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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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^35'^«"^ \>r\^=£>(o jl^il)i>trO- LIBRARY 1 



Public Document 



! .Mi^ I ! 

I DETftOIT, MICH. Jtelm^ 






TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1926 



.62 
1926 




"Printed by Ordbb op the Police Commissioner 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




Public Document 



No. 49 



Olljf OInmm0ttui?aUl| nf lHaaaarljuaftta 



TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1926 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



X 



.J> 



ID55^. ?. 






CONTENTS 













PAGE 


Letter to Governor .......... 5 


Liquor traflBc and narcotics 










5 


Firearms . . . . . . 










8 


Traffic 










11 


Sale by Police of unclaimed, etc., property 










. 13 


Celerity in dispatching police information 










14 


Assaults on police officers . 










15 


Plant 










16 


-The Department ..... 










18 


The Police Force .... 










18 


Signal service ..... 










. . 18 


Employees of the department 










18 


Recapitulation ..... 










18 


Distribution and changes 










19 


Police officers injured while on duty 










19 


Work of the department .... 










19 


Arrests ...... 










19 


Drunkenness ..... 










20 


Nativity of prisoners, etc. . 










20 


Bureau of criminal investigation 










21 


Officer detailed to assist medical examiners . 










23 


Lost, abandoned and stolen property . 










23 


Larceny of automobiles, etc. 










24 


Violations of State liquor law 










25 


Special events ...... 










25 


Missing persons ..... 










27 


Record of automobiles reported stolen 










28 


Record of used cars reported 










29 


Miscellaneous business . . ^ . 










29 


Inspector of claims ..... 










30 


House of detention . . . ... 










31 


Police signal service ..... 










31 


Signal boxes ..... 










31 


Miscellaneous work .... 










32 


Harbor service ..... 










33 


Horses ....... 










34 


Vehicle service ..... 










34 


Automobiles ..... 










34 


Ambulances ..... 










35 


List of vehicles used by the department 










36 


PubUc carriages ..... 










37 


Sight-seeing automobiles 










38 


Wagon licenses ..... 










38 


Listing work in Boston .... 










38 


Listing expenses .... 










39 


Number of policemen employed in listing 










39 


Police work on jury lists . 










39 


Special police ....... 










40 


Railroad police . . . 










40 



CONTENTS. 



Conductors, motormen and starters 
Miscellaneous licenses 
Musicians' licenses . 

Itinerant . 

Collective . 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
Public lodging houses 
Pensions and benefits 
Financial 
Statistical tables, 

Distribution of police force, etc. . 

List of police officers in active service who died 

List of officers retired 

List of officers promoted 

Number of men in active service . 

Men on police force and year born 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness 

Complaints against officers . 

Number and distribution of horses 

Number of arrests by police divisions 

Arrests and offences . 

Age and sex of persons arrested . 

Comparative statement of police criminal work 

Licenses of all classes issued 

Dog licenses issued 

Wagon licenses issued 

Financial statement . 

Payments on account of signal service 

Accidents ..... 

Male and female residents listed . 



PAGE 

40 
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43 
43 
43 
44 

45 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
56 
57 
58 
73 
74 
75 
77 
77 
78 
79 
80 
82 



SIfp QlommnnuJpaltli of ilaHHarliMarttB. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 

Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1926. 

To His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller, Governor. 

Your Excellency : — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in compliance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 1906, a report 
of the Police Department for the year ending November 30, 
1926. 

Liquor Traffic and Narcotics. 

Enforcement of the prohibitory laws because of the many 
important legal questions being brought to the attention of 
the highest federal and state tribunals, both affecting the con- 
struction to be given to various parts of these prohibitory^ acts 
and the proper method of enforcement by the state and federal 
authorities, still commands public attention. Increasing dif- 
ference of opinion of the federal courts as to the construction 
of certain parts of the Volstead Act and the rigidity of pro- 
cedure laid upon the enforcing authorities by the state courts, 
together with the undue publicity given to new ways and 
means adopted by the violators of the liquor laws to carry on 
liquor traffic, naturally focuses public attention upon the 
liquor situation. 

Enforcement of the liquor law is still a paramount problem 
for both federal and state authorities. After the proper 
methods of enforcement procedure have been settled by the 
courts, the ensuing problem is the detection and conviction of 
liquor violators with the infliction of proper punishment for 
the commission of this type of crime. The punishment meted 
out to liquor violators should act as a real deterrent. Distinct 
progress in decreasing liquor traffic in this city cannot be gain- 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

said. The number of arrests for drunkenness may serve as a 
barometer for those opposed to the principle of the prohibitory- 
laws, but the accurate method to determine whether the law 
is being enforced is by reference to credible and substantial 
reports of enforcement agents to superiors as to the quantity 
and quality of intoxicating liquor to be purchased illegally. 

The proper way, therefore, to ascertain whether the liquor 
laws are being enforced is to ascertain whether this contraband 
article can easily be obtained. The supply of potable alcohol 
has been greatly diminished in this city and the price of gen- 
uine alcohol is extremely high. The number of places where 
this product may be obtained in large quantities has been 
materially reduced. Distillation of the various toxic concoc- 
tions from commercial or mercantile alcohol into pseudo or 
quasi-vendible products advertised as genuine products seems 
to be the last resort of those plying the contraband liquor 
trade. 

The illegal liquor distilling industry, because its functioning 
is easily detected, cannot be carried on in crowded cities and 
is now suburban in character. Death seems not to be a ready 
deterrent to an irrational desire for intoxicating liquors and, 
strangely enough, many persons by buying and consuming 
distilled products wrapped in masquerading labels and covers, 
are innocently courting this grim figure. 

To the praise of this department, every possible device and 
scheme to import and distribute intoxicating liquors is known 
or can be easily detected, but the difficulty with the liquor 
situation is not so much in stopping liquor flowing into the 
city from legitimate sources of manufacture or supply, but to 
eliminate that despicable class which has no hesitancy in 
knowingly selling a rank type of poison. 

If the activities of violators who persist in a deliberate, cal- 
culating manner to evade the liquor laws are not properly 
checked upon conviction with jail or prison sentences, the 
police in their prosecution of liquor violators are only making 
gestures. As an indication of the activities of this department 
in these prosecutions, 38,882 persons were arrested for drunk- 
enness in this city, 37,376 males and 1,506 females, from De- 
cember 1, 1925, to November 30, 1926, and during the same 
period, 4,609 liquor searches on warrants were made. 

Owners of property, more solicitous for income from real 
estate than for respectable tenants, are actual participants in 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

sordid conditions created by tenants violating liquor laws. 
Responsibility for such conditions rests squarely upon their 
shoulders as taxpayers of this city. If indifference and cu- 
pidity control the action of property owners, it would seem 
strange if, in time, the same atmosphere did not permeate the 
ranks of the Police Department. 

In certain sections of this city the police are cognizant that 
liquor is being sold illegally and secretly. Persons engaged in 
this contraband business are naturally watching the police so 
that their activities may not be disturbed. By stratagem the 
police often either obtain a sale or seize intoxicating liquor in 
a building. Parties occupying the premises are brought into 
court and fined, with a warning that conviction of the same 
offense (not conviction of another offense against the liquor 
laws) may result in imprisonment. Under such a hazard, 
liquor traffickers aj-e careful that when the next raid is made, 
some other lessee or occupant of the building is apprehended. 
The fact that the substitute lessee or occupant is an agent of 
the former lessee or occupant is generally known to the owner 
of the building and, despite a similar suspicion by the courts, 
yet, because of the lack of necessary legal proof, such agent 
being treated as a principal and as a first offender escapes the 
real punishment due him. 

Owners of real estate, with their minds on overhead charges, 
thus seem to be willing to accept as new tenants, well-known 
liquor traffickers. Leases under the law may be voided where 
lessees or occupants engage in unlawful business upon the 
premises. Where landlords refuse to take notice, even after 
police advice concerning the nature of the business carried on 
by their tenants, and tenant after tenant of the same building 
is convicted of some one or other of the various infringements 
of the liquor laws, it would seem logical that the police should 
not be compelled to resort to the archaic method of securing 
an interminable number of search warrants and find itself 
moving around in a circle, accomplishing nothing, to the 
amusement of this type of lawbreakers, but should have the 
same authority to eradicate from suspected buildings "rum" 
joints by methods similar to those now authorized by statute 
in eliminating houses of prostitution. I am again proposing 
legislation to this effect whereby buildings may be declared 
by the courts to be nuisances and enjoined as such. Equity 
proceedings of this nature would produce as effective results 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

as the application of the so-called "padlock law" by the 
federal equity courts. 

The problem of the suppression of the use of narcotic drugs 
is not local but international in scope. With federal and 
state laws enacted to regulate the handling, manufacture, 
transportation, storing, prescribing and use of narcotics, the 
police problem in relation to narcotic drugs is reduced to that 
of prevention of smuggling of narcotics and the arrest of both 
illegal distributors and addicts. 

The principal narcotics used by addicts are opium, mor- 
phine, heroin and cocaine. The arrest of the drug addict in 
many cases is both humanitarian and economic, inasmuch as, 
upon reliable information, cocaine addicts being subject to vio- 
lent hallucinations approaching a state of insanity are dan- 
gerous, and often adopt violent methods both in the commis- 
sion of crime or when about to be placed under arrest. 

Detection and apprehension of those engaged in narcotic 
drug distribution or consumption require extreme patience 
and ingenuity, inasmuch as narcotic peddlers or users, knowing 
that they are under the surveillance of the police, attempt to 
conceal their movements and methods. The police are handi- 
capped by the fact also that many drug distributors are not 
drug addicts. Distribution of narcotic drugs in this city has 
been reduced to a favorable minimum, obtained because of the 
intelligent and conscientious work of the police in general and 
those especially assigned to narcotic drug work. 

Firearms. 

The use and display of firearms having become an impor- 
tant factor in the commission of serious crimes and having de- 
veloped into a typically American practice, constant watch 
and careful supervision of the various sources of the sale and 
distribution of dangerous weapons is imperative. Possession 
and use of firearms, guns and other dangerous implements in 
many instances being necessary, imperative and lawful, and 
inasmuch as it is axiomatic that "every man's home is his 
castle," it is obvious that the proper means of safeguarding the 
homes of citizens should always be available. On the other 
hand, however, indiscriminate permission and promiscuous 
license to carry on the person or in vehicles dangerous weapons 
should be carefully avoided because of the apparent possi- 
bility of danger of great abuses arising therefrom. The 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

ability to obtain easily firearms and dangerous weapons by 
certain classes has resulted in the practice by undesirables of 
using dangerous weapons either to protect or pursue illegal 
businesses from rum-running to hold-ups. Pursuit of sport 
to encourage the use of firearms, pistols and other similar 
weapons on one hand is laudable and should be encouraged, 
but the right of citizens to safety and security should not be 
abrogated, diminished or endangered in order that a minority 
may be amused. If the rights and privileges of gun clubs and 
other sporting organizations are restricted through a general 
tightening of the laws relating to the possession or purchase of 
fu-earms, it may be unfortunate for the devotees of this par- 
ticular pastime, but the rights of individuals must always be 
suspended or limited for the rights and safety of the majority. 
Promiscuous and indiscriminate sale of firearms, whether at 
wholesale or retail, should be strictly regulated. The legis- 
lature of Massachusetts last year, by constructive and effec- 
tive legislation, aided governmental agencies endeavoring to 
limit and control the distribution of dangerous weapons, and 
remedial legislation enacted relative to the sale and purchase 
of firearms affords notable check to the police upon the in- 
discriminate sale of such merchandise. 

Federal legislation is required, however, in the matter of 
firearms in transit by mail in interstate commerce and the im- 
portation of firearms from foreign countries. Naturally, con- 
siderable opposition to federal legislation upon this subject 
has developed. At the present time, several bills relative to 
firearms in interstate trade are in Congress in various stages of 
progress. Last year a conference was held in New York City 
at which police officials of the various eastern states gathered 
for the purpose of emphasizing and impressing upon Congress 
the necessity of immediate legislation upon the subject of the 
forbiddance of transit of firearms by mail and the importance 
of such legislation has been emphasized in many of the lead- 
ing newspapers and periodicals of this country. 

Several reputable mail-order houses, realizing the inevitable 
consequences of such unlimited and unchecked chstribution 
of firearms by mail, have wisely discontinued the mails as a 
medium for the delivery of such articles. Unfortunately, 
other concerns engaged in selling firearms generally of foreign 
make, almost unexceptionally inferior in grade and cheap in 
price, have not the same perspective or viewpoint on this 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

subject, with the result that firearms may be obtained through 
the mail by irresponsible and often abnormal persons from 
such dealers with places of manufacture or business outside 
this Commonwealth. The eastern states have taken the ini- 
tiative in this matter and are endeavoring, in the absence of 
federal legislation, to promote state legislation along these 
lines by campaigns of education in states which have not taken 
steps in legislative progress upon this subject. When im- 
pediments are placed in the way of a purchaser who, because 
of criminality, abnormality or juvenility is unfit to carry a 
firearm, serious crimes may be in many cases averted. In my 
opinion, legislation should be passed to correct a serious de- 
fect in the present law which allows ammunition to be sold to 
minors over the age of fifteen years. Under the present law 
of this state, a minor cannot obtain a permit to carry a firearm 
except an employee of a bank or a public utility corporation. 
The privilege accorded to this class of minors is granted be- 
cause of the control which this stated type of employer natu- 
rally exercises over the person selected to be licensed to carry 
firearms, and because the licensee, although a minor, is a per- 
son who has been considered by responsible authorities to be 
a person fit to carry deadly weapons. I believe the law should 
be further changed so that no minor should be allowed to buy 
ammunition for firearms unless he also has a license to carry 
a firearm. 

The solution of many desperate crimes by the police, while 
ordinarily difficult, is in many cases made more laborious and 
mystifying by the fact that the trail of the perpetrator, often 
wounded or injured in the commission of the crime, is fre- 
quently covered by medical assistance to the criminal ren- 
dered by physicians who either through indifference or design 
fail to notify the police of such aid. This statement is not an 
indictment of the medical profession, but inasmuch as every 
profession, trade or business has members not actuated by 
proper ethical motives, it is the unfortunate experience of the 
police to find that the medical profession is not free from shady 
practitioners. Legislation requiring physicians or persons 
controlling sanatoriums to report to the local police when aid 
has been rendered for wounds or burns caused by guns or 
firearms, in my opinion would aid the police in more rapidly 
detecting criminals. The legislature of New York last year 
passed similar legislation, and I believe that the reputable 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

medical practitioners or medical societies of this Common- 
wealth will not oppose legislation of this type, while the pas- 
sage of such legislation will coercively control members of the 
medical profession whose type of practice is more or less under 
police surveillance. 

In order to impress more deeply upon the understanding of 
those individuals who perpetrate crime, and to give the citi- 
zens of this state the satisfaction of knowing that their in- 
terests are paramount to those of criminals, I believe in the 
passage in this state of legislation similar to that which was 
passed in New York relative to the graduated scale of punish- 
ment of persons arrested in the commission of a felony while 
armed with a pistol or other dangerous weapon. According 
to reputable authorities, the passage of this legislation in New 
York demonstrated in a very short time that terror had been 
stricken into the hearts of criminals whose chief purpose was 
persistence in the practice of terrorizing peaceful citizens of 
the community. 

Traffic. 

An efficient police department primarily prevents crime or, 
after crime has been committed, detects and apprehends the 
criminal offenders. Efficient management of private business 
corporations provides for future growth. Police departments 
necessarily must progress and coordinate with advancements 
in business. A traffic problem did not exist in Boston twenty 
years ago.' Today, proper and efficient control of vehicular 
and pedestrian traffic, not only because of advancement in 
business activities and the necessity of safeguarding the pub- 
lic, but because of the increasing number of police officers 
needed for traffic work, is an outstanding problem with which 
all municipal authorities are confronted. 

The importance or magnitude of a traffic problem is rarely 
realized by the general public. Direction of traffic either by 
manual effort, beacons, lights, or synchronizing systems, pre- 
sents one aspect of this problem. On the other hand, rational 
enforcement of the various traffic laws, rules or regulations 
cannot be accomplished by mechanical devices but requires 
personal service. Pertinent to the traffic problem, which in 
the last analysis means the orderly flow of both vehicular and 
pedestrian traffic, the necessity of eliminating illegal and un- 
necessary parking of vehicles is apparent. Unrestrained and 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

uncontrolled parking of vehicles not only detrimentally affects 
the growth and development of business, but also seriously in- 
terferes with the operation of various governmental agencies 
engaged in the protection or safeguarding of both private and 
municipal property. Vehicular parking for an unlimited time 
on a thoroughfare which should be devoted to the passage of 
commercial vehicles is about as logical as dumping a cartload 
of paving blocks upon the same spot and forgetting to remove 
it. 

Strict enforcement of traffic laws cannot be neglected inas- 
much as orderly control of traffic spells prevention of acci- 
dents, the latter causing traffic tangles and consequent delays, 
and also unnecessarily requiring the service of police officers 
who are thus temporarily diverted from more important police 
duties. 

During the past year, 2,235 vehicles were licensed as hack- 
ney carriages with 4,031 licensed drivers. As most of these 
vehicles are operated where traffic is densest, their control and 
supervision, not taking into consideration the additional work 
in the investigation of applications for licenses of hackney 
carriage drivers and the careful allocation and licensing of the 
various special stands for hackney vehicles, requires the con- 
stant supervision of a separate unit. 

■ Automobiles temporarily appropriated for selfish reasons 
and subsequently abandoned, often in a damaged condition, 
in places obstructing traffic, place an additional burden upon 
the police. Records of this department show during the past 
year that approximately 3,700 automobiles were found aban- 
doned in the streets of this city by the police. 

Increase in school population and school buildings neces- 
sarily requires more police officers to protect school children at 
crossings. This obligation, with similar protection to the 
aged and infirm, is justly demanded from the police by the 
tax payers of this city. Boston, unlike some other cities, has 
not the advantage of laws against *'jay walking." With the 
continual increase in the number of automobiles, pedestrian 
control by the police has become more arduous inasmuch as 
density of vehicular traffic produces greater density of pedes- 
trian traffic as the more populous sections of this city are built 
around or in the vicinity of main arteries of travel. 

Mechanical control of traffic is replacing to a great extent 
manual traffic direction. Education of the public to obedi- 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

ence to the operation of mechanical traffic signals, as expected, 
has been successful. In the working out of the traffic prob- 
lem, knowledge of the various lighting systems in other cities 
of this country is valuable. The installation in this city of a 
system of synchronized lights directed under the progressive 
system, as an economic measure, cannot be delayed. The cost 
of installing a system of electrical traffic control under the 
present law requiring that the wires operating such a system 
shall be laid underground, would seem to be prohibitive. A 
possible solution of this problem could be effected if a system 
of electric traffic control were linked to the present plant of a 
public utility corporation operating with fixed conduits for 
wires. 

During the past year twenty-four spot lights were installed, 
making a total of one hundred and twenty-three spot lights 
set up by this department for the protection of traffic officers. 
Experimental work also relative to the adoption of flood lights 
to eliminate the glare of the present spot lights has been carried 
on. 

The two traffic divisions of this department were increased 
by the addition of eighty men from the additional 300 added 
to the department during the past year. At the present time, 
47 men are assigned to enforcing the parking laws and other 
officers will be placed in the traffic divisions in the near future. 
The present personnel of these two divisions is 2 captains, 2 
lieutenants, 12 sergeants and 254 patrolmen. Continuous 
traffic service has been inaugurated. 

I desire again to publicly thank Gifford LeClear, Esq., 
chairman of Committee on Street Traffic and Municipal and 
Metropolitan Affairs of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, 
and Ellerton J. Brehaut, Esq., assistant secretary of the Bos- 
ton Chamber of Commerce, for the valuable advice given me 
in the study of the traffic problems of this city and for their 
efficient service in the installation of beacons and lighting 
systems for the expedition of pedestrian and vehicular traffic. 

Sale by the Police of Unclaimed or Abandoned 
Property. 

Yearly increase in the number of automobiles registered in 
this state, a large percentage of which has been fairly esti- 
mated to enter Boston at some period of the license year, not 
only increases police work because of the necessity of directing 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the same, but also increases the possibihty of cars either being 
stolen deliberately for resale or misappropriated for temporary 
use and enjoyment. The number of cars abandoned on the 
streets of this city is increasing yearly. Many of these cars, 
because reported to the police as lost or stolen, can be promptly 
and readily restored to owners, but inasmuch as owners of 
cars so taken sometimes do not live in this city, temporary 
storage must be arranged by the police until the owner arrives 
after receiving notice to repossess. 

Automobiles necessarily cannot be left out-of-doors in in- 
clement weather and therefore many cars found abandoned 
must be stored in public garages. It is found that many 
abandoned cars are damaged in the illegal operation of the 
same, and the owners, incensed justifiably, sometimes refuse 
for this reason to repossess the cars from the garage in which 
they are stored in good faith by the police. Storage space 
must be paid for and the city of Boston should not be obliged 
to pay for the storage of cars when the owner is known and 
has been notified where his property may be located. De- 
mands by the police to owners to repossess their property 
often have been met with refusal and as the law now stands, 
the owner of a stolen or abandoned car, placed in a garage by 
the pohce, may enjoy free storage for an entire winter season 
by refusing to repossess the same, with the city obligated for 
the payment of the storage. 

The owner of an automobile which has been stolen or used 
unlawfully and found abandoned by the police, who refuses 
to repossess his property after receiving written notice of its 
location by the pohce, should, in all fairness, after at least six 
months from the time of receiving notice, lose the right to re- 
possess the same, and the police department should have the 
authority and right to sell these cars in order to release the 
lien of the garage owner for the fair charge for storage thereon. 

At the present time there is no space available in this de- 
partment for the storage of a large number of cars and the 
increasing number of abandoned and lost cars necessarily, 
therefore, must be stored in private garages or warehouses. 

Celerity in Dispatching Police Information. 

Rapidity of interchange of important police information be- 
tween police departments of this state is essential. Inasmuch 
as the means of rapid exchange is available either by telephone, 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 15 

telegraph or special communicating systems, a system oper- 
ated from a central distributing station either at the State 
House or at Police Headquarters, Boston, should be installed. 
A similar recommendation was made by me in my last three 
annual reports. 

Important communications can be sent to the various units 
of this department in an exceptionally short time, but con- 
fining the rapid diffusion of police news to the confines of this 
city, in view of the present use of automobiles by criminals in 
the commission of crimes, is futile. Crime is seldom discov- 
ered upon its execution and delay in the disclosure of com- 
mission of serious crime permits many criminals using auto- 
mobiles to be removed far from the scene of the crime soon 
after commission. 

A central communicating system with antenna stretching 
to the boundaries of this state and with branches to the im- 
portant cities and towns, should replace the present clumsy 
and cumbersome method of relaying important criminal in- 
formation to adjacent or distant police departments. Police 
methods and systems should progress steadily and methods 
employed in the apprehension of criminals should be in ad- 
vance of those used by criminals today in committing crime. 

Assaults on Police Officers. 

The underlying principle of stable government is respect by 
its citizens for constituted law and authority. While indi- 
vidual freedom with its accompanying prerogatives of free 
speech and independence of action, guaranteed by the Consti- 
tution, must be carefully guarded in order that democratic 
government may exist, yet unlimited and unbridled license for 
personal activities produces disorder and chaos. 

In Great Britain the police on duty without firearms rep- 
resent the Sovereign and malicious attacks upon police officers 
carry rapid and severe punishment. In this country, unfor- 
tunately, respect for authority does not always obtain. Delay 
of trial and sympathy for the criminal with outspoken disre- 
spect, antipathy and contempt for the police often produce 
judicial travesties. 

The police are human and therefore err, but without the 
protecting screen of a police department, anarchy ensues. 
Unlimited excoriation and abuse of police departments by in- 
telligent persons because of weaknesses or abuses of individual 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

members tend to break down the fabric of the system and 
offer to the criminal and undesirable, favorable manna for 
their mental nourishment. 

Our Honor Roll for the year consists of one officer mur- 
dered in cold blood by youthful desperadoes, and three police 
officers murderously assaulted by criminals armed with fire- 
arms. 

As a tribute to the memory of members of this Department 
who heroically died in the performance of their duties, an- 
nually, on Memorial Day, bronze markers appropriately in- 
scribed have been placed upon their graves. These markers 
stand as mute evidence of the bravery and valor of men un- 
necessarily sacrificed that the lives and property of the citi- 
zens of Boston might be protected. 

Plant. 

During the past year steam heating systems were installed 
in the station houses of Divisions 14 and 17, and the heating 
apparatus of all other station houses throughly overhauled, 
cleaned and made ready for service. 

Work in cleaning and painting was done in Stations 12 and 
7 and a new system of lighting was installed in the latter 
building. 

The usual repairs were made on the harbor boats Guardian, 
E. U. Curtis, and Argus. The steamer Watchman, thoroughly 
rebuilt, is now in condition for a twenty-four-hour day ser- 
vice for a number of years. 

Two new motor prison vans and a patrol wagon to serve as 
replacements were purchased and placed in commission. 

Eight additional police ambulances were requested by me 
from the Mayor, through the Board of Municipal Emergencies. 
I have made provision in the Department estimates for 1927 
for these additional ambulances and I hope, if they are allowed, 
to put them into commission during the coming year. 

A trafiic booth with a synchronized system of lights was in- 
stalled at the junction of Massachusetts Avenue and Common- 
wealth Avenue. 

The present antiquated and unsanitary station houses of 
Divisions 3, 4 and 5 should be replaced by modern structures. 

The Mayor has been requested by me to allow Division 14 
and Division 11, respectively, to occupy the premises now 
used for court purposes in the Brighton and Dorchester dis- 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 17 

tricts after these courts are installed in their new buildings in 
said districts. This additional space is urgently needed inas- 
much as the number of officers assigned to these two divisions 
has been materially increased. 

I have also discussed with the Mayor the necessity of a large 
central garage where both the cars of this Department and 
cars found abandoned by the police may be stored and thus 
eliminate the unnecessary large expenditure for storage in 
private and public garages and storehouses. 

The new police headquarters building situated at Berkeley 
and Stuart streets was dedicated on November 22, 1926. 
This building is seven stories in height above the street with 
basement and sub-basement. The exterior is treated in 
Italian Renaissance style with limestone on the Berkeley and 
Stuart street fagades and a light-colored brick on Stanhope 
Street and the Court. The interior with regard to rooms, 
corridors, and stair towers is of modern office building design 
with sanitary floors and fireproof construction throughout. 
The building is heated by return tubular boilers supplied by 
oil for fuel. The main facade is on Berkeley Street set back 
from the lot line about twenty feet. The Stuart Street fagade 
is on the property line at the sidewalk and adjoins the present 
building of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. The 
cornerstone of the building was laid August 25, 1925, with 
appropriate ceremonies. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows: — 



Police Commissioner. 



Secretary. 







The Police Force. 




Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Chief inspector . 
Captains . 
Inspectors 


1 

3 

1 

30 

27 


Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen 

Total . 


42 

166 

. 2,004 


. 2,275 


Inspector of 


carriages 








(lieutenant) 




1 










Signal Service. 




Director . 




1 


Linemen . 


6 


Foreman . 




1 


Driver 


1 


Signalmen 
Mechanics 




6 
3 


Total 




18 



Employees of the Department. 



Clerks .... 23 

Stenographers . . . 13 

Matrons (house of detention) 5 

Matrons (station houses) . 5 

Engineers on police steamers 3 

Firemen on police steamers . 8 

Firemen .... 5 

Auto repair shop foreman . 1 

Auto repair shop mechanic . 1 

Repairmen ... 2 

Superintendent of building . 1 

Elevator operators . . 5 



Chauffeurs 


3 


Assistant property clerk 


1 


Foreman of stable 


1 


Hostlers 


12 


Janitors 


32 


Janitresses . 


20 


Telephone operators . 


3 


Tailor 


1 


Painters . 


4 


Steamfitter 


1 



Total 



150 



Recapitulation. 



Police Commissioner and Secretary 
Police force . . . . , 
Signal service . . . . 

Employees . . . . , 

Grand total . . . , 



2 

2,275 

18 

150 



2,445 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



19 



Distribution and Changes. 

The distribution of the pohce force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 449 patrolmen were appointed; 1 patrolman 
reinstated; 22 patrolmen discharged; 47 patrolmen resigned 
(26 while charges were pending), and 1 patrolman was trans- 
ferred to the Department of Public Utilities; 1 chief inspector, 
1 inspector, 6 lieutenants, 2 sergeants and 18 patrolmen were 
retired on pension; 1 captain, 1 inspector, 2 sergeants and 7 
patrolmen died. (See Tables II, III, IV.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 

The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries. 



How Injured. 


Number of 
Men Injured. 


Number of 
Duties Lost. 


In arresting prisoners ..... 
In pursuing criminals ..... 
By cars and other vehicles .... 
Various other causes ..... 


53 
14 
71 
80 


418 

45 

635 

.700 


Total 


218 


1,798 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 84,273 as against 83,145 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 1,128. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows : — 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person . . . ■ . . Decrease 3 . 89 

Offences against property committed with violence . Decrease 4 . 00 

Offences against property committed without violence Decrease 3 . 23 

MaHcious offences against property . . . Decrease 16.56 

Forgery and offences against the currency . . Decrease 30 . 85 

Offences against the license laws .... Decrease 16.54 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . Decrease 5 . 58 

Offences not included in the foregoing . . . Increase 3 . 75 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



There were 12,502 persons arrested on warrants and 51,707 
without warrants; 20,064 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 80,868 persons were held for trial; 3,405 were re- 
leased from custody. The number of males arrested was 
78,849; of females, 5,424; of foreigners, 26,662, or approxi- 
mately 31.63 per cent; of minors, 8,464. Of the total num- 
ber arrested, 21,569, or 25.59 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1922 to 1926, inclusive, was $312,344.66; in 
1926 it was $391,169.50; or $78,824 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
47,691; in 1926 it was 50,674, or 2,983 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $15,277.55; 
in 1926 it was $14,593.60, or $683.95 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. 
There were 938 more persons arrested than in 1925, an in- 
crease of 2.47 per cent; 23.40 per cent of the arrested persons 
were nonresidents and 38.40 per cent were of foreign birth. 
(See Table XL) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows : — 



United States 






57,611 


British Provinces 




4,063 


Ireland 




8,647 


England 








674 


France 








108 


Germany 








239 


Italy 








3,919 


Russia 








3,542 


China 








243 


Greece 








526 


Sweden 








728 


Scotland 








458 


Spain 








75 


Norway 








234 


Poland 








1,119 


Australia 








17 


Austria 








152 


Portugal 








344 


Finland 








159 


Denmark 








88 


Holland 








24 


Wales 








4 



East Indies 






4 


West Indies 






86 


Turkey . 






50 


South America 






61 


Switzerland 






9 


Belgium 






46 


Armenia . 






109 


Africa 






7 


Hungary . 






10 


Asia . 






4 


Arabia 






5 


Mexico 






6 


Japan 






6 


Syria 






189 


Roumania 






2 


Lithuania . 






695 


India 






1 


Egypt 






1 


Albania 






7 


Cuba 






1 



Total 



84,273 



1927.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 

21 

The number of arrests for the year was 84,273, being an in- 
crease of 1,128 over last year, and 3,129 more than the aver- 
age for the past five years. There were 38,882 persons ar- 
rested for drunkenness, being 938 more than last year, and 
284 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 2.91 
per cent in males and a decrease of 7.49 per cent in females 
from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (84,273), 475 
were for violation of the city ordinances; that is to say that 
one arrest in 177 was for such offence, or .56 per cent. 

Sixty and twenty-nine hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and 
forty. (See Table XL) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 27,281, and 
the fines amounted to $391,169.50. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred twenty-nine persons were committed to the 
State Prison, 2,807 to the House of Correction, 36 to the 
Women's Prison, 88 to the Reformatory prison, and 1,620 to 
other institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 1 
life, 2,282 years, 10 months (320 sentences indefinite); the 
total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 
50,674, and the witness fees earned by them amounted to 
$14,593.60. ' 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $271,247.90. 

Eight witnesses were detained at station houses, 186 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 27 over last year. 
There was a decrease of 10.62 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 14.46 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in and about the 
city for the five years from 1922 to 1926, inclusive, was 
$1,967,475.64, in 1926 it was $1,803,519.18, or $163,956.46 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in and 
out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, 
was $2,214,100.62 as against $2,804,798.15 last year, or 
$590,697.53 less. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The "identification room" now contains 67,085 photographs, 
55,706 of which are photographs with BertiUon measurements, 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

a system used by the Department since November 30, 1898. 
In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, section 18, 
and with the General Laws, chapter 127, sections 27 to 29, 
both inclusive, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measurements taken of the convicts in the State Prison and 
Reformatory, a number of which have been added to our 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
system by the Department in 1898, is and will continue to be 
of great assistance in the identification of criminals. A large 
number of important identifications have thus been made 
during the year for this and other police departments, through 
which the sentences in many instances have been materially 
increased. The records of 943 criminals have been added to 
the records of this Bureau, which now contains a total of 
47,051. The number of cases reported at this office which 
have been investigated during the year is 40,111. There are 
43,256 cases reported on the assignment books kept for this 
purpose, and reports made on these cases are filed away for 
future reference. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the Department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of about 
212,000 persons. There are also "histories and press clip- 
pings" now numbering 9,330 made by this Bureau, in envelope 
form, for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing corrobo- 
rating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service are 
included in the statement of the general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties are of a special character, the following 
statement will be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies . . 2,723 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and deliv- 
ered to officers from those States ..... 41 

Number of cases investigated . . . . . . 40,111 

Number of extra duties performed ..... 2,228 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court . . 204 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court . ' . . . 17 
Number of days spent in court by police officers . . 2,496 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



Number of years' imprisonment imposed by court 195 years, 11 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $503,885.62 

Nmnber of photographs added to identification room . . 1,078 



Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 816 cases of death from the following 
causes : — 



Abortion . 






8 


Machinery 


4 


AlcohoHsm 






21 


Natural causes . 


321 


Asphyxiation 






2 


Poison 


52 


Automobiles 






6 


Railway (street) 


2 


Bicycle 






1 


Railroad (steam) 


18 


Burns 






25 


Stillborn . 


8 


Drowning . 






27 


Suffocation 


9 


Elevators . 






12 


Suicide 


47 


Explosion . 






1 


Teams 


2 


FaUs 






57 
5 


Homicide . 


187 


-T tilling oujecib 




Ivicked by horse 






1 


Total 


816 



On 268 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicides were prose- 
cuted in the courts : — 



Alcoholism 


2 


Railway (street) 


17 


Automobiles 


133 


Shot by police officer . 


2 


Elevators . 


1 


Struck by pohce officer's club 


1 


Infanticide 


1 


Suicides .... 


2 


Manslaughter 


12 


Teams .... 


3 


Murder 
Natural causes . 


12 

1 






Total .... 


187 



Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 

On December 1, 1925, there were 1,825 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the property 
clerk; 1,661 were received during the year; 463 pieces were 
sold at public auction and the proceeds, $1,477.63, were 
turned over to the chief clerk; 3 lots were sold as perishable 
and the proceeds, $34.88, turned over to the chief clerk; 402 
packages were destroyed as worthless or sold as junk and the 
proceeds, $366.50, turned over to the chief clerk; and 108 
packages were returned to owners, finders or administrators, 
leaving 2,510 packages on hand. 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Larceny of Automobiles and Unlawful Appropriation 
OF Automobiles or Using without Authority. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for these offences for the year ending November 
30, 1926: — 



Larceny of Automobiles. 

Number of arrests ..... 
Final dispositions: 

Not guUty and discharged . 

Fined ...... 

Sentenced to a penal or other institution 

Probation ..... 

Sentence suspended .... 

On file 

Turned over to police of other cities 

Still pending ..... 

Defaulted ..... 

Dismissed for want of prosecution 

Total 



65 

3 

67 

42 

6 

7 

11 

40 

, 1 

1 



233 



233 



Unlawful Appropriation of Automobiles or Using Without Authority. 



Number of arrests ..... 


. 


Final dispositions : 




Not guilty and discharged . 


26 


Fined 


14 


Sentenced to a penal or other institution 


71 


Probation ..... 


41 


Sentence suspended .... 


7 


On file 


7 


Turned over to police of other cities 


8 


Still pending 


13 



187 



Total 



187 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



Violations of Massachusetts State Liquor Law. 

The following table shows the number of prosecutions and 
dispositions for this offence for the year ending November 30, 
1926: — 



Number of arrests ......... 

Final dispositions: 

Not guilty and discharged ..... 903 

Fined 1,819 

Fined and sentenced to jail or house of correction . 105 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction . . 43 

Probation 202 

Sentenced to jail or house of correction (sentence 

suspended) ....... 145 

On file 172 

Turned over to police of other cities ... 5 

StiU pending 251 

Defaulted 12 

Total 3,657 



3,657 



Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 



1925. 



Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve 



6, 
16, 
30, 

7, 
10, 
16, 
22, 



1926. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 17, 
Mar. 17, 
April 10, 
April 19, 
April 19, 
May 9, 
May 19, 
May 23, 
May 30, 
May 30, 
May 31, 



Mechanics Building, Boston Police ball 

Billings Field, skating carnival 

Sullivan Square playground, skating carnival 

Army Base, public inspection of S.S. Leviathan 

Mechanics Building, Firemen's ball 

Funeral of Patrolman Phillip J. AschofY 

State House, Governor's reception 

State Street, Evacuation day exercises . 

South Boston, Evacuation day parade . 

Cathedral road race .... 

Marathon race ..... 

Patriotic exercises and parade 

Boston Common, Mother's Day exercises 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, services . 

Fenway Park, memorial services . 

At city cemeteries .... 

Franklin Field, field day of Jewish Welfare Association 

At city cemeteries ...... 



Men. 

27 

201 
11 
11 
12 
40 
36 
56 
34 

288 
54 

413 
69 
27 
21 
53 
29 
16 
29 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1926. 




May 


31, 


June 


5, 


June 


5, 


June 


7, 


June 13, 


June 


13, 


June 


16, 


June 


17, 


June 


17, 


June 


17, 


June 


19, 


June 20, 


July 


5, 


July 


5, 


July 


5. 


July 


10, 


July 


17, 


July 


18, 


July 


19, 


July 


20, 


July 


21, 


July 


22, 


July 


23, 


July 


23, 


July 


24, 


Aug. 


19, 


Aug. 


25, 


Aug. 


26, 


Sept. 


6, 


Sept. 


14, 


Oct. 


2, 


Oct. 


2, 


Oct. 


3, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


10, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 



Work Horse parade ...... 

Boston Common, Boston Traveler marble contest . 

Dorchester day, band concerts .... 

Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

Boston Common, Flag day exercises 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet . 

Charlestown, eve of Bunker Hill day 

South Station, departure of persons to Eucharistic Con 
gress 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill day parade and fireworks 

Brookline, Eastern Horse Club races . . , 

Brookline, Eastern Horse Club races 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet . 

Independence Day, Frankhn Field ... 

Independence Day, Boston Common, afternoon and eve 
ning ........ 

Independence day, Charlesbank, athletic contests . 

Funeral of Captain James F. Hickey 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of miUc wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers 

Funeral of Sergeant Michael T. Trayers 

Strike of milk wagon drivers .... 

Funeral of Sergeant John J. Flynn 

Parade, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Mystic Shrine 

Parade, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Mystic Shrine 

Parade, Labor Day .... 

State Primaries ..... 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball . 

Stadium, Harvard-Geneva football game 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game 

Braves Field, professional football 

Bulletin boards, baseball 

Braves Field, Boston CoUege-Fordham football game 

Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battaUons of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned 
a military band, one of which was the Boston Police 



1926.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



27 



Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


16, 


Oct. 


23, 


Oct. 


23, 


Oct. 


30, 


Oct. 


30, 


Oct. 


30, 


Oct. 


30, 


Nov. 


2, 


Nov. 


2, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


11, 


Nov. 


13, 


Nov. 


13, 


Nov. 


20, 


Nov. 


22, 


Nov. 


25, 


Nov. 


25, 



Nov. 27, 



Department Traffic Band. The regiment included a 
sergeant arid twenty men mounted on department 
horses, a colonel commanding, with his adjutant and 
staff, officers from the respective police divisions and 
units in military company formation, shot-gun com- 
panies, patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns, a 
motorcycle unit, and a machine gun unit mounted on 
automobiles. The regiment was reviewed at City Hall 
by His Honor the Mayor; at the State House by His 
Excellency Governor- Alvan T. Fuller, and on the 
Parade Grounds of the Common by His Excellency the 
Governor and the Police Commissioner, Hon. Herbert 
A. Wilson . . 

Detail on line of parade on Boston Common 
Fenway Park, schoolboy football game 
Parade of Sons of Italy ..... 

Harvard-William and Mary football game 
Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 
Bulletin boards, football returns .... 

Stadium, Harvard-Tufts football game 

Braves Field, Boston College-West Virginia football game 

Gilchrist Building, dedication aviation beacon 

Tremont Temple, Republican rally 

State election ....... 

Bulletin boards, election returns .... 

Stadium, Harvard-Princeton football game . 
Bulletin boards, football returns .... 

Armistice Day parade ...... 

Stadium, Harvard-Brown football game 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Haskell football game 

Bulletin boards, football returns .... 

Dedication new police headquarters 

Fenway Park, morning, schoolboy football game 

Fenway Park, afternoon, Knights of Columbus football 

game ......... 

Braves Field, Boston College-Holy Cross football game 



1,457 

110 
13 

159 
50 
90 
54 
52 
14 
21 
27 

820 
72 
81 
38 

325 
81 
20 
76 
23 
25 

22 
70 



Missing Persons. 

The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year : — 



Total number reported 
Total number found 



954 

868 



Total number still missing 



86 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 



[Jan. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 

Over 21 years 


246 

187 
217 


41 

170 
93 


246 

155 
193 


41 

155 

78 


32 
24 


15 
15 


Totals 


650 


304 


594 


274 


56 


30 



Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year ending 
November 30, 1926. 





Stolen. 


Recovered 
during 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1925. 

December 


451 


407 


15 


29 


1926. 

January 








419 


381 


8 


30 


February 








242 


217 


9 


16 


March 








358 


304 


21 


33 


April . 








334 


298 


12 


24 


May . 








375 


303 


19 


53 


June 








334 


273 


13 


48 


July . 








408 


330 


25 


53 


August 








412 


357 


15 


40 


September 








405 


351 


13 


41 


October 








500 


452 


12 


36 


November 








526 


469 


- 


57 


Totals 


4,764 


4,142 


162 


460 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



Record of Used Cars Reported to this Department by Ldcensed Dealers in 

the Same. 





1924-1925 

Bought by 

Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


1925-1926 

Bought by 

Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 

Indi- 
viduals. 


December 


1,902 


1,530 


719 


2,482 


1,763 


895 


January . 


1,670 


1,336 


652 


2,252 


1,704 


814 


February 


1,845 


1,617 


520 


1,485 


1,346 


459 


March . " 


2,814 


2,439 


1,036 


2,241 


2,137 


1,121 


April 


3,581 


3,059 


1,325 


3,865 


3,731 


1,585 


May 


3,228 


3,359 


1,326 


4,003 


4,105 


1,745 


June 


4,363 


3,197 


1,260 


3,529 


3,910 


1,480 


July 


3,386 


3,095 


1,203 


3,793 


3,338 


1,460 


August . 


2,892 


2,378 


1,000 


3,001 


2,560 


1,321 


September 


2,731 


2,028 


1,045 


2,912 


2,505 


1,178 


October 


3,178 


2,333 


1,153 


2,963 


2,281 


1,396 


November 


2,814 


2,155 


843 


3,191 


2,486 


1,173 


Totals 


34,404 


28,526 


12,082 


35,717 


31,866 


14,627 



Miscellaneous Business. 





1923-24. 


1924-25. 


1925-26. 


Abandoned children cared for . 


10 


18 


9 


Accidents reported ..... 


6,761 


6,154 


6,275 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,592 


3,070 


3,261 


Cases investigated ..... 


89,599 


83,333 


78,977 


Dangerous buildings reported . 


29 


11 


32 


Dangerous chimneys reported . 


11 


14 


11 


Dead bodies recovered .... 


55 


54 


40 


Dead bodies cared for .... 


258 


321 


335 


Defective cesspools reported 


76 


46 


30 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


3 


16 


14 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



[Jan. 





1923-24. 


1924-25. 


1925-26. 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported . 


13 


6 


4 


Defective gas pipes reported 




24 


25 


35 


Defective hydrants reported 




61 


78 


111 


Defective lamps reported 




10,797 


8,919 


9,077 


Defective sewers reported 




114 


789 


99 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 




8,042 


7,510 


8,090 


Defective water pipes reported . 




104 


1,013 


163 


Disturbances suppressed . 




425 


308 


470 


Extra duties performed . 




38,153 


43,386 


39,583 


Fire alarms given 






3,429 


3,268 


2,633 


Fires extinguished . 






1,684 


1,502 


1,562 


Insane persons taken in charge 






439 


383 


332 


Intoxicated persons assisted 






21 


15 


30 


Lost children restored 






1,611 


1,293 


1,480 


Persons rescued from drowning 






20 


11 


14 


Sick and injured persons assisted 






8,246 


7,312 


6,535 


Stray teams reported and put up 






71 


46 


65 


Street obstructions removed 






949 


3,304 


2,541 


Water running to waste reported 






608 


574 


462 


Witnesses detained . 






15 


8 


8 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
2,488 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by- 
dogs. 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



31 



Other Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ...... 2,488 

Number of witnesses examined ...... 12,430 

Number of notices served ....... 7,478 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers regard- 
ing accidents and to examine police records) . . . 8,190 
Number of days in court ....... 228 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 98 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to re- 
pair same .......... $2,528 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of 
the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are 
returned to the house of detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 3,265 were committed for the following: — 



Drunkenness 














1,324 


Larceny 
Night walking 
Fornication . 














483 

58 

155 


Idle and disorderly 

Assault and battery 

Adultery 

Violation of liquor law . 

Keeping house of ill fame 

Various other causes 














101 
22 
26 
52 
26 

368 


Total 


2,615 


Recommitments. 


From Municipal court . 
From County jail . 














214 
436 



Grand total 



3,265 



Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 515. Of these 345 are 
connected with the underground system and 170 with the 
overhead. 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this service responded, to 
1,848 trouble calls; inspected 515 signal boxes, 18 signal desks 
and 955 batteries; repaired 193 box movements, 68 registers, 
90 polar box bells, 65 locks, 65 time stamps, 10 stable motors, 
8 stable registers, 14 vibrator bells, 9 relays, 11 pole changers 
and 9 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and electric light 
work at headquarters and the various stations. There have 
been made 45 plungers, 53 complete box fittings, 51 line blocks, 
55 automatic hooks, 3 stable boards and a large amount of 
small work done which cannot be classified. One new signal 
box was installed on Division 13 and two on Division 17. 

The police signal service now has charge of 123 reflector 
spotlights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for 
the regulation of traffic, also 3 signal towers. 

Most of the prescribed district for 1925 and 1926 affecting 
this Department was in South Boston. Cable has been 
bought but has not been installed. Box outlets and pole 
connections were laid in the summer of 1926, but on account 
of the underground and other trouble, both this Department 
and the Fire Department have not been able to "pull in" 
cable together. This work should be done later this season 
or early next spring. 

Greatly increased use of the automatic answer-back signals 
has put added strain on register contacts and other working 
parts and the registers have to be constantly repaired. Mea- 
sures are being taken to prolong their life until such time as 
some one can be found to build new and suitable ones. The 
signal desk at Division 4 has been rebuilt and refitted. 

There are in use in' the signal service : 1 White truck, 1 Ford 
sedan and 1 Ford truck. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 
53,432 runs, covering an aggregate distance of 98,431 miles. 
There were 36,661 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 
3,705 runs were made to take injured or insane persons to 
station houses, hospitals or their homes and 379 runs were 
made to take lost children to station houses. There were 
2,869 runs to fires and 698 runs for liquor seizures. During 
the year there were 515 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 
battery circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 609,328 telephone 
messages and 4,426,607 "on duty" calls were sent over the 
lines. 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



33 



The following list comprises the property in the signal ser- 
vice at the present time : — 



224,140 feet overhead cable. 

21,220 feet of duct. 

66 manholes. 

1 White truck. 

1 Ford truck. 

1 Ford sedan. " 



18 signal desks. 

72 circuits. 

515 street signal boxes. 

14 stable call boards. 

78 test boxes. 

955 cells of battery. 

622,017 feet underground cable. 

Harbor Service. 

The special duties performed by the police of Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as fol- 
lows : — 
Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, rigging, float 

stages, etc . $43,194 90 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded ..... 721 

Vessels ordered from the channel ..... 339 

Vessels removed from the channel by police steamers . . 3 

Assistance rendered ....... 107 

Assistance rendered wharfinger ...... 1 

Permits granted to discharge cargoes from vessels at anchor 32 

Obstructions removed from the channel .... 58 

Alarms of fire on water front attended .... 19 

Boats challenged . . . . . . . . 1,070 

Sick and injured persons assisted ..... 2 

Dead bodies recovered ....... 18 

Person rescued from drowning ..... 1 

Vessels assigned to anchorage ...... 750 

Cases investigated ........ 318 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor . 392 

Boats searched for contraband ..... 1,070 



The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,^ 
6,321 of which were from domestic ports, 596 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, and 971 from foreign ports. Of the 
latter 711 were steamers, 9 were motor vessels and 1 schooner. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 15 to October 18, 1926. 

The launch E. U. Curtis cruised nightly from Castle Island 
to Neponset Bridge. Twenty-six cases were investigated, 8 
boats were challenged for contraband, 1 obstruction removed 
from the channel, assistance rendered to 12 boats in distress 
by reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., and tow- 
ing them with the persons aboard to a place of safety, 1 dead 
body recovered from the water, 6 arrests for larceny and 3 
yachts ordered from the channel. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



tJan. 



Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1925, there were 32 horses in 
the service. During the year one was purchased and one 
humanely killed. At the present time there are 32 in the 
service as shown by Table VIII. 

Vehicle Service. 

Automohiles. 

There are 65 automobiles in the service at the present time ; 
18 attached to headquarters; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 11 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; four in the 
South Boston district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; two 
in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; four in the Back Bay 
and Fenway, attached to Division 16; two in the West Rox- 
bury district, attached to Division 17 ; two in the Hyde Park 
district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan dis- 
trict, attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the 
traffic divisions and five unassigned. (See page 36.) 



Cost of Running Automobiles. 



Repairs .... 


... . . $15,628 00 


Tires 


3,851 81 


Gasoline . . . • . 


11,964 89 


Oil 


1,850 20 


Storage ..... 


3,292 32 


License fees .... 


278 00 


Total .... 


. $36,865 22 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



35 



Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Divi- 
sion 1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) 
in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 
17, 18 and 19, and there are five unassigned. 

During the year aml^ulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 



City Hospital ...... 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston District) 

Calls where services were not required 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Psychopathic Hospital 

Home . 

Morgue . 

Carney Hospital 

PoUce station houses 

Forest Hills Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

United States Veterans Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital . 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Boston State Hospital 

Commonwealth Hospital 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 

Chelsea Naval Hospital . 

Homeopathic Hospital 

New England Baptist Hospital 

New England Hospital . 

Strong Hospital 



2,447 

1,244 

166 

91 

74 

62 

55 

40 

31 

20 

16 

10 

8 

6 

5 

4 

4 

3 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 



Total 



4,294 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

List of Vehicles Used by the Department. 



[Jan. 



Divisions. 


c 

03 

< 


2 

< . 


13 
O 
M 
cS 

<u 

.a 

O 


i 

c 
3 

a 

< 


3 
> 

s 

o 


t 

o 

2 
o 


>.03 


o 


Headquarters 


- 


- 


- 


16 


2 


- 


- 


18 


Division 1 


1 




- 




- 


1 


1 


5 


Division 2 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 


- 




- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Division 5 


- 




- 




- 


1 


- 


3 


Division 6 


- 




- 




- 


1 


1 


4 


Division 7 


- 




- 




_ 


3 


2 


7 


Division 9 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 11 


- 




- 




- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 13 


- 




- 




- 


7 


2 


11 


Division 14 


- 




- 




- 


8 


3 


13 


Division 15 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 16 


- 




- 




- 


9 


3 


16 


Division 17 


- 




- 




- 


8 


2 


12 


Division 18 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 


- 




- 




- 


6 


2 


10 


Division 20 


- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


3 


Joy Street Stable 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Unassigned 


- 


5 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


Totals . . . 


1 


23 


3 


37 


4 


64 


27 


159 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



37 



Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,241^ carriage Hcenses granted, 
being an increase of 472 as compared with last year; 2,225 
motor carriages were Hcensed, being an increase of 484 com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 16 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 407 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the inspector; 50 of these were restored to the owners, 
and the balance placed in the custody of the lost property 
bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received 
Number of carriages licensed . 
Number of licenses transferred 
Number of licenses canceled 
Number of licenses revoked 
Number of licenses suspended . 
Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected 
Number of applications for carriage licenses reconsidered and 
granted ........ 

Number of carriages inspected .... 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . 
Number of complaints against drivers investigated 
Number of days spent in court .... 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens 

Articles left in carriages reported by drivers 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected . 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted 

Drivers' licenses granted ...... 



22,378 

2,235 

158 

45 

5 

122 

136 

26 

2,235 

4,136 

235 

7 

19 

407 

105 

20 

4,031 



Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned to 
persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1926, 1,459 such special stands. 

Of these special stands, there have been 60 canceled or re- 
voked, 38 transferred and 97 suspended. 

There have been 482 applications for special stands re- 
jected, 33 of which were reconsidered and granted and 35 
applications rejected for transfer of special stands. 

1 Six canceled for nonpajrment. 

2 One held for cause. 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Sight-seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1926, there have been 
issued licenses for 63 sight-seeing automobiles and 32 special 
stands for them. 

There have been rejected 1 application for a sight-seeing 
automobile and 3 applications for special stands. 

There have been 231 operators' licenses granted. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During the 
year 4,594 applications for such licenses were received; 
4,592 of these were granted and 2 rejected. 

Of these licenses 84 were subsequently canceled for non- 
payment of license fee, 17 for other causes, and 22 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 







Listing Work 


IN Boston, etc. 






Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


19031 


181,045 


1915 








220,883 


1904 






193,195 


19163 








- 


1905 






194,547 


1917 








221,207 


1906 






195,446 


1918 








224,012 


1907 






195,900 


1919 








227,466 


1908 






201,255 


1920 








235,248 


1909 






201,391 


19214 








480,783 


19102 






203,603 


1922 








480,106 


1911 






206,825 


1923 








477,547 


1912 






214,178 


1924 








485,677 


1913 






215,388 


1925 








489,478 


1914 






219,364 







' 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

2 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

' 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year : — 



Male 
Female 



Total 



241,616 
251,799 

493,415 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 



Advertising and printing 


. $39,985 35 


Clerical services ..... 


24,708 00 


Stationery ...... 


305 99 


Interpreters ...... 


262 52 


Telephone ...... 


10 25 


Table 


12 41 



Total 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 



April 1 

April 2 
April 3 
April 5 
April 6 
April 7 
April 8 



,284 52 



1,224 

1,185 

956 

491 

221 

26 

4 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 



The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1926 may be summarized as follows: — 





1926. 


Dead or could not be found in Boston .... 


1,213 


Physically incapacitated . 


235 


Convicted of crime ....... 


143 


Unfit for various reasons ...... 


606 


Apparently fit . . . ... 


4,898 


Total 


7,095 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1926, there were 
1,550 special police officers appointed; 21 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause and 3 appointments 
revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows : — 



From United States Government 






26 


From State departments .... 






3 


From city departments .... 






347 


From county of Suffolk .... 






15 


From railroad corporations 






111 


From other corporations and associations . 






792 


From theatres and other places of amusement 






228 


From private institutions 






19 


From churches ..... 






9 



Total 



1,550 



Railroad Police. 



There were 20 persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 18 of whom were employees of the Boston & Maine 
Railroad and 2 of the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
RaiLroa,d. 

Conductors, Motormen and Starters of Street Railway 

Companies. 

During the year licenses of conductors, motormen and 
starters of the street railway companies hereinafter listed, 
were cancelled for various causes. 

The Boston Elevated Railway Company, with the approval 
of the Police Commissioner, inaugurated a system to have 
many of its employees already licensed both as "Conductors" 
and "Motormen" transferred to licenses as "Conductor- 
Motorman." 

The purpose of the Elevated Railway Company in doing 
this was that they could issue an operator's badge, so called, 
to each "Conductor-Motorman," who would then bear on 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



41 



his uniform but one badge and number instead of two as 
heretofore. 

An additional purpose was that such "Conductor-Motor- 
man" would be available for the operation of a one-man car, 
or on either end of a two-man car. 

Cancelations and Transfers. 





Canceled. 


Transferred. 


Boston & Worcester Street Railway Company . 

Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company 
Boston Elevated Railway Company 


32 

16 

233 


2,198 


Totals 


281 


2,198 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 26,616. Of these 26,197 were granted, of which 
152 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 26,045. During 
the year 244 licenses were transferred, 261 canceled, 9 re- 
voked, and 419 applications were rejected. The officers in- 
vestigated 479 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
$64,265.05. There was also $65.01 received by the city col- 
lector from the Law Department on account of damage to 
police property which was credited to the Police Department. 
(See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 54 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 11 of which were disapproved. 
Two licenses were subsequently canceled on account of non- 
payment of license fee. 

All the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are in- 
spected before the license is granted, and it is arranged by a 
qualified musician, not a member of the department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September of 
each year. 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



During the year 62 instruments were inspected with the 
following results : — 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Number 
Rejected. 


Street pianos 










22 


18 


4 


Hand organs 










16 


14 


2 


Violins . 










9 


9 


- 


Harps . 










2 


2 


- 


Mouth organs 










3 


3 


- 


Banjos . 










4 


4 


- 


Guitars 










2 


2 


- 


Accordions . 










2 


2 


- 


Bagpipes 










2 


2 




Totals . 


62 


56 


6 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years, and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Ye.*.r. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1922 


309 


308 


1 


1923 


246 


245 


1 


1924 . . . . . 


231 


231 


- 


1925 


240 


239 


1 


1926 


223 


222 


1 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 
or revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked : — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1922 .... 


3,100 


2,916 


184 


8 


1923 .... 


3,191 


3,067 


124 


6 


1924 .... 


2,998 


2,879 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 


1926 .... 


3,165 


3,043 


122 


3 



Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
Acts of 1904 as amended, during the year, the location of 
each house and the number of lodgers accommodated. 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


194 Commercial Street ...... 

234 Commercial Street ...... 

17 Davis Street ........ 

1051 Washington Street 

1202 Washington Street 

1025 Washington Street 


29,246 
10,872 
44,500 
30,000 
26,000 
24,000 


Total 


164,618 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1925, there were 240 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 20 died, viz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 
director of signal service, 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants, 13 patrol- 
men, 1 fireman and 1 annuitant. Twenty-seven were added. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

viz., 1 chief inspector, 1 inspector, 6 lieutenants, 2 sergeants, 
16 patrolmen and the widow of Patrolman Frank J. Comeau, 
who was killed while on duty; leaving 247 on the roll at date, 
217 men and 30 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $196,341.03, and it is estimated that $208,245.66 
will be required for pensions in 1927. This does not include 
pensions for 2 inspectors, 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant, 30 patrol- 
men and 3 civilian employees, all of whom are 65 years old or 
more and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and 
term of service. 

The invested fund of the police charitable fund on the thir- 
tieth of November last amounted to $207,550. There are 65 
beneficiaries at the present time and there has been paid to 
them the sum of $8,229.67 during the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and listing persons twenty years of 
age or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police 
signal service, were $5,000,729.29. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $58,230.54. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., 
was $70,383.59. There was turned into the City Collector's 
office by the city law department and credited to the police 
department, the sum of $65.01 on account of damage to police 
property. (See Table XIV.) 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



45 



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■3 § g'SS S'g.S fe^ Siii^ e.h *^ 3;§ S.M^.S 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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Driver .... 

Repairmen 

Chauffeurs 

Foreman of stable 

Hostlers .... 

Superintendent of building 

Painters .... 

Tailor .... 

Janitors .... 

Janitresses 

Telephone operators . 

Steamfitter 

Elevator operators . 






1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



47 





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48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

Ldst of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 1926, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time 
of Retirement 
(Years). 



Years of 
Service. 



Carl R. Ammelin 
George W. Bacher 
Charles E. Carbee 
Wesley W. Chandler 
Patrick H. Connerny 
Gardner M. Davis 
John F. Dobbyn 
Daniel F. Eagan 
John E. Geary . 
Stilhnan B. H. Hall 
Joseph F. Hurley 
Lincoln H. Jones 
Thomas Keane 
James B. Keiran 
John H. LaughUn 
David M. McCarthy 
John R. McGarr 
John J. McGillicuddy 
James H. Mitchell 
James M. Nelson 
Jeffrey J. O'Connell 
Hugh E. O'Donnell 
WiUiam H. Pelton 
Henry J. Walkins 
Winfield S. Wallace 
Guy E. V. Whitman 



Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 
. Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 



60 2 

58* 
65 9 

61 => 

6410 

61 

66* 
68^, 
53 \ 
59^ 
61 8 
52 8 
67 
65 1 
70 
33 6 

64 9 
27 8 
65 
6010 

65 9 
65 9 
6210 
68^ 
65* 
50 3 



30 9 

31 2 

34 9 
33 ^ 

38 * 

36 2 

35 * 

44 1 

24 9 

30 8 

31 ' 

25 ^ 
3711 
40 8 

45 1 
6 2 

35 1 
4 7 

37 8 

33 6 

34 9 

38 * 
29 « 
447 

37 8 
22 8/ 



Police Officers Retired during the Year under the Boston Retirement System, 
which went into effect February 1, 1923. 



Name. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age. 


Date of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Corwin, Walter F. . 
McAdams, John 


Patrolman 
Patrolman 


Disability 
Disability 


56 V12 
57i«/i2 


Dec. 31, 1925 
Mar. 31, 1926 


30 8/12 
30iVj2 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



49 



Table IV. 

List of Officers who were Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November 30, 1926. 



Date. 



Name and Rank. 



May 


31, 


1926 


May 


31, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13. 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Nov. 


26, 


1926 


Nov. 


26, 


1926 


Nov. 


26, 


1926 


Nov. 


26, 


1926 


Nov. 


26, 


1926 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Dec. 


4, 


1925 


Sept. 


13. 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13. 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 


Sept. 


13, 


1926 



Captain Ainsley C. Armstrong to the rank of chief in- 
spector. 

Lieutenant WiUiam W. Livingston to the rank of captain. 

Lieutenant Archibald F. Campbell to the rank of captain. 

Sergeant John J. Coughlan to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Wilham P. Gaffney to the rank of Ueutenant. 

Sergeant Harry T. Grace to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant George A. Mahoney to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant John T. O'Dea to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Harry N. Dickinson to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant James J. Hoy to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Wilham Lewis to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Jeremiah B. Sheehan to the rank of lieutenant. 

Sergeant Patrick J. WiUiams to the rank of lieutenant. 

Patrolman Wilham Balch to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman August H. Barthel to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman George H. Bird to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Walter BrowTi to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John E. Curran to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman James F. Daley to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John Donovan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Maurice Driscoll to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John F. Dunleavy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward W. Fallon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Stephen K. Higgins to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edmund R. Inghs to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward A. Moore to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William G. E. Mutz to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Athanasius McGilUvray to the rank of ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Wilham H. McKenzie to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman James F. O'Neil to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman WiUiam B. Quinan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Benjamin A. Wall to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Adien F. Edwards to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John P. Farrell to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Charles S. Gordon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Bernard J. Graham to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman William Hartigan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman George D. Kennedy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John J. McArdle to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Thomas E. McMurray to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman John P. McNealy to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Melvin A. Patterson to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Carleton B. Perry to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Wilham J. Riordan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Martin J. Shannon to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Manuel J. Suzan to the rank of sergeant. 

Patrolman Arthur D. Timmins to the rank of sergeant. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year who were 
Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date Appointed. 


c 
a 
T3 

a 

01 

_c 
a 

3 . 
02 


0. . 
3 m 

^-§ 
3 C 

a 0) 

Q 


o 

a 
c 

O 


a 
'3 
a 

ci 

O 


U 
O 

1 

c 


1 

c 

3 

3 


c 

03 
a> 
M 


d 
S 


O 


1875 
















1 


1 


1882 






_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


1883 






_ 


— 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 




1 


1884 






- 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_- 


_ 


1 


1 


1885 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


4 


1886 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


_ 


— 


5 


8 


1887 






- 


_ 


- 


1 


2 


— 


2 


5 


10 


1888 






1 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


5 


_ 


12 


20 


1889 






- 


— 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


7 


1890 






- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


9 


1891 






— 


- 


1 


— 


_ 


_ 


3 


7 


11 


1892 






- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


8 


1893 






- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


5 


9 


20 


42 


1894 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


6 


2 


10 


1895 






- 


1 


- 


7 


2 


8 


17 


33 


68 


1896 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


7 


11 


1897 






_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


7 


10 


20 


1900 






- 


_ 


- 


4 


2 


5 


16 


16 


43 


1901 






- 


_ 


- 


— 


2 


4 


7 


4 


17 


1902 






— 


_ 


- 


_ 


— 


— 


1 


_ 


1 


1903 






- 


- 


- 


2 


— 


4 


11 


11 


28 


1904 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


3 


1 


11 


7 


22 


1905 






— 


— 


— 


_ 


1 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1906 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


2 


6 


1907 






- 


- 


_ 


— 


1 


1 


9 


8 


19 


1908 






_ 


— 


- 


— 


3 


_ 


14 


6 


23 


1909 






_ 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


4 


2 


6 


1910 






_ 


— 


— 


_ 


1 


.- 


3 


3 


7 


1911 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


4 


1912 






— 


— 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


6 


4 


12 


1913 






_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


1914 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


1915 






_ 


— 


- 


_ 


— 


_ 


1 


— 


1 


1916 






— 


_ 


— 


_ ■ 


_ 


_ 


1 


3 


4 


1917 






_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


4 


5 


1919 






- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


17 


653 


670 


1920 






_ 


- 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


— 


215 


215 


1921 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


143 


143 


1922 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


81 


81 


1923 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


131 


131 


1924 






_ 


- 


"~ 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


85 


85 


1925 






— 


_ 




_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


63 


63 


1926 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


435 


435 


Totals 






1 


3 


1 


30 


27 


43 


166 


2,004 


2,275 



1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



51 



Table VI. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1926, who were Born in the Year 
Indicated on the Table below. 



Date of Birth. 


m 


s . 

3 fi 

Q 


o 
w 

C 

u 


c 

n 
«i 
O 


o 
c 


G 
oi 
C 

3 

3 


c 

03 
M 
S 


"o 
I 




1848 
















1 


1 


1851 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1857 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


6 


1858 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


3 


5 


1859 






- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


4 


1860 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


13 


14 


1861 






- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


7 


13 


1862 






_ 


- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


11 


19 


1863 






— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


"6 


6 


16 


1864 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


5 


12 


20 


1865 






_ 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


7 


15 


28 


1866 






1 


- 


- 


3 


1 


6 


8 


15 


34 


1867 






- 


- 


1 


6 


3 


4 


9 


14 


37 


1868 






_ 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


11 


7 


21 


1869 






- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


5 


7 


8 


24 


1870 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


14 


1871 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


4 


9 


17 


1872 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


6 


11 


19 


1873 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


15 


4 


22 


1874 






- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


3 


8 


8 


24 


1875 






- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


6 


2 


13 


1876 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


6 


2 


12 


1877 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


6 


7 


15 


1878 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


7 


4 


13 


1879 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


5 


8 


14 


1880 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


1 


5 


1881 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


2 


10 


1882 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


2 


9 


1883 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


5 


1884 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


1885 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


_ 


1 


18 


19 


1886 






- 


- 


- 


■ - 


- 


- 


2 


32 


34 


1887 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


47 


49 


1888 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


63 


65 


1889 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


82 


83 


1890 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


74 


74 


1891 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


105 


105 


1892 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


151 


154 


1893 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


148 


151 


1894 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


3 


190 


193 


1895 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


184 


186 


1896 






- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


205 


206 


1897 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


191 


192 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


120 


120 


1899 






- 


- 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


_ 


85 


85 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


— 


_ 


— 


- 


92 


92 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


25 


Totals 






1 


3 


1 


30 


27 


43 


166 


2,004 


2,275 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1926, is 36 years. 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



> 



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1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



55 



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56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 

Number and Distribution of Horses in the Department. 



Divisions. 


03 


1 

Is 
fin 


bb 

c 


Totals. 


Division 16 . 

Stable, 40 Joy Street . 


1 


1 


22 

8 


22 
10 


Totals .... 


1 


1 


30 


32 



1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



57 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year 
November 30, 1926. 



ending 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters . 








2,377 


348 


2,725 


Division 1 








6,560 


111 


6,671 


Division 2 








3,288 


614 


3,902 


Division 3 








4,962 


394 


5,356 


Division 4 








3,227 


315 


3,542 


Division 5 








9,152 


1,093 


10,245 


Division 6 








5,704 


310 


6,014 


Division 7 








5,009 


206 


5,215 


Division 8 








37 


- 


37 


Division 9 








5,542 


268 


5,810 


Division 10 








4,437 


404 


4,841 


Division 11 








3,378 


115 


3,493 


Division 12 








2,895 


115 


3,010 


Division 13 








2,093 


41 


2,134 


Division 14 








1,953 


167 


2,120 


Division 15 








5,009 


176 


5,185 


Division 16 








2,552 


358 


2,910 


Division 17 








1,556 


52 


1,608 


Division 18 








763 


61 


824 


Division 19 








1,028 


57 


1,085 


Division 20 








6,426 


161 


6,587 


Division 21 








901 


58 


959 


Totals 


78,849 


5,424 


84,273 



58 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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60 



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[Jan. 



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1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



61 



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62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



63 



I I I I I I I 



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64 



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[Jan. 



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1927.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



65 



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66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1927.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 67 



1 


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68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1927.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 71 



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72 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



o 



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1927.1 



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1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



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1927. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



77 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1926. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 . . . 


59 


21 


• 


3 


83 


2 








2 


1 


- 


3 


6 


3 








250 


95 


14 


1 


360 


4 








61 


21 


5 


- 


87 


5 








295 


92 


11 


11 


399 


6 








148 


41 


2 


- 


191 


7 








483 


130 


19 


- 


632 


9 








622 


169 


45 


2 


838 


10 








365 


82 


19 


1 


467 


11 








815 


145 


96 


2 


1,058 


12 








356 


72 


15 


- 


443 


13 








511 


121 


64 


1 


697 


14 








584 


148 


83 


2 


817 


15 








397 


144 


22 


- 


563 


16 








478 


136 


65 


- 


679 


17 








1,004 


176 


131 


3 


1,314 


18 








321 


68 


31 


- 


420 


19 








408 


81 


37 


- 


526 


Totals 








7,159 


1,743 


659 


19 


9,580 



1 Breeder at $50. 



Table XVI . 
Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 






906 


Division 12 


67 


Division 2 






1,411 


Division 13 


71 


Division 3 






171 


Division 14 


68 


Division 4 






346 


Division 15 


137 


Division 5 






212 


Division 16 


115 


Division 6 






373 


Division 17 


56 


Division 7 






119 


Division 18 


64 


Division 9 






256 


Division 19 


56 


Division 10 






70 








Division 11 






94 


Total 


1 4,592 



' 84 canceled for nonpayment of license fee. 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1926. 



Expenditures. 
Pay of police and employees 
Pensions 
Fuel and Light 
Water and ice 
Furniture and bedding 
Printing, stationery, telegrams, etc. 
Care and cleaning .station houses and city prison 
Repairs to station houses and city prison 
Repairs and suppHes for police boats 
Telephone rentals and tolls .... 
Purchase of horses and vehicles 
Care and keeping of horses .... 
Care and repair of automobiles 
Transportation of prisoners, sick and insane persons 
Feeding prisoners .... 

Medical attendance and medicine . 
Transportation ..... 
Pursuit of criminals .... 
Uniforms and uniform caps . 
Badges, buttons, clubs,- belts, insignia, etc 
Travehng expenses and food for police . 
Rent of buildings 
Traffic signs and symbols 
Expert services . 
Grave markers and wreaths 
Music for police parade 
Rifle Association membersliip 

Total 

Expenses of listing .... 
Expenses of signal service (see Table XVIII) 



$4,281,571 


15 


196,341 


03 


52,140 44 


718 


14 


10,524 


13 


31,107 


91 


12,730 41 


24,294 


80 


36,543 


96 


13,940 


70 


31,864 


01 


10,383 


35 


35,812 


66 


397 


80 


4,984 


88 


7,115 


34 


4,019 


61 


11,377 


10 


93,715 


57 


16,514 


97 


3,735 


40 


29,459 41 


23,954 


00 


1,300 


00 


388 


00 


310 


00 


200 


00 


. $4,935,444 77 


65,284 


52 


58,230 


54 



Total 



$5,058,959 83 



Receipts. 



For all licenses issued by the Pohce Commissioner . 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 

Sale of condenmed, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 

For license badges, copies of hcenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, rent, uniform cloth, use of 
police property, etc. ....... 

Refunds . . . . . > . 

For damage to police property ..... 

Received by City Collector from the City Law Department 
on account of damage to police property and credited to 
the Pohce Department ...... 

Rebates ......... 



$39,414 05 

24,851 00 

2,077 27 



1,942 71 
867 12 
808 35 



65 01 
423 09 



$70,448 60 



1927.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



79 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 
November SO, 1926. 



Pay roUs $36,008 18 


Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor 




15,323 64 


Rent of buildings ..... 




1,000 07 


Repairs to building 








1,121 92 


Moving to Parmelee Street . 








131 00 


Care of and repairs to vehicles 








1,052 56 


Shoeing horse . . . 








111 50 


Carfare .... 








625 64 


Stub-files .... 








74 00 


Prescribed underground work 








2,782 03 


Total .... 


$58,230 54 



80 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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INDEX 



Accidents 

caused by automobile 

persons killed or injured by, in streets 

number of, reported 
Ambulance service . 
Arrests .... 

age and sex of 

comparative statement of 

for offences against chastity, morality 

for drunkenness 

foreigners 

minors 

nativity of 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions 

number of, punished by fine 

on warrants 

summoned by court 

total number of 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants 
Assaults on police officers 
Auctioneers .... 
Automobiles .... 

accidents due to 

larceny of . . . 

police .... 

public .... 

sight-seeing 

stolen .... 

used .... 
Benefits and pensions 
Bertillon system 
Buildings .... 

dangerous, reported . 

found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Carriages, public 

articles left in . 

automobile 

number licensed 
Cases investigated . 

Celerity in dispatching police information 
Cesspools, defective, reported . 
Children .... 

abandoned, cared for 

lost, restored . 
Chimneys, dangerous, reported 
City ordinances, arrests for violation of 
Claims, inspector of 
Collective musicians 
Commitments 
Complaints .... 

against police officers 

against miscellaneous licenses 
Courts ..... 

fines imposed by 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 

number of persons summoned by 
Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 

arrests by . . . 

finger-print system . 

identification room . 

photographs 

records .... 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 
Dangerous weapons 
Dead bodies, cared for 

recovered 
Deaths ..... 

by accident, suicide, etc. . 

of police officers 
Department, police 
Distribution of force 
Disturbances suppressed 
Dogs ..... 

amount received for licenses for 

damage done by 

number licensed 
Drivers, hackney carriage 



parks and 



etc. 



19, 



23, 



24, -28, 29, 



20,21,22 



PAGE 

23, 29, 80, 81 

23, 80, 81 

23, 80, 81 

29 

36 

22, 57, 58-72, 74 
73 
74 

19, 63, 72 
20, 21, 31, 67 

20, 58-72 
20, 58-72 

20 

20, 58-72 

57 

21 

20, 58-72 

20, 58-72 

21, 72 

21, 66 

20, 58-72 
15 
75 

34, 36, 37, 80, 81 
23, 80 81 
24 

34, 36 
37 

38.75 

24, 28 
29 
43 
21 
29 
29 
29 
21 

37, 75 
37 
37 

37,75 

22, 31, 33 

14 

29 

21, 29, 30 
29 

21, 30 
29 

21, 66 
30 

42,75 

21, 31 

41, 53, 75 

53 

41,75 
31,58-72,74 

20,74 
20, 21, 22, 31, 74 
20, 58-72 
21 
22 
22 
21 
21 
22 
74 
74 
43 

29,33 

29 33 

19, 23. 47. 80*. 81 

23 

19,47 
18 

19. 45 

29 

30, 75, 77, 78 

75,78 
30 

75,77 

37, 75 



P.D. 49. 



85 



Drowning, persons rescued from 
Drunkenness .... 
arrests for, per day . 
foreigners arrested for 
increase in number of arrests for 
nonresidents arrested for . 
total number of arrests for 
women committed for 
Employees of the Department 
Events, special 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial .... 
expenditures . 
pensions .... 
receipts .... 

miscellaneous license fees 
signal service . 
Fines ..... 
amount of . . . 

average amount of . 
number punished by 
Finger-print system 
Fire alarms .... 
defective, reported . 
number given . 
Firearms .... 
Fires ..... 
extinguished . 
on water front attended . 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 
Gaming, illegal 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Hand carts 
Harbor service 
Horses . 

distribution of 
number in service 
purchased 
House of detention 
House of ill fame, keeping 
Hydrants, defective, reported . 
Identification room 
Imprisonment 

persons sentenced to 
total years of . 
Income .... 

Inquests held 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians 
Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers . 
Jury lists, police work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous ... 
Liquor law, violation of Massachusetts State 
Liquor traffic and narcotics 
Listing, police 
expenses of 
number listed . 

number of policemen employed ; 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, public . 
applications for licenses 
authority to Ucense . 
location of . . . 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 
causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 
complaints investigated . 
number canceled and revoked 
number issued 
number transferred . 



PAGE 

30, 33 
20, 21, 31, 67 

20 

20,67 

20, 21 

20, 67 

21,67 

31 

18,45 

25 

44, 78, 79 

22, 30 

44, 75, 78, 79 

44,78 

44, 78 

44,78 

44, 75, 78 

44, 78, 79 

20, 21, 74 

20, 21, 74 

20,74 

21 

22 

30 

30 

30 

8 

30,33 

30 

33 

20, 58-72 

22 

68 

37, 75 

37,75 

75 

33 

34,56 

56 

34, 56 

34 

31 

31, 64 
30 

21, 23 

23,74 

23 

23,74 

44,78 

23 

30 

30 

30 

30 

41,75 

75 

75 

39 

30 

41, 75, 78 

25 

5 

38, 39, 78, 82, 83 
39, 78 
38, 82, 83 
39 
21 
43,75 
75 
43 
43 
43 
23, 76, 78 
21 
23 
23 
23 
20, 58-72 
29 
41, 75, 78 
41, 75, 78 
41,75 
41,75 
41,75 
41,75 



86 



P.D. 49. 



Missing persons 

age and sex of 

number found 

number reported 
Musicians, collective 
Musicians, itinerant 

applications for licenses 

instruments inspected 

instruments passed . 
Narcotics, etc. 
Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences 

against chastity, morality, etc. 

against license laws . 

against the person . 

against property, malicious 

against property, with violence 

against property, without violence 

forgery and against currency 

miscellaneous . 

recapitulation . 
Operators 
Parks, public . 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers . 
Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 

number of persons on rolls 

payments on account of 
Plant .... 
Police .... 

railroad . 

special . 

Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries 
Police department . 

distribution of 

horses in use in 

how constituted 

officers appointed 
absent sick 
arrests by 
assaults on 
complaints against 
date appointed . 
detailed, special events 
died 

discharged 
injured 
nativity of 
promoted . 
resigned . 
retired 

vehicles in use in 

work of . 
Police listing . 
Police signal service 

miscellaneous work . 

payments on account of 

property of 

signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of 
Property 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 

stolen 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lodging houses 
Railroad police 
Receipts 
Revolvers 

licenses to carry 
Second-hand articles 
Sewers, defective, reported 
Sick and injiued persons assisted 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, police 
Special events 
Special police 
Station houses 

lodgers at 

witnesses detained at 



13, 21 



19 



19, 



38, 39, 78 
18,31, 



44, 



23, 33, 74 
23 
21, 
13, 44 



44, 



21, 

18, 31, 



PAGE 

27, 28 

28 

27 

27 

42,75 

41,75 

41,75 

41 

41 

5 

20 

58-72 

, 58-72 

63,72 

62,72 

58,72 

61,72 

60,72 

60,72 

62,72 

65,72 

72 

38,75 

80, 81 

80,81 

75 

43,78 

44 

44 

44,78 

16 

40 

40 

40 

44 

18,45 

18,45 

34,56 

18 

19 

52 

58-72 

15 

53 

50 

25 

19,47 

19 

19 

51 

49 

19 

44,48 

36 

19 

82, 83 

78,79 

32 

78,79 

33 

31 

20 

76,78 

76,78 

33,74 

76,78 

21,74 

21 

37 

43.75 

40 

75,78 

43,75 

43,75 

75 

30 

30,33 

52 

38, 75 

78, 79 

25 

40 

21 

21 

21 



P.D. 49. 



87 



Stolen property 

recovered 

value of . 
Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters 
Streets .... 

accidents reported in 

defective, reported . 

obstructions removed 
Teams . 

stray, put up 
Traffic . 
Used cars 

licensed dealers 

sales reported 
Vehicles 

ambulances 

automobiles 

in use in police department 

public carriages 

wagons . 
Vessels . 
Wagons 

number licensed by divisions 

total number licensed 
Water pipes, defective, reported 
Water running to waste reported 
Weapons, dangerous 
Witnesses .... 

fees earned by officers as . 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as 

number of, detained at station houses 
Women committed to House of Detention 



34, 



PAGE 

21. 74 

21, 74 

21, 74 

40, 75 

. 30, 80, 81 

80, 81 

30 

30 

30 

30 

11 

29, 75 

75 

29 

35, 36, 37, 80, 81 

35 

34 

36 

37, 75 
. 38, 75, 77 

33 

. 38, 75, 77 

77 

38, 77 
30 
30 
43 

20, 21, 31, 74 
20. 74 

20, 24 

21, 30 
31 



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