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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"






. . ANNUAL REPORT .n^.O;^:-;:' 



OF THE 



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YbM BNi>mo NoYKaii^JEB' 30, 1928 



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1928 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 







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Public Document No. 49 



©It? OInmmnttiuraltIt of ilaasarl^UBrtfa 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1928 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



^ 



X' 



^ 






CONTENTS. 



Letter to Governor .... 

Control of pedestrian and vehicular traffic 

Liquor nuisances 

Celerity in transmitting Police news 

Police property .... 

Pensions to police officers . 

Additional police officers 
The Department .... 

Police Force .... 

Signal service .... 

Employees of the Department 

Recapitulation .... 

Distribution and changes 

Police officers injured while on duty 
Work of the Department . 

Arrests ..... 

Drunkenness .... 

Nati\aty of prisoners, etc. . 
Bureau of criminal investigation 
Officer detailed to assist medical examiners 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property . 
Special events ..... 
Missing persons .... 

Record of automobiles reported stolen 
Record of purchases and sales of used cars reported 
Miscellaneous business 
Inspector of claims . 
House of detention . 
Police signal service . 

Signal boxes 

Miscellaneous work 
Harbor service 
Horses .... 
Vehicle service 

Automobiles 

Ambulances 

List of vehicles used by the Department 
Public carriages 

Sight-seeing automobiles 
Wagon licenses 
Listing work in Boston 

Listing expenses 

Number of policemen employed in listing 
Police work on jury lists . 
Special police . 
Railroad police 
Miscellaneous licenses 



PAGE 

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34 
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34 
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36 
36 
36 



RELEASED BY 

PUBUC LiBR^fJ; 

DETROIT. WICH 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Musicians' licenses . . . . . . . . . .37 

Itinerant ........... 37 

Collective 37 

Carrying dangerous weapons ........ 38 

Public lodging houses ......... 38 

Pensions and benefits . . . . . . . . . 39 

Financial ........... 39 

Statistical tables 

Distribution of police force . . . . . . . .41 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 43 

List of officers retired ........ 44 

Police officers and employees retired under Boston Retirement 

System ........... 44 

List of officers promoted ........ 45 

Number of men in active service ...... 46 

Men on the police force and year born ..... 47 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness . . 48 

Complaints against officers ........ 49 

Number of arrests by police divisions ...... 52 

Arrests and offences, also disposition of cases . . . .53 

Age and sex of persons arrested ....... 65 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 66. 

Licenses of all classes issued ....... 67 

Dog licenses .......... 69 

Wagon licenses .......... 69 

Financial statement ......... 70 

Payments on account of signal service ...... 71 

Accidents ........... 72 

Male and female residents listed ....... 74 



51|p (Eommanmraltlj nf HaaaarljuarttB 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 

Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1928. 

To His Excellency Alvan T. Fuller, Governor. 

Your Excellency: — As Police Commissioner for the city 
of Boston I have the honor to present, in comphance with the 
provisions of chapter 291 of the Acts of the year 1906, a report 
of the PoHce Department for the year ending November 30, 
1928. 

Control of Pedestrian and Vehicular Traffic. 

On February 7, 1927, at the suggestion of the Mayor's 
Traffic Advisory Committee, Malcohn E. Nichols, Mayor of 
Boston, appointed Dr. Miller McClintock, Director of the 
Street Traffic Survey to be made under the auspices of the 
Albert Russell Erskine Bureau, Harvard University, to con- 
duct an engineering investigation of the traffic control problem 
of the city of Boston. The Street Traffic Survey with the aid 
of the Police Department worked assiduously and earnestly 
upon this problem of traffic solution. Careful compilation of 
figures relative to the flow and direction of traffic both vehicu- 
lar and pedestrian was obtained with the aid of intelligent 
investigators. The problem was considered not hastily but 
with the thoroughness and intelligence naturally to be expected 
from the traffic expert engaged for this purpose. In June, 
1928, a voluminous and comprehensive report was submitted 
to the Mayor of Boston by Dr. McClintock, and after many 
consultations and conferences, many of the recommendations 
made by. the Traffic Survey for the development of celerity 
of traffic were adopted by the Board of Street Commissioners 
in the form of new traffic rules and regulations issued in Sep- 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

tember of this year. The recommendation of the boulevard 
stop system on Commonwealth Avenue and Blue Hill Avenue 
requiring traffic on side streets to come to a complete stop 
before entering these main arteries has been put into effect 
by orders of the Street Commissioners and Board of Park 
Commissioners. The Police Department after having ob- 
tained from the State Department of Public Works approval 
of the signs and markers to be placed for the purpose of notify- 
ing the public of this regulation have been installing the same 
on these two avenues. The Legislature of 1928, Chapter 357, 
provided for uniform traffic signs, lights, markings, signal 
systems and regulations. Under this legislation no rule, 
regulation, order, ordinance, or by-law of a city or town herein- 
after made or promulgated relative to or in connection with 
such signs,f lights, markings, signal systems or devices, or in 
any way within this control can take effect until approved in 
writing by the State Department of Public Works, or can be 
effective after this approval is^revoked. 

The adoption of boulevard stops on main arteries is not 
only imperative to reduce accidents, but necessary also to 
expedite traffic in congested areas. The extension of these 
boulevard stops to other main traffic arteries in this city 
undoubtedly will be recommended. 

Upon the recommendation of the Traffic Survey automatic 
timing lights were recommended for installation on Washing- 
ton Street and Tremont Street so that traffic can be speeded 
up from six to sixteen miles an hour. Plans and specifications 
have been prepared by the Engineering Division of the Board 
of Street Commissioners, and advertisements for bids have 
been made to be received early in January, 1929. The effect 
of the installation of this system in these crowded areas both 
as regards fluidity of traffic and prevention of accidents, is 
at present impossible to foretell. Additional installations of 
similar lights upon other main arteries in this city will un- 
doubtedly be recommended. During the past year ten spot- 
lights were installed in various parts of the city, making a 
present total of one hundred and forty-eight spotlights in use. 
Several other recommendations of the Survey relative to con- 
trol of traffic in the congested areas are now being tested, such 
as the adoption of traffic lanes. At this time it is too early 
to determine the effect that the adoption of these recom- 
mendations will have upon the control of traffic. 



1929] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 7 

Liquor Nuisances. 

A statement in regard to the amount of work done by the 
pohce in enforcing the prohibitory laws, and also of local 
liquor conditions, necessarily must be included in the annual 
report of this Department. Liquor traffic and street traffic 
control present a continuous problem to the police. Homi- 
cides, burglaries and other violent crimes are sporadic, and 
may be classified as seasonable police business. Police work 
suppressing liquor violations is constant. The increase or 
decrease of arrests for drunkenness is regarded by some 
statisticians as a barometer to determine the status of the 
liquor problem. These arrests however are not an accurate 
gauge of the enormous burden placed upon local police since 
the passage of the prohibitory laws. 

Arrests cannot be made even though suspicion obtains 
that the liquor laws are being violated, for violators cannot 
be convicted upon suspicion but only upon direct evidence of 
violation of law. The presentation to a magistrate, as proof 
of guilt, of a vessel smelling strongly of intoxicating liquor 
would be regarded as ridiculous, even though intoxicating 
liquor had been hastily poured from this vessel, in the presence 
of the police, within a very few seconds before its seizure. 
Intoxicating liquor, neutralized by disinfectants, because non- 
potable, is worthless as evidence. 

If under the laws of the Commonwealth the illegal purchase 
of intoxicating liquor was made a criminal offence as is the 
illegal sale, considerable caution about violating prohibitory 
laws would be exercised by that class of citizens who look for 
the strict enforcement by the police of all laws protecting 
lives or property. I^aw enforcement cannot be qualified. 

Those who illegally buy intoxicating liquor and stifle their 
consciences with the theory that prohibitory laws are not 
binding because they abridge personal freedom, should at 
least not openly complain of Hquor conditions in their respec- 
tive communities. Much unwarranted criticism is made of 
the police in not terminating liquor traffic. This censure is 
most unjust, because often made by individuals or organiza- 
tions that are not cognizant of the unlimited odds, obstacles 
and difficulties which the police constantly encounter in try- 
ing to desiccate wet sections of a city. The liquor problem in 
this city has been treated in all my annual reports, and frankly 
speaking, the difficult conditions encountered by the police 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

to arrest liquor traffickers have not diminished but have 
increased. Recommendations have been made from time to 
time that upon conviction, a violator of the liquor law should 
be given a jail sentence. The records of the courts show that 
very few liquor violators are sent to jail. Courts believe 
that extenuating circumstances often surround the commis- 
sion of crime, and are loath therefore to inflict additional 
punishment on the families of those convicted and fined for 
liquor violations. 

Absentee landlordism among liquor traffickers is spreading. 
Unfortunate agents hazard reputation and possibly liberty 
in dispensing intoxicating liquor for principals who never 
frequent premises where liquor is sold illegally. To appre- 
hend the principal therefore is practically impossible. Con- 
stant raids upon places suspected of illegal liquor traffic with 
a possible conviction each time of a different violator is futile 
and discouraging work, and accomplishes a vicious circle. 

It has been repeatedly advocated by me that the prohibitory 
laws of this State should be amended so as to be in accord 
with the Volstead Act, in giving governmental authorities 
the right and authority to petition courts for injunctive relief 
against places where despite continuous police activity illegal 
traffic has persisted. The Legislature of 1928 has afforded 
relief in equity where, by injunction, owners of property who 
have allowed their property to become liquor nuisances can 
be held responsible. Proof of a present liquor nuisance and 
three prior convictions for liquor traffic upon the premises 
within the three prior years enables injunctive relief in closing 
the premises for at least one year. 

The term "conviction" as used in the statute means final 
conviction. Where liquor law violators have been placed on 
file, or have received suspended sentence, or probation, a 
conviction has not been obtained. 

Equity proceedings under this legislation have been started 
by this Department. Both before and after the commence- 
ment of these proceedings many places where iilegafl liquor 
traffic existed have been closed by the voluntary act of the 
owner, and illegal liquor business thus discontinued upon the 
premises. The effect of the so-called "Padlock Law" cannot 
at this early date be predicted. Owners with proper civic 
pride will not compel the police to thrash them into an observ- 
ance of authority. Methods of attempting to evade the law 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 9 

bj^ moving these liquor nuisances to new places where con- 
victions have not been obtained are beginning to appear. 
Eventually, however, lessors, it is believed, will appreciate 
the fact that a vacant tenement is better than a bad tenant. 

Liquor enforcement officers of the Department report that 
the liquor situation in Boston is well in hand, and welcome 
comparison with any city in this country in the matter of 
liquor law enforcement. 

Celerity in Transmitting Police News. 

The Morkrum Teletype, a scientific system of transmitting 
police information operating under the Bell system has been 
in use in this Department for about one year. Messages 
relayed from PoHce Headquarters are instantaneously regis- 
tered upon a receiving machine in the various police stations. 
The previous clumsy and antiquated method of transmitting 
police news has been replaced by efficient and accurate broad- 
casting machinery. Intricate machinery such as the teletype 
requires occasional repairs. These repairs have been made 
both speedily and effectively by the company installing the 
teletype system. 

This effective method of transmitting news should not be 
confined to this cit3^ Conditions under which police must 
act are constantly changing. The advent and perfection of 
the automobile and other agencies now used by criminals in 
the commission of crime have so changed conditions that 
speed and accuracy in the dissemination of police news is 
imperative. Allowing the criminal to employ new methods 
and material in the commission of crime without combating 
him with modern methods and machinery is false economy. 

Private organizations maintain steady march with changing 
economic conditions, and there is no hesitancy on the part of 
these organizations to install new methods when increasing 
business may be anticipated. The latest scientific instru- 
ments, when possible, should be employed by police organiza- 
tions either in checking or apprehending criminals. To rely 
upon past systems of delivery of messages by telephone or 
telegraph is not only antiquated but negligent. 

The system of transmission of news by teletype which has 
been installed in this city could be utilized as a nucleus to 
extend a network of antennae for the conveyance of important 
messages to the police departments of the Commonwealth. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Delay in the prosecution of criminals by the invocation of 
intricate legal technicalities cannot be attributed to the 
police, but to permit criminals to escape from the confines of 
this Commonwealth after the commission of crime, because of 
inadequate broadcasting, would be unfortunate. 

Police Property. 

During the past year the exterior and interior of the station 
houses attached to Divisions 15 and 16 were thoroughly 
cleansed and repainted, and also the garage and stable of 
Division 16. The police stable on Albany Street used by 
Traffic Division 20 for stabling horses has been abandoned, 
and the twenty-six saddle horses of this Department are now 
quartered at the stable attached to Division 16. The offices 
of station houses of Divisions 11 and 12 were remodeled to 
take care of increased business. Repair work was done on the 
garage attached to Division 11; also considerable repairs to 
the exterior of station house of Division 9. 

All boats attached to Division 8 were overhauled, and 
placed in condition for continuous service. The heating 
apparatus at Headquarters and at all the station houses was 
inspected and repaired during the summer. The new type of 
patrol wagons was placed at Divisions 7, 10, 11, 13 and 16, 
and 52 motorcycles were purchased by the Department, mak- 
ing a total of 66 motorcycles available for police work. 

New garages at Station 14, situated in Brighton, and Sta- 
tion 12, situated in South Boston, are greatly needed. As 
stated in my report of last year, the old wooden building 
owned by the city of Boston in the rear of the old Town Hall, 
now used by Division 14 as a garage, could be sold, and the 
proceeds of both land and building used for the erection of a 
fireproof eight-car garage in the rear of the station house. 
A new garage is necessary for the motor vehicles and motor- 
cycles used by Division 12. Storing motor vehicles used by 
Division 12 in the garage of Station 6, South Boston, should 
in the interest of better policing be discontinued. 

The police steamer Guardian, which has been in continuous 
police service since October, 1896, except for short intervals 
for overhauling, must be replaced by another boat. The 
boilers of the Guardian are not in good condition, and parts 
of the hull show signs of rot and decay. The policing of the 
waterfront and harbor is an important part of the work done 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 11 

by this Department, and with the advent of prohibition addi- 
tional work has been placed upon the Harbor police. The 
expenditure of a large amount of money to overhaul the 
Guardian would be both uneconomic and unprofitable. If 
it be forced out of service because of condemnation proceed- 
ings by the Federal Government, a replacement by another 
vessel would be absolutely necessary, inasmuch as the three 
other boats attached to the harbor service and patrol would be 
insufficient for the service required. The building of a 
modern boat, designed for police purposes, is preferable to 
bujang at auction or at private sale a vessel either now in 
service or temporarily in drydock. The question of building 
a new boat has been presented to the Mayor of Boston, and 
this recommendation is now under consideration. 

Pensions to Police Officers. 

Members of both fire and police departments are con- 
stantly exposed to personal injury and for fatal injuries 
received while in the performance of duty their dependents 
should be amply protected. Amounts received under the 
present pension law by dependents of deceased police officers, 
in my opinion, are not sufficient. It is reasonable to believe, 
however, that in the future this matter will be worked out 
satisfactorily by the Legislature of this Commonwealth. 

A variance exists in the law retiring on pension police officers 
in this department because of permanent disability from in- 
juries received in the performance of duty. All police officers 
appointed to the Boston Police Department since 1923, 
automatically become members of the Boston Retirement 
System, and, if retired because of permanent disability, must 
undergo a yearly physical examination by a medical board 
functioning under the Boston Retirement Act. Many mem- 
bers of the force are not members of this Boston Retirement 
System, and if permanently injured in the performance of 
duty are retired under the provisions of chapter 353 of the 
Acts of 1892, as amended by chapter 306 of the Acts of 1900, 
and chapter 6 of the Acts of 1920. These men are not subject 
to a subsequent yearly examination as to their fitness for 
reinstatement and restoration to duty. 

In time of emergency the Police Commissioner has the 
power to recall to duty for temporary service officers who have 
been pensioned, but this does not grant him the power to recall 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

retired officers for permanent service. In 1927, legislation 
was passed (chapter 257 of the Acts of 1927), requiring a 
yearly physical examination of firemen in Boston who have 
been retired under pension laws other than the Boston Retire- 
ment Act of 1922. It appears equitable that the provision of 
law relating to the pension of police officers in the city of 
Boston should be the same in the case of all members of the 
force who have been retired because of physical disability. 
Legislation to this effect has been introduced by me to the 
incoming Legislature. 

Additional Police Officers. 

The present maximum strength of this department is 2,024 
patrolmen. The number of police officers available for patrol 
work is always seven-eighths of the total force, inasmuch as 
every police officer is entitled to one day off in eight. The 
sickness list necessarily increases during the winter months. 
During the summer and fall months, especially during the 
vacation period which extends from May to December, there 
are at times, nearly 500 men unassailable, one-eleventh of the 
force being on vacation and one-eighth of the remainder on a 
day off. 

With increase in construction of schoolhouses, more police 
officers are required to protect school children. All school 
crossings, at the present time, are not covered, because of 
shortage of police officers. Even when all available officers 
are used for this purpose, it often requires the withdrawal of 
patrolmen from important special work to which they have 
been assigned. 

Control of vehicular and pedestrian traffic at an increased 
number of traffic points presents a difficult problem because 
of the limited number of police officers to assign to this work. 
Installation of synchronized lights will not eliminate the neces- 
sity of traffic officers at intersections equipped with such a 
lighting system, because police officers will be required for 
some time at every intersection to enforce obedience to the 
signals and to render police service in case of accidents. 

At the present time 32 police officers have been assigned 
to enforce the parking regulations promulgated by the Board of 
Street Commissioners. Sufficient evidence must be presented 
to satisfy the Court in cases of illegal parking. Police officers 
must know the time when a car was parked at a certain point. 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 13 

and the time of departure. This requires police officers to 
confine their work to a small area, for courts will not accept 
estimates of the length of time of parking by persons cited 
into court for illegal parking. For this work at least 100 men 
are required if the people are to be made to understand that 
parking rules were made to be enforced. 

Traffic officers assigned to fixed posts cannot do parking 
work and if more officers are to be added to the present park- 
ing squad, they must be obtained from divisions where com- 
manding officers are continually asking for additional officers 
for patrol work. 

Traffic and route officers are necessarily obliged to go to 
court in the prosecution of cases and while there, important 
traffic posts cannot be manned or routes patrolled. 

Control of hackney carriages operated in this city (2,667 
taxicabs and 7 horse-drawn carriages, and 4,537 licensed 
hackney carriage drivers) requires additional officers. The 
duty and responsibility of licensing all hackney carriage 
drivers and carriages rests upon the Police Commissioner. 
Before these licenses are granted an investigation is made of 
the character of the applicant and also an examination of the 
vehicle licensed. Supervising officers are necessary so that 
the traveling public may be protected. The present staff of 
police officers assigned to this work necessarily has been 
drawn from police divisions. Proper supervision of the 
operations of these licensees requires a larger number of 
officers than at present assigned. 

Claims against the city of Boston are investigated by the 
Inspector of Claims with the assistance of police officers. 
The number of claims against this city has increased enor- 
mously during the past five years and additional men drawn 
from the various divisions have been added to this unit. 

The District Attorney of Suffolk County files requests 
for the services of police officers of this department to bring 
back to this jurisdiction prisoners desired for trial. These 
requests have always been honored and a considerable with- 
drawal of police officers from this department from patrol work 
has necessarily ensued. 

A Special Service Squad of 20 men under the direct charge 
of a captain has been created for the purpose of night patrol 
duty in motor vehicles. That their services have been of 
great value cannot be gainsaid as hundreds of stolen automo- 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

biles have been recovered and many bandits and hold-up 
men captured. The personnel of this organization is of men 
from the various divisions. At present there is only one shift. 
The number of officers attached to this unit should be increased 
so that another night shift could be formed. 

Conditions today require more police officers than in the 
past. The advent of the automobile and its use in the com- 
mission of crime has presented new and alarming problems 
for the police. 

Concurrent action of the Mayor of Boston and the Police 
Commissioner is required in order to increase the present 
number of patrolmen in this department. I have requested 
150 additional police officers of the Mayor and that request 
is now under advisement. 

Very respectfully, 

HERBERT A. WILSON, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



15 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The police department is at present constituted as follows : — 
Police Commissioner. Secretary. 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Chief inspector . 
Captains . 
Inspectors 



Director . 

Signalmen 

Mechanics 



1 

2 

1 

30 

27 



Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen 



Total 



Signal Service. 



Linemen 
Chauffeur 

Total 



44 

175 

2,025 

2,305 



17 



Employees of the Department. 



Property clerk . 


1 


Matrons (station houses) 


5 


Clerks .... 


28 


Mechanic 


1 


Stenographers . 


10 


Painters . . . 


5 


Chauffeurs 


3 


Repairmen 


2 


Elevator operators 


5 


Steamfitter 


1 


Engineers on poUce steamers 


3 


Superintendent of building . 


1 


Firemen on police steamers . 


8 


Superintendent, repair shop 


1 


Firemen .... 


6 


Tailor .... 


1 


Hostlers .... 


11 


Telephone operators . 


3 


Janitors .... 
Cleaners .... 


34 
17 






Total 


151 


Matrons (house of detention) 


5 







Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary ...... 2 

Police force .......... 2,305 

Signal service ........... 17 

Employees. 151 

Grand total 2,475 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I, 
During the year 104 patrolmen were appointed; 19 patrolmen 
were discharged; 28 patrolmen resigned (19 while charges 
were pending), 29 patrolmen were promoted; 2 captains, 2 
lieutenants, 7 sergeants and 15 patrolmen were retired on 
pensions; 1 captain, 1 inspector, 1 sergeant and 10 patrolmen 
died. (See Tables II, III, IV.) 



Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
injured while on duty during the past year, the number of 
duties lost by them on account thereof, and the causes of the 
injuries. 



How Injured. 


Number of 
Men Injured. 


Number of 
Duties Lost. 


In arresting prisoners ..... 
In pursuing criminals ..... 
By cars and other vehicles .... 
By stopping runaways ..... 
Various other causes ..... 


79 
16 

119 

2 

113 


118 

204 

3,004 

692 


Total 


329 


4,018 



Work of the Department. 

Airests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 95,807 as against 88,878 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 6,929. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: — 



Offences against the person ..... 
Offences against property committed with violence . 
Offences against property committed without violence 
Malicious offences against property 
Forgery and offences against the currency 
Offences against the license laws .... 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . 
Offences not included in the foregoing 



p 


er Cent. 


Increase 


7.67 


Increase 


11.40 


Increase 


8.20 


Increase 


38.09 


Decrease 


1.63 


Increase 


7.66 


Increase 


34.91 


Increase 


7.10 



RELEASED Bif 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 
' -^nn, MICH 
1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



17 



There Avere 15,651 persons arrested on warrants and 52,741 
without warrants; 27,415 persons were summoned by the 
courts; 69,281 persons were prosecuted; 25,601 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses and 925 
were dehvered to outside authorities. There were 800 extra 
prosecutions, making a total of 70,081 cases prosecuted. 
The number of males arrested was 89,467; of females, 6,340; 
of foreigners, 27,528; or approximately 28.73 per cent; of 
minors, 9,177. Of the total number arrested, 27,433, or 28.63 
per cent, were non-residents. (See Tables IX, X.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1924 to 1928, inclusive, was $388,590.18; in 
1928 it was $493,577.00; or $104,986.82 more than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
53,451; in 1928, it was 59,739, or 6,288 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,946.38, 
in 1928 it was $14,790.26 or $156.12 less than the average. 
(See Table XII.) 

Drunkenness.. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 106. 
There were 254 more persons arrested than in 1927, an increase 
of .66 per cent; 24 per cent of the arrested persons were non- 
residents and 36.32 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table X.) 

The nativity of the prisoners was as follows: — 



United States . 


68,280 


British Provinces 


4,322 


Ireland . 


8,207 


England . 


641 


France 


116 


Germany 


376 


Italy 


4,036 


Russia 


3,433 


China 


818 


Greece 


567 


Sweden . 


7.50 


Scotland . 


505 


Spain 


123 


Norway . 


249 


Poland . 


1,205 


Australia 


29 


Arabia 


6 


Mexico . 


16 


Syria 


150 


Lithuania 


589 



Austria . 
Portugal . 
Finland . 
Denmark 
Holland . 
Wales 
East Indies 
West Indies 
Turkey . 
South America 
Switzerland 
Belgium 
Armenia 
Africa 
Hungary 
Asia 

Roumania 
Japan 
Philippine Islands 
Total ' . 



132 

495 

202 

87 

23 

1 

10 

98 

81 

52 

23 

29 

123 

6 

9 

1 

1 

13 

3 



95,807 



18 , •; ;VPOLIC;E>.e.0MM:':SSIONER. [Jan. 

The number of arrests for the year was 95,807, being an 
increase of 6,929 over last year, and 8,603 more than the 
average for the past five years. There were 39,048 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 254 more than last year, and 
220 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of .68 
per cent in males and a decrease of .20 per cent in females 
from last year. (See Tables X, XII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year, 95,807, 467 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one arrest 
in 205 was for such offence, or .48 per cent. 

Sixty-one and four hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table X.) 

The number of persons punished by fines was 33,812 and the 
fines amounted to $493,577. (See Table XII.) 

One hundred persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,772 to the House of Correction, 47 to the Women's Prison, 
135 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2,738 to other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were 2,446 years, 10 
months, 27 days (322 sentences indefinite) ; the total number of 
days' attendance at court by officers was 59,739, and the 
witness fees earned by them amounted to $14,790.26. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $277,094.57. 

Twenty witnesses were detained at station houses, 192 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 6 from last year. 
There was an increase of 10.61 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 13.42 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property reported stolen in and out 
of the city for the five years from 1924 to 1928, inclusive, 
was $1,787,449.76, in 1928 it was $1,516,623.37, or $270,826.39 
less than the average. The amount of property stolen in 
and out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston police, 
was $2,881,110.36, as against $2,100,248.24 last year, or 
),862.12 more. (See Table XII.) 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
The "identification room" now contains 69,980 photographs, 
56,521 of which are photographs with Bertillon measurements, 
a system used by the Department since November 30, 1898. 



1929.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 19 

In accordance with the Revised Laws, chapter 225, section 18, 
and with the General Laws, chapter 127, sections 27 to 29, 
both inclusive, we are allowed photographs with Bertillon 
measurements taken of the convicts in the State Prison and 
Reformatory, a number of which have been added to our 
Bertillon cabinets. This, together with the adoption of the 
system by the Department in 1898, is and will continue to be 
of great assistance in the identification of criminals. A large 
number of important identifications have thus been made 
during the year for this and other police departments, through 
which the sentences in many instances have been materially 
increased. The records of 1,033 criminals have been added 
to the records of this Bureau, which now contains a total of 
49,459. The number of cases reported at this office which 
have been investigated during the year is 33,838. There are 
46,594 cases reported on the assignment books kept for this 
purpose and reports made on these cases are filed away for 
future reference. The system of indexing adopted by this 
Bureau for the use of the Department now contains a list of 
records, histories, photographs, dates of arrests, etc., of 
about 234,600 persons. There are also "histories and press 
clippings" now numbering 10,275 made by this Bureau, in 
envelope form for police reference. 

The finger-print system of identification which was adopted 
in June, 1906, has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
with it the identification of criminals is facilitated. It has 
become very useful in tracing criminals and furnishing cor- 
roborating evidence in many instances. 

The statistics of the work of this branch of the service 
are included in the statement of the general work of the De- 
partment, but as the duties are of a special character, the 
following statement will be of interest : — 

Number of persons arrested, principally for felonies . . 1,735 
Fugitives from justice from other States, arrested and deliv- 
ered to officers from those States ..... 65 

Number of cases investigated ...... 33,838 

Number of extra duties performed ..... 2,007 

Number of cases of homicide and supposed homicide investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for trial in court . . . 202 
Number of cases of abortion and supposed abortion investi- 
gated and evidence prepared for court .... 9 

Number of days spent in court by police officers . . 2,938 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Number of years of imprisonment imposed by court, 157 years, 7 months 
Amount of stolen property recovered .... $894,000.00 

Number of photographs added to identification room . . 1,732 

Officer Detailed to Assist Medical Examiners. 
The officer detailed to assist the medical examiners reports 
having investigated 776 cases of death from the following 
causes: — 



Abortion 






4 


Accidental shooting 




2 


Aeroplane 




2 


Alcoholism 






14 


Asphyxiation 






9 


Automobiles 






3 


Bicycle . 






1 


Burns 






15 


Drowning 






51 


Elevators 






6 


Falls 






59 


Falling objects 




15 


Kicked by horse 




1 


Machinery 






5 



Motorcycle 
Natural causes 
Poison 

Railroad (steam) 
Railway (street) 
Stillborns 
Struck by swing 
SufTocation 
Suicides . 
Teams 
Homicides 

Total 



1 

297 

24 

12 

4 

7 

1 

8 

66 

2 

167 



776 



Accidental shooting . 


1 


Railway (street) 


Automobiles . 


117 


Suicide . 


Falls 


1 


Teams 


Manslaughter . 


13 




Motorcycle 


2 


Total 


Murder . 


11 





On 248 of the above cases inquests were held. 
Of the total number the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts : — - 

20 
1 
1 

167 

Lost, Abandoned and Stolen Property. 
On December 1, 1927, there were 1,915 articles of lost, 
stolen or abandoned property in the custody of the Property 
Clerk, and during the year 1,180 were received. Forty 
pieces were sold at public auction and the proceeds, $544.80, 
were turned over to the Chief Clerk; 20 pieces were destroyed 
as worthless or sold as junk and the proceeds, $104.40, turned 
over to the Chief Clerk; 10 pieces were sold as perishable and 
the proceeds, $90.88, turned over to the Chief Clerk; 113 
packages containing money to the amount of $511.61 were 
turned over to the Chief Clerk and 62 pieces were returned to 
owners, finders or administrators, leaving 2,850 packages on 
hand. 



1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



21 



Special Events. 
The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 

1927. Men. 

Dec. 5, South Station, arrival of French Ambassador . . 23 

Dec. 24, On traffic duty Christmas Eve in West End ... 18 

Dec. 24, On Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration . . 10 

Dec. 24, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight Mass . . 10 



1928. 

Jan. 11, Mechanics Building, Police Ball . 

Feb. 4, Visit of Italian Ambassador 

Feb. 14, Funeral of patrolman Charles J. Bonworth 

Feb. 22, State House, Governor's reception 

Feb. 26, East Boston airport, arrival of Mrs. Evangeline L. Lind 
bergh ....... 

Feb. 26, Hotel Statler, visit of Mrs. Evangeline L. Lindbergh 

Mar. 1, Mechanics Building, reception to Mrs. Evangeline L 
Lindbergh ....... 

Mar. 1, East Boston airport, arrival of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh 

Mar. 1, CopIey-PlazaHotel, visit of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh 

Mar. 3, Hotel Statler, departure of Mrs. Evangeline L. Lindbergh 

Apr. 15, Back Bay, railroad station fire 

Apr. 16, Back Bay, railroad station fire 

Apr. 19, Fenway Park, baseball game 

Apr. 19, Marathon race .... 

Apr. 19, Patriots' Day parade 

Apr. 24, Presidential primary . 

May 7 to 

May 17, Convention Hall, convention American Federation of 
Labor ........ 

May 19, Arrival and reception to Bremen fliers . 

May 19, Parade of Bremen fhers and officers detailed . 

May 19, Arena, reception to Bremen fliers 

May 20, Fenway Park, memorial service and reception to fliers 

May 20, Copley-Plaza Hotel, visit of Bremen fliers 

May 21, Boston Common, fireworks ..... 

May 26, Boston Common, conclave of bands 

May 26, Mechanics Building (evening), conclave of bands . 

May 30, Fenway Park, baseball game .... 

May 30, Workhorse parade ...... 

June 1, Parade of Boston School cadets .... 

June 2, Dorchester Day celebration .... 

June 4, Parade and review, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany ........ 

June 17, Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Roxbury Crossing . 

June 17, Eve of Bunker Hill Day, Charlestown . 

June 18, Bunker Hill Day, Charlestown, parade and fireworks 

June 30, Rehearsal of pageant for July 4th on Boston Common 



270 
29 
34 
61 

96 
22 

321 

106 

95 

20 

6 

26 

67 

455 

138 

355 



189 

305 

419 

266 

320 

37 

23 

16 

14 

60 

33 

356 

79 

336 

25 

135 

374 

36 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1928. 


July 


3, 


July 


3, 


July 


4, 


July 


4, 


July 


9, 


July 


9, 


July 


10, 


July 


22, 


July 


23, 


July 


26, 


July 


31, 


Aug. 


3, 


Aug. 


9, 


Sept. 


9, 


Sept. 


18, 


Sept. 


30, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


12, 



Oct. 12, 



Oct. 13, 
Oct. 15, 



Rehearsal of pageant for July 4th on Boston Common 

South Boston, fireworks ..... 

Boston Common, Independence Day, afternoon and 
evening ....... 

Charlesbank, athletic contests 

Arrival of Miss Amelia Earhart and tour of city 

Arena, reception to Miss Amelia Earhart 

Departure of Miss Amelia Earhart 

Beach Street, wreck of Boston Elevated train 

Beach Street, wreck of Boston Elevated train 

Bulletin boards, Tunney-Heeney fight . 

Braves Field, boxing matches 

Funeral of Patrolman John F. W. Ferris 

Funeral of Patrolman Clarence A. Lewis 

Fenway Park, baseball game 

State primary ..... 

Franklin Field, women's athletic meet . 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Boston Arena, Democratic rally . 

Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 

Braves Field, schoolboy football game . 

Mechanics Building, Democratic rally . 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Duke University football 
game ......... 

Annual Dress Parade and Review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of rank 
and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into three 
battalions of eight companies each, in command of a 
major, so designated. To each battalion was assigned a 
military band. The regiment included a sergeant and 
twenty men mounted on department horses, a colonel 
commanding, with his adjutant and staff officers from 
the respective police divisions and units in military 
company formation, shotgun companies, patrolmen 
with Thompson sub-machine guns, a motorc3rcle unit, 
and a machine gun unit mounted on automobiles. The 
regiment was reviewed at City Hall by His Honor the 
Mayor; at the State House by Hon. William S. Young- 
man, Treasurer of the Commonwealth, representing 
His Excellency Governor Alvan T. Fuller, and on the 
Parade Grounds of the Common by Hon. William S. 
Youngman and the Police Commissioner Hon. Herbert 
A. Wilson ........ 

Stadium, Harvard-North CaroUna football game 

Visit of Presidential candidate Herbert Hoover, arrival, 
reception on Common, Hotel Statler, Governor's home, 
the Arena, Copley-Plaza Hotel and departure from 
South Station ....... 



Men. 

30 
30 

182 

52 

795 

210 

113 

58 

18 

75 

84 

45 

45 

40 

1,017 

39 

70 

70 

78 

70 

14 

69 

33 



1,585 
50 



747 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



23 



1928. 


Oct. 


17, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


20, 


Oct. 


22, 


Oct. 


23, 


Oct. 


24, 


Oct. 


25, 


Oct. 


27, 


Oct. 


27, 


Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


2, 


Nov. 


2, 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


3, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


6, 


Nov. 


10, 


Nov. 


11, 


Nov. 


17, 


Nov. 


24, 



Tremont Temple, Democratic rally- 
Visit of West Point Cadets, parade, etc. 

Stadium, Harvard-West Point football game 

Bulletin boards, Harvard- West Point football game 

Symphony Hall, Democratic rally 

Special primary in Ward 18 .... 

Visit of Presidential candidate Governor Smith, arrival, 
reception on Common, Mechanics Building, Symphony 
Hall and Arena ...... 

Departure of Governor Smith .... 

Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Boston University football 
game ........ 

Mechanics Building, Democratic rally . 

Republican torchlight parade .... 

Arena, Republican rally ..... 

Stadium, Harvard-Lehigh football game 

State House, Sacco-Vanzetti protest gathering 

Presidential and State election .... 

Bulletin boards, election returns .... 

Stadium, Harvard-Penn football game . 

Armistice Day parade ..... 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game . 

Bulletin boards, Harvard-Yale football game 



Men. 

41 
435 
95 
31 
49 
48 



1,336 
334 
104 

19 

36 

665 

60 

53 

44 

1,017 

82 

106 

314 

95 

56 



Missing Persons. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 



Total number reported 
Total number found 



874 
760 



Total number still missing . . . . . .114 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years 


185 


55 


180 


52 


5 


3 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years 


156 


167 


135 


135 


21 


32 


Over 21 years 


206 


105 


168 


90 


38 


15 


Totals 


547 


327 


483 


277 


64 


50 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year ending 
November 30, 1928. 



Month. 


Stolen. 


Recovered, 
during 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1927. 

December 




389 


358 


24 


7 


1928. 
Jan. 






284 


266 


12 


6 


February 






279 


263 


15 


1 


March . 






289 


265 


19 


5 


April 






304 


279 


20 


5 


May 






400 


363 


27 


10 


June 






362 


336 


11 


15 


July . 






318 


280 


25 


13 


August . 






344 


314 


17 


13 


September 






393 


376 


12 


5 


October 






395 


357 


22 


16 


November 






445 


418 


- 


27 


Totals 


4,202 


3,875 


204 


123 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



25 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this Department for 
the Year ending November 30, 1928. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1927. 

December . 


1,960 


1 ,623 


760 


1928. 

January 


2,408 


1,877 


759 


February 






2,152 


2,068 


557 


March 






2,445 


2,506 


1,009 


April . 






2,595 


2,470 


1,521 


May . 






3,958 


4,482 


1,245 


June . 






3,349 


4,021 


1,324 


July . 






3,706 


3,956 


1,011 


August 






3,088 


3,083 


1,040 


September 






2,764 


2,451 


722 


October 






2,859 


2,958 


925 


November 






2,539 


2,216 


694 


Totals 


33,823 


33,711 


11,567 



Miscellaneous Business. 





1925-26. 


1926-27. 


1927-28. 


Abandoned children cared for . 


9 


6 


8 


Accidents reported ..... 


6,275 


6,711 


8,973 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,261 


3,460 


3,388 


Cases investigated ..... 


78,977 


76,261 


78,577 


Dangerous buildings reported . 


32 


51 


15 


Dangerous chimneys reported . 


11 


16 


22 


Dead bodies recovered .... 


40 


49 


198 


Dead bodies cared for . 


335 


257 


54 


Defective cesspools reported 


30 


17 


38 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


14 


4 


1 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business — Concluded. 



[Jan. 



1925-26. 1926-27. 1927-28 



■eported 



Defective fire alarms and cloclvs repor 
Defective gas pipes reported 
Defective hydrants reported 
Defective lamps reported . 
Defective sewers reported 
Defective sidewalks and streets 
Defective water pipes reported 
Disturbances suppressed . 
Extra duties performed 
Fire alarms given 
Fires extinguished . 
Insane persons taken in charge 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Lost children restored 
Persons rescued from drowning 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Stray teams reported and put up 
Street obstructions removed 
Water running to waste reported 
Witnesses detained . 



ted 





4 


7 




3,5 


15 




111 


79 




9,077 


6,306 




99 


59 




8,090 


9,032 




163 


43 




470 


437 




39,583 


42,189 




2,633 


3,335 




1,562 


1,364 




332 


352 




30 


29 




1,480 


1,520 




14 


19 




6,535 


6,446 




65 


105 




2,541 


3,432 




462 


484 




8 


23 



13 

70 

5,737 

116 

9,439 

42 

693 

49,256 

3,631 

1,283 

355 

18 

1,316 

17 

7,130 

28 

2,054 

467 

20 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 
law department in investigating claims against the city for 
alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 
2,677 cases, 3 of which were on account of damage done by 
dogs. 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



27 



Other Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated ...... 2,677 

Number of witne.sses examined ...... 14,340 

Number of notices served ....... 11,097 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers 

regarding accidents and to examine police records) . . 11,573 

Number of days in court ....... 250 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office . 95 
Collected for damage to the city's property and bills paid to 

repair same . . . . . . . • . . $2,834.75 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of the 
matron until the next session of the court before which they 
are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment, they are re- 
turned to the house of detention, and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,534 were committed for the following: — 



Drunkenness . 

Larceny . 

Night walking . 

Fornication 

Idle and disorderly 

Assault and battery 

Adultery . 

Violation of liquor law 

Keeping house of ill fame 

Various other causes 



1,220 

373 

52 

168 

162 

18 

50 

64 

34 

393 



Total 



From Municipal court 
From County jail 

Grand total 



Recommitments. 



2,534 

183 
505 

3,222 



Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 535. Of these 362 
are connected with the underground system and 173 with the 
overhead. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

During the year the employees of this service responded to 
1,980 trouble calls; inspected 535 signal boxes, 18 signal desks 
and 1,083 batteries; repaired 230 box movements, 83 registers, 
96 polar box bells; 102 locks, 73 time stamps, 19 vibrator 
bells and 9 electric fans, besides repairing all bell and electric 
light work at the various stations. There have been made 96 
plungers, 75 complete box fittings, 101 line blocks, 91 auto- 
matic hooks and a large amount of small work done which 
cannot be classified. 

The police signal service has charge of 148 reflector spot- 
lights, which have been installed by the Commissioner for the 
regulation of traffic, also 5 signal towers. 

Nine new signal boxes have been installed, two at Station 7, 
two at Station 11, one at Station 16, four at Station 19, five of 
which are overhead boxes and four underground. 

Cable and boxes are on hand for the 1928 prescribed under- 
ground district but work of installation will not be undertaken 
until the spring of 1929. The underground work done this 
year was on the 1926 and 1927 underground districts in East 
Boston, Roxbury and Dorchester. 

A new signal desk was purchased and fitted for Station 12 
and the old one was repaired for use on some other Division. 

The Gamewell punching register installed at Station 4 did 
not prove satisfactory and was returned to the factory for 
alterations. It is now in service again at the same station. 

The Gamewell Company changed one of its standard 
police box movements to conform to our requirements, which 
is now being tried out. A box movement of another concern 
is also on trial. 

A new type Ford truck was purchased to replace the old one 
used by the painter. 

There are in use in the signal service: 1 White truck, 1 Ford 
sedan and 2 Ford trucks. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 54,310 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 118,602 miles. There 
were 36,137 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,928 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 415 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were 3,132 runs 
to fires and 627 runs for liquor seizures. During the year 
there were 535 signal boxes in use arranged on 72 battery 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



29 



circuits and 72 telephone circuits; 627,486 telephone messages 
and 4,184,221 "on duty" calls were sent over the lines. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time: — 



18 signal desks 
72 circuits 
535 street signal boxes 
14 stable call boards 
75 test boxes 
1,083 cells of battery 
664,408 feet underground cable 



223,690 feet overhead cable 
23,094 feet of duct 
67 manholes 

1 White truck 

2 Ford trucks 
1 Ford sedan 



Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the Police of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows :- 



Value of property recovered consisting of boats 
float stages, etc. .... 

Vessels from foreign ports boarded . 

Vessels ordered from channel . 

Vessels removed from channel by police steamer 

Assistance rendered .... 

Assistance rendered wharfinger 
Permission granted to discharge cargoes from 
anchor ...... 

Obstructions removed from channel 
Alarms of fire on the water front attended 
Fires extinguished wthout alarm 
Boats challenged ..... 

Boats searched for contraband 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Dead bodies recovered .... 

Persons rescued from drowning 
Vessels assigned to anchorage 
Vessels ordered to put on anchorage lights 
Cases investigated .... 

Permits issued to transport and deliver fuel oil in h 
Dead bodies cared for ..... 



iggmg, 



-'Is at 



irbor 



)2,959 00 

709 

263 

2 

73 

1 

26 

24 

22 

1 

296 

286 

5 

28 

5 

1,215 

3 

341 

158 

6 



The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 8,830, 
7,197 of which were from domestic ports, 577 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, and 1,633 from foreign ports. Of 
the latter 667 were steamers, 40 were motor vessels and 2 
schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 15 to October 17, 1928. The launch E. U. Curtis 
cruises nightly from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge. Thirty- 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

eight cases were investigated, four boats were challenged and 
searched for contraband, five obstructions removed from the 
channel, assistance rendered to seven boats in distress, by- 
reason of disabled engines, stress of the weather, etc., and 
towing them with the persons aboard to a place of safety, 
two dead bodies recovered from the water, three arrests for 
larceny, six yachts ordered from the channel and seven boats 
challenged. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1927, there were 32 horses in 
the service. During the year three were delivered to the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health for anti-toxin 
purposes; three, on account of age, to the Massachusetts 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals; one hu- 
manely killed; one sold in trade; one sold outright and one 
purchased. 

At the present time there are 24 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses, attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 

Automobiles. 

There are 75 automobiles in the service at the present time ; 
25 attached to headquarters; one at the house of detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 12 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; four in the 
South Boston district, attached to Divisions 6 and 12; two 
in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; four in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; two in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; two in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; two in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14 ; two in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; five in the Back Bay 
and Fenway, attached to Division 16; two in the West Rox- 
bury district, attached to Division 17; two in the Hyde 
Park district, attached to Division 18; two in the Mattapan 
district, attached to Division 19; two assigned for use of the 
traffic divisions and six unassigned, (See page 32.) 



1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



31 



Cost of Running Aidomobiles. 



Care and repairs .... 


$16,034 62 


Tires ...... 


4,700 35 


Gasoline . . . . . 


15,868 49 


Oil 


2,979 81 


Storage ..... 


5,787 05 


License fees ..... 


252 00 


Total 


$45,622 32 



Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are 5 unassigned. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 



City Hospital .... 








2,310 


City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) 






. 1,032 


City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) 






169 


Calls where services were not required 






70 


Massachusetts General Hospital 








62 


Home ...... 








61 


Psychopathic Hospital 








52 


Morgue ..... 








51 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital . 








48 


Carney Hospital .... 








27 


Police Station houses 








17 


Forest Hills Hospital 








15 


Peter Bent Brigham Hospital . 








11 


Homeopathic Hospital 








5 


Faulkner Hospital .... 








4 


New England Hospital . 








4 


Beth Israel Hospital 








3 


Boston State Hospital 








3 


Strong Hospital .... 








3 


Chardon Street Home 








2 


Bay State Hospital 








1 


Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 








1 


Ro.xbury Hospital .... 








1 


Trumbull Hospital .... 








1 



Total 



3,953 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

List of Vehicles Used hy the Department. 



[Jan. 



Divisions. 


1^ 


s 

3 
< m 

2 fi 

%< 

o 


B 
O 
bc 
03 

01 

.a 
O 


3 
o 
£ 

O 

'S 
< 


> 

2 

o 


J) 

>. 

B 
o 


2:2 


.id 


Headquarters 


- 


- 


- 


24 


1 


- 


- 


2.5 


Division 1 


1 




- 




- 


1 


1 


5 


Division 2 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 


- 




- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 


- 




- 




1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 5 


- 




- 




- 


1 


- 


4 


Division 6 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 7 


- 




- 




- 


4 


4 


10 


Division 9 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 


- 




- 




- 


2 


1 


5 


Division 11 


- 




- 




- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 


- 




- 




- 


3 


2 


7 


Division 13 


- 




- 




- 


7 


2 


11 


Division 14 


- 




- 




~ 


8 


3 


13 


Division 15 


- 




- 




- 


2 


2 


6 


Division 16 


- 




- 




- 


9 


3 


17 


Division 17 


- 




- 




- 


8 


2 


12 


Division 18 


- 




- 




- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 


- 




- 




- 


6 


2 


10 


Division 20 


- 


- 


- 




- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 


3 


Unassigned 


- 


5 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


8 


Totals 


1 


2;] 


2 


48 


3 


66 


31 


174 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



33 



Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,675^ carriage licenses granted, 
being an increase of 502 as compared with last year; 2,668 
motor carriages were licensed, being an increase of 506 com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 7 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 231 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., left in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the inspector, 14 of these were restored to the owners, 
and the balance placed in the custody of the lost property 
bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : — 



Number of applications for carriage licenses received 

Number of carriages licensed . 

Number of licenses transferred 

Number of licenses canceled 

Number of licenses revoked 

Number of licenses suspended . 

Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected . 

Number of carriages inspected . ' . 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . 

Number of complaints against owners and drivers investigated 

Number of daj^s spent in court ..... 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens 
Articles left in carriages reported by drivers 
Drivers' applications for licenses rejected .... 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . 
Drivers' licenses granted ....... 

Drivers' licenses revoked ...... 

Drivers' licenses suspended ...... 

Drivers' licenses canceled ...... 



2,682 

2,674 

95 

548 

9 

30 

7 

' 1,928 

4,664 

1,750 

273 

23 

208 

125 

21 

2 4,539 

23 

265 

105 



Since July 1, 1914, the Police Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations licensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such licensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1928, 1,890 such special stands. 

Of these special stands there have been 260 canceled or 
revoked, 34 transferred and 20 suspended. There have been 
329 applications for special stands rejected, 27 of which were 
reconsidered and granted, and 23 applications rejected for 
transfer of special stands. 



Uiic canceled for nonpayment, 1 granted "no fee." ^ Three canceled for nonpayment. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Sight-seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1928, there have been 
issued licenses for 46 sight-seeing automobiles and 33 special 
stands for them. There have been rejected 3 applications for 
sight-seeing automobiles and 6 applications for special stands. 

There have been 81 operators' licenses granted and there 
has been one operator's license suspended. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. During the year 
4,214 applications for such licenses were received and granted. 

Of these licenses 200 were subsequently canceled for npn- 
payment of license fee, 64 for other causes and 46 transferred 
to new locations. (See Tables XIII, XV.) 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


19031* . . 


181,045 


1904 .... 


193,195 


1905 .... 


194,547 


1906 .... 


195,446 


1907 .... 


195,900 


1908 .... 


201,255 


1909 .... 


201,391 


19102 


203,603 


1911 .... 


206,825 


1912 .... 


214,178 


1913 .... 


215,388 


1914 .... 


219,364 


1915 .... 


220,883 



Ye.^r. 



Canvass. 



1916^ 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921* 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 



221,207 
224,012 
227,466 
235,248 
480,783 
480,106 
477,547 
485,677 
489,478 
493,415 
495,767 



' 1903 to 1909 both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

2 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

3 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 94. 



35 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year : — 



Male 
Female 



Total 



239,166 
252,111 

491,277 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: — 



Advertising and printing ..... 


$40,068 50 


Clerical services ....... 


18,625 00 


Stationery ........ 


419 30 


Interpreters ........ 


285 00 


Card cabinet ....... 


91 35 


Telephone ........ 


10 05 


Total 


$59,499 20 


Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 




April 2 


. 1,404 


Aprils 


. 1,283 


AprU 4 . . . . . . . 


. 1,096 


April 5 ........ . 


583 


April 6 


82 


April 7 . 


12 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The police department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1928 may be summarized as follows: — 



1928. 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Con^dcted of crime 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit 
Total . 



1,007 
183 
171 
379 

5,375 



7,115 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application of 
any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1928, there were 1,508 
special police officers appointed; 7 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause and 2 appointments canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as fol- 
lows : — 



From United States Government 

From State departments . 

From City departments . 

From County of Suffolk . 

From railroad corporations 

From other corporations and associations . 

From theatres and other places of amusements 

From private institutions 

From churches ..... 

Total 



38 

3 

335 

1 

65 

800 

233 

17 

16 



1,508 



Railroad Police. 

There were 23 persons appointed railroad policemen during 

the year, 2 of whom were employees of the Boston, Revere 

Beach & Lynn Railroad, 20 of the New York, New Haven and 

Hartford Railroad and 1 of the Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 
The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 28,321. Of these 28,083 were granted, of which 
255 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 27,828. During 
the year 483 licenses were transferred, 1,369 canceled, 34 
revoked and 238 applications were rejected. The officers 
investigated 2,314 complaints arising under these licenses. 
The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $71,520.50. (See Tables XIII, XVI.) 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



37 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 40 applications for itinerant 
musicians' Ucenses received, one of which was disapproved 
and 3 Hcenses were subsequently canceled on account of non- 
payment of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 51 instruments were inspected with the 
following result: — 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos 














24 


24 


Accordions 














9 


9 


Violins . 














7 


7 


Flutes . 














3 


3 


Guitars . 














3 


3 


Banjos . 














2 


2 


Bag-pipes 














2 


2 


Flageolette 














1 


1 


Totals 


51 


51 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : — 



Year. 


Applica- 
tions. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1924 


231 


231 


- 


1925 


240 


239 


1 


1926 


223 


222 


1 


1927 . . . . 


193 


192 


1 


1928 


223 


221 


2 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the numl^er revoked : • — • 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1924 .... 


2,998 


2,879 


119 


7 


1925 .... 


3,227 


3,090 


137 


8 


1926 .... 


3,165 


3,043 


122 


3 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 


77 


2 


1928 .... 


2,954 


2,904 1 


50 


1 



1 30 canceled for nonpayment. 

Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Pohce Commissioner under chapter 242 of the 
acts of 1904, as amended during the year, the location of each 
house and the number of lodgers accommodated: — 



1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



39 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street ........ 


33,172 


1051 Washington Street ...... 


32,154 


1202 Washington Street 


29,555 


1025 Washington Street ...... 


29,081 


Total 


123,962 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1927, there were 272 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 16 died, viz., 1 deputy superintendent, 1 
chief inspector, 2 lieutenants, 3 sergeants, 7 patrolmen, 1 
signal service employee and 1 annuitant. Twenty-two were 
added, viz.: 1 captain, 2 lieutenants, 6 sergeants, 11 patrol- 
men, 1 signal service mechanician and the widow of Patrolman 
John Condon who died from injuries received in the perform- 
ance of duty, leaving 278 on the roll at date, 247 men and 
31 women. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $241,148.09 and it is estimated that $264,388 
will be required for pensions in 1929. This includes partial 
provision for 1 lieutenant, 2 inspectors, 5 sergeants, 16 patrol- 
men and 2 civilian employees all of whom are 65 years old or 
more and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and 
term of service. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 58 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,952.33 during 
the past year. 



Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and listing persons twenty years of 
age or more, but exclusive of the maintenance of the police 
signal service were $5,542,581.83. (See Table XVI.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was $56,780.01. (See Table XVII.) 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from fees for 
licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale of 
unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., was 
$83,055.66. (See Table XIII.) 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



41 







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42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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Repairmen 
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Steamfitter 

Superintendent of building 
Superintendent of repair 
shop .... 
Telephone operators . 
Tailor .... 


"a 
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1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



43 





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44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table III. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November SO, 1928, giving the 
Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 


Age at Time 


Years of 




Retirement. 


(Years). 


Service. 


Downey, Jeremiah J. 


Age 


7911/12 


53 3/12 


Driscoll, Daniel F. . 






Age 


62 Vi-2 


3611/12 


Gallagher, James J. . 






Age 


65 V12 


32 8/12 


Garrison, Roland W. 






Incapacitated 


3410/12 


510/12 


Guard, George H. 






Age 


65 


40 1/12 


Hennessey, William J. 






Age 


641'/l2 


36 V12 


Howes, James A. 






Age 


61 


35 V12 


Jacobs, James H. 






Age 


60 V12 


29 V12 


Kempton, Howard P. 






Age 


61 9/12 


30 


Magee, Frank M. 






Age 


60 1/12 


2710/12 


McCabe, Thomas F. 






Incapacitated 


40 1/12 


76/12 


McGillivray, Athanasius 






Age 


63 8/12 


3110/12 


Murphy, Dennis F. . 






Age 


6311/12 


3411/12 


Murphy, John F. 






Age 


65 1/12 


34 V12 


Nolan, Thomas F. . 






Incapacitated 


37 5/12 


7»/l2 


Searles, Charles W. . 






Age 


63 V12 


39 V12 


Tanck, Henry C. 






Age 


70 


40 V12 


Tilton, WiUiam C. M. 






Age 


60 1/12 


34 0/12 


Randall, Alvin R. 






Incapacitated 


31 V12 


91/12 


Smith, Edmund M. . 






Age 


60 V12 


35 V12 


Wedell, Carl V. 






Incapacitated 


31 8/12 


8»/l2 



Police Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under the Boston 
Retirement System, which went into effect February 1, 1923. 



Name. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at 

Time of 

Reth-e- 

ment 

(Years) . 


Years of 
Service. 


Bouzane, Charles M. 

Garland, George C. . 
Gelchis, William A. . 

Hurley, Nora A. . 
MacLaughlin, Elizabeth A. D. . 
McCaffrey, George H. . 
MiUigan, Daniel V. . 

Toland, Patrick F 


Patrolman 

Captain 
Patrolman 

Cleaner 

Stenographer 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Hostler 


Incapa- 
citated 

Age 
Incapa- 
citated 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapa- 
citated 

Age 


28 V12 
70 

33>/i2 
69 

69 8/12 
66 V12 

3111/12 
69io/,2 


21/12 
45 

111/12 
2611/12 
25 V12 
34 2/12 

5Vl2 

22V12 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



45 



Table IV. 

LAst of Officers who were Promoted above the Rank of Patrolman during the 
Year ending November SO, 1928. 



Date. 



Name and Rank. 



Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


10 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


Feb. 


17 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


6 


1928 


July 


20 


1928 


July 


20 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


July 


27 


1928 


Nov. 


23 


1928 



Patrolman George V. Augusta to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward C. Blake to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Alfred Boucher to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas F. Lyons to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph J. Maguire to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Maurice F. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Cornelius J. Ring to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman .Joseph E. Rollins to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William N. Taylor to the rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant William R. Connolly to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Owen Farley to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Michael A. Kelley to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Elkana W. D. LeBlanc to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant William A. Sayw'ard to the rank of Inspector. 
Sergeant Timothy J. Sheehan to the rank of Inspector. 
Lieutenant Samuel Dunlap to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Michael Healy to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Martin H. King to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John J. Mullen to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant William J. Carey to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Timothy M. Ferris to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Stephen J. Gillis to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Joseph W. F. McDonough to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Thomas N. Trainor to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman James L. Culleton to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph A. Buccigross to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William D. Donovan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William E. J. Driscoll to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles F. Eldridge to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles T. Florentine to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank J. Kelley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Albert F. Madden to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Harold G. Mitten to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Stephen J. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John D. McPherson to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Justin McCarthy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Granville B. Spinney to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Harold J. Walkins to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frederick G. Brauer to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward L. Kelley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant Amasa E. Augusta to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Lawrence H. Dunn to the rank of lieutenant. 
Sergeant Emerson P. Marsh to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Allen V. Nixon to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Hugh D. Brady to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas G. Duggan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George P. Hayes to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas F. Reedy to the rank of Sergeant. 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year who were 
Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date Appointed. 


a 
v 
■a 

c 

0) 

o. 

3 


h 

a) 

a . 
am 

^a 

3 C 
ft « 

Q 


3 

o 
a> 

ft 

a 

!s 

la 
O 


a 
'3 

5' 
O 


o 
u 
a 

ft ■ 

C 1 


B 

c 

OS 

c 

3 
01 

3 


03 

1 




"3 
1 


1882 




1 














1 


1886 






- 


_ 


- 


2 


1 


- 


_ 


— 


3 


1887 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 


5 


1888 






1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


_ 


8 


13 


1889 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


1890 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


7 


1891 






- 


_ 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


4 


8 


1892 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


1 


5 


1893 






- 


~ 


- 


5 


'.~l 


3 


4 


9 


24 


1894 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


4 


2 


8 


1-895 






- 


1 


- 


7 


1 


10 


13 


31 


63 


1896 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


7 


10 


1897 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


2 


6 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


6 


9 


18 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


6 


2 




> 


14 


13 


40 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


1 


T 




) 


8 


3 


16 


1903 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 




:> 


11 


9 


25 


1904 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 




i 


10 


5 


20 


1905 






- 


- 


- 


- 


T 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1906 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1907 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


8 


7 


19 


1908 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


13 


5 


23 


1909 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


2 


6 


1910 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


1911 






^ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1 


4 


1912 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


6 


4 


12 


1913 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1914 






- 


-^ 


^ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1916 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


1917 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


5 


1919 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


601 


637 


1920 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


197 


202 


1921 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


133 


137 


1922 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


77 


77 


1923 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


119 


119 


1924 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


81 


81 


1925 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


102 


102 


1926 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


335 


335 


1927 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


134 


134 


1928 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


104 


104 


Totals 






1 


2 


1 


30 


27 


44 


175 


2,026 


2,305 



1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



47 



Table VI. 

Me7i on the Police Force on November 30, 1928, who were Born in the Year 
Indicated on the Table below. 



Datk of Birth. 


a 

(U 

a 
a 

3 


h 
ft . 

3 C 

ft Oi 

0) ■'^ 

Q 


u 

S 

o 

1 

a 

o 


CO 

'3 
a 

6 


£ 

o 

1 

c 


C 

"3 
3 


03 




"5 
I 


1851 












^ 


"~7 


1 


1 


1858 




- 


- 


, - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1859 




- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1860 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


1861 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


3 


6 


1862 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


1863 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


4 


6 


12 


1864 




- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


3 


10 


17 


1865 




- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


1 


5 


14 


25 


1866 




1 


- 


- 


3 


2 


7 


6 


12 


31 


1867 




- 


- 


1 


6 


2 


4 


7 


10 


30 


1868 




- 


- 


- 


2 


T 


- 


9 


6 


18 


1869 




- 


1 


- 


4 


- 


5 


6 


8 


24 


1870 




_ 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


2 


6 


13 


1871 




- 


- 


^ 


- 


1 


3 


3 


9 


16 


1872 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


6 


10 


19 


1873 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


16 


2 


22 


1874 




- 


- 


- 


2 


4 


3 


9 


5 


23 


1875 




- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


5 


1 


11 


1876 




- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


5 


2 


11 


1877 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


6 


7 


14 


1878 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


5 


12 


1879 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


7 


14 


1880 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


1881 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


6 


2 


10 


1882 




- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


5 


- 


9 


1883 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


1 


5 


1884 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


3 


7 


1885 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


18 


19 


1886 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


30 


32 


1887 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


46 


48 


1888 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


59 


63 


1889 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


77 


80 


1890 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


70 


70 


1891 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


100 


102 


1892 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


147 


153 


1893 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


153 


160 


1894 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


186 


191 


1895 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


179 


185 


1896 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


203 


208 


1897 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


181 


188 


1898 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


141 


143 


1899 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


100 


100 


1900 




- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


127 


127 


1901 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


61 


61 


1902 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


9 


Totals 




1 


2 


1 


30 


27 


44 


175 


2,02. 


5 2,305 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1928, is 37 years. 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






en. 


(M 


o 


t^ 


on 


CO 


LO 


o 


^ 


o 


Ci 


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(N 


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(M 




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rH 


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1—1 




"SS 




(M 


^ 


C5 


^ 




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Oi 


S-H 


1— 1 


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1— 1 


1—1 


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CO 

s 




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o 


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<! < 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



49 

















i: J: ij ^ i: 
















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50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



51 



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1 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year 
November SO, 1928. 



ending 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters . 










1,488 


247 


1,735 


Division 1 










7,539 


171 


7,710 


Division 2 










3,157 


551 


3,708 


Division 3 










4,966 


404 


5,370 


Division 4 










3,371 


190 


3,561 


Division 5 










9,142 


1,082 


10,224 


Division 6 










5,079 


349 


5,428 


Division 7 










6,811 


303 


7,114 


Division 8 










17 


- 


17 


Division 9 










7,829 


383 


8,212 


Division 10 










4,304 


454 


4,758 


Division 11 










3,321 


171 


3,492 


Division 12 










2,897 


114 


3,011 


Division 13 










2,444 


86 


2,530 


Division 14 










2,007 


187 


2,194 


Division 15 










4,849 


206 


5,055 


Division 16 










3,392 


499 


3,891 


Division 17 










1,851 


71 


1,922 


Division 18 










797 


62 


859 


Division 19 










1,405 


62 


1,467 


Division 20 










8,367 


52 


8,419 


Division 21 










2,197 


380 


2,577 


Liquor and Narcotic unit 






2,115 


310 


2,425 


Special Service squad 






122 


6 


128 


Totals 






89,467 


6,340 


95,807 





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Child, female, abuse of 
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Animals, vehicles and boats, using 
without consent of owner 

Automobile, unlawful appropriation . 

Burglar's tools, having in possession . 

Common cheat .... 

Conspiring to defraud 

Electricity, unlawfully diverting 

Innholders, boarding house keepers, 
etc., defrauding .... 

Larceny ..... 

Larceny from person 

Larceny from person, attempt to 
commit ..... 

Larceny, attempt to commit 

Larceny in a building or vessel 

Larceny from an express . 

Larceny from an express, attemjjt to 
commit ..... 

Larceny from realty 

Larceny of automobile 

Larceny of automobile, attempt 

Leased property, concealing, convey- 
ing, selling, etc. .... 

Mortgaged property, concealing, con- 
veying, selling, etc. 

.Stolen goods, buying, receiving, etc. . 

Trespass ..... 


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Malicious mischief .... 

Show bills, etc., injuring . 

Wilful damage and trespass 


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suoi'jn^t^s 
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■suoiinips 
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UOSUJ 

a^B^g aqi o^ paoua^uag 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 lllllll '^) 1 1 llll 


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■pa^noasojd sasBQ 


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Building law, violation of 
Carriage regulations, violation of 
Common victualler and innholder, as- 
suming to be . 
Dog law, violation of . . . 
Explosives, unlawfully keeping 
Junk, dealing in unlawfully 
Liquor law, violation of (State) 
Lodging house law, violation of 
Merchandise, sale or storage of, in 
public place .... 
Manufacturing clothing in dwelling . 
Operating elevator without license 
Physician, assuming to be 
Peddling without license . 
Pharmacy law, violation of 
Physician, practising unlawfully 
Pistol or revolver, carrying without 
license ..... 
Pool and billiard room, unlawfully 
admitting minor to . . . 
Public amusement, unlawfully main- 
taining ..... 
Second-hand articles, dealing in un- 
lawfully ..... 
Soft drink law, violation of 
Ticket selling law, violation of . 
Transient vendor law, violation of 


o 









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II— ioo|t-;l II oomoi— 1 coloooiM-j-eoi 1— ciiiiiw-h 


CO 




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C5 




■sjauSia.ioj 


^,og.,^i ^^ 2S2'^ S^'ggS-^" ..t^i.. ,-,2^ 


CO 




■sai^ijoql 
-ni3 apis^no o? paJaAipQ 


1IIIICCC-, ,, -1001 ,,|-,,.^| ||||„,|,| 


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•UOIJBJS 

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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 




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Suipuaj 


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•pa^innjaa 


1 1 1 1 1 C-l 1 11 1 CO 1 C^l CO 1 1 -*< >o 1 1 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 t- 1 o 




•passojd joNj 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 II 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 






inq OK 


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■passnustp asBQ 


lii^oio-. 1 1-1 — — 1— 11^, |||„| iiiiiiiij gj 1 




•paSjBqjsip puB A}]inS yi^i 


- i-^S-:2; ' ~ 1 f-g-'S '-^2^2-=° ' -rco-cc 1 1 KMco 2 




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liopu^dsns luoimiosijcluij 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 ~' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


-1 




■papuadstts aiiij 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 
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Abortion ..... 

Abortion, accessory to . 

Abduction ..... 

Adultery ..... 

Animals, cruelty to . 

Bastardy ..... 

Bigamy 

Conception, possession of articles to 
Jjrevent ..... 

Eavesdropping .... 

Female, annoying or accosting with 
offensive language 

Forni(tation ..... 

Illegitimate child law, violation of 

Ill-fame, keeping house of . " . 

Immoral entertainment, presenting 
and being present at . 

Incest ...... 

Indecent exposure of the [lerson 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Night walking .... 

Obscene books and prints 

Open and gross lewdness . 

Polygamy ..... 

Premises, allowing to be used for im- 
moral purposes .... 

Prostitute, deriving support from 

Prostitution, enticing to . 

Public conveyance, being disorderly in 

Public decency, acts against 

Seduction ..... 

Soliciting for prostitute . 

True name law, violation of 

Unnatural and lascivious acts . 


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■SJOUIJ^ 


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•g^uapisajuoj^ 


1 l-;l |>OI 1 1— MOOl IMtO (MC^— 1 U5-HTOO 
O CTi OO COM 

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■sjauSiajoj 




saouoq; 
-nB apts'jno o? p'aiaAqaQ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — JS'S 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 II 5g2 


"HOl'JB^S 

IB paSjBqasip JO pasBaiay^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•siB^ox 


CD CO — -^ CO 
CD" of 


•Suipuaj 


1 CC 10 1 1 IM 1 1 1 1 1 00 CO 1 —00 1 « 1 <M C-l 1 CO 1 
CC<M (M 


•pa'JinBjaa 


lltpil-HIIIIICCIII-. I'-lll llll 


•passojd lofj 


|.-iro|i|i|i|i|-H|||ira III— 1 ll'-'l 


inq ON 


liooiiiii—iiiiiii llll (Mill 


•passiuisip asBQ 


1 1 eg 1 1 1 1 1 CO 1 cooo 1 1 r-icn 1 CO 1 — ' ' g ' 


•paSjBqosip puB XiimS ■^ojvj 


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■p9pii9dsns fu9iuuosudiuj 


, 1 1 <-^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 llll llll 


■p9pil3dsns 3UljJ 


1 1 ~< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 llll llll 


■^uaiuuosijd 
-ra; puB aug o') paoua^uag 


1 1 00 1 1 1 1 1 cq 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 llll llll 


■p9pU9dSnS 90U9}U9g 


, ll^llllllll-=.|||~< llll llll 


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|OO^I|t--||— i|jg|||CS C-ICOII — ■OTCgl 


■p3pU9dSns 90U9}V9g 


^ 1 1 p. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 :Q 1 1 1 1 llll llll 


■suoi^n'ji^s 
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1 „g 1 |rt 1 1 1 — rttjTti — CO-H cor- 1 1 r-00^ 1 
<M <M 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 llll llll 


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n of . 
of . 
lin fire limits 

of '. '. 
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g, etc. 
ying (other 


Advertisment, misleading 
Alien firearm law, violatio 
Automobile law, violation 
Automobile, operating wit 
Bail bond 
Bets, registering 
Bonfires, making 
Boxing law, violation of 
Bribery . 

Bucket shop keeping 
Capias . 

Children, delinquent 
Children, neglected . 
Children, truant 
Children, wayward . 
City ordinance, violation 
City Registrar, making f al 

to . . . 
Common nuisance, keepin 
Common beggars 
Common brawlers . 
Concealed weapons, carr 

than pistol or revolver) 
Contempt of court . 
Default warrant 
Deserters 



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Disorderly .... 
Disturbing the peace 
Drunkard, common 
Drunkenness .... 
Election law, violation of 
Electrician, assuming to be 
Expectoration law, violation of 
Fire alarm, giving false or tampering 

with ..... 
Fire arms, selling to minor 
Fire Commissioner's rules, violation o 
Fire Department, obstructing . 
Fire prevention rules, violation of 
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Stubborn children . 

Sunday law, violation of . 

Suspicious persons . 

Tenant law, violation of . 

U.S. Prohibition Act, violation of 

U. S. Veteran Act, violation of . 

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Vagrants, tramps, etc. 

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No. 1 Offences against the Person . 

No. 2 Offences against Property com- 
mitted with Violence . 

No. 3 Offences against Property com- 
mitted without violence 

No. 4 Malicious Offences against 
Property .... 

No. 5 Forgery and Offences against 
the Currency 

No. 6 Offences against the License 
Laws .... 

No. 7 Offences against Chastity, etc. 

No. 8 Offences not Included in the 
Foregoing 


"3 
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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



65 



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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



67 



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1929.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



69 



Table XIV. 

Niimber of Dog Ldcenses Issiied during the Year ending 
November SO, 1928. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 . . . 


106 


40 




3 


149 


2 








5 


- 


- 


- 


5 


3 








263 


96 


18 


1 


378 


4 








90 


51 


8 


- 


149 


5 








377 


129 


24 


11 


531 


6 








160 


38 


5 


- 


203 


7 








652 


180 


22 


1 


855 


9 








658 


182 


49 


1 


890 


10 








537 


180 


49 


- 


766 


11 








961 


167 


118 


2 


1,248 


12 








354 


95 


35 


- 


484 


13 








577 


128 


81 


2 


788 


14 








669 


156 


90 


4 


919 


15 








387 


145 


21 


- 


553 


16 








542 


170 


85 


- 


797 


17 








1,146 


179 


190 


1 


1,516 


18 








489 


108 


50 


- 


647 


19 








532 


84 


58 


- 


674 


Totals 


8,505 


2,128 


903 


16 


11,552 



' Breeder's license at $50. 



Table XV. 

Total Number of Wagon Ldcenses Granted in the City by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . 928 


Division 12 


37 


Division 2 






1,314 


Division 13 


72 


Division 3 






163 


Division 14 


65 


Division 4 






342 


Division 15 


78 


Division 5 






185 


Division 16 


97 


Division 6 






361 


Division 17 


37 


DiAosion 7 






86 


Division 18 


47 


Division 9 






233 


Division 19 


45 


Division 10 
Division 11 






59 
65 










Total 


4,214 » 



'Two hundred canceled for nonpayment of license fee. 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVI. 

Financial Statement for the Year ending November SO, 1928. 



Expenditures. 
Pay of police and employees 
Pensions 
Fuel and light 
Water and ice 
Furniture and bedding 
Printing and stationery 

Care and cleaning station houses and city prison 
Repairs to station houses and city prison 
Repairs and supplies for police boats 
Telephone rentals, tolls and telegrams . 
Purchase of horse, saddlery and motor vehicles 
Care and keeping of horses . 
Care and repair of motor vehicles 
Feeding prisoners 
Medical attendance and medicine 
Transportation 
Pursuit of criminals 
Uniforms and uniform caps . 
Badges, buttons, clubs, belts, insignia, etc. 
Traveling expenses and food for police . 
Rent of buildings .... 

Traffic signs and signals 
Legal and other expert services 
Storage on abandoned and stolen cars . 
Music for police parade 
Membership in rifle association 
Memorial wreaths for graves of poUce 

Total 

Expenses of listing . . . . ' 
Expenses of signal service (see Table XVII) 

Total . 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 

For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposit, uniform cloth, use of police 
property, etc. ........ 

Refunds ......... 

For damage to police property ..... 

Total 



$4,778,696 75 


241,148 


09 


64,347 


56 


555 42 


9,458 25 


32,753 


43 


15,834 


65 


29,824 


38 


27,494 


01 


27,211 


63 


42,341 


58 


10,040 


35 


43,987 


50 


5,342 


49 


7,934 


19 


7,120 29 


9,695 


39 


76,894 


86 


11,306 


76 


1,958 


16 


9,788 37 


24,109 


24 


3,774 


98 


727 


30 


465 


00 


200 


00 


72 


00 


$5,483,082 63 


59,499 


20 


56,780 


01 


$5,599,361 84 


$41,639 50 


29,881 


00 


1,603 


07 


2,490 


61 


5,316 


26 


2,125 


22 


$83,055 66 



1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



71 



Table XVII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year ending 
November 30, 1928. 



Pay rolls ...... 


$35,460 18 


Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies therefor 


11,786 10 


Rent and taxes ...... 


1,089 51 


Care and repairs of building 


85 36 


Charts, files, etc. 


817 40 


Furniture and furnishings .... 


288 18 


Purchase of Ford truck and sedan 


1,223 00 


Storage and repairs of motor vehicles 


1,634 82 


Shoeing horse ...... 


28 50 


Carfares ....... 


638 65 


Prescribed underground work 


3,728 31 


Total 


$56,780 01 



72 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1929.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



73 



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1929. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



75 



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INDEX 



, PAGE 

Accidents 20, 25, 72, 73 

caused by automobile ............ 20, 72, 73 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares . . . 72, 73 

number of. reported ............ 25 

Additional police officers ............ 12 

Ambulance service .............. 31 

Arrests 16, 17, 18, 19, 52, 53-64, 65, 66 

age and sex of ............. 65 

comparative statement of ........... 66 

final disposition of ............ 53-64 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . . . . . . 16, 59, 64 

for drunkenness ............ 17, 18, 27, 61 

foreigners 17, 53-64 

minors •.17, 53-64, 65 

nativity of ............. . 17 

nonresidents .............. 17, 53-64 

number of, by divisions ............ 52 

number of, punished by fine ........... 18 

on warrants .............. 17 

summoned by court ............ 17 

total number of ............. 16, 64, 66 

violation of city ordinances ........... 18, 60 

without warrants ............. 17 

Auctioneers ............... 67 

Automobiles 20, 24, 25, 30, 32, 33, 34, 72, 73 

accidents due to ............ . 20, 72, 73 

deaths caused by ............ . 20 

police 30, 32 

public 33 

sight-seeing 34, 67 

stolen ............... 24r 

used . . 25, 67 

Benefits and pensions ............. 39 

Bertillon system .............. 18 

Buildings ............... 25 

dangerous, reported ............. 25 

found open and made secxire ........... 25 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation ........... 18 

Carriages, public .............. 33, 67 

articles left in ............. . 33 

automobile .............. 33 

number licensed ............. 33, 67 

Cases investigated .............. 19, 25, 27 

Celerity in transmitting police news .......... 9 

Children 18, 25, 26 

abandoned, cared for ............ 25 

lost, restored .............. 18, 26 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of . . . . . . . . . 18, 60 

Claims, inspector of ............ . 26 

Collective musicians ............. 37, 38, 67 

Commitments .............. 18, 27 

Complaints 36, 49, 67 

against police ofiicers ............ 49 

against miscellaneous licenses ........... 36, 67 

Control of Pedestrian and Vehicular TraflBc ......... 5 

Courts 17, 18, 19, 27, 66 

fines imposed by ............. 17, 66 

number of days' attendance at, by oflScerB . . . . . 17, 18, 19, 66 

number of persons summoned by .......... 17 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of .......... . 18 

arrests by ............. . 19 

finger-print system ............. 19 

identification room ............. 18 

photographs 18, 20 

records ............... 19 

Criminal work .............. 66 

comparative statement of ........... 66 

Dangerous weapons ............. 38 

Dead bodies, cared for ............. 25, 29 

recovered .............. 25, 29 

Deaths 16, 20, 43, 72, 73 

by accident, suicide, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 72, 73 

of police officers ............. 16, 43 

Department, police ............. 15 

Distribution of force ............. 16, 41 

Disturbances suppressed ............ 26 

Dogs 26, 67, 69, 70 

amount received for licenses for .......... 67, 70 

damage done by ............ . 26 

number licensed 67, 69 



P.D. 49. 



77 



Drivers, hackney carriage 
Drowning, persons rescued from 
Drunkenness .... 

arrests for, per day . 

foreigners arrested for 

increase in number of arrests for 

nonresidents arrested for . 

total number of arrests for 

women committed for 
Employees of the Department 
Events, special 
Expenditures 

Extra duties performed by officers 
Financial .... 

expenditures . 

pensions .... 

receipts .... 
miscellaneous license fees 

signal service . 
Fines 

amount of . . . 

average amount of . 

number punished by 
Finger-print system 
Fire alarms .... 

defective, reported . 

number given . 
Fires ..... 

extinguished . 

on water front attended . 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 
Gaming, illegal 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Hand carts .... 
Harbor service 

Horses ..... 
House of detention 
House of ill fame, keeping 
Hydrants, defective, reported . 
Identification room 
Imprisonment 

persons sentenced to 

total years of . 
Income .... 

Inquests held 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspector of claims 

cases investigated 
Intoxicated persons assisted 
Itinerant musicians 
Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers . 
Jury lists, police work on 
Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Liquor nuisances 
Listing, police 

expenses of 

number listed . 

number of policemen employed i 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, public . 

applications for licenses 

authority to license . 

location of . . . 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost, abandoned and stolen property 
Lost children restored 
Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 

causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued 

number transferred 
Missing persons 

age and sex of 

number found 

number reported 



36, 39 



34, 35 





PAGE 




33, 67 




26, 29 


18 


27, 61 




17 




17, 61 




17. 18 




17, 61 




18, 61 




27 


41, 


42, 44 




21 


39, 


70, 71 




19, 26 


67, 


70, 71 




39, 70 




39, 70 


36, 


40, 70 


36, 


67, 70 


39, 


70, 71 


17, 


18, 66 


17, 


18, 66 




17, 66 




18 




19 




26 




26 




26 




26, 29 




26, 29 




29 


17 


, 53-64 




19 




61 




33, 67 




33, 67 




67 




29 




30 




27 




27, 59 




26 




18 


18, 


20, 66 




18 


18, 


20, 66 


40, 


67, 70 




20 




26 




26 




26 




26 




37, 67 




67 




67 




35 




26 


36, 


67, 70 




7 


70, 


74, 75 




35, 70 


35, 


74, 75 




35 




18 




38, 67 




67 




38 




39 




39 


20, 


67, 70 




18, 26 




20 




20 




20 


53 


-64, 65 




25 


36, 


67, 70 


36, 


67, 70 




36, 67 




36, 67 




36, 67 




36, 67 




23 




23 




23 




23 



78 



P.D. 49. 



Musicians 

collective 

itinerant 
Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences 

against chastity, morality, etc. 

against license laws 

against the person 

against property, malicious 

against property, with violence 

against property, without violence 

forgery and against ciu:rency 

miscellaneous . 

recapitulation . 
Operators .... 
Parks, public .... 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers .... 
Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 

number of persons on rolls 

payments on account of . 
Police ..... 

railroad .... 

special .... 
Police charitable fund, number of beneficiaries 
Police department . 

annual dress parade of 

distribution of 

horses in use in 

how constituted 

officers appointed 
absent sick 
arrests by 
complaints against 
date appointed- . 
detailed, special events 
died 

discharged 
injured 
nativity of 
promoted . 
resigned . 
retired 

vehicles in use in 

work of . 
Police listing .... 
Police property 
Police signal service 

miscellaneous work . 

payments on account of 

property of 

signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of 
Property .... 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc. 

stolen 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Public carriages 
Public lodging houses 
Railroad police 

Receipts .... 

Revolvers .... 

licenses to carry 
Second-hand articles 
Sewers, defective, reported 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, police 
Special events 
Special police 
Station houses 

lodgers at 

witnesses detained at 
Stolen property 

recovered 

value of . 
Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters 



15 



34, 35 
27-29, 39 



IS, 20, 40, 
20' 



40 



1.5, 27, 39 



P.D. 49. 79 

PAGE 

Streets . . 26, 72, 73 

accidents reported in ........... . 72, 73 

defective, reported ............. 26 

obstructions removed ............ 26 

Teams . 26 

stray, put up .......■■•-.. • 26 

Used cars . . ............ 25, 67 

licensed dealers ............. 67 

sales reported .............. 25 

Vehicles 24, 30-34, 67, 69 

ambulances .............. 31 

automobiles .............. 24, 30 

in use in police department ........... 32 

pubUo carriages ............. 33, 67 

wagons ............... 34, 67, 69 

Vessels ................ 29 

Wagons . . 34, 67, 69 

number licensed by divisions ........... 69 

total number Ucensed ............ 34, 69 

Water pipes, defective, reported ........... 26 

Water running to waste reported ........... 26 

Weapons, dangerous ............. 38 

Witnesses 17, 18, 26, 27, 66 

fees earned by officers as . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 18, 66 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . . . . .17, 27, 66 

number of, detained at station houses ......... 18, 26 

Women committed to House of Detention ......... 27 



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