the custody of the lost 
property bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 1,851 

Number of carriages licensed . 1,766 

Number of licenses transferred 106 

Number of licenses canceled . . . . . . . 106 

Number of licenses suspended ....... 15 

Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected ... 82 
Number of applications for carriage licenses reconsidered and 

granted .......... 16 

Number of carriages inspected ....... 1,851 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 3,576 

Number of complaints against drivers investigated ... 92 

Number of warrants obtained ....... 1 

Number of days spent in court ...... 1 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 43 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers .... 315 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ..... 86 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . . 14 

Drivers' licenses granted ........ 3,504 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1925, 916 such special stands. 

Of these special stands, there have been 83 canceled or 
revoked, 15 transferred and 5 suspended. 

There have been 147 applications for special stands rejected, 
19 of which were reconsidered and granted and 1 application 
rejected for a transfer of a special stand. 

* Three canceled for nonpayment. 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Sight-seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1925, there have been 
issued licenses for 64 sight-seeing automobiles and 28 special 
stands for them. 

There have been rejected 1 application for a sight-seeing 
automobile and 1 application for a special stand. 

There have been 216 operators' licenses granted and 2 
applications for operators' licenses rejected. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During the 
year 4,639 applications for such licenses were received; 4,635 
of these were granted and 4 rejected. 

Of these licenses 70 were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 28 for other causes and 19 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 



Listing Work in Boston, etc. 



Yea«. 


Canvass. 


Yuul 


Canvass. 


1903 1 .... 


181,045 


1914 


219,364 


1904 . 






193,195 


191f 






220,883 


1905 . 






194,547 


1916' 






- 


1906 . 






195,446 


1917 






221,207 


1907 . 






195,900 


1918 






224,012 


1908 . 




• 


201,255 


1919 






227,466 


1909 . 






201,391 


1920 






235,248 


1910 1 . 






203,603 


1921* 






480,783 


1911 . 






206,825 


1922 






480,106 


1912 . 






214,178 


1923 






477,547 


1913 . 






215,388 


1924 




485,677 



1 1903 to 1900, both inclusive, listing wis oo Msy \. 

> 1910 bating changed to April 1. 

• 101ft bating done by Board of Assessors. 

4 1921 taw ctjangml to include women in listing. 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



37 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 

239,869 

249,609 

489,478 



Male 
Female 



Total 



Listing Expenses. 

The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Advertising and printing ....... $37,767 30 

Clerical services 24,501 75 

Stationery 211 47 

Interpreters 243 05 

Telephone 39 18 



Total 



K umber of Policemen Employed in Listing. 



$62,762 75 



April 1 
April 2 
April 3 
April 4 
April 6 
April 7 
April 8 



1,229 

1,182 

1,025 

689 

79 

43 

14 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 



The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1925 may be summarized as follows: — 



1»25. 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated . 
Convicted of crime .... 
Unfit for various reasons . 
Apparently fit .... 
Total 



1,291 
206 
240 
567 

5,930 



8,234 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1925, there were 
1,455 special police officers appointed; 9 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause and one appointment 
revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From United States Government ...... 19 

From State departments 4 

From city departments ........ 376 

From county of Suffolk ........ 16 

From railroad corporations . . . . . . 112 

From other corporations and associations .... 663 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 234 

From private institutions ....... 19 

From churches ......... 12 



Total 1,455 



Railroad Police. 

There were 178 persons appointed railroad policemen dur- 
ing the year, 151 of whom were employees of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, 26 of the New York, New Haven <fc Hartford 
Railroad and 1 of the Boston & Albany Railroad. 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 25,258. Of these 24,914 were granted, of which 
154 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 24,760. During 
the year 498 licenses were transferred, 657 canceled, 9 revoked 
and 344 applications were rejected. The officers investi- 
gated 464 complaints arising under these licenses. The fees 
collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
$64,592.50. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 50 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted. Five 
licenses were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment 
of license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are in- 
spected before the license is granted, and it is arranged by a 
qualified musician, not a member of the department, that such 
instruments shall be inspected in April and September of 
each year. 

During the year, 75 instruments were inspected, with the 
following results: — 



Kind or IawTHCTirarr. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Paased. 


Number 
Rejected. 


Street pianos 








30 


22 


8 


Hand organs 








19 


15 


4 


Violins . 


- 








7 


7 


- 


Harps . 










2 


2 


- 


Banjos . 










4 


4 


- 


Accordions 










4 


4 


- 


Guitars 










2 


2 


- 


Bagpipes 










5 


5 


- 


Harmonicas 










o 


2 


- 


Totals 


75 


63 


12 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years, and the action taken 
thereon: — 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



Year. 


Applications. 


Gratiwd. 


Rejected. 


1921 


294 


292 


2 


1922 


309 


308 


1 


1923 


246 


245 


1 


1924 


231 


231 


- 


1925 


240 


239 


1 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 
or revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked : — 



YfcAH. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Revoked. 


1921 .... 


3,190 


2,843 


347 


4 


1922 .... 


3,100 


2,916 


1S4 


8 


1923 .... 


3,191 


3,067 


124 


6 


1924 .... 


2,998 


2,879 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 



Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
Acts of 1904 as amended, during the year, the location of 
each house and the number of lodgers accommodated. 



1926.) PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 41 



Locatiojt. 



Number 
Lodged. 



194 Commercial Street 
234 Commercial Street 
17 Davis Street 
1051 Washington Street 
1202 Washington Street 
1025 Washington Street 
Total . 



30,344 
13,908 
46,272 
36,500 
27,000 
31,025 



185,049 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1924, there were 246 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 19 died, viz., 1 superintendent, 1 deputy 
superintendent, 1 captain, 3 sergeants, 12 patrolmen and 1 
annuitant; 1 annuitant was dropped on account of remarriage 
and 1 was dropped on account of expiration of tenure of 
annuity. Fifteen were added, viz., 1 inspector, 3 sergeants, 
10 patrolmen and the widow of Inspector Benjamin Alexander, 
who was killed while on duty, leaving 240 on the roll at date, 
210 men and 30 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $196,803.53 and it is estimated that $196,884 
will be required for pensions in 1926. This does not include 
pensions for 4 lieutenants and 23 patrolmen, all of whom are 
sixty-five years old or more and entitled to be pensioned on 
account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the 
thirtieth of November last amounted to $207,550. There 
are 63 beneficiaries at the present time and there has been 
paid to them the sum of $7,704.16 during the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including the pensions, house of detention and listing 
persons twenty years of age or more, but exclusive of the 
maintenance of the police signal service, were $4,670,303.43 
(See Table XVII.) 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees 
from licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, 
etc., was $69,539.43. (See Table XIV.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $51,920.36. (See Table XVIII.) 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November SO, 1025, giring 
the Age at Time of Retirement and the S'umbcr rf Years' Scrricc of Each. 



Name. 


Cau« of 
Retirement. 


Aee at Time 

of Retirement 

(Yeara). 


Year* of 
Service. 


William L. Bierman 


Incapacitated 


31 


5 


George C. Brennan 






Age 


71 


45 


George X. Durkee 






Age 


67 


38 


Charles A. Gilman 






Age 


70 


30 


Frank X. Harrington 






Age 


60 


31 


Wilbur F. Harris . 






Incapacitated 


54 


25 


Alexander Herring 






Incapacitated 


65 


22 


Asa G. Howland . 






Age 


60 


27 


Edonund J. Ivers . 
William D. Kerr . 






Incapacitated 


50 


25 






Age 


72 


41 


Walter M. Murphy 






Age 


63 


38 


Anthony J. Rock 






Incapacitated 


40 


5 


Thomas F. Supple 






Age 


65 


36 


Frank Tays 






Age 


60 


31 



Employees of the Department Retired during the Year under the Boston 
Retirement System, which xcenl into effect February 1, 1023. 



Name. 


Poaitioo. 


Cause 

of 
Retire- 
ment. 


Age. 


Date of 
Retirement. 


Yeara 

of 

Service. 


Charles C. Carter . 


Van 








■ 




driver 


Age 


60 


Jan. 31, 1925 


26 1 
24 «4 


Timothy Connolly . 


Janitor 


Age 


63 


Oct. 31, 1925 


Joseph A. Hoey 


Van 








»■ 




driver 


Age 


69 


Oct. 31, 1925 


32 Jg 


Thos. B. Lafayette 1 


Janitor 


Age 


60 


Mar. 31, 1925 


.">. 



> Penaioned originally Nov. 30. 1923. and reinatated to active duty by order of the 
Boavon Retirement Board on Dee. 1, 1924. 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



47 



Table IV. 

List of Officers who were Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November SO, 1925. 



Date. 



Name and Rank. 



Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 



13, 1925 

13, 1925 

13, 1925 

13, 1925 

13, 1925 

13, 1925 

13, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 

3, 1925 



Inspector George W. Patterson to the rank of captain. 
Lieutenant John M. Anderson to the rank of captain. 
Sergeant John J. Hanrahan to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergeant Daniel J. Hines to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergeant William W. Livingston to the rank of lieutenant 
Patrolman Thomas F. Casey to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Cashman to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman John C. Blake to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Dennis F. Driscoll to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Henry W. Laskey to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas F. J. McGrade to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank McXabb to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman Robert C. Mooney to the rank of sergeant. 
Patrolman David V. Tintle to the rank of sergeant. 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Sumber of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year uho 
trere Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date ArroixTED. 


o 

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2 


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1S93 






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- 


- 


6 


2 


4 


10 


21 


43 


1S94 






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1 


6 


3 


12 


1895 






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1 


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20 


39 


74 


1886 






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1 


2 


8 


13 


1897 






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1 


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10 


20 


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2 


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13 


21 


44 


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18 


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9 


22 


1805 






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7 


2 


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1506 






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3 


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6 


1907 






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11 


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20 


1908 






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12 


8 


23 


1909 






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7 


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3 


7 


1911 


















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2 


4 


1912 






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1 


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1 


5 


5 


12 


1913 




















2 


2 


1914 




















2 


2 


1915 


















1 


- 


1 


1916 


















1 


3 


4 


1917 


















1 


5 


6 


1919 




















693 


693 


1920 




















225 


225 


1921 




















146 


146 


1922 




















84 


84 


1923 




















136 


136 


1924 




















91 


91 


1925 




















71 


71 


Total* 






1 


3 


1 


30 


29 


41 


146 


1,683 


1,934 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT«-No. 49. 



51 



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1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



55 



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1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



57 



Table IX. 
Number and Distribution of Horses in the Department. 



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58 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrettt by Police Division* during the Year ending 
Sorember SO, 1025. 



Divisions. 




Males. 


Female*. 


ToUls. 


Headquarters . 






2,048 


409 


3,057 


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0,842 


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7,008 


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2,923 


415 


3,338 


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4,812 


457 


5,269 


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3,3GG 


276 


3,642 


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8,S96 


1,146 


10,042 


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276 


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16 


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301 


5,042 


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496 


5,656 


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SS 


3,028 


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2,579 


134 


2,713 


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2,078 


61 


2,139 


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2,380 


191 


2,571 


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4,901 


19S 


5,099 


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2,824 


406 


3,230 


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1,502 


26 


1,528 


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703 


39 


742 


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1,058 


46 


1,104 


Division 20 








0,720 


31 


6,751 


Division 21 








413 


10 


423 


Totals 


77,813 


5,332 


S3, 145 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 




GO 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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61 



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1926.1 



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1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



65 



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3 



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I o o> •-< lO o 
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81 



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82 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Sumber of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November SO, 102-5. 



Drvisioxa. 


Val». 


Femnles. 


. c imyed. 


Breeder*. 


Total. 


1 


52 


24 




3 


79 


2 








2 


1 


- 


1 


4 


3 








220 


82 


14 


1 


317 


4 








63 


31 


3 


- 


97 


5 








296 


100 


16 


I 1 


413 


6 








146 


47 


3 


- 


196 


/ 








46S 


139 


15 


1 


623 


9 








5S7 


1S5 


40 


2 


814 


10 








392 


91 


25 


1 


509 


11 








763 


154 


79 


2 


998 


12 








. 331 


62 


13 


- 


406 


13 








4S7 


US 


56 


3 


664 


14 








538 


159 


75 


2 


774 


15 








350 


14S 


18 


- 


516 


16 








444 


132 


63 


- 


639 


17 








947 


162 


113 


4 


1,226 


18 








357 


69 


28 


1 


454 


19 








355 


58 


29 


1 


443 




1 


'otals 




6.79S 


1,702 


590 


22 


9,172 



' Breeder at $50. 



Table XVI. 
Tnlnl Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the Cily hy Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . 


901 


Division 12 . 


69 


Division 2 . 


1,443 


Division 13 . 


70 


Division 3 . 


185 


Division 14 . 


71 


Division 4 . 


364 


Division 15 . 


128 


Division 5 . 


228 


Division 16 . 


118 


Division 6 . 


363 


Division 17 . 


66 


Division 7 . 


125 


Division IS . 


67 


Division 9 . 


230 


Division 19 . 


19 


Division 10 . 
Division 11 . 


91 
92 






Total . 


4,635 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 83 

Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November SO, 19£6. 

Expenditures. 
Pay of police and employees ..... $3,980,614 98 

Pensions 196,803 53 

Fuel and light 57,133 44 

Water and ice 1,875 38 

Furniture and bedding ...... 11,414 20 

Printing, stationery, telegrams, etc 21,747 42 

Care and cleaning station bouses and city prison . . 15,946 09 

Repairs to station bouses and city prison . . 23,330 00 

Repairs and supplies for police boats .... 18,960 54 

Telephone rentals and tolls 13,217 29 

Purchase of horses and vehicles ..... 32,234 57 

Care and keeping horses 10,947 57 

Care and repairs of automobiles ..... 43,547 66 

Transportation of prisoners, sick and insane persons . . 447 70 

Feeding prisoners ....... 4,286 68 

Medical attendance and medicine ..... 6,984 78 

Transportation 4,427 12 

Pursuit of criminals ....... 11,746 76 

Uniforms and uniform caps ...... 75,552 57 

Badges, buttons, clubs, insignia, etc. .... 7,343 78 

Traveling expenses and food for police .... 3,850 65 

Rent of buildings 30,033 99 

Traffic signs and signals ...... 18,670 41 

Expert services ........ 550 00 

Music for police parade ...... 305 00 

Rifle tests 375 00 

Expense of state census 2,985 00 

Total $4,595,332 11 

Expenses of listing . . . . . 62,762 75 

Expenses of house of detention ..... 12,208 57 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII) . . . 51,920 36 

Total $4,722,223 79 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . $40,431 50 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 24,161 00 
Sale of auctioneer record books, condemned, lost, stolen and 

abandoned property, etc. ...... 2,577 01 

For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, rent, uniform cloth and use of 

police property ....... 1,409 35 

Refunds 605 08 

For damage to police property ..... 355 49 

Total $69,539 43 



84 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 
November 30, 1025. 



Pay rolls $34,826 51 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor . . 14,164 71 

Rent of stable 1,000 00 

Care and repair of vehicles and shoeing horse . . . 759 88 

Carfare 755 36 

Purchase of Ford car 363 75 

Underground plans ....... 50 15 

Total 851,920 36 



1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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Street oars 
Automobiles 
Defects in streets 
Live electric wires 
Falling object* . 
Falls, various caures 
Excavations In streets 
Defects in sidewalks 
Motorcycles 
Railroad* . 
Bitten by dogs . 
Kicked by horses 
Runaway horses 
Coasting , , 
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Struek by bullets 
Struck by baseball ba 
Cave-in of trench 
Miscellaneous 


Total killed 
Total injured 





86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1926.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



87 



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88 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 

Table XXI. 



89 



Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1925, icho were Born in the 
Year Indicated in the Table below. 





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Pate or 

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1 


1 


1851 


















1 


1 


1856 


















1 


1 


1857 




- 


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5 


6 


1858 




- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


2 


1 


3 


7 


1859 




- 


l 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


5 


1860 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


13 


15 


1861 




- 


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2 


o 


2 


1 


14 


22 


1862 




- 


- 


- 


2 


o 


2 


2 


12 


20 


1863 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


6 


6 


17 


1864 




- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


5 


13 


23 


1865 




- 


- 


— 


4 


1 


1 


7 


18 


31 


1866 




1 


- 


- 


3 


1 


5 


9 


18 


37 


1867 




- 


- 


- 


7 


3 


4 


8 


15 


37 


1868 




- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


11 


9 


23 


1869 




- 


l 


- 


3 


- 


3 


8 


10 


25 


1870 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


4 


7 


14 


1871 




- 


- 


— 


- 


1 


2 


5 


9 


17 


1872 














2 


6 


11 


19 


1873 • 














2 


13 


9 


24 


1874 




- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


10 


24 


1875 




- 


- 


— 


1 


2 


2 


4 


5 


14 


1876 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


7 


3 


13 


1877 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


6 


7 


15 


1878 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


8 


4 


13 


1879 
















5 


9 


14 


1880 




- 


- 


- 


- 


o 


- 


3 


1 


6 


1881 
















7 


3 


10 


1882 




- 


- 


— 


- 


3 


- 


4 


3 


10 


1883 
















3 


2 


5 


1884 
















3 


6 


9 


1885 
















1 


18 


19 


1886 


















35 


35 


1887 
















1 


49 


50 


1888 
















1 


67 


68 


1889 


















86 


86 


1890 


















75 


75 


1891 


















90 


90 


1892 


















135 


135 


1893 


















134 


134 


1894 


















168 


168 


1895 


















154 


154 


1896 


















164 


164 


1897 


















152 


152 


1898 


















86 


86 


1899 


















32 


32 


1900 


















8 


8 


Totals 




1 


3 


1 


30 


29 


41 


146 


1,683 


1,934 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1925, is 
thirty-seven years. 



INDEX. 



Aceideots . . • 

caused by automobile . 
persona killed or injured by. 
number of, reported 
Ambulance service 
Arrests . . . • 

ace and sex of 
comparative statement of 
for offences against chastity, nxjral 
for drunkenness . 
foreigners . 
minors . . 

nativity of 
nonresidents 
number of. by divisions 
Dumber of, punisbed by fi::e 
on warrants 
summoned by court 
total number of . 
violation of city ordinance* 
without warrants 
Auctioneers 
Automobiles 

accidents due to 
police 
public 
sight-seeing 
theft of 
Benefits and pensions 
Bertillon system 
Buildings . . . • 

dangerous, reported 
found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Carriages, public 
articles left in 
automobile 
Dumber licensed . 
Cases investigated 
Census taking . 
Cesspools, defective, reported 
Children .... 
abandoned, cared for . 
lost, restored 
Chimntys, dangerous, reported 
City ordinances, arrests for violation «! 
Claims, inspector of 
Collective musicians . 
Commitments . 
Complaints 

against police officers . 
against miscellaneous licences 
Courts 

fines imposed by 
Dumber of days' attendance at. by 
number of persons summoned \>y 
Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 
arrests by . 
finger-print system 
identification room 
photographs 
records 
Criminal work . 

comparative statement of 
Dangerous weapons 
Dead bodies, cared for 

recovered . 
Deaths .... 
by accident, suicide, etc. 
of police officers . 
Department, police 
Distribution of force . 
Disturbances suppressed 
Dogs .... 

amount received for licenses for 
damage done by . 
number licensed . 
Drivers, hackney carriage . 
Drowning, persons rescued from 



arks a 



.,(1, 



ltd squares 



20, 



. n 



. it> 



27. 3 



33, 



FAOS 

27. 85, 86 

. 85. 86 

85, 86 

27 

33 

58, 59, 78. 79 

78 

79 

19, 66. 77 
20, 22. 29. 70 

20. 59-77 
20. 59-77 

22 

20. 59-77 

68 

22 

20. 59-77 

20, 59-77 

19.77 

22.69 

20. 69-77 
80 

34. 85. 86 

23. 85, 86 

32 

35 

36.80 
11 
41 
20 
27 
27 
27 
20 
35 
35 
35 

35. 80 

21.29,31 

16 

27 

23, 27, 28 

27 

23, 28 
27 

22.69 
29 

39, 80 

22, 29 

38.64,80 

64 

38.80 
59-77. 79 

20.79 

21, 29. 79 
20, 69-77 

20 

21 

21 

20 

20 

20 

79 

79 

10,40 

27.31 

27.31 

45. 86. 86 

23 

19. 45 

18 

19,43 

28 

80. 82. 83 

80. 83 

29 

80. 82 

35.80 

28,31 



21.29, 
20.': 



19. 23, 



29. 



P.D. 49. 



Drunkenness . 

arrests for, per day 
foreigners arrest*./ for . 
decrease in number of arrests for 
noo-residents arrested for 
total number of arrests for 
women committed for . 
Employees of the Department 
Events, special . 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial . 

expenditures 
bouse of detention 
pensions . 

receipts .... 
miscellaneous license fees 
signal service 
Fines 

amount of . 
average amount of 
number punished by 
Finger-print system . 
Fire alarms 

defective, reported 
number given 
Firearms, relative to sale of, etc. 
Fires 

extinguished 
on water front attended' 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 
Gaming, illegal . 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages 
Hand carts 
Harbor service . 
Horses 

distribution of 
number in service 
purchased . 
House of detention 
House of ill fame, keeping . 
Hydrants, defective, reported 
Identification room 
Imprisonment . 

persons sentenced to 
total years of 
Income 

Inquests held . , 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians . 
Junk collectors . 
Junk shop keepers 
Jury lists, police work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Listing, police . 
expenses of 
number listed 

number of policemen employed I 
Lodgers at station houses . 
Lodging houses, publio 

applications for licenses 
JJ authority to license 
™ location of . 

number of persons lodged in 
i ? fo'paoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored . 

Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 
causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business 
Misc ellaaeous licenses . 

Mat amount of fees collected for 
complaints investigated 
number canceled and revoked 
number issued 
number transferred 
Missing persons 
age and sex of 
number found 
number reported 
Musicians, collective . 



36 



37 



91 



20. 22,29.70 
20 
20.70 
20.22 
24 70 
22.70 
29 
18.4J.44 
24 
41.83. 84 
21.28 
41. S3 
41.83 
41.83 
41.83 
42.83 
38.80.83 
42.84 
20. 22. 79 
20.22.79 
20.79 
22 
21 



28 
10 

28.31 
28 
31 
20.59-77 
21 
71 

35.80 

35.80 
SO 
31 

32.57 
57 

32.57 
33 

29.83 

29. M 
28 
20 

22.79 
23 

22.79 

42.83 
23 



28 
39.80 
80 
80 
37 
28 
38.42.80 
83.87.88 
37.83 
34.87.88 
37 
23 
40.80 
80 
40 
41 
41 
24.81.83 
10.28 
23 
23 
23 
20.59-78 
27 
38.80. S3 
38.80.83 
38.80 
38.80 
38.80 
28.80 



39.80 



benefi 



ents 



92 



M usierans, itinerant . 

applications for licenses 

instruments inspected . 

instruments passed 

Nativity of persons arrested 

Nonresident offenders 

Offences . - - 

against chastity, morality, etc 
against license laws 
against the person 
against property, malicious 
against property, with violence 
against property, without violence 
forgery and against currency 
miscellaneous 
recapitulation 
Operators 
Parka, public . - . 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers 
Pensions and benefits . 

estimates for pensions . 
number of persons on rolls 
payments on account of 
Police 

railroad 

special . • 

Police charitable fund, number ol 
Police department 
distribution of 
horses in use in . 
how constituted . 
officers appointed 
absent sick . 
arrests by • 
complaints against 
date appointed 
detailed, special ev 
died . 
discharged 
injured 
nativity of . 
promoted 
resigned 
retired 
vehicles in use in . 
work of 
Police listing . 
Police signal service . 
miscellaneous work 
payments on account 
property of 
signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of . 
Prohibition laws, enforcement of 
Property . . . 

lost, abandoned and 
police 

recovered . 
sale of condemned 
stolen . - ■ 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lodging bouses 
Railroad police . 
Receipts . 
Revolvers 

licenses to carry . 
Second-hand articles . 
Sewers, defective, reported . 
Sick and injured persons asais 
Sickness, absence on accoun' 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, police . 
Special eventa . 
Special police 
Station houses . 
lodgers at . 
witnesses detained at 
Stolen property 
recovered . 
value of 
Street railways, conductors 
Streets 

accidents reported in 
defective, reported 
obstructions removed 
Teams 

stray, put up 



:ol 



tolen 



and motormen licensed 



15 



23 



36, 



24, 31 



P.D. 49. 

. 39. 80 

. 39.80 

39 

39 

22 

20. 59-77 

20. 59-77 

20. 66-77 

20. 64, 77 

20, 59, 77 

20. 63, 77 

20.61,77 

20. 62. 77 

20. 64, 77 

20, 68, 77 

77 

36, 80 

. 85, 86 

85,88 

80 

41.83 

41 

41 

41.83 

38 



41 
18 
. 19. 43 
32. 57 
18 
19 
53 
19. 59 
54 
48 
24 
. 19. 45 
19, 49 
19 
89 
47 
19. 49 
19.41.46 
34 
19 
37, 83. 87. 88 
30. 42, 83. 84 
30 
42. 83. 84 
31 
30 
22 
5 
42. 79. 80. 83 
24, 80. 83 
15 
23.31.79 
42. 80. 83 
23,79 
23 
35 
40.80 
38 
42. 80. 83 
40.80 
40,80 
80 
28 
23. 28. 31 
53 
36.80 
30.83. 84 
24 
38 
23 



18, 



23 

23,79 

23,79 

23.79 

80 

28. 85. 86 

85. 86 

28 

28 

28 

28 



I 



P.D. 49. 93 

PAGE 

Traffic control 8 

Used cars 27, 80 

licensed dealers .............. 80 

ealea reported .............. 27 

Vehicle* 32,33.34.35,80.82 

ambulances .............. 33 

Automobile* ............... 32 

in use in police department ............ 34 

public carriages .............. 35, 80 

wagons 36, 80, 82 

\ easels 31 

Wagons 36, 80, 82 

number licensed by divisions ........... 82 

total number licensed ............. 36, 80 

Water pipes, defective, reported ............ 28 

Water running to waste reported ............ 28 

Weapons, dangerous .............. 10, 40 

Witnesses 23, 28, 79 

fees earned by officers as ............ 23, 79 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as ....... 23, 79 

number of, detained at station bouses .......... 23| 28 

Women committed to House of Detention .......... 29 



Public Document No. 49 

She (tommnnuipaltlr of fflassartjUHrtts 
TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Police Commissioner 

FOR THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

FOR THE 

Yeab ending November 30, 1926 



u 

Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



S. s • * ' 



v 

\ 



. . . . ,. , 



\s ,f at 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Letter to Governor .......... 5 

Liquor traffic and narcotics ..... 5 

Firearms ......... . . 8 

Traffic 11 

Sale by Police of unclaimed, etc., property ..... 13 

Celerity in dispatching police information ..... 14 

Assaults on police officers ........ 15 

Plant 16 

The Department .......... 18 

The Police Force 18 

Signal sen-ice .......... 18 

Employees of the department ....... 18 

Recapitulation .......... 18 

Distribution and changes ........ 19 

Police officers injured while on duty ...... 19 

Work of the department ......... 19 

Arrests 19 

Drunkenness .......... 20 

Nativity of prisoners, etc. ........ 20 

Bureau of criminal investigation ....... 21 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners ...... 23 

Lost, nbandoned and stolen property ........ 23 

Larceny of automobiles, etc. ........ 24 

Violations of State liquor law ........ 25 

Special events ............ 25 

Missing persons .......... 27 

Record of automobiles reported stolen ... . . .28 

Record of used cars reported ........ 29 

Miscellaneous business . . . ... . . . .29 

Inspector of claims .......... 30 

House of detention .......... 31 

Police signal service .......... 31 

Signal boxes .......... 31 

Miscellaneous work . . . . . 32 

Harbor service .......... 33 

Horses 34 

Vehicle service .......... 34 

Automobiles .......... 34 

Ambulances .......... 35 

List of vehicles used by the department ..... 36 

Public carriages ........ 37 

Sight-seeing automobiles ........ 38 

Wagon licenses .......... 38 

Listing work in Boston ......... 38 

Listing expenses ......... 39 

Number of policemen employed in listing ..... 39 

Police work on jury lista ......... 39 

Special police ........... 40 

Railroad police .......... 40 



4 CONTENTS. 

PAfiE 

Conductors, motormen and starter* ....... 40 

Miscellaneous licenses . '. . . . . . . .41 

Musicians' licenses . . . . . . . . . .41 

Itinerant . . . . . . . . . . .41 

Collective 42 

Carrying dangerous weapons ........ 43 

Public lodging houses ......... 43 

Pensions and benefits ......... 43 

Financial ........... 44 

Statistical tables. 

Distribution of police force, etc. ....... 45 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 47 

List of officers retired ........ 48 

List of officers promoted ........ 49 

Number of men in active service . . .... .50 

Men on police force and year born . .... .51 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sckncwi 52 

Complaints against officers ........ 53 

Number and distribution of horses ...... 50 

Number of arrests by police divisions ...... 57 

Arrests and offences ......... 58 

Age and sex of persons arretted . . .... .73 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 74 

Licenses of all classes issued ....... 75 

Dog licenses issued ......... 77 

Wagon licenses issued ........ 77 

Financial statement ......... 78 

Payments on account of signal service ...... 70 

Accidents 80 

Male and female residents listed ....... 82 



®fjr (CmttmmtniralJij of fflaaanttpxattta. 



REPORT. 



HtAJXJCABTERS Or THE POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Orncr or the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkelet Stbeet. 
Boston, December 1. 1926. 

To His Excellency Alt ax T. Fuller, Governor. 

Your Excellzxct: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 1906, a report 
of the Police Department for the year ending November 30, 
1926. 

Liquor Traffic and Narcotics. 

Enforcement of the prohibitory laws because of the many 
important legal questions being brought to the attention of 
the highest federal and state tribunals, both affecting the con- 
struction to be given to various parts of these prohibitory acts 
and the proper method of enforcement by the state and federal 
authorities, still commands public attention. Increasing dif- 
ference of opinion of the federal courts as to the construction 
of certain parts of the Volstead Act and the rigidity of pro- 
cedure laid upon the enforcing authorities by the state courts, 
together with the undue publicity given to new ways and 
means adopted by the violators of the liquor laws to carry on 
liquor traffic, naturally focuses public attention upon the 
liquor situation. 

Enforcement of the liquor law is still a paramount problem 
for both federal and state authorities. After the proper 
methods of enforcement procedure have been settled by the 
courts, the ensuing problem is the detection and conviction of 
liquor violators with the infliction of proper punishment for 
the commission of this type of crime. The punishment meted 
out to liquor violators should act as a real deterrent. Distinct 
progress in decreasing liquor traffic in this city cannot be gain- 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

said. The number of arrests for drunkenness may serve as a 
barometer for those opposed to the principle of the prohibitory 
laws, but the accurate method to determine whether the law 
is being enforced is by reference to credible and substantial 
reports of enforcement agents to superiors as to the quantity 
and quality of intoxicating liquor to be purchased illegally. 

The proper way, therefore, to ascertain whether the liquor 
laws are being enforced is to ascertain whether this contraband 
article can easily be obtained. The supply of potable alcohol 
has been greatly diminished in this city and the price of gen- 
uine alcohol is extremely high. The number of places where 
this product may be obtained in large quantities has been 
materially reduced. Distillation of the various toxic concoc- 
tions from commercial or mercantile alcohol into pseudo or 
quasi-vendible products advertised as genuine products seems 
to be the last resort of those plying the contraband liquor 
trade. 

The illegal liquor distilling industry, because its functioning 
is easily detected, cannot be carried on in crowded cities and 
is now suburban in character. Death seems not to be a ready 
deterrent to an irrational desire for intoxicating liquors and, 
strangely enough, many persons by buying and consuming 
distilled products wrapped in masquerading labels and covers, 
are innocently courting this grim figure. 

To the praise of this department, every possible device and 
scheme to import and distribute intoxicating liquors is known 
or can be easily detected, but the difficulty with the liquor 
situation is not so much in stopping liquor flowing into the 
city from legitimate sources of manufacture or supply, but to 
eliminate that despicable class which has no hesitancy in 
knowingly selling a rank type of poison. 

If the activities of violators who persist in a deliberate, cal- 
culating manner to evade the liquor laws are not properly 
checked upon conviction with jail or prison sentences, the 
police in their prosecution of liquor violators arc only making 
gestures. As an indication of the activities of this department 
in these prosecutions, 38,882 persons were arrested for drunk- 
enness in this city, 37,376 males and 1,506 females, from De- 
cember 1, 1925, to November 30, 1926, and during the same 
period, 4,609 liquor searches on warrants were made. 

Owners of property, more solicitous for income from real 
estate than for respectable tenants, are actual participants in 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

sordid conditions created by tenants violating liquor laws. 
Responsibility for such conditions rests squarely upon their 
shoulders as taxpayers of this city. If indifference and cu- 
pidity control the action of property owners, it would seem 
strange if, in time, the same atmosphere did not permeate the 
ranks of the Police Department. 

In certain sections of this city the police are cognizant that 
liquor is being sold illegally and secretly. Persons engaged in 
this contraband business are naturally watching the police so 
that their activities may not be disturbed. By stratagem the 
police often either obtain a sale or seize intoxicating liquor in 
a building. Parties occupying the premises are brought into 
court and fined, with a warning that conviction of the same 
offense (not conviction of another offense against the liquor 
laws) may result in imprisonment. Under such a hazard, 
liquor traffickers are careful that when the next raid is made, 
some other lessee or occupant of the building is apprehended, 
The fact that the substitute lessee or occupant is an agent of 
the former lessee or occupant is generally known to the owner 
of the building and, despite a similar suspicion by the courts, 
yet, because of the lack of necessary legal proof, such agent 
being treated as a principal and as a first offender escapes the 
real punishment due him. 

Owners of real estate, with their minds on overhead charges, 
thus seem to be willing to accept as new tenants, well-known 
liquor traffickers. Leases under the law may be voided where 
lessees or occupants engage in unlawful business upon the 
premises. Where landlords refuse to take notice, even after 
police advice concerning the nature of the business carried on 
by their tenants, and tenant after tenant of the same building 
is convicted of some one or other of the various infringements 
of the liquor laws, it would seem logical that the police should 
not be compelled to resort to the archaic method of securing 
an interminable number of search warrants and find itself 
moving around in a circle, accomplishing nothing, to the 
amusement of this type of lawbreakers, but should have the 
same authority to eradicate from suspected buildings "rum" 
joints by methods similar to those now authorized by statute 
in eliminating houses of prostitution. I am again proposing 
legislation to this effect whereby buildings may be declared 
by the courts to be nuisances and enjoined as such. Equity 
proceedings of this nature would produce as effective results 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

as the application of the so-called "padlock law" by the 
federal equity courts. 

The problem of the suppression of the use of narcotic drugs 
is not local but international in scope. With federal and 
state laws enacted to regulate the handling, manufacture, 
transportation, storing, prescribing and use of narcotics, the 
police problem in relation to narcotic drugs is reduced to that 
of prevention of smuggling of narcotics and the arrest of both 
illegal distributors and addicts. 

The principal narcotics used by addicts are opium, mor- 
phine, heroin and cocaine. The arrest of the drug addict in 
many cases is both humanitarian and economic, inasmuch as, 
upon reliable information, cocaine addicts being subject to vio- 
lent hallucinations approaching a state of insanity are dan- 
gerous, and often adopt violent methods both in the commis- 
sion of crime or when about to be placed under arrest. 

Detection and apprehension of those engaged in narcotic 
drug distribution or consumption require extreme patience 
and ingenuity, inasmuch as narcotic peddlers or users, knowing 
that they are under the surveillance of the police, attempt to 
conceal their movements and methods. The police are handi- 
capped by the fact also that many drug distributors are not 
drug addicts. Distribution of narcotic drugs in this city has 
been reduced to a favorable minimum, obtained because of the 
intelligent and conscientious work of the police in general and 
those especially assigned to narcotic drug work. 

Fireaiims. 

The use and display of firearms having become an impor- 
tant factor in the commission of serious crimes and having de- 
veloped into a typically American practice, constant watch 
and careful supervision of the various sources of the sale and 
distribution of dangerous weapons is imperative. Possession 
and use of firearms, guns and other dangerous implements in 
many instances being necessary, imperative and lawful, and 
inasmuch as it is axiomatic that "every man's home is his 
castle," it is obvious that the proper means of safeguarding the 
homes of citizens should always l>e available. On the other 
hand, however, indiscriminate permission and promiscuous 
license to carry on the person or in vehicles dangerous weapons 
should lie carefully avoided because of the apparent possi- 
bility of danger of great abuses arising therefrom. The 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

ability to obtain easily firearms and dangerous weapons by 
certain classes has resulted in the practice by undesirables of 
using dangerous weapons either to protect or pursue illegal 
businesses from rum-running to hold-ups. Pursuit of sport 
to encourage the use of firearms, pistols and other similar 
weapons on one hand is laudable and should be encouraged, 
but the right of citizens to safety and security should not be 
abrogated, diminished or endangered in order that a minority 
may be amused. If the rights and privileges of gun clubs and 
other sporting organizations are restricted through a general 
tightening of the laws relating to the possession or purchase of 
firearms, it may be unfortunate for the devotees of this par- 
ticular pastime, but the rights of individuals must always be 
suspended or limited for the rights and safety of the majority. 
Promiscuous and indiscriminate sale of firearms, whether at 
wholesale or retail, should be strictly regulated. The legis- 
lature of Massachusetts last year, by constructive and effec- 
tive legislation, aided governmental agencies endeavoring to 
limit and control the distribution of dangerous weapons, and 
remedial legislation enacted relative to the sale and purchase 
of firearms affords notable check to the police upon the in- 
discriminate sale of such merchandise. 

Federal legislation is required, however, in the matter of 
firearms in transit by mail in interstate commerce and the im- 
portation of firearms from foreign countries. Naturally, con- 
siderable opposition to federal legislation upon this subject 
has developed. At the present time, several bills relative to 
firearms in interstate trade are in Congress in various stages of 
progress. Last year a conference was held in New York City 
at which police officials of the various eastern states gathered 
for the purpose of emphasizing and impressing upon Congress 
the necessity of immediate legislation upon the subject of the 
forbiddance of transit of firearms by mail and the importance 
of such legislation has been emphasized in many of the lead- 
ing newspapers and periodicals of this country. 

Several reputable mail-order houses, realizing the inevitable 
consequences of such unlimited and unchecked distribution 
of firearms by mail, have wisely discontinued the mails as a 
medium for the deliver}' of such articles. Unfortunately, 
other concerns engaged in selling firearms generally of foreign 
make, almost unexceptionally inferior in grade and cheap in 
price, have not the same perspective or viewpoint on this 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

subject, with the result that firearms may be obtained through 
the mail by irresponsible and often abnormal persons from 
such dealers with places of manufacture or business outside 
this Commonwealth. The eastern states have taken the ini- 
tiative in this matter and are endeavoring, in the absence of 
federal legislation, to promote state legislation along these 
lines by campaigns of education in states which have not taken 
steps in legislative progress upon this subject. When im- 
pediments are placed in the way of a purchaser who, because 
of criminality, abnormality or juvenility is unfit to carry a 
firearm, serious crimes may be in many eases averted. In my 
opinion, legislation should be passed to correct a serious de- 
fect in the present law which allows ammunition to be sold to 
minors over the age of fifteen years. Under the present law 
of this state, a minor cannot obtain a permit to carry a firearm 
except an employee of a bank or a public utility corporation. 
The privilege accorded to this class of minors is granted be- 
cause of the control which this stated type of employer natu- 
rally exercises over the person selected to be licensed to cam- 
firearms, and because the licensee, although a minor, is a per- 
son who has been considered by responsible authorities to be 
a person fit to carry deadly weapons. I believe the law should 
be further changed so that no minor should be allowed to buy 
ammunition for firearms unless he also has a license to cam - 
a firearm. 

The solution of many desperate crimes by the police, while 
ordinarily difficult, is in many cases made more laborious and 
mystifying by the fact that the trail of the perpetrator, often 
wounded or injured in the commission of the crime, is fre- 
quently covered by medical assistance to the criminal ren- 
dered by physicians who either through indifference or design 
fail to notify the police of such aid. This statement is not an 
indictment of the medical profession, but inasmuch as every 
profession, trade or business has members not actuated by 
proper ethical motives, it is the unfortunate experience of the 
police to find that the medical profession is not free from shady 
practitioners. Legislation requiring physicians or persons 
controlling sanatoriums to report to the local police when aid 
has been rendered for wounds or burns caused by guns or 
firearms, in my opinion would aid the police in more rapidly 
detecting criminals. The legislature of New York last year 
passed similar legislation, and I believe that the reputable 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

medical practitioners or medical societies of this Common- 
wealth ■will not oppose legislation of this type, while the pas- 
sage of such legislation will coercively control members of the 
medical profession whose type of practice is more or less under 
police surveillance. 

In order to impress more deeply upon the understanding of 
those individuals who perpetrate crime, and to give the citi- 
zens of this state the satisfaction of knowing that their in- 
terests are paramount to those of criminals, I believe in the 
passage in this state of legislation similar to that which was 
passed in New York relative to the graduated scale of punish- 
ment of persons arres.ted in the commission of a felony while 
armed with a pistol or other dangerous weapon. According 
to reputable authorities, the passage of this legislation in New 
York demonstrated in a very short time that terror had been 
stricken into the hearts of criminals whose chief purpose was 
persistence in the practice of terrorizing peaceful citizens of 
the community. 

Traffic. 

An efficient police department primarily prevents crime or, 
after crime has been committed, detects and apprehends the 
criminal offenders. Efficient management of private business 
corporations provides for future growth. Police departments 
necessarily must progress and coordinate with advancements 
in business. A traffic problem did not exist in Boston twenty 
years ago. Today, proper and efficient control of vehicular 
and pedestrian traffic, not only because of advancement in 
business activities and the necessity of safeguarding the pub- 
lic, but because of the increasing number of police officers 
needed for traffic work, is an outstanding problem with which 
all municipal authorities are confronted. 

The importance or magnitude of a traffic problem is rarely 
realized by the general public. Direction of traffic either by 
manual effort, beacons, lights, or synchronizing systems, pre- 
sents one aspect of this problem. On the other hand, rational 
enforcement of the various traffic laws, rules or regulations 
cannot be accomplished by mechanical devices but requires 
personal service. Pertinent to the traffic problem, which in 
the last analysis means the orderly flow of both vehicular and 
pedestrian traffic, the necessity of eliminating illegal and un- 
necessary parking of vehicles is apparent. Unrestrained and 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

uncontrolled parking of vehicles not only detrimentally affects 
the growth and development of business, but also seriously in- 
terferes with the operation of various governmental agencies 
engaged in the protection or safeguarding of both private and 
municipal property. Vehicular parking for an unlimited time 
on a thoroughfare which should be devoted to the passage of 
commercial vehicles is about as logical as dumping a cartload 
of paving blocks upon the same spot and forgetting to remove 
it. 

Strict enforcement of traffic laws cannot be neglected inas- 
much as orderly control of traffic spells prevention of acci- 
dents, the latter causing traffic tangles and consequent delays, 
and also unnecessarily requiring the service of police officers 
who are thus temporarily diverted from more important police 
duties. 

During the past year, 2,235 vehicles were licensed as hack- 
ney carriages with 4,031 licensed drivers. As most of these 
vehicles are operated where traffic is densest, their control and 
supervision, not taking into consideration the additional work 
in the investigation of applications for licenses of hackney 
carriage drivers and the careful allocation and licensing of the 
various special stands for hackney vehicles, requires the con- 
stant supervision of a separate unit. 

Automobiles temporarily appropriated for selfish reasons 
and subsequently abandoned, often in a damaged condition, 
in places obstructing traffic, place an additional burden upon 
the police. Records of this department show during the past 
year that approximately 3,700 automobiles were found aban- 
doned in the streets of this city by the police. 

Increase in school population and school buildings neces- 
sarily requires more police officers to protect school children at 
crossings. This obligation, with similar protection to the 
aged and infirm, is justly demanded from the police by the 
tax payers of this city. Boston, unlike some other cities, has 
not the advantage of laws against "jay walking." With the 
continual increase in the number of automobiles, pedestrian 
control by the police has become more arduous inasmuch as 
density of vehicular traffic produces greater density of pedes- 
trian traffic as the more populous sections of this city are built 
around or in the vicinity of renin arteries of travel. 

Mechanical control of traffic is replacing to a great extent 
manual traffic direction. Education of the public to obedi- 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

ence to the operation of mechanical traffic signals, as expected, 
has been successful. In the working out of the traffic prob- 
lem, knowledge of the various lighting systems in other cities 
of this country is valuable. The installation in this city of a 
system of synchronized lights directed under the progressive 
system, as an economic measure, cannot be delayed. The cost 
of installing a system of electrical traffic control under the 
present law requiring that the wires operating such a system 
shall be laid underground, would seem to be prohibitive. A 
possible solution of this problem could be effected if a system 
of electric traffic control were linked to the present plant of a 
public utility corporation operating with fixed conduits for 
wires. 

During the past year twenty-four spot lights were installed, 
making a total of one hundred and twenty-three spot lights 
set up by this department for the protection of traffic officers. 
Experimental work also relative to the adoption of flood lights 
to eliminate the glare of the present spot lights has been carried 
on. 

The two traffic divisions of this department were increased 
by the addition of eighty men from the additional 300 added 
to the department during the past year. At the present time, 
47 men are assigned to enforcing the parking laws and other 
officers will be placed in the traffic divisions in the near future.- 
The present personnel of these two divisions is 2 captains, 2 
lieutenants, 12 sergeants and 254 patrolmen. Continuous 
traffic service has been inaugurated. 

I desire again to publicly thank Gifford LeClear, Esq., 
chairman of Committee on Street Traffic and Municipal and 
Metropolitan Affairs of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
and Ellerton J. Brehaut, Esq., assistant secretary of the Bos- 
ton Chamber of Commerce, for the valuable advice given me 
in the study of the traffic problems of this city and for their 
efficient service in the installation of beacons and lighting 
systems for the expedition of pedestrian and vehicular traffic. 

sale by the pouce of unclaimed or abandoned 
Phopebtt. 

Yearly increase in the number of automobiles registered in 
this state, a large percentage of which has been fairly esti- 
mated to enter Boston at some period of the license year, not 
only increases police work because of the necessity of directing 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the same, but also increases the possibility of cars either being 
stolen deliberately for resale or misappropriated for temporary 
use and enjoyment. The number of cars abandoned on the 
streets of this city is increasing yearly. Many of these cars, 
because reported to the police as lost or stolen, can be promptly 
and readily restored to owners, but inasmuch as owners of 
cars so taken sometimes do not live in this city, temporary 
storage must be arranged by the police until the owner arrives 
after receiving notice to repossess. 

Automobiles necessarily cannot be left out-of-doors in in- 
clement weather and therefore many cars found abandoned 
must be stored in public garages. It is found that many 
abandoned cars are damaged in the illegal operation of the 
same, and the owners, incensed justifiably, sometimes refuse 
for this reason to repossess the cars from the garage in which 
they are stored in good faith by the police. Storage space 
must be paid for and the city of Boston should not be obliged 
to pay for the storage of cars when the owner is known and 
has been notified where his property may be located. De- 
mands by the police to owners to repossess their property 
often have been met with refusal and as the law now stands, 
the owner of a stolen or abandoned car, placed in a garage by 
the police, may enjoy free storage for an entire winter season 
by refusing to repossess the same, with the city obligated for 
the payment of the storage. 

The owner of an automobile which ha* been stolen or used 
unlawfully and found abandoned by the police, who refuses 
to repossess his property after receiving written notice of its 
location by the police, should, in all fairness, after at least six 
months from the time of receiving notice, lose the right to re- 
possess the same, and the police department should have the 
authority and right to sell these cars in order to release the 
lien of the garage owner for the fair charge for storage thereon. 

At the present time there is no space available in this de- 
partment for the storage of a large number of cars and the 
increasing number of abandoned and lost cars necessarily, 
therefore, must be 6tored in private garages or warehouses. 

Celeritt in- Dispatching Police Information. 

Rapidity of interchange of important police information be- 
tween police departments of this state is essential. Inasmuch 
as the means of rapid exchange is available either by telephone, 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 15 

telegraph or special communicating systems, a system oper- 
ated from a central distributing station either at the State 
House or at Police Headquarters, Boston, should be installed. 
A similar recommendation was made by me in my last three 
annual reports. 

Important communications can be sent to the various units 
of this department in an exceptionally short time, but con- 
fining the rapid diffusion of police news to the confines of this 
city, in view of the present use of automobiles by criminals in 
the commission of crimes, is futile. Crime is seldom discov- 
ered upon its execution and delay in the disclosure of com- 
mission of serious crime permits many criminals using auto- 
mobiles to be removed far from the scene of the crime soon 
after commission. 

A central communicating system with antenna stretching 
to the boundaries of this state and with branches to the im- 
portant cities and towns, should replace the present clumsy 
and cumbersome method of relaying important criminal in- 
formation to adjacent or distant police departments. Police 
methods and systems should progress steadily and methods 
employed in the apprehension of criminals should be in ad- 
vance of those used by criminals today in committing crime. 

Assaults on Police Officers. 

The underlying principle of stable government is respect by 
its citizens for constituted law and authority. While indi- 
vidual freedom with its accompanying prerogatives of free 
speech and independence of action, guaranteed by the Consti- 
tution, must be carefully guarded in order that democratic 
government may exist, yet unlimited and unbridled license for 
personal activities produces disorder and chaos. 

In Great Britain the police on duty without firearms rep- 
resent the Sovereign and malicious attacks upon police officers 
carry rapid and severe punishment. In this country, unfor- 
tunately, respect for authority does not always obtain. Delay 
of trial and sympathy for the criminal with outspoken disre- 
spect, antipathy and contempt for the police often produce 
judicial travesties. 

The police are human and therefore err, but without the 
protecting screen of a police department, anarchy ensues. 
Unlimited excoriation and abase of police departments by in- 
telligent persons because of weaknesses or abuses of individual 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

members tend to break down the fabric of the system and 
offer to the criminal and undesirable, favorable manna for 
their mental nourishment. 

Our Honor Roll for the year consists of one officer mur- 
dered in cold blood by youthful desperadoes, and three police 
officers murderously assaulted by criminals armed with fire- 
arms. 

As a tribute to the memory of members of this Department 
who heroically died in the performance of their duties, an- 
nually, on Memorial Day, bronze markers appropriately in- 
scribed have been placed upon their graven. These markers 
stand as mute evidence of the bravery and valor of men un- 
necessarily sacrificed that the lives and property of the citi- 
zens of Boston might be protected. 

Plant. 

During the past year steam heating systems were installed 
in the station houses of Divisions 11 and 17, and the heating 
apparatus of all other station houses throughly overhauled, 
cleaned and made ready for service. 

Work in cleaning and painting was done in Stations 12 and 
7 and a new system of lighting was installed in the latter 
building. 

The usual repairs were made on the harbor boats Guardian, 
E. U. Curtis, and Argus. The steamer Watchman, thoroughly 
rebuilt, is now in condition for a twenty-four-hour day ser- 
vice for a number of years. 

Two new motor prison vans and n patrol wagon to serve as 
replacements were purchased and placed in commission. 

Eight additional police ambulances were requested by me 
from the Mayor, through the Board of Municipal Emergencies. 
I have made provision in the Department estimates for 1927 
for these additional ambulances and 1 hope, if they are allowed, 
to put them into commission during the coming year. 

A traffic booth with a synchronized system of lights was in- 
stalled at the junction of Massachusetts Avenue and Common- 
wealth Avenue. 

The present antiquated and unsanitary station houses of 
Divisions 3, 4 and 5 should be replaced by modern structures. 

The Mayor has been requested by me to allow Division 14 
and Division 11, respectively, to occupy the premises now 
used for court purposes in the Brighton and Dorchester dis- 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 17 

tricts after these courts are installed in their new buildings in 
said districts. This additional space is urgently needed inas- 
much as the number of officers assigned to these two divisions 
has been materially increased. 

I have also discussed with the Mayor the necessity of a large 
central garage where both the cars of this Department and 
cars found abandoned by the police may be stored and thus 
eliminate the unnecessary large expenditure for storage in 
private and public garages and storehouses. 

The new police headquarters building situated at Berkeley 
and Stuart streets was dedicated on November 22, 1926. 
This building is seven stories in height above the street with 
basement and sub-basement. The exterior is treated in 
Italian Renaissance style with limestone on the Berkeley and 
Stuart street facades and a light-colored brick on Stanhope 
Street and the Court. The interior with regard to rooms, 
corridors, and stair towers is of modern office building design 
with sanitary floors and fireproof construction throughout. 
The building is heated by return tubular boilers supplied by 
oil for fuel. The main facade is on Berkeley Street set back 
from the lot line about twenty feet. The Stuart Street fagade 
is on the property line at the sidewalk and adjoins the present 
building of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. The 
cornerstone of the building was laid August 25, 1925, with 
appropriate ceremonies. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 
Police Commissioner. Secretary. 2 





The Police Force. 




Superintendent . 


1 


Lieutenants 


42 


Deputy superintendents 


3 


Sergeants . 


166 


Chief inspector . 
Cnptnina . 


1 
30 


Patrolmen 


2,004 






Inspectors 


27 


Total . . 


2,275 


Inspector of carriages 








(lieutenant) 


1 








Signal Service. 




Director . 


1 


Linemen 


6 


Foreman 


1 


Driver 


1 


Signalmen 


6 








Mechanics 


3 


Total 


18 


Employees of the Department. 




Clerks 


23 


Chauffeurs 


3 


Stenographers 


13 


Assistant property clerk 


1 


Matrons (house of detention 


) 5 


Foreman of stable 


1 


Matrons fetation houses) 


5 


Hostlers . 


12 


Knginecra on )>olicc steamers 3 


Janitors 


32 


Firemen on police steamers 


8 


Janitrcsses. 


20 


Firemen 


5 


Telephone operators . 


3 


Auto repair shop foreman 


1 


Tailor 


1 


Auto repair shop mechanic 


1 


Painters . 


4 


Repairmen 


2 


Steamfittcr 


1 


Superintendent of building 


1 








Elevator operators 


5 


Total 


150 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary ..... 2 

Police force 2,275 

Signal service ......... 18 

Employees .......... 150 

Grand total 2,445 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



19 



Distribution and Changes. 

The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 449 patrolmen were appointed; 1 patrolman 
reinstated; 22 patrolmen discharged; 47 patrolmen resigned 
(26 while charges were pending), and 1 patrolman was trans- 
ferred to the Department of Public Utilities; 1 chief inspector, 
1 inspector, 6 lieutenants, 2 sergeants and 18 patrolmen were 
retired on pension; 1 captain, 1 inspector, 2 sergeants and 7 
patrolmen died. (See Tables II, III, IV.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 

The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries. 



How Ix/rmE»-- 


Number of 
Men Injured. 


Number o( 
Duties Lost. 


In arresting prisoners ..... 
By cars and other vehicles .... 


53 
14 
71 

80 


418 

45 

635 

700 


Total 


218 


1,798 



Work of the Department. 
.4rreste. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 84,273 as against 83,145 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 1,128. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Decrease 3.89 

Decrease 4.00 

Decrease 3.23 

Decrease 16.56 

Decrease 30.85 

Decrease 16.54 

Decrease 5 . 58 

Increase 3.75 



Offences against the person ..... 
Offences against property committed with violence . 
Offences against property committed without violence 
Malicious offences against property 
Forgery and offences against the currency 
Offences against the license laws 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . 
Offences not included in the foregoing 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



There were 12,502 persons arrested on warrants and 51,707 
without warrants; 20,064 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 80,808 persons were held for trial; 3,405 were re- 
leased from custody. The number of males arrested was 
7S.S49; of females, 5,424; of foreigners, 26,662, or approxi- 
mately 31.63 per cent; of minors, 8,464. Of the total num- 
ber arrested, 21,569, or 25.59 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1922 to 1926, inclusive, was S312.344.66; in 
1926 it was S391, 169.50; or 878,824 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
47,691; in 1926 it was 50,674, or 2,983 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was S15, 277.55; 
in 1926 it was $14,593.60, or $683.95 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. 
There were 938 more persons arrested than in 1925, an in- 
crease of 2.47 per cent; 23.40 per cent of the arrested persons 
were nonresidents and 38.40 per cent were of foreign birth. 
(See Tabic XI.) 



X 11V M.ltlVltN Ul 11IC I 

United States 


n isuuci 

57,011 


3 » ti.-5 aa luuun 

East Indies 






4 


British Provinces 


4.003 


West Indies 






80 


Ireland 


8,047 


Turkey 






50 


Kngland 


074 


South America 






01 


France 


108 


Switzerland 






9 


Germany . 


239 


Belgium 






40 


Italy 


3,919 


Armenia . 






109 


Kussia 


3,542 


Africa 






7 


China 


243 


Hungary . 






10 


Greece 


520 


Asia . 






4 


Sweden 


723 


Arabia 






5 


Scotland 


45S 


Mexico 






6 


Spain 


75 


Japan 






6 


Xonvay 


234 


Syria 






189 


Poland 


1,119 


Roumania 






2 


Australia . 


17 


Lithuania . 






695 


Austria 


152 


India 






1 


Portugal . 


344 


Egypt 






1 


Finland 


159 


Albania 






7 


Denmark . 


88 


Cuba 






1 


Holland 
Wales 


24 
4 




Total 






84,273 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 21 

The number of arrests for the year was 84,273, being an in- 
crease of 1,128 over last year, and 3,129 more than the aver- 
age for the past five years. There were 38,882 persons ar- 
rested for drunkenness, being 938 more than last year, and 
284 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 2.91 
per cent in males and a decrease of 7.49 per cent in females 
from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (84,273), 475 
were for violation of the city ordinances; that is to say that 
one arrest in 177 was for such offence, or .56 per cent. 

Sixty and twenty-nine hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and 
forty. (See Table XI.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 27,281, and 
the fines amounted to S391, 169.50. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred twenty-nine persons were committed to the 
State Prison, 2,807 to the House of Correction, 36 to the 
Women's Prison, 88 to the Reformatory prison, and 1,620 to 
other institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 1 
life, 2,282 years, 10 months (320 sentences indefinite); the 
total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 
50,674, and the witness fees earned by them amounted to 
S14,593.60. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was S271.247.90. 

Eight witnesses were detained at station houses, 186 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 27 over last }'ear. 
There was a decrease of 10.62 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 14.46 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in and about the 
city for the five years from 1922 to 1926, inclusive, was 
81,967,475.64, in 1926 it was SI, 803,5 19. 18, or S163,956.46 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in and 
out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, 
was §2,214,100.62 as against S2,804,798.15 last year, or 
S590.697.53 less. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation*. 

The "identification room" now contains 67,085 photographs, 
55,706 of which are photographs with BertiHon measurements, 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

a system used by the Department since November 30, 1898. 
In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, section 18, 
and with the General Laws, chapter 127, sections 27 to 29, 
both inclusive, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measurements taken of the convicts in the State Prison and 
Reformatory, a number of which have been added to our 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
system by the Department in 1898, is and will continue to be 
of great assistance in the identification of criminals. A large 
number of important identifications have thus been made 
during the year for this and other police departments, through 
which the sentences in many instances have been materially 
increased. The records of 943 criminals have been added to 
the records of this Bureau, which now contains a total of 
47,051. The number of cases reported at this office which 
have been investigated during the year is 40,111. There are 
43,256 cases reported on the assignment books kept for this 
purpose, and reports made on these cases are filed away for 
future reference. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the Department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of about 
212,000 persons. There are also "histories and press clip- 
pings" now numbering 9,330 made by this Bureau, in envelope 
form, for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing corrobo- 
rating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service arc 
included in the statement of the general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties are of a special character, the following 
statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies 2,723 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and deliv- 
ered to officers from those States . . 41 
Number of case* investigated ...... 40,111 

Number of extra duties performed 2,228 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court 204 
Number of cases of abortion and sup|>oscd abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court . . . 17 
Number of days spent in court by police officers 2,400 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court 195 years, 11 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $503,885.62 

Number of photographs added to identification room . . 1,078 



Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 816 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion 






8 


Alcoholism 






21 


Asphyxiation 






2 


Automobiles 






6 


Bicycle 






1 


Burns 






25 


Drowning . 






27 


Elevators . 






12 


Explosion . 






1 


Falls 






57 


Falling objects 






5 


Kicked by horse 






1 



Machinery 
Natural causes . 
Poison 

Railway (street) 
Railroad (steam) 
Stillborn . 
Suffocation 
Suicide 
Teams 
Homicide . 

Total 



4 

321 

52 

2 
18 

8 

9 
47 

2 
187 



816 



On 268 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicides were prose- 
cuted in the courts: — 



Alcoholism 
Automobiles 
Elevators . 
Infanticide 


2 
133 

1 
1 


Railway (street) 
Shot by police officer . 
Struck by police officer's club 
Suicides .... 


17 
2 

1 
2 


Manslaughter 
^lurdcr 


12 
12 


Teams .... 


3 


Natural causes . 


1 


Total .... 


187 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On December 1, 1925, there were 1,825 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the property 
clerk; 1,661 were received during the year; 463 pieces were 
sold at public auction and the proceeds, $1,477.63, were 
turned over to the chief clerk; 3 lots were sold as perishable 
and the proceeds, $34.88, turned over to the chief clerk; 402 
packages were destroyed as worthless or sold as junk and the 
proceeds, $366.50, turned over to the chief clerk; and 108 
packages were returned to owners, finders or administrators, 
leaving 2,510 packages on hand. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Larceny of Automobiles and Unlawful Appropriation 
of Automobiles or Using without Authority. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for these offences for the year ending November 
30, 1926: — 

Larceny of Automobiles. 

Number of arrests ......... 233 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged .... C5 

Fined ........ 3 

Sentenced to a penal or other institution . . 57 

Probation ....... 42 

•Sentence suspended ...... f» 

On file 7 

Turned over to police of other cities ... 11 

Still pending ....... 40 

Defaulted 1 

Dismissed for want of prosecution ... 1 

Total 233 

Unlawful Appropriation of Automobiles or Using Without Authority. 

Number of arrests ......... 187 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged ..... 20 

Fined ........ 14 

Sentenced to a penal or other institution . 71 

Probation ....... 41 

Sentence suspended ...... 7 

On file 7 

Turned over to police of other cities ... 8 

Still pending ....... 13 

Total 187 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



25 



Violations of Massachusetts State Liquor Law. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for this offence for the year ending November 30, 
1926: — 

Number of arrests ......... 3,657 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged ..... 903 

Fined 1,819 

Fined and sentenced to jail or house of correction . 105 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction . . 43 

Probation 202 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction (sentence 

suspended) ....... 145 

On file 172 

Turned over to police of other cities ... 5 

Still pending 251 

Defaulted 12 

Total 3,657 



Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 



1925. 

Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve 

1926. 

Jan. 6, 
Jan. 16, 
Jan. 30, 
Feb. 7, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 16, 
Feb. 22, 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 17, 
April 10, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
May 9, 
May 19, 
May 23, 
May 30, 
May 30, 
May 31, 



Mechanics Building, Boston Police ball 

Billings Field, skating carnival 

Sullivan Square playground, skating carnival 

Army Base, public inspection of S.S. Leviathan 

Mechanics Building, Firemen's ball 

Funeral of Patrolman Phillip J. Aschoff 

State House, Governor's reception 

State Street, Evacuation day exercises . 

South Boston, Evacuation day parade . 

Cathedral road race .... 

Marathon race ..... 

Patriotic exercises and parade 

Boston Common, Mother's Day exercises 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, services . 

Fenway Park, memorial services . 

At city cemeteries .... 

Franklin Field, field day of Jewish Welfare Association 

At city cemeteries ...... 



Men. 

27 

201 
11 
11 
12 
40 
36 
56 
34 

2SS 
54 

413 
69 
27 
21 
53 
29 
16 
29 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1926. 




May 


31, 


June 


5, 


June 


5, 


June 


7, 


June 


13, 


June 


13, 


June 


16, 


June 17, 


June 


17, 


June 


17, 


June 


19, 


June 


20, 


Julv 


5, 


July 


5, 


July 


5, 


July 


10, 


July 


17, 


July 


18, 


July 


19, 


Julv 


20, 


July 


21, 


July 


22, 


July 


23, 


July 


23, 


July 


24, 


Aug. 


19, 


Aug. 


25, 


Aug. 


26, 


Sept. 


6, 


Sept. 


14, 


Oct. 


2, 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


3, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


10, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 



Work Horse parade ..... 

BostoD Common, Boston Traveler marble contest 

Dorchester day, band concerts 

Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

Boston Common, Flag day exercises 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet . 

Charlestown, eve of Bunker Hill day 

South Station, departure of persons to Eucharistic Con 



Charlestown, Bunker Hill day parade and fireworks 

BrooiKne, Eastern Horse Club races 

Brookline, Eastern Horse Club races 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet . 

Independence Day, Franklin Field 

Independence Day, Boston Common, afternoon and eve- 
ning 

Independence day, Charlesbank, athletic contests 

Funeral of Captain James F. Ilickey 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Funeral of Sergeant Michael T. Trayers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Funeral of Sergeant John J. Flynn 

Parade, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Mystic Shrine 

Parade, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Mystic Shrine 

Parade, Labor Day ..... 

State Primaries ...... 

Bulletin boards, world's series buseball . 

Stadium, Harvard-Geneva football game 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game 

Braves Field, professional football 

Bulletin boards, baseball .... 

Braves Field, Boston College-Fordham football game 

Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior ollicers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battalions of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned 
a military band, one of which was the Boston Police 



Men. 
44 
16 
45 

1SS 
21 
21 

137 

22 
371 
48 
48 
36 
25 

228 
50 
78 
58 
79 
82 
114 
63 
61 
62 
24 
21 
24 
473 
466 
498 
820 
74 
61 
12 
74 
74 
74 
74 
71 
17 
12 
17 



1926.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 27 

Department Traffic Band. The regiment included a 
sergeant and twenty men mounted on department 
horses, a colonel commanding, with his adjutant and 
staff, officers from the respective police divisions and 
units in military company formation, shot-gun com- 
panies, patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns, a 
motorcycle unit, and a machine gun unit mounted on 
automobiles. The regiment was reviewed at City Hall 
by His Honor the Mayor; at the State House by His 
Excellency Governor Alvan T. Fuller, and on the 
Parade Grounds of the Common by His Excellency the 
Governor and the Police Commissioner, Hon. Herbert 

A. Wilson 1,457 

Oct. 12, Detail on line of parade on Boston Common . 110 

Oct. 12, Fenway Park, schoolboy football game ... 13 

Oct. 12, Parade of Sons of Italy . . . .159 

Oct. 10, Harvard-William and Mary football game ... 50 
Oct. 23, Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game . 90 

Oct. 23, Bulletin boards, football returns .... .54 

Oct. 30, Stadium, Harvard-Tufts football game ... 52 

Oct. 30, Braves Field, Boston College-West Virginia football game 14 
Oct. 30, Gilchrist Building, dedication aviation beacon . . 21 
Oct. 30, Tremont Temple, Republican rally .... 27 

Xov. 2, State election 820 

Nov. 2, Bulletin boards, election returns ..... 72 
Xov. 6, Stadium, Harvard-Princeton football game . . . 81 * 
Xov. 6, Bulletin boards, football returns ..... 38 

Xov. 1 1 , Armistice Day parade 325 

Xov. 13, Stadium, Harvard-Brown football game ... 81 
Xov. 13, Fenway Park, Boston College-Haskell football game 20 

Xov. 20, Bulletin boards, football returns ..... 76 
Xov. 22, Dedication new police headquarters .... 23 
Xov. 25, Fenway Park, morning, schoolboy football game . 25 

Xov. 25, Fenway Park, afternoon, Knights of Columbus football 

game 22 

Xov. 27, Braves Field, Boston College-Holy Cross football game 70 

Missing Persons. 

The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported ........ 954 

Total number found ........ 868 

Total number still missing . ...... 86 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Age md Sex of Such Person*. 



[Jan. 





Much. 


FOCND. 


Still Mibsixo. 




Vxl*r». 1 females. 


Mala. 


Frmftlfs. 


Mules. 


Females. 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 

Over 21 years 


246 

1ST 
217 


41 

170 

93 


240 

155 
193 


ii 

155 

7S 


32 

24 


15 
15 


Totals 


650 


304 


594 


274 


50 


30 



Record of all AuiwJsUt* Ee ported Stolen in Motion for the Year ending 
November 30, 1026. 





Stolen. 


Recovered 
during 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


ins. 

December 


451 


407 


15 


29 


MM. 

January 


419 


3S1 


8 


30 


February 


242 


217 


9 


16 


March 


358 


304 


21 


33 


April .... 


334 


29S 


12 


24 


May .... 


375 


303 


19 


53 


June .... 


334 


273 


13 


48 


July . 


408 


330 


25 


53 


August 


412 


357 


15 


40 


September 


405 


351 


13 


41 


October 


500 


452 


12 


36 


November 


526 


409 


- 


57 


Totals 


4,764 


4,142 


162 


400 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



Record of Used Cars Reported to this Department by Licensed Dealers in 

the Same. 





1924-1925 
Bought by 

Dealers 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


1925-1926 

Bought by 

Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


December 


1,902 


1,530 


719 


2,482 


1,763 


895 


January . 


1,670 


1,336 


652 


2,252 


1,704 


814 


February 


1,S45 


1,617 


520 


1,485 


1,346 


459 


March . 


2,814 


2,439 


1,036 


2,241 


2,137 


1,121 


April 


3,581 


3,059 


1,325 


3,865 


3,731 


1,585 


May 


3,22S 


3,359 


1,326 


4,003 


4,105 


1,745 


June 


4,363 


3,197 


1,260 


3,529 


3,910 


1,480 


July . 


3.3S6 


3,095 


1,203 


3,793 


3,338 


1,460 


August . 


2,892 


2,378 


1,000 


3,001 


2,560 


1,321 


September 


2,731 


2,028 


1,045 


2,912 


2,505 


1,178 


October 


3,178 


2,333 


1,153 


2,963 


2,281 


1,396 


November 


2,814 


2,155 


843 


3.191 


2,486 


1,173 


Totals 


34,404 


28,526 


12,082 


35,717 


31,866 


14,627 



MlSCELLAXEOCS BUSINESS. 





mj-24. 


1*24-25. 


1ST2S-2S. 


Abandoned children cared for 


10 


18 


9 


Accidents reported ..... 


6,761 


6,154 


6,275 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,592 


' 3,070 


3,261 


Cases investigated ..... 


89,599 


83,333 


78,977 


Dangerous buildings reported . 


29 


11 


32 


Dangerous chimneys reported . 


11 


14 


11 


Dead bodies recovered .... 


55 


54 


40 


Dead bodies cared for 


258 


321 


335 


Defective cesspools reported 


76 


46 


30 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


3 


16 


14 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 





1923-24. 


1924-2S. 


1925-26. 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 


13 


6 


4 


Defective gas pipes reported 


24 


25 


35 


Defective hydrants reported 


61 


78 


111 


Defective lamps reported 


10,797 


8,919 


9,077 


Defective sewers reported 


114 


789 


99 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 


S.042 


7,510 


8,090 


Defective water pipes reported . 


104 


1,013 


163 


Disturbances suppressed . 


425 


308 


470 


Extra duties performed 


3S,153 


43,386 


39,583 


Fire alarms given ..... 


3,429 


3,268 


2,633 


Fires extinguished ..... 


1,684 


1,502 


1,562 


Insane persons taken in charge 


439 


383 


332 


Intoxicated persons assisted 


21 


15 


30 


Lost children restored 


1,611 


1,29.3 


1,480 


Persons rescued from drowning 


20 


11 


14 


Sick and injured persons assisted 


S.246 


7,312 


6,535 


Stray teams reported and put up 


71 


46 


65 


Street obstructions removed * . 


949 


3,304 


2,541 


Water running to waste reported 


608 


574 


462 


Witnesses detained ..... 


15 


8 


8 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
2,488 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 31 

OQuer Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ...... 2,488 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 12,430 

Number of notices served ....... 7,478 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers regard- 
ing accidents and to examine police records) . . . 8,190 
Number of days in court ....... 228 

' Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 98 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to re- 
pair same .......... $2,528 

Hocse of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street- All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Chariestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of 
the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are 
returned to the house of detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 3,265 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness ......... 1,324 

Larceny .......... 483 

Night walking ......... 58 

Fornication .......... 155 

Idle and disorderly ........ 101 

Assault and battery ........ 22 

Adultery 26 

Violation of liquor law ........ 52 

Keeping house of ill fame ....... 26 

Various other causes ........ 368 

Total 2,615 

Recommitments. 

From Municipal court ........ 214 

From County jail ......... 436 

Grand total 3,265 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 515. Of these 345 are 
connected with the underground system and 170 with the 
overhead. 



/ 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this sen-ice responded to 
1,848 trouble calls; inspected 515 signal boxes, 18 signal desks 
and 955 batteries; repaired 193 box movements, 68 registers, 
90 polar box bells, 65 locks, 65 time stamps, 10 stable motors, 
8 stable registers, 14 vibrator bells, 9 relays, 11 pole changers 
and 9 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and electric light 
work at headquarters and the various stations. There have 
been made 45 plungers, 53 complete box fittings, 51 line blocks, 
55 automatic hooks, 3 stable boards and a large amount of 
small work done which cannot be classified. One new signal 
box was installed on Division 13 and two on Division 17. 

The police signal service now has charge of 123 reflector 
spotlights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for 
the regulation of traffic, also 3 signal towers. 

Most of the prescribed district for 1925 and 1926 affecting 
this Department was in South Boston. Cable has been 
bought but has not been installed. Box outlets and pole 
connections were laid in the summer of 1926, but on account 
of the underground and other trouble, both this Department 
and the Fire Department have not been able to "pull in" 
cable together. This work should be done later this season 
or earh' next spring. 

Greatly increased use of the automatic answer-back signals 
has put added strain on register contacts and other working 
parts and the registers have to be constantly repaired. Mea- 
sures are being taken to prolong their life until such time as 
some one can be found to build new and suitable ones. The 
signal desk at Division 4 has been rebuilt and refitted. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 Ford 
sedan and 1 Ford truck. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 
53,432 runs, covering an aggregate distance of 98,431 miles. 
There were 36,661 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 
3,705 runs were made to take injured or insane persons to 
station houses, hospitals or their homes and 379 runs were 
made to take lost children to station houses. There were 
2,869 runs to fires and 698 runs for liquor seizures. During 
the year there were 515 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 
battery circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 609,328 telephone 
messages and 4,426,607 "on duty" calls were sent over the 
lines. 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



33 



224,140 feet overhead cable. 

21,220 feet of duct. 

66 manholes. 

1 White truck. 

1 Ford truck. 

1 Ford sedan. 



The following list comprises the property in the signal ser- 
vice at the present time: — 
IS signal desks. 
72 circuits. 

515 street signal boxes. 
14 stable call boards. 
78 test boxes. 
955 cells of battery. 
622,017 feet underground cable. 

Harbor Service. 

The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as fol- 
lows: — 
Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float " 

stages, etc. ..... . . $43, 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded 

Vessels ordered from the channel 

Vessels removed from the channel by 

Assistance rendered 

Assistance rendered wharfinger. 

Permits granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at anchor 

Obstructions removed from the channel 

Alarms of fire on water front attended 

Boats challenged ....... 

Sick and injured persons assisted .... 

Dead bodies recovered ...... 

Person rescued from drowning .... 

Vessels assigned to anchorage ..... 

Cases investigated ....... 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor 
Boats searched for contraband .... 



police steamers 



194 90 

721 

339 

3 

- 107 

1 

32 

58 

19 

1,070 

2 

18 

1 

750 

318 

392 

1,070 



The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,888, 
6,321 of which were from domestic ports, 596 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, and 971 from foreign ports. Of the 
latter 711 were steamers, 9 were motor vessels and 1 schooner. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 15 to October 18, 1926. 

The launch E. U. Curtis cruised nightly from Castle Island 
to Neponset Bridge. Twenty-six cases were investigated, 8 
boats were challenged for contraband, 1 obstruction removed 
from the channel, assistance rendered to 12 boats in distress 
by reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., and tow- 
ing them with the persons aboard to a place of safety, 1 dead 
body recovered from the water, 6 arrests for larceny and 3 
yachts ordered from the channel. 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1925, there were 32 horses in 
the service. During the year one was purchased and one 
humanely killed. At the present time there arc 32 in the 
service as shown by Table VIII. 

Vehicle Service. 

Automobiles. 

There are 65 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
18 attached to headquarters; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's ran and kept at Division 4; 11 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; four in the 
South Boston district,, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; two 
in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached! to Division 15; four in the Back Bay 
and Fenway, attached to Division 16; two in the West Rox- 
bury district, attached to Division 17; two in the Hyde Park 
district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan dis- 
trict, attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the 
traffic divisions and five unassigned. (See page 36.) 

f~4*t nf Running Automobiles. 

Repairs $15,628 00 

Tires ... 3,851 81 

Gasoline . 11,964 89 

Oil 1,850 20 

Storage 3,292 32 

License fees 278 00 

Total . 836,865 22 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 35 

Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Divi- 
sion 1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) 
in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18 and 19, and there are five unassigned. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital .' 2,447 

City Hospital (Relief Station. Ha* market Square) . . . 1,244 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston District) . 166 

Calls where sen-ices were no* nwjuired ..... 91 

Massachusetts General Hospital ...... 74 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital .62 

Psychopathic Hospital ........ 55 

Home 40 

Morgue 31 

Carney Hospital ......... 20 

Police station houses ........ 16 

Forest Hills Hospital 10 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital ....... 8 

United States Veterans Hospital ...... 6 

Faulkner Hospital ......... 5 

Beth Israel Hospital 4 

Boston State Hospital ........ 4 

Commonwealth Hospital ....... 3 

Cambridge Relief Hospital ....... 2 

Chelsea Naval Hospital ........ 2 

Homeopathic Hospital ........ 1 

New England Baptist Hospital ...... 1 

New England Hospital ........ 1 

Strong Hospital ......... 1 

Total 4,294 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

List of Vehicle* Used by the Departmcut. 



[Jan. 



Divisions. 


< 


2 
< , 

- a 

o 


| 


.2 
J? 


■ 

> 
7. 


J 
ii 

»t 



S 


5 ■ 
it 

C-3 
CM 
P. 


i 
3 


Headquarters 


- 


- 


- 


10 


o 


- 


- 


18 


Division 1 


1 




- 




- 


1 


1 


5 


Division 2 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 


- 




- 


- 


o 


- 


- 


3 


Division 5 


- 




- 




- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 6 


- 




- 




- 


1 


1 


4 


Division 7 


- 




- 




- 


3 


2 


7 


Division 9 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 11 


- 




- 




- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 13 


- 




- 




- 


7 


2 


11 


Division 14 


- 




- 




- 


8 


3 


13 


Division 15 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 16 


- 




- 




- 


9 


3 


16 


Division 17 


- 




- 




- 


8 


2 


12 


Division 18 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 


- 




- 




- 


6 


2 


10 


Division 20 


- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


3 


Joy Street Stable 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Unassigned 


- 


5 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Totals 


1 


23 


3 


37 


4 


64 


27 


159 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 37 

Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,24 1 1 carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 472 as compared with last year; 2,225 
motor carriages were liceased, being an increase of 484 com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 16 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 407 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the inspector; 50 of these were restored to the owners, 
and the balance placed in the custody of the lost property 
bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . *2,378 

Xumber of carriages licensed ....... 2,235 

Xumber of licenses transferred ...... 158 

Xumber of licenses canceled ....... 45 

Xumber of licenses revoked ....... 5 

Xumber of licenses suspended ....... 122 

Xumber of applications for carriage licenses rejected . . . 136 
Xumber of applications for carriage licenses reconsidered and 

granted .......... 26 

Xumber of carriages inspected ...... 2,235 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 4,136 

Xumber of complaints against drivers investigated . - . 235 

Xumber of days spent in court ...... 7 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 19 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers .... 407 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ..... 105 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . . 20 

Drivers' licenses granted ........ 4,031 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned to 
persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1926, 1,459 such special stands. 

Of these special stands, there have been 60 canceled or re- 
voked, 38 transferred and 97 suspended. 

There have been 482 applications for special stands re- 
jected, 33 of which were reconsidered and granted and 35 
applications rejected for transfer of special stands. 

1 Six c&ncclcd for nonpayment. 
' One held for < 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Sight-seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1926, there have been 
issued licenses for 63 sight-seeing automobiles and 32 special 
stands for them. 

There have been rejected 1 application for a sight-seeing 
automobile and 3 applications for special stands. 

There have been 231 operators' licenses granted. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses' are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During the 
year 4,594 applications for such licenses were received; 
4,592 of these were granted and 2 rejected. 

Of these licenses 84 were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 17 for other causes, and 22 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 







Listing Work 


in Boston, etc. 




Yeab. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903' 


181,045 


1915 


220,883 


1904 






193,195 


191G 1 




- 


1905 






194,547 


1917 




221,207 


1906 






195,446 


1918 




224,012 


1907 






195,900 


1919 




227,466 


1908 






201,255 


1920 


• 


235,248 


1909 






201,391 


1921« 




480,783 


1910* 






203,603 


1922 




480,106 


1911 






206,825 


1923 




477,547 ' 


1912 






214,178 


1924 


. 


485,677 


1913 






215,388 


1925 




489,478 


1914 






219,364 







1 1903 to 19O0. both inclusive, listing was oo May 1. 

1 1910 listing changed to April I. 

1 1916 listing done by Board of AsMMora. 

4 1921 law changed to include women in luting. 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 

Male 241,616 

Female 251,799 



Total 



493,415 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 



Advertising and printing 
Clerical services 
Stationery 
Interpreters . 
Telephone 
Table . 



Total 



April 1 . 

April 2 . 

April 3 . 
April 5 

April 6 . 

April 7 . 

April 8 . 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 



$39,985 35 

24,708 00 

305 99 

262 52 

10 25 

12 41 

$65,284 52 



1,224 

1,185 

956 

491 

221 

26 

4 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1926 may be summarized as follows: — 





IMC 


Dead or could not be found in 


Boston .... 


1,213 


Physically incapacitated 




235 






143 


Unfit for various reasons 




606 






4,898 




7,095 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1926, there were 
1,550 special police officers appointed; 21 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause and 3 appointments 
revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows : — 



From United States Government 

From .State departments . 

From city departments 

From county of Suffolk . 

From railroad corporations 

From other corporations and associations . 

From theatres and other places of amusement 

From private institutions 

From churches ..... 



Total 



26 

3 

347 

15 

111 

792 

228 

19 

9 

1,550 



Railroad Police. 

There were 20 persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 18 of whom were employees of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad and 2 of the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad. 

Conductors, Motormen and Starters of Street Railway 

Companies. 

During the year licenses of conductors, motormen and 
starters of the street railway companies hereinafter listed, 
were cancelled for various causes. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company, with the approval 
of the Police Commissioner, inaugurated a system to have 
many of its employees already licensed both as "Conductors" 
and "Motormen" transferred to licenses as "Conductor- 
Motorman." 

The purpose of the Elevated Railway Company in doing 
this was that they could issue an operator's badge, so called, 
to each "Conductor-Mot orman," who would then bear on 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



41 



his uniform but one badge and number instead of two as 
heretofore. 

An additional purpose was that such "Conductor-Motor- 
man" would be available for the operation of a one-man car, 
or on either end of a two-man car. 



Cancelations and Transfers. 





Canceled. 


Transferred. 


Boston & Worcester Street Railway Company . 
Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company 
Boston Elevated Railway Company 


32 

16 

233 


2,198 


Totals 


281 


2,198 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 26,616. Of these 26,197 were granted, of which 
152 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 26,045. During 
the year 244 licenses were transferred, 261 canceled, 9 re- 
voked, and 419 applications were rejected. The officers in- 
vestigated 479 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
S64,265.05. There was also S65.01 received by the city col- 
lector from the Law Department on account of damage to 
police property which was credited to the Police Department. 
(See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 54 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 11 of which were disapproved. 
Two licenses were subsequently canceled on account of non- 
payment of license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are in- 
spected before the license is granted, and it is arranged by a 
qualified musician, not a member of the department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September of 
each year. 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



During the year 62 instruments were inspected with the 
following results: — 



Kind or Imithcuxt. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Number 
Rejected. 


Ptreet pianos 










22 


18 


4 


Hand organ* 










16 


14 


2 


Violins . 










9 


9 


- 


Harps . 










2 


2 


- 


Mouth organ* 










3 


3 


- 


Banjos . 










4 


4 


- 


Guitars 










2 


2 


- 


Accordions . 










2 


2 


- 


Bagpipes 










2 


2 


- 


Totals 


02 


50 


6 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years, and the action taken 
thereon: — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1922 


309 


308 


1 


1923 


246 


245 


1 


1924 


231 


231 


- 


1925 


240 


239 


1 


1926 


223 


222 


1 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 
or revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked: — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Li censes 
Revoked. 


1922 .... 


3,100 


2,916 


184 


8 


1923 .... 


3,191 


3,067 


124 


6 


1924 .... 


2,998 


2,879 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 


1926 .... 


3,165 


3,043 


122 


3 



Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
Acts of 1904 as amended, during the year, the location of 
each house and the number of lodgers accommodated. 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



194 Commercial Street 
234 Commercial Street 
17 Davis Street . 
1051 Washington Street 
1202 Washington Street 
1025 Washington Street 
Total . 



29,246 
10,872 
44,500 
30,000 
26,000 
24,000 



164,618 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1925, there were 240 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 20 died, viz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 
director of signal sen-ice, 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants, 13 patrol- 
men, 1 fireman and 1 annuitant. Twenty-seven were added, 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

viz., 1 chief inspector, 1 inspector, 6 lieutenants, 2 sergeants, 
16 patrolmen and the widow of Patrolman Frank J. Comeau, 
who was killed while on duty; leaving 247 on the roll at date, 
217 men and 30 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the pa>t year 
amounted to 8196,341.03, and it is estimated that $208,245.60 
Bill be required for pensions in 1927. This does not include 
pensions for 2 inspectors, 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant, 30 patrol- 
nuen and 3 civilian employees, all of whom are 65 years old or 
more and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and 
term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the thir- 
tieth of November last amounted to $207,550. There are 65 
beneficiaries at the present time and there has been paid to 
ttem the sum of S8,229.67 during the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and listing persons twenty years of 
aze or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police 
s%nal sen-ice, were 85,000,729.29. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was 858,230.54. (Sec Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., 
was S70,383.59. There was turned into the City Collector's 
office by the city law department and credited to the police 
department, the sum of S65.01 on account of damage to police 
property. (See Table XIV.) 



1927. 



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46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

List of Officers Retired during Oie Year ending Xoeember SO, 1926, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Are at Time 
of Retirement 
(Yean). 


Year* of 

Service. 


Carl R_ Ammelin 


Age 


60V>» 


30»/.. 


George W. Bachcr 


Incapacitated 


58'/.. 


31 V.. 


Charted E. Carbec 


Age 


65 Vu 


34 V.. 


Wesley W. Chandler 


Age 


61 V.. 


33'/.. 


Patrick II. Connerny 


Age 


64»/u 


38 Vii 


Gardner M. Davis 


Age 


61 


36'/.. 


John F. Dobbyn 


Age 


66«/» 


35 V.. 


Daniel F. Eagan 


Age 


6SV>. 


44 «/.. 


John E. Geary . 


Incapacitated 


53 */u 


24 »/.. 


Stillman B. H. Hall . 


Incapacitated 


59 '/„ 


30 V.. 


Joseph F. Hurley 


Age 


61 V.j 


31 '/., 


Lincoln H. Jones 


Incapacitated 


52 Vi. 


25'/.. 


Thomas Keane 


Age 


67 Vii 


37"/.. 


James B. Keiran 


Age 


65'/.. 


40 Vi. 


John H. Laughlin 


Age 


70 


45 '/.. 


David M. McCarthy 


Incapacitated 


33'/.. 


6'/.. 


John R. McGarr 


Age 


64'/.. 


35'/.. 


John J. McGillicuddy 


Incapacitated 


27 */n 


4'/.. 


James H. Mitchell 


Age 


65 


37 »/.. 


James M. Nelson 


Age 


60"/.. 


33 Vi. 


Jeffrey i. O'Connell . 


Age 


65 »/.. 


34 V.. 


Hugh E. O'Donncll . 


Age 


65 •/.. 


3SV.» 


William H. Pelton 


Age 


62"/.» 


29 Vu 


Henry J. Walkins 


Age 


68'/.. 


44'/,, 


Winfield S. Wallace . 


Age 


65 V.. 


37 Vi» 


Guy E. V*. Whitman . 


Incapacitated 


50'/.. 


22 V.. 



Police Officers Retired during the Year under the Boston Retirement System, 
which went into effect February 1, 1923. 



Name. 


Petition. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age. 


Date of 

Retirement. 


Years of 

Service. 


Corwin, Walter F. . 
McAdama, John 


Patrolman 
Patrolman 


Disability 
Disability 


56 Vu 
57'Vu 


Dec. 31. 1925 
Mar. 31. 1926 


30»/.i 
30»/ii 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



49 



Table IV. 

Lift of Officers xcho wrre Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November SO, 1926. 



D»<». 



Ni»i jot E»ji. 



May 31, 1926 



May 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept- 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Xov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 

Dec. 
Dee. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



31, 1926 

13, 1926 

13, 1926 

13, 1926 

13, 1926 

13, 1926 

13. 1926 

26, 1926 

26, 1926 

26, 1926 

26, 1926 

26. 1926 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4. 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4, 1925 

4. 1925 

4. 1925 
4, 1925 
4, 1925 
4. 1925 
13. 1926 
13, 1926 
13. 1926 
13. 1926 
13. 1926 
13. 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13, 1926 
13,1926 



CapSain Ainsley C. Armstrong to the rank of chief in- 
spector. 

Iietxenant William W. Livingston to the rank of captain. 

Lieoeenant Archibald F. Campbell to the rank of captain. 

Servant John J. Coughlan to the rank of lieutenant . 

Serjeant William P. Gaflney to the rank of lieutenant. 

Serpant Harry T. Grace to the rank of lieutenant. 

Serpant George A. Mahoney to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant John T. O'Dea to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Harry N. Dickinson to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant James J. Hoy to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant William Lewis to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Jeremiah B. Sheehan to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Patrick J. Williams to the rank of lieutenant. 

Patrolman William Balch to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman August H. Bart he) to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman George H. Bird to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Walter Brown to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John E. Cm-ran to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman James F. Daley to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John Donovan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Maurice DriscoU to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John F. Dunleavy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward W. Fallon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Stephen K. Higgins to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edmund R. Ingus to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward A. Moore to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William G. E. Mutx to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Athanasius McGuTrrray to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman William H. McKenzie to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman James F. O'Xeil to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William B. Qui nan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Benjamin A. Wall to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Adien F. Edwards to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John P. Farrell to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Charles S. Gordon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Bernard J. Graham to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William Hart igan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman George D. Kennedy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John J. McArdle to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Thomas E. McMurray to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John P. McXealy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Melvin A. Patterson to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Carleton B. Perry to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William J. Riordan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Martin J. Shannon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Manuel J. Suzan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Arthur D. Timmins to the rank of sergeant. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

X umber cf item, in Active Serriee at the End of the Present Year who were 
Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 





a 


i 


i 














Date Amtym. 



B 

e 

1 


1% 


£ 

| 


a 


c 

B 
I 


3 

s 

9 


a 

o 
m 


O 

~5 


4 

« 




3 

to 


I 


3 


m 



J 


- 


£ 


£ 


o 


1S75 
















i 


1 


1882 


_ 


2 












i 


3 


1883 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1884 
















i 


1 


1885 
















4 


4 


1886 


_ 


- 


- 


o 


1 


- 


- 


5 


8 


1SS7 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


5 


10 


18SS 


1 


- 


— 


1 


1 


5 


- 


12 


20 


1880 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


i 


isao 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


<> 


o 


•> 


2 


9 


1891 


_ 


- 


i 


— 


- 


- 


3 


t 


11 


1892 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


■> 


3 


8 


1893 


- 


- 


— 


6 


2 


5 


9 


20 


42 


1894 


- 


- 


— 


2 


- 


- 


6 


2 


10 


1895 


- 


1 


- 


7 


2 


8 


17 


33 


68 


1896 


_ 


- 


— 


- 


1 


1 


2 


7 


11 


1897 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1S9S 












3 


/ 


10 


20 


190O 


_ 


- 


- 


4 


o 


o 


16 


16 


43 


1901 


- 


- 


— 


- 


2 


4 


4 


4 


17 


1902 














1 


- 


1 


1903 


- 


- 


- 


o 


_ 


4 


11 


11 


28 


1904 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


11 


i 


oo 


1905 


- 


- 


— 


— 


1 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1906 


_ 


. _ 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


3 


2 


6 


1907 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


1 


1 


9 


8 


19 


1905 


- 


- 


— 


- 


3 


- 


14 


6 


23 


1909 














4 


2 


6 


1910 


_ 


- 


~ 


- 


1 


- 


3 


3 


t 


1911 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


o 


o 


4 


1912 


- 


- 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


6 


4 


12 


1913 














1 


1 


2 


1914 
















2 


2 


1915 














1 


— 


1 


1916 














1 


3 


4 


1917 


— 


- 


— 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


4 


5 


1919 














17 


653 


670 


1920 
















215 


215 


1921 
















143 


143 


1922 
















81 


81 


1923 
















131 


131 


1924 
















85 


85 


1925 
















63 


63 


1926 
















435 


435 


ToUk . 


1 


3 


i 


30 


27 


43 


166 


2,004 


2,275 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



51 



Table VI. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1926, who were Born in the Year 
Indicated on the Table below. 







a 


© 
















e 

■a 


K . 


I 

« 














Date or Birtb. 


B 
o 




c 


O 


"a 


3 
s 


e 
■ 






3 
BD 


3 Z 
- C 

Q 


6 


as 

~L . 
as 
U 


B 


e 


p 
1 




i 

a 


1848 
















1 


1 


1851 




















1 


1 


1857 






- 


1 












5 


6 


1858 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


3 


5 


1859 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


2 


4 


1860 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


13 


14 


1861 






- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


7 


13 


1862 






- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


11 


19 


1863 






- 


- 


— 


- 


1 


3 


6 


6 


16 


1864 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


5 


12 


20 


1865 






- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


7 


15 


28 


1866 






1 


- 


- 


3 


1 


6 


8 


15 


34 


1867 






- 


- 


l 


6 


3 


4 


9 


14 


37 


1868 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


_ 


11 


7 


21 


1869 






- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


5 


7 


8 


24 


1870 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


14 


1871 






- 


- 


— 


- 


1 


3 


4 


9 


17 


1872 
















2 


6 


11 


19 


1873 






- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


2 


15 


4 


22 


1874 






- 


- 


— 


1 


4 


3 


8 


8 


24 


1875 






- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


6 


2 


13 


1876 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


6 


2 


12 


1877 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


6 


7 


15 


1878 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


7 


4 


13 


1879 
















1 


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8 


14 


1880 






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- 


- 


- 


1 


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3 


1 


5 


1881 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


8 


2 


10 


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— 


— 


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_ 


3 


_ 


4 


2 


9 


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3 


2 


5 


1884 






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— 


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_ 


_ 


4 


3 


7 


1885 


















1 


18 


19 


1886 


















2 


32 


34 


1887 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


2 


47 


49 


1888 


















2 


63 


05 


1889 






- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


_ 


1 


82 


83 


1890 




















74 


74 


1891 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


105 


105 


1892 


















3 


151 


154 


1893 


















3 


148 


151 


1894 






- 


- 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


3 


190 


193 


1895 


















2 


184 


186 


1896 


















1 


205 


206 


1897 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


191 


192 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


120 


120 


1899 




















85 


85 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


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_ 


92 


92 


1901 
















25 


25 


Totals 






1 


3 


i 


30 


27 


43 


166 


2,004 


2,275 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30. 1926. is 36 years. 



52 



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1927.1 



PUBLIClDOCUMENT— No. 49. 



55 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 
Sumbcr and Distribution of Horses in Hit Department. 



Dirmom. 


3 


e 


H 

c 


Toul». 


Division 10 . 

Stable, 40 Joy Street . 


1 


1 


22 

S 


22 
10 


Total* .... 


1 


1 


30 


32 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



57 



Table X. 

S'umUr of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November SO, 1926. 



Divuion. 


Male*. 


Females. 


Total*. 


Headquarters 










2,377 


348 


2,725 


Division 1 










0,560 


111 


6,671 


Division 2 










3,288 


614 


3,902 


Division 3 










4,962 


394 


5,356 


Division 4 










3,227 


315 


3,542 


Division 5 










9,152 


1,093 


10,245 


Division 6 










5,704 


310 


6,014 


Division 7 










5,009 


206 


5,215 


Division S 










37 


- 


37 


Division 9 










5,542 


268 


5,810 


Division 10 










4,437 


404 


4,841 


Division 11 










3,378 


115 


3,493 


Division 12 










2,895 


115 


3,010 


Division 13 










2,093 


41 


2,134 


Division 14 










1,953 


167 


2,120 


Division 15 










5,009 


176 


5,185 


Division 16 










2,552 


358 


2,910 


Division 17 










1,556 


52 


1,608 


Division IS 










763 


61 


824 


Division 19 










1,028 


57 


1,085 


Division 20 










6,426 


161 


6,587 


Division 21 










901 


58 


959 


Totals 


78,849 


5,424 


84,273 



58 



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1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



59 



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1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



77 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1926. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


TouL 


1 


59 


21 


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3 


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2 








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95 


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92 


11 


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191 


7 








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130 


19 


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632 


9 








622 


169 


45 


2 


838 


10 








365 


82 


19 


1 


467 


11 








S15 


145 


96 


2 


1,058 


12 








356 


72 


15 


— 


443 


13 








511 


121 


64 


1 


697 


14 








5S4 


148 


83 


2 


817 


15 








397 


144 


22 


- 


563 


16 








478 


136 


65 


- 


679 


17 








1,004 


176 


131 


3 


1,314 


18 








321 


68 


31 


- 


420 


19 








408 


81 


37 


- 


526 


Totals 








7,159 


1,743 


659 


19 


9.5S0 



' Hrecder at »50. 



Table XVI. 
Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by Police Dirisions. 



Division 1 






906 


Division 12 


67 


Division 2 






1,411 


Division 13 


71 


Division 3 






171 


Division 14 


6S 


Division 4 






346 


Division 15 


137 


Division 5 






212 


Division 16 


115 


Division 6 






373 


Division 17 


56 


Division 7 






119 


Division 18 


64 


Division 9 






256 


Division 19 


56 


Division 10 






70 








Division 11 






94 


Total 


•4,592 



1 SI canceled fur nonpayment of license fee. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending Xorember 30, 1926. 



Expenditures. 
Pay of police and employees 
Pensions .... 
Fuel and light 
Water and ice . 
Furniture and bedding 
Printing, stationery, telegrams, etc. 
Care and cleaning station houses and city prison 
Repairs to station houses and city prison 
Repairs and supplies for police boats 
Telephone rentals and tolls .... 
Purchase of horses and vehicles 
Care and keeping of horses .... 
Care and repair of automobiles . 

Transportation of prisoners, sick and insane persons 
Feeding prisoners .... 

Medical attendance and medicine . 
Transportation ..... 
Pursuit of criminals .... 
I'niforms and uniform caps . 
Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc. 
Traveling expenses and food for police 
Rent of buildings .... 

Traffic signs and symbols 
Expert services ..... 
Grave markers and wreaths . 
Music for police parade 
Rifle Association membership 

Total 



Expenses of listing .... 
Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII) 



S4,2S1,571 15 

196,341 03 

52,140 44 

718 14 

10,524 13 

31,107 91 

12,730 41 

24,294 80 

36.543 96 

13,940 70 

31,S64 01 

10,383 35 

35,812 66 

397 80 

4.9S4 88 

7,115 34 

4,019 61 

11,377 10 

93,715 57 

16,514 97 

3,735 40 

29,459 41 

23,954 00 

1,300 00 

388 00 

310 00 

200 00 



$4,935,444 77 

65,284 52 
58,230 54 



Total $5,058,959 83 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 

For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, rent, uniform cloth, use of 
police property, etc. ....... 

Refunds ......... 

For damage to police property . 

Received by City Collector from the City Law Department 
on account of damage to police property and credited to 
the Police Department ...... 

Rebates ......... 



S39.414 05 

24,851 00 

2,077 27 



1,942 71 
867 12 
80S 35 



65 01 
423 09 



S70.448 60 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 79 

Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 
November SO, 1926. 

Pay rolls $36,008 18 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor . . 15,323 64 

Rent of buildings 1,000 07 

Repairs to building 1,121 92 

Moving to Parmelee Street ...... 131 00 

Care of and repairs to vehicles ..... 1,052 56 

Shoeing horse . . . . . . 11150 

Carfare 625 64 

Stub-files 74 00 

Prescribed underground work ..... 2,782 03 

Total $58,230 54 



so 



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1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



83 








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1,174 

1,041 
1.534 
1,050 
1,417 
1,742 
1,101 
1,481 

060 
1,884 

011 
2,373 
1,150 
1.151 
1.101 
1,715 

028 

800 
1,250 
1,078 






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1,058 
3,015 
1,806 
1,280 
1,363 
1,045 
1,451 
1,100 

080 
1,200 
1,353 
1,006 
1,234 
1.154 
1.117 
1.107 
1,362 
1,001 

060 
2,371 
1,103 






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INDEX 



treet* 



Accident* . ■ 

ciiiMd by automobile 
per*on* killed or injured by, in 
number of. reported 
Ambulance aervice . 
Arrest* . ■ - 

ace and rti of ■ 

comparative statement of 
for offence* ipiut chastity, morality 
for drunkenness 
foreta-neT* 

minor* • 

nativity of . . • 
nonresidents 

number of, by divniona . 
number of. punished by fine 
on warrants 
summoned by court 
total number of 
vioUti//n of city ordinances 
hiI.mii warrant* 
A**ault* on |,olice officer* 
Auction**:* . 
Automobile* . 

accident* due to 
larceny of 
police . 
public • 

•i«bt-*«ein*; 

stolen . . • • 

used . . ■ • 
Benefit* and pension* 
Bertilion system 
Building* • 

danft>fou*. reported . 
found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal lovestiitulion 
Carriage*, public 
article* left in . 
autoa^'I'll* 
iHjn.U f licensed 
Cue* investigated . 

Celerity in di.patchin*: polire information 
Ce**poo1*. defective, reported . 
Children . - ■ 

abrndoned. cared for 
lost, restored . 
Chimney*, dangerous, reiorted 
City ordinances, arrest* for violation 
Claim*. in»(*etor of 
Collective musician* 
Commitment* 
Complaint* - 

against |<olice officer* 
:,rai(»»i miscellaneous license*. 
Court* . - 

fine* ini|^j*fd by . . 

number of iay attendance at. 
nuBil^r of i*r»on» summoned by 
Criminal Investigation. Bureau of 
arrest* by 

finger-jiTd system . 
identification room . 
photograph* 

record* .... 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 
Dangerous weapon* 
Dead bodie*. cared for 

recovered 
Death* . . ■ ■ 

by accident, suicide, etc. . 
of police officer* 
Department, police 
Ihslribution of foree 
Ihsturbmnce* suppressed 

Ix.gs 

amount received for licenses for 
damage done by 
numt<er licensed 
I>rivers. h*ckl.ey carriage 



of 



by o 



park* 



mcer* 



nd 



qusr 



23 



19. 20. 21 



24. 28. 20 



22 



34, 



20 



KOI 

23, 29. 60. 61 
23. 60. 81 
23. Ml. t)l 
29 

as 

57, 58-72. 74 
72 
74 
. 19. 63. 72 
20, 21.31. 67 
20. 56-72 
20. 58-72 
20 
20. 56-72 
57 
21 
20. 58-72 
20. 06-72 
21.72 

zi.ee 

20.58-72 
U 



rto 



21 



20, 



22. 



37. 60. 61 
23.60 81 
24 

31. 3* 

37 

38.74 

24.26 

2* 

43 

21 

29 

29 

29 

21 

37.75 

37 

37 

37.75 

22. 31. 33 

14 

2* 

21.29.30 

29 

21. 3<l 

29 

21.ee 

30 

42.75 

21.31 

41. S3. 71 

S3 

41.75 

31,58-72.74 

20.74 

22. 31. 74 

20.56-72 

21 

22 

Z2 

21 

21 

32 

74 

74 

43 

Z9. 33 

29. 33 

47. 60. 61 

a 

19.47 
18 

19. 45 
29 
75. 77. 78 

75.76 
30 

75.77 

37.75 



21 



23 



:v> 



P.D. 49. 



Drowning, persons rescued from 
Drunkenness .... 

arrests for, per day . 

foreigners arrested for 

increase in number of arrests for 

nonresidents arrested for . 

total number of arrests for 

women committed for 
Employees of the Department 
Events, special 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial . 

expenditures . 

pensions .... 

receipts . 

miscellaneous license fees 

signal service . 
Fines ..... 

amount of 

average amount of . 

number punched by 
Finger-print system 
Fire alarms .... 

defective, reported . 

number given . 
Firearms .... 
Fires ..... 

extinguished 

on water front attended 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 
Gaming, illegal 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Hand carts 
Harbor service 
Horses . 

distribution of 

number in service 

purchased 
House of detention 
House of ill fame, keeping 
Hydrants, defective, reported . 
Identification room 
Imprisonment 

persons sentenced to 

total years of . 
Income .... 

Inquests held 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians 
Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers . 
Jury lists, police work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
licenses, miscellaneous 
Liquor law. violation of Massachusetts State 
Liquor traffic and narcotics 
Listing, police 

expenses of 

number listed . 

number of policemen employed i 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, public 

applications for licenses 

authority to license . 

location of 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' assistants ■ 

cases on which inquests were held 

causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued 

number transferred . 



85 



MSB 

30.33 

20. 21. 31. 67 

20 

20.67 

20.21 

20.67 

21.67 

31 

18.45 

25 

44. 78. 79 

22.30 

44. 75. 78. 79 

44.78 

44.78 

44.78 

44, 75. 78 

44, 78, 79 

20. 21, 74 

20, 21. 74 

20,74 

21 

22 

30 

30 

30 

8 

30.33 

30 

33 

20, 58-72 

22 

68 

37.75 

37,75 

75 

33 

34.56 

56 

34.56 

34 

31 

31,64 

30 

21.23 

23.74 

23 

23.74 

44.78 

23 

30 

30 

30 

30 

41.75 

75 

75 

39 

30 

41.75.78 

25 

5 

38. 39. 78. 82, 83 
39.78 
38. 82. 83 
39 
21 
43.75 
75 
43 
43 
43 
13. 23, 76, T8 
21 
23 
23 
23 
20,58-72 
29 
41, 75, 78 
41, 75, 78 
41,75 
41.75 
41.75 
41.75 



86 



P.D. 49. 



Missing persons 

age and sex of 

number found 

number reported 
Musicians, collective 
Musicians, itinerant 

applications for licenses 

instruments inspected 

instruments passed . 
Narcotics, etc. 
Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences 

against chastity, morality, etc 

against license laws 

against the person 

against property, malicious 

against property, m-ith violence 

against property, without violence 

forgery and against currency 

miscellaneous . 

recapitulation . 
Operators .... 
Parks, public .... 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers .... 
Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 

number of persons on rolls 

payments on account of 

PUnt 

Police 

railroad .... 

special .... 
Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries 
Police department . 

distribution of 

horses in use in 

how constituted 

officers appointed 
absent sick 
arrests by 
assaults on 
complaints against 
date appointed . 
detailed, special events 
died 

discharged 
injured 
nativity of 
promoted . 
resigned 
retired 

vehicles in use in 

work of . 
Police listing .... 
Pohce signal service 

miscellaneous work . 

payments on account of 

property of 

signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of 
Property .... 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, et 

stolen ..... 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lodging houses 
Railroad police 

Receipt* .... 

Revoh'era .... 

licenses to carry 
Second-hand articles 
Sewers, defective, reported 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, police 
Special evenu 
SpecisJ polios 
Station bousea 

lodgers at 

witnesses detained at 



13.21 



FAOC 

27. 28 

28 

27 

27 

42,75 

41,75 

41,75 

41 

41 

5 

20 

20, 58-72 

19, 58-72 

19. 63, 72 

19, 62, 72 

19, 58, 72 

19. 61. 72 

19. 60, 72 

19. 60, 72 

19. 62, 72 

19. 65, 72 

72 

38.75 

80.81 

80,81 

75 

43.78 

44 

44 

44,78 

16 

40 

40 

40 

44 

18,45 

18,45 

34.56 

18 

19 

52 

19, 58-72 

15 

53 

50 

25 

19,47 

19 

19 

51 

49 

19 

19. 44. 48 

as 

19 

38, 39, 78. 82. 83 
31,78.79 
32 
44. 78, 79 
33 
31 
20 

23. 33. 74. 76, 78 
23. 76, 78 
21,33,74 
44. 76. 78 
21,74 
21 
37 
43.75 
40 
44, 75, 78 
43.75 
43.75 
75 
30 
21.30,33 
52 
38.75 
31. 78. 79 
25 
40 
21 
21 
21 



13. 



18. 



P.D. 49. 87 

PASX 

Stolen property 21. 74 

recovered .............. 21, 74 

value of H. 74 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters ........ 40, 75 

Mi-eets 30, 80. 81 

accidents reported in ............ 80, 81 

defective, reported 30 

obstruction* removed ............ 30 

Teams . . .............. 30 

stray, put up.............. 30 

Traffic 11 

Tsed ears 29, 75 

licenced dealers .............. 75 

sales reported .............. 29 

Vehicles 34.35.36,37,80,81 

ambulances .............. 35 

automobiles .............. 34 

in use in police department ........... 36 

public carriages ............. 37. 75 

wagons 38,75,77 

Vessels 33 

Wagons 38, 75. 77 

number licensed by divisions ........... 77 

total number licensed ............ 38, 77 

Water pipes, defective, reported ........... 30 

Water running to waste reported ........... 30 

Weapons, dangerous ............. 43 

Witnesses 20. 21, 31. 74 

fees earned by officers ae . . • . . . . . . . 20, 74 

number of days' attendance at court by officer* as ...... . 20. 24 

number of, detained at station bouses ......... 21. 30 

Women committed to House of Detention ......... 31 



Public Document No. 49 



tlliF (£ommmtuiralth nf MuBBUtifixsttta 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1927 




Printed bt Order or the Police Commissioner 








< , . 



.•' 



C/-/p 



CONTENTS 



PAOB 

Letter to Governor ......... 5 

Dispatch of Police news *....... .5 

Pickpockets .......... 6 

Prohibition .......... 7 

Relative to annuity to dependents of police officers killed in the 

performance of duty ........ 9 

Automobiles leased on a mileage basis ...... 10 

Extortion ........... 10 

Traffic 11 

Plant 12 

The Department .......... 1 

The Police Force ......... 1 

Signal service .......... 1 

KrupJoyecs of the Department ....... 1 

Recapitulation .......... 1 

DUtribution and changes . . .... . .15 

Police officers injured while on duty ...... 15 

Work of (lie Department ......... 15 

Arrests ........... 15 

Drunkenness .......... 16 

Xativity of prisoners, etc. ........ 16 

Bureau of criminal investigation ....... IS 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners ...... 19 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property ....... 19 

Larceny of automobiles, etc. ........ 20 

Violations of State liquor law ........ 21 

Special events ........... 21 

Missing persons .......... 23 

Record of automobiles reported stolen ...... 24 

Record of purchases and sales of used cars reported .... 25 

Miscellaneous business ......... 25 

Inspector of claims .......... 26 

House of detention .......... 27 

Police signal service .......... 27 

Signal boxes .27 

Miscellaneous work ......... 28 

Harbor service .......... 29 

Horses ............ 30 

Vehicle service .......... 30 

Automobiles .......... 30 

Ambulances .......... 31 

List of vehicles used by the Department ..... 32 

Public carriages . . . . . . .33 

.Sight-seeing automobiles 34 

Wagon licenses .......... 34 

Listing work in Boston ......... 34 

Li nin g expenses ......... 35 

Number of policemen employed in listing ..... 35 



CONTENTS. 



Police work on jury lists . 

Special police ..... 

Kaiiru M IMjIieo .... 

Miscellaneous licenses 

Musicians' Ihtihi'i .... 

Itinerant ..... 

Collective ..... 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
Public lodging houses 
Pension* and l>enefits 
Financial ..... 

Stati>tieal tables. 

Distribution of police force, etc . 

Liit of police officer* in active Bcrvii-c w 

I.ist of officers retired 

Ijjst of officers promoted 

JCumbcr of men ifi active «n ice 

Men on the police force and yeur lx>ni 

Niirnln r of days' absence from duly by 

Complaint* against offiei-rs . 

N'unilxT ami distribution of horse* 

N'unjl* r of arrests by |*fc divisions 

Arrests and offences . 

Ac* and sex of persons arrested 

Comparative statement of police crimin 

licenses of all classes issued 

Jjog licenses .... 

Wagon licenses .... 

Financial statement . 

Payments on account of signal service 

Aoridcnts ..... 

Male and female residents listed . 

Final dispositions of arrests for certain offences 



il work 



ckne; 



PACE 

35 
30 
zr, 
36 
37 
37 
37 
38 
35 
39 
39 

41 
43 
44 
45 
4G 
47 
4S 
49 
52 
53 
51 
70 
71 
72 
74 
74 
75 
76 
77 
79 
81 



ullj? (UmmnonuiFaltli nf BlaaBatifvatttB. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters or tbx Police DmtmtuT, 
On ice of the Police Couurasjoxra, 154 Bran.ii Stttt. 
Boston, December 1, 1927. 

To His Excellency AlVAN T. Fuller, Goi<crnor. 

Your Excellency : — As Police Commissioner for the 
city of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance 
with the provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 
1906, a report of the Police Department for the year ending 
November 30, 1927. 

Dispatch of Police News. 

Since my incumbency in office as Police Commissioner, 
I have repeatedly urged in annual reports the installation 
of a state-wide agency for instantaneously and accurately 
transmitting important information to the police units 
of the surrounding cities and towns of the metropolitan area. 

The present method of transmitting information from the 
police headquarters in Boston to police departments of out- 
side cities and towns by telephonic service is not only archaic 
but ineffective, because of the' length of time necessarily 
expended in transferring this information and the evident 
possibility of mistakes and errors in the reception of important 
information transmitted. 

Large appropriations are made yearly for the building and 
repair of highways in order that the commercial development 
of the various sections of this state may be advanced by a 
close and rapid intercommunication. It is therefore a logical 
conclusion that the cost of installing a new and rapid system 
of long distance conveyance of important information to 
police departments should not weigh seriously against its 
installation, especially when the proper protection and safe- 
guarding of the lives and property of the citizens of this 
Commonwealth demand it because of the rapid methods and 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

means now employed by criminals in the commission of crime. 

Clumsy and cumbersome methods of transmitting news 
should not be tolerated when modern, effective and expeditions 
means exist. The installation of the teletype system has 
been considered with the officials of the New England Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company, and as a result of conferences 
and demonstrations, contracts will be executed for the in- 
stallation of the Morkrum Teletype, a modern, scientific 
device for the transmission of news, and operating under 
the Bell system. Work will be immediately commenced to 
install this news printing machine, operating from Police 
Headquarters to the various police divisions in Boston, 
whereby important information upon being typed upon a 
central distributing machine will be instantaneously re- 
produced upon a receiving machine in all the police precincts. 
Instantaneous, permanent, written records will be made of 
information thus translated, eliminating the necessity of 
a delayed telephonic grouping of all divisions heretofore! 
employed when important news had to be immediately 
transmitted. 

The installation of this -mechanical device in Boston, I 
trust, will be the beginning of its adoption by at least all the 
cities and towns in the metropolitan area. Interest in the 
installation of this project has been awakened and will in 
time undoubtedly result in a hook-up of Boston with all 
cities and large towns of this Commonwealth, inasmuch as 
the cost of tying-in other cities and towns with Boston is not 
prohibitive. Public agencies must imitate public utility 
corporations in adopting latest scientific inventions so that 
the best service may be rendered to the public. This method 
of disseminating news has already been installed in many 
large newspaper offices of this country, and its use has been 
universally approved. 

Pickpockets. 

The larger cities and towns of this Commonwealth are 
affected by the criminal operations of a commercialized 
class of vagabonds known as pickpockets, resulting in large 
financial toll from innocent citizens. 

Well known pickpockets apprehended while acting in a 
suspicious manner, when brought into court, take advantage 
of the construction given by some courts to the present 



192SJ PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

vagabond law (section 68 of chapter 272 of the General Laws), 
and because of the failure of the prosecuting officer to prove 
a certain preliminary requisite interpolated into the law, 
are released to mingle again in crowds with larcenous intent. 
Bold and seemingly fearless, many of these rogues are allowed 
to roam unmolested, seeking their prey, because the police 
know that it is useless to arrest them as vagabonds. 

According to section 68, a person known to be a pickpocket, 
thief or burglar, if acting in a suspicious manner around a 
steamboat landing, railroad depot — place of amusement, etc., 
shall be deemed to be a vagabond. The police after arresting 
a pickpocket under such circumstances, must prove in some 
courts that he is a well known thief, that he was acting sus- 
piciously, and that he has a recent conviction for that offence. 

Criminals of this type, in a craft thoroughly organized 
and commercialized, if convicted are extremely anxious that 
final convictions be not obtained against them and desire 
that these be placed on file or the sentences imposed be sus- 
pended, or to receive themselves the enshrouding protection 
of probation, the application of which to this type of convicted 
criminal is both futile and ineffective. A recital of the un- 
successful efforts of officers of this department to convict 
these modern marauders after trailing them for extensive 
periods of time through numerous crowds and gatherings 
would be extremely interesting and illuminating to the general 
public. 

In courts where this preliminary requisite of proof of a 
recent conviction has not been interpolated into the law 
summary justice can be dealt to this type of miscreant. 
This loophole in the law, however, can be remedied by the 
enactment of legislation submitted by me this year to the 
Legislature similar to the provision of law now in the penal 
code of the State of New York known as the "jostling law." 
Unfortunately, however, the provision of the New York law, 
which gives final jurisdiction to the lower court magistrate, 
cannot be enacted into the laws of this Commonwealth, 
inasmuch as such a provision of law would violate the pro- 
visions of the State constitution. 

Pbohibition. 

Prohibition is of such paramount interest to the public, 
that a summary of police activities in enforcing the prohibi- 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

tory laws has become a necessity in the annual reports of police 
departments. During the past year, the police of this city 
searched upon warrants 4,714 buildings, arrested 3,904 
persons either for the illegal sale, keeping and exposing or 
transportation of liquor, and arrested 38,794 persons for the 
crime of drunkenness induced by the voluntary use of in- 
toxicating liquor. 

The public naturally is interested in arrests made for 
violation of the liquor laws, but unfortunately seldom realizes 
the enormous expenditure of time required of the police in 
the subsequent prosecution of these liquor violations. An 
increasing number of police officers is being assigned to this 
particular work, which means necessarily the withdrawal 
of police officers from other types of police work necessary 
for the protection of the citizens of this city from serious 
crime. This department has rendered efficient service in 
the enforcement of the State liquor law and would have an 
added incentive in this work if more tangible results could be 
observed from its efforts. From the total number of liquor 
violators exclusive of those convicted of drunkenness, handled 
by the department this year, only one hundred twenty-seven 
convicted persons were sent to jail. County treasuries, 
by the imposition of fines in liquor cases are necessarily 
inflated and the criminal business of the various courts 
appears well from a monetary standpoint; but the continued 
imposition of fines, suspended sentences and probation to 
deliberate wrong-doers necessarily lengthens the business 
lives of this type of malefactor and gives the lawbreaker 
the idea that perhaps not even the courts themselves are 
.'eriously disposed in the work of eliminating illegal vendors. 
Today, liquor is being sold in establishments where the real 
owner of the liquor never appears on the premises, but has 
his business conducted for him by a dummy. When this 
dummy is arrested and convicted of violation of the liquor 
law, another dummy will be used. The public today are 
educated to the fact that intoxicatiog liquor that can be bought 
illegally is highly injurious and chemically manufactured. 
The fact that spurious labels of well known brands of liquor 
fail to deceive is a favorable sign and indication that while 
the illegal liquor business by the policy of attrition will not 
perhaps be wholly eliminated, yet at least it will be kept 
well in restraint. 



192S.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

Relattvk to Annuitt to Dependents of Police Officers 
Killed in the Performance of Duty. 

Justice requires that dependent families of police officers 
killed in the performance of duty should be fully protected 
and safeguarded when the wage earner is removed either 
through acts of criminal violence or from causes beyond 
his control while in the conscientious peformance of duty. 
Dependents of police officers in this Department, killed 
while on duty or dying from injuries received while on duty, 
although in a more favorable position than similar dependents 
of police officers of other police departments of this State, 
in that they arc entitled not only to the sum of $2,500, now 
received by dependents of police officers outside of Boston, 
but also to an annuity of not more than SG00 a year, — are, 
however, not fully recompensed for their loss, inasmuch as 
the widow or other dependents, even with these payments, 
cannot give the family of the decedent or receive themselves 
the comforts and education that would have been obtained 
if the police officer had not been killed. 

During my incumbency in office, a number of police officers 
of this department have been killed in the performance of 
duty. To pay to the dependents of police officers the sum 
of $2,000 yearly until either the remarriage of the widow, 
the attainment of majority of the children or the death of 
adult dependents, would not place an undue burden upon a 
city or town. In all decency, monetary considerations 
should not be regarded, as this annuity should be a testimonial 
of the citiiens to the heroic action of the dead officer. 

Publie or private subscriptions for the benefit of families of 
slain police officers should be unnecessary and now are often 
ill timed. Employees of private corporations, under the 
workman compensation law, are protected by indemnity 
insurance paid for by employers. It is self evident that a 
city or town should have some equitable form of insurance 
for dependent families of slain police officers, especially in 
cases where the slain officer leaves a large family. 

The family of a slain police officer should not be the object 
of charitable contributions, but should, as a matter of right, 
remain in the same financial position immediately after the 
head of the house is stricken as it was before his death. The 
grief of a family over the loss of a dear one should not be 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

magnified by the attendant fear of pecuniary embarrassment. 
A bill has been presented by me to the Legislature whereby 
the yearly sum of $2,000 will be paid to the dependents of 
police officers killed in the performance of duty. 

Automobiles Leased ox a Mileage Basis. 

Employment of lawful agencies by criminals to pursue 
criminal operations cannot be prevented, but may be super- 
vised. New methods employed in the commission of crime 
naturally present new problems for the police to solve. Stolen 
cars as a means of conveyance in the commission of crime, 
have been found by criminals to be a dangerous expedient, 
but a convenient substitute for stolen cars, however, is the 
leased car. Persons or corporat'ons owning and renting cars 
on a mileage basis find ready customers in those criminally 
inclined. 

Statutory enactment defining the duties of owners of garages 
in keeping proper records of cars entering and leaving the 
premises was recently passed. While proprietors of this 
new industry of leasing cars to be driven by tlic lessee are 
not unfriendly to the police and would not deliberately 
conceal important information which should be reported, 
yet, inasmuch as there is no legal obligation upon them to 
record the names or license numbers of operators of cars 
leased by them, accurate records arc therefore not kept. 
Investigating officers consequently are often unable to obtain 
important evidence where clues have been obtained that one 
of these leased cars was involved in serious crime. Legis- 
lation to remedy this defect I am proposing, realizing the 
growth which this particular line of industry is bound to have. 

Extortion. 

It is a common statement that there arc too many laws 
passed by legislative assemblies and that if the laws now in 
effect were enforced, additional laws would be unnecessary. 
Police experience demonstrates that not only arc there a large 
number of laws relating to crime in effect in this Common- 
wealth, infringement of which brings little disturbance to the 
safety of the community, but, what is more important, that 
there are serious defects in important laws relating to crime, 
of which criminals, defended by astute counsel, take advantage 
in order to escape just and due punishment. 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

Blackmailing innocent and wealthy individuals should be 
summarily dealt with when the blackmailers are apprehended. 
Chapter 265, section 25, of the General Laws, relating to 
this type of crime, punishes the perpetrator when he threatens 
injury to the person or property of another, but unfortunately 
affords no remedy when an attempt is made to terrorize by 
threat of death or injury to his child or other relative. Com- 
mon sense demands that this condition should not exist, 
and I am proposing legislation to take care of this omission. 

Traffic. 

Regulation and control of pedestrian and vehicular traffic 
in this city is decidedly a local problem, dissimilar in its main 
features to that of other cities. Considerable work has been 
done in widening and straightening several narrow and 
winding streets in the business section of the city, but the 
increased number of vehicles thus afforded passage and parking 
facilities magnifies the police problem of keeping traffic Huent. 

On February 7. 1927, at the suggestion of the Mayor's 
Traffic Advisor}* Committee, His Honor Malcolm E. Nichols 
appointed Dr. Miller McClintoek, Director of the Street 
Traffic Survey to l>e made under the auspices of the Albert 
Russell Erskine Bureau of Harvard University for the purpose 
of conducting an engineering investigation of the traffic 
control problems of the city of Boston. 

During the year, the Survey has been pursuing studies 
designed to reveal the primary causes of accident and con- 
gestion within the city and to design on the basis of such facts 
a comprehensive system of traffic control to relieve these 
conditions. In making this survey, the Police Department 
has rendered material assistance, many police officers having 
l>een detailed from time to time for the tabulation of traffic 
and one traffic sergeant detailed continuously on this work 
for the greater part of the year. 

Pending the report by the Traffic Survey, all action by the 
police department to install any synchronized system of 
traffic signals upon main arteries, as suggested in my report 
of last year, was suspended. However, sixteen additional 
flashing beacons were placed at important intersections, 
and fifteen additional spotlights for the protection of traffic 
officers on fixed posts were installed during the year, making 
a total of 138 spotlights now in operation. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Plant. 

On December 4, 1926, the entire personnel and equipment 
of Police Headquarters were transferred to the new and com- 
modious headquarters building at 154 Berkeley Street. The 
activities of this department were not suspended during the 
removal through the efficient system adopted for the transfer 
of the various units, and the skill exercised in its operation. 
Telephone lines were instantly "cut-over" to the new quarters 
from the old headquarters building and nil departments 
transferred were functioning in the new building a few hours 
after the transfer was commenced. Considering the mag- 
nitude of the operation with the necessary transfer of hundreds 
of thousands of valuable records, books and documents 
from the offices of the Police Commissioner, the Super- 
intendent, the Chief Inspector, the Chief Clerk, Director 
of Signal Service, Inspector of Hackney Carriages, and 
Inspector of Claims, great credit is due both to the contractor 
effecting the transfer, and to the officials of this department 
who planned and cooperated with the contractor in making 
this transfer. 

During the past year, the police station of the fourteenth 
division in Brighton was enlarged by the taking over of space 
in the same building previously occupied by the Brighton 
District Court. This district now has a large, sanitary and 
well equipped station house. The exteriors and interiors 
of the station houses of Divisions 1, 4, 6 and the City Prison 
were thoroughly cleansed and repainted, and repair work 
done on the exteriors of the station houses of Divisions 10 
and 3. Three new patrol wagons were installed at Divisions 
4, 5 and 12, and the harbor police boats, Guardian, Watchman, 
E. U. Curtis and Argus, were reconditioned and repaired 
for continuous service. 

The general condition of the station houses of Divisions 3, 
4, and 5 is not good. These buildings are antiquated and 
unfit for police work both in general office and in dormitory 
arrangements. The cells in these station houses, located 
in the basements, are contrary to law and also unsanitary. 
New buildings for these Divisions with proper space for the 
conduct of police business, with healthful and sanitary 
accommodations for police officers and prisoners as well, 
are badly needed, which facts I have stated in my previous 
reports. 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

The old wooden stable owned by the city of Boston, in the 
rear of the old town hall, now used by Division 14 as a garage, 
could well be sold and the proceeds of both land and building 
used for the erection of a fireproof, eight-car garage in the 
rear of the station house. 

Plans have been drawn and approved for the enlargement 
of the station house of Division 7 in East Boston in connection 
with the enlargement of the Court House. This building 
at present is tfto small and poorly arranged for the amount 
of police business transacted by this division. The proposed 
alterations and repairs should be completed forthwith so 
that the premises may be made sanitary and adequate for 
the carrying on of police business for this district. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



II 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted ns follows: — 
Police Commission*-!-, Secret fin - . 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Chief inspector . 
Captain* . 
Inspectors 



Director . 

Signalmen 

Mechanics 



I 

2 

1 

2> 

22 



Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 

Patrohmn 



Tot ii I 



Signal Serrice. 



Linemen 

Chauffeur 

Total 



41 

1G9 
2,021 

2.2SG 



Employee* of Oie Department. 



IS 



Assistant property 


clerk 


1 


Matrons (house of detention) 


5 


Clerks 




25 


Matrons (station houses) 


5 


Stenographers 




10 


Mechanic 


1 


Chauffeurs 


. 


% 


Painters .... 


4 


KIcvator operator 


. 


5 


Repairmen 


o 


Engineers on police 


steamer. 


i % 


Steamfitier 


1 


Firemen on police steamers 


s 


Superintendent of building . 


1 


Firemen 




f. 


Superintendent, repair shop 


1 


Foreman of stable 




1 


Tailor .... 


1 


Hostlers 




12 


Telephone operators . 


3 


Janitors 

Jani tresses 




2* 

IS 








Total 


151 






Re&zpti 


idation. 




Police Commissioner and Se 


cr^tery 




o 



Police force 
Signal sen-ice 
Employees 



Grand total 



2,2S6 

18 

151 

2,157 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



15 



Distribution and Changes. 

The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 149 patrolmen were appointed; 3 patrolmen 
reinstated; 30 patrolmen discharged; 54 patrolmen resigned 
(25 while charges were pending); 13 patrolmen promoted; 
1 sergeant reduced; 1 deputy superintendent, 2 captains, 
3 inspectors, 4 lieutenants, 4 sergeants and 33 patrolmen 
were retired on pensions; 2 inspectors, 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant 
and 6 patrolmen died. (See Tables II, III, IV.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 

The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past jear, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of 
the injuries. 



HOW IsjCBED. 


Number of 
Men Injured. 


Number of 
Duties Lost. 


In arresting prisoners 

By cars and other vehicles .... 


52 
14 
96 
1 
79 


250 

106 

1,457 

1,027 


Total 


242 


2,840 



Work of the Department. 



Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 88,878 as against 84,273 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 4,605. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person ..... Decrease 4.07 

Offences against property committed with violence . Decrease 7.37 

Offences against property committed without violence Decrease 5.24 

Malicious offences against property . . . Increase 4.25 

Forgery and offences against the currency . Decrease - 6.15 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Offences against the license laws 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc. 
Offences not included in the foregoing 



Per Cent. 
Increase 2.09 
Decrease 9.91 
Increase 7.24 



There were 13,601 persons arrested on warrants and 52,410 
without warrants; 22,867 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 84,774 persons were held for trial; 4,104 were re- 
leased from custody. The number of males arrested was 
S3, 136; of females, 5,742; of foreigners, 27.165; or approx- 
imately 30.56 per cent ; of minors, 8,317. Of the total number 
arrested, 23,825, or 26.80 per cent, were non-residents. (See 
Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1923 to 1927, inclusive, was $343,946.21; 
in 1927 it was 8394,223.25; or $30,277.04 more than the 
average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
50,249; in 1927 it was 55,268, or 5,019 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was 315,296.53; 
in 1927 it was S13,934.18, or $1,362*35 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. 
There were 88 fewer persons arrested than in 1926, a decrease 
of .22 per cent; 22.97 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 36.98 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table 
XI.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States . 






61,713 


British Provinces 




4,264 


Ireland 




8,290 


England . 






662 


France 






97 


Germany 






266 


Italy 






4,077 


Russia 






3,480 


China 






476 


Greece . 






722 


Sweden . 






763 


Scotland . 






431 


Spain 






127 


Norway . 






254 


Poland 






1,124 


Australia 






23 



Austria 
Portocal . 
Finland . 
Denmark. 
Holland . 
Wale* 
East Indies 
West Indies 
Turkey 
Socxti Amerie* 
Switzerland 
Belgium . 
Armanis . 
Africa 
Hungary 
Asia 



129 

405 

146 

62 

26 

8 

10 

74 

135 

63 

19 

32 

117 

7 

16 

4 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



17 



Arabia . 


17 


India 


Mexico . 


12 


Egypt 


Japan 


9 


Albania 


Syria 


169 


Iceland 


Roumania 


2 




Lithuania 


623 


Tot 



1 

2 

17 

2 



. 88,878 

The number of arrests for the year was 88,878, being an 
increase of 4,605 over last year, and 5,489 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 38,794 persons 
Arrested for drunknness, being 88 fewer than last year, and 196 
more than the average for the past five years. Of the arrests 
for drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of .11 per cent 
in males and a decrease of .12 per cent in females from last 
year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (88,878), 768 
were for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one 
arrest in 115 was for such offence, or .12 per cent. 

Sixty and ninety-eight hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table XI.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 28,928, and 
the fines amounted to S394,223.25. (See Table XIII.) 

Eighty-six persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,988 to the House of Correction, 36 to the Women's Prison, 
96 to the Reformatory prison, and 1,579 to other institutions. 
The total years of imprisonment were 1 life, 2,118 years, 10 
months (178 sentences indefinite); the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 55,268, and the witness 
fees earned by them amounted to 813,934.18. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $264,448.85. 

Twenty-three witnesses were detained at station houses, 
198 were accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 12 
over last year. There was a decrease of 1.36 per cent in the 
number of sick and injured persons assisted, and an increase 
of about 2.70 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property reported stolen in and out 
of the city for the five j-ears from 1923 to 1927, inclusive, was 
SI, 896,409 .85, in 1927 it was 51,421,731.11, or $474,678.74 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in and 
out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, 
was $2,100,248.24 as against $2,214,100.62 last year, or 
$113,852.38 less. (See Table XIII.) 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Bureau of Crimixal Ixvestication. 

The "identification room" now contains GS.24S photographs, 
55.928 of which are photographs with liertiUon measurements, 
a system used by the Department since November 30, 1S9S. 
In accordance with the Revised Law*, chapter 225, section 
IS, and with the General Laws, chapter 127, sections 27 to 
29, both inclusive, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measurements taken of the convicts in the State Prison and 
Reformatory, a number of which have }»<-en added to our* 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
system by the Department in 1S98, is and will continue to 
be of great assistance in the identification of criminals. A 
large number of important identifications have thus been 
made during the year for this and other ijoliee departments, 
through which the sentences in many instances have been 
materially increased. The records of 1,375 criminals have been 
added to the records of this Bureau, wbirh now contains a 
total of 48,426. The number of case* retorted at this office 
which have been investigated during the year fa 3S,4 10. There 
are 44,789 cases reported on the assignment books kept for 
this purpose and reports made on thr-*e case* arc filed away 
for future reference. The system of in<5cxing adopted b}- 
this Bureau for the use of the Department now contains a 
list of records, histories, photograph*. dates of arrests, etc., 
of about 223,000 persons. There are al-o "ht-tories and press 
clippings" now numbering 9,857 made by this Bureau, in 
envelope form for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminal.* is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminal* an<i furnishing corrob- 
orating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties are of a special character, the following 
statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for (Vflonies . . 1,593 

Fugitives from justice from other States, arrr*."t«*l mvl rleliv- 

' ered to officers from those States ..... 54 

Number of cases investigated ...... 38,410 

Number of extra duties performed ..... 2,530 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



19 



Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court. . 206 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court .... 17 
Number of days spent in court by police officers . . 2,985 
Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court, 174 years, 4 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $525,306.84 
Number of photographs added to identification room . . 1,163 

Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examinees. 

The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 7S6 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion 


4 


Natural causes 


302 


Alcoholism 


14 


Poison 


34 


Asphyxiation 


1 


Railroad (steam) 


19 


Automobile 


11 


Railway (street) 


3 


Burns 


32 


Steam roller 


1 


Drowning 


33 


Stillboms 


14 


Elevators . . 


3 


Suffocation 


1 


Electricity 


1 


Suicides . 


53 


Falls 


63 


Teams 


1 


Falling objects 


9 


Homicides 


176 


Kicked by horse 


3 








Machinery' 


7 


Total 


786 


Motorboat 


1 







On 244 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts: — 



Accidental shooting 


1 


Natural causes 


1 


Automobiles 


118 


Railway (street) 


15 


Burns 


1 


Railroad (steam) 


1 


Drowning 


1 


Suicide 


1 


Falls 


3 


Teams 


3 


Manslaughter 


14 








Motorcycle 


2 


Total 


176 


Murder . 


15 







Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On December 1, 1926, there were 2,510 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the property 
clerk; 1,160 articles were received during the year; 829 pieces 
were sold at public auction and the proceeds, $1,478.17, were 
turned over to the Chief Clerk; 702 packages were destroyed 
as worthless or sold as junk and the proceeds, $522.22, turned 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

over to the Chief Clerk; 123 packages containing money 
to the amount of $333.64 were turned over to the Chief Clerk 
and 101 packages were returned to owners, finders or ad- 
ministrators, leaving 1,915 packages on hand. 

Larcext of Automobiles and Unlawful Appropriation 
of Automobiles or Using without Authority. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for these offences for the year ending November 
30, 1927: — 

Larceny of AvU/mohilis. 

Number of arrests ......... 328 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged ..... 99 

Fined 2 

Sentenced to a penal or other institution . . 48 

Probation ....... 7S 

Sentence suspended ...... 2 

On file 11 

Turned over to police of other citie* ... 21 

Still pending ....... 50 

Defaulted 2 

"No bill" 8 

''Xol prosequi'' ....... 1 

Total 32S 

Unlnuful Apjnrnpriotion nj Automobiles or L'titig Without Authority. 

Number of arrests . . . . . . . . 10S 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged ..... 32 

Fined 1 

Sentenced to a penal or other institution . 15 

Probation ....... -11 

Sentenced supended ...... 2 

Onffle 5 

Still pending ....... 11 

Defaulted 1 

Total 108 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 21 

Violations of Massachusetts State Liquor Law. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for this offence for the year ending November 30, 
1927: — 

Xuniber of arrests ......... 3,904 

Final dispositions: 

Xot guilty and discharged . . . . . 1,013 

Fined ........ 1,477 

Fined and sentenced to jail or house of correction . 71 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction . . 56 

Probation 340 

Fined and sentenced to jail or house of correction 

(sentence suspended) ..... 273 

Fined and sentenced to jail or house of correction 

(both suspended) ...... I 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction (sentence 

suspended) ....... ISO 

On file 211 

Turned over to police of other cities ... 2 

Still pending 241 

Defaulted 39 

Total 3,904 



Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 

the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty 
at each : — 

!«*. Men. 

Dec 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve .... 40 

Dec 31, Boston Common, Xcw Year's Eve .... 12 



tar. 

Jan. 5, Mechanics Building, Police ball . 
Feb. 16, Mechanics Building. Firemen's ball 
Feb. 22, State House, Governor's reception 
Mar. 17, South Boston, Evacuation Day parade 
Apr. 7, South Station, arrival of French ambassador 
Apr. 2S, Funeral of Inspector William F. Crawford 
Apr. 30, Parade of 104th Mass. Infantry . 
May 1, Parade of Order of St. Francis . 
May 14, Dedication of John \V. Weeks bridge . 
May 21, Boston Common and Arena, contests of bands and or- 
chestras ...... 

May 30, Work horse parade ..... 

Jane 3, Parade of Boston School Cadets . 



268 
40 
56 

2SS 
36 
39 

104 

105 



3S 

37 

353 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1917 


. 


June 


4, 


June 


5. 


June 


0, 


June 


10, 


June 


13, 


June 


10, 


June 


10, 


June 


10, 


Juno 


17, 


July 


2, 


July 


4, 


July 


4, 


July 


5. 


July 


0, 


July 


21, 


July 




July 


*>-> 

**"*l 


July 


23, 


July 


24, 


Aug. 


10, 


Aug. 


<*> 


Aug. 


28, 


Sept. 


22 


Oct. 


1, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


0, 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


8, 


Oct. 


8, 


Oct. 


10, 


Oct. 


11, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 



Dorchester Day, celebration of 

Anti-Faseisti meeting in Scenic Temple 
Parade and review Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany ... 

MarctUa street playground, baseball game . 
Braves Field, Crosscup-Pishon Post boxing carnival 
Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Koxbury Crossing district 
Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Charlcstown 
Xavy Yard, docking of the "Constitution" . 
Chariestown, Bunker Hill Day parade and fireworks 
Boston Common, rehearsal of July 4th pageant 
Charlesbank Park athletic contests .... 

Boston Common Independence Day, afternoon and eve- 
ning .... .... 

St. Peter's Church, funeral of Rt. Rev. J. G. Anderson 
Funeral of patrolman Harris B. Mclnnes 
Bulletin boards, Dempsey -.Sharkey fight 
Arrival of CoL Charles A. Lindbergh, tour of city 
Boston Arena, reception to Colonel IJndbergh 

Parade of 26th Division 

Marine Park, reception to Lieut. Hegenbrrgcr rt al. 
Date set for execution Sacco and Vanzetti fpostponcd) . 
Execution of .Sacco and Van zctti . . . . 

Funeral of Sacco and Vanzetti ..... 
Bulletin boards, Tunney-Dempsey fight 
Stadium, Harvard-Vermont football game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's scries baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's scries baseball game 
Stadium, Harvard-Purdue football game 
Funeral of patrolman John Condon .... 
Funeral of Lieutenant Frederic J. SwcnuVman 
Fenway Park, football game, school boy* 
Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battalions of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned 
a military band, one of which was the Boston Police 
Post 1018, Veterans of Foreign Wars Band, composed 
of members of the Boston Police Department. The 
regiment included a sergeant and twenty men mounted 
on department horses, a colonel commanding, with his 
adjutant and staff officers from the respective police 
division* and units in military company formation, shot- 
gun companies, patrolmen with Thomix-on sub-machine 
guns, a motorcycle unit, and a machine gun unit 
mounted on automobiles. The regiment was reviewed 



Men. 

109 

34 



334 
14 
03 
25 

135 
39 

309 
42 
52 

1S2 

SO 

61 

21 

903 

231 

077 

74 

439 

450 

703 

59 

73 

78 

7S 

7S 

7S 

72 

59 

32 

13 



192S.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



Oct. 


15. 


Oct. 


•>» 


Oct. 


•» 


Oct. 


29, 


Nov. 


10, 


Xov. 


12, 


Nov. 


12, 


Xov. 


19, 


Xov. 


19, 


Xov. 


24, 


Xov. 


24. 



Xov. 



at City Hal! by Ilis Honor the Mayor; at the State 
House by His Excellency Governor Alvan T. Fuller, 
and on the Parade Grounds of the Common by His 
Excellency the Governor and the Police Commis- 
sioner, Hon. Herbert .V- Wilson 
Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game . 
Braves Field, Boston CoDege-Wesle3-an football game 
Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 
Stadium, Harvard-Indiana football game 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, consecration of Bishop 
Peterson ....... 

Stadium. Harvard-Brown football game 
Braves Field, Boston College-Georgetown football game 
Stadium and t raffic duty. Harvard- Yale football game 
Bulletin boards, Harvard- Yale football game 
Fenway Park, forenoon, schoolboy football game . 
Fenway Park, aftcr&ooo, Fitton Council-Pere Marquette 
footbali game ...... 

Braves Field, Boston CoQege-I loly Cross football game 



1,581 
77 
14 
93 
90 

58 
105 

16 
173 

45 

25 



100 



Missing Persons. 

The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported ........ 920 

Total number found ........ 820 



Total number 53LLI missing ....... 100 

Age and Strz of Such Persons. 





Miuao. 


Found. 


Still Muma. 




Ililn 


Fcrrnlge. 


Mala. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years 


207 


47 


203 


45 


4 


2 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 


ISO 


lfiO 


101 


136 


19 


24 


Over 21 years 


232 


94 


190 


79 


36 


15 


Totals 


G19 


301 


500 


260 


59 


41 



2-t 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Potion for One 
November SO, 1927. 


\'car ending 


Month. 


Stolen. 


Recovered. 

during 
Month. 


1 flr:-tT. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1926. 

December 


2S2 


243 




16 


1*27. 
Jan. 






21C 


19S 


11 


7 


February 






1S5 


174 


i 


4 


March . 






241 


223 


8 


10 


April 






297 


266 


12 


19 


May . 






335 


306 


* 


20 


June 






332 


300 


10 


16 


July . 






321 


278 


23 


20 


August . 






391 


345 


15 


31 


September 






434 


3SS 


20 


26 


October 






402 


431 


8 1 


23 


November 






443 


410 


— i 


33 


Totalj 


3,939 


3,562 


152 ! 


225 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



25 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this Department for 
the Year ending Xorrmber 30, 1027. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1926. 

December . 


2,549 


1,860 


1,112 


1*27. 

January 






1,SSS 


1,657 


801 


February 






1,756 


1,753 


690 


March 






2,635 


2,767 


1,099 


April . 






3.173 


3,901 


1,414 


May . 






2,9S5 


3,759 


1,130 


June . 






2.SS2 


3,097 


1,101 


July . 






2.590 


2.92S 


1,143 


August 






2,700 


2.SS0 


933 


September 






2,355 


2,331 


S85 


October 






2, ISO 


2,441 


830 


Xovember 






2.31S 


2,373 


698 


Totals 


30,077 


32,347 


11,836 



Miscellaneous Business. 





1*25-26. 


1926-27. 


1927-28. 


Abandoned children cared for 


18 


9 


6 


Accidents reported ..... 


6,154 


6,275 


6,711 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,070 


3,261 


3,460 


Cases investigated ..... 


S3.333 


7S,977 


76,261 


Dangerous buildings reported . 


11 


32 


51 


Dangerous chimneys reported . 


14 


11 


16 


Dead bodies recovered .... 


54 


40 


49 


Dead bodies cared for 


321 


335 


257 


Defective cesspools reported 


46 


30 


17 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


16 


14 


4 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



[Jan. 





l'IJJ.24. 


1926-27. 


1927-28. 


Defective fire alarms anil clocks reported . 





•1 


7 


Defective gas pipes reported 


25 


115 


1.'. 


Defective hydrants reported 


rs 


111 


70 


Defective lamps reported .... 


8,01 '.» 


0,077 


0,300 


Defective sewers reported 


789 


00 


59 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 


7..M0 


S.000 


0,032 


Defective water pipes reported . 


1,013 


163 


43 


Disturbances suppressed .... 


.'{OS 


170 


437 


Extra duties peforrned .... 


•i:i,:isr. 


30.5S3 


12,189 


Fire alarms given ..... 


3,268 


2,633 


3,335 


Fires extinguished ..... 


1,502 


J ,502 


1,364 


Insane persons taken in charge . 


383 


332 


352 


Intoxicated persons assisted 


15 


:;o 


29 


Lost children restored .... 


1,203 


1,180 


1,520 


Persons rescued from drowning 


11 


11 


19 


Sick and injured persons assisted 


7,3 1 2 


ii,."i:f.". 


6,446 


Stray teams reported and put up 


•to 


05 


105 


Street obstructions removed 


3,301 


2,511 


3,132 


Water running to waste reported 


:.ri 


■102 


■181 


Witnesses detained ..... 


s 


S 


23 


IXSPECTOn OK Cl. 


VIMS. 






The officer detailed to assist the c< 


HlllllittC 


B on claims and 


law department in investigating clui 


ns agai 


ist the 


city for 



alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
2,754 cases, 2 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 27 

Other Services Performed. 

Xumber of cases investigated 2,754 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 10,207 

Number of notices served ....... 8,968 

Xumber of permissions granted (to speak to police officers regard- 
ing accidents and to examine police records) . . 9,328 
Xumber of days in court ....... 211 

Xumber of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 94 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to repair 

same . $2,523.54 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of 
the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are 
returned to the house of detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,475 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness ......... 1,266 

Larceny .......... 397 

Xight walking ......... 41 

Fornication .......... 129 

Idle and disorderly ........ 105 

Assault and battery ........ 9 

Adultery 45 

Violation of liquor law ........ 60 

Keeping house of ill fame ....... 17 

Various other causes ........ 406 

Total 2,475 

Recommitment*. 

From Municipal court ........ 206 

From County jail ......... 487 

Grand total 3,168 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 526. Of these 358 are 
connected with the underground system and 168 with the 
overhead. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year (lie employees of this service responded to 
1,7S1 trouble calls; inspected 52G signal boxen, 18 signal desks 
and 1,083 batteries; repaired 205 box movements, 74 registers, 
So polar box bells, 90 locks, 70 time stamps, 20 vibrator bells, 
and 12 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and electric 
light work at the various stations. There have been made 
58 plungers, 60 complete box fittings, 70 line blocks, 72 auto- 
matic hooks and a large amount of small work done which 
cannot be classified. 

The police signal service has charge of 138 rcllcctor spot- 
lights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for 
the regulation of traffic, also 5 signal towers. A light Ford 
truck has been provided for spotlight and tower work. 

Eleven new signal boxes have been installed; one at station 
13, two at station II, one at station 17, four at station 18, 
three at station 19, six of which arc overhead boxes and 
five underground. 

Cable is on hand for the 1927 prescribed district but as 
the New England Telephone Company's ducts arc not avail- 
able none has been laid. The underground work done this 
year was on the 1925 and 192G prescribed district at South 
Boston on Divisions and 12. 

Owing to excessive work and long service our signal 
registers are in very poor condition. The Camcwell Com- 
pany made changes in their standard register adaptable to 
our system and one has been purchased and is now under test. 
There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 
Ford sedan and 2 Ford trucks. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 54,054 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 94,594 miles. There 
were 35,441 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,558 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 306 runs were made 
to take lost children to station houses. There were 2,877 
runs to fires and 577 runs for liquor seizures. During the 
year there were 526 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 
circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 602,55-1 telephone messages 
and 4,250,996 "on duty" calls were sent over the lines. 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time : — 



IS signal desks 

72 circuits 

526 street signal boxes 

It stable call boards 

75 test boxes 

1.0S3 cells of battery 

t>ll,55S feet underground cable 



224,890 feet overhead cable 
22,346 feet of duct 
66 manholes 

1 White truck 

2 Ford trucks 
1 Ford sedan 



ce steamers 



Harbor Service. 

The special duties performed by the Police of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows:- 

Yalue of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, 

float stages, etc. 
Vessels from foreign ports boarded 
Vessels ordered from channel . 
Vessels removed from the channel by poli 
Assistance rendered 
Assistance rendered to wharfinger 
Permissions granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at 

anchor .... 
Obstructions removed from channel 
Alarms of fire on the water front attended 
Fires extinguished without alarm 
Boats challenged . 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Dead bodies recovered . 
Persons rescued from drowning 
Vessels assigned to anchorage 
Vessels ordered to put on anchor lights 
Vessel ordered to rig in jib-boom 
Cases investigated 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor 
Boats searched for contraband .... 



532,798 00 

699 

289 

3 

86 

3 

25 

60 

17 

2 

952 

4 

22 

4 

884 

4 

1 

297 

399 

952 



The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 8,820, 
7,344 of which were from domestic ports, 486 from the British 
Provinces in Canada and 990 from foreign ports. Of the 
latter 64S were steamers, 27 were motor vessels and 1 schooner. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 20 to October 15, 1927. 

The launch E. U. Curtis cruised nightly from Castle 
Island to Neponset Bridge. Twenty-two cases were inves- 
tigated, twelve boats were challenged and searched for contra- 
band, five obstructions removed from the channel, assistance 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

rendered to ten boats in distress by reason of disabled engines, 
stress of weather, etc., and towing them with the persons 
aboard to a place of safety, one dead body recovered from 
the water, two arrests on suspicion, two yachts ordered from 
channel and three boats challenged. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 192G, there were 32 horses in 
the service. During the year two were purchased; one was 
sold in trade and one humanely killed. At the present time 
there are 32 in the service as shown by Table VIII. 

Vehicle Service. 
Automobiles. 
There are 69 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
23 attached to headquarters; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 10 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; four in the 
South Boston district, attached to Divisions and 12; two 
in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in 
the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in 
the Dorchester district attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; five in the Back Bay 
and Fenway, attached to Division 16; two in the West Rox- 
bury district, attached to Division 17; two in the Hyde Park 
district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan district, 
attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the traffic 
divisions and four unassigncd. (See page 32.) 

Cott of Running Autovmbilfs. 

Care and repairs ........ $17,392 14 

Tires . 6,397 67 

Gasoline 13,981 75 

Oil 2,398 33 

Storage 3,705 77 

License fees 31 1 00 

Total $13,240 50 



1928.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



31 



Ambulances. 
The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, G, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 

and 19, and there arc 4 unassigncd. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 

sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 

City Hospital (Belief Station, Haymarkct Square) 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston District) 

Calls where services were not required 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Home ....... 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital . 

Psychopathic Hospital 

Morgue 

Police station houses 

Forest Hills Hospital 

Carney Hospital 
Strong Hospital 
Boston State Hospital 
Faulkner Hospital . 
Beth Israel Hospital 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 
Chelsea Naval Hospital . 
Common ivealth Hospital 
Homeopathic Hospital 
Chardon Street Home 
Children's Hospital 
Codman Square Hospital 
Emerson Hospital . 
New England Hospital . 
St. Margaret's Hospital . 
Trumbull Hospital . 
U. S. Veterans' Hospital . 



2,177 

978 

187 

74 

69 

59 

56 

54 

48 

27 

24 

23 

9 

8 

5 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 



Total 



3,818 



32 



TOLICE COMMISSIONER. 

IAtt of Ythieles Used by the Department. 



[Jan. 







s 




































9 


















< . 


■ 












DivimoNs. 


i 

s 


Il 


c 
o 
B 
■ 


i 


a 

3 

i 


j 

"3 


a 






*3 

Ji 

c = 

< 




if 
| 

o 


O 
| 


> 
3 

Q 


hi 

a 

s 




S3 


3 
e2 


Headquarters 


- 


- 


- 


21 


2 


- 


- 


23 


Division 1 


1 




- 




- 


1 


1 


5 


Division 2 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5 


- 




- 




- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 7 


- 




- 




- 


4 


3 


9 


Division 9 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 11 


- 




- 




- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 


- 




- 




- 


3 


2 


7 


Division 13 


- 




- 




- 


7 


2 


11 


Division 14 


- 




- 




- 


8 


3 


13 


Division 15 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


9 


3 


17 


Division 17 


- 




- 




- 


8 


2 


12 


Division 18 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 


- 




- 




- 


6 


2 


10 


Division 20 


- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


3 


Albany Street Stable . 


- 


- 


o 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Unassipned 


- 


t 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Totals 


1 


22 


o 


43 


3 


66 


30 


1C7 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 33 

Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,173' carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 68 as compared with last year; 2,162 
motor carriages were licensed, being a decrease of 63 compared 
with last year. 

There have been 11 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 309 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the inspector; 32 of these were restored to the 
owners, and the balance placed in the custody of the lost 
property bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Xumber of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 2,257 

Number of carriage* licensed ....... 2,161 

Xumber of licenses transferred 119 

Xumber of licenses canceled . . ..... 116 

Xumber of licenses revoked ....... 1 

Xumber of licenses suspended ....... 92 

Xumber of applications for carriage licenses rejected ... 83 
Xumber of applications for carriage Licenses reconsidered and 

granted ..... 6 

Xumber of carriages inspected ...... 200 

Applications for drivers' b'censes reported upon .... 4,706 

Xumber of complaints against drivers investigated . . . 725 

Xumber of days spent in court ...... 288 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 14 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers .... 309 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ..... 141 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . . 31 
Drivers' licenses granted ......... 4,565 

Drivers' licenses revoked ....... 2 

Drivers' licenses suspended ....... 195 

Drivers' Licenses canceled . 71 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1927, 1,565 such special stands. 

Of these special stands there have been 155 canceled or 
revoked, 39 transferred and 57 suspended. There have been 
478 applications for special stands rejected, 27 of which 

> Twelve canceled tor nonpayment. 
' Oae one jieditor nonpayment. 



3-1 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



were reconsidered and granted and 52 applications rejected 
for transfer of special stands. 

SiGHT-SEEINO AUTOMOBILES. 

During the year ending November 30, 1927, there have been 
issued licenses for 50 sight-seeing automobiles and 35 special 
stands for them. There have been rejected 2 applications 
for sight-seeing automobiles and 2 applications for special 
stands. 

There have been 1S2 operators' licenses granted. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During 
the year 4,201 applications for such licenses were received; 
4.2S9 of these were granted and 2 rejected. 

Of these licenses Sf> were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 4 for other causes, and 14 trans- 
ferred to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Listing Wokk is Boston. 



Year. 




Year. 


Canvass. 


1003' 








181,015 


1915 






220.SS3 


1004 








193,195 


1910 » 






- 


too.-, 








191,517 


1917 






221,207 


1000 








195,4 4 G 


191S 






224,012 


1907 








195,900 


1910 






227,406 


lOOS 








201,255 


1020 






23.5,248 


1000 








201,391 


1921 4 






4S0.783 


1910 » 








203,003 


1022 






4S0.106 


1911 








206,825 


1023 






477,547 


1912 








214.17S 


1024 






4S5.677 


1913 








215,388 


1025 






4S9.478 


1914 








219,304 


1020 






493,415 



i IW)3 to 1909. both if.rlu-ivfr. Ii-tinc Wfti on Mny 1. 

* 1010 lifting ■ b.iM-.'l io Aj.nl 1. 

1 lltlG li-unc done by Ito.nrd of AWttOH. 

4 1021 law changed to Include women in lutinje. 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



35 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 



Male 
Female 



Total 



241,525 
254,242 

495,767 



Listing Expenses. 

The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Advertising and printing ..... 

Clerical services ....... 

Stationery ........ 

Interpreters ........ 

Telephone ........ 



Total 



X umber of Policemen Employed in Listing. 



S40.019 74 


19,925 00 


609 55 


170 25 


11 12 


S60.735 60 


. 1,32S 




1,219 




963 




519 




39 




8 



April 1 . 
April 2 . 
April 4 . 
April 5 . 
April 6 . 
April 7 . 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The police department under the provisions of chapter 
348, Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in 
ascertaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury 
service. The police findings in 1927 may be summarized 
as follows: — 





1927. " 


Dead or could not be found in Boston .... 


1.5S7 


Physically incapacitated ...... 


i 1244 


Convicted of crime ....... 


243 


Unfit for various reasons ...... 


794 


Apparently fit ....... . 


7,818 


Total 


10.6S6 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Spkcial Police. 

Special police arc appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1927, there were 
1,754 special police officers appointed; 14 application* for 
appointment were refused for cause and 3 appointments 
revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as 
follows: — 

From United States Government ...... 31 

From State departments ........ 4 

From City departments ........ 579 

From County of Suffolk ........ 15 

From railroad corporations ....... 83 

From other corporations and associations ..... 76S 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 231 

From private institutions ....... 31 

From churches ......... 12 

Total .......... 1,751 

' Railroad Police. 

There were 127 persons appointed railroad policemen 
during the year, 117 of whom were employees of the Boston 
<fc Maine Railroad and 10 of the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 28,851. Of these 28,526 were granted, of which 
150 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 28,376. During 
the year 720 licenses were transferred, 579 canceled, 17 re- 
voked, and 325 applications were rejected. The officers 
investigated 1,629 complaints arising under these licenses. 
The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to S74.435.35. There was also $19.44 received by the city 
collector from the Boston City Hospital for eighteen police 
pocket directories, which sum was credited to this Depart- 
ment. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



37 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 50 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received. Four licenses were subsequently 
canceled on account of nonpayment of license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged 
with a qualified musician, not a member of the department, 
that such instruments shall be inspected in April and Sep- 
tember of each j-ear. 

During the year Gl instruments were inspected with the 
following results: — 



Kisd or Instrciient. 


Number 
Iftsiiected. 


Number 
Passed. 


.Street pianos ....... 


22 


22 




13 


13 




9 


9 




G 


6 




4 


4 




3 


3 














Harp 














CI 


61 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of 
persons over sixteen years of age to play on musical in- 
struments in company with designated processions at stated 
times and places. 



3S 



POLICK COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following shows the number of applications made 
for these licenses during the past five years and the action 
taken thereon : — 



Year. 


Aw>lica- 
lioni. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1923 


210 


215 


i 


1924 


231 


231 


- 


1925 


210 


239 


i 


1926 


°°3 


222 


i 


1927 


193 


192 


i 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return .shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 
or revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked: — 



Yeas. 



Allocation*. 



Granted. 



Rejected. 



Licences 

Revoked. 



1923 .... 


3,191 


3,007 


124 





1924 .... 


2.99S 


2,S79 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3.227 


3,000 


137 


S 


1920 .... 


3,10.5 


3,ai3 


122 


3 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 ' 


77 


2 



1 Twtntv-i-iip.t cxi*r*'t*ii for Donjiayntcnt. 

Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of 
the Acts of 1904, as amended during (he year, the location of 
each house and the number of lodgers accommodated: — 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis Street 
1051 Washington Street 
1202 Washington Street 
1025 Washington Street 
Total . 




32.S94 
29,674 
29,377 
33,025 



124,970 



Pension's and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1926, there were 24G pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 23 died, viz., 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 5 ser- 
geants and 16 patrolmen, and 1 annuitant remarried. Fifty 
were added, viz., 2 captains, 3 inspectors, 4 lieutenants, 4 
sergeants, 33 patrolmen, 1 chief matron, 1 foreman of line- 
men, 1 signalman and the widow of Patrolman Harris B. 
Mclnnes, who was killed while on duty; leaving 272 on the 
roll at date, 241 men and 31 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to S224,00S.53, and it is estimated that $240,700.66 
will be required for pensions in 192S. This does not include 
pensions for 1 inspector, 1 sergeant, 11 patrolmen and 1 
civilian employee, all of whom are 65 years old or more and 
are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and term of 
service. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 62 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $S,273.34 during 
the past j'ear. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and listing persons twenty years 
of age or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the 
police signal service, were $5,454,235.51. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $56,S76.25. (See Table XVIII.) 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees 
for licenses over which the poflice have supervision, for tin- 
sale of unclaimed and comi«mia»ed property, uniform cloth, 
etc., was $82,191.34. There wrus turned into the City Col- 
lector's office from the Bostoni City Hospital $19.44 for 18 
police directories, which suna was credited to this Depart- 
ment. (See Table XIV.) 



■ irn unTmr' i i a 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



41 



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42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Jan. 







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1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



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44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Tabix III. 

Lint of Q£iarz Retired during llie Ytnr aiding November SO, 1927, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and O.e X umber of Years' Scrince of Each. 



Vur. 






Ace at Tinio 

t>f Retirement 

tYcars). 



Yt:.rs ..f 
Service. 



Abort, iita F. 






Axe 


65 Vis 


JO'13 


.khera, Jamee EL 






Are 


66* .: 


35 Vis 


ALem. WiEta J. 






Axe 


69" i; 


■11 </n 


Axrjokl Fnu . 






Act 


65 « ii 


32»'is 


Bafley. WiE*m O. . 






Are 


67 Vii 


39 Vis 


BrmMao, ^fjrdAel C. 






Ace 


65 


33 Vis 


Caswell, WilEaaii H. . 






Axe 


69 Vis 


M'/ii 


Coffer. Paov-i H. . 






Axe 


6S • is 


37 Vis 


Cretan. Mirfca*d J- . 






Are 


64 » ',• 


-Jl'/ii 


I>linT. Dleriiel F. 






Are 


66 » ii 


34 


Eldrvije. Peter C. . 






Are 


86 Vis 


40>Vii 


FairesT, Join, T. 






Ir.--»;ffc-i-iU-l 


30 : it 


Vii 


Gillex. Jin^« J. 






Are 


65 


31 » 13 


Glai»-y. Jo-e^i. 3*. 






Are 


65 • ,: 


J2« ,3 


Grteiey. Mwfca»el J. . 






Are 


67 » u 


39«', : 


Groej^rz, Jar«x> 






IrK»;»*"i:atr<l 


jp» ,. 


7 fc 13 


HsSM90m« WiZajftD 1L. 






Axe 


67 ' i: 


•11" 13 


Hart. D&fiie* **"- 






Are- 


6.1 ' 13 


3»«'|S 


Hay«. Petes* A, 






Are 


63 ' is 


"11 < 13 


Hur*ie». Jo*in F- 






Are- 


65 : |3 


3K"*ll 


Kenx«*?y, Tbfccmrf F. 






Are 


70 


40= 13 


Leary. KrhiriS. . 






Are 


70 


-11 < 13 


Issntimrd, Rv-j-asrd H. 






Are 


6*i * is 


11" 13 


I.yjjri. Daniel J. 






Are 


66 ' ■: 


■10" i: 


Mal>y, Patrick 






Ar«- 


70 


3fc" |3 


Miki. Be-k/fley C. . 






Are 


65 


34 ' i3 


Mejer*. Hefiry >-. 






Are 


63 ' 13 


•'«•" 13 


Moose, WU&am. F. . 






Are 


65 > ,; 


40 '.'is 


Mur>try. June* A. . 






Are 


60 


32 ' is 


Murray. Georasfc 






Are 


CO : ,3 


26 Vl! 


MelA/boooii. Pwtrirk J. 






Irvea;^ai"i*ateil 


57 ■ i: 


31 


McLe^ei, Kes-jKcli 






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65= ,. 


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McXealy. Patrie-k J. 






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33 


CXest. Pa-xv-i J. 






Are 


65 - is 


33 Vis 


O'NoE, Pairv-k J. . 






Are 


60 ' 13 


31* "n 


Powers. John EL 






Are 


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31 !',: 


Kae, Tnotna* **L 






Are 


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KvtMimaa, VWStOO H. 






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31 1/u 


Koonry, WiEEaon J. . 






Are 


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36 Vis 


Il'j-e-jJelii. C-ar>-_K%e . 






Are 


63 : i3 


42>/is 


P-oee. John 






Axe 


66 » ir 


31 


.""prasx. Jobs HL 






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t"6 * 13 


31 


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We 


<|6 ■ 11 


:••»',: 


.-Hariard. ^mjua F. • 






Are 


6S ' ,. 


3* l/u 


Tuner, William H. . 






\rr 


63 ■ ii 


32 


WsjBaaaafla, Airy P. 






Are 


65" is 


8M ». is 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



45 



Table III. — Concluded. 

Police Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under the Boston 
Retirement System, which went into effect February 1, 192S. 



Name. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at 
Time of 
Retire- 
ment 
(Years) 


Years of 
Service. 


Caulfield. Bridget .... 

Kennedy. Francis E. 
Nyman, Mary C. . 

Sheridan, Jane A. . 


Janitress 
Deputy Su- 
perintendent 
Janitor 

Janitress 
and Matron 

Janitress 
and Matron 


Age 

Age 
Age 
Age 

Age 


61 «/■« 

70 Vu 
69 
67 >/u 

61 •/» 


16 '/u 

44»/u 
22 Vu 
28 
5"/ii 

19 Vu 



Table IV. 

List of Officers who were Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November SO, 1927. 



Date. 



Name and Rank. 



Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Sept. 16, 1927 
Nov. 4, 1927 
Nov. 4, 1927 



SergeaDt Thomas F. Connolly to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Thomas S. J. Kavanagh to the rank of Lien- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Charles W. Miller to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Ferdinand E. Breed to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John Foley to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman William J. Harrow to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman James J. Hinchey to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Louis DiSessa to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward J. Keating to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Cornelius F. Leary to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John P. J. Maune to tne rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Frauds J. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Leonard E. J. O'Connell to the rank of 

Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward P. O'Neill to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman James T. Sheehan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Lawrence L. Waitt to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant Jeremiah N. Mosher to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant William H. Rymes to the rank of Lieutenant. 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Xumber of Hen in Active Service at the Eroi of the Preterit Year who were 
Appointed on the Force in the Year Suited. 



Date Appointed. 





£ 


• 
















o 












S 


5 


£ 






^ 






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1 s 


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• 


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BO 


- 


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O 


— 


— 


■j. 


Cm 



1S75 

1SS2 

1SS3 

1SS6 

1SS7 

1SSS 

1SS9 

1S90 

1S91 

1S92 

1S93 

1S94 

1S95 

1S96 

1S97 

1S98 

1900 

1901 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

190S 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 



Totals 



1 
2 

1 
1 

1 



:'. 
2 
8 
4 

17 
1 
2 
7 

14 
7 

11 
9 
6 
3 
9 

13 
4 
3 
3 
6 
1 



1 
2 

T 

25 

3 



22 U 



169 



9 
4 
1 
5 
1 

13 
2 

32 
7 
2 

10 

15 
4 

11 
8 
2 
2 
8 
6 
2 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 

2 

4 

627 

208 

142 

79 
122 

84 
106 
350 
139 



2,021 



1 

1 

1 

3 

5 

15 

5 

7 

9 

6 

31 

8 

65 

10 

6 

20 

42 

17 

27 

21 

10 

6 

19 

23 

6 

7 

4 

12 
2 
2 

T 

4 

5 

652 

211 

142 

79 
122 

84 
106 
350 
139 



2,286 



1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



47 



Table VI. 

Hen on the Police Force on November SO, 1927, who were Born in Vie Year 
Indicated on the Table below. 



Date or Bibtb. 



e 






9 


S? 




3 3 
M - 


o 






S4J 


M 


3 3 


© 


m -* 




Q 


O 



1848 
1S51 
1858 
1859 
1S00 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1S67 
1S6S 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1SS3 
1884 
1885 
18S6 
1SS7 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 



Totals 



29 



22 



41 



6 
5 
7 
8 
8 

11 
7 
2 
3 
6 

14 
7 
5 
6 
6 
6 
5 
3 
8 
3 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 



169 



1 
1 
1 

3 

4 

4 

6 

11 

14 

14 

12 

7 

8 

7 

9 

11 

4 

8 

2 

2 

7 

5 

8 

1 

2 

2 

1 

3 

18 

30 

46 

62 

80 

71 

102 

151 

154 

189 

181 

203 

180 

136 

95 

113 

49 

3 



2,021 



1 

1 

3 

2 

4 

7 

4 

16 

19 

27 

33 

33 

21 

24 

13 

16 

19 

22 

24 

13 

12 

14 

12 

14 

5 

10 

9 

5 

7 

19 

32 

48 

65 

81 

71 

102 

156 

160 

193 

183 

205 

185 

136 

95 

113 

49 

3 



2,286 



The average age of the member* of the force on November 30, 1927, is 37 yean. 



AS 



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1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



51 



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52 



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[Jan. 



Table IX. 
Number and Distribution of Horses in Hit Department. 



DfVUIONI. 


C 
O 

B 

a 


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ft 


|2 


Totals. 


Division 16 . 

Stable, Albany Street . 


1 


l 


22 

S 


22 
10 


Totals .... 


1 


l 


30 


32 



192S,] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



53 



Table X. 

Number of Armtt by Police Divisions during the Year 
November SO, 1927. 



ending 



DlVISIOXSL 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division S 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 12 
Division 13 
Division 14 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Division IS 
Division 19 
Division 20 
Division 21 
• Liquor and Narcotic nnit 
Totals 



1,492 
6,673 
2,754 
5,777 
2,974 
S,572 
5,937 
6,5S0 
40 
6,540 
4,648 
3,661 
2,200 
1,972 
1,875 
4,958 
2,839 
1,711 
797 
1,015 
6,741 
1,497 
1,8S3 



83,136 



106 
17S 
509 
5S5 
232 
1,079 
294 
317 

310 
451 
10S 

ss 

63 

142 

184 

394 

5S 

27 

48 

102 

149 

31S 



5,742 



1,598 
6,851 
3,263 
6,362 
3,206 
9,651 
6,231 
6,897 
40 
6,850 
5,099 
3,769 
2,2S8 
2,035 
2,017 
5,142 
3,233 
1,769 
824 
1,063 
6,843 
1,646 
2,201 



8S.878 



54 



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1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 55 



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192S.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



i i • • i i i i i i I i 



57 









t — x> n i 



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192&] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



59 



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1928.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 65 



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Suspicious persons 
Tenant law, violation of 
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Trade mark law, violation of 
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U. iS. flaK law, violation of 
U. S. Immigration law, violation of 
V. S. Navy uniform, weariun unlaw full 
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Vagrants, tramps, ctr. 
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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during Ihe.Year ending 
November SO, 1927. 



DrriBioss. 


Males. 


Female*. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Told, 


l 


83 


39 


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1 


123 


2 








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107 


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1 


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44 


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196 


21 


1 


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227 


57 


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601 


191 


48 


1 


841 


11 








1,074 


214 


126 


2 


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12 








373 


107 


39 


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13 








576 


148 


82 


1 


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14 








737 


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4 


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15 








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16 








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2 


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545 


129 


58 


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732 


19 








503 


86 


5S 


- 


647 


Totals 








8,935 


2,421 


S97 


19 


12,272 



1 One breeder's license at $50. 



Table XVI. 
Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . 


800 


Division 12 


53 


Division 2 . 


1,362 


Division 13 


67 


Division 3 . 


176 


Division 14 


58 


Division 4 . 


343 


Division 15 


124 


Division 5 . 


187 


Division 16 


10S 


Division 6 


370 


Division 17 


45 


Division 7 . 


106 


Division IS 


53 


Division 9 


233 


Division 19 


47 


Division 10 . 


72 








Division 11 . 


85 


Total 


4,289' 



1 Eighty-six cancel ed for nonpayment of Licence fee. 



1928.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 75 

Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November SO, 1927. 

ExPENDITUHES. 

Pay of police and employees ..... $4,652,353 28 

Pensions 224,008 53 

Fuel and light 63,317 21 

Water and ice ....... 1,518 54 

Furniture and bedding 30,483 23 

Printing and stationery . ... . . 27,712 12 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison . . 18,374 04 

Repairs to station houses and city prison . . . 36,100 36 

Repairs and supplies for police boats .... 18,070 31 

Telephone rentals, tolls and telegrams .... 15,197 60 

Purchase of horses and vehicles ..... 31,049 40 

Care and keeping of horses 10,662 04 

Care and repair of automobiles ..... 42,598 81 

Feeding prisoners . 4,704 99 

Medical attendance and medicine ..... 6,707 60 

Transportation 6,312 62 

Pursuit of criminals ....... 10,525 18 

Uniforms and uniform caps ...... 111,502 60 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc. . . . 8,778 05 

Traveling expenses and food for police .... 3,463 02 

Rent of buildings 27,410 50 

Traffic signs and symbols ...... 36,877 60 

Expert services ........ 4,660 55 

Storage on abandoned and stolen cars .... 738 67 

Music for police parade ...... 310 00 

Memorial wreaths for graves of police .... 63 00 

Total $5,393,499 85 

Expenses of listing 60,735 66 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVTLI) . . . 56,876 25 

Total $5,511,111 76 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . $42,166 35 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) . 32,269 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 2,677 79 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, uniform cloth, use of 

police property, etc 2,231 16 

Refunds 1,894 99 

For damage to police property 952 05 

Received by City Collector from the Boston City Hospital 
for 18 police pocket directories, which sum was credited 

to this Department 19 44 

Total $82,210 78 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Table XVIII. 

PagmenU on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 
November SO, 19B7. 

Pay rolU $36,106 44 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor . . 11,391 68 

Rent, taxes and water 1,200 73 

Repairs to building ....... 70 00 

Fuel 100 64 

Furnishing*, etc. ........ 16 52 

Purchase of Ford cars 800 60 

Storage and repairs to motor vehicles .... 647 75 

Shoeing horse ........ 95 00 

Carfare 575 10 

Prescribed underground work ..... 5,871 79 

Total $56,876 25 



1928.] 



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INDEX 



Accident* 

caused by automobile 

persons killed or injured by. in streets, porta and 

number of. reported 
Ambulance service . 
Arreata . 

ace and eex of 



omparative statement of 
final disposition of 

for offences against chastity, morality 
for drunkenness 
foreigners . . . 
minors . 

nativity of . , ] 

nonresidents 
number of, by divisions 
number of, punished by fine 
on warrants 
summoned by court 
total number of \ 

violation of city ordinances 
without warrants 
Auctioneers . 
Automobiles . [ 

accidents due to \ 
deaths caused by 
larceny of 

leased on mileage basis 
police 

public . , [ ] 
sight-seeing ] 

stolen 
used 
Benefits and pensions 
Bertillon system 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported '. 
found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Carriages, public . 
articles left in . 
automobile 
number licensed '. 
Cfeej investigated . 
Children 

abandoned, cared for 
ioifc r estored . 
City ordinances, arrests for violation 
Claim*, inspector of 
Collective musicians 
Commitments 
Complaints * 

»gainet police officers 
Court?"*" miscellaneous licenses 

fines imposed by 

S^£f Sr ltaw -ttendmee at. by 
rwJ^t er 0f ***""» summoned by 
Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 

arrests by 

fipger-pnnt system ! 

identification room . 

photographs 
. records . 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of " 
"serous weapons 

1 bodies, cared for 
_ recovered 
Deaths. . 

by accident, suicide, etc. 

of police officers 
Department, police 
Dispatch of police news 
Distribution of force 
Disturbances suppressed * 

•mount received for licenses for 
damage done by . ^^ 
number licensed 



of 



etc 



firm 



squares 



15 



16 



17, 



19 



18. 



20 



24. 



53. 



2o. 



16, 



raex 

19. 25, 77. 78 

. 19,77.78 

77.78 

25 

SH», 70, 71, 81-84 
7. 
71 
81-64 
16. 60, 69. S3 
18. 17, 27. C3 

- 16,54-69 
16. 54-69. 70 

16 

- 16. 54-69 
53 
17 

. 16,54-60 

- 16. 54-69 
■ 17.52.69 

17.63 

- 16.54-60 
72 

3*. 33. 34. 77. 78 

- 19. 77. 78 

19 

20 

K) 

31.32 

33 

34.72 

2«.24 

25.72 

39 

18 

25 

2S 

25 

18 

33.72 

23 

33 

33.72 

-25.26.29 

- 17,25.26 

23 
17.26 
17.63 

26 
37.72 

- . 17.27 

- 36.49.72 

49 
„ - 36.72 

». 27. 54-69. 71 

16. 17. 19. 27. 71 

- 16.54-69 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

18 

71 

71 

38 

25.29 

25.29 

1*19.43.77:78 

- 19.77.78 

15.43 

14 

: 15.4! 

2». 72, 74. 75 

72.75 

26 

7X74 



86 P.D. 49. 

rim 

Driven. aaflmey carriage ............ 33, 72 

aaa gsnaaa w. pmow rescued from 26, 20 

Oruckeaaes* 16. 17, 27, 63 

arrest* for, per dsy . 10 

dniiaai in Bunbtr of arrest* for .......... 16,17 

forocMn mated for 16,63 

nonresidents arrested for 16, 63 

total number of arrest* for 17,63 

voeea committed for ............ 27 

Employee* of toe Department 14,41,45 

Events, special .............. 21 

I-x;*iviEare3 .............. 39, 75, 76 

I^nonir,^ ............... 10 

Extra dories performed by officer* 18,26 

EnaneiaJ 39, 72, 75, 76 

expenditure* 39, 75 

pemnona 39, 75 ' 

reecho 40. 75 

E-oK-ellaneocf license fee* 36, 72, 75 

signal »erTice 39, 75, 76 

flnee 16.17.71 

amoent of . . 16,17,71 

arena's amount of ............. 16, 71 

cumier punched by ............ 17 

Firncer-pmt typtem 18 

Jjre alarse ............... 26 

defective, reported . 26 

rmmr>T riven .............. 26 

Krea 26, 29 

e-rrrraTriiihed .............. 26. 29 

on water front attended 29 

Torei»T«*. number arretted 16.54-60 

Fugitive* from justice ............. IS 

Qarnrng. zfegal .............. 64 

Haeixey carriage driven 33. 72 

Backney orruro 33, 72 

^and carta ............... 72 

Harbor aerriee 29 

Borsee -. . 30, 52 

dmUMMU an of ............. 52 

TnrmraT in service 30, 62 

pnre&raaed 30 

Some of detention 27 

Bouse at H fame, keeping 27, 60 

Bvdrant*. defective, reported 26 

ao rritrfv-ao pn room 18, 19 

imprisonment 17. 19, 71 

persona aentenced to 17 

total year, of 17. 19. 71 

jKome . , , 40. 72, 75 

Iwjtteet* Leid .............. 19 

Insane persons taken ia charge ...'... 26 

Jbvpeetor U daima 26 

caeca investigated ... 26 

lfaaoxieated persons assisted ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 26 

frtmerant stueiciana ............. 37, 72 

Junk eodemor* .............. 72 

Junk shop keepers .........*.!.. 72 

Jury be tp. police work on ............ 35 

g * rmiw . deaeetive. reported .......].!.. 26 

LaTKOaea. Bnteellaneow* 38. 72, 75 

JLsguor law. violation u Massachusetl* State 21 

lasting. 1**» , 34, 35. 75. 79, 80 

try i n an of 35, 75 

cumber Sited 35. 79, 80 

number of poticeanen employed in ......... 35 

Lodgers at etation bo— 17 

Lodging hoowes. pubne • •«,..,...... 38, 72 

a pp l ic ati on * for nretiee* '72 

authority to boeasw .... 38 

locaoca o( 30 

number of person* lodced in ...'*'"' 39 

Jjort. ahusioaed and stolen property 19. 73. 76 

law* cznktaea restored 17, 26 

eaeea *• which inquest* were beid '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 19 

cause* of death .19 

Jjjronunaaakar arrested 16.54-69,70 

jfbwornsnsaoa buaineaa ... 25 

Ma """"— licensee '.'.'. 36 72 76 

"■OBjat wf fees coOaeUd for . . 36. 72, 76 

wiip sa i i m mvtatktated 36.72 

nuxabsr eann e l ed aad revoked .... 36. 72 

36.72 

36,72 



etc. 



P.D. 49. 



M Lit in* J-BSCffl* 

ace «wi **a ef 
n umtur Swrnd 
Dumt>ec rrc«ctrd 
M uj ir-.aLt*, wiDe-rove 

M wkuuau xEwraat 

appbracke^ for licences 

iti'tnmwc* iaspeel ed 

iD«tmiidaE» passed . 
Nativity of per-ors arrested 
Nonreridru oSemiera 
Offences - - . 

tfMJm i dba*«Y, morality 

aeairax tfiv rvrx>n 

acainsa prvrvrty, malicious 

afiiusi pcwextiy, with violence 

ajaiua iwagg , without vio' 

(orrery ami SafMBfl t currency 

mitceiDancvc)* . 

rc*-aj trtiiaci- Ji . 
Operator* .... 
Parks . ptibBr .... 

acridncs wr*rted in 
Pawnbrokecs .... 
Pension* mud beme&ts 

e^tuuaces vr pensions 

numixr«ryrvMi* on rolls 

payn-mxs «« account of 
Pirkpockfus .... 

ITant 

Police 

railraai .... 

• [«ia3 .... 
Police charcaMe far.d, number of 
Police depanzraa . 

:. he uaJ •irrw- parade of 

dtftrabtXEaui «t 

borMi ■* *»* in 

bow SMBVhVBrd 

officer? a^rrocrif^i 
aivens sack 
■a a — by 
e— pM— against 
dice- vt «cin t ei i . 
<lrsaaVi s apedal events 



87 



lence 



beneficiaries 



mjmw. 

xisuitj^j of 



nnped . . . 

resaTev • ■ • 

vehicles ia «se in 

work c d . 
Police fistinc .... 
Police f iciaL s c usn 

DOMdBMBMl work . 

payments m acrount of 

pVapBVfJTwS ... 

signaltwoes 
Prisoners, lissrrary of 
Prohibition 

Property .... 

lost, sbsndmrd and stolen 

recovered 

sale ai eondnaaed, unclaimed, etc. 

stolen 

taken &an cnoners and lodgers 
Public ca nSaf Sj 
Public lodm* 1 
Railroad pcSre 

Receipt. .... 
Rerolrers .... 

license, to carry 
Second -tun* mrarum 
Sewers. oe>--xr«e. reported 
Sck and injired persons assisted 
Sickness, abecsr. oa account of 
Si tbt-eerj nt axa. (mobiles 
Signal as 
Special. 
Special pofcos 



14 



17 



14. 



rxau 

23 

23 

23 

23 

37.72 

37.72 

37,72 

37 

37 

IS 

16. 54-«9 

15. 54-69. 81-84 

16. 60. 69. 83 

IS. 58. 69. 83 

" 54.69,81 

57.69.83 

56, 69. 82 

56. 69. 83 

58.69,83 

61. 69. 83 

69 

34.72 

77.78 

77.78 

72 

39.75 

39 

39 

39.75 

S 

12 

36 

36 

36 

39 

14.22 

22 

14.41 

30.52 

14 

15 

48 

15.54-69 

49 

46 

21 

15.43 

15 

15 

47 

15.45 

15 

15. 44. 45 

32 

15 

75.79.80 

41. 75. 76 

28 

39. 75. 76 
29 
27 
16 

7 

71. 73. 75 

19.71 

17. 19. 71 

40. 73. 75 
17,71 

17 

33.72 

38.72 

36 

40. 72. 75 

38.72 

38.72 

72 

28 

17. 26. 29 

a> 48 

34.72 

41 .175. 76 

21 

38 



34.35 
27.39, 



19. 40, 



27.39 



88 P-D. 49. l , 

i 
run 

Statsws fc — 17 

lodams* 17 

■fc— ■fctaioed at .17 * 

Stoles tmvjaatf 17, 71 

reeevesed ......... ..... 17. 71 

rMued 17.71 

Street rajjp-ayi. conductors, motormen and starters 72 

Street* , 26. 77. 78 

uadflm sported in ........... . 77. 78 

deteetrse. ■ported 26 

ofaatfumxna removed . 26 

Teams) 26 « 

stray, j'vrt «p ............. . 28 

Traffie 11 

Used esses 25.72 , 

leooasji dealers 72 

■itj rej/oeed .............. 2 "> 

Vehicle* 30,31.32,33.72.74 I 

— fafcpBM 31 

■ssj Mm 30 

is 4i»e a j is Oce department ........... 32 ' 

peablic fsarisaTS 33. 72 

w*vi» 34. 72, 74 

\ easels 29 

»'■<» 34.72.74 

asssnber Incased by divisions ........... 74 

total mmtbsr licensed 34, 74 

Water fifitm. detective, reported ........... 26 

Water nonaf es> waste reported ........... 26 

Weapoee. <1 aii ani i u a ............. 38 

Witt i— I 16. 17, 26. 27, 71 

fee* MCBoJ by officers aa ............ 16.71 

Daatober rf days' attendance at court by officers aa . .16,27.71 

sjwmbcr.<£. detained at station houses ......... 17,26 

Wooes wmTnrred to House of Detention ......... 27 






■ 



/ 



Public Document No. 49 



<il?p (jluuumituiiraltfr of MuaauxfyxBtttB 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OFTIIE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Yeah ending November 30, 1928 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



,1/J/ f ! t ,»)Q3 

1 1. ' ■ . i ' ■ s 

ffcss. Sccrstsry of fa: Uonn:3T.vSalth 



yq^LV, 2.L, /;-: /. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Letter to Governor ......... 5 

Control of pedestrian and vehicular traffic ..... 5 

Liquor nuisances ......... 7 

Celerity in transmitting Police news ...... 9 

Police property .......... 10 

Pensions to police officers ........ 11 

Additional police officers ........ 12 

The Department .15 

Police Force .......... 15 

Signal service .......... 15 

Employees of the Department ....... 15 

Recapitulation .......... 15 

Distribution and changes ........ 16 

Police officers injured while on duty ...... 16 

Work of the Department ......... 16 

Arrests ........... 16 

Drunkenness .......... 17 

Nativity of prisoners, etc. ........ 17 

Bureau of criminal investigation ....... 18 

Officer detailed to assist medical examiners . . . . 20 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property ....... 20 

Special events ........... 21 

Missing persons .......... 23 

Record of automobiles reported stolen ...... 24 

Record of purchases and sales of used cars reported .... 25 

Miscellaneous business ........ .25 

Inspector of claims .......... 26 

House of detention .......... 27 

Police signal service .......... 27 

Signal boxes ......... .27 

Miscellaneous work ......... 28 

Harbor service .......... 29 

Horses ............ 30 

Vehicle service .......... 30 

Automobiles .......... 30 

Ambulances . . . . . . . . 31 

List of vehicles used by the Department ..... 32 

Public carriages .......... 33 

Sight-seeing automobiles ........ 34 

Wagon licenses ..........34 

Listing work in Boston ......... 34 

Listing expenses ......... 35 

Number of policemen employed in listing ..... 35 

Police work on jury lists . . . . . ■ . . .35 

Special police ........... 36 

Railroad police .......... 36 

Miscellaneous licenses ......... 36 



CONTENTS. 



V 



PAGE 

Musicians' licenses .......... 37 

Itinerant ........... 37 

Collective 37 

Carrying dangerous weapons ... .... .38 

Public lodging houses ......... 33 

Pensions and benefits ......... 39 

Financial ........... 39 

Statistical tables j 

Distribution of police force ........ 4 1 * 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 43 

list of officers retired ........ 44 

Police officers and employee* retired under Hqnioii Retirement 
System ........... 44 \ 

List of officers promoted . . . . . ... .45 

Number of men in active service . ..... 46 

Men on the police force and year born . ... .47 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of liclcncM . . 48 

Complaints against officers ........ 49 

Number of arrests by police division* ...... 52 

Arrests and offences, also disposition of cases .... 53 

Age and sex of persons arrested ....... 65 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 66 

Licenses of all classes issued ....... 67 

Dog licenses .......... 69 

Wagon licenses ..... .... .69 

Financial statement ......... 70 

Payments on account of signal service . .... .71 

Accidents ........... 72 

Male and female residents listed ....... 74 



/ 



fjllje (Conraumuipaltlf nf fHassarfniflrtta 



REPORT. 



Hf.ADQUAHTERS OF THE IViLKI DEPARTMENT, 

Omcc or the Police Commissioned. 15* Berkeley Street, 
Uoston, DecembCT L 1928. 

To His Excellency Alvan T. Fixler, Gorernor, 

Your Excellency : — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 1906, a report 
of the Police Department for the year ending November 30, 
1928. 

Control of Pedestrian and Vehicular Traffic. 

On February 7, 1927, at the suggestion of the Mayor's 
Traffic Advisory Committee, Malcolm E. Nichols, Mayor of 
Boston, appointed Dr. Miller McClintoek, Director of the 
Street Traffic Survey to be made under the auspices of the 
Albert Russell Erskine Bureau, Harvard University, to con- 
duct an engineering investigation of the traffic control problem 
of the city of Boston. The Street Traffic Survey with the aid 
of the Police Department worked assiduously and earnestly 
upon this problem of traffic solution. Careful compilation of 
figures relative to the flow and direction of traffic both vehicu- 
lar and pedestrian was obtained with the aid of intelligent 
investigators. The problem was considered not hastily but 
with the thoroughness and intelligence naturally to be expected 
from the traffic expert engaged for this purpose. In June, 
1928, a voluminous and comprehensive report was submitted 
to the Mayor of Boston by Dr. McClintoek, and after many 
consultations and conferences, many of the recommendations 
made by the Traffic Survey for the development of celerity 
of traffic were adopted by the Board of Street Commissioners 
in the form of new traffic rules and regulations issued in Sep- 



" I - - t _\. 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

t ember o£ this year. The recommendation of the boulevard 
stop system on Commonwealth Avenue and Blue Hill Avenue 
requiring traffic on side streets to come to a complete stop 
before entering these main arteries has been put into effect 
by orders of the Street Commissioners and Board of Park 
Commissioners. The Police Department after having ob- 
tained from the State Department of Public Works approval 
of the signs and markers to be placed for the purpose of notify- 
ing the public of this regulation have been installing the same 
on these two avenues. The Legislature of 1928, Chapter 357, 
provided for uniform traffic signs, lights, markings, signal 
systems and regulations. Under this legislation no rule, 
regulation, order, ordinance, or by-law of a city or town herein- 
after madc"or promulgated relative to or in connection with 
such signs'lights, markings, signal systems or devices, or in 
any way within this control can take effect until approved in 
writing by the State Department of Public Works, or can be 
effective after this approval is revoked. 

The adoption of boulevard stops on main arteries is not 
only imperative to reduce accidents, but necessary also to 
expedite traffic in congested areas. The extension of these 
boulevard stops to other main traffic arteries in this city 
undoubtedly will be recommended. 

Upon the recommendation of the Traffic Survey automatic 
timing lights were recommended for installation on Washing- 
ton Street and Tremont Street so that traffic can be speeded 
up from six to sixteen miles an hour. Plans and specifications 
have been prepared by the Engineering Division of the Board 
of Street Commissioners, and advertisements for bids have 
been made to be received early in January, 1929. The effect 
of the installation of this system in these crowded areas both 
as regards fluidity of traffic and prevention of accidents, is 
at present impossible to foretell. Additional installations of 
similar lights upon other main arteries in this city will un- 
doubtedly be recommended. During the past year ten spot- 
lights were installed in various parts of the city, making a 
present total of one hundred and forty-eight spotlights in use. 
Several other recommendations of the Survey relative to con- 
trol of traffic in the congested areas are now being tested, such 
as the adoption of traffic lanes. At this time it is too early 
to determine the effect that the adoption of these recom- 
mendations will have upon the control of traffic. 



\ 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

t Liquor Nuisances. 

A statement in regard to the amount of work done by the 
police in enforcing the prohibitory laws, and also of local 
liquor conditions, necessarily must be included in the annual 
report of this Department. Liquor traffic and street traffic 
; control present a continuous problem to the police. Homi- 

cides, burglaries and other violent crimes are sporadic, and 
may be classified as seasonable police business. Police work 
suppressing liquor violations is constant. The increase or 
decrease of arrests for drunkenness is regarded by some 
' statisticians as a barometer to determine the status of the 

liquor problem. These arrests however are not an accurate 
gauge of the enormous burden placed upon local police since 
the passage of the prohibitory laws. 

Arrests cannot be made even though suspicion obtains 
that the liquor laws are being violated, for violators cannot 
be convicted upon suspicion but only upon direct evidence of 
violation of law. The presentation to a magistrate, as proof 
of guilt, of a vessel smelling strongly of intoxicating liquor 
would be regarded as ridiculous, even though intoxicating 
liquor had been hastily poured from this vessel, in the presence 
of the police, within a very few seconds before its seizure. 
Intoxicating liquor, neutralized by disinfectants, because non- 
potable, is worthless as evidence. 

If under the laws of the Commonwealth the illegal purchase 
of intoxicating liquor was made a criminal offence as is the 
illegal sale, considerable caution about violating prohibitory 
laws would be exercised by that class of citizens who look for 
the strict enforcement by the police of all laws protecting 
lives or property. Law enforcement cannot be qualified. 

Those who illegally buy intoxicating liquor and stifle their 
consciences with the theory that prohibitory laws are not 
binding because they abridge personal freedom, should at 
least not openly complain of liquor conditions in their respec- 
tive communities. Much unwarranted criticism is made of 
the police in not terminating liquor traffic. This censure is 
most unjust, because often made by individuals or organiza- 
tions that are not cognizant of the unlimited odds, obstacles 
and difficulties which the police constantly encounter in try- 
ing to desiccate wet sections of a city. The liquor problem in 
this city has been treated in all my annual reports, and frankly 
speaking, the difficult conditions encountered by the police 



) 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

to arrest liquor traffickers have not diminished but have 
increased. Recommendations have been made from time to 
time that upon conviction, a violator of the liquor law should 
be given a jad sentence. The records of the courts show that 
very few liquor violators are sent to jail. Courts believe 
that extenuating circumstances often surround the commis- 
sion of crime, and are loath therefore to inflict additional 
punishment on the families of tho.se convicted and fined for 
liquor violations. 

Absentee landlordism among liquor traffickers is spreading. 
Unfortunate agents hazard reputation and possibly liberty 
in dispensing intoxicating liquor for principals who never 
frequent premises where liquor is sold illegally. To appre- 
hend the principal therefore is practically impossible. Con- 
stant raids upon places suspected of illegal liquor traffic with 
a possible conviction each time of a different violator is futile 
and discouraging work, and accomplishes a vicious circle. 

It has been repeatedly advocated by me that the prohibitory 
laws of this State should be amended so as to be in accord 
with the Volstead Act, in giving governmental authorities 
the right and authority to petition courts for injunctive relief 
against places where despite continuous police activity illegal 
traffic has persisted. The Legislature of li>28 has afforded 
relief in equity where, by injunction, owners of property who 
have allowed their property to become liquor nuisances can 
be held responsible. Proof of a present liquor nuisance and 
three prior convictions for liquor traffic upon the premises 
within the three prior years enables injunctive relief in closing 
the premises for at least one }'ear. 

The term "conviction" as used in tlic statute means final 
conviction. Where liquor law violators have been placed on 
file, or have received suspended sentence, or probation, a 
conviction has not been obtained. 

Equity proceedings under this legislation have been started 
by this Department. Both before and after the commence- 
ment of these proceedings many places where illegal liquor 
traffic existed have been closed by the voluntary act of the 
owner, and illegal liquor business thus discontinued upon the 
premises. The effect of the so-called "Padlock Law" cannot 
at this early date be predicted. Owners with proper civic 
pride will not compel the police to thrash them into an observ- 
ance of authority. Methods of attempting to evade the law 



/ 

/ 



y 

f. 



r ko 



1929.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 



i j by moving these liquor nuisances to new places where con- 

victions have not been obtained are beginning to appear. 
Eventually, however, lessors, it is believed, will appreciate 
the fact that a vacant tenement is better than a bad tenant. 

Liquor enforcement officers of the Department report that 
the liquor situation in Boston is well in hand, and welcome 
comparison with any city in this country in the matter of 
liquor law enforcement. 

Celerity in* Transmitting Police News. 

The Morkrum Teletype, a scientific system of transmitting 
police information operating under the Bell system has been 
in use in this Department for about one year. Messages 
relayed from Police Headquarters are instantaneously regis- 
tered upon a receiving machine in the various police stations. 
The previous clumsy and antiquated method of transmitting 
police news has been replaced by efficient and accurate broad- 
casting machinery. Intricate machinery such as the teletype 
requires occasional repairs. These repairs have been made 
both speedily and effectively by the company installing the 
teletype system. 

This effective method of transmitting news should not be 
confined to this city. Conditions under which police must 
act are constantly changing. The advent and perfection of 
the automobile and other agencies now used by criminals in 
the commission of crime have so changed conditions that 
speed and accuracy in the dissemination of police news is 
imperative. Allowing the criminal to employ new methods 
and material in the commission of crime without combating 
him with modern methods and machinery is false economy. 

Private organizations maintain steady march with changing 
economic conditions, and there is no hesitancy on the part of 
these organizations to install new methods when increasing 
business may be anticipated. The latest scientific instru- 
ments, when possible, should be employed by police organiza- 
tions either in checking or apprehending criminals. To rely 
upon past systems of delivery of messages by telephone or 
telegraph is not only antiquated but negligent. 

The system of transmission of news by teletype which has 
been installed in this city could be utilized as a nucleus to 
extend a network of antennae for the conveyance of important 
messages to the police departments of the Commonwealth. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Delay in the prosecution of criminals by the invocation of 
intricate legal technicalities cannot be attributed (o the 
police, but to permit criminals to escape from the confines of 
this Commonwealth after the commission of crime, because of 
inadequate broadcasting, would be unfortunate. 

Police Property. 

During the past year the exterior and interior of the station 
houses attached to Divisions 15 and 16 were thoroughly 
cleansed and repainted, and also the garage and stable of 
Division 16. The police stable on Albany Street used by 
Traffic Division 20 for stabling horses has been abandoned, 
and the twenty-six saddle horses of this Department arc now 
quartered at the stable attached to Division 16. The offices 
of station houses of Divisions 11 and 12 were remodeled to 
take care of increased business. Repair work was done on the 
garage attached to Division 11; also considerable repairs to 
the exterior of station house of Division 9. 

All boats attached to Division 8 were overhauled, and 
placed in condition for continuous service. The heating 
apparatus at Headquarters and at all the station houses wai 
inspected and repaired during the summer. The new type of 
patrol wagons was placed at Divisions 7, 10, 11, 13 and 16, 
and 52 motorcycles were purchased by the Department, mak- 
ing a total of 66 motorcycles available for police work. 

New garages at Station 14, situated in Brighton, and Sta- 
tion 12, situated in South Boston, are greatly needed. As 
stated in my report of last year, the old wooden building 
owned by the city of Boston in the rear of the old Town Hall, 
now used by Division 14 as a garage, could be sold, and the 
proceeds of both land and building used for the erection of a 
fireproof eight-car garage in the rear of the station house. 
A new garage is necessary for the motor vehicles and motor- 
cycles used by Division 12. Storing motor vehicles used by 
Division 12 in the garage of Station 6, South Boston, should 
in the interest of better policing be discontinued. 

The police steamer Guardian, which has been in continuous 
police service since October, 1S96, except for short intervals 
for overhauling, must be replaced by another boat. The 
boilers of the Guardian are not in good condition, and parts 
of the hull show signs of rot and decay. The policing of the 
waterfront and harbor is an important part of the work done 



(: 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

by this Department, and with the advent of prohibition addi- 
tional work has been placed upon the Harbor police. The 
expenditure of a large amount of money to overhaul the 
Guardian would be both uneconomic and unprofitable. If 
it be forced out of sen-ice because of condemnation proceed- 
ings by the Federal Government, a replacement by another 
vessel would be absolutely necessary, inasmuch as the three 
other boats attached to the harbor service and patrol would be 
insufficient for the service required. The building of a 
modern boat, designed for police purposes, is preferable to 
buying at auction or at private sale a vessel either now in 
service or temporarily in drydock. The question of building 
a new boat has been presented to the Mayor of Boston, and 
this recommendation is now under consideration. 

Pensions to Police Officers. 

Members of both fire and police departments are con- 
stantly exposed to personal injury and for fatal injuries 
received while in the performance of duty their dependents 
should be amply protected. Amounts received under the 
present pension law bj- dependents of deceased police officers, 
in my opinion, are not sufficient. It is reasonable to believe, 
however, that in the future this matter will be worked out 
satisfactorily by the Legislature of this Commonwealth. 

A variance exists in the law retiring on pension police officers 
in this department because of permanent disability from in- 
juries received in the performance of duty. All police officers 
appointed to the Boston Police Department since 1923, 
automatically become members of the Boston Retirement 
System, and, if retired because of permanent disability, must 
undergo a yearly physical examination by a medical board 
functioning under the Boston Retirement Act. Many mem- 
bers of the force are not members of this Boston Retirement 
System, and if permanently injured in the performance of 
duty are retired under the provisions of chapter 353 of the 
Acts of 1892, as amended by chapter 306 of the Acts of 1900, 
and chapter 6 of the Acts of 1920. These men are not subject 
to a subsequent yearly examination as to their fitness for 
reinstatement and restoration to duty. 

In time of emergency the Police Commissioner has the 
power to recall to duty for temporary service officers who have 
been pensioned, but this does not grant him the power to recall 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

retired officers for permanent service. In 1927, legislation 
was passed (chapter 257 of the Acts of 1927), requiring a 
yearly physical examination of firemen in Boston who have 
been retired under pension laws other than the Boston Retire- 
ment Act of 1922. It appears equitable that the provision of 
law relating to the pension of police officers in the city of 
Boston should be the same in the case of all members of the 
force who have been retired because of physical disability. 
Legislation to this effect has lieen introduced by me to the 
incoming Legislature. 

Additional Police Officers. 

The present maximum strength of this department is 2,024 
patrolmen. The number of police officers available for patrol 
work is always seven-eighths of the total force, inasmuch as 
every police officer is entitled to one day off in eight. The 
sickness list necessarily increases during the winter months. 
During the summer and fall months, especially during the 
vacation period which extends from May to December, there 
are at times, nearly 500 men unavailable, one-eleventh of the 
force being on vacation and one-eighth of the remainder on a 
day off. 

With increase in construction of schoolhouses, more police 
officers are required to protect school children. All school 
crossings, at the present time, are not covered, because of 
shortage of police officers. Even when all available officers 
are used for this purpose, it often requires the withdrawal of 
patrolmen from important special work to which they have 
been assigned. 

Control of vehicular and pedestrian traffic at an increased 
number of traffic points presents a difficult problem because 
of the limited number of police officers to assign to this work. 
Installation of synchronized lights will not eliminate the neces- 
sity of traffic officers at intersections equipped with such a 
lighting system, because police officers will be required for 
some time at every intersection to enforce obedience to the 
signals and to render police service in case of accidents. 

At the present time 32 police officers have been assigned 
to enforce the parking regulations promulgated by the Board of 
Street Commissioners. Sufficient evidence must be presented 
to satisfy the Court in eases of illegal parking. Police officers 
must know the time when a car was parked at a certain point, 






!/ 
I 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

and tho time of departure. This requires police officers to 
confine their work to a small area, for courts will not accept 
estimates of the length of time of parking by persons cited 
into court for illegal parking. For this work at least 100 men 
arc required if the people are to be made to understand that 
parking rules were made to be enforced. 

Traffic officers assigned to fixed posts cannot do parking 
work and if more officers are to be added to the present park- 
ing squad, they must be obtained from divisions where com- 
manding officers arc continually asking for additional officers 
for patrol work. 

Traffic and route officers are necessarily obliged to go to 
court in the prosecution of cases and while there, important 
traffic posts cannot be manned or routes patrolled. 

Control of hackney carriages operated in this city (2,667 
taxicabs and 7 horse-drawn carriages, and 4,537 licensed 
hackney carriage drivers) requires additional officers. The 
duty and responsibility of licensing all hackney carriage 
drivers and carriages rests upon the Police Commissioner. 
Before these licenses arc granted an investigation is made of 
the character of the applicant and also an examination of the 
vehicle licensed. Supervising officers are necessary so that 
the traveling public may be protected. The present staff of 
police officers assigned to this work necessarily has been 
drawn from police divisions. Proper supervision of the 
operations of these licensees requires a larger number of 
officers than at present assigned. 

Claims against the city of Boston are investigated by the 
Inspector of Claims with the assistance of police officers. 
The number of claims against this city has increased enor- 
mously during the past five years and additional men drawn 
from the various divisions have been added to this unit. 

The District Attorney of Suffolk County files requests 
for the services of police officers of this department to bring 
back to this jurisdiction prisoners desired for trial. These 
requests have always been honored and a considerable with- 
drawal of police officers from this department from patrol work 
has necessarily ensued. 

A Special Scmce Squad of 20 men under the direct charge 
of a captain has been created for the purpose of night patrol 
duty in motor vehicles. That their services have been of 
great value cannot be gainsaid as hundreds of stolen autorao- 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

biles have been recovered and many bandits and hold-up 
men captured. The personnel of this organization is of men 
from the various divisions. At present there is only one shift. 
The number of officers attached to this unit should be increased 
so that another night-shift could be formed. 

Conditions today require more police officers than in the 
past. The advent of the automobile and its use in the com- 
mission of crime has presented new and alarming problems 
for the police. 

Concurrent action of the Mayor of Boston and the Police 
Commissioner is required in order to increase the present 
number of patrolmen in this department. I have requested 
150 additional police officers of the Mayor and that request 
is now under advisement. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner {or the City of Boston. 



/ 



!/ 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



15 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 
Police Commissioner. Secretary. 







The Police Force. 




Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Chief inspector . 
Captains 
Inspectors 


1 

2 

1 

30 

27 


Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen 

Total 


44 

175 
. 2,025 


. 2,305 






Signal Service. 




Director 
Signalmen 

Mechanics 


• 


1 
6 
2 


Linemen . . . 
Chauffeur . 


7 
1 



Total 



Employee* of the Department. 



17 



Property clerk . 

Clerks 

Stenographers 

Chauffeurs 

Elevator operators 

Engineers on police steamers 

Firemen on police steamers 

Firemen 

Hostlers . 

Janitors . 

Cleaners 

Matrons (house of detention) 



1 

28 

10 

3 

5 

3 

8 

6 

11 

34 

17 

5 



Matrons (station houses) 
Mechanic 


5 
1 


Painters .... 


5 


Repairmen 

Steamfitter 


2 
1 


Superintendent of buOding . 
Superintendent, repair shop 
Tailor .... 


1 
1 
1 


Telephone operators . 


3 



Total 



151 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary 2 

Police force 2,305 

Signal service 17 

Employees 151 

Grand total 2,475 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 104 patrolmen were appointed; 19 patrolmen 
were discharged; 28 patrolmen resigned (19 while charges 
were pending), 29 patrolmen were promoted; 2 captains, 2 
lieutenants, 7 sergeants and 15 patrolmen were retired on 
pensions; 1 captain, 1 inspector, 1 sergeant and 10 patrolmen 
died. (Sec Tables II, III, IV.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries. 



How IxjmED. 


Number f>f 
Men Injured 


Number of 
Duties Lo*t. 


In arresting prisoners ..... 
In pursuing criminals ..... 
By cars and other vehicles .... 
By stopping runaways ..... 
Various other causes . 


79 
16 

119 
2 

113 


118 

201 

3,004 

092 






4,018 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 95,807 as against 88,878 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 6,029. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 



Offences against the person .... 
Offences against property committed with violence 
Offences against property committed without violence 
Malicious offences against property 
Forgery and offences against the currency 
Offences against the license laws 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc 
Offences not included in tho foregoing 



Per Cent. 


Increase 


7.67 


Increase 


11.40 


;e Increase 


8.20 


Increase 


38.09 


Decrease 


1.63 


Increase 


7.66 


Increase 


34.91 


Increase 


7.10 



7 



/ 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



17 



' 9 



i 






There were 15,651 persons arrested on warrants and 52,741 
without warrants; 27,415 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 69,281 persons were prosecuted; 25,601 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses and 925 
were delivered to outside authorities. There were 800 extra 
prosecutions, making a total of 70,081 cases prosecuted. 
The number of males arrested was 89,467; of females, 6,340; 
of foreigners, 27,528; or approximately 28.73 per cent; of 
minors, 9,177. Of the total number arrested, 27,433, or 28.63 
per cent, were non-residents. (See Tables IX, X.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1924 to 1928, inclusive, was $388,590.18; in 
1928 it was $493,577.00; or $104,986.82 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
53,451 ; in 1928, it was 59,739, or 6,288 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,946.38, 
in 1928 it was $14,790.26 or $156.12 less than the average. 
(See Table XII.) 

Dhuxkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. 
There were 254 more persons arrested than in 1927, an increase 
of .66 per cent; 24 per cent of the arrested persons were non- 
residents and 36.32 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table X.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States 






. 68^80 


Austria . 






132 


British Provinces 




. 4^22 


Portugal . 






495 


Ireland 




. 8^07 


Finland . 






202 


England . 






(VII 


Denmark 






87 


France 






116 


Holland . 






23 


Germany 






376 


Wales 






1 


Italy 






4,036 


East Indies 






10 


Russia 






3,433 


West Indies 






98 


China 






818 


Turkey . 






81 


Greece 






567 


South America 






52 


Sweden . 






750 


Switzerland 






23 


Scotland . 






505 


Belgium . 






29 


Spain 






123 


Armenia . 






123 


Norway . 






249 


Africa 






6 


Poland . 






1,205 


Hungary . 






9 


Australia 






29 


Asia 






1 


Arabia 






6 


Roumania 






1 


Mexico 






16 


Japan 






13 


Syria 






150 


Philippine Islands . 




3 


I itniionifl 








Total 






j~iinu.iiim . m osy 


95,807 






18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The number of arrests for the year was 95,807, being ati 
increase of 6,929 over last year, and 8,603 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 39,048 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 2-54 more than last year, and 
220 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of .68 
per cent in males and a decrease of .20 per cent in females 
from List year. (See Tables X, XII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year, 95,807, 167 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one arrest 
in 205 was for such offence, or .48 per cent. 

Sixty-one and four hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table X.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 33,812 and the 
fines amounted to $493,577. (See Table XII.) 

One hundred persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,772 to the House of Correction, 47 to the Women's Prison, 
135 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2.738 to other institutions. 
The total years of imprisonment were 2,446 years, 10 
months, 27 days (322 sentences indefinite); the total number of 
days' attendance at court by officers was 59,739, and the 
witness fees earned by them amounted to §14,790.26. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $277,094.57. 

Twenty witnesses were detained at station houses, 192 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 6 from last year. 
There was an increase of 10.61 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 13.42 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property reported stolen in and out 
of the city for the five years from 1924 to 1928, inclusive, 
was $1,787,449.76, in 1928 it was $1,516,623.37, or $270,826.39 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in 
and out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, 
was $2,881,110.36, as against $2,100,248.24 last year, or 
$7S0362.12 more. (Sec Table XII.) 

Bcreau of Criminal Investigation. 
The "identification room" now contains 69,980 photographs, 
56,521 of which are photographs with Bertillon measurements, 
a system used by the Department since. November 30, 1898. 



I 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 19 

In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, section 18, 
and with the General Laws, chapter 127, sections 27 to 29, 
both inclusive, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measurements taken of the convicts in the State Prison and 
Reformatory, a number t>f which have been added to our 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
system by the Department in 1898, is and will continue to be 
of great assistance in the identification of criminals. A large 
number of important identifications have thus been made 
during the year for this and other police departments, through 
which the sentences in many instances have been materially 
increased. The records of 1,033 criminals have been added 
to the records of this Bureau, which now contains a total of 
49,459. The number of cases reported at this office which 
have been investigated during the year is 33,838. There are 
46,594 cases reported on the assignment books kept for this 
purpose and reports made on these cases are filed away for 
future reference. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the Department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of 
about 234,600 persons. There are also "histories and press 
clippings" now numbering 10.275 made by this Bureau, in 
envelope form for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing cor- 
roborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service 
are included in the statement of the general work of the De- 
partment, but as the duties are of a special character, the 
following statement will be of interest : — 

Xumbcr of persons arrested, principally for felonies . 1,735 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and deliv- 
ered to officers from those States ..... 65 

Xumbcr of cases investigated ...... 33,838 

Xumbcr of extra duties performed ..... 2,007 

Xumbcr of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court . . . 202 
Xumber of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court .... 9 

Xumber of days spent in court by police officers . . 2,938 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Number of years of imprisonment imposed by court, 157 years, 7 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $S9 1,000.00 

Numberof photographs added to identification room . 1,732 

Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 776 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion 






4 


Accidental shooting 




2 


Aeroplane 




2 


Alcoholism 






14 


Asphyxiation 






9 


Automobiles 






3 


Bicycle . 




, 


1 


Burns 






15 


Drowning 






51 


Elevators 






6 


Falls 






59 


Falling objects 




15 


Kicked by horse 




1 


Machinery 






5 



Motorcycle 


1 


Natural causes 


297 


Poison 


24 


Railroad (steam) 


12 


Railway (street) 


4 


Stillborn* 


7 


Struck by swing 


1 


Suffocation 


8 


Suicides . 


06 


Teams 


2 


Homicides 


167 



Total 



776 



On 248 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts: — 



Accidental shooting . 


1 


Railway (street) 


Automobiles 


117 


Suicide 


Falls 


1 


Teams 


.Manslaughter . 


13 




Motorcycle 


o 


Total 


Murder . 


11 





20 
1 

1 



167 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 
On December 1, 1927, there were 1,915 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the Property 
Clerk, and during the year 1,180 were received. Forty 
pieces were sold at public auction and the proceeds, $544.80, 
were turned over to the Chief Clerk; 20 pieces were destroyed 
as worthless or sold as junk and the proceeds, $104.40, turned 
over to the Chief Clerk; 10 pieces were sold as perishable and 
the proceeds, $90.88, turned over to the Chief Clerk; 113 
packages containing money to the amount of $511.61 were 
turned over to the Chief Clerk and 62 pieces were returned to 
owners, finders or administrators, leaving 2,850 packages on 
hand. 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



21 



Special Events. 
The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each: — 

1,27 Men. 

Dec. 5, South Station, arrival of French Ambassador . . 23 

Dec. 24, On traffic duty Christmas Eve in West End ... 18 

Dec. 24, On Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration . . 10 

Dec. 24, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight Mass . . 10 



1928. 

Jan. 11 

Feb. 4 

Feb. 14 

Feb. 22, 

Feb. 26, 

Feb. 26, 
Mar. 1 

Mar. 1 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 3 
Apr. 15, 
Apr. 16, 
Apr. 19, 
Apr. 19, 
Apr. 19 
Apr. 24 
May 7 to 
May 17, 

May 19, 
May 19, 
May 19, 
May 20, 
May 20, 
May 21 
May 26, 
May 26, 
May 30, 
May 30, 
June 1 
June 2 
June 4 

June 17, 
June 17 
June 18, 
June 30, 



Mechanics Building, Police Ball 

Visit of Italian Ambassador 

Funeral of patrolman Charles J. Bonworth 

State House, Governor's reception 

East Boston airport, arrival of Mrs. Evangeline L. Land 

bergh ....... 

Hotel Statler, visit of Mrs. Evangeline L. Lindbergh 
Mechanics Building, reception to Mrs. Evangeline L 

Lindbergh ....... 

East Boston airport, arrival of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh 
Copley-Plaza Hotel, visit of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh 
Hotel Statler, departure of Mrs. Evangeline L. Lindbergh 
Back Bay, railroad station fire 
Back Bay, railroad station fire 
Fenway Park, baseball game 
Marathon race . 
Patriots' Day parade 
Presidential primary . 



Convention Hall, convention American Federation of 
Labor ........ 

Arrival and reception to Bremen fliers . 

Parade of Bremen fliers and officers detailed . 

Arena, reception to Bremen fliers . . . . 

Fenway Park, memorial service and reception to fliers 

Copley-Plaza Hotel, visit of Bremen fliers 

Boston Common, fireworks ..... 

Boston Common, conclave of bands 

Mechanics Building (evening), conclave of bands . 

Fenway Park, baseball game .... 

Workhorse parade ...... 

Parade of Boston School cadets .... 

Dorchester Day celebration .... 

Parade and review, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany ........ 

Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Roxbury Crossing . 

Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Charleston n . 

Bunker Hill Day, Chariest ow n, parade and fireworks 

Rehearsal of pageant for July 4th on Boston Common 



270 
29 
34 
61 

96 
22 

321 

106 

95 

20 

6 

26 

67 

455 

138 

355 



189 

305 

419 

266 

320 

37 

23 

16 

14 

60 

33 

356 

79 

336 

25 

135 

374 

36 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1*2*. 


July 


3, 


July 


3, 


July 


4, 


July 


4, 


July 


9. 


July 


9, 


July 


10, 


July 


22 


July 


23, 


July 


26, 


July 


31, 


Aug. 


3, 


Aug. 


9. 


Sept. 


9, 


Sept. 


18, 


Sept. 


30, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 



Oct. 12, 



Oct. 13, 
Oct. 15, 



Rehearsal of pageant for July 4th on Boston Common . 

South Boston, fireworks ...... 

Boston Common, Independence Day, afternoon and 
evening . ... 

Charlesbank, athletic contests ..... 

Arrival of Miss Amelia Earhart and tour of city 

Arena, reception to Miss Amelia Earhart 

Departure of Miss Amelia Earhart .... 

Beach Street, wreck of Boston Elevated train 

Beach Street, wreck of Boston Elevated train 

Bulletin boards, Tunncy-Heeney fight .... 

Braves Field, boxing marches ..... 

Funeral of Patrolman John F. W. Ferris 

Funeral of Patrolman Clarence A. Lewis 

Fenway Park, baseball game ..... 

State primary ........ 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet .... 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Boston Arena, Democratic rally ..... 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Braves Field, schoolboy football game .... 

Mechanics Building. Democratic rally .... 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Duke University football 
game ......... 

Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battalions of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned a 
military band. The regiment included a sergeant and 
twenty men mounted on department horses, a colonel 
commanding, with his adjutant and staff officers from 
the respective police divisions and units in military 
company formation, shotgun companies, patrolmen 
with Thompson sub-machine guns, a motorcycle unit, 
and a machine gun unit mounted on automobiles. The 
regiment was reviewed at City Hall by His Honor the 
Mayor; at the State House by Hon. William S. Young- 
man, Treasurer of the Commonwealth, representing 
His Excellency Governor Alvan T. Fuller, and on the 
Parade Grounds of the Common by Hon. William S. 
Youngman and the Police Commissioner Hon. Herbert 
A. Wilson ........ 

Stadium, Harvard-North Carolina football game 

Visit of Presidential" candidate Herbert Hoover, arrival, 

reception on Common, Hotel Statlcr, Governor's home, 

the Arena, Copley-Plaza Hotel and departure from 

South Station ....... 



Men. 

30 
30 

182 
.72 
7!#5 
210 
113 

m 

18 
75 
81 
45 
45 
40 
1,017 

:» 
70 
70 
78 
70 
II 

m 

33 



1,585 
50 



747 



'I 



1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



1928. 


Oct. 


17, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


oo 


Oct. 


23, 


Oct. 


24, 


Oct. 


25, 


Oct. 


27, 


Oct. 


27, 


Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


2, 


Nov. 


•y 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


10, 


Nov. 


". 


Nov. 


17, 


Nov. 


24, 



Tremont Temple, Democratic rally .... 
Visit of West Point Cadets, parade, etc. 
Stadium, Harvard-West Point football game 
Bulletin boards, Harvard-West Point football game 
Symphony Hall, Democratic rally .... 

Special primary in Ward 18 ..... 

Visit of Presidential candidate Governor Smith, arrival, 

reception on Common, Mechanics Building, Symphony 

Hall and Arena . 
Departure of Governor Smith ..... 
Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 
Fenway Park, Boston College-Boston University football 

game ......... 

Mechanics Building, Democratic rally .... 

Republican torchlight parade ..... 

Arena, Republican rally ...... 

Stadium, Harvard-Lchigh football game 

State House, Sacco-Vanzetti protest gathering . . . 

Presidential and State election ..... 

Bulletin boards, election returns ..... 

Stadium, Harvard-Penn football game .... 

Armistice Day parade ...... 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game . 
Bulletin boards, Harvard-Yale football game 



41 
435 
95 
31 
49 
48 



1,336 
334 
104 

19 

36 

665 

60 

53 

44 

1,017 

82 

106 

314 

95 

56 



Missing Persons. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported ........ 874 

Total number found ........ 760 

Total number still missing ....... 114 

Age and Sex of Such Per$om. 





MliSINQ. 


Foum>. 


Still Muhh 












Males. 


Females. 


Malaa. 


Females. 


Malta. 


F.-W 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 

Over 21 years 


185 

156 

206 


55 

167 
105 


180 

135 
168 


52 

135 
90 


5 

21 
38 


3 

32 
15 


Totals 


547 


327 


483 


277 


64 


50 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year ending 
November SO, 10X8. 



MOKTH. 


Stolen. 


Recovered, 
during 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1M7. 

December 






389 


358 


24 


7 


1928. 

Jan. 






284 


266 


12 


6 


February 






279 


263 


15 


1 


March . 






289 


265 


19 


5 


April 






304 


279 


20 


5 


May 






400 


363 


27 


10 


June 






362 


336 


11 


15 


July . 






318 


280 


25 


13 


August . 






344 


314 


17 


13 


September 






393 


376 


12 


5 


October 






395 


357 


22 


16 


November 






445 


418 


- 


27 


Totals 


4,202 


3,875 


204 


123 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 25 

Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this Department for 
the Year ending Norember SO, 1928. 



Mom. 


Bought by 

Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Individual*. 


1927. 
December 






1,960 


1,623 


760 


1928. 

January 






2,408 


1,877 


759 


February 






2,152 


2,068 


557 


March 






2,445 


2,506 


1,009 


April . 






2,595 


2,470 


1,521 


May . 






3,958 


4,482 


1,245 


June . 






3,349 


4,021 


1,324 


July . 






3,706 


3,956 


1,011 


August 






3,088 


3,083 


1,040 


September 






2,764 


2,451 


722 


October 






2,859 


2,958 


925 


November 






2,539 


2,216 


694 


Totals 


33,823 


33,711 


11,567 



Miscellaneous Business. 



1925-26. 



1926-27. 



1927-28. 



Abandoned children cared for . 
Accidents reported .... 
Buildings found open and made secure 
Cases investigated .... 
Dangerous buildings reported . 
Dangerous chimneys reported . 
Dead bodies recovered 
Dead bodies cared for 
Defective cesspools reported 
Defective drains and vaults reported 



9 

6,275 

3,261 

78,977 

32 

11 

40 

335 

30 

14 



6 

6,711 

3,460 

76,261 

51 

16 

49 

257 

17 

4 



8 

8,973 

3,388 

78,577 

15 

22 

198 

54 

38 

1 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



(Jan. 





1925-2*. 


1*26-27. 


1927-28. 


Defective fire alarms hihI docks report it 1 


4 


7 


8 


Defective gas pijies reported 


35 


15 


13 


Defective hydrant! ref>ortcil 


ill 


79 


70 


Defective lamps rc|>orted .... 


9,077 


6,306 


5,737 


Defective newer* re|>orteil . . 


99 


59 


no 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 


8,090 


0,032 


9,439 


Defective water pijs's reported . 


163 


43 


42 


Disturbances suppressed .... 


470 


437 


(193 


Extra duties performed .... 


39,583 


42,189 


49,256 


Fire alaniM given ..... 


2,033 


3,335 


3,631 


Fires extinguished ..... 


1,502 


1 ,3(V4 


1,283 


Insane persons taken in charge. 


332 


352 


355 


Intoxicated persons nssistcd 


30 


29 


IS 


Lost children restored .... 


1,480 


1,520 


1,316 


Persons rescued from drowning 


14 


19 


17 


Sick and injured i>crsons assisted 


0,535 


fl,44C. 


7,130 


Stray teams reported and put up 


65 


105 


28 


Street obstructions removed 


2,541 


3,432 


2,054 


Water running to wustc reported 


462 


484 


467 


Witnesses detained ..... 


8 


23 


20 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
2,677 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 27 

Other Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ...... 2,677 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 14,340 

Number of notices served ....... 11,097 

Xumber of permissions granted (to speak to police officers 

regarding accidents and to examine police records) . 11,573 

Number of days in court ....... 250 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 95 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to 

repair same ......... $2,834.75 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the 
matron until the next session of the court before which they 
are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are re- 
turned to the house of detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,534 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness .......... 1 220 

Larceny 373 

Xight walking .......... 52 

Fornication .......... 168 

Idle and disorderly ......... 162 

Assault and battery ......... 18 

Adultery ........... 50 

Violation of liquor law . . . . ■ . . .64 

Keeping house of ill fame ........ 34 

Various other causes ........ 393 

Total 2,534 

Recommitment*. 
From Municipal court ...... 183 

From County jail ........ 505 

Grand total ......... 3 222 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 535. Of these 362 
are connected with the underground system and 173 with the 
overhead. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this service responded to 
1,980 trouble calls; inspected 535 signal boxes, 18 signal desks 
and 1,083 batteries; repaired 230 box movements, 83 registers, 
96 polar box bells; 102 locks, 73 time stamps, 19 vibrator 
bells and 9 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and electric 
light work at the various stations. There have been made 90 
plungers, 75 complete box fittings, 101 line blocks, 91 auto- 
matic hooks and a large amount of small work done which 
cannot be classified. 

The police signal service has charge of 148 reflector spot- 
lights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for the 
regulation of traffic, also 5 signal towers. 

Nine new signal boxes have been installed, two at Station 7, 
two at Station 11, one at Station 16, four at Station 19, five of 
which are overhead boxes and four underground. 

Cable and boxes are on hand for the 1928 prescribed under- 
ground district but work of installation will not be undertaken 
until the spring of 1929. The underground work done this 
year was on the 1926 and 1927 underground districts in East 
Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester. 

A new signal desk was purchased and fitted for Station 12 
and the old one was repaired for use on some other Division. 

The Gamewell punching register installed at Station 4 did 
not prove satisfactory and was returned to the factory for 
alterations. It is now in service again at the same station. 

The Gamewell Company changed one of its standard 
police box movements to conform to our requirements, which 
is now being tried out. A box movement of another concern 
is also on trial. 

A new type Ford truck was purchased to replace the old one 
used by the painter. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 Ford 
sedan and 2 Ford trucks. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 54,310 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 118,602 miles. There 
were 36,137 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,928 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 415 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were 3,132 runs 
to fires and 627 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 535 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 627,486 telephone messages 
and 4,184,221 "on duty" calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time : — 



IS signal desks 
72 circuits 

535 street signal boxes 
1 4 stable call boards 
75 test boxes 
1,083 cells of battery 
664,408 feet underground cable 



223,090 feet overhead cable 
23,094 feet of duct 
67 manholes 

1 White truck 

2 Ford trucks 
1 Ford sedan 



Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the Police of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows :- 

Value of property recovered consisting of boats, rigging. 

float stages, etc $62,959 00 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded ..... 709 

Vessels ordered from channel ...... 263 

Vessels removed from channel by police steamer . 2 

Assistance rendered ....... 73 

Assistance rendered wharfinger ..... 1 

Permission granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at 

anchor ......... 26 

Obstructions removed from channel .... 24 

Alarms of fire on the water front attended ... 22 

Fires extinguished without alarm ..... 1 

Boats challenged 296 

Boats searched for contraband ..... 286 

Sick and injured persons assisted ..... 5 

Dead bodies recovered ....... 28 

Persons rescued from drowning ..... 5 

Vessels assigned to anchorage ..... 1,215 

Vessels ordered to put on anchorage lights ... 3 

Cases investigated ....... 341 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor . 158 

Dead bodies cared for ....... 6 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 8,830, 
7,197 of which were from domestic ports, 577 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, and 1,633 from foreign ports. Of 
the latter 667 were steamers, 40 were motor vessels and 2 
schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 15 to October 17, 1928. The launch E. U. Curtis 
cruises nightly from Castle Island to Ncponset Bridge. Thirty- 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

eight cases were investigated, four bouts were challenged and 
searched for contraband, five obstructions removed from the 
channel, assistance rendered to seven boats in distress, by 
reason of disabled engines, stress of the weather, etc., and 
towing them with the persons aboard to a place of safety, 
two dead bodies recovered from the water, three arrests for 
larceny, six yachts ordered from the channel and seven boats 
challenged. 

Houses. 

On the 30th of November, 1927, there were 32 horses in 
the service. During the year three were delivered to the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health for anti-toxin 
purposes; three, on account of ago, to the Massachusetts 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; one hu- 
manely killed; one sold in trade; one sold outright and one 
purchased. 

At the present time there arc 21 in (he service, all of which 
are saddle horses, attached to Division 10. 

Vehicle Service. 

Automobiles, 

There are 75 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
25 attached to headquarters; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 12 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; four in the 
South Boston district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; two 
in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; five in the Back Bay 
and Fenway, attached to Division 10; two in the West Rox- 
bury district, attached to Division 17; two in the Hyde 
Park district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan 
district, attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the 
traffic divisions and six unassigned. (Sec page 32.) 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 31 

Cott of Running Automobiles. 

Care and repairs $16,034 62 

Tires 4,700 35 

Gasoline 15,868 49 

Oil 2,979 81 

Storage 5,787 05 

License fees 252 00 

Total $45,622 32 

Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are 5 unassigned. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 2,310 

City Hospital (Relief I Nation, Hay market Square) . . 1,032 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) ... 169 

Calls where services were not required ..... 70 

Massachusetts General Hospital ...... 62 

Home ........... 61 

Psychopathic Hospital ........ 52 

Morgue 51 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital ... . . 48 

Carney Hospital ... 27 

Police Station nouses ... ... 17 

Forest Hills Hospital . . ... 15 

Peter Bent Brieham Hospital 11 

Homeopathic Hospital ..... . . 5 

Faulkner Hospital . . . 4 

New England Hospital ..... 4 

Beth Israel Hospital ........ 3 

Boston State Hospital 3 

Strong Hospital .... .... 3 

Chardon Street Home ....... 2 

Bay State Hospital 1 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 1 

Roxbury Hospital .... .... 1 

Trumbull Hospital ......... 1 



Total 



3.953 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

List of Vehicle* Used by the Department. 



[Jan. 



Divisions. 


s 

a 
*5 

•< 


3. 

o 

<m 
S 8 

■S3 

n 

¥ 


3 

1 

(S 

■ 

5 


J 

'2 
5 

3 

< 


■ 
> 

3 

o 


J 
"3 
to 

o 

1 

o 

a 


S3 

c '/> 


i 

(2 


Headquarters 




- 


- 


- 


24 


1 


- 


- 


25 


Division 1 




i 




- 




- 


i 


1 


5 


Division 2 




- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 




- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 




- 




- 




1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 5 




- 




- 




- 


i 


- 


4 


Division 6 




- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 7 




- 




- 




- 


4 


4 


10 


Division 9 




- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 




- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 11 




- 




- 




- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 




- 




- 




- 


3 


2 


7 


Division 13 




- 




- 




- 


7 


2 


11 


Division 14 




- 




- 




- 


8 


3 


13 


Division 15 




- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 16 




- 




- 




- 


9 


3 


17 


Division 17 




- 




- 




- 


8 


2 


12 


Division 18 




- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 




- 




- 




- 


6 


2 


10 


Division 20 




- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 




- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


3 


Unaasigned 




- 


5 


2 


- 


1 


. - 


- 


8 


Totals 


i 


23 


2 


48 


3 


66 


31 


174 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 33 

Public Cahkiages. 

During the year there were 2,675' carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 502 as compared with last 3 r ear; 2,668 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of 506 com- 
pared with last 3*ear. 

There have been 7 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 231 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the inspector, 14 of these were restored to the owners, 
and the balance placed in the custody of the lost property 
bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 2,682 

Number of carriages licensed ....... 2,674 

Number of licenses transferred ...... 95 

Number of licenses canceled ....... 548 

Number of licenses revoked ....... 9 

Number of licenses suspended ....... 30 

Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected ... 7 

Number of carriages inspected ....... 1,928 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 4,664 

Number of complaints against ownereand drivers investigated . 1,750 

Number of days spent in court ...... 273 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 23 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers .... 208 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ..... 125 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . . 21 
Drivers' licenses granted ........* 4,539 

Drivers' licenses revoked ....... 23 

Drivers' licenses suspended ....... 265 

Drivers' licenses canceled ....... 105 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1928, 1,890 such special stands. 

Of these special stands there have been 260 canceled or 
revoked, 34 transferred and 20 suspended. There have been 
329 applications for special stands rejected, 27 of which were 
reconsidered and granted, and 23 applications rejected for 
transfer of special stands. 

' One canceled for nonpayment, 4 granted "bo lee." » Three canceled for nonpayment. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Sight-seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1928, there have been 
issued licenses for 46 sight-seeing automobiles and 33 special 
stands for them. There have been rejected 3 applications for 
sight-seeing automobiles and 6 applications for special stands. 

There have been 81 operators' licenses granted and there 
has been one operator's license suspended. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. During the year 
4,214 applications for such licenses were received and granted. 

Of these licenses 200 were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 64 for other causes and 46 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIII, XV.) 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 



Canvass. 



Year. 



Can 



1903> 


181,045 


1904 .... 


193,195 


1903 .... 


194,547 


1906 .... 


195,446 


1907 . 


195,900 


1903 ... 


201,255 


1909 .... 


201,391 


1910 1 


203,603 


1911 .... 


206,825 


1912 .... 


214,178 


1913 .... 


215,388 


1914 .... 


219,364 


1915 .... 


220,883 



1916" 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921* 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 



221,207 
224,012 
227,466 
235,248 
480,783 
480,106 
477,547 
485,677 
489,478 
493,415 
495,767 



1 1903 to 1909 both inclusive, luting was on May 1. 

1 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

» 1916 luting done by Board of Assessor*. 

• 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 



1929.) 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 94. 



35 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 

Male •' • 239,166 

Female 252,111 



Total 



491,277 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 



Advertising and printing 
Clerical services 
Stationery 
Interpreters . 
Card cabinet 
Telephone 



$40,068 50 


18,625 00 


419 30 


285 00 


91 35 


10 05 


$59,499 20 



Total 

Xumber of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 2 1,404 

April 3 1,283 

April 4 1,096 

April 5 .......... . 583 

April 6 82 

April 7 12 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1928 may be summarized as follows: — 





1928. 


Dead or could not be found in Boston .... 

Physically incapacitated . . . . . • 

Convicted of crime ....... 

Unfit for various reasons ...... 

Apparently fit . . . . . 


1,007 
183 
171 
379 

5,375 


Total 


7,115 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from tlie 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application of 
any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 192S, there were 1 ,508 
special police officers appointed; 7 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause and 2 appointments canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 



From United States Government 

From State departments . 

From City departments . 

From County of Suffolk . 

From railroad corporations 

From other corporations and associat 

From theatres and other places of amusements 

From private institutions 

From churches ..... 



38 

3 

335 

1 

6.5 

son 

233 

17 

in 



Total 



1,508 



Railroad Police. 

There were 23 persons appointed railroad policemen during 

the year, 2 of whom were employees of the Boston, Revere 

Beach & Lynn Railroad, 20 of the New York, New Haven and 

Hartford Railroad and 1 of the Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licexses. 
The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 28,321. Of these 28,083 were granted, of which 
255 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 27,828. During 
the year 483 licenses were transferred. 1,3G9 canceled, 34 
revoked and 238 applications were rejected. The officers 
investigated 2,314 complaints arising under these licenses. 
The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to 871,520.50. (See Tables XIII, XVI.) 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



37 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 40 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, one of which was disapproved 
and 3 licenses were subsequently canceled on account of non- 
payment of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 51 instruments were inspected with the 
following result: — 



Kind OF iNBTRrSIEXT. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos ....... 


24 


24 




9 


9 




7 


7 


Flutes 


3 


3 




3 


3 




2 


2 




2 


2 




1 


1 


Totals 


51 


51 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following shows the number of application* made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Year. 



A 5S!lT g™»««* n «i~* d - 



1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
192S 



231 


231 


240 


239 


223 


222 


193 


192 


223 


221 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked: — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Reject**! 


Revoked. 


1924 .... 


2,998 


2,879 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 


1926 .... 


3,165 


3,043 


122 


3 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 


77 


2 


192S .... 


2,954 


2,904 " 


50 


1 



I 30 canceled for nonpayment. 

Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
acts of 1904, as amended during the year, the location of each 
house and the number of lodgers accommodated: — 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

1051 Washington Street ...... 

1202 Washington Street 

1025 Washington Street ...... 


33,172 
32,154 
29,555 
29,081 


Total 


123,962 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1927, there were 272 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 16 died, viz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 
chief inspector, 2 lieutenants, 3 sergeants, 7 patrolmen, 1 
signal service employee and 1 annuitant. Twenty-two were 
added, viz.: 1 captain, 2 lieutenants, 6 sergeants, 11 patrol- 
men, 1 signal service mechanician and the widow of Patrolman 
John Condon who died from injuries received in the perform- 
ance of duty, leaving 278 on the roll at date, 247 men and 
31 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $241,148.09 and it is estimated that $264,388 
will be required for pensions in 1929. This includes partial 
provision for 1 lieutenant, 2 inspectors, 5 sergeants, 16 patrol- 
men and 2 civilian employees all of whom are 65 years old or 
more and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and 
term of service. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 58 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,952.33 during 
the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
3*ear, including pensions and listing persons twenty years of 
age or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police 
signal service were $5,542,581.83. (See Table XVI.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was $56,780.01. (See Table XVII.) 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale of 
unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., was 
S83,055.GG. (Sec Table XIII.) 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



41 



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42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 



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44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November SO, 19S8, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Sauk. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Are at Time 

of Retirement 

(Years). 


Years of 
Service. 


Downey. Jeremiah J. 


Age 


79»/u 


53 V.i 


DriscolL Daniel F. . 






Ane 


02 Vu 


3G"/u 


C*W*f\*r James J. . 






Age 


65 »/u 


32 »/u 


Gtrasom, Roland W. 






Incapacitated 


34'Vu 


5>»/is 


Guard, George H. 






Age 


05 


40 Vu 


netmes^ej - , William J. 






Abb 


04«/u 


36 Vu 


>Io*e*. James A. 






Age 


01 


35 Vu 


Jacob?. James H. 






Age 


00»/u 


29 Vu 


Kemi'Ujax. Howard P. 






Age 


01 Vu 


30 


Maeee, Frank M. 






Age 


00'/.. 


27»/u 


McCabe. Thomas F. 






Incapacitated 


40'/u 


Tin 


MrGiHrrray, Athanasius 






Age 


JSVu 


31»/u 


Murphy. Denni* F. . 






Age 


63»/u 


34»/u 


Murj'hy. John F. 






Age 


05 i/n 


34 »/u 


Xolan. Thomas F. 






Incapacitate*! 


37 »/u 


7Vu 


Seailes. Charles W. . 






Are 


03 »/ll 


39 Vis 


Tanek. Henry C. 






Age 


70 


40 Vu 


Tilton, William C. M. 






Ace 


BO'/n 


34 Vu 


Randall. Ahin R. 






Incapacitated 


31 Vu 


9Vu 


.-nuth, Edmund M . 






Age 


60 Vu 


35 »/u 


Wedeu. Carl V. 






Incapacitated 


31 »/u 


8Vit 



Polio. Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under the Boston 
Retirement System, which vceid into effect February 1, 192S. 









Age at 










Time of 


Years of 


.Vine. 


Position. 


Retirement. 


Retire- 
ment 
(Years). 


Service. 


Boaxaije. Charles M . 


Patrolman 


Incapa- 










citated 


28 Vu 


2Vi» 


Garlarvi. Georre C. . 


Captain 


Age 


70 


45 


Gelrhi*. William A. . 


Patrolman 


Incapa- 










citated 


33 Vu 


l'Vu 


Hurler. Nora A. 


Cleaner 


Age 


09 


20»/u 


MaeLaaznlin, Elisabeth A. D. . 


Stenographer 


Age 


09 Vu 


25 Vu 


McCaCrer. George H. . . . 


Patrolman 


Age 


66 Vu 


34»/u 


MuTiiax. Daniel V 


Patrolman 


Incapa- 










citated 


31»/u 


5Vu 


Toland. Patrick F 


Hostler 


Age 


69"/u 


22 Vu 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



45 



Table IV. 

List of Officers \cho were Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November SO, 19S8. 



Date. 



Name and Rui. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 



10, 1928 

10, 1928 

10, 192S 

10, 192S 

10, 192S 

10, 1928 

10, 1928 

10, 1928 

10, 1928 

17, 1928 

17, 192S 

17, 1928 

17, 1928 

17, 1928 

17, 1928 

C>, 1928 

6, 1928 

6, 1928 

6, 1928 

6, 192S 

6, 192S 

(1, 192S 

6, 192S 



July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July- 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 



f», 1928 
f>, 192S 
6, 1928 
0, 192S 
C, 192S 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
6, 192S 
6, 1928 
6, 1928 
July 20, 1928 
July 20, 1928 
July 27, 1928 
July 27, 192S 
July 27, 1928 
July 27, 1928 
July 27, 1928 
July 27, 1928 
July 27, 1928 
Nov. 23, 1928 



Patrolman George V. Augusta to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward C. Blake to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Alfred Boucher to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas F. Lyons to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph J. Maguire to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Maurice F. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Cornelius J. King to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph E. Rollins to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William X. Taylor to the rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant William 11. Connolly to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Owen Farley to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Michael A. Kelley to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Elkana W. D. LeBlanc to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant William A. Sayward to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Timothy J. Sheehan to the rank of Inspector. 
Lieutenant Samuel Dunlap to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Michael Hcaly to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Martin H. King to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John J. Mullen to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant William J. Carey to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Timothy M. Ferris to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Stephen J. Gillis to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Joseph W. F. MeDonough to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Thomas N. Trainor to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman James L. Culleton to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph A. Buccigross to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William D. Donovan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William E. J. Driscoll to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles F. Eldridge to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles T. Florentine to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank J. Kelley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Albert F. Madden to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Harold G. Mitten to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Stephen J. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John D. McPherson to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Justin McCarthy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Granville B. Spinney to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Harold J. Walkins to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frederick G. Brauer to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward L. Kelley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant Amasa E. Augusta to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant I-awrence H. Dunn to the rank of IJeutenant. 
Sergeant Emerson P. Marsh to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Allen V. Nixon to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Hugh D. Brady to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas G. Duggan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George P. Hayes to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas F. Reedy to the rank of Sergeant. 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End oj the Present Year who were 
Appointed on the Force in the Year Slntcd. 







a 
















Date ArroixTED. 


1 

C 

3 

s 


I 

*8 


1 

c 


• 


i 

o 
E 


3 

e 
1 
c 
« 


3 


■ 


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3 
00 


3 e 
Q 


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u 


■ 

c 


3 
41 

2 




O 

a 

i 
c 


a 
o 


1SS2 




1 














1 


1SS6 






- 


- 


- 


•_> 




- 


- 


- 


3 


1SS7 






- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


•y 


2 


5 


1SSS 






1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


.! 


- 


S 


13 


18S9 




















1 


4 


1S90 






- 


- 


- 


1 




•j 


2 


1 


7 


1S91 






- 


- 


1 


- 




- 


2 


4 


S 


1S92 






- 


- 


- 


1 




- 


2 


1 


5 


1S93 






- 


- 


- 


o 




.1 


I 





24 


1S94 






- 


- 


- 





- 


- 


1 


2 


8 


1S95 






- 


I 


- 


t 




10 


13 


31 


03 


1S9C 






- 


- 


- 


1 




- 


1 


7 


10 


1S97 






- 


- 


- 


- 




I 


1 


2 


6 


1S9S 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


• > 


U 


9 


18 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


G 


2 


.'i 


11 


13 


40 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


1 




:f 


8 


3 


16 


1903 






- 


- 


- 


1 




3 


11 


9 


25 


1904 






- 


- 


_ 


- 




:t 


10 


5 


20 


1905 






- 


- 


- 


- 




i 





2 


10 


1906 






- 


- 


- 


- 




l 


o 


2 


6 


1907 






- 


- 


- 


- 




3 


8 


7 


19 


190S 






- 


- 


- 


- 




2 


13 


5 


23 


1909 






- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


3 


2 


6 


1910 






- 


- 


- 


- 




1 


o 


3 


7 


1911 






- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


1 


4 


1912 






- 




- 


1 


- 


1 


{> 


4 


12 


1913 


















1 


1 


o 


1914 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


»> 


2 


1915 


















1 


- 


T 


1916 


















2 


2 


4 


1917 


















4 


T 


5 


1919 






- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


'Mi 


1,01 


637 


1920 






_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


197 


202 


1921 






- 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


133 


137 


1922 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


77 


77 


1923 




















119 


119 


1924 




















SI 


81 


1925 




















102 


102 


1926 






- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


335 


335 


1927 




















134 


134 


1928 


















— 


104 


104 


Totals 






1 


o 


1 


30 


27 


11 


175 


2,02." 


2.305 



1929.) 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



47 



Table VL 

Men on the Police Force on November SO, 19t8, who were Born in the Year 
Indicated on the Table below. 



Date orBnta. 


s 

■ 
c 

9 

c 

1 


a 

I. 

3 = 


ii 
3 

i 

a 

"3 


3 
S 


e 

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1 


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a 
1 
a 
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o 


3 

a 

s 

B 


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■ 

P 


i 




3 
GO 


a 


8 


a 


2 


3 


i 


1 
a. 


(2 


1851 
















1 


1 


1858 














i 


- 


1 


1859 


- 


l 


- 


— 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1860 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


1861 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


i 


3 


6 


1862 
















4 


4 


1863 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


4 


6 


12 


1864 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


3 


10 


17 


1865 


- 


- 


- 


3 


O 


1 


5 


14 


25 


1866 


1 


- 


- 


3 


o 


i 


6 


12 


31 


1867 


- 


- 


i 


6 


o 


4 


7 


10 


30 


1868 


- 


- 


- 


9 


1 


- 


9 


6 


18 


1869 


- 


I 


- 


4 


- 


5 


6 


8 


24 


1870 


- 


- 


- 


•y 


9 


1 


2 


6 


13 


1871 


- 


— 


- 


— 


1 


3 


3 


9 


16 


1872 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


o 





10 


19 


1873 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


3 


16 


2 


22 


1874 


- 


- 


- 


2 


4 


3 


9 


5 


23 


1875 


- 


- 


- 


*> 


1 


2 


5 


1 


11 


1876 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


5 


2 


11 


1877 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


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6 


7 


14 


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2 


5 


5 


12 


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2 


5 


7 


14 


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1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


1881 


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- 


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1 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1882 


- 


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3 


1 


5 


_ 


9 


1883 












1 


3 


1 


5 


1884 


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_ 


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1 


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3 


7 


1885 














1 


18 


19 


1886 














2 


30 


32 


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•> 


46 


48 


1888 














4 


59 


03 


1889 














3 


77 


SO 


1890 
















70 


70 


1891 














2 


100 


102 


1892 














6 


147 


153 


1893 














7 


153 


160 


1894 


- 


— 


- 


- 


— 


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5 


186 


191 


1895 














6 


179 


185 


1896 














5 


203 


208 


1897 


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— 


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7 


181 


188 


1898 














2 


141 


143 


1899 
















100 


100 


1900 
















127 


127 


1901 
















61 


61 


1902 
















9 


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1 


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30 


27 


44 


175 


2,025 


2,305 



The avcnce age of the membcro of the force on November 30, 1028, is 37 yean. 



48 



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52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 

Kumber of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year 
November SO, 19SS. 



ending 



Divisions 




Males. 


Females. 


Totale. 


Headquarters 










1.4SS 


247 


1,735 


Division 1 










7,539 


171 


7,710 


Division 2 










3,157 


551 


3.70S 


Division 3 










4,960 


404 


5,370 


Division 4 










3,371 


190 


3,561 


Division 5 










9,142 


1,0S2 


10,224 


Division 6 










5,079 


349 


5,428 


Division 7 










6,S11 


303 


7,114 


Division 8 










17 


- 


17 


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7.S29 


383 


8,212 


Division 10 










4,304 


454 


4,758 


Division 11 










3,321 


171 


3,492 


Division 12 










2.S97 


114 


3,011 


Division 13 










2,444 


S6 


2,530 


Division 14 










2,007 


187 


2,194 


Division 15 










4.S49 


206 


5,055 


Division 16 










3,392 " 


499 


3,S91 


Division 17 










1,851 


71 


1,922 


Division 18 










797 


62 


859 


Division 19 










1,405 


62 


1,467 


Division 20 










8,367 


52 


8,419 


Division 21 










2,197 


3S0 


2,577 


Liquor and Narcotic unit 






2,115 


310 


2,425 


Special Service squad 






122 


6 


128 


Totals 






89,467 


6,340 


95,807 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



67 



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68 



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pany (commission on automatic pay station) 
Uocoivod, iuterost on deposits ... 
Uofund by polico officers ...... 

Uofund from Federal Court (carting alcohol) . 

Uofund on hospital sorvico ...... 

Refund on officers' bonds ...... 

Uofund on safoty deposit box ..... 

Uofund, storage on automobile* abandoned 

Uofund on transfer of automobile registration . 

Sale of auctioneers' record books ..... 

Sale of condemned property ..... 

Sale of lost, stolen and abandoned property 

Salo of old listing cards ...... 

Sale of pawnbrokers' and second-hand articles report blanks 
Uniform cloth, etc. ....... 


« 

3 
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1929.]. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



69 



Table XIV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November SO, 1M8. 



DmBIOKB. 


Males. 


Female*. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


100 


40 


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3 


149 


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263 


96 


18 


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51 


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5 








377 


129 


24 


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531 


6 








160 


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- 


203 


7 








652 


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22 


1 


855 


9 








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49 


1 


890 


10 








537 


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49 


- 


766 


11 








961 


167 


118 


2 


1,248 


12 








354 


95 


35 


- 


484 


13 


• 






577 


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81 


2 


788 


14 








669 


156 


90 


4 


019 


15 








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145 


21 


- 


553 


16 








542 


170 


85 


- 


797 


17 








1,146 


179 


190 


1 


1,516 


IS 








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50 


- 


647 


19 








532 


S4 


58 


- 


674 


Totals 


S.505 


2,128 


903 


16 


11,552 



1 Breeder's license st (50. 



Table XV. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . 


92S 


Division 12 


37 


Division 2 . 


1,314 


Division 13 


72 


Division 3 . 


163 


Division 14 


65 


Division 4 . 


342 


Division 15 


78 


Division 5 . 


185 


Division 16 


97 


Division 6 . 


361 


Division 17 


37 


Division 7 . 


S6 


Division 18 


47 


Division 9 . 


233 


Division 19 


45 




59 
65 






Division 11 . 


Total 


4,214' 



■Two hundred canceled for nonpayment of license fee. 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVJ. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending Socemher SO, 192S. 

E-XPENDITCBES. 

Pay of police and employees ..... $4,778,696 75 

Pensions 241,148 09 

Fuel and light 64,347 56 

Water and ice 555 42 

Furniture and bedding ...... 9,458 25 

Printing and stationery ...... 32,753 43 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison . 15,834 65 

Repairs to station houses and city prison . . . 29,824 38 

Repairs and supplies for police boats .... 27,494 01 

Telephone rentals, tolls and telegrams .... 27,211 63 

Purchase of horse, saddlery and motor vehicles . . 42,341 58 

Care and keeping of horses ...... 10,040 35 

Care and repair of motor vehicles ..... 43,987 50 

Feeding prisoners ....... 5,342 49 

Medical attendance and medicine ..... 7,934 19 

Transportation 7,120 29 

Pursuit of criminals ....... 9,695 39 

Uniforms and uniform caps ...... 76,894 86 

Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc. . 11,306 76 

Traveling expenses and food forpolice .... 1,958 16 

Rent of buildings 9,788 37 

Traffic signs and signals _ . . . . . 24,109 24 

Legal and other expert services ..... 3,774 98 

Storage on abandoned and stolen cars .... 727 30 

Music for police parade ...... 465 00 

Membership in nfle association ..... 200 00 

Memorial wreaths for graves of police .... 72 00 

Total $5,483,082 63 

Expenses of listing ....... 59,499 20 

Expenses of signal service (see Table XVII) . . . 56,780 01 

Total $5,599,361 84 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . $41,639 50 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) . . 29,881 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,603 07 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, uniform cloth, me of police 

property, etc 2,490 61 

Refunds 5,316 26 

For damage to police property ..... 2,125 22 

Total $83,055 66 



1929.J PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 71 

Tabu XVII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Tear ending 
November SO, 19t8. 

Pay rolls $35,460 18 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor . . 11,786 10 

Rent and taxes 1,089 51 

Care and repairs of building ..... 85 36 

Charts, files, etc 817 40 

Furniture and furnishings ...... 288 18 

Purchase of Ford truck and sedan .... 1,223 00 

Storage and repairs of motor vehicles .... 1,634 82 

Shoeing horse 28 50 

Carfares 638 65 

Prescribed underground work 3,728 31 

Total $56,780 01 



72 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 








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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



73 





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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1,991 
1,080 
4,886 
1.915 
2,255 
1,577 
1.263 
1,464 
2,425 
1,361 
1.303 
1,195 
1.374 
3,031 
1,005 
1,175 
903 
2.027 
1,340 
1,201 
1.752 
1.446 






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2,610 
1,432 
5,712 
2,060 
2.413 
1,793 
1.340 
1,235 
1.947 
1,305 
1.483 
1,330 
1.313 
1.957 
1,363 
1,00.1 
1,017 
1.285 
1.109 

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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



75 



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INDEX 



Accident* . 

caused by autonomic 

persons kilted or injured by, in street*. par*" 
number of. reported 
Additional police officers 
Ambutanee service . 
Arrest* . 

aee and rex of 

comparative statement of 

final duposhios of 

for offence* against chastity, morality 

for drur-Lennes* 

foreicnera 

minor* .... 

nativity of 

nonresident* . 

number of. by divisions 

number of. puiished by fine 
on warrant* 

lumtMLtd by court 

total number of 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrai4* 
Auctioneer* . 
Automobile* .... 

arrideM* due to 

death* eaused iy 

police .... 

public .... 

right-seeing 

stolen .... 

u*ed .... 

Benefit* and pensions 
Bertillon system 
Building* .... 

dangerous , reported . 

foun/i open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Carriage*, pcblie - 

article* left in . 

automobile 

number licensed 
Case* investigated . . # 

Celerity in transmitang pohce news 
Children .... 

ahandored, cared for 

lost, restored - 
City ordinaries. arrest* for violation of 
Claim*, inspector of 
Collective musician* 
Commitment* 
Complaint* .... 

again*t police officers 

agAin*t miscellaneous licenses 
Control <A lYrJcutritti and Vehicular Traffic 
Court* ..... 

fine* impoved by 

number of days* attendance at, by officer* 

number of pertens summoned by 
Criminal Invertic&tJon, Bureau of 

arreat* by 

fingerprint system . 

identi&eatios room . 

photograph* * 

record* .... 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 
Dangeron* weapon* 
Dead bodie*, cared for . 

recorered 
Death* 

by accident, suicide, etc. . 

of K-'i- * officer* 
Department, joliee 
Distribution of force 
Disturbance* suppressed 
Dog* . . ._ . 

amount received for license* for 

damage done by • 

number licensed 



and 



■4UATM 



16, 17, 



0. 24 



18, 



2;. 







PACE 




20, 25. 72. 73 




. 20. 72, 73 




72, 73 




25 




12 




31 


19, '. 


>2, 53-64. 65. 66 




65 




66 




53-64 




16. 59. 64 




17. 18. 27. 61 




. 17, 53-64 




17. 53-64. 65 




17 






17, 53-64 






52 






18 






17 






17 






16. 64. 66 






18. 60 






17 






67 


30, 3 


2, 33 


34, 72. 73 

20. 72, 73 

20 

30, 32 

33 

34, 67 

24 

25. 67 

39 

18 

25 

25 

25 

IS 

33. 67 

33 

33 

33, 67 

19. 25. 27 

9 

18. 25, 26 

25 

18, 26 

18, 60 

26 

37. 38, 67 

18. 27 

36, 49. 67 

49 

36. 67 

5 




17, 18 


, 19. 27. 06 
17. 00 




17 


, 18. 19, 60 

17 

18 

19 

19 

18 

18, 20 

19 

60 

66 

38 

25. 29 

25. 29 




10, 20 


. 43. 72, 73 

. 20, 72, 73 

10, 43 

15 

10. 41 

20 




2« 


. 67. 69. 70 

67. 70 

20 

67. 69 






' 



P.D. 49. 



Drivers, hackney carriage . 

Drown inc. persons rescued from 
Drunkenness .... 

arrests for, per dav . 

foreigners arrested for 

increase in number of arrests for 

nonresidents arrested for . 

total number of arrests for 

women committed for 
Employees of the Department 
Events, sped** 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial .... 

expenditures . 

pensions .... 

receipts ; 

miscellaneous license fees 

signal service . 
Fines . 

amour- 1 of . • 

average amount of . 

number punished by 
Finger-print system 
Fire alarms .... 

defective, reported . 

number given . , 

Fires ..... 

extinguished . 

on water front attended 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 
Gaming, illegal 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Hand carts .... 
Harbor service 

Horses ..... 
House of detention 
House of i Li fame, keeping 
Hydrants, defective, reported . 
Identification room 
Imprisonment 

persons sentenced to 

total years of . 
Income .... 

Inquests held . . 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians . . 

Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers . 
Jury lists, ponce work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous . 
Liquor nuisances 
Listing, police 

expenses of . . 

number bated . 

number of policemen employed i 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging bouses, public 

applications for licenses 

authority to license . 

location of 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 

causes of death . 

Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued 

number transferred 
Missing persons 

age and sex of 

number found 

number reported 



IS, 



77 



PACE 

33. 67 

26, 29 

27, 61 
17 

17, 61 
17, 18 

17, 61 

18, 61 
27 

41. 42. 44 

21 

39, 70, 71 

19, 26 
67, 70, 71 

39, 70 
39. 70 

36, 40, 70 

36. 67, 70 

39. 70, 

17, " 



17, 



18. 66 
18, 66 
17, 



66 
18 
19 
26 
26 
26 
26, 29 

26, 29 
29 

17, 53-64 
19 
61 
33. 67 
33. 67 
67 
29 
30 
27 

27, 59 
26 
18 

IS. 20, 66 
18 
18. 20, 66 
40, 67, 70 
20 
26 
26 
26 
26 

37, 67 
67 
67 
35 

36, 67, 70 

7 

70, 74. 75 

35. 70 

35, 74. 75 

35 

18 

38. 67 
67 
38 
39 
.19 





20. 67, 



18, 26 

20 

20 

20 

. 53-«4, 65 

25 

36, 67. 70 

36. 67, 70 

36, 67 

36, 67 

36, 67 

36, 67 

23 

23 

23 

23 



L» 






78 



P.D. 49. 3 



Mnairi ans . 

collective 

itinerant . • • 

Nativity of penon arrested 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences • 

against chastity, morality, etc. 

against license lavs • 

against the person . 

against property, malicious 

against property, with violence - 

against property, without violence 

forgery and acainat currency 

miscellaneous . 

recapitulation . 
Operators . 
Parks, public . . • 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers . 
Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 

Dumber of persons on rolls 

payments on account of . 
Police 

railroad , 

Police charitable fund, number of bene6ciaries 
Police department . ■ 

annual dress parade of 
distribution of 
horses in use in 
bow constituted 
officers appointed 
absent sick 
arrests by 
complains against 
date appointed . 
detailed, special events 
died 

discharged 
injured 
nativity of 
promoted . 
resigned . 
retired 
vehicles in use in 
work of . 
Police listinc . . ■ 

Police property . 
Police signal service 

miscellaneous work . 
payments on account of 
property of 
signal boxes 
Prwoners, nativity of 
Property . • • 

lost, abandoned and stolen 
recovered . . 
aale of condemned, unclaimed, etc. 
stolen . . . .... ■ 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lodging bosses 
Railroad police 
Receipts . 

Revolvers ...» 

beenses to carry 
Second-band articles 
Sewers, defective, reported . 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Bight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, pofiee 
Special events 
Soerial police 
Station bouses 
lodgers at 

witnesses detained st 
Stolen property 
recovered 

value of . . . - • ■ 

Street railwsys, conductors, motormen and starters 



27- 



18 



1.', 



34, 35 
20, 39, 



20, 40, 



20, 



40, 



27, 39 



37, 38, 67 

37, 38. 67 

37. 67 

17 

17. 53, 64 

16, 53-64 

16, SO, 64 

16, 58, 64 

16. 53, 64 

16, 66, 64 

16, 54, 64 

16, 55, 64 

16, 57, 64 

16. 60, 64 

64 

34. 67 

72, 73 

72, 73 

67 

11, 39 

39 

39 

39, 70 

36 

36 

36 

39 

15. 22 
22 
41 
30 
15 
16 
48 

16, 52, 64 
49 
46 
21 

16. 43 
16 
16 
47 

16, 45 

16 

16, 44 

32 

16 

70, 74. 75 

10 

41, 70, 71 

28 

39, 70, 71 

29 
27 
17 

66, 68, 70 
20, 70 

18, 20, 66 

40, 68, 70 
18, 66 

18 

33, 67 
38, 67 

36 

67, 68, 70 
38, 67 
38, 67 

67 

26 

18, 26, 29 

48 

34. 67 

41, 70, 71 
21 

36 
18 
18 
18 
18, 66 
18, 68 
18, 66 
67 



P.D. 49. 79 

PAOE 

Streets 26, 72, 73 

accidents reported in ............ 72, 73 

defective, reported 26 

obstruction* removed ............ 26 

Tea nu 26 

stray, put up 26 

Used can . 25, 67 

licensed dealer* ............. 67 

sale* reported 25 

Vehicle* 24. 30-34, 67, 6* 

ambulances .............. 31 

automobiles 24, 30 

in use in police department ........... 32 

public carriages 33, 67 

wagons 34, 67, 69 

Vessels 29 

Wagons 34, 67, 69 

Dumber licensed by dHa aaaaaj ........... 69 

total number licenced ........... .34,69 

Water pipes, defective, reported ........... 26/ 

Water running to waste reported ........... 26 

Weapons, dangerous ............. 38 

Witnesses 17, 18, 28, 27, 66 

fees earned by officers as . . . . . . . . . * . . 17, 18, 66 

number of days' attendance at court by officer* as . . 17, 27, 66 

number of, detained at station booses ......... 18.26- 

Women committed to Hoose of Detentaoa ......... 27 ' 



Public Document No- 49 



(ilip (TommonuiFaltl? nf iBasaarbufirtts 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OK TIIK 



Police Commissioner 



FOB TIIK 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOB THE 



Year ending November 30, 1929 




Printed by Order op the Police Commissioxeb 



o fj s. fc 



i '- 



/ / 






.o 



CONTENTS. 













I'AGE 


Letter to Governor .... 5 


Traffic 










5 


Liquor Inw enforcement 










7 


Teletype 










JO 


Plant and Personnel 










10 


The Department .... 










13 


Police l'orec .... 










13 


Signal service .... 










13 


Employees of the Department 










13 


Recapitulation .... 










13 


Distrihut ion and changes 










1-1 


Police officers injured while on duty 










14 


Work of the Department . 










14 


Arrests ..... 










14 


Drunkenness .... 










IS 


Nativity of prisoners, etc. 










16 


Bureau of criminal investigation . 










17 


Officer detailed to assist medical examiners 










18 


Lost, abandoned and stolen property . 










19 


Special events ..... 










19 


Missing persons .... 










21 


Used car dealers' licenses 










21 


Record of automobiles reported stolen . 










22 


Record of purchases and sales of used cars re 


xirtci 


1 






23 


Miscellaneous business 










23 


Inspector of claims .... 










24 


House of detention .... 










25 


Police signnl service .... 










25 


Signal boxes .... 










25 


Miscellaneous work 










26 


Harbor service ..... 










27 


Horses ...... 










28 


Vehicle service ..... 










28 


Automobiles .... 










28 


Ambulances ... 










29 


List of vehicles used by the Department 










30 


Public carriages .... 










31 


Sight-seeing automobiles 










32 


Wagon licenses ..... 










32 


Listing work in Boston 










33 


Listing expenses .... 










33 


Number of policemen employed in listing 


• 








34 


Police work on jury lists 










31 


Special police ..... 










34 


Miscellaneous licenses 










35 


Musicians' licenses .... 










35 


Itinerant ..... 










35 


Collective 










36 



CONTENTS. 



Carrying dangerous weapons ....... 

Public lodging houses ........ 

Pensions an/1 benefits ........ 

Financial ........... 

Statistical tabic*: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the police force, signal 
service and employees 

Change* in authorized and actual strength 

List of police officers in active service who died 

Lust of officers retired . 

Police officers and employees retired under Boston retirenien 
system .... 

List of officers promoted 

Number of men in active service 

Men on the police force and year born 

Number of flays' absence from duty by reason 

Complaint* against officers 

Number of arrests by police divisions 

Arrests, offences and final disposition of cases 

Dispositions of certain major prosecutions 

Age and sex of person arrested 

Comjiarative statement of police criminal work 

License* of all classes issued 

Dog license* .... 

Wagon licenses .... 

Financial statement 

Payment* on account of signal service 

Accident* ..... 

Male and female residents listed 



PAGE 

30 

37 
37 
as 



of sickness 



30 
41 
42 
4:1 



43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
4S 
50 
51 
05 
66 
07 
OS 
70 
70 
71 
72 
73 
75 



ahr (Uommnnutralth of fHaBsarbuB* tta 



REPORT. 



I1e»docakterj» or the Pouci Dtrumn, 
Ornre or the Pouce Coumimioxeb. 151 Brntm Stkeet 
Boston-. Dt-cember I. 1929. 



To His Excellency Frank G. Allen. Governor. 

Your Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 1906 a report 
of the Police Department for the year ending November 30, 
1929. 

Traffic. 

On February 7, 1927, the Director of the Street Traffic 
Survey under the auspices of the Albert Russell Erskine 
Bureau of Harvard University, after careful investigation 
with competent assistants and with a full measure of police 
co6()eration submitted a comprehensive report to the Mayor 
of Boston relative to traffic conditions in this city. The 
Board of Street Commissioners, the municipal body at that 
time authorized to make rules and regulations affecting the 
vehicular and pedestrian traffic of this city, adopted the 
recommendations of the survey. 

Among the recommendations adopted was the boulevard 
stop system, a traffic aid previously recommended by me in 
my annual report to the Governor and later to the Board 
of Street Commissioners. Special markers for the same were 
approved by the Department of Public Works of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts and the system put into effect 
with favorable results on Commonwealth and Blue Hill 
Avenues. 

The Boston Traffic Commission was created by legislative 
act on April 26, 1929, which became effective May 26, 1929. 
The personnel of the commission consists of a Commissioner 
appointed by the Mayor, and as associate commissioners: 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER [Jan. 

the Police Commissioner, Commissioner of Public Works, 
Park Commissioner and the Chairman of the Board of Street 
Commissioners. The body now has control of vehicular 
traffic with power to erect and maintain traffic signs, markers 
and traffic control devices, and also authority to adopt, amend 
and repeal all existing rules pertaining to the control of 
vehicular traffic. The Commission has reconsidered, revised 
and adopted the former rules and regulations to render 
traffic more fluid and to prepare for traffic emergencies. 
An appropriation of $125,000 was made by the City Council 
of Boston, the plans were completed and the work has been 
started on the synchronization of traffic lights on Washington 
Street from Broadway to Haymarket Square, on Cambridge 
Street from Temple Street to Scollay Square, on Tremont 
Street from Scollay Square to Broadway, and on Boylston 
Street from Washington Street to Arlington Street. Ap- 
propriations of (1) $125,000 have been granted for the in- 
stallation of this system of traffic lights on Massachusetts 
Avenue between Tremont Street and the Harvard Bridge, 
(2) $125,000 for traffic lights on Commonwealth Avenue 
between Arlington Street and Governor Square, and (3) 
$100,000 for the installation of automatic traffic lights in 
the suburban district* at dangerous intersections. The 
installation of this system of traffic lights on Shawmut 
Avenue between Roxbury Street and Broadway, and on 
Centre Street, West Roxbury, has been urged by the Police 
Commissioner for some time. Automatic traffic signals will 
not eliminate the nectswity of man power at congested 
traffic intersections where pedestrian traffic must be con- 
trolled and protected and police aid rendered in case of ac- 
cidents. 

Jurisdiction over hackney carriages (taxicabs) remains 
with the Police Commi«rioner who has cooperated with the 
Traffic Commission as to the allocation of hackney carriage 
stands so that as far a* possible, there may be conformity 
with the rules governing traffic. 

Control of hackney carriages carries a twofold duty; first: 
the necessity to see that the public are properly served with 
taxicab service in all sections of the city, and second: that 
traffic is not impeded or congested because of unnecessary 
taxicab traffic in the congested parts of the city. On No- 
vember 30, 1922, there were 1,401 licensed hackney carriages 



1030.) PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 40. 7 

ami 1,673 operators. On November 30, 1020, there were 
2,030 licensed hackney carriages and 4,803 operators. 

Legislation to make all hackney carriage stands public, 
to be used by all hackney carriage drivers, was defeated, 
but a commission was appointed to investigate the question 
of taxicab service and regulation in the city of Boston. Several 
hearings were held where all the parties concerned were given 
a right to express their views. The reports of this Com- 
mission will be forwarded to the incoming legislature. Care- 
ful study of the situation in cities where all hackney stands 
are public proved that the public stands benefit only the 
few who have obtained them by means similar to seques- 
tration and are of no financial benefit to the majority of 
taxicab operators. Continuous cruising of operators in 
search of a vacant and profitable stand would cause traffic 
congestion and render more difficult traffic control by the 
police. 

Liquor Law Enforcement. 

The liquor situation in Boston compares favorably with 
other cities in this country. 

Constant effort was made by the department during the 
past year to suppress illegal liquor traffic. 4,727 buildings 
were searched upon warrants, 3,047 persons arrested for tha 
violation of the state prohibitory laws and 33,011 persons 
arrested for drunkness. 

Enforcement of the liquor law, however, is becoming more 
difficult because the illegal sale of liquor is now being ef- 
fected more secretly, and because of the almost insur- 
mountable difficulty encountered by police officers in ob- 
taining evidence of liquor violations in barricaded and 
fortified places. Police officers of this Department are 
forbidden to drink intoxicating liquor to obtain evidence of 
liquor violations. The increased activity of the police has 
forced proprietors of liquor nuisances to remove their estab- 
lishments from the street to barricaded second and third 
floors of buildings. This ruse gives them more time to 
destroy liquor evidence in case of sudden raids by the police. 
Time is of the essence to operators of liquor nuisances. 
Liquor poured into containers filled with chemicals, cannot 
l>e used as evidence in prosecutions for violation of the liquor 
laws. 



S POLICE COMMISSIONER [Jan. 

It is indeed unfortunate that the police arc seldom able 
to apprehend proprietors of liquor nuisances because they 
are rarely seen upon the premises anil arc invariably absent 
when their unfortunate agents arc trapped. 

The question of the repeal of the so-called "Baby Volstead 
Act" will come before the legislature thin year. This Act 
was passed in 1923 to further strengthen the existing state 
liquor law, and made transportation and manufacture of 
intoxicating liquor without a permit a criminal offence. 
Repeal of this law would seriously cripple the work of this 
department. 

The police alone cannot stop violations of the prohibitory 
laws. When the police have detected and apprehended 
violators of the liquor laws and have presented evidence to the 
court, they have fulfilled their part of the liquor enforcement 
problem. Whether habitual offenders convicted of violations 
of the liquor laws continue in their practices is a problem 
for the courts to solve. Fines indicted as punishment for 
liquor violations can be charged to overhead expense. Im- 
prisonment or fear of imprisonment awes liquor violators, 
but liquor violators have little respect for law and less for 
enforcement officers when they know that upon conviction, 
only fines undoubtedly will be imposed. The police alone 
cannot close liquor nuisances, suspected houses of ill fame 
or any other place suspected of carrying on illegal business. 
When such evidence as the police may have regarding such 
illegal business is presented to the court their power ends. 

During the past year 3,947 liquor cases, exclusive of 
drunkenness, were obtained by this department. 293 
persons were sentenced to jail and of this number 239 sen- 
tences were suspended. 1,4C5 persons were fined and 132 
of these fines were suspended. 579 persons received fines 
and imprisonment, and of these, 483 imprisonments and 3 
fines were suspended. A total of 150 persons were imprisoned 
for violation of the state prohibitory laws during the past 
year, 955 persons were found not guilty, and the balance of 
the cases disposed of other than by fine or imprisonment. 
162 of these eases are now pending. The police cannot be 
expected to suppress liquor violations unless persistent 
offenders against the prohibitory laws, when convicted, arc 
sent to jaiL 

Although illegal transportation of liquor is now a criminal 



1930.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

offence, many motor vehicles seized for illegal transportation 
of liquor, the operators of which were convicted, have been 
returned, by order of the court, to the owners because the 
operator was not convicted of keeping and exposing liquor 
for sale in the vehicle used for illegal transportation of liquor. 

No motor vehicle can be forfeited as an implement of sale 
unless the operator is not only convicted of transporting 
liquor illegally but also convicted of keeping and exposing 
liquor illegally for sale in the vehicle. 

Before conviction can be obtained for illegal keeping and 
exposing liquor for sale in a motor vehicle specific evidence 
is required that the vehicle is being used as an implement of 
sale or that the car was specially built or remodelled for the 
purpose of transporting liquor illegally or that the owner 
or operator of the seized motor vehicle was a well known 
liquor violator. Since December 1, 1928, 60 cars were 
seized for illegal transportation of liquor. 47 of these 
operators were found guilty of illegal transpoi . tion, 13 
cars were confiscated, and orders for return of 40 cars to the 
owners or persons entitled to possession, were made. 7 cars 
are now in the possession of the Property Clerk of this 
department awaiting disposition of the cases upon which the 
seizures were made. 

Equity proceedings were taken against several places 
where liquor nuisances existed and injunctions or "pad- 
locks" were obtained. Many cases are now being prepared 
and will In? prosecuted during the coming year. 

Some property owners have realized the seriousness of 
leasing real estate to liquor violators and notice has been 
received many times when padlock proceedings were threat- 
ened that the liquor law violators have been or would be 
ejected. When forced to vacate a location because of 
police activities, violators of the liquor law, however, cannot 
be prevented from establishing headquarters at places where 
liquor convictions have not been obtained. The actual 
working of the padlock law has been clearly demonstrated 
that the fear of injunction creates a salutary effect upon that 
type of property owner who is desirous only of obtaining 
revenue from his property without regard to the character 
of his tenants. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER [Jan. 

Teletype. 

Prevention of crime and apprehension of criminals is 
distinctly a police problem. Human agency requires con- 
junction with mechanical aids to successfully combat crime. 
Police officers from the time of appointment arc instructed 
carefully in the methods employed by the criminal. Crime 
is progressive in its technique, and new methods and means 
used in the commission of crime are ascertained and ex- 
plained. 

New mechanical devices to expedite or increase business 
are accepted and installed by progressive mercantile organ- 
izations, and refusal to adopt and install such innovations 
means commercial annihilation. Following this business 
principle a progressive police department must adopt 
mechanical devices useful and necessary either in preventing 
or detecting crime or in capturing the criminal. 

In several previous reports the teletype system of trans- 
mitting information relative to crime has been referred to. 
In the twenty-one station houses in this department the 
instantaneous reception upon machines of messages relayed 
from Headquarters has been of immense value. Arlington, 
Brookline, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Somerville, Quincy, 
Maiden, Melrose and Medford, and the Metropolitan 
District Commission already have recognized the value of 
this method of disseminating important information relative 
to crime, and are now connected by teletype with Police 
Headquarters at Boston. 

Teletype transmission of news is comparatively instan- 
taneous, correct and unfailing, not exposed to the hazards 
of atmospheric conditions as is the use of the radio, or subject 
to errors or incorrect reception of relayed news as is possible 
where the telephone is used. 

Plant and Personnel. 

Considerable work has been done during the past year 
l>oth on the exterior and interior of police buildings carrying 
out plans to make station houses and police quarters comfort- 
able and sanitary for police officers stationed therein. Neces- 
sary repairs, additions and remodelling have been done upon 
the station houses of Divisions 3, 5, 10, 11, 15 and 10. At 
my request an examination of all police buildings and boats 



U^^ 1^ jj^j m 



1930] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 11 

was made by the American LaFrance & Foamite Company, 
and their recommendations relative to the placing of oil 
extinguishers, alcohol extinguishers and the ordinary fire 
extinguishers were carried out. Every cell, door and lock 
in station houses and lock-ups has been carefully examined, 
repaired and renewed where found necessary. 

The rolling stock of the department consisting of seventy- 
nine automobiles and seventy-four motorcycles (including 
twenty-four of the latter purchased during this year) were 
inspected and repaired. Three new motor patrol wagons 
specially designed for accident cases and equipped like the 
other patrol wagons of the department with first aid kits and 
gas mask* were put into commission. The summer uniform 
of the entire force was remodelled, and the collar, to insure 
comfort, changed from the military to the roll type. 

A perpetual stock inventory and cost record was instituted 
in the office of the Property Clerk to record the requirements, 
distribution and cost of stock used by the department. 

The City Council passed an order for a $200,000 loan which 
was later appro ved by the Mayor on April 30, 1929, for a 
police boat to replace the steamer Guardian which has been 
in police service continuously since 1896. The present 
unfit condition of the hull and boilers of the Guardian with 
the expense of repairing and remodelling the craft demon- 
strated clearly that a new boat should be built. The special 
harbor service of this boat necessitated it should be of 
wooden construction and steam propelled, and to insure 
prompt service a radio must be installed. Plans and speci- 
fications have been already drawn and proposals for con- 
struction will soon be asked for by advertising. 

In addition to the patrol boat already in use a gasoline 
propelled boat is needed for the purpose of having con- 
tinuous service during seven months of the year to protect 
the increasing number of valuable yachts and motor boats 
ruoored or stored in the harbor proper and surrounding 
waters and over which this department has jurisdiction. 
The proximity of many bathing beaches to these boat yards, 
yacht clubs and maritime associations demands constant 
police patrol. 

An increase of one hundred and fifty men to take care of 
the growing needs of the department and to render proper 
jMilic-e service to the congested and outlying districts was 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER [Jan. 

requested of the Mayor. Authorization to add 01.? hundred 
and twenty-five men to the force was granted and these 
additional men are at present in service. On account of 
the growing needs of traffic, additional police officers are 
quickly absorbed. 

On May 31, 1929, through joint action of the Mayor and 
Police Commissioner, the salaries of deputy superintendents 
of this department were raised from $4,000 to $4,500 per 
annum; the chief inspector from S3,S00 to 84,300; captains 
from $3,500 to $4,000; lieutenants and lieutenant-inspectors 
from $2,G00 to S2,700; and sergeants and detective-sergeants 
from $2,400 to $2,500. 

New station houses are needed on Divisions 3, 4, 5, and 
17, and garages for police vehicles needed at Stations 12 
and 14. 

Nineteen men will be added early in January, 1930, to the 
Special Service Unit now operating in motor vehicles from 
Headquarters. This will create two shifts of police officers 
operating in this unit and will insure continuous patrol of 
the city from G.OO p.m. to 8.00 a.m. The present unit 
operating from 11.00 p.m. to 8.00 a.m. has already dem- 
onstrated its great value in preventing crime, apprehending 
thieves, discovering fires, and in the general protection of the 
lives and property of the citizens of this city. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner for the City of fionlon. 



1 - 



1930.) 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



13 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows :■ 



Police Commissioner. 



Secretary. 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Chief inspector . 
Captains 
Inspectors 



1 
2 

1 

JO 



Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen 

Total 



44 

1S4 
2,14$ 

2,434 



Director 

Signalmen 

Mechanics 



Signal Service. 



Linemen 
Chauffeur 

Total 



IS 



Employees of the DepartmenL 



Property clerk . 
Clerks 
Stenographers . 


1 

20 
11 


Matrons (house of detention) 
Matrons (station houses) 
Mechanic 


5 
5 

1 


Chauffeurs 
Cleaners . 


3 

17 


Repairmen 
Steamfittcr 


2 
1 


Elevator operators 
Engineers on police steamen 
Firemen, marine 


5 

) 3 

8 


Superintendent of building . 
Superintendent, repair shop 
Tailor .... 


1 

1 
1 


Firemen, stationary . 


6 
11 
36 


Telephone operators . 


3 


Janitors 


Total 


151 


Lal>wr and Helper . 


1 







Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary ...... 2 

Police force 2,434 

Signal service IS 

Employees 15J 

Grand total 2,605 



14 



POLIOS COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 

The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 221 patrolmen were appointed (one restored 
to duty from pension); 1!) patrolmen were discharged; 30 
patrolmen resigned (thirteen while charges were pending); 
24 patrolmen were promoted; 1 captain, 4 lieutenants, 2 
inspectors, 4 sergeants and 1 1 patrolmen were retired on 
pensions; 1 captain, sergeants and 13 patrolmen died. 
(Sec Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While ox Duty. 

The following statement shows the number of police 
officers attached to the various divisions and units who were 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them and the number of duties lost by police 
officers during the past year who were injured previous to 
December 1, 1928. 



How iNJldr.D. 


Number of Mm 

Injuml In 
Vi'iir Kmling 
Nov. 30i IW.U 


Numbrr <*f l>ut i< - 

Loft bv Such 

Men. 


Number of Duties 
L«*t this Vrar 
by Men on Ar- 
mani of Injiiricn 

Rrerirgd Prrviou* 
to Dcr. 1. 1028. 


In arresting prisoners 


s:i 


216 


32 


In pursuing criminuls 


It 


92 


21 


By cars and other vehicles 


117 


1,275 


.V_'7 


By stopping runaways 


'1 


7 


- 


Various other Cannes 


\\i 


s.vs 


->o:{ 


Totals 


:»'j« 


'.*, 1 13 


7K.J 



Work of tjik Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 91,048 as against 95,807 the preceding 
year, being a decrease of 3,850. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 



1930] rUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 15 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person ..... Decrease 4.71 

Offences against property committed with violence . Decrease 6.19 

Offences against property committed without violence Decrease 8.92 

Malicious offences against property . . . Increase 5.41 

Forgerj' and offences against the currency . . Increase 28.33 

Offences against the license laws .... Decrease 10.34 

There were 15,184 persons arrested on warrants and 46,504 
without warrants; 30,200 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 69,410 persons were prosecuted; 21,526 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses and 
1,012 were delivered to outside authorities. There were 
776 extra prosecutions, making a total of 70,186 cases pros- 
ecuted. The number of males arrested was 86,182; of 
females 5,766; of foreigners, 24,294, or approximately 26.42 
per cent; of minors 9,080. Of the total number arrested 
27,706, or 30.13 per cent, were non-residents. (See Tables 
X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1925 to 1929, inclusive, was $438,513.55: 
in 1929 it was $471,194;or §32,680.45 more than the average. 

The average number of daj's' attendance at court was 
56,055; in 1929 it was 56,032, or 23 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,807.84; 
in 1929 it was $13,377.01 or $1,430.83 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 
92. There were 5,137 less persons arrested than in 1928, a 
decrease of 13.15 per cent; 25.74 per cent of the arrested 
persons were non-residents and 35.46 per cent of foreign 
birth. (See Tabic XI.) 

The number of arrests for the year was 91,948, being a 
decrease of 3,859 over last year, and 3,138 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 33,911 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 5,137 less than last year, and 
4,929 less than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of 
13.22 per cent in males and a decrease of 11.45 per cent in 
females from last year. (Sec Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year, 91,948, 676 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



were for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one 
arrest in 136 was for such offence, or .73 per cent. 

Sixty-two and two hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table XII.) 



Natin 


ly of I'e 


United States 


<>7.(i.>» 


Ireland 


0.870 


British Provinces 


4.021 


Italy 


3,702 


Russia 


3.399 


Poland 


1,021 


Sweden 


72'J 


China 


352 


England 


534 


Scotland 


•115 


Greece 


•112 


Lithuania . 


392 


Portugal 


377 


Norway 


311 


Germany . 


333 


Finland 


200 


Syria 


170 


Armenia 


134 


Austria 


130 


Spain . 


113 


France. . 


98 


West Indies 


98 



Denmark . 

Turkey 

South Amenta 

Au-tralia . 

Holland 

Ilclpurn 

Albania 

Switzerland 

Mexico 

Iceland 

Africa 

Ka.it Indies 

Hungary 

Japan 

Koumania 

Wales 

Cuba 

Axia 

Arabia 

Egypt 

Total . 



5-1 

50 

37 

30 

25 

10 

15 

14 

13 

9 

8 

8 

8 

7 

(I 

5 

4 

3 

1 

1 



91,948 



The number of persons punished by fines was 33,822 and 
the fines amounted to $471,104. (See Table XIII.) 

Fifty-three persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,818 to the House of Correction, 31 to the Women's Prison, 
151 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2,161 to other insti- 
tutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were 1 life, 2,381 years, 9 
months, 22 days (315 sentences indefinite); the total number 
of days' attendance at court by officers was 56,032, and the 
witness fees earned by them amounted to §13,377.01. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was 8237,681.18. 

Eleven witnesses were detained at station houses, 141 
were accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 51 from last 
year. There was a decrease of 8.19 per cent in the number 
of sick and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 
10.48 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 



1930.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 17 

The average amount of property stolen in and out of 
the city for the five years from 1925 to 1929 inclusive, was 
Sl,743,171.90, in 1929 it was $1,607,046.62, or $136,125.28 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in and 
out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston Police, 
was S3,580,S49.30, as against $2,881,110.36 last year, or 
SC99,73S.94 more. (See Table XIII.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The "identification room" now contains 71,684 photo- 
graphs, 57,119 of which are photographs with Bertillon 
measurements, a system used by the Department since 
November 30, 189S. In accordance with the Revised Laws, 
chapter 225, section 18, and with the General Laws, chapter 
127, sections 27 to 29, both inclusive, we are allowed photo- 
graphs with Bertillon measurements taken of the convicts 
in the State Prison and Reformatory, a number of which 
have been added to our Bertillon cabinets. This, together 
with the adoption of the system by the Department in 1898, 
is and will continue to be of great assistance in the identi- 
fication of criminals. A large number of important identi- 
fications have thus been made during the year for this and 
other police departments, through which the sentences in 
many instances have been materially increased. The 
records of 1,140 criminals have been added to the records 
of this Bureau, which now contains a total of 50,599. The 
number of cases reported at this office which have been 
investigated during the year is 31,453. There are 48,754 
cases reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose 
and reports made on these cases are filed away for future 
reference. The system of indexing adopted by this Bureau 
for the use of the Department now contains a list of records, 
histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of about 248,090 
persons. There are also "histories and press clippings" 
now numbering 10,603 made by this Bureau, in envelope 
form for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was 
adopted in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory 
manner, and with it the identification of criminals is facil- 
itated. It has become very useful in tracing criminals and 
furnishing corroborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service 






18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



arc included in the statement of the general work of the 
Department, but as the duties arc of a special character, the 
following statement will he of interest: — 



Number of pcrsoas arrested, principally for /clonic* 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and dcliv 

ercd to officers from those States .... 
Number of cases investigated ..... 
Number of extra duties performed .... 
Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide invest 

gated and evidence prepared for trial in court . 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion invest 

gated and evidence prepared for court 
Number of days spent in court by police officers 



Number of years of imprisonment imposed by court, 177 years, tl months 



Amount of stolen property recovered 

Number of photographs added to identification room . 



1,200 

GO 

31,453 

2,017 

204 

11 

2,678 



S4SS,SG5.79 
1,704 



Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 

The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 822 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion . 
Accidental cut . 
Accidental poison 
Aeroplane . 
Alcoholism 
Asphyxiation 
Automobiles 

(No prosecution) 
liicyelc 
Burns 
Coasting 
Drowning . 
Electricity 
Elevators . 
Exposure . 



•J 


falls 


73 


1 


1 ailing objects 


S 


1 


Machinery 


4 


r, 


Natural causes . 


353 


i;> 


Poison 


32 


;j 


Itailroad (steam) 


12 




Stillborn* . 


4 


ii 


Stone thrown 


1 


l 


Suffocation 


3 


28 


Suicides 


GO 


1 


Team 


1 


.'(."> 


Homicides 


152 


(1 








11 


Total 


S22 


1 







On 245 of the above caws inquests were held. 

Of the total number the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts: — 



Accidental poison 

Automobiles 

Bicycle 

Manslaughter 
Murder 



2 


Itailroad (sl<-rim) 


12 


Itailuay (street). 


1 


Teams 


10 




13 


Total . 



1 

12 

1 



152 



IC'30.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



19 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On December 1, 1928, there were 2,850 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the Property 
Clerk, and during the year 1,102 were received. 841 articles 
were sold at public auction and the proceeds SI, 479. 75 were 
tinned over to the Chief Clerk. 

FV.ur articles were sold as perishable and 771 worthless 
articles were destroyed or sold as junk and the entire proceeds, 
-5411.01, turned over to the Chief Clerk. 135 articles were 
returned to owners, finders or administrators, leaving 2,201 
on hand. 



Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 



fVr. 
I*r. 

I).*-. 

Dee. 



I, Fenway Park, Boston College-Holy Cross football game 

21, Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration 

24, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight Mass 

24, West End, traffic duty on Christmas Eve 

•JO, Funeral of Lieutenant Francis J. Mulligan, retired 



Men. 

100 

14 

8 

42 

33 



in*. 

Jan. S, Mechanics Building, Police Ball 

Jan. 22, Funeral of I'atrolman John J. Cavanaugh 

Feb. II, Funeral of Sergeant Alfred H. Daniels 

Feb. 12, Mechanics Building, Firemen's Ball 

Feb. 14, Washington and Summer Streets, manhole explosion 

Feb. 27, Bulletin Boards, Sharkcy-Stribling fight 

Mar. 5, Funeral of I'atrolman Thomas E. Smith 

Mar. 17, South Boston, Evacuation Day parade 

Mar. 26. Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Foch Memorial service 

Apr. 19, Commonwealth Pier, departure of Cardinal O'Connell 

party 

Apr. 19, Marathon race ..... 

Apr. 19, Patriots' Day parade 

Apr. 25, Funeral of Patrolman Frederick I. Morrill 

May 20, Funeral of Captain Matthew J. Dailey 

May 20, Funeral of Patrolman Pierce L. Finn 

May 20, Fenway Park, Memorial Sunday service 

May 27. Funeral of Sergeant John J. Montague 

May 30, At city cemeteries .... 

May 30, Traffic duty, vicinity of cemeteries 

May 30, St. Joseph's Cemetery, memorial service of Boston Police 

Posts, American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars . 



272 
45 
24 
39 

109 
40 
24 

328 
87 

65 
570 
106 
24 
62 
45 
48 
24 
28 
89 

78 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

!«»_ Men. 

Jnur 7, Parade of Boston School Cadets ..... 358 

Jtne 15, Sullivan Square playground ..... 21 

Jim* 10, Eve of Bunker Hill Day in Charlcstown . . . 135 
Zvnr If., Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Roxbury Crossing district . 25 
Jtiw 17, Bunker Hill Day, Charlestown, parades and fireworks . 378 
Jrfr 3, Columbus Park, bonfire ..... 32 

Jrfv 3, Boston Common, rehearsal of July 1th pageant . 61 

Jxirr -1, Columbus Park, bonfire ...... 22 

Jii!y- 4, Charlcsbank, athletic contests ..... 35 

Jtfy 4, Boston Common, pageant and fireworks . . 185 

Jdy 10, South Station, departure of Marchioness Townwnd for 

England ........ 21 

Jx£r 15, Deer Island fire 82 

Ate. 20, Braves Field, boxing bouts 84 

Ate. 25. Boston Common, attempted meeting Succo-Vnnzctti 

sympathizers ........ 95 

Sfpt. 25, Funeral of Patrolman Edward J. Lothrop ... 37 
Or. 5, Raymond's store ....... 00 

fVr. 5, Stadium, Harvard-Bates football game ... 89 

Oit. 8, Bulletin boards, world's series baseball ... 74 

Oct. 9, Bulletin boards, world's series baseball ... 74 

Oct. 11, Bulletin boards, world's series baseball ... 74 

Ore 12, Bulletin boards, world's series baseball ... 74 

Ort. 12, Braves Field, football game . . . . 14 

Ott. 12, Harvard-Xew Hampshire football game ... 85 

Ott. 12, Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of 
rank and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into 
three battalions of eight companies each, in command 
of a major, so designated. To each battalion was as- 
signed a military band. The regiment included u 
sergeant and eighteen men mounted on department 
horses, a colonel commanding, with his adjutant and 
staff officers from the respective police divisions and 
units in military company formation, shotgun com- 
panies, patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns 
and a motorcycle unit. 

The regiment was reviewed at City Hall by the Hon. 
Timothy F. Donovan, Acting Mayor; at the State 
House by His Excellency Governor Frank (I. Allen, and 
on the Parade Grounds of the Common by His Excel- 
lency the Governor and the Police Commissioner, Hon. 

Herbert A. Wilson 1,537 

Ort. 14, Pulaski Day parade 228 

Ort. 14, Bulletin boards, world's series baseball ... 74 

Ot. 15, Funeral of Lieutenant Patrick J. Williams, retired . 32 

Ott. 19, Parade and review of West Point cadets . . 3-35 

<"h-t. 19, Stadium, Harvard-West Point football game . . 109 

Ort. 26, Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game . 100 



1930.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



21 



19M 




Nov. 




Nov. 


o 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


5, 


Nov. 


•i. 


Nov. 


s, 


Nov. 


9, 


Nov. 


11, 


Nov. 


16, 


Nov. 


23, 


Nov. 


23, 


Nov. 


30, 



Man. 

Stadium, Harvard-Florida football game ... 84 

Symphony Hall, political rally ..... 27 

Boston Garden, political rally 31 

City election, at polling places, etc. .... 1,017 

Bulletin boards, election returns S2 

Boston Common, Red Cross demonstration . . 135 
Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game (freshmen 

teams) .... .... .72 

Armistice Day parade and service, Boston Common 336 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game . . 123 
Stadium and streets in vicinity, Harvard-Yale football 

game ......... 130 

Bulletin boards, footbiD returns ..... 94 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Holy Cro?s football game 104 



Missing Persons. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported ........ 920 

Total number found 843 



Total number still missing ....... 77 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Mnaoia. 


Founn. 


Still Muanca. 




Mile*. 


Fi nnWi 


kbits. 


Females. 


Mala. 


Fem&le*. 


Under 15 years 


°22 


53 


21S 


52 


4 


1 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 


203 


167 


1SS 


145 


15 


22 


Over 21 years 


172 


103 


145 


95 


27 


8 


Totals 


597 


323 


551 


292 


46 


31 



Used Car Dealers' Licenses for the Sale of Second- 
hand Motor Vehicles. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, 
firms and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the 
First, Second and Third Classes. 

During the year 290 applications for such licenses were 
received, 275 of which were granted (3 "without fee") and 
15 were rejected. 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the licenses granted 19 were voluntarily surrendered for 
cancelation and 18 transferred to new locations. 

Two applications for transfer to new locations were re- 
jected and five licenses suspended indefinitely. (See Table 
XIV.) 

Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Bonlon Jot the Year ending 
November SO, 1'JSH. 



Month. 


Stolen. 


Recovered. 

during 

M'.ntl.. 


Recovered 
I*atcr. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1928. 

December 






421 


3SS 


21 


12 


19». 

Jan. 






317 


302 


12 


3 


February 






270 


2.*)."> 


13 


2 


March . 






400 


302 


13 


1 


April 






351 


337 


10 


4 


May 






342 


323 


11 


S 


June 






310 


■'M\ 


10 


5 


July . 






205 


244 


10 


11 


August . 






332 


30S 


13 


11 


September 






315 


2SS 


11 


10 


October 






417 


3'JO 


•J 


18 


November 






300 


337 


- 


23 


Totals 


4,112 


3,«W 


133 


114 



1930. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



23 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Car* Reported lo Out Department for 
the Year ending Xoccmbcr SO, 1&S9. 



Month. 


Bought by 

Dealer*. 


feMlr 

rmiiiii 


Sold by 

Individuals. 


1928. 
December . 


2.4S7 


1,750 


783 


1929. 

January 






2,8. r »9 


2J0S6 


847 


February 






2,070 


2,211 


617 


March 






3,503 


zs«n 


877 


April . 






4,140 


V3S2 


1,257 


May . 






4,501 


KSV, 


1,294 


June . 






4,910 


4.730 


1,116 


July . 






4,053 


4,2*7 


1,146 


August 






4,107 


UJTO 


004 


September 






3.4S0 


3,459 


753 


October 






3,019 


23SS 


072 


November 






2,542 


1,705 


759 


Totals 


43,033 


3&J857 


11,415 



Miscellaneous Bcstxess. 





192*- n. 


1927-2*. 


192S-29. 


Abandoned children cared for 


C 


s 


4 


Accidents reported ..... 


'"--711 


S.973 


0,793 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3. WO 


3.3SS 


3,205 


Cases investigated ..... 


76J6I 


78,577 


75.345 


Dangerous buildings reported 


51 


15 


15 


Dangerous chimneys reported 


16 


22 


S 


Dead 1 todies recovered .... 


49 


19S 


55 


Defective cesspools reported 


17 


3S 


40 


Defective drains and vaults reported . 


4 


1 


3 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported . 


7 


S 


13 






24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



Defective gas pipes reported 

Defective hydrants reported 

Defective lamps reported . 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective sidewalks and streets reported 

Defective water pipes reported . 

Disturbances suppressed . 

Extra duties performed 

Fire alarms Riven .... 

Fires extinguished .... 

Insane persons taken in charge . 

Intoxicated persons assisted 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persoas assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained .... 



[Jan. 





1926-17. 


I927-M. 


1928-29. 




15 


13 


5 




79 


70 


52 




e.,:soo 


5,737 


5,S>9 




59 


116 


05 




0,0:52 


9,439 


S.93I 




43 


42 


SI 




437 


093 


911* 




42,189 


49.1V. 


40,072 




3,335 


3,031 


4.437 




1,364 


1,283 


1,171 




352 


355 


355 




29 


IS 


M 




1,520 


1,310 


1,454 




19 


17 


2S 




0.44G 


7,130 


0,540 




105 


28 


2S 




3,432 


2,054 


1,917 




4S4 


407 


424 




23 


20 


11 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
3,037 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



1930.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 25 

Other Serrices Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ...... 3,037 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 14,860 

Number of notices served ....... 11,863 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers 

regarding accidents and to examine police records) . . 12,491 

Number of days in court ....... 180 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 91 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to 

repair same ......... $2,294.35 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a 
van provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge 
of the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment they are 
returned to the house of detention and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,210 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness .......... 1,104 

Larceny ........... 311 

Night walking .......... 37 

Fornication ..... ..... 118 

Idle and disorderly . . . . • . . . . . 129 

Assault and battery ......... 14 

Adultery 56 

Violation of liquor law ........ 39 

Keeping house of ill fame ........ 21 

Various other causes ........ 381 

Total 2,210 

Recommitments. 

From Municipal court 134 

From County jail ......... 424 

Grand total ......... 2 768 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 536. Of these 362 
are connected with the underground system and 174 with the 
overhead. 









26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 



Miscellaneous V/ork. 

During the year the employees of this service responded 
to 1,901 trouble calls; inspected 53G signal boxes, 18 signal 
desks and 1,083 batteries; repaired 217 box movements, 
91 registers, 103 polar box bells, 8G locks, SS time stamps, 
33 vibrator bells, beside repairing all bell and electric light 
work at the various stations. There have been made 110 
plungers, 55 complete box fittings, 100 line blocks, 100 auto- 
matic hooks and a large amount of small work done which 
cannot be classified. 

The maintenance of the spot lights and traffic towers 
has been taken over by the new traffic commission. 

In the prescribed underground district five boxes were 
installed and connected with the underground system, one 
on Division 10, three on Division 12 and on one Division 14. 

A new signal box was installed on Division 7, to connect 
with the overhead system. A new signal desk was purchased 
for Division 1, and is being fitted up. 

A new White truck was purchased to replace one that had 
been in service eight years; a new Ford coupe purchased to 
replace an old Ford truck for inspection work, and a new 
Ford sedan purchased in replacement for inspection work. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 
Ford sedan, 1 Ford coupe and 1 Ford truck. 

Ten improved box movements were purchased and are 
now in service, also two signal desk inking registers were 
purchased. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 51,024 
runs covering an aggregate distance of 110,S09 miles. There 
were 32,507 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,309 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 391 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were 3,3S9 runs 
to fires and 646 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 53G signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 
circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 052,925 telephone mes- 
sages and 4,287,080 "on duty" calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time: — 



1930.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 27 



18 signal desks 
72 circuits 

536 street signal boxes 
14 stable call boards 
75 test boxes 
1,103 cells of battery 
GG9,75S feet underground cable 



218,340 feet overhead cable 
23,294 feet of duct 
67 manholes 
1 White truck 
1 Ford truck 
1 Ford sedan 
1 Ford coupe 



Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the Police of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as 

follows: — 

Value of property recovered consisting of boats, rigging, 
t n ° at sta 6 cs - <*c. -.. . $55,005 00 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports . . 731 
N'umber of vessels ordered from channel to the proper anchor- 

, a S c 243 

N'umber of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharf- 
inger 3 

Permits granted vessels to discharge cargo in stream . . 20 

Alarms of fire attended on the water front . 04 

Fires extinguished without alarm "j 

Boats challenged ..... ip 

Sick and injured persons assisted ... » 

Cases investigated 0153 

Dead bodies recovered .... •>•» 

Rescued from drowning .... c 

Vessels ordered to rig in jib-boom ... j 

Assistance rendered .... r- 

Obstructions removed from channel ... 50 
Vessels assigned to anchorage .... 1 5-1 
Fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver fuel oil in 

harbor ..... 101 

Dead bodies cared for ... ■> 
Gra PP"ng ■ • '. '. '. (hours) 107 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 9,134, 
7,47G of which were from domestic ports, 556 from' the 
British Provinces in Canada, and 1,658 from foreign ports. 
Of the latter 1,102 were steamers, 32 were motor vessels and 
1 schooner. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 17 to October 15, 1929. The launch E. U. Curtis 
cruises nightly from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge. 
Twenty-eight cases were investigated, five boats were 
challenged, three obstructions were removed from the 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

channel, two boats ordered to their proper anchorage, one 
dead body cared for, assistance rendered to four boats in 
distress by reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., 
and towing them with the persons aboard to a place of safety. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1928, there were 24 horses in 
the service. During the rear five were delivered to the 
Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals on account of age; one sold to the Boston Park 
Department and two were purchased. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses, attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
Automobiles. 
There are 78 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
26 attached to headquarter?; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 11 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; 5 in the 
South Boston district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 3 in 
the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 5 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 2 in the Dor- 
chester district, attached to Division 11; 2 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 2 in the Brighton 
district, attached to Division 14; 3 in the Charlestown 
district, attached to Division 15; 5 in the Back Bay and the 
Fenway, attached to Division 16; 2 in the West Roxbury 
district, attached to Division 17; 2 in the Hyde Park district, 
attached to Division 18; 2 in theMattapan district attached 
to Division 19; 2 assigned for use of the traffic divisions, and 
5 unassigned. (See page 30.) 

Cost of Riukmiag A ulomobilei. 

Care and repairs $22,433 62 

Tires 4,637 10 

Gasoline 18,363 98 

Oil 3,407 35 

Storage 5,516 48 

License fees 336 00 

Total $54,694 53 



1930. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo. 49. 



29 



Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are 4 unassigncd. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 



City Hospital ....... 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Hnymnrkct Squnrr) 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) 

Calls where sen-ices were not required 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Morgue . 

Psychopathic Hospital 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Home 

Carney Hospital 

Forest Hills Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Police station houses 

Boston State Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Chardon Street Home 

Milton Hospital 

Bay State Hospital . 

Chelsea Xaval Hospital 

Commonwealth Hospital 

Emerson Hospital 

Fenway Hospital 

Homeopathic Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Xcwton Hospital 

Strong Hospital 



2,193 

S76 

I.M 

116 

60 

•v.t 

5i 

47 

46 

39 

26 

17 

16 

5 

4 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 



Total 



3,733 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

List of VthieUt Uttd by the Department. 



[Jan. 



Divmran. 




'Z e 
c -r 

~ S 


8 

3 

8 

s 

3 


> 
7. 


i 


>. e 

fc r 

P. 


H 


He»<V|U3rtcrs 








- 


- 


25 


i 


- 


- 


.-•> 


Divi«r«n 1 . 


.. 






i 




1 


- 


1 


1 


5 


Divw.n 2 . 








- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


o 


Divi-*>n .'{ . 








- 




1 


- 


- 


- 





Divvirni 4 . 








- 




- 


i 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5 . 








- 




•> 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Dirw»n ft . 








- 




•> 


- 


•> 




7 


Diriw>n 7 . 








- 




■> 


- 


1 




11 


Divi*»>n '.) . 








- 




1 


- 


:i 


- 


5 


Diri«ion 10 








- 




•> 


- 


•> 




(i 


Diri«r»n 1 1 








- 




1 


- 


1 


'-' 


S 


Divwion |2 








- 




1 


- 


:{ 


2 


7 


DivMf>n 13 








- 




1 


- 


s 




13 


DirMr>n 14 








- 




1 


- 







15 


DivMr.n I.'i 








- 




•t 


- 


5 


3 


11 


DirMr>n 16 








- 




1 


- 







17 


Divw^n 17 








- 




1 


- 


s 


2 


12 


Divi-»,n IS 








- 




1 


- 


:s 




(i 


Divi*»n 10 








- 




1 




(i 


2 


10 


Diriwn 20 








-. 


- 


1 


- 


•> 


2 


"> 


Divwrti 21 








- 


- 


1 


- 


•» 


2 


."i 


1 H:s— izrv-<l 








- 


1 


- 


i 


•_> 


- 


1) 


Tr»U»L* 








i 


22 


52 


3 


71 


:;<; 


1SS 



1030.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 31 

Public Cahhiages. 

During the year there were 2,930 carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 255 as compared with last year; 2,926 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of 258 com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 4 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 206 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which 
were turned over to the inspector; G7 of these were restored 
to the owners, and the balance placed in the custody of the 
lost property bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 2,93S 

Number of carriages licensed ....... 2,930 

Number of licenses transferred ...... 66 

Number of licenses canceled ....... 606 

Number of licenses revoked ....... 9 

Number of licenses suspended ....... 31 

Number of applications for carriage Beenses rejected ... 8 

Number of carriages inspected ....... 3,756 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 5,074 

Number of complaints against owncrsaud drivers investigated . 1,874 

Number of days spent in court ...... 251 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 271 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 206 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected ..... 181 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconadcrcd and granted . . 28 

Drivers' licenses granted ........ 4,893 ' 

Drivers' licenses revoked ....... 21 

Drivers' licenses suspended . . . . . . . 217 

Drivers' licenses canceled ....... 104 

Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1929, 1,874 such special stands, 2 of which 
were reconsidered and rejected. 

Of these special stands there have been 234 canceled or 
revoked, 57 transferred and 12 suspended. There have been 
328 applications for special stands rejected, 20 of which were 

1 3 cunri-lrd for smxgnynicnt. 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

reconsidered and granted, and 22 applications rejected for 
transfer of special stands, 3 of which were reconsidered 
and granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1929, there have 
been issued licenses for 57 sight-seeing automobiles and 34 
special stands for them. There have been rejected 2 ap- 
plications for sight-seeing automobiles and 4 applications 
for special stands. 

There have been 124 operators' licenses granted, 2 ap- 
plications for operators' licenses rejected and 5 operators' 
licenses canceled. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey mer- 
chandise from place to place within the city for hire. During 
the year 4,002 applications for such licenses were received 
and granted. Of these licenses 197 were subsequently 
canceled for non-payment of license fee and 47 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 



1930.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 

Listing Work in Boston. 



33 



Tul 


Canvaa. 


Yea a. 


CsnvsM 


1903 » 


181,045 


1916' 








- 


1904 . 






193,195 


1917 








221 ,207 


1905. 






194,547 


1018 








224,012 


1906 . 






195,446 


1919 








227,466 


1907 . 






195,900 


1920 








235,248 


190S. 






201,255 


1921* 








480,783 


1909. 






201,391 


1922 








480,106 


1910» 






203,603 


1923 








477,547 


1911 . 






206,825 


1924 








485,677 


1912. 






214,178 


1925 








489,478 


1913. 






215,388 


1926 








493,415 


1914 . 






219,364 


1927 








495,767 


1915 . 






220,883 


192S 








491,277 



1 1903 to 1909. both indiuire, lining i 
> 1910 lutmi rbuued to April I 



i on May 1. 



■ 1916 toting done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 Uw changed to include women in listing. 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 

Male 238,982 

Female 254,268 



Total 



493,250 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 

Advertising and printing $39,906 51 

Clerical services 18,625 00 

Stationery 291 55 

Interpreters 252 17 

Card cabinet 68 27 

Telephone 10 19 



Total $59,153 69 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



S'umbcr of Policemen Employed in Lifting. 

April 1 1,400 

April 2 1,331 

April 3 1,077 

April 4 "27 

April5 50 

April 6 IS 

April 8 7 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1929 may be summarized as follows: — 



1*29. 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Convicted of crime 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit ... . 
Total 



1,022 
264 
20S 
372 

5,000 



7,865 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application of 
any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1929, there were 1,518 
special police officers appointed; 18 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause and 39 appointments canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows: — 

From United States Government ...... 33 

Fro m .State departments ........ 3 

From City departments ........ 342 

From County of Suffolk ........ 1 

Fro m railroad corporations ....... 61 

From other corporations and associations ..... 807 



193a] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 94. 35 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 244 

From private institutions ....... 8 

From ciorches ......... 19 

Total 1,618 

i 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 27,818. Of these 27,492 were granted, of which 
239 were canceled for non-payment, leaving 27,253. During 
the rear 432 licenses were transferred, 1,236 canceled, 32 
revoked and 328 applications were rejected. The officers 
investigated 2,440 complaints arising under these licenses. 
The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $69,S60.75. (See Tables XIV, XVII.) 

Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 34 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, two of which were disapproved 
and two licenses were subsequently canceled on account of 
nonpayment of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 57 instruments were inspected with the 
following result : — 



3G 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Kind <>r Ixwibchext. 


Numlwr 
lo*peclf>r|. 


Pa***»L 


Street pianos 














20 


20 


Hand orpins 








• 






13 


!:; 


Violins . 














7 


7 


Accordions 








• • 






7 


7 


Banjos . 














•j 


•j 


Clarinets 








• 






•j 


*j 


Mutes . 














•j 


^j 


Guitars 








■ 






•j 


•j 


liajr-pipcs 














1 


1 


Piano 








* 






1 
.17 


1 


Totals 


57 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses arc granted to hands of (>cr- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instrument* 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Yeah. 


Applica- 
tion!. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


ice; 


240 


239 


1 


1926 


223 


222 


1 


1927 


193 


192 


1 


1928 


223 


221 


2 


1929 


209 


207 


2 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 



1930.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



37 



the number of sueh applications granted, the number refused 
and the numler revoked: — 



Yn*. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 


192G .... 


3,105 


3,043 


122 


3 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 


77 


2 


192S .... 


2,954 


2,904 


50 


1 


1929 .... 


3,025 


2,224 « 


70 


1 



1 -V canceled for nonpaymess. 

Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
acts of 1904, as amended during the year, the location of each 
house and the number of lodgers accommodated: — 



LOCATIOX. 


Number 
Lodged. 


1 7 Davis .Street ........ 


37,323 


1051 Waslu'ngloo Strcirl ...... 


30,551 


1202 WasliingJoo^Uwi 


25,093 


1025 Washington An*t ...... 


25,931 


Total 


1 19,553 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1928, there were 27S pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 14 died, viz., 1 captain, 5 lieutenants, 1 
sergeant, 5 patrolmen and 2 annuitants. Eighteen were 
added, viz., 1 captain, 2 lieutenant inspectors, 3 lieutenants, 
3 sergeants, S patrolmen, and the widow of Patrolman John 
J. Fitzgerald, who died from injuries received in the per- 
formance of doty, leaving 281 on the roll at date, 251 men 
and 30 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to S251.149.6G, and it is estimated that S275J2G 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. (Jan. 

will be required for pensions in 1930. This includes partial 
provision for 1 captain, 2 lieutenant inspectors, 1 lieutenant, 
4 sergeants, 22 patrolmen and 2 civilian employees all of 
whom are 65 years old or more and are entitled to be pen- 
Honed on account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 55 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,405.93 during 
the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and listing persons twenty years of 
age or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police 
signal service were S5,S8 1,029.23. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was $01,190.72. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., 
was S80,614.24. (See Table XIV.) 



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1930. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



41 



Taule II. 
Change* in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





A IT II mi ill u 

Stkknoth. 


Acttal Stoescth. 


RANKS AND GRADES. 


J .in. 1. 
1929. 


Nov. 30. 
1929. 


Jan. I. 
1929. 


Nor. 30. 
1929. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy superintendent* 


•> 


2 


o 


2 


- 


Chief inspector . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Captains 


30 


:i() 


30 


29 


Minus 1 


Inspectors . 


27 


27 


27 


25 


Minus 2 


Lieutenants 


44 


44 


43 


44 


Plus 1 


Sergeants 


177 


177 


174 


1S4 


Plus 10 


Patrolmen . 


•-Mr.' 1 


2,149 


2,011) 


2.143 


Plus 127 


I'atrolwomcn 


8 


S 


5 


5 


- 


Totals . 


2.3111 


2.441 


2,301 


2,430 


Plus 135 



The last column (NYt Gain or Ixiss) represents the difference, between 
the actual strength on January 1 nntl on November .'{0. 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1930.J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November SO, 1929, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Bik-h. William 


Age 


60 Vu years 


34 Vu years 


Br>-eo. Jiidk M 


Incapacitated 


5S"Vu " 


30 Vu ' 




Carbon, Charles 


Age 


65 Vu " 


33 Vu " 




Casey. LVais J. 


Age 


65 Vu " 


35 Vu ' 




Fallon. George J. . 


Incapacitated 


32 Vu " 


9«/t« " 




Ferris, Timothy M. 


Age 


62"/u " 


34 Vu • 




Garrett. Oliver B. . 


Incapacitated 


35 


9»/u * 




Green. Thomas E. . 


Age 


65 Vu " 


40 Vu • 




Hinkard. Michael J. 


Age 


C2=/u " 


35'Vu ' 




H viand. Edward F. 


Age 


02°/!! " 


37»/u ' 




KUday. John W. . 


Age 


62 Vu " 


30 Vu - 




\*-* is, Woodbury L.. Jr. . 


Age 


67 Vu " 


3S Vu ' 




Mnllifui. Francis J. 


Age 


65Vii " 


40 Vu - 




Muri.hr. Daniel G. 


Age 


65 Vu " 


37 Vu ' 




Riley. George 


Age 


79 Vu " 


34 


Williams Patrick J. 


Age 


63 •/« " 


36 Vu " 


Wise. OfircrJ. 


Age 


65 •/« " 


42 



Police Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under the Boston Re- 
tirement Sytem, which went into effect February I, 1923. 



Name. 


Poation. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Evans. Rarhard H. 


Sergeant 


Age 


70 years 


41 Vu years 


Lenin, John J. 


HoctJer 


Age 


70 


10 Vu " 


Lynn. William M. 


Patrolman 


Age 


72 


40 >/u '" 


Mullen. IIU.ir.1 M. 


Lieutenant 


Age 


70 Vu " 


40 Vu " 


Savage. John 


Patrolman 


Incapacitated 


JSVu " 


6 Vu " 


Walsh. James M. 


Patrolman 


Incapacitated 


29»/u " 


5>'/„ " 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



(Jan. 



Table V. 

Lid of Ojucrrs who were Promoted nhove the Rank oj l*utfutmiiit fluting the 
Year ending S'orembcr 30, 1929. 



Dalr 



Hank and Name. 



Jan. 


IS, 


1920 


Jan. 


18, 


1020 


Jan. 


18, 


19-29 


Jan. 


IS 


1929 


Jan. 


is. 


1929 


Jan. 


is, 


1929 


Jan. 


is, 


1929 


Mar. 


1, 


1929 


Mar. 


1, 


1929 


Mar. 


* I 


1929 


A tie. 


16, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


A UK- 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


192".) 


Aug. 


16. 


1929 


Aug. 


16, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


A lie. 


IB, 


1929 


Aug. 


IB, 


1929 


Auk. 


16, 


1929 


Auk- 


30, 


1929 


Auk- 30. 


1929 


(M. 


1, 


1929 


C*\. 


4, 


1929 


Oet. 


4, 


1929 


Oct. 


4, 


1929 



Serjeant Max B. F. Thornier to Ihc rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Henry J, Bailey to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward A. Carey to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael P. Carr to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Crossen to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Leo E. ffoban to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Hugh J. Sullivan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward B. Cain to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph Maraghy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Daniel M. O'Connell to the rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant Andrew J. Hurley to the rink of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Thomas F. Casey to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Edward W. Fallon to the rink of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman William J. Cripps to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman J.vnes J. Crowley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Patrick .1. Flannery to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George A. Hunter to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Mark J. Leonard to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Cecil E. Lewis to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Andrew Markhard to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John H. McFarland to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank V. Sullivan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George F. Wcckliachcr to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Harrington B. W'yand to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William M. Donahue to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Robert A. Lynch to the rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant John J. Hanrahan to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant Sherman W. Augusta to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman William J. McCarthy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William McDonnell to the rank of Sergeant. 



1930.] 



PUBLIC DOCUilENT— No. 49. 



45 



Table VL 

.V umber of Men in Active Service at tie End of ike Pretenl Year who wer* 
Appointed on Die Force in tie Year Staled. 







P 


i 














Datz ArroiNTtD. 


B 

c 

B 

a 
*C 

& 

3 
CO 


• 

E.5 


• 
C 

1 

IS 






£ 
o 
E 
B 


a 

e 
■ 
s 
3 

■ 

3 


a 
5 
1 


• 

E 
§ 


i 




1SS2 


i 














1 


1SS6 






_ 


_ 


- 


•* 


1 


— 


- 


- 


3 


1SS7 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


ISSS 






1 


- 


- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


6 


8 


1SS9 




















4 


4 


isoo 






_ 


— 


- 


1 





2 


2 


1 


i 


1S91 






- 




1 




1 


— 


1 


2 


5 


iso2 






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a 


- 


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-» 


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20 


IS94 






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-» 


2 


S 


is»5 






- 


i 




4 


J 








28 


o.-> 


1S96 






- 




- 


1 





- 


1 


6 


9 


1S97 






- 




- 


- 


* 


1 


1 


2 


6 


ISO* 






- 


- 




1 


— 


-> 


6 


8 


17 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


K 


-» 


.i 


13 


12 


38 


1001 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


s 


3 


16 


ioo:; 






- 


- 


— 


•> 


11 


•> 


11 


8 


2' 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


- 


-9 


4 





5 


20 


loa'i 






- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


.7 


2 


9 


loot; 






- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


3 


1 


6 


1007 






- 


- 


— 


- 


11 


4 


6 


6 


17 


100S 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


12 


o 


23 


1000 






- 


— 


— 


— 


a 


- 


3 


•> 


6 


1010 






- 


- 


— 


- 


a 


1 


2 


■> 


6 


1011 






- 




_ 


- 


i 




■> 


T 


4 


1012 






- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


6 


4 


12 


1013 


















1 


1 


2 


ion 




















2 


2 


1015 


















1 


- 


1 


1916 
















1 


1 


2 


4 


1917 


















4 


I 


5 


1910 
















1 


51 


572 


624 


19 


















9 


185 


194 


1921 


















6 


128 


134 


1922 




















76 


76 


192:$ 






- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


- 


1 


112 


113 


1924 




















79 


79 


1925 




















99 


99 


1926 




















329 


329 


1927 




















131 


131 


192S 




















95 


95 


1929 




















215 


215 


TolaL 


* 




1 


2 


1 


29 


25 


" 


1S4 


2,148 


2,434 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November SO, 1020, who were Born in the Yenr 
Indicated on the Table below. 







a 


















e 


'JZ 


5 
















« 
-o 
e 


i. . 

£3 


i 




■ 


3 


, 


c 




Datz or Birth. 


5 

e 

s. 


3 a 


3 

B 


3 

*3 


O 

i 


3 

a 
S 

3 


3 

I 


■ 

e 


i 




3 

m 


a 






3 


3 


1 


* 


o 


1859 




1 














1 


1S60 






— 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


•» 


3 


1.861 






_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


4 


1S62 






_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


3 


3 


1S63 


















■» 


f. 


8 


18<U 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


10 


15 


1S65 






- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


r 


13 


23 


1866 






1 


- 


- 


3 


2 


a 


5 


10 


26 


1867 






- 


- 


1 


6 


1 


4 


6 


9 


27 


1868 






_ 


_ 


- 


2 


1 


_ 


8 





17 


1S60 






- 


1 


- 


4 


- 


5 


5 


S 


23 


1870 






- 


- 


- 


2 


o 


1 


2 


5 


12 


1871 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


3 


8 


15 


1872 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


6 


9 


18 


1873 






- 


- 


_ 


2 


- 


2 


16 


o 


22 


1874 






- 


— 


— 


2 


4 


3 


9 


5 


23 


1875 






- 


_ 


_ 


2 


1 


•> 


5 


- 


10 


1S76 






- 


- 


— 


1 


1 


3 


4 


i 


11 


1877 






- 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


2 


4 


7 


14 


1878 






- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


2 


5 


4 


11 


1879 






- 


— 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


4 


6 


12 


1880 






- 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


1881 






- 


— 


- 


- 


1 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1S82 






_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


3 


1 


5 


- 


9 


18S3 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


1 


5 


1884 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


2 


7 


1885 


















•j 


17 


19 


18S6 


















•> 


:{0 


32 


1887 






_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


46 


48 


1888 


















5 


56 


61 


1889 


















5 


75 


80 


1890 




















6S 


68 


1891 


















2 


99 


101 


1892 


















7 


140 


147 


189.3 


















9 


154 


163 


1894 


















10 


176 


186 


1895 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


173 


184 


1896 


















7 


197 


204 


1897 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


9 


189 


199 


1898 


















2 


159 


161 


1899 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


115 


115 


1900 




















147 


147 


1901 




















99 


99 


1902 




















43 


43 


1903 




















34 


34 


1904 




















9 


9 


Total. 


i 




1 


2 


1 


29 


25 


44 


184 


2,148 


2,434 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1929, is 
37 years. 



1930.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



49 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 
Xumbar of Arrests by Police Divisions 4uri~g the Year 
November SO, 1929. 



ending 



Divisions 




Mile*. 


Females. 


ToUli. 


Headquarters 










1,011 


27S 


1,289 


Division 1 










6,805 


112 


6,917 


Division 2 










2,821 


359 


3,180 


Division 3 










4,718 


327 


5,015 


Division 4 










4,274 


152 


1,426 


Division 5 










8,514 


995 


9,509 


Division 6 










4,187 


345 


4,532 


Division 7 










6,812 


356 


7,168 


Division 8 










35 


- 


35 


Division 9 










7.743 


410 


8,153 


Division 10 










3,950 


476 


4,426 


Division 11 










2.640 


177 


2.S17 


Division 12 










2,919 


168 


3,087 


Division 13 










2,317 


108 


2,425 


Division 14 










1,824 


163 


1,987 


Division 15 










5,442 


248 


5,690 


Division 16 










2,637 


279 


2,916 


Division 17 










1,803 


87 


1,890 


Division 18 










632 


33 


665 


Division 19 










2,078 


120 


2,198 


Division 20 










8,847 


98 


8,945 


Division 21 










2,109 


215 


2,324 


liquor and Xarcotic unit 






1,709 


243 


1,952 


Special Service squad 






355 


17 


372 


Totals 






S6.IR2 


5,766 


91,918 



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70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Sumbrr of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
Kovcmbcr SO. J9S9. 



DlTDlOX*. 


Male.. 


Female*. 


Spayed. 


Breeder*. 


Total. 


1 


HO 


10 


i 


2 


K2 


o 


s 


1 


- 


- 





3 


214 


SO 


17 


•J 


352 


4 


1 7 


.'{7 


(i 


- 


120 


5 


353 


10S 


26 


1 ' 


•iss 


6 


1% 


GO 





- 


265 


t 


con 


IS6 


•» 


1 


818 


S 


l 


- 


- 


- 


1 





.".74 


121 


44 


- 


7:io 


10 


510 


151 


.">0 


- 


711 


11 


ir.V) 


140 


99 


1 


1,165 


12 


3ss 


100 


39 


- 


527 


13 


5>>7 


130 


7fi 


1 


701 


14 


605 


147 


87 


■> 


841 


15 ... 


361 


125 


23 


- 


500 


16 ... 


4:!0 


139 


68 


- 


037 


17 


1.007 


ls2 


170 


I 


1 ,4511 


IS ... 


454 


Of; 


52 


- 


002 


10 


433 


02 


52 


- 


549 


Totals 


7.014 


1,893 


S.iO 


11 


10,668 



1 Breeder'a Enue at JoO. 



Table XVI. 
Total Sumbrr of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by Police Divisions. 



Divi-ion 1 . 021 


Division 12 


40 


Divi-ion 2 






1 ,220 


Division 13 


70 


Divi-ion 3 






84 


Division 14 


01 


Divi-ion 4 






320 


Division 15 


70 


Divi-ion 5 






144 


Division 16 


100 


Divi-ion 6 






382 


Division 17 


37 


Divi-ion 7 






OS 


Division 18 


44 


Divi-ion 9 . 




252 


Division 19 


40 


Divi-ion 10 
Divi-ion 1 1 




58 
01 








Total . 


4,002' 



■Or* buodrevl ninet y M t t n canceled (or nonpayment of Ucchm fee. 



1930.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



71 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year endimg Koeemher SO, 1929. 



EXPKXDITUBES. 

Pay of police and employees 

Pensions 

Fuel and light 

Water and iee 

Furniture and bedding . 

Printing and stationery . 

Care and cleaning of station house* and city prison 

Repairs to station houses and city prison 

Repairs and supplies for police boats 

Telephone rentals, tolls and telegrams 

Purchase of horses, saddler}' and motor vehicles 

Care and keeping of horses 

Care and repair of motor vehicles 

Feeding prisoners . 

Medical attendance and medicine 

Transportation 

Pursuit of criminals 

Uniforms and uniform caps 

Badges, buttons, clubs, bolts, insignia, etc 

Traveling expenses and food for police 

Rent of buildings .... 

Traffic signs and signals 

Legal and other expert services 

Storage on abandoned and stolen cars 

Shooting gallery, flag staffs, etc. 

Music for police parade 

Membership and fees in rifle association 

Shrubbery for station house grounds 

Memorial wreaths for graves of police 

Total 

Expenses of listing 

Expenses of signal sen-ice (see Table XVIII> 

Total 



85,006,191 12 

251,149 60 

05,470 40 

1,798 70 

8,597 37 

33,140 20 

17,944 27 

2S.542 57 

23,342 09 

28,134 72 

47.02S 42 

8,357 56 

53,439 70 

4,719 10 

8,010 50 

7,365 13 

12,040 38 

114,001 09 

11,932 59 

2,295 39 

5,080 00 

10,724 37 

2,575 52 

1,303 22 

1,163 59 

470 00 

210 00 

1.50 50 

72 00 

S5.S2 1,875 54 

59,153 69 
61,190 72 

S5.942.219 95 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commuwioner . $42,567 75 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) . 27,293 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and atiandoned property 2,282 54 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commnnons on tele- 
phone, interest on deposits, uniform cloth, use of police 

property, etc 2,734 00 

Refunds 4,307 54 

For damage to police property 1,351 32 

Miscellaneous item ....... 42 03 

Sale of street pocket directories (credit by City Collect c r) 36 00 

Total SS0.614 24 



72 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Serrice daring tlie Year eiuting 
November 30, 1929. 



Pay mils 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor 

Kent of part of building . 

Care and repairs of building 

Purchase of truck, coupe and sedan . 

Storage and repairs of motor vehicles 

Car fares ..... 

Prcscril>ed underground work . 

Total 



$37,S78 24 
13.2S7 65 

1.000 00 
00 12 

4.001 75 
1,254 83 

029 90 

2,478 23 

$01,190 72 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



73 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



75 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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o >. 
V.S. 



INDEX 



PAOE 

Accidents lf - JJ ™. 74 

caused by automobile . . . . • 10 - '%• '* 

persona killed or injured by. in streets, parks ndtqwa l\ 

number of. reported .....-••••-• 



Ambulance service . 



29 



ArreVt. . '. '. '■ ....... 14.15.18.50,51-67 

age and sex o( ** 

comparative statement of ........... ,.,_?£ 

6nal disposition of ?i~il 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . SI'S! 

for drunkenness >°- i D ' 2 



foreigners 



15, 51-66 



minors 15 - 51 -*| 

nativity of „Jg 

nonresident* 15 - sl ~™ 

number of. by divisions *2 

number of, punished by fine ........... jo 

on warrants .......-■••••• J» 

summoned by court . . • • • • _. .. *5 

total number of ' it Si 

violation of city ordinances ........... 15, o 1 

without varrants ......-••••-• ** 

fttotEBS.: :::::::::: :«i )l ««ii S a8 

accident* due to . . . • • - * • . 18, 73, 74 

death* caused by ....•■-••••- • 15 

police . 28,30 

public ........-•■•••■ 31 

eigbt-seeins; .......-•••••• '55 

t»tolen ........-.-••-• 22 

lied . I 21.23.68 

Benefit* and pension*: .....*-••••-• 37 

Bertitlon system .............. « 

Buildings ........-•• ... 23 

dangerous, reported ............. 23 

found open *nd made secure ........... 23 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation .. ..... ... 17 

Carriage*, public .......... ... 31, 68 

articles left in 31 

automobile . . . . . . . • • . • • ii 31 

number licensed . . . . . . • • • 31,68 

Cases investigated 18, 23. 25 

Children - . 16. 23, 24 

abandoned, eared for ........... 23 

lost, restored 16, 24 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of ......... 15, 61 

Claims, inspector of ............ 24 

Collective musician* ............. 36, 68 

Commitments ........--..-• 16, 25 

Complaints 35, 48, 68 

against police officers ............ -iS 

against miscellaneous licenses ........... 35, 68 

Courts 15, 16, 18, 25, 67 

fines imposed by . .......... 15, 67 

number of days attendance at, by officers ... . . . 15, 16. 18. 67 

number of persons summoned by ......... 15 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of .......... 17 

arrests by ............. IS 

finger-print system ............. 17 

identification room ............. 17 

photographs 17, 18 

records ............... 17 

Criminal work .............. 67 

comparative statement of ........ . 67 

Dangerous weapons ............. 36 

Dead bodies 23. 27 

recovered .............. 23, 27 

Deaths 14.18,42,73,74 

by accident, suicide, etc 14, 73, 74 

of police officers ............. 14, 42 

Department, police ............. 13 

Distribution of force 14, 39 

Disturbances suppressed ............ 24 

Dogs 24, 68, 70 

amount received for licenses for .......... 68,71 

damage done by ............ 24 

number licensed 68, 70 



7S 



P.D. 49. 



Drivers, hackx**? earriaar 
Drowning, person* reacu«6 from 
Drunkenness , • « 

arrests for, per d*T - 

foreigners arrestee W 

decrease i« numfjerr -*/ trrwli f«< 

nonresident* sjrre*rt**£ for 

total number of vnwu for 

women committed iw 
Employees of the Depesrsateiit 
Events, special . * 

Expenditures . „ 

Extra duties performed !by officers 
Financial , 

expenditure* . * 

pensions , . + 

receipts , 
* miteetTaneoos !*•**•* fees 

signal 6tr*it% . 
Fines . 

amount of 

average amount of „ 

number punished i-y 
Finger-print tytttm 
Fire alarms . . „ 

defective, reported - 

number gjveo . 
Fires , 

extinguished . -. 

on water front atten^*f 
Foreigners, number arre«ee«d 
Fugitives from justice * 
Gaming, illegal 
Hackney carriage driver* 
Hackney carriages . * 

Hand carts . . , 

Harbor service 
Horses . 

House of detection 
Hou'e of ill fame, keeps*; 
Hydrants, defective, reyieuH 
Identification room , 

Imprisonment . * 

persons seateneed u* 

total years of . 
Income , 

Inquests held 

Insane personr taken is rt&tsrge 
Inspector of claim* ,. 

cases investigated , 
Intoxicated penon* aseurMd 
Itinerant musician* 
Junk collectors 
Junk »hop keepers . 
Jury lists, poli** work 031 
Lamps, defective, refjorvi 
Licenses, misceSaneoos „ 

LiqilOT law <M,f..*r l .n^r 1 i „ 

Listing, police 

expenses of 

number listed . 

number of pcAiectcMst <*» ployed i 
Lodgers at station boume*) 
Lodging houses, pubbe , 

application* for ss g*M ss *J 

authority to license , 

location of 

number of peraooa Wflced in 
Lost, abandoned and rto*A property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' awtrffsni 

cases on wh*eh i&9ue*ti* were held 

causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous b**foes*> 
Miscellaneous Urease* 

amount of fee* cofiex&t»f for 

complaJnu inrnticwstil 

number casvaled *ut svoked 

number ls*«*d 

number Uaa*f«rr*d - 
Misting perron* . m m 

age and sex af 

- > > l r r . I .-* r \(l\3SA 

i- u nil- r reported 



33. 3 





PACE 




31. 6S 




■t\ ^>~ 






IS 


2*i .".7 




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IS, :.7 




IS 
IS, .'i7 




IS, 37 




23 






1, 39 


10, 43 




l!l 


3* 


7 1 7- 




ls| 24 


!, 0i> 


71, 72 


38 


71,72 




37. 71 


3S 


till. 71 


a. - . 


09, 71 


38 


71,72 


IS 


ltl, 67 


IS 


111, 67 




1 3, 67 




16 




17 




23 




23 




24 




24 27 




24! 27 


IS 


.-.1-66 




IS 




61 




31. 6S 




31. OS 




«S 




11,27 




28 




2S 








2,i, 5j 




24 




17 


111 


is, 67 




16 


111 


IS, 07 


38 


OS. 71 




18 




24 




24 




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24 




33. OS 




OS 




OS 




34 




24 


3S, 


OS, 71 




7 


■ 71i 


7.1. 76 




33,71 


3:.. 


73. 76 




34 




16 




37. 6S 




68 




37 




37 




37 


Hi, 


09, 7 1 




10, 21 




18 




18 




IS 


1 "1. 


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23 


33, 


lis, 71 


3.*., 


OS. 71 




33, OS 




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SS, i.s 




21 




21 




21 




21 



16 



P.D. 49. 79 

raGC 
Musician ^Skm 

collective S-g 

itinerant . 

Nativity of persons arrested. .....•••-•• 

Nonresident offenders *?• ?!"2 

CCence. ^2T2 

acnmn chastity, morality, rse i- ?i*2 

against license Imi ,•-=?' jiv 2 

against Ihe person H 51, M. 65 

against property, milicx»u> i? m" 2 

against property, »ith violence it S" 2 

acuinst property, witbou violence . • • • • " 1* « 2 

forgery and against currency is m2 

miscellaneous 2 

recapitulation J™ 



Operators 
Parks, public . 



32. M 

7 ■'. T4 



accident* reported in _.....--•-- ***• ■* 

Pawnbrokers t- --| 

Pensions and bene&ts ....».-«•---■ "iy 

estimates for pension* .......----- xt 

nunilier of persona on roQ* .......---- ** 

payments on account of-,.*.. ------ •*■ ' 



Plant and |.-rai,nncl 



10 



Police *} 

special . " 

Police charitable fund „ .^. «. . . S? 

PoBce department 13. 14. 19. 20. 2S. 39. 41-64 

annual dress parade of ........... 20 

authonw-d atrd aclu.nl ^rv^cih t>f .......... *» 

distribution of ......... - 39 

horse* m use in.-....-.----- 2S 

bow constituted ._.......-..- *3 

officer* appointed ........-.-•• ** 

absent sick -*.«.« li 

arrest i by 14, oO, ol-64 

complaints afr&in*t ........■••• ■*§ 

date appointed ......••■•--• 

detailed, special eve*es ........... 

died 14.42 

discharged ._..-.......- 

injured .............. 

nativity of ............ ■» 

promoted .............. 14, 44 

resigned « 

retired H. ■« 

vehicle* in use in ............ . 30 

work of M 

Police lis tint 33,71,7-1,-6 

PoHce signal service 13. 25. 3S, 39, 71. 72 

miscellaneous work ............. 38 

payment* on account of ............ 39,71,72 

property of .............. 27 

signal boxes .............. 25 

Prisoner*, nativity of ............ 16 

Property 18, 19. 3S, 67, 69. 71 

loot, abandoned and MoVa ........... 19, 1 

recovered .............. IS, 67 

sale of condemned, unclasxaed, etc. .......... 19, 69, 71 

stolen 17, 67 

taken from prisoner* and fedcen .......... 16 

Public carriage* 31, 68 

Public lodging bouse* ...... ...... 37, 6S 

Receipt* 38,68,71 

Revolver* 36. 68 

license* to eaiTy ............. 36, 68 

Salanf* 12, 39, 40 

Second-band article* ............. 68 

Sewer*, defective, reported ............ 24 

>ick and injured person* a*sa*3ed . . . . 16, 24, 27 

Sickness, absence on account of........... 47 

Sight-seeing automobile* ............ 32. 68 

Signal service, police 13, 25, 38, 39, 1. 72 

Special events .............. 19 

Sc*r»»J police .............. 34 

Station bouse* .............. 16 

lodger* at 16 

witnesses detained at ........... 16 

Stolen property .............. 17,67 

recovered .............. 17, 67 

value of ............... 17,67 

Street railways, conductor*, cc to ra. cn and starter* ........ 68 



SO PD. 49. 

r-Aor. 

Smew M ' ?HJ 

sm-irtts reported in ............ 'I 

defectrre. reported 24 

obstructions removed ............ 24 

Tomi 2i * 



■tr»y. p« up 



24 



T-ietype "> 

Traffic 5 

C»»d can . 21, 23. 68 

bcenaed dealer. -'l.i'.s 

•ale* W PO gt wl .•....<•••-••• 23 

T«iiiclM . 22, 28, 30, 32, 68. 70 

ambulaoea. ....■■•......• 20 

sutomobsles 22, 28 

is at, ta police department ........... 30 

pubbe carriage. . . ■ • . ■ > * * 31,68 

wacooa 32, 68, 70 

Teasel, 27 

Tuod! 32, 68, 70 

Dumber licensed by division. ........... 70 

total ssmber beensed ............ 32, 68 

Water pipes, defective, reported 24 

Water runnr-t to waste reported ........... 24 

Weapons, dacxerous ............. 36 

Witnesses IS. 16, 24, 25, 67 

leea earned by officer, a. IS, 16, 67 

number of days' attendance at court by officer, a. ...... 15,16, 18,67 

number of. detained at itation bouse. . 16, 24 

Wcraea committed to House of Detection ......... 25 



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