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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"









ill.. 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49] 

Wf)t Commontuealtt) of Masiat^uittti 



TWENTY- FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1930 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 






te 



A 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 5 

Expenditures 8 

Receipts 8 

Arrests 9 

Prosecutions fornuisances 10 

Uniform crime record reporting 10 

Parade duty 11 

Traffic 11 

Hackney carriages and stands 12 

Plant and equipment 12 

Personnel 15 

Conclusions 16 

The Department 18 

Police Force 18 

Signal service 18 

Employees of the Department 18 

Recapitulation 18 

Distribution and changes 19 

Police officers injured while on duty 19 

Work of the Department 19 

Arrests 19 

Drunkenness 20 

Nativity of persons arrested 21 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 22 

Automobile division 22 

Homicide division 24 

Identification division 25 

Criminal identification 27 

Lost and Stolen property division 28 

General 28 

Special events 29 

Lost, stolen or abandoned property (property clerk) .... 32 

Missing persons . . - 33 

Miscellaneous business . . • 33 

Inspector of claims 34 

House of detention 35 

Police Signal Service 35 

Signal boxes 35 

Miscellaneous work 35 

Harbor service 36 

Sight-seeing automobiles 37 

Wagon licenses 37 

Horses 38 



4 ■ CONTENTS. 

Page 

Vehicle Service 38 

Automobiles . . " . 38 

Combination ambulances .38 

List of vehicles used by the Department 40 

Public Carriages 41 

Listing Work in Boston . .42 

Listing expenses 42 

Number of policemen employed in listing 43 

Special police 43 

Railroad police 43 

Miscellaneous licenses 44 

Musicians' Licenses 44 

Itinerant 44 

Collective 45 

Carrying dangerous weapons 45 

Public lodging houses 45 

Pensions and benefits 46 

Financial 47 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the Police Force, 

Signal service and employees 48 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 50 

List of police officers in active service who died . . . . 51 

List of officers retired 52 

Police officers and employees retired under Boston retirement 

system 52 

List of officers promoted 53 

Number of men in active service 54 

Men on Police Force and year born 55 

Number of daj^s' absence from duty bj' reason of sickness . 56 

Complaints against officers 57 

Number of arrests by police divisions 59 

Arrests, offences and final disposition of cases . . • . . 60 

Dispositions of certain major prosecutions - 73 

Age and sex of persons arrested 74 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 75 

Licenses of all classes issued 76 

Dog licenses 78 

Wagon licenses .-78 

Financial statement 79 

Payments on account of signal service 80 

Accidents 81 

Male and female residents listed 83 



tClje Commontoealtf) of iWassiacfjUiStttsi. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 
Boston, December 1, 1930. 

To His Excellency Frank G. Allen, Governor. 

Your Excellency: — In accordance with the provisions of 
chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, I have the honor to submit, as 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston, this report for the 
year ending November 30, 1930. 

Following a special investigation by and report of the 
Attorney General, made on order of the General Court, Hon. 
Herbert A. Wilson was removed on May 6, 1930, as Police 
Commissioner by the Governor, with the approval of the Exec- 
utive Council, and Hon. Eugene C. Hultman was appointed on 
May 7, 1930, to that office for a term of five years. 

For the purpose of promoting the efficiency of the PoHce 
Department and increasing its effectiveness, many internal 
changes have been made by the Commissioner during the last 
six months in the organization of the force. Commanding 
officers of divisions are held strictly responsible, through the 
Superintendent, for the detection of criminals, the ehmination 
of vice resorts, and the observance of law and good order in 
their respective divisions. In addition, division commanders 
are held directly accountable for the conduct of the officers 
under their direction, and their compliance with the rules and 
regulations of the Department. The Commissioner beHeves 
that this poHcy will give the executive officers of the Department 
a reasonable opportunity to demonstrate their qualifications 
and ability to render the kind of service which the pubfic has 
a right to expect from its poHce force. 

The investigation of the Attorney General disclosed that 
inadequate records and the actions of members of certain 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

special units operating from Headquarters were in part the 
cause for complaints involving the PoUce Department. It was 
apparent that such special squads tended to shift or divide 
responsibihty between division commanders and Headquarters. 
One of the first acts of the Commissioner was to disband these 
so-called vice squads, placing their duties squarely on the 
shoulders of the responsible officers of the Department. The 
Commissioner is giving personal attention to results achieved 
under this new method, which makes it possible to deal directly 
with the problems arising in the different divisions. 

Probably no necessary procedure in connection with poUce 
duty is more misunderstood than that of transfers. It is 
essential that members of the Department be intimately 
familiar with all sections of the city, and when it appears that 
any officer is unable to cope with conditions confronting him, 
other officers may be found in the Department who will be able 
to effectively handle the situation. Many transfers of officers 
of rank as well as patrolmen have been made for the good of the 
service during the past seven months. Utilization of this 
administrative power is one of the means by which the Com- 
missioner hopes to find out the qualifications and to develop 
the capabilities of members of the Department. 

Believing that the Bureau of Criminal Investigation repre- 
sents a branch of pohce duty of growing importance, a Deputy 
Superintendent has been assigned to have complete charge of 
the detective service branch of police work. This bureau is 
in close contact with other highly organized pohce forces 
throughout the country, and even with foreign countries. It 
renders a service of inestimable value to each division, providing 
it with expert advice and service in the identification and 
capture of dangerous criminals. To provide instruction and 
training in fingerprinting identification and the technique 
followed by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, officers from 
various divisions have been assigned to this bureau. This 
training will make it possible to discover officers possessing the 
essential qualifications for this line of work, as well as enable the 
divisions to better understand the workings of the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation, and more intelligently co-operate with 
it. This bureau is constantly on duty, day and night, and in 
recent months it has a number of outstanding achievements 
to its credit. With a better appreciation of the value and 
workings of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, the Pohce 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 7 

Department as a whole will be able to deal more efficiently 
with dangerous criminals of all types. The development of 
this branch of police service is receiving from the Commis- 
sioner the special attention which he believes it merits, as, 
under present-day conditions, the PoHce Department must be 
equipped to expeditiously and effectively deal with all kinds 
of criminals. 

A new "Uniformed Automobile PoHce Patrol" has been 
established which will operate continuously during the day and 
night from Divisions and Headquarters. This automobile 
patrol will supplement the service of regular route officers and 
will aid them, when necessary. It will be able to respond more 
speedily to the demands of the pubHc. The signal system is 
being readjusted so that by means of flashing lights on the 
boxes, contact may be promptly made, even between regular 
duty calls, with route officers as well as the automobile patrol 
to post them to be on the lookout for criminals suspected of 
passing through their districts, or for emergency assignments. 
It is expected that this automobile patrol will be of great value 
in providing protection against hold-ups and other crimes of 
violence, as well as facilitating the prompt pursuit and capture 
of criminals involved in such cases. 

Many other changes have been made in the administration 
of the affairs of the Department, such as, requiring lieutenants 
on divisional duty to spend at least two hours of every tour of 
duty on inspection duty upon the street, changing the pro- 
cedure in connection with promotional examinations, installing 
a modern system of personnel records, revising the forms and 
records of the Department, and various other improvements 
that will facilitate the performance of the multitudinous duties 
entrusted to the Police Department. 

On May 28, it was agreed between the Mayor and the 
PoHce Commissioner that the Law Department of the City of 
Boston would act as legal advisor to the PoUce Commissioner, 
and Leo Schwartz, Esq., Assistant Corporation Counsel of the 
City of Boston, was designated to attend to legal matters con- 
nected with the Police Department. Under this arrangement 
authoritative legal advice is readily available in regard to the 
many legal questions constantly arising in the Department. 

A special board consisting of three captains has been 
appointed to give careful consideration to suggestions received 
for the improvement of the Department and to report upon 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the feasibility of their practical application. In this way the 
best features of modern developments in police work will be 
known and their appUcation can be adjusted to conform with 
the actual operation of the Department. 

In connection with the comments of the Attorney General 
regarding the inadequacy of the records of the Department, 
special study has been given to this important matter, and, 
while a number of changes have already been made, many 
others are under consideration, as revisions in the keeping of 
such records are matters which must be applied gradually, so 
that there will be no hiatus in the preservation of proper 
records. 

On November 18, Bernard P. Scanlan, Director of the 
Division on the Necessaries of Life, was appointed Secretary 
to the PoHce Commissioner, vice John H. Merrick, Esq., who 
resigned on July 18. Mr. Scanlan was designated to have 
charge of all records of this Department in addition to his 
other duties. 

Expenditures. 

As shown by the financial statement in the latter part of 
this report, the total expenses of the Department for the 
twelve months ending November 30, 1930, for the pay of 
police and employees, pensions, supplies, expense of Usting 
(the annual enrollment on April 1 of all persons 20 years of 
age or over) and including, also, the expense of maintaining 
the Police Signal Service, — amounted to $6,051,624.43. 

For the corresponding period in 1929, for these items, there 
was expended $5,942,219.95, which shows an increase in 1930 
of $109,404.48, due to increases in the salary, pension and 
annuity and listing items. 

Receipts. 

The total receipts for 25,844 Ucenses in the twelve months 
ending November 30, 1930, was $66,219.75, and from all 
other sources, such as the sale of condemned, lost, stolen and 
abandoned property, license badges, copies of Licenses, refunds, 
damage to police property and miscellaneous items, there was 
received $13,875.21, making a grand total of $80,094.96. 

For the corresponding period in 1929, the receipts for 27,253 
licenses issued, there was received $69,860.75 and from mis- 
cellaneous sources as detailed above, $10,753.49, making a 
grand total of $80,614.24. 



1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Aee^sts 
A brief comparison of the number of arrests for the major 
offences for the twelve months ending November 30, 1930, as 
compared with November 30, 1929, may be of interest. 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1929. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1930. 


Offences Against the Person. 






Murder 


12 


18 


Manslaughter 


85 


96 


Rape (including attempts) .... 


42 


76 


Robbery (including attempts) 


174 


217 


Aggravated assault 


121 


137 


Offences Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 






Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 


394 


502 


Offences Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 






Auto thefts (including attempts) . 


332 


306 


Larceny (including attempts) 


2,336 


2,423 


Offences Against the License Laws. 






Liquor Law, violation of (State) . 


3,943 


4,021 


Offences Against Chastity, 
Morality, Etc. 






Drunkenness 


33,911 


33,764 


Offences not Included in the Foregoing. 






Auto, operating under influence of liquor 
(first offence) 


659 


570 


Auto, operating under influence of liquor 
(second offence) 


45 


36 


Total arrests 


42,054 


42,166 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Prosecutions for Nuisances. 
Since my appointment a new process has been inaugurated 
to rid the city of vice, such as liquor, prostitution, gaming, and 
drugs, by actions in equity enjoining the maintenance of these 
nuisances, and ultimately closing buildings where nuisances 
have been allowed to exist by the owners or other persons 
interested in the buildings. The results already accomplished 
indicate that this method is more effective than simply the 
prosecution under the criminal statutes. It is interesting to 
note that since the inauguration of this pohcy, we are receiv- 
ing in most cases the active cooperation of the owners and 
holders of mortgages on the properties in question. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
The Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the Inter- 
national Association of Chiefs of Police early in 1930 requested 
this Department to report monthly on printed forms ''Offences 
Known to the Police," which it supplies. The offences reported 
on are those ordinarily known or reported to the pohce, and 
are as follows : — 

1. Felonious Homicide : 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny, 

(a) $50 and over in value, 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

The returns from reporting units over the entire country 
are compiled and tabulated by the National Division of 
Identification and Information in the Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C. The purpose of the returns under offences 
reported is to ascertain the nature and volume of crime preva- 
lent, its geographical location and the periodic fluctuation of 
the same. 

The Boston Police Department is cooperating in this effort 
to compile authoritative statistics in regard to crime. 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

Parade Duty. 

During the summer and fall of this Tercentenary Year the 
Boston PoHce Department was placed under a tremendous 
strain in handling huge parades and conventions, which 
brought crowds of unprecedented size to the city. These 
attractions also further complicated the traffic problem, which 
is serious under normal conditions. Not one, but many large 
events, together with observances almost nightly on the 
Common for several months, made it necessary to have sub- 
stantial details of pohce officers on special duty. The manner 
in which the police handled these large congregations of people, 
including millions of visitors to Boston, brought unsoHcited 
commendations from those in charge of the observances and 
conventions, visitors from all over the country, and from 
public officials. 

In addition to preserving order at the events, the police 
also took special precautions to protect the public from pick- 
pockets and other criminals. To meet this condition a selected 
group of officers were constantly on duty equipped with 
photographs of notorious pickpockets and followers of vice 
from all parts of the country. This new service worked so 
well that it will be followed in protecting the public from 
shoplifters, pickpockets and bag snatchers in the retail trade 
centers of the city during the holiday season. 

Practically every member of the Department was obHged 
to work hundreds of extra hours durmg the past year without 
extra compensation and, it may be stated, that this service 
was rendered without a single complaint from a police officer. 
In connection with the Tercentenary Observance, the Police 
Commissioner for the city of London, Sir Hugh Stephenson 
TumbuU, K. B. E., was the guest of the Department at 
the Annual PoHce Parade and exercises on the Common on 
October 13 which were reviewed by the Governor of the 
Commonwealth and the Mayor of Boston, and attended by 
an extraordinarily large gathering of the public. 

Traffic. 
Early in August, the Office of the Inspector of Carriages, 
the Department Traffic Shop, the Wagon License Division, 
together with Traffic Divisions 20 and 21, were consolidated 
into a unit known as the Bureau of Traffic, in direct charge of 
a Deputy Superintendent. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

On September 2, in order to better enforce the Rules and 
Regulations of the Boston Traffic Commission, a new systera 
for tagging cars violating these rules was inaugurated. This 
system consisted of a tag made in three parts which allowed 
of the handling of all cases of this nature in the Traffic Bureau 
at Headquarters. It also provided for the notification of the 
owner of the car irrespective of who was the operator on each 
violation of the traffic laws. No prosecution was made on the 
first offence unless of the most aggravated nature. The second 
offence was not prosecuted if the operator had what seemed 
to be a reasonable excuse advanced to the Bureau of Traffic. 
The third offence automatically is sent to court for adjudica- 
tion by the judge. The fourth offence has, by agreement with 
the Registrar of Motor Vehicles in the Commonwealth, been 
reported to him for action in deafing with the owner of the 
offending motor vehicle. 

This system has resulted in relieving the lower courts of 
many petty cases which congested their dockets, and has 
resulted in reheving the traffic congestion in the business 
districts, and on the main arteries of travel which had been 
congested with parked automobiles to such an extent that 
traffic was seriously delayed in movement, and emergency 
vehicles, such as the Fire and PoHce Department vehicles, 
were seriously hampered in responding to their emergency 
duties. 

Hackney Carriages and Stands. 
By chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, the General Court 
substantially amended the former law in -regard to granting 
licenses for hackney stands and carriages in Boston. Pursuant 
to the provision of this law, the Commissioner is preparing a 
new set of rules and regulations relative to hackney carriages 
and stands in the city of Boston, which will become effective 
on February 1, 1931. 

Plant and Equipment. 

General repairs were made to the building, including the 
roof, of the station house of Division 19, located on Morton 
Street, Mattapan District, and the building repainted. 

The House of Detention for Women, located in the Court 
House Building, with an entrance on Somerset Street, is in 
process of repair, which work will be completed soon. 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

The station house of Police Division 7, located on Emmons 
and Paris Streets, East Boston District, is undergoing remodel- 
ing by the Superintendent of PubHc Buildings of the City of 
Boston. 

The poHce boat steamer Watchman has been overhauled 
and put in good order. 

A contract has recently been entered into for necessary 
repairs to the launch E. U. Curtis used on Division 8, the 
harbor police. 

On November 22, 1930, the new police steamer built by 
the George B. Lawley and Son Corporation, to replace the old 
boat, Guardian, which was condemned, was launched at the 
builders' shipyard at Neponset, Mass., and named the Stephen 
O'Meara for the first Police Commissioner appointed under the 
so-called single-headed Commission Act of 1906. It is a coal- 
burning vessel of 118 feet overall, with triple-expansion engine, 
and equipped with appliances modem and up-to-date. It is 
expected that this vessel will be put in commission on or about 
February 15, 1931. 

At the Police Headquarters Building, Stuart and Berkeley 
Streets, the basement floor has been waterproofed to prevent 
seepage. 

At the Department's Motor Vehicle Repair Shop excellent 
work has been done in connection with the rolling stock of this 
Department. This workshop located in the basement of the 
station house of Division 19 is in cramped and limited quarters. 
Its small personnel has not been able to take care of all the 
motor vehicle work of the Department. A large saving is 
made, however, by its operation. During the year, in addition, 
the employees of this workshop towed from the streets of the 
city 240 automobiles. 

During the year a new system for caring for lost, stolen and 
abandoned property was inaugurated whereby we are able, 
through advertising in the daily newspapers, to return to lawful 
owners a larger portion of unclaimed articles than was possible 
heretofore . 

The revolvers with which the officers of this Department are 
equipped have been inspected, and where needed, are being put 
into first-class condition by a firearms expert with the assistance 
of an officer of this Department, trained for the work. This is 
the first time that this has been done on such a large scale. The 
work is progressing in an efficient manner at a very low cost. A 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

yearly inspection by a competent officer of all revolvers in use in 
this Department will be made in the future. 

The motor rolling stock of the Department consists of one 
ambulance, twenty-one combination ambulance and patrol 
wagons, two utility wagons, three prison vans, one tow wagon, 
four trucks, forty-six small vehicles of the pleasure car or runa- 
bout type and eighty-two motorcycles with forty-seven sidecar 
attachments. 

To assist in traffic control, to participate on the occasions of 
parades and other gatherings, to patrol and for such work as 
occasions demand, the Department is equipped with nineteen 
saddle horses, all housed in the stable of Police Division 16, 
Back Bay district. At the present time the Department is one 
horse short of the total number it needs and three of the horses 
now on hand should be disposed of on account of age and 
condition. This is a matter which will require attention in the 
coming year as very valuable service is rendered by the mounted 
officers. 

The necessity for remedying the crowded conditions in 
many of our station houses is apparent to even the most casual 
observer. Study and planning are now going on, with a view 
of replacing some of the more antiquated buildings housing our 
officers, and in which the poHce of this Department are com- 
pelled to transact business. Garage facilities in many of the 
stations do not meet the present-day needs. Improvements 
along these lines are badly needed and the Commissioner 
intends to give this matter further attention during the coming 
year. 

The motor patrol wagon in service in -the Department was 
found not to have been improved in several years, and was 
lacking in equipment necessary for emergency police work both 
in cases of disturbance as well as the necessary life-saving 
features. A new body has been designed and mounted upon a 
high-speed passenger car chassis which is equipped with much 
necessary equipment as well as being much more suitable for 
ambulance work. Two of these new cars have been introduced. 
Three more have been ordered and thej^ will gradually supersede 
the old-fashioned patrol wagon. 

The Police Signal Service provides an electrical-signalling 
system and telephone communication between the signal boxes 
and the station houses. Its electrical theory of operation and 



1931.] POLICE COMMISSIONER. 15 

its physical structure have remained practically the same since 
it was originally installed. With the view of making this 
service more flexible to meet the demands for speedy and 
accurate transmission of pohce reports, as well as to control 
the activities of the poHce on duty throughout the city, plans 
have already been made to install colored flashing lights upon 
police signal boxes to call officers, both day and night, while 
on their "beats" to the nearest box to receive instructions and 
information. The isolation of officers on the street is not con- 
ducive to efficient police work. The Commissioner is also giving 
special study to the system of intercommunication between the 
Divisions and Headquarters, and it is contemplated making 
additional improvements in the signal service, so that the Head- 
quarters and Divisions will be in close touch with each other, 
and the officers on their "beats" will be available for call at 
any time. 

Personnel. 

During the poHce year ending November 30, 1930, the 
strength of the uniformed force was practically the same, num- 
bering 2,424 officers at the end of the year as compared to 
2,434 officers on December 1, 1929; other employees, totaling 
171, remained unchanged, making a total of 2,595 persons on 
the roll of the PoHce Department on November 30 of this year. 

Chapter 241 of the Acts of 1930 materially increased the 
annuities to be paid widows and orphans of officers who have 
died from injuries received while in the discharge of their 
duties, allowing the Mayor and the City Council to make 
larger allowances for the support of dependents of officers killed, 
or dying from injuries received in the performance of duty. 

By the provisions of chapter 387 of the Acts of 1930, pension 
laws for members of the Department not included within the 
Boston Retirement Act or any other retirement system, were 
amended so as to provide that the physical and mental examina- 
tion of a member presented for retirement be conducted by the 
Medical Board established under the Boston Retirement Act 
of 1922, instead of by the city physician, as heretofore. Fur- 
thermore, under the requirements of this law, the approval of 
his Honor the Mayor is now required in cases under the 
"twenty-five consecutive years of service and sixty years of 
age" provision. The Commissioner in retiring a member of 
the force under the provision of the above-mentioned law is 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

obliged to submit to the Mayor a certificate in writing stating 
that the officer to be retired is in good standing and that no 
charges are pending against him. 

During the year 2,769 days were lost by officers of the 
Department while on duty by reason of injuries received by 
266 officers, of which about 30 per cent were on traffic duty. 
The records of the Department are replete with courageous 
acts by members in the performance of their official duty, 
even when faced with liability for serious injury or sudden 
death. 

During the past year Patrolman James J. Troy of Division 6, 
on January 13, and Patrolman Franklin B. Dwyer of Divi- 
sion 11, on April 24, were shot while attempting to apprehend 
dangerous criminals and gave their lives in protecting their 
fellow citizens. 

For meritorious work in the detection and apprehension of 
law violators, the Commissioner since assuming office has 
commended in General Orders 8 sergeants and 77 patrolmen. 

In the same period 1 lieutenant, 3 sergeants and 38 patrol- 
men have been punished for violation of the Police Rules and 
Regulations by either suspension from duty with loss of pay, 
hours of extra duty or reprimands, and 4 officers, after hearing, 
have been dismissed from the service. 

Conclusions. 

The Pohce Commissioner is given wide powers in the admin- 
istrg,tion of his duties. His responsibilities are clear-cut and 
definite. While the principal duty of the Police Department 
is the enforcement of the laws and city ordinances, it is called 
upon to investigate and report upon thousands of individuals 
for other governmental agencies, furnish data in regard to 
prospective jurors, list annually on April 1 all residents twenty 
years of age and over, issue about twenty-six thousand licenses 
and permits, and render other varied services and duties to the 
public. 

A Police Department cannot function properly unless it 
enjoys the confidence of the people it serves. That the pubhc 
are interested in helping the police enforce the laws is evident 
from the great numbers of "tips" and suggestions that are 
received daily by the Commissioner. Furthermore, many of 
the letters received by the Commissioner in recent months 
indicate that the public are as quick to appreciate a courteous 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

act by a police officer or an able accomplishment by the Depart- 
ment as they are to resent harsh treatment or inefficient police 
work. In this connection a group of citizens have recently 
informed the Commissioner that they wish to donate a num- 
ber of instruments that will facilitate the detection of forgery 
and misrepresentation as a token of their appreciation of an 
outstanding achievement by the Department. The Com- 
missioner is of the opinion that some progress has been made 
by the Department towards regaining the confidence of the 
public, the increasing evidence of which has been of inesti- 
mable value in restoring the morale of the force as well as 
stimulating its officers in the performance of their duties. 

The Commissioner finds that the Boston Police Department 
is fundamentally sound, the chief task being to modernize 
methods and to encourage the development along proper lines 
of the inherent initiative and abihty within the Department. 

In the following sections of this report the activities of the 
Department during the past year are reported upon in detail. 
Respectfully submitted: 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows : — 
Police Coaimissioner. Secretary. 2 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Chief Inspector . 
Captains 
Inspectors . 



Signalmen 
Mechanics 
Linemen 



Lieutenants 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Total 



Signal Service. 
Chauffeur 



Painter 



Total 



Employees of the Department. 



Property Clerk . 

Clerks . 

Stenographers 

Chauffeurs . 

Cleaners 

Elevator Operators 

Engineers on police steam 

ers . 
Firemen, Marine 
Firemen, Stationary 
Hostlers 
Janitors 
Laborer and Helper 



Matrons .... 

Mechanic .... 

Repairmen .... 

Steamfitter .... 

Superintendent of Build- 
ing 

Superintendent of Repair 
Shop 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators . 

Total 



46 

182 

2,140 

2,424 



17 



152 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner and Secretary 2 

Police Force 2 424 

Signal Service 17 

Employees 152 



Grand total 2,595 



1931.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the police force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 51 patrolmen were appointed (one restored 
to duty from pension) ; 10 patrolmen were discharged (one 
reinstated); 19 patrolmen resigned (nine while charges were 
pending); 13 patrolmen were promoted; 1 deputy superin- 
tendent, 4 captains, 1 lieutenant, 1 inspector, 3 sergeants, 
and 10 patrolmen were retired on pensions; 1 inspector, 
4 sergeants and 8 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of pohce officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by poHce officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1929. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 
Injured in Year 

Ending 
Nov. 30, 1930. 


Number of Duties 
Lost by Such 
Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year 
by Men on .-Ac- 
count of Injuries 
Received Previous 
to Dec. 1. 1929. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

By stopping runaways, 

Various other causes . 


62 

18 

81 

4 

101 


367 
591 

993 

65 

753 


6 
559 

538 
268 


Totals . 


266 


2,769 


1,371 



Work of the Department. 
Arrests. 
The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that 
of a separate person, was 93,592 as against 91,948 the pre- 
ceding year, being an increase of 1,644. The percentage of 
decrease and increase was as follows: — 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person Increase 6.73 

Offences against property committed with violence . Increase 27. 41 

Offences against property committed without violence, Increase 7 . 36 

Malicious offences against property .... Increase 2.33 

Forgery and offences against the currency . . No change 

Offences against the license laws Increase 1 . 40 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . . Decrease . 84 

Offences not included in the foregoing . Increase 3 . 02 

. There were 14,965 persons arrested on warrants and 47,598 
without warrants; 31,029 persons were summoned by the 
court; 69,174 persons were prosecuted; 23,412 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses and 1,006 
were delivered to outside authorities. The number of males 
arrested was 88,098; of females, 5,494; of foreigners, 23,491; 
or approximately 25.09 per cent; of minors, 9,374. Of the 
total number arrested 28,185 or 30.11 per cent, were non- 
residents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1926 to 1930, inclusive, was $435,189.35; in 
1930 it was S425,783; or $9,406.35 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
55,085; in 1930 it was 53,714, or 1,371 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,143.45; 
in 1930 it was $14,032.20, or $111.25 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 92. 
There were 147 less persons arrested than in 1929, "a decrease 
of .40 per cent; 22.98 per cent of the arrested persons were 
non-residents and 35.18 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XI.)- 

The number of arrests for all offences for the year was 93,592, 
being an increase of 1,644 over last year, and 2,693 more than 
the average for the past five years. There were 33,764 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 147 less than last year, and 
3,951 less than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of .08 
per cent in males and a decrease of .53 per cent in females from 
last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year 93,592, 545 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one arrest 
in 171 was for such offence, or .58 per cent. 



1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



21 



Sixty-two and eight hundredths per cent of the persons taken 
into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table XII.) 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 

South America 
Australia 
HoUand 
Belgium 
Albania 
Switzerland 
Mexico . 
Iceland . 
Africa . 
East Indies 
Hungary- 
Japan . 
Roumania 
Wales . 
Cuba 
Asia 

Arabia . 
Egypt . 
Serbia . 

Philippine Islands 
Central America 

Total . 



United States 






70,101 


Ireland . 






6,720 


British Provinces 






3,641 


Italy . . 






3,560 


Russia . 








3,077 


Poland . 








997 


Sweden . 








757 


China . 








564 


England 








517 


Scotland 








401 


Greece . 








529 


Lithuania 








502 


Portugal 








349 


Norway 








333 


Germany 








276 


Finland 








164 


Syria 








179 


Armenia 








133 


Austria . 
Sparu 








135 
108 


France . 








102 


West Indies 








95 


Denmark 
Turkey . 








82 
65 



47 

27 

25 

13 

11 

4 

8 

11 

8 

7 

9 

6 

7 

1 

2 

6 

5 

1 

5 

1 

1 

93,592 



The number of persons punished by fines was 33,732 and the 
fines amounted to $425,783. (See Table XIII.) 

Ninety-two persons were committed to the State Prison, 
2,220 to the House of Correction, 30 to the Women's Prison, 
131 to the Reformatory Prison, 2,515 to other institutions 
and 1 to the Bridgewater State Criminal Asylum. 

The total years of imprisonment were 2 Ufe, 2,073 years, 2 
months (487 sentences indefinite); the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 53,714, and the witness fees 
earned by them amounted to $14,032.20. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $210,437.17. 

Fourteen witnesses were detained at station houses, 308 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 167 from last year- 
There was an increase of 2.36 per cent in the number of sick 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 23.03 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in and out of the 
city for the five years from 1926. to 1930. inclusive, was 
.Sl."716,3&4.49, in 1930 it was .$2.2:32.902.17. or $516,537.68 
more than the average. The amount of property stolen in 
and out of the city, which was recovered by the Boston PoUce, 
was S2.6S3.6a3.22. as against S3.5S0.849.30 last year, or 
$897,246.0S less. .See Table XHI. > 

BuEEAU OF Crmixal Ixa-zstigatiox. 

Since !May of this year the Bureau, which is the central 
detective office of the Department, has operated on a scale 
much larger than heretofore. Because of a considerable 
increase in the personnel and additional equipment, it is now 
operating more efficiently. The Bureau is always open and is 
subject to call for pohce service at all times. 

The acti\'ities of this unit cover such a wide field that a 
statement of the work of some of its sub-di\-isions may be of 
interest. 

ArTOMOBELE Dl^^5IO^^ 

This di\Tsion investigates all reports of automobiles reported 
stolen and is in daily communication with pohce departments 
all over the countrj*. The automobile index contains records 
of 200.000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
and cars for which owners are wanted. This index is constantly 
increasing. 

All appHcations for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their hcenses. 

In addition to recovering many stolen automobiles, members 
of this division, during the \-ear, have identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on 
pohce divisions and have assisted in restoring these vehicles to 
the owners. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as Esed Car Dealers of the First, 
Second and Third Classes. 



1931.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



23 



During the j-ear 280 applications for such licenses were 
received, 268 of which were granted (3 "without fee"; and 12 
were rejected. 

Of the Hcenses granted, 16 were voluntarily surrendered for 
cancellation and 17 transferred to new locations. One apphca- 
tion for transfer to new location was rejected and five Hcenses 
suspended indefinitely. (See Table XIV.) 



Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1930. 



Month. 


Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1929 












December 




385 


372 


8 


5 


1930 












January 








373 


355 


15 


3 


February 










349 


337 


8 


4 


March 










436 


417 


13 


6 


April . 










402 


385 


6 


11 


May . 










363 


341 


16 


6 


June . 










338 


319 


12 


7 


July . 










314 


286 


22 


6 


August 










328 


296 


19 


13 


September 








381 


357 


12 


12 


October . 








655 


626 


8 


21 


November 








555 


521 


— 


34 


Totals 








4,879 


4,612 


139 


128 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Eliding November 30, 1930. 



■ Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1929. 








December 


3,352 


2,306 


719 


1930. 








January .... 


2,974 


2,159 


896 


February 






2,528 


2,253 


406 


March 






3,613 


3,397 


944 


April . . 






3,359 


3,803 


1,060 


May 






4,443 


3,009 


1,235 


June 






2,885 


3,361 


1,139 


July 






3,082 


3,406 


948 


August . 






3,087 


3,353 


882 


September 






2,705 


2,653 


737 


October . 






2,538 


2,498 


702 


November 






2,617 


2,386 


496 


Totals . 






37,183 


34,584 


10,164 



Homicide Division. 

This division investigates all deaths by violence and pre- 
pares all cases for inquest. It examines and records aU reports 
of accidents and cases of serious injury. Officers attached to 
this division, with poHce stenographers, are subject to call at any 
hour of the day or night. The homicide files contain complete 
reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, a record of all 
inquests and a record of all deaths and serious accidents which 
are reported to the PoUce Department. 

Officers of this division detailed to assist the medical exam- 
iners report having investigated 773 cases of death from the 
following causes : — 



1931.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



25 



Aeroplane 




1 


Falling objects . 


6 


Alcoholism . 


18 


Machinery . 


4 


Asphyxiation 


2 


Motorcycle . 


2 


Automobiles 


3 


Natural causes 


344 


(No prosecution). 




Poison .... 


19 


Burns .... 


20 


Railroad (steam) 


14 


Drowning 




29 


StiUborns . 


14 


Electricity 




1 


Suffocation . 


5 


Elevators 




11 


Suicides 


69 


Exposure 
Falls . 




1 
57 


Teams .... 


2 


Homicides 




151 


Total . . 


773 



Of the total number, the following homicide cases were 
prosecuted in the courts : — 



Automobiles 


108 


Railway (street) . 


18 


Manslaughter 


12 


Teams .... 


2 


Murder .... 


10 




— ■ 


Railroad (steam) 


1 


Total . 


151 


The following inquests were 


held during the year:— 


- 


Aeroplane . 


1 


Homicides . 


14 


Alcoholism . 


1 


Machinery . 


3 


Asphyxiation 


1 


Motorcycle . 


1 


Automobiles 


107 


Natural causes 


5 


Boxing match 


1 


Poison .... 


2 


Burns . 


12 


Railroad (steam) 


15 


Drowning 


1 


Railway (street) . 


11 


Electricity . 


1 


Suicides 


3 


FaUs .... 


16 


Teams .... 


3 


Elevators 


7 







Falling objects 


3 


Total . 


208 



Identification Division. 
During the past year the efficiency of this division has been 
greatly increased through the installation of complete and 
thoroughly modern criminal identification equipment. The 
rectigraph, fingerprint cameras, copying and enlarging cam- 
eras, view cameras and photo record machine now in use in 
the identification division make it possible to render a service 
which will compare favorably with the service rendered by 
any other identification bureau in this country. The files in 
this office contain records of all arrests and assignments made 
at the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also records of all 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

arrests throughout the Department where the offence is of 
sufficient seriousness to require fingerprints or photographs of 
the defendants. 

In the identification division records are kept of all per- 
sons committed to Massachusetts State Prison, including their 
fingerprints and photographs. Photographs and records of 
the inmates of the Massachusetts Reformatory and records of 
the inmates of the Suffolk County House of Correction are 
also filed in this Bureau. In addition to the foregoing, the 
files contain many thousands of photographs, fingerprints, 
correspondence, records, clippings and histories of criminals 
arrested or wanted in various parts of the United States and 
foreign countries. There are now approximately 350,000 
persons recorded in the files of this Bureau. 

During the year 31,900 circulars containing photographs and 
fingerprints of persons wanted in this city for various crimes 
were drafted and mailed from this office to every city and town 
in the United States of 5,000 population or more, to state 
bureaus of identification, to all army and navy recruiting 
stations, and to a number of the larger cities in foreign countries. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police 
Department and photographs received from other sources are 
now filed in segregated cabinets. Pictures received from out- 
side departments are placed in the foreign segregated file and 
those taken by this Department are placed in the local segre- 
gated file. 

The photographs of the criminals are segregated into four 
distinct sections, namely, white, negro, yellow and gypsy. 
Each of these groups is further subdivided according to the 
sex and they are all classified under the heading of the crimes 
in which they specialize. 

The identification division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to local and out of town officers in exhibiting photo- 
graphs of criminals in the segregated files to victims of rob- 
beries, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and in many 
instances important identifications have been made. Valu- 
able assistance has also been rendered to government officials, 
Post Office Department, Treasury Department, Secret Service, 
Department of Justice, Prohibition Department and railroad 
and express companies. 

The fingerprint system has practically ehminated the Ber- 
tillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 



1931.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



27 



the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
through the fingerprint files in this division, for this and other 
Departments. Among the most important of these identifica- 
tions were those of several persons who were wanted for murder. 

Members of this division visited the scene of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies and other crimes and in many instances 
secured photographs of fingerprints of the persons who com- 
mitted these crimes and in a number of cases took photographs 
of the scenes where crimes were committed. 

The figures and other data submitted as a part of the report 
of the identification division show a decided increase in the 
volume of the work handled by this unit during the past year. 



Criminal Identification. 
This table gives a brief outline of the more important accom- 
pUshments of the Criminal Identification Bureau. The table 
refers only to the number of individuals who are photographed 
and fingerprinted, and not to the number of prints or copies 
prepared. 



Identifications of criminals arrested locally 
Identifications of criminals arrested elsewhere 
Scenes of crimes photographed . . . . 
Latent prints obtained and photographed 
Circulars sent out by Identification Bureau . 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1929 . 
Made and filed during the year . 
Received from other authorities and filed 
Number on file November 30, 1930 . 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1929 . 
Taken and filed during the year 
Received from other authorities and filed 
Number on file November 30, 1930 . 



Photographs Sent to: 

Biu-eau of Investigation, United States Department of 

Justice 

State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and states 

Fingerprints Sent to: 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of 

Justice 

State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and states 



812 

672 

13 

44 

31,900 

121,300 
1,353 
2,708 

125,361 

74,900 
1,959 
2,854 

79,713 



23 

675 

857 



1,339 

1,525 

852 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of aU articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city are filed in this di\Tsion. AU of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places to be filed. AU pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daUy reports of aU articles pawned or pur- 
chased. A comparison of the descriptions of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recover}' of thousands of doUars of stolen 
property and the arrest of many thieves. Approximately 
150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property- index during 
the j'ear. 

In addition, members of this bureau \isit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daUy and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of indentifj-ing propertj- which may 
have been stolen. 

General. 
The number of cases reported at this Bureau which were 
investigated during the j-ear is 51,920. There are 47,590 cases 
reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose and 
reports made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
Complaints are received from many sources, including cases 
referred to the Bureau by justices of courts and the district 
attorney in addition to cases reported direct to the poUoe 
department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Inves- 
tigation is included in the statements of the general work of the 
Department, but as the duties of this bureau are of special 
character, the foUowing statement may be of interest : — 

Number of persons arrested 3,018 

Fugitives from justice from other states arrested and de- 
livered to officers from those states ... 67 
Number of cases investigated 51,920 
Number of extra duties performed 1,151 
Number of cases of homicide, etc. . 249 
Number of cases of abortion, etc. ... 8 
Number of days 8i>ent in court by f)olice officers . 4,105 
Number of years of imprisonment, 95 years, 4 months and 

57 indefinite terms. 
Amount of stolen property recovered $592,569 89 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : — 

1929. Men. 
Dec. 10, Symphonj'^ Hall, lecture by Governor Ritchie of Mary- 
land 20 

Dec. 24, West End, Christmas Eve, traffic duty . . 45 

Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve celebration . 10 

Dec. 24, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight Mass . 10 

Dec. 31, New Year's Eve 20 

Dec. 31, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, midnight Mass ... 11 

1930. 

Jan. 6, Symphony Hall, inauguration of Mayor James M. 

Curley ' . . . . 62 

Jan. 7, Mechanics Building, Boston Police Ball .... 214 

Jan. 7, Funeral of Sergeant William D. Walsh .... 23 

Jan. 16, Funeral of Patrolman James J. Troy 61 

Jan. 19, Funeral of Judge David A. Lourie 32 

Jan. 27, City Hall, contemplated gathering of unemployed . . 15 

Jan. 31. Keith's Theatre, benefit for family of Patrolman Troy . 13 

Feb. 13, Mechanics Building, Firemen's Ball 39 

Feb. 19, St. Matthew's Church, funeral of Monsignor Edward F. 

Hurley 26 

Feb. 27, Newspaper bulletin boards, Sharkey-Scott fight . 24 

Mar. 17, South Boston, Evacuation Day parade .... 338 

Apr. 12, Cathedral road race 38 

Apr. 19, Marathon race 542 

Apr. 19, Patriots' Day celebration 66 

Apr. 28, Funeral of Sergeant William J. Flynn .... 24 

Apr. 28. Funeral of Patrolman Franklin B. Dwyer ... 104 

May 22, Boston Common, drill of intermediate school boyf . 55 

May 30, City cemeteries 28 

May 30, Vicinity of cemeteries, traffic duty 112 

May 30, New Calvary cemetery, police posts memorial service . 96 

June 2, Parade of Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 358 

June 4, Franklin Field, children's day 124 

June 6, Parade of Boston school cadets 362 

June 7, Dorchester Day parade 253 

June 7, Dorchester Day, events of playgrounds and band concerts, 88 

June 10, Fenway Park, Boston school pageant .... 32 

June 11, Funeral of Patrolman Patrick J. Lydon .... 14 

June 12, Newspaper bulletin boards, Sharkey-Schmelling fight . 30 

June 13, Funeral of Mrs. James M. Curley 112 

June 15, South Station, arrival of Rabbi Joseph Schnersohn . 47 

June 16, Roxbury District, night before Bunker Hill Day . 25 

June 16, Charlestown District, night before Bunker Hill Day . 120 

June 17, Bunker Hill Day, parade, fireworks and band concerts . 377 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



lOiO. 




June 27, 


July 


2, 


July 


3, 


July 


3, 


July 


4, 


July 


4, 


July 


15, 


July 


16, 


July 


18, 


July 


21, 


July 


23, 


July 


24, 


July 


25, 


July 


26, 


July 


27, 


July 


28, 


July 


30, 


July 


31, 


July 


31, 


Aug. 


1, 


Aug. 


4, 


Aug. 


5, 


Aug. 


5, 


Aug. 


6, 


Aug. 


7, 


Aug. 


7, 


Aug. 


8, 


Aug. 


11, 


Aug. 


12, 


Aug. 


12, 


Aug. 


13, 


Aug. 


14, 


Aug. 


15, 


Aug. 


16, 


Aug. 


18, 


Aug. 


19, 


Aug. 


20, 


Aug. 


21, 


Aug. 


21, 


Aug. 


22, 


Aug. 


22, 


Aug. 


22 


Aug. 


23! 


Aug. 


25, 


Aug. 


26, 


Aug. 


27, 


Aug. 


28, 


Aug. 


28, 



Reception to Admiral Byrd 

Boston Common, rehearsal of July 4th pageant 
Funeral of Inspector Michael J. Morrissey 

Columbus Park, bonfire 

Columbus Park, fireworks 

Boston Common, athletic events, pageant and fireworks. 

Tercentenary parade and meeting on Common 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

City Point, Tercentenary water carnival . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Funeral of Sergeant Dennis F. Driscoll 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Park, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Park, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Park, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Park, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Field, children's carnival 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, proposed Sacco-Vanzetti meeting 

Old South Church, Sacco-Vanzetti memorial meeting 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Franklin Park, Tercentenarv exercises 



Men. 

524 
90 
39 
73 
57 
224 
510 
33 
23 
20 
12 



1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



31 



Aug. 


30, 


Sept. 


1, 


Sept. 


3, 


Sept. 


5, 


Sept. 


13, 


Sept. 


14, 


Sept. 


14, 


Sept. 


15, 


Sept. 


15, 


Sept. 


16, 


Sept. 


17, 


Sept. 


18, 


Sept. 


19, 


Sept. 


20, 


Sept. 


20, 


Sept. 


20, 


Oct. 


1, 


Oct. 


2, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


7, 


Oct. 


9, 


Oct. 


11, 


Oct. 


12, 


Oct. 


13, 


Oct. 


13, 


Oct. 


13, 



Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Anticipated Communist meeting (held in reserve) 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Garden, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

East Boston Airport, Tercentenary exercises 

Tercentenary night parade 

East Boston Airport, arrival of French flyers . 

State primary day 

Boston Tercentenary parade .... 

Franklin Field, Tercentenary exercises 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

City Point, fireworks 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Newspaper bulletin boards, world's series baseball 

Newspaper bulletin boards, world's series baseball 

Newspaper bulletin boards, world's series baseball 

East Boston Airport, Tercentenary exhibition . 

Stadium, Harvard-Vermont football game 

Brighton District, Tercentenary parade 

American Legion parade 

Faneuil Hall, American Legion service 

East Boston Airport, Tercentenary exhibition . 

Visit of President Hoover 

"Forty and Eight" parade 

East Boston Airport, Tercentenary exhibition . 

American Legion parade 

Newspaper bulletin boards, world's series baseball 

Symphony Hall, American Legion meeting 

Stadium, Harvard-Springfield football game 

Columbus Park, dedication of stadium 

Boston Common, Tercentenary exercises . 

Parade of Sons of Italy in America . 

Annual dress parade and review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of 
rank, and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into 
three battalions of eight companies each, in command 
of a major, so designated. To each battalion was 
assigned a military band. The regiment included a 
sergeant and eighteen men mounted on department 
horses, a colonel commanding, with his adjutant and 
staff officers from the respective police divisions, and 
units in military company formation, shotgun com- 
panies, patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns 
and a motor-cycle unit. 



Men. 

11 

11 

65 

11 

11 

43 

11 

30 

466 

38 

1,197 

1,140 

45 

20 

10 

38 

10 

37 

37 

37 

28 

61 

28 

848 

30 

28 

429 

899 

25 

1,692 

37 

25 

55 

93 

10 

248 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Oct. 


14, 


Oct. 


15, 


Oct. 


17, 


Oct. 


18, 


Oct. 


18, 


Oct. 


25, 


Oct. 


28, 


Oct. 


28, 


Oct. 


28, 


Nov. 


1, 


Nov. 


1, 


Nov. 


4, 


Nov. 


4, 


Nov. 


8, 


Nov. 


11, 


Nov. 


15, 


Nov. 


29, 



The regiment was reviewed at a reviewing stand on 
Tremont Street by the Honorable James M. Curley, 
Mayor; at the State House by Adjutant-General 
Jesse F. Stevens representing His Excellency the 
Governor, and at the "Tribune" on the Boston 
Common by Adjutant General Jesse F. Stevens, 
Honorable James M. Curley, Mayor; Lieutenant- 
Colonel Sir Hugh Stephenson Turnbull, K. B. E., 
Police Commissioner for the city of London, England, 
and the Police Commissioner, Honorable Eugene C. 
Hultman 

Hotel Bradford, disturbance by Communists 

Hotel Bradford, guarding against disturbance 

Boston Garden, Tercentenary ball 

Parade and review of West Point cadets . 

Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-West Point football 
game 

Stadium, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 

Arrival of and reception to Ex-Governor Smith of New 
York 

Boston Arena, Democratic rally 

South Station, departure of Ex-Governor Smith 

Funeral of Patrolman John McLean .... 

Stadium, Harvard-William and Mary football game 

City election, at polling places . 

Newspaper bulletin boards, election returns 

Stadium, Harvard-Michigan football game 

Armistice Day parade 

Stadium, Harvard-Holy Cross football game 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Holy Cross football game 



1,56S 

34 

14 

32 

33S 

115 
110 

520 

225 
62 
23 
79 
1,017 
68 
95 

371 
92 

103 



Lost, Stolen or Abandoned Property in Custody of 
Property Clerk. . 

On December 1, 1929, there were 2,201 articles of lost, stolen 
or abandoned property in the custody of the Property Clerk 
and during the year 1,502 were received; 567 articles were 
sold at pubUc auction and the proceeds, $736.48, were turned 
over to the Chief Clerk. 

One hundred twenty-two packages containing money amount- 
ing to $644.20 were turned over to the Chief Clerk; 5 pieces 
were sold as perishable, and 371 worthless articles were destroyed 
or sold as junk and the entire proceeds, $192.19, turned over 
to the Chief Clerk; 165 articles were returned to owners, 
finders or administrators, leaving 2,473 on hand. 



1931.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Missing Persons. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year: — 

Total number reported 1,075 

Total number found 985 

Total number still missing 90 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 


263 

240 
213 


55 

212 
92 


257 

217 
190 


53 

187 
81 


6 

23 
23 


2 

25 
11 


Totals 


716 


359 


664 


321 


52 


38 



Miscellaneous Business. 



1928-29. 



1929-30. 



Abandoned children cared for 

Accidents reported 

Buildings found open and made secure. . 

Cases investigated 

Dangerous buildings reported 

Dangerous chimneys reported 

Dead bodies recovered 

Defective cesspools reported 

Defective drains and vaults reported . . . . 
Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 

Defective gas pipes reported 

Defective hydrants reported 



8,973 

3,388 

78,577 

15 

22 

198 

38 

1 

8 

13 

70 



4 

9,793 

3,205 

75,345 

15 

8 

55 

40 

3 

13 

5 

52 



3 

10,099 

3,489 

98,049 

14 

7 

224 

20 

10 
14 
62 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Business. — Concluded. 



1927-28. 1928-29. 1929-30 



Defective lamps reported 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective sidewalks and streets reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained 



5,737 

116 

9,439 

42 

693 

49,256 

3,631 

1,283 

355 

18 

1,316 

17 

7,130 

28 

2,054 

467 

20 



5,889 

65 

8,931 

81 

949 

46,072 

4,437 

1,171 

355 

31 

1,454 

28 

6,546 

28 

1,917 

424 

11 



5,897 

82 

9,770 

65 

701 

35,862 

3,984 

1,113 

354 

22 

1,789 

26 

6,701 

21 

1,842 

495 

14 



Inspector of Claims. 

The officer detailed to assist the committee on claims and 

law department in investigating claims against the city for 

alleged damage of various kinds reports that he investigated 

858 cases, 5 of which were on account of damage done by dogs. 

Other Services Performed. 

Number of cases investigated 858 

Number of witnesses examined 877 

Number of notices served 3,009 

Number of permissions granted (to speak to police officers 

regarding accidents and to examine police records) 14,183 

Number of days in court 151 

Number of cases settled on recommendation from this office, 16 
Collected for damage to city property and bills paid to repair 

same |;2,052 90 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

House of Detention. 
The House of Detention for women is located in the Court- 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city- 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston and Roxbury 
Crossing districts are taken to the House of Detention in a van 
provided for the purpose. They are then held in charge of 
the matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment they are 
returned to the House of Detention and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,115 were committed for the following: — 

Drunkenness 997 

Larceny 301 

Night walking 39 

Fornication Ill 

Idle and disorderly 133 

Assault and battery 25 

Adultery 43 

Violation of liquor law 56 

Keeping house of ill fame 20 

Various other causes 390 

Total 2,115 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 142 

From county jail 384 

Grand total 2,641 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 544. Of these, 400 are 
connected with the underground system and 144 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 
In the past year the employees of this service responded to 
1,741 trouble calls; inspected 544 signal boxes, 18 signal desks 
and 1,000 batteries. Repairs have been made on 199 box 
movements, 106 registers, 88 polar bells, 91 locks, 77 time 
stamps, 6 garage motors, 3 garage registers, 40 vibrator bells, 
11 relays, 3 pole changes, 9 electric fans and all bell and electric 
light work at the various stations. There have been made 115 



36 POLICE COAIMISSIOXER. [Jan. 

plungers, 60 box fittings, 86 line blocks, 98 automatic hooks 
and other general super^ision and maintenance work have 
been engaged in. 

Two new signal boxes were added to Division 7, one to 
Division 11, three to Division 13, one to Division 14, one to 
Division 16, two to Division 17 and four to Di\'ision 19. A new 
signal desk was installed at Division 1, and ten new movements 
were installed at Division 16. Two new signal registers 
were also installed. Connected with the poHce signal boxes 
there are 72 signal and 72 telephone circuits ; 700,696 telephone 
messages and 4,286,326 "on duty" calls were sent over 
these lines. 

There are assigned to this unit, one White truck, 2^ tons 
capacity; one Ford truck, 1| tons capacity; one Ford five- 
passenger four-door sedan and one Ford coupe, business model. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 55,407 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 104,600 miles. There 
were 31,325 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,638 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 487 runs were made 
to take lost children to station houses. There were 3,654 runs 
to fires and 527 runs for liquor seizures. 

The following list comprises the property in the signal 
service at the present time : — 



22 signal desks 
72 circuits 
544 signal boxes 
14 garage annunciators 
75 test boxes 

1,103 cells of battery ! 1 Ford sedan 

680,758 feet underground cable ! 1 Ford coupe 



233,340 feet overhead cable 
23,294 feet duct 
67 manholes 
1 White truck 
1 Ford truck 



Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the police of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein were as follows : — 

Value of property recovered consisting of boats, riggings, 

float stages, etc $47,850 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports 668 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 213 

Number of vessels moved from channel 2 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to 

wharfinger 3 

Permits granted vessels to discharge cargo in stream ... 9 

Alarms of fire attended on the water front 39 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

Fires extinguished without alarm 3 

Boats challenged 52 

Boats searched for contraband 9 

Sick and injured persons assisted 3 

Cases investigated 328 

Dead bodies recovered 15 

Rescued from drowning 2 

Vessels ordered to put on anchor lights 7 

Assistance rendered 72 

Obstructions removed from channel 53 

Vessels assigned to anchorage 1,575 

Fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver fuel oil in harbor . 166 

Coal permits granted 16 

Grappling (hours) 665 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 8,608; 
6,995 of which were from domestic ports ; 560 from the British 
Provinces in Canada and 1,053 from foreign ports. Of the 
latter 669 were steamers, 37 were motor vessels and 6 schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay from 
June 23 to October 22, 1930. The launch E. U. Curtis cruised 
nightly from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge. There were 
27 cases investigated, 7 boats challenged, 4 obstructions 
removed from channel, 8 boats ordered to their proper 
anchorage, 1 dead body cared for, 3 arrests, assistance rendered 
to 7 boats in distress by reason of disabled engines, stress of 
weather, etc., and towing them with the persons aboard to a 
place of safety and 7| hours were spent in grappling. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1930, there have been 
issued licenses for 56 sight-seeing automobiles and 34 special 
stands for them. There has been rejected 1 application for 
special stand. 

There have been 103 operators' hcenses granted, 1 application 
for operator's license rejected and 3 operators' Ucenses canceled. 

Wagon Licenses. 
Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. During the year 
3,539 applications for such Ucenses were received; 3,532 of 
these were granted and 7 rejected. Of these licenses 86 were 
subsequently canceled for nonpayment of Ucense fee, 1 because 
it was surrendered and 9 transferred to new locations. (See 
Tables XIV, XVI.) 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1929, there were 20 horses in the 
service. During the year two were deHvered to the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
on account of age and one was purchased. 

At the present time there are 19 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses, attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
Automobiles. 
There are 78 automobiles in the service at the present time; 
29 attached to Headquarters; one at the House of Detention, 
used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 11 in the city 
proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; 5 in the 
South Boston district attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 3 in the 
East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 5 in the Roxbury 
district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 2 in the Dorchester 
district, attached to Division 11; 2 in the Jamaica Plain dis- 
trict, attached to Division 13; 2 in the Brighton district 
attached to Division 14; 3 in the Charlestown district, attached 
to Division 15; 3 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, attached 
to Division 16; 2 in the AVest Roxbury district, attached to 
Division 17; 2 in the Hyde Park district, attached to Division 
18; 2 in the Mattapan district, attached to Division 19; 
2 assigned for use of the traffic divisions and 4 unassigned. 
(See page 40.) 

Cost of Running Anloinohiles. 

General repairs $14,740 87 

Tire repairs and battery charging 709 25 

Storage and washing 5,978 84 

Gasolene 18,071 34 

OU 2,643 08 

Prestone, polish, patches, plugs, etc. 1,104 58 

License fees 165 GO 

Total $43,412 96 

Combination Ambulances. 
The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are 3 unassigned. 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 2,113 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) .... 1,039 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) . . . 165 

Calls where services were not required 115 

Morgue 80 

Psychopathic Hospital 80 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 78 

Carney Hospital 53 

Massachusetts General Hospital 46 

Home 42 

Forest Hills Hospital .27 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 23 

Beth Israel Hospital 10 

Boston State Hospital 10 

Faulkner Hospital 6 

Police Station Houses 3 

Chardon Street Home 3 

Children's Hospital 2 

Commonwealth Hospital 2 

Strong Hospital 2 

Charlesgate Hospital 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Emerson Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Memorial Hospital 

Roxbury Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Total 3,907 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

List of Vehicles Used By The Department. 



Divisions. 


i 

a 
1 

i 

< 

2 
3 


2 

3 

111 


utomobiles, In- 
cluding Trucks 
and other 
Wagons. 


c 
> 
1 


1 
1 


i 
I 


1 




< 


'^ 


< 


1 


^ 


§ 


^ 


Headquarters . 








- 


- 


28 


1 


- 


- 


29 


Division 1 . 








1 




1 


- 


1 


1 


5 


Division 2 . 








- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 3 . 








- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 . 








- 




- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Division 5 . 








- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


- 


4 


Division 6 . 








- 




2 


- 


3 


3 


9 


Division 7 . 








- 




2 


- 


5 


5 


13 


Division 9 . 








- 




1 


- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 10 








- 




2 


- 


2 


1 


6 


Division 11 








- 




1 


- 


4 


2 


8 


Division 12 








- 




1 


- 


4 


3 


9 


Division 13 








- 




1 


- 


8 


3 


13 


Division 14 








- 




1 


- 


11 


8 


21 


Division 15 








- 




2 


- 


5. 


3 


11 


Division 16 








- 




2 


- 


9 


3 


15 


Division 17 








- 




1 


- 


10 


4 


16 


Division 18 








- 




1 


- 


3 


1 


6 


Division 19 








- 




1 


- 


6 


3 


11 


Division 20 








- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 








- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 


5 


Unassigned 


. 


. 


. 


- 


3 


- 


1 


3 


2 


9 


Totals . 


1 


21 


53 


3 


82 


47 


207 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

Public Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,890 carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 40, as compared with last year; 2,886 motor 
carriages were Hcensed, being a decrease of 40 as compared 
with last year. 

There have been 4 horse-drawn carriages hcensed during 
the year. 

There were 251 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the inspector; 111 of these were restored to the 
owners, and the balance placed in the ctstody of the lost 
property bureau. 

The following statement gives details concerning pubHc 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 2,897 

Number of carriages licensed 2,890 

Number of licenses transferred 80 

Number of licenses canceled 797 

Number of licenses revoked 2 

Number of licenses suspended 14 

Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected ... 8 
Number of applications for carriage licenses reconsidered and 

granted 1 

Number of carriages inspectred 3,716 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 4,864 

Number of complaints against owners and drivers investigated . 1,842 

Number of days spent in court 193 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens 516 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 251 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected 145 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . . 22 

Drivers' licenses granted 4,741 

Drivers' licenses revoked 7 

Drivers' licenses suspended 214 

Drivers' licenses canceled 95 

Since July 1, 1914, the Pohce Commissioner has assigned 
to persons or corporations hcensed to set up and use hackney 
carriages, places designated as special stands for such hcensed 
carriages, and there have been issued in the year ending 
November 30, 1930, 1,740 such special stands. 

Of these special stands there have been 130 canceled or 
revoked, 23 transferred and 7 suspended. There have been 
147 apphcations for special stands rejected, 10 of which were 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



reconsidered and granted, and 8 applications rejected for 
transfer of special stands, 1 of which was reconsidered and 
granted. 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


19031 .... 


181,045 


1917 .... 


221,207 


1904 










193,195 


1918 










224,012 


1905 








r 


194,547 


1919 










227,466 


1906 










195,446 


1920 










235,248 


1907 










195,900 


1921^ 










480,783 


1908 










201,255 


1922 










480,106 


1909 










201,391 


1923 










477,547 


1910^ 










203,603 


1924 










485,677 


1911 










206,825 


1925 










489,478 


1912 










214,178 


1926 










493,415 


1913 










215,388 


1927 










495,767 


1914 










219,364 


1928 










491,277 


1915 










220,883 


1929 










493,250 


1916" 










- 







' 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

1 1910 listing changed to .\pril 1. 

» 1916 listing done by Board of Aasessore. 

* 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 



Male . 
Female 



Total 



242,449 
259,652 

502,101 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the poUce force, were as follows: — 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

Printing police list $40,060 64 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list . . 21,264 64 

Newspaper notices 685 15 

Circulars 339 00 

Stationery 325 46 

Interpreters 294 00 

Telephone 10 77 

Total $62,979 66 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 1 1,395 

April 2 1,344 

April 3 1,043 

April 4 628 

Aprils 155 

April 7 18 

Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written appHcation of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the city of Boston, or on the application of 
any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
oflficial misconduct of the person appointed. 

During the year ending November 30, 1930, there were 1,690 
special poHce officers appointed; 10 apphcations for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause and 94 appointments were canceled. 

Appointments were made on apphcations received as 
follows : 

From United States Government 32 

From State Departments 4 

From City Departments 524 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 63 

From other corporations and associations 825 

From theatres and other places of amusement 214 

From private institutions 8 

From churches 19 

Total 1,690 

Railroad Police. 
There were 13 persons appointed railroad poHcemen during 
the year, 11 of whom were employees of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad and 2 of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 
The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 26,237. Of these 25,957 were granted, of which 
113 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 25,844. During 
the year 533 licenses were transferred, 1,274 canceled, 14 
revoked and 280 appHcations were rejected. The officers 
investigated 2,086 complaints arising under these licenses. 
The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
$66,219.75. (See Tables XIV, XVII.) 

Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 37 appUcations for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 3 of which were disapproved and 
1 license was subsequently canceled on account of nonpay- 
ment of Hcense fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with a 
quaUfied musician, not a member of the Department, that such 
instruments shall be inspected in April and September of each 
year. 

During the year 52 instruments were inspected with the 
following result : — 



Kind of Instrument. 



Number Number 

Inspected. Passed. 



Street pianos 
Violins 
Hand organs 
Accordions . 
Banjos 
Bag-pipes . 
Clarinets . 
Plutes . 
Guitars 
Harp . 

Totals . 




1931.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



45 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
. thereon : — 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1926 


223 


222 


1 


1927 


193 


192 


1 


1928 


223 


221 


2 


1929 


209 


207 


2 


1930 


212 


210 


2 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to Carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such apphcations granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked : — 



Ye.^.r. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1926 .... 


3,165 


3,043 


122 


3 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 


77 


2 


1928 .... 


2,954 


2,904 


50 


1 


1929 .... 


3,025 


2,224 


70 


1 


1930 .... 


2,967 


2,902 1 


65 


5 



13 canceled for nonpayment. 



Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 

licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 

General Laws (amended by Chapter 45 of the Acts of 1927) 

and Sections 33 to 36, both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

General Laws, the location of each house and the number of 
lodgers accommodated: — 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

1051 Washington Street 

1202 Washington Street 

1025 Washington Street 


39,488 
18,428 
27,000 
25,550 


Total 


110,466 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1929, there were 281 pensioners on the roll. 
During the year 17 died, \1z., 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants, 13 
patrolmen and 1 annuitant. One patrolman was restored to 
duty, 1 patrolman was dropped from the roll and 1 annuitant 
remarried. Twenty-four were added, viz., 4 captains, 1 
lieutenant inspector, 1 lieutenant, 3 sergeants, 10 patrolmen, 
1 director of signal service, 1 signalman and 3 annuitants, the 
widow of Sergeant Edward Q. Butters and the widows of 
Patrolmen James J. Troy and Franklin B. Dwyer, who died 
from injuries received in the performance of duty, leaving 285 
on the roll at date, 256 pensioners and 29 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $262,301.77 and it is estimated that $293,900.66 
will be required for pensions in 1931. This includes partial 
provision for 1 captain, 3 lieutenant inspectors, 2 lieutenants, 
3 sergeants and 26 patrolmen, all of whom are 65 years old or 
more and are entitled to be pensioned on account of age and 
term of service. 

The invested fund of the PoHce Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 56 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,333.50 durmg 
the past year. 



1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age 
or more and the maintenance of the police signal service, were 
$6,051,624.43. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $55,635.42. (See Table XVIIL) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the poHce have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, etc., 
was $80,094.96. (See Table XIV.) 







SIBIOX 


^^^C^, .^OM!OCgiO.O-H-c> 


> 





M 


,,,,,-, ^Og.,,, 


g 


lliii-Hi^oooiiii 


2 


1 , , , , ^ , ., t^ g , , , , 


CO 


Iliil-l^Jt-'^lili 


- 


lllll-HlCSt^gllll 


o 


IIIII^INOOCJ'III 


- 


1 1 1 1 1 -H 1 c-> r- (M 1 1 1 1 


Z 


,,ll,-l^r.|,l,l 


r^ 


, , , , , ^ . c. o o , , , . 


2 


'''''-'-* S ''' ' 


:: 


1 1 1 1 1 rt 1 C-) r~ o 1 1 1 1 


o 


,lll,^,^,^g,,i, 


Ov 


, . 1 , i -, ■ c. ^ - , , , , 


X 


iilli-^loat-W'''' 


t> 


1 i 1 1 1 rt 1 O t^ Tfi 1 1 1 1 


O 


, , , , , ^ . ., 00 S5 , , , , 


U5 


1 1 1 1 1 — 1 CI t- X 1 1 1 1 


- 


C3 


<-5 


,,,,,« i C. W O , 1 , , 


<S 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 CI t- O 1 i 1 1 


- 


lllll«l<Nt-MIIII 


•uoii 
-uaiaa JO asnoH 




•aoiAjag jBuSig 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•>iaaio Xjjadojj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 _ 1 1 CI C-l 1 « CO 1 


•(aojo^j -o^aa) 

UOI}BSl}SaAU| 

IBuiiuuq' n^aang 


1 1 irtrtoco-^ooci>f:iooc4 


•gja^JBnbpuajj 


,«,ocj2, lor^ 


I 

a 

a 

< 


$8,000 

5,000 

7,000 

4,500 

4,300 

4,000 

2,700 

2,700 

2,500 
1,600 to 2,100 

2,100 

3,600 
750 to 3,600 
1,100 to 3,500 


z 

o 

C 

< 






5 


Police Commissioner 
Secretary 
Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendei 
Chief inspector . 
Captains 
Inspectors 
Lieutenants . 
Sergeants 
Patrolmen . 
Patrolwomen 
Property clerk 
Clerks . . 
Stenographers 



■^^^t^lOco•«J'o^^^^-oco.-c^5tO'H-H--|.-^co 


i 

IN 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


S 


, : . ^ : . 


2 


'"'''''^'''^ 


o 


1 -^ i 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


§ 


'''■''"'''''''''''' 


t^ 


1 1 1 1 1 o ^^ -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 


§ 


1 ■-' 1 1 1 1 •-< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


2 


1 1 1 : 1 1 '^ 1 1 ■-I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


12 


IrHl.ilCNII^-llllllllll 


2 


1 -^ 1 1 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


S; 


1 " i 1 1 1 "-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


IM 


1 "-1 1 1 1 1 —1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


2 


1 -H 1 , , 1 C-l 1 1 r^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


IC 


I-1CCXI^I||;I|IIII|| 


5! 


1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 rt 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


s 


'"'''' '^ '' ' ' ' ' ' 


8 


< i I ' 1 ^< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 C^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 


= 


c, , , , ' ' ' 1 g 

1 -^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


1 •-1 1 - 1 1 (M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


2 




-^ 


"lllllllt-l(N«IOIJi|| 


^ 


«^OI=DIC--l 1 |rt|CO|r-,«««-, 


^ 


' ' 


§ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 IN 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 M 


§g 


1,600 to 1,800 

1,200 
1,000 to 1,600 
2,100 to 2,700 
1,700 to 2,000 

1,600 
1,600 to 1,800 

1,600 

2,000 to 2,300 

400 to 1,800 

2,000 to 2,100 

1,900 
1,800 to 2,000 

2,100 

1,700 

3,000 

2.200 

2,000 
1,600 to 1,800 










§■ 


s 

1 


^ t ' ' 

......... ^ -3 


Chauffeurs . 

Cleaners 

Elevator operators 

Engineers 

I<irenien 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborer and helper 

Linemen 

Matrons 

Mechanics . 

Painter . 

Ilepairnien . 

Signalmen . 

Steamfitter . 

Superintendent of buil 

Superintendent of rep 

Tailor . . . 

Telephone operators 



3 

.12 a 



.2 o 



w .2 

"o M 

a .S 

o > 

i 1 

« .s 



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fl fl s °^ 

O e8 e >/" 

2 o e ca 

IHIS 

■a-g g g-o 

1 1 . . 

si §rtN 
o o 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IL 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


.ACTUAL Strength. 


RANKS AND GRADES. 


Jan. 1, 
1930. 


1 

Nov. 30, 
1930. 


Jan. 1, 
1930. 


Nov. 30. 
1930. 


Net Gain 
or Loss. 
(Plus or) 
Minus.) 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 




Secretary 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Superintendent 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendents, 


2 


2 


2 


2 


- 


Chief Inspector 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Captains .... 


29 


29 


29 


29 


- 


Inspectors 


27 


27 


25 


23 


Minus 2 


Lieutenants 


44 


46 


44 


46 


Plus 2 


Sergeants 


187 


187 


186 


182 


Minus 4 


Patrolmen 


2,149 


2,149 


2,135 


2,135 


- 


Patrolwomen . 


8 


8 


5 


5 


- 


Totals . 


2,450 


2,452 


2,430 


2,426 


Minus 4 



The last column (Net Gain or Loss) represents the difference between 
the actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1931.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



51 





■i 

I 
i 

u 


Cardiac disease 
Cancer 

Hodgkin's disease 
Bullet wounds 
Cancer 
Tuberculosis 
Angina Pectoris 
Cerebral Hemorrhage 
Kidney trouble 
Complication of diseases 
Cardiac disease 
Bullet wounds 
Cancer 


J 


1 

1 
Q 


mmmtm 




d 
.2 
"> 

(5 


lOTt<l0^iMCCOCC(M<M'-'c005 


^ 


< 




-^ 




C) 




1 


llllililllili 


5S 








1 












sacScscsasBafl 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1930, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Ser\ice. 


Bannister. Charles F. . 


Age 


65 years 


37 Vis years 


Blake. Edward C. 






Incapacitated 


55"/i: " 


26 V« " 


Farrell, John F. . 






Incapacitated 


33 Vi: - 


7V« " 


Fitzgerald. Richard . 






Age 


63Vi2 " 


36 Vis " 


Flynn. John R. . 






Age 


70 


42>o/i2 " 


Grant. Robert E. 






Age 


65i»/i: " 


29Vii " 


HoweU, Charles L. . 






Age 


65 Vi! " 


40"/i2 " 


KeUy, Charles B. 






Age 


65>/is " 


39Vi2 " 


Kenefick. Thomas W. 






Age 


70 


41Vi= • 


Kihlgren, Charles A. . 






Age 


60J/.I « 


29'«/,i ' 


Lamb, Charles M. 






Age 


65 Vn " 


36ViJ " 


McConnell, Arthur B. 






Age 


652/12 " 


37 Vk ' 


McLean. James H. 






Age 


65 '/i2 - 


37W/12 ' 


Nutting. Nathan W. . 






Age 


65V.2 " 


34'«/i2 " 


Parker. Alpheus W. . 






Age 


64Vi2 " 


34 Vk " 


Patterson, George W. 






Age 


64»/i! " 


37Vi2 " 


Sayward, William A. . 






Age 


60'/iJ " 


32Vi2 " 


Shorey. Weston . 






Age 


62 '/i= ' 


29V.2 * 


Wyer. Calvin S. . 






Age 


65 '/i; " 


37 Vk • 



Police Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under 
the Boston Retirement Systeyn, which went into effect February 
1, 1923. 



Name. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age 
at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years ol 
Service. 


Evans. Thomas C. . 
O'Reilly, Timothy . 


Deputy Superin- 
tendent 

Hostler 


Age 
Age 


70 i/iJ yeara 
67 '/ij • 


47 Vii yeare 
20Vii • 



1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



53 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1930. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



Jan. 10, 1930 

Jan. 10, 1930 

Jan. 10, 1930 

Feb. 14, 1930 

Feb. 14, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

Feb. 21, 1930 

June 20, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

July 28, 1930 

Aug. 8, 1930 

Aug. 8, 1930 

Aug. 8, 1930 

Aug. 8, 1930 

Aug. 22, 1930 

Aug. 22, 1930 

Aug. 22, 1930 

Nov. 14, 1930 

Nov. 14, 1930 



Patrolman John E. Tevnan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Francis M. Tiernan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John L. Willard to the rank of Sergeant. 

Captain James McDevitt to the rank of Deputy Super- 
intendent. 
Lieutenant John S. Ridlon to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant James F. Daley to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant James F. O'Neil to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant David V. Tintle to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Michael T. Clougherty to the rank of 

Sergeant. 
Patrolman Walter A. DriscoU to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Anthony J. FerruUe to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant John McGrath to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Joseph McKinnon to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant Frank McNabb to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Michael J. Trainor to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Robert N. Adams to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward C. Lawless to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Edward L. Twohig to the rank of Sergeant. 

Sergeant John J. Cashman to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Ariel H. Dunham to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Edmond V. Gallahue to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Wilfred D. Mulligan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant Mathew Killen to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant John C. Blake to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Patrick J. Freeley to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant Harry N. Dickinson to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant Robert Caverly to the rank of Lieutenant. 



54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 















































































































































Date 
Appointed. 


'c 


c 


1 












Totals . 




i 


& 




s 




^ 

e 


i 




























m 


3 

P 


.£ 

6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 
I 




1886 . 








2 








_ 


2 


1887 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1888 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


6 


8 


1889 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1890 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


7 


1891 






- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


4 


1892 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1893 






- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


2 


2 


6 


15 


1894 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


1 


6 


1895 






- 


2 


- 


7 


1 


7 


9 


26 


52 


1896 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


6 


9 


1897 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


5 


1898 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


4 


8 


16 


1900 






- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


5 


12 


11 


36 


1901 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


7 


3 


15 


1903 






- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


1 


11 


8 


24 


1904 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


5 


7 


5 


19 


1905 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


5 


2 


9 


1906 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1 


6 


1907 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


6 


6 


17 


1908 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


11 


4 


21 


1909 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


2 


6 


1910 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1911 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


* 1 


4 


1912 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


4 


11 


1913 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1914 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


1916 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


4 


1917 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


3 


1 


5 


1919 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


3 


57 


557 


617 


1920 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




10 


181 


191 


1921 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


125 


133 


1922 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


75 


76 


1923 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


110 


112 


1924 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


78 


78 


1925 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


96 


96 


1926 






- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


320 


320 


1927 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


128 


128 


1928 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


^ 


_ 


_ 


92 


92 


1929 






- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


211 


211 


1930 






: 


- 




"~ 




— 


- 


51 


51 


Totj 


lis 




1 


2 


1 


29 


23 


46 


182 


2,140 


2,424 



1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



55 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1930, who were Born 

in the Year Indicated in the Table below. 



Date or 
Birth. 




i 

Q 




a 
6 


1 


i 

1 


1 


a 
s 
1 


1 


I860 


1 

_ 


2 


1 


1 
1 

1 
3 
5 
2 
4 
2 

2 
3 
2 

3 

- 


1 
2 
2 

3 

1 


1 
1 

3 

4 

4 

4 
3 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

2 
2 

1 


1 

2 
2 
4 

4 
5 
8 
4 
2 
2 
5 
15 
8 
5 
4 
3 
5 
4 
2 
5 
4 
3 
4 
1 
2 

3 
5 

2 

8 
14 
12 
12 

8 
12 

2 


1 

3 
6 
9 
7 
10 
9 
6 
7 
5 
8 
9 
2 
5 

3 

7 
4 
5 
1 
2 

1 

2 

17 

30 

45 

55 

75 

67 

98 

136 

147 

172 

167 

198 

185 

161 

115 

149 

106 

46 

40 

18 

1 


1 


1861. . . 


3 


1862. 


3 


1863 


8 
13 


1864 


1865 


15 


1866 


23 


1867 


25 


1868. 


17 


1869 


21 


1870 


11 


1871 


15 


1872 


18 


1873 


21 


1874. 


22 


1875 


10 


1876 


12 


1877 


13 


1878 


11 


1879 


11 


1880. 


5 


1881. 


10 


1882 


9 


1883 


5 


1884 


7 


1885 


19 


1886 . 


32 


1887 


47 


1888 


60 


1889 


80 


1890 


67 


1891 

1892 


100 
144 


1893. 


161 


1894 

1895 

1896 


184 
179 
206 


1897 


198 


1898 


163 


1899 

1900 

1901. 


115 
149 
106 


1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 


46 

40 

18 

1 






Totals. . . . 


1 


2 


1 


29 


23 


46 


182 


2,140 


2,424 



The average age of tne memoers of tne torce on JNovember 30, 1930, is 
37.83 years. 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 





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1931.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



57 





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1931. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1930. 



Divisions. 



Males. 



Totals. 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
Division 6 
Division 7 . 
Division 8 . 
Division 9 . 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 12 
Division 13 
Division 14 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Division 18 
Division 19 
Division 20 . 
Division 21 

Totals . 



2,528 
5,936 
3,116 
4,698 
5,570 
8,955 
3,603 
6,893 
49 
8,087 
3,778 
3,330 
3,786 
1,696 
1,839 
7,052 
2,388 
1,338 
691 
1,659 
8,510 
2,596 



490 
127 
311 
298 
284 
851 
250 
354 

387 
398 
205 
167 

59 
177 
292 
294 

86 

35 
111 

31 
287 



3,018 
6,063 
3,427 
4,996 
5,854 
9,806 
3,853 
7,247 
49 
8,474 
4,176 
3,535 
3,953 
1,755 
2,016 
7,344 
2,682 
1,424 
726 
1,770 
8,541 
2.883 



5,494 



93,592 



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Arson and other burnings 

Kire setting, with intent to defraud . 

I'ire, setting with intent to defraud, accessory to. 

Malicious mischief 

Wilful damage and trespass 


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Forgery and uttering 

Worthless check, passing 


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Amusement tickets, reselhng without a license, 

Attorney, practising as, unlawfully . 

Cigarette law, violation of 

Common victualler and innholder, assuming 

to be 

Dog law, violation of 

Electricity, installing without a license . 
Hospital, conducting without a license . 

Liquor, unlawful sale of 

Liquor, unlawful keeping and exposing for sale, 
Liquor, unlawful manufacture of . . . 
Liquor, unlawful transportation of . . . 
Lodging house law, violation of ... 
Merchandise, sale or storage of, in public place, 

Milk law, violation of 

Minor, employing, to peddle unlawfully . 

Peddling without a license 

Physician, practising unlawfully 
Pistol or revolver, carrying without license 
Public amusement, unlawfully maintaining . 
Soft drink law, violation of .... 
Used car dealers' license law, violation of 









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House, of ill-fame, assisting in . 

Idle and disorderly persons 

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Incest or attempted 

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Night walking 

Noisy and disorderly house, keeping 
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Open and gross lewdness .... 

Polygamy 

Premises, allowing to be used for immorul 

purposes 

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Public conveyance, disorderly conduct in, 
Public meetings, disturbing 
Religious worship, disturbing 
Removing flowers from grave . 
Sauntering and loitering .... 

School disturbing 

Sodomy and other unnatural practices 
Soliciting for a prostitute .... 
True name law, violation of . . . 

Vagabond 

Vagrants, tramps, etc. .... 


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Default warrant . 

Deserters from United StatesArmy and 

Election law, violation of ! ' * 
Electricity, unlawfully diverting ! 
Explosives, keeping or using unlawfully 
with ^^'""^ ^*'^^ """ tanipering 

Fish and game law," violktion of '. '. 
J^^oot travel, obstructing 
fugitive from justice . 
Gaming and being present at '. 
Oaming house, keeping . 

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Gas meter unlawfully tampering with, 

Harrison Act (Drug), violation . 

Health law, violation of 

Jones-Miller Narcotic Act, violation of. 

Labor law, violation of . 

Lotteries and prize enterprise ! '. 

Motion picture filnus, storing in dwell- 



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75 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



77 



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78 



POLICE CO:\niISSIONER. 

9 



[Jan, 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1930. 



Divisiojra. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


46 


20 




1 


67 


2 


7 




_ 




7 


3 


202 


69 


20 


1 


292 


4 


66 


32 


8 


- 


106 


5 


308 


94 


25 


1^ 


428 


6 


143 


42 


3 


1 


189 


7 


539 


148 


19 


1 


707 


9 


554 


114 


55 


1 


724 


10 


465 


100 


47 


1 


613 


11 


1,005 


140 


110 


1 


1,256 


12 


337 


67 


34 


— 


438 


13 


551 


117 


81 


1 


750 


14 


548 


100 


92 


3 


743 


15 


262 


68 


15 


1 


346 


16 


434 


113 


67 


1 


615 


17 


1,095 


171 


186 


2 


1,454 


18 


439 


76 


49 


- 


564 


19 


422 


66 


66 


- 


554 


Totals 


7,423 


1,537 


877 


16 


9,853 



Breeder's license at $50. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . . 671 


Division- 12 ... 38 


Division 2 . 






1,203 


Division 13 






70 


Division 3 . 






71 


Division 14 






57 


Division 4 . 






280 


Division 15 






66 


Division 5 . 






105 


Division 16 






107 


Division 6 . 






324 


Division 17 






39 


Division 7 . 






60 


Division 18 






43 


Division 9 . 






234 


Division 19 






45 


Division 10 
Division 11 






53 
66 








Total .... 3,5321 



Eighty-six canceled for nonpayment of license fee. 



1931.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 



79 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November SO, 1930. 





Expenditures. 


A. Personal Service: 




1. 


Permanent employees . 


$5,246,226 87 


2. 


Temporary employees . 


2,795 42 


3. 


Unassigned .... 


622 19 




— ■ — ■ — ■ — $0,^4:y,0'44 'lo 


B. Service Other Than Personal: 




1. 


Printing and binding . 


$952 55 


3. 


Advertising and posting 


749 05 


4. 


Transportation of persons . 


16,681 56 


5. 


Cartage and freight 


329 43 


8. 


Light, heat and power . 


27,879 53 


10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


7,507 52 


12. 


Bond and insurance pre- 






miums 


376 68 


13. 


Communication 


29,278 09 


14. 


Motor vehicle, repairs and 






care 


22,541 79 


15. 


Motorless vehicle repairs 


47 06 


16. 


Care of animals 


3,398 64 


18. 


Cleaning 


7,680 89 


19. 


Removal of ashes, dirt and 






garbage .... 


150 00 


22. 


Medical 


11,604 56 


28. 


Expert 


3,414 60 


35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


1,475 88 


37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 






ing 


4,235 29 


39. 


General plant .... 


39,183 60 


42. 


Music 


475 00 

177 061 7*^ 






C. Equipment: 




1. 


Apparatus, cable, wire, etc. . 


$1,046 14 


4. 


Motor vehicles 


34,405 30 


5. 


Motorless vehicles . 


24 08 


6. 


Stable 


918 02 


7. 


Furniture and fittings . 


6,588 33 


9. 


Office 


6,562 71 


12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory, 


137 73 


13. 


Tools and instruments . 


2,071 92 


14. 


Live stock .... 


350 00 


16. 


Wearing apparel . 


123,230 58 


17. 


General plant .... 


14,547 50 

— 189,882 31 



80 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVII.— Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November SO, 1930. 



D. Supplies: 
1. Office 



2. Food and ice . 

3. Fuel 

4. Forage and animal 

5. Medical, surgical, laboratory 
8. Laundry, cleaning, toilet 

11. Motor vehicle 

13. Chemicals and disinfectants, 

16. General plant . 

17. Electrical 



$24,662 62 

8,802 63 

34,892 19 

3,409 39 

211 88 

3,486 47 

21,819 00 

707 41 

8,817 72 

2,045 18 



F. Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities . . $262,301 77 

14. Listing 62,979 66 



$108,854 49 



325,281 43 



Total $6,051,624 43 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . $41,509 75 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) . 24,710 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,870 61 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposits, uniform cloth, use of police 

property, etc 2,639 19 

Refunds 7,183 66 

For damage to police property 2,121 75 

Refund credited to Police Charitable Fund ... 60 00 



Total $80,094 96 

Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1930. 

(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls $39,165 69 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies 12,366 92 

Prescribed underground work 1,281 61 

Rent and taxes on part of building 1,182 69 

Storage and repair of motor vehicles 897 44 

Car fares 550 80 

Printing and stationerv 91 00 

Fuel ...."....■..... 85 19 

Incidentals 14 18 

Total $55,635 42 



1.] 


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1931.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 85 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Accidents . . . 24, 25, 81, 82 

caused by automobile 25, 81, 82 

number of, reported 33 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 81, 82 

Ambulance service 39 

Arrests 9, 19, 28, 59-74 

age and sex of 74 

comparative statement of 75 

final disposition of 59-74 

for drunkenness 9,20,35,66 

foreigners 20, 60-74 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc 9, 20, 66, 72 

minors 20, 60-74 

nativity of 21 

nonresidents 20, 60-74 

number of, by divisions 59 

number of, punished by fine 21 

on warrants 20 

summoned by court 20 

total number of 20, 72, 75 

violation of city ordinances 20, 69 

without warrants 20 

Auctioneers 76 

Automobiles 22, 25, 37, 38, 40, 68, 81, 82 

accidents due to 81, 82 

deaths caused by 25 

police 38, 40 

public 41, 76 

sight-seeing 37, 76 

stolen 22, 23 

used . 22, 24, 76 

Benefits and pensions 46 

Buildings 33 

dangerous, reported 33 

found open and made secure 33 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 22 

Carriages, public 41, 76 

articles left in ; 41 

automobile 41 

number licensed 41, 76 

Cases investigated 24, 28, 33 

Children 22,33,34 

abandoned, cared for 33 

lost, restored 22, 34 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 20, 69 

Claims, inspector of 34 

Collective musicians 45, 76 

Commitments 21, 35 

Complaints 44, 57, 76 

against miscellaneous licenses 44, 76 

against poUce officers 57 

Courts 20, 21, 28, 34, 75 

fines imposed by 20, 75 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 21, 28, 34, 75 

number of persons summoned by 20 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 22 

automobile division 22 

criminal identification 27 

general 28 

homicide division 24 

identification division 25 

lost and stolen property division 28 

Criminal work 75 

comparative statement of 75 

Dangerous weapons 45 

Dead bodies 33, 37 

recovered 33, 37 

Deaths 19, 24, 51, 81, 82 

by accident, suicide, etc. 24, 81, 82 

of pohce officers 19, 51 

Department, police 18 

Distribution of force 19, 48 

Disturbances suppressed 34 



86 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Dogs 34, 76, 78, 80 

amount received for licenses for 76, 80 

damage done by 34 

number licensed • . 76, 78 

Drivers, hackney carriage 41, 76 

Drowning, persons rescued from 34, 37 

Drunkenness 9, 20, 35, 66 

arrests for, per day 20 

decrease in number of arrests for 20 

foreigners arrested for 20, 66 

nonresidents arrested for ■ 20, 66 

total number of arrests for 20, 66 

women committed for ^ ...... . 35 

Employees of the Department 18, 48, 52 

Events, special 29 

Expenditures 8, 47, 79 

Extra duties performed by officers 28, 34 

Financial 8, 44, 47, 79, 80 

expenditures 8, 46, 80 

pensions 46, 80 

receipts 8, 47, 76, 80 

miscellaneous license fees 44, 76, 80 

signal service 47, 80 

Fines 20,21,75 

amount of 20, 21, 75 

average amount of 20, 75 

number punished by . . 21 

Finger-print system , . . . 26, 27 

Fire alarms 33,34 

defective, reported 33 

number given 34 

Fires 34,36,37 

extinguished 34, 37 

on water front attended 36 

Foreigners, number arrested 20, 60-72 

Fugitives from justice 28 

Gaming, illegal 70 

Hackney carriage drivers 41, 76 

Hackney carriages 12, 41, 76 

Hand carts 76 

Harbor service 13, 36 

Homicide division 24 

Horses 38 

House of detention 35 

House of ill fame, keeping 35, 67 

Hydrants, defective, reported 33 

Identification division 25 

Imprisonment ■ 21, 28, 75 

persons sentenced to 21 

total years of 21, 28, 75 

Income , 47, 77, 80 

Inquests held 25 

Insane persons taken in charge 34 

Inspector of claims 34 

cases investigated 34 

Intoxicated persons assisted 34 

Itinerant musicians "... 44, 76 

Junk collectors 76 

Junk shop keepers .' 76 

Lamps, defective, reported 34 

Licenses, miscellaneous 44, 76, 80 

Listing, police 42, 80, 83, 84 

expenses of 42, 80 

number listed 42, 83, 84 

number of policemen employed in 43 

Lodgers at station houses 21 

Lodging houses, public ' . 45, 76 

applications for licenses 76 

authority to license 45 

location of 46 

number of persons lodged in 46 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 28, 32, 80 

Lost children restored 22, 34 

Medical examiners' assistants 24 

cases on which inquests were held 25 

causes of death 25 

Minors, number arrested 20, 59-74 

Miscellaneous business 33 

Miscellaneous licenses 44, 76, 80 

amount of fees collected for 44, 76, 80 

complaints investigated 44, 76 

number canceled and revoked 44, 76 

number issued . . . . 44, 76 

number transferred 44, 76 



1 



p. D. 49. 87 

... . PAGE 

Missing persons 33 

age and sex of [ [ 33 

number found .'.*.' 33 

number reported 33 

Musicians ! '. ! 44, 45, 76 

collective [ ' 45' 75 

itinerant . . . 44! 76 

Nativity of persons arrested .' ' '21 

Nonresident offenders 20 60-7'' 

Offences ■ ^ • . • • .. • 9. 10, 20.' 60-72 

against chastity, morality, etc 9, 20 66, 72 

against license laws 9,' 20,' 65,' 72 

against the person 9, 2o! 60! 72 

against property, malicious ' 20,' 63,' 72 

against property, with violence 9, 20, 63, 72 

against property, ■without violence 9, 20, 61,' 72 

forgery and against currency . '. . ' 2o! 64! 72 

miscellaneous ' 20' 68' 72 

recapitulation ! " ' ' 72 

Operators . . 37, 76 

Parade duty * 11 

Parks, public [ \ 81 82 

accidents reported in , [ 81! 82 

Pawnbrokers 7g 

Pensions and benefits , [ 15, 46 

estimates for pensions [ '45 

number of persons on rolls 46 

payments on account of 46, 80 

Personnel I5 

Photographs [ \ 26, 27 

Plant and equipment 12 

Police 43 

special 4 

Police charitable fund , [ 46 

Police department 18,19,29,31,38,48,50,56,57,59-74 

annual dress parade of 31 

authorized and actual strength of " 50 

distribution of 19, 48 

horses in use in '33 

how constituted Ig 

officers appointed I9 

absent sick ', 55 

arrests by 19, 59, 60-74 

complaints against 57 

date appointed 54 

detailed, special events 29 

died 19,51 

discharged I9 

injured I9 

nativity of 65 

promoted 19, 53 

resigned 19 

retired 19, 52 * 

vehicles in use in 40 

work of 19 

Police listing ! 42, 80, 83, 84 

Police signal service 18,35,47,49,80 

miscellaneous work 35 

payments on account of 47, 80 

property of 36 

signal boxes 35 

Prisoners, natiidty of . 21 

Property 21, 22, 28, 32, 75, 77, 80 

lost, abandoned and stolen 28, 32 

recovered 22, 75 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 32, 77, 80 

stolen 22, 75 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 21 

Prosecution for nuisances 10 

Public carriages 41, 76 

Public lodging houses 45, 76 

Railroad police 43 

Receipts 8, 77, 80 

Revolvers 45, 76 

licenses to carry 45, 76 

Salaries 48, 49 

Second-hand articles 76 

Sewers, defective, reported 34 

Sick and injured persons assisted 21, 34, 37 

Sickness, absence on account of 56 

Sight-seeing automobiles 37, 76 

Signal service, police 18, 35, 47, 49, 80 

Special events 29 

Special police 43 



88 P.D. 49. 

PAGE 

Station houses 21 

lodgers at 21 

witnesses detained at 21 

Stolen property ; . 28, 75 

recovered 28, 75 

value of 28, 75 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters 76 

Streets 34, 81, 82 

accidents reported in 81, 82 

defective, reported 34 

obstructions removed 34 

Teams 34 

stray, put up 34 

Traffic . . . . , 11 

Uniform crime record reporting 10 

Used cars 22, 23, 24, 76 

licensed dealers 22, 76 

sales reported 22, 24 

Vehicles 22, 37, 38, 40, 41, 76, 78 

ambulances 38 

automobiles 22, 38 

in use in police department 38, 40 

public carriages 41, 76 

wagons 37, 76, 78 

Vessels 36 

Wagons . . . 37, 76, 78 

number licensed by divisions 78 

total number licensed 37, 76 

Water pipes, defective, reported 34 

Water running to waste reported 34 

Weapons, dangerous 45 

Witnesses 20, 21, 34, 75 

fees earned by ofiScers as 20, 21, 75 

number of days' attendance at court by oflBcers as 20, 21, 75 

number of, detained at station houses 21, 34 

Women committed to House of Detention 35 



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