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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"






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BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 





(PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49] 

Cije Commontoealtf) of Jtlaggacfiuseltsi 



TWENTY- SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1931 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



%c<s^:T^ 






CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 5 

Introductory 5 

Expenditures 8 

Receipts 8 

Arrests 8 

Uniform crime record reporting . 10 

Bureau of criminal investigation U 

Traffic 11 

Hackney carriages and stands 13 

Bureau of records 15 

Prosecutions for nuisances 16 

Communications 18 

Plant and equipment 20 

Personnel 22 

Walter Scott medal for valor 23 

Department medal of honor 23 

Conclusions 24 

The Department 27 

Police Force 27 

Signal service 27 

Employees of the Department 27 

Recapitulation 27 

Distribution and changes 28 

Police officers injured while on duty 28 

Work of the Department 28 

Arrests 28 

Drunkenness 29 

Nativity of persons arrested 30 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 31 

Automobile division 31 

Homicide division 33 

Lost and stolen property division 34 

General 35 

Bureau of Records 35 

Identification division 35 

Criminal identification 37 

Lost, stolen or abandoned property (property clerk; .... 38 

Special events • 39 

Missing persons 42 

Miscellaneous business 42 

Inspector of claims 43 

House of detention 43 

Police Signal Service 44 

Signal boxes 44 

Miscellaneous work 44 

Harbor service 46 



4 CONTENTS. 

P.AGE 

Horses 46 

Vehicle service 46 

Automobiles 46 

Combination ambulances . 47 

List of vehicles used by the Department 48 

Hackney Carriages 49 

Special hackney stands .50 

Public hackney stands 50 

Private hackney stands 50 

Sight-seeing automobiles 51 

Wagon licenses 51 

Listing Work in Boston .52 

Listing expenses 53 

Number of policemen employed in listing 53 

Police work on jury lists 53 

Special police 53 

Railroad police 54 

Miscellaneous licenses 54 

Musicians' licenses 55 

Itinerant 55 

Collective 55 

Carrying dangerous weapons 56 

Public lodging houses 56 

Pensions and benefits 56 

Financial 57 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the Police Force, 

Signal service and employees 58 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 60 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 61 

List of officers retired 62 

Police officers and employees retired under Boston retirement 

system 63 

List of officers promoted 63 

Number of men in active service 65 

Men on Police Force and year born 66 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness . . 67 

Complaints against officers 68 

Number of arrests by police divisions 71 

Arrests, offences and final disposition of cases .... 72 

Dispositions of certain major prosecutions which were pending, 85 

Age and sex of persons arrested 86 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 87 

Licenses of all classes issued 88 

Dog licenses 90 

Wagon licenses 90 

Financial statement 91 

Payments on account of signal service 92 

Accidents 93 

Male and female residents listed 95 



Cfie Commonttiealtf) of ifttassatfjusetts. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters op the Police Departmext, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley- Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1931. 
To His Excellency Joseph B. Ely, Governor. 

Your Excellency. — In accordance with the provisions 
of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the 
honor to submit, as PoUce Commissioner for the City of Bos- 
ton, the following report for the year ending November 30^ 
1931. 

Introductory. 

Remodeling the police force to enable it to deal more effect- 
ively with present-day demands has been the principal work 
during the past year. Police work, particularly in a large 
metropoHtan center Uke Boston, has become a matter of 
scientific procedure, requiring men able to use the latest 
resources of modern science with trained intelligence instead 
of mere force that has heretofore been regarded as the chief 
reliance of policemen. 

During the last year a specially designed apparatus for 
the microscopic examination of bullets and other objects 
that may be used in a crime, was presented to the Depart- 
ment by a group of public-spirited men in appreciation of 
service that had been rendered them by the Department. 
It is a valuable addition to the photographic and identifica- 
tion equipment of the Division of Criminal Identification 
where service is now maintained during the entire twenty-four 
hours. 

UtiUty wagons equipped with gas bombs, riot guns, various 
tools required in emergency, as well as stretchers and blankets 
are gradually replacing the old patrol wagons. Increase in 
automobile patrols, continuous use of. motorcycles, with 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the addition of sidecars as a measure of safety, testify to the 
growing motorization of the Department. Last year 28 
new automobiles were added to the equipment, making a 
total of 106 automobiles and 82 motorcycles now in use. 

Adequate communication systems and equipment are 
essential in these days for the PoHce to meet the criminal 
on equal terms. The Signal Service of the Boston PoHce 
Department has invented and perfected the so-called ''flash- 
ing lights" signal system with a citizen's alarm on each 
box, and further study of the entire communication system, 
both wire and radio, is being made by the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. Lack of a modern communication 
system places the police at a serious disadvantage, and with 
the idea of changing this disadvantage to one of advantage 
as well as organizing the Department so that it may function 
as a single unit in the detection and apprehension of criminals, 
special attention has been given and will continue to 
be given to perfecting the communication system of the 
Department. 

Records in police work are indispensable. Properly kept 
police records quickly available frequently narrow the search 
for suspects and furnish valuable clues leading to the appre- 
hension of the guilty party. Fingerprinting and photograph- 
ing of individuals and classifications by crimes, histories 
of criminals showing former prosecutions and convictions 
and careful property identification, are some of the means 
employed by poHce to detect and apprehend criminals. A 
Bureau of Records has been established under a Deputy 
Superintendent to centralize all police records at Headquarters 
as well as to have uniform station house records. This Bureau 
will bring about closer unity in the Police Department and 
aid not only in the detection and apprehension of criminals 
but in the efficient administration of the Department, making 
it possible to prepare intelligent plans to deal with specific 
criminal conditions. 

For the purpose of promoting the efficiency of the De|>art- 
ment and its service to the public, a Police School was estab- 
lished on November 16. Instructors for the school are selected 
from the senior officers and practical subjects in everyday 
police work covered in a thorough manner. The duties of 
the police are so numerous and complex as to demand almost 



1932.1 PUBLIC DOCUAIRNT — No. 49. 7 

continuous study and instruction, in order that officers may 
be acquainted with court decisions, proper procedure, regula- 
tions and statutes that they are called on to enforce. While 
the school has not been in operation long enough to warrant 
any conclusive comments it promises to be of growing value 
to the Department. 

Many other changes designed to better the work of the 
Department have been made in the administration of its 
affairs during the year. Divisional lines of four divisions have 
been revised after careful study by the Board of Efficiency, 
consisting of three captains, with the idea of simplifying 
police service in those sections of the city. Revising the 
forms used and reports made by the Department has been 
continued whenever the stock of an existing form has been 
depleted, with the result that many reports have been greatly 
simplified, cards substituted for license books and some twelve 
obsolete record books so far, discontinued. In connection 
with the changes made in the dog license records alone, approxi- 
mately 2,500 more dogs were licensed in Boston last year than 
in the preceding year. 

A new loose-leaf Journal permitting the use of typewritten 
records has been substituted during the past year for the 
old Journal Book, made out in long hand. A copy of this 
typewritten Journal is sent to Headquarters each morning, 
thereby eliminating the former Morning Report or sum- 
mary of the Journal. This new system informs Headquarters 
of all events of importance that have taken place in the sta- 
tion house during the preceding twenty-four hours. It has 
not only relieved the work at the station but has also resulted 
in Headquarters receiving much more information than form- 
erly of happenings in the station houses. 

These various changes in records have been put into effect 
gradually during the year in order to give the Department an 
opportunity to assimilate and understand these new methods 
and improvements. 

The method for suppression and control of vice adopted last 
year by means of equity process has been pursued with vigor. 
The results from this method must be cumulative, and as show- 
ing its efficacy, the following is quoted from a report recently 
made to the Commissioner b^"" Superintendent of Police Michael 
H. Crowley, a policeman of some forty years' experience, in 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONEPv. [Jan. 

answer to a request for a report on the outstanding accom- 
plishments of this Department during the past year: 

Of all the outstanding accomplishments, it is my opinion that the new 
method of equity proceedings established by the Police Commissioner is 
the greatest achievement of all. From personal knowledge, I know of 
the vast amount of work and energy put into this method by the Police 
Commissioner and his Legal Advisor, and it is a pleasure to me to note 
the many good results accomplished in ridding certain stores and tene- 
ments of undesirable tenants operating speakeasies and other kinds of 
disorderly places by this process of holding the owner or mortgagee partly 
or directly responsible for the operation of these various violations of 
law committed upon the premises of said owners and mortgagees. 

Early in February the Corporation Counsel advised the 
Police Commissioner that the Law Department of the City 
of Boston, which up to that time had been acting as legal 
advisor for the Police Commissioner, could no longer act in 
that capacity; therefore, on February 14, 1931, Leo Schwartz, 
Esquire, formerly Assistant Corporation Counsel for the 
City of Boston, was appointed Legal Advisor by the Police 
Commissioner. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months period ending November 30, 1931, 
the total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted 
to $6,173,296.24. This included the pay of the poUce and 
employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing (the annual 
enrollment on April 1st of all persons 20 years of age or over). 
In the corresponding period for 1930, the expenditures totaled 
$6,051,624.43. The increase of $121,671.81 was .in a sub- 
stantial part due to the step-rate increase in salaries, pensions, 
annuities and the cost of police listing. In the latter part of 
this report the financial expenditures of the Department are 
shown in detail. 

Receipts. 

In the past pohce year ending November 30, 1931, receipts 
totaled $98,858.25 as compared to $80,094.96 in the previous 
year, and this increase in receipts is largely due to the fact 
that certain license fees which the Commissioner felt should 
be increased were raised during the past year. 

Arrests. 
For the twelve months ending November 30, 1931, us com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1930, a 



1932.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



brief comparison of the number of cases reported and arrests 
for major offences may be of interest and is submitted below : 





Year Ending Year Ending 

November 30, li November 30, 

1930. 1931. 




Cases 
Reported. 


.Arrests. 


Cases 
Reported. 


Arrests. 


Ofiences Against the Person. 
Murder 


19 
96 
81 
299 
148 

1,708 

5,336 
5,089 

4,556 
34,275 

591 
36 


18 
96 
76 
217 
137 

502 

306 
2,423 

4,021 
33,764 

570 
36 


10 
98 
62 
350 
124 

1,464 

5,402 
5,440 

3,739 
36,620 

614 

42 








Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 


68 

9g4 






Offences Against Phoperty 
CoMMiTTED With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (includ- 
ing attempts) 

Offences Against Property 
C0.MMITTED Without Violence. 

.\uto thefts (including attempts) 

Larceny (including attempts) 


536 

343 
■^ 767 


Offences .\gainst the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) 

Drunkenness 


2,899 
36.113 

608 


Offences not Included in the 
Foregoing. 

Auto, operating under the influence of 


Auto, operating under the influence of 
liquor (second offence) 


42 






Totals 


52,234 


42 166 .SS-Ofi."; 


43,891 











The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offences, such as traffic violations, violation of city 
ordinances, gaming, and miscellaneous offences. Total arrests 
(cases prosecuted) for the year amounted to 92,131 of which 
86,159 were males and 5,972 were females. This total compares 
to 93,592 for the preceding year. 

In connection with the arrests record it is exceedingly 
interesting to note that 25,708 persons or 27.90 per cent of the 
total arrests during the past year were of persons residing 
outside the city limits of Boston. This shows clearly the ex- 
tent to which Boston is called upon to perform police work 
for nonresidents. 



10 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The Police Commissioner has attempted to find out what 
liercentage of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, 
either of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 27.90 
per cent of the arrests in Boston is of nonresidents, whereas 
other cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests of 
nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
About a year ago, this Department started furnishing returns 
to the National Division of Identification and Information of 
the Department of Justice, Washington, D. C, of certain 
offences. The purpose of these returns was to ascertain the 
nature and volume of crime prevalence, its geographical 
location and the periodical fluctuations. While the figures are 
incomplete for many of the cities, and in fact some of the cities 
have apparently refused to cooperate with the Federal Author- 
ties in compiling this valuable crime record, a summary of the 
eleven months, period from December 1, 1930, to October 31, 
1931, of certain serious crimes reported in various large cities 
is tabulated herewith: 



ELEVEN MONTHS' PERIOD FROM DECEMBER 1. 1930, TO OCTOBER 31, 1931 





Felonious Homicide. 


Robbery, 


Burglary. 
(Breaking 

or 
Entering.) 




Place. 


Murder and 
Non-negligent 
Manslaughter. 


Manslaughter 

by 

Negligence. 


Auto 
Theft. 


Boston 

Baltimore 

* Chicago 

Cleveland 

Detroit 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 


10 
69 

287 
91 
94 

112 
90 


87 
103 
175 

21 

52 
368 

28 


329 

470 

11,846 

1,719 

1,395 

947 

1.495 


1,355 
2.279 
14,591 
3,417 
1.986 
3.024 
2,178 


4.165 
3.459 
24.526 
3.662 
5.566 
2,291 
4.121 



* No figures for May. 1931, on felonious homicide. 

These figures which the Federal authorities have been 
collecting for about a year, indicate that the prevalence of 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

serious crimes in Boston is less than in most of the other large 
cities of the country reporting to the Department of Justice. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
Every effort has been made to improve the detective branch 
of this Department. The equipment for crime detection, 
transportation and armament has been increased, and trans- 
portation has been provided for immediate dispatch of both 
men and apparatus to any part of the city at a moment's 
notice. The personnel of this Bureau has been enlarged, and 
young and promising officers from all over the city have been 
detailed for six-months' periods in order that the best available 
material in the Department may be chosen for the proper 
functioning of a high-grade detective service. That this 
method of building a proper detective force is justified has 
been shown by the successful solution of many intricate and 
difficult criminal cases during the last year. 

Traffic. 

Under the law the Traffic Rules are drawn up by the Boston 
Traffic Commission, and the poHce enforce them. In the past 
year the police have been obliged to exercise great patience, 
forbearance and tact in attempting to enforce the regulations, 
some of which have been held by the court to be improperly 
drawn. A situation has arisen which is far from satisfactory. 
The police are, however, responsible for the safety of the 
public using the highways; therefore, it is only reasonable that 
adequate authority should be given to the pofice to meet 
this responsibility. 

The Bureau of Traffic reports in the matter of enforcement 
during 1931, that some 89,291 tags were placed upon motor 
vehicles for violation of the traffic regulations. Of this number, 
17,646 were presented to the courts for prosecution. Motor 
vehicles numbering about 400 were tagged four times or more, 
and the owners reported to the Registrar of Motor Vehicles. 
Complete enforcement of parking regulations was made impos- 
sible by the fact that 2,723 owners or operators of motor vehicles 
refused to return tags placed upon their automobiles. The 
police could only report such cases to the Registrar of Motor 
Vehicles. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In November, the Superior Court made an adverse decision 
in regard to the method of prosecution of owners of automo- 
biles for faihire to turn in tags to the Bureau of Traffic which 
would be placed on their cars for parking overtime and other 
violations of the traffic regulations. This decision made it 
necessary for the Police Department to change its entire 
method of procedure. 

Cases against the owner, which resulted in the above deci- 
sion, were presented by the pohce to the Court upon the sug- 
gestion of several of the Justices of the lower courts. 

By direction of Chief Justice Wilfred Bolster of the Munic- 
ipal Court, in the future all apphcations for summonses for 
violations of the rules and regulations will be applied for by 
the officer having knowledge of the violation, who shall appear 
personally before the Justice sitting in the warrant session 
and make complaint, and he shall be held responsible for the 
proper presentation of the case and the appearance of all 
witnesses concerned. This makes the procedure necessary for 
the police nearly as laborious and exacting in order to secure 
a summons in each of its multitudinous traffic cases as it 
would be for a warrant in an important criminal case. 

In addition to directing and observing the movement of 
traffic and the enforcement of the regulations, the two Traffic 
Divisions have made prosecutions in many other cases of 
misdemeanors and felonies. Approximately 2,000 accident 
cases, 606 sick persons assisted, recovery of much valuable 
property, and nearly a thousand minor cases have been 
investigated by this branch of the service. 

During the autumn, the movement of -nearly a million per- 
sons to and from local football games was directed under 
the supervision of the Bureau of Traffic with no record of 
any personal injury or property damage. In addition, the 
usual heavy holiday traffic congestion was handled with a 
minimum amount of confusion and lack of accidents this 
year, which has resulted in many favorable comments from 
the merchants and the pubfic. 

Motor vehicle regulations should be made mainly to keep 
traffic mobile under all conditions, prevent tie-ups or jams, 
and allow business to be carried on in heavily congested sec- 
tions. Like every other law, the traffic laws must be reason- 
able and command the respect of the people whom they are 
to control, so that the voluntary observance of the regulations 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

will simplify the problem of enforcement. In view of the 
nature of traffic violations, a great deal of misunderstanding 
and some resentment seems to have arisen in the mind of 
the motor vehicle operator or owner who may be summoned 
to court on complaint for violation of the parking rules, because 
he is treated in the same manner as a criminal who commits 
a much more serious offence. In fact, many motorists seem 
to regard the parking regulations merely as a plan to divide 
the use of the public highways equitably for parking pur- 
poses, and if they use for business or other reasons part of the 
space longer than that alloted by the regulations, they believe 
that they should be allowed to pay for it, but they do not 
consider a parking violation as a criminal offence, as it is now 
under the law. The General Court might well consider the 
present complicated method of bringing parking offenders to 
justice, for the purpose of producing a speedier method of 
disposing of parking complaints without making the offender 
a criminal. 

Hackney Carriages and Stands. 
Under the provisions of chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
which became effective February 1, 1931, the Police Com- 
missioner w^as required to prepare new rules and regulations 
relative to hackney carriages and stands in the City of Boston 
substantially different from those formerly in force. In 
accordance with this law the Commissioner has prepared 
and established a new set of rules and regulations relative to 
hackney carriages, stands, and hackney carriage owners and 
drivers in the City of Boston. Some of the important features 
that are contained in these new rules are: — 

Photographs are required of every driver. 

All apphcants are fingerprinted by the Department. 

No advertising may be carried without permission. 

Maximum and minimum rates established and no flat 
rate allowed. 

Hackney stands plainly marked with standard markers. 

Driver's number on windshield plate as well as on his 
card. 

Display of rnedalUon specially affixed to machine on 
each taxicab indicating it is a licensed vehicle, and whether 
for use on special or public stands. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

No special stand license is granted until both the owner 
of property who applies for it as well as the taxicab owner 
file affidavits to the effect that no valuable consideration 
has been given or promised by either party. 

The new taxicab law brought about a reduction in the 
number of hcensed special stands from 1,740 in effect on 
January 31, 1931, to 588 on November 30, 1931. PubUc 
stands were increased during the same period of time from 
30 locations for 121 cabs to 299 locations for 745 cabs. There 
was also a reduction in the number of licensed hackney car- 
riages during the past year, due probably to economic condi- 
tions, the number of licensed cabs dropping from 2,890 at 
the first of the year to about 2,000 on November 30, 1931. 

Under the new taxicab law, special stands can only be 
granted upon the request of the owner, lessee or official repre- 
sentative of a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public 
or semi-public building, upon a designated portion of the 
public way abutting such buildings, and on no other portion 
of the pubhc way. In the matter of granting special stands 
at "semi-pubUc buildings" many questions have been raised 
by applicants as to what legally constitutes a semi-public 
building. On the other hand, in the matter of granting public 
stands, the law is mandatory upon the Police Commissioner 
to designate certain portions of the public way for public 
stands. This portion of the statute has been observed liber- 
ally, and additional public stands created, as will be noted 
from the fact that more than 600 additional public stands 
have been added to the list during the last ten months. 

Another feature in connection with the hackney carriage 
stands is the growing number of so-called private stands, 
that is, stands located on private property. During the past 
ten months 354 private hackney carriage stands have, been 
granted upon request of the owner, lessee or official represen- 
tative of the private property. This private stand takes 
taxicabs off the public streets and frequently enables taxicab 
operators to have telephone service on the private property 
which would otherwise not be available. There is no restric- 
tion as to the class of taxicab, that is, those holding licenses 
to occupy public or special stands, that may occupy private 
taxicab stands. 

In administering the hackney carriage rules and regula- 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

tions, a system of issuing tags to drivers for violations has 
worked very well during the past year. All police officers 
have taxicab tags for reporting any violation observed. The 
offender is obliged to report to the Bureau of Traffic before 
10 a. m. the following day for a hearing on the offence. In 
this way discipline is enforced by immediate reprimand, 
definite suspension, or revocation, stripping the driver of his 
credentials at the time. During the period February 1 to 
November 30, 1931, approximately 3,700 tags were issued to 
taxicab drivers for various violations, about 650 suspensions 
ranging from 1 day to a month, according to the offence, 
and 23 revocations were made, the balance being placed on 
file for future reference with a reprimand and warning to the 
driver. This system of discipline has not only resulted in 
relieving the courts of many minor cases which congest their 
dockets, but has simphfied the handling of the taxicab situa- 
tion at Headquarters. Any driver dissatisfied with the find- 
ings of the Bureau of Traffic may appeal immediately to the 
Commissioner, and during the past year appeal was taken in 
less than a half dozen cases. 

It is interesting to note that since the new regulations and 
methods of enforcement were put into effect, "taxicab 
holdups," which formerly were so frequent, seem to have 
disappeared. 

Bureau of Records. 

In police work it is necessary to preserve photographs, 
fingerprint impressions, laundry symbols, dental work, and 
many other exhibits, as well as the usual narrative presenta- 
tions. Many forms are required for routine reports but the 
alertness and observation of the officers at the scene of a crime 
or accident play no small part in accurately and concisely 
setting forth the facts in a case. For this reason the 
importance of proper reports cannot be over-emphasized. 
Police reports are of little value unless instantly available 
when their use is necessary. 

All important police work is a matter of record which should 
be preserved, yet little or no attempt had been made to classify^ 
collect and analyze the records of the Department. Generally 
stated, the records of this Department were highly decen- 
tralized and lacking in uniformity or system to a striking 
degree. Not only for the purpose of unifying the activities 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of the Department but to aid in its administrative control, a 
systematic compilation and segregation of police records are 
absolutely essential. On October 17, a Bureau of Records 
was established at Headquarters under the direction of a 
Deputy Superintendent having general supervision over all 
criminal police records. 

This new Bureau will be one of the most important factors 
in the organization of the Police Department as it will be of 
invaluable aid in narrowing the list of suspects and in appre- 
hending criminals, as well as creating a so-called personnel 
record of criminals and their crimes. There is being estab- 
lished in the Bureau of Records, a centralized information 
record of all warrants. The Bureau of Records will also carry 
on the activities of the Missing Persons Division, together 
with additional duties which will be assigned to it from time 
to time, with the view of promoting greater efficiency and 
skill in the operation of the Police Department. 

Prosecutions for Nuisances. 

Prosecutions for vice nuisances such as liquor, drugs, gaming, 
and prostitution have received careful attention. Special 
fonns for uniform reports have been prepared, location files 
established, and during the past year some one hundred and 
fifty cases have been brought in the Equity Court to enjoin 
and abate nuisances of various kinds. Equity proceedings 
may be regarded as a new weapon of the police as its powers 
had heretofore rarely been invoked. The system followed 
in Boston, however, has proved to be of great help in the 
campaign against vice conditions, particularly the more 
flagrant offenders. It has compelled ''notorious joints" that 
had defied numerous searches by the pohce and convictions 
in court to close their doors and vacate the premises. In 
some few cases keepers of vice resorts have removed to new 
places and it has been necessary to close the place to which 
they moved, but this attempt to move from place to place is 
far from satisfactory to the panders of vice. The publicity of 
court proceedings against landlords as well as occupants 
increases the difficulty of the vice operators in obtaining build- 
ings in which to continue their nefarious business. 

The purpose of bringing actions of this type was to clean 
up various public nuisances throughout the city, for example, 
buildings resorted to by habitual users of narcotic drugs, for 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

the purpose of using such drugs, or which were used for the 
illegal keeping or selling of such drugs; premises resorted to 
for illegal gaming, or which were used for the illegal keeping and 
selling of intoxicating liquor, and buildings used for prostitu- 
tion, assignation and lewdness, or in which acts of prostitution, 
assignation and lewdness occurred. 

The bills of complaint in all these cases were brought against 
the owners, mortgagees and occupants of the premises involved, 
and in practically every case either a temporary injunction 
restraining the further maintenance of the nuisance or stipu- 
lations were filed in which all parties involved agreed to refrain 
and desist from maintaining or permitting the nuisance alleged, 
under the penalty of being adjudged in contempt of court. 
In many cases the nuisance was immediately abated and the 
premises vacated, and cash bonds were filed in court for surety 
before the building could be again occupied. 

The owners and mortgagees of real estate in the city have 
cooperated with the police and in many cases, as soon as action 
was brought, ordered the premises vacated. The whole effect 
of this procedure is that now landlords realize that they have a 
serious duty towards the public to see that the property o^vned 
by them is used for decent and legitimate purposes; also, 
people loaning money on mortgages have had it brought home 
to them that they have a certain responsibihty in regard to the 
character of the business to be conducted on the premises 
on which they hold mortgages. The Supreme Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on January 13, 1931, 
handed down a decision in a case brought against the Police 
Commissioner by one James J. Harmon et al., defying the 
powers of the police in suppressing vice conditions. The 
plaintiffs in this case were the owners of a building that the 
police alleged was being used for improper purposes. The 
plaintiffs asked that the Police Commissioner, Superintendent 
of Police and the Captain of Division 4 be restrained from 
entering the plaintiffs' premises and from instituting groundless 
action against the plaintiffs, and that they be ordered to remove 
policemen from the premises and be restrained from having 
pohce officers in and about the premises. The Court, in its 
opinion, said, "It is a general rule expressed by the current of 
authority that equity will not interfere to prevent the enforce- 
ment of a criminal statute unless it appears that the statute is 
unconstitutional and interference by a court of equity is neces- 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

sary to protect property rights. Equity will not ordinarily 
interfere with the conduct of pohce officers in the performance 
of their pubUc duties. They are obhged to aid in the preven- 
tion of crime. In the performance of this duty a large dis- 
cretion belongs to the one who takes charge. A court of equity 
will not ordinarily interfere." A decree was entered dismissing 
the bill against the PoHce Commissioner and other officers of 
this Department. 

COXIMUXICATIONS. 

The importance of communications to the proper and 
efficient functioning of the police cannot be exaggerated. The 
signal devices of the police are one of the most important 
unifying elements of the entire organization. Except for the 
teletj-pe and the telephone, the signal ser^'ice of the Police 
Department was practically obsolete and of little help in 
enabling the Force to act quickly or in unison. Some changes 
and improvements of great value have already been made, 
but it is essential that the communication system of the Depart- 
ment be closely co-ordinated and modem in everj- respect. It 
is imperative that the police have speedy, sure and secret 
transmission of alarms and information, both from, the public 
to the police and from the police to its various arms. 

Upon taking over the office of Pohce Commissioner, it was 
evident that the signal system of the department was entirely 
inadequate to meet the demands for speedy, secret and sure 
communications, so essential to police work, particularly as 
applied to the men on the street. No method of immediate 
contact prevailed. The signal system was orginally devised to 
check up on the officers patrolling their "beats." It was 
necessary' to set switches on the signal desk and wait patiently 
for the officer to pull his duty call which would cause a bell to 
ring, and the officer would call in for orders. On closing the 
door of the signal box the officer was out of contact with the 
Station Headquarters for forty minutes. Duty calls should 
be only an incidental use of a signal system, which should 
primarily be the means of making the entire Department act 
as a unit in the prompt pursuit of a criminal by disseminating 
information of the crime, description of the criminal, and other 
intelligence. In addition, a well designed signal system should 
provide means bj- which the pubhc can obtain quick and 
rehable police assistance in case of emergency, therefore the 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

new system includes a citizen's alarm exposed to view so that 
any citizen may summon the police when necessan'. 

During 1931 the first installation was made in Division 14. 
the Brighton District. The new system provides a signal 
lantern about sLxteen feet high at each police signal box. This 
lantern flashes the box number when a citizen's alarm is pulled 
on all boxes on the circuit to which that box is attached. At 
the same time, the box number is flashed at the signal desk in 
the division station house so that two responses are made, one 
by the officers on routes obsei\'ing the fight flashuig the box 
number, re-enforced by automobile squads from the station 
house. AYhen the station house wants to communicate with 
officers on street duty, by thro\sing switches on the signal 
desk, lanterns on all of the signal boxes are flashed continuously 
until officers have reported in from the boxes nearest to them 
when lights are flashed. Station 13 (Jamaica Plain), Station 11 
(Dorchester), and Station 2 (do'^-n-town Boston) have also 
been equipped with the new "flashing fight" system, and work 
is proceeding as quickly as possible ysrith the instaUation of 
this system throughout the entire city. 

Both the ''flashing fight" signals to communicate with 
officers on duty on the streets, and the citizen's alarm, have 
demonstrated in many cases their practical usefulness. For 
example, the commanding officers of several of the stations 
where the lights have been instaUed have reported their abifity 
to transmit information to afi officers on the street within six 
minutes, and in many instances they have been able to handle 
complaints received at the station house quickh' bj' instructing 
officers on duty in the vicinity of the complainant to take care 
of the complauit. In the case of the citizen's alarm, many 
examples could be given where it has proven its practical value 
in facifitating and bettering the tj'pe of pofice ser^-ice rendered. 

Boston is the first city to inaugurate such a system of signal 
fights, which system was invented by members of the Signal 
Ser\'ice of the Department, and is being installed at com- 
paratively small expense. 

T\ing together the individual pofice officers scattered 
throughout the city so that an impenetrable cordon wiU be 
created around the city in the shortest possible time to prevent 
the escape of criminals, and action by the force as a unit, are 
absolutely essential from a police standpoint. It is necessary 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

that the responsible head be able to strike intelligently, quickly, 
and with force and unity. 

Plant and Equipment. 

While the title of Superintendent of Police Buildings was 
previously in existence this officer only had charge of two 
buildings. He now has charge of general repairs and needed 
alterations, including the cleaning of boilers and repair of 
heating system of all station houses and other buildings main- 
tained by the Department, including Headquarters. 

Certain remodehng of building interiors to meet future and 
present needs was done at the station houses of Division 2, 
City proper; 9, Dudley Street section of Roxbury; and 16, the 
Back Bay district. The basement of the station house of 
Division 19, Mattapan district, was remodeled for the use of 
the Department's automobile and motorcycle repair shop. A 
new garage has been under construction at Division 14, Brigh- 
ton district. At the station house of Division 18, Hyde Park 
section, the old recreation room in the rear basement is in 
process of remodeling to provide additional garage facilities. 

At Headquarters large heavy bronze doors which were im- 
practicable at the front entrance were removed and in their 
place were put doors of similar material but of lighter con- 
struction. In the main front corridor of Headquarters Build- 
ing has been placed a bronze honor-roll tablet on which are 
displayed the names of officers of this Department who met 
their death while in the performance of duty. This tablet 
was dedicated with appropriate exercises on the first Policemen's 
Memorial Sunday, June 7, 1931. 

Facilities and equipment, including ventilation and magna- 
vox, chairs and lighting, were installed for the new Police 
School, which has been in operation since November 16, 1931. 

The Mayor and City Council during the past year took 
action in regard to erecting, through the Superintendent of 
Public Buildings, a new station to accommodate the personnel 
and equipment of present Stations 4 and 5, which are obsolete 
and unfit for police quarters, and a new station for Division 1, 
which will be replaced on account of the construction of the 
new East Boston Vehicular Tunnel. Plans have already been 
prepared for these stations and it is expected that construction 
on the new station in the South End to replace Stations 4 and 5 
will commence shortly. 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

The ''flashing hghts" upon police signal boxes to call officers, 
both day and night, while on their "beats," to receive instruc- 
tions and information, were installed and put in commission in 
the following divisions on the dates stated : — 

Division. Date. 

14 March 26, 1931. 

13 June 15, 1931. 

11 August 28, 1931. 

2 November 6, 1931. 

In January of 1931 a new motor and pilot house were installed 
on the police launch, "E. U. Curtis." 

March 7, 1931, the police steamer "Stephen O'Meara," 
built by the George Lawley & Sons Corporation, was accepted 
by the Police Commissioner and put into commission. The 
effectiveness of the steamer was greatly increased by the in- 
stallation of a centrifugal fire pump with a capacity of 1,100 
gallons per minute, so that it could, in an emergency, be used 
as an auxiliary fire boat. 

On April 1, 1931, a new row boat, to replace an old one, was 
completed for the Department, accepted and put in use. 

On July 18, 1931, two new motor launch speedboats, one 
15 feet long and the other 20 feet long, were purchased for use 
in conjunction with the steamer "Stephen O'Meara." 

The work of the Property Clerk, who is also the purchasing 
agent, has increased, owing to additional detail caused by greater 
activity in the mechanical branches and the establishment of 
new systems and methods pertaining to the clerical work of 
the Department. 

The new plan of obtaining written proposals for the larger 
quantities of supplies and materials bought by the Depart- 
ment and for construction involving the furnishing of labor 
and materials was put into general operation during the past 
year. Competitive bidding has enabled the Department to 
save much money by purchasing good materials at the lowest 
prices. 

The new system of handling lost, stolen and abandoned 
property has assisted the Department in returning this year 
to rightful owners 479 articles, as compared with 165 similar 
articles in the pre\'ious year. 

Of the 214 automobiles which came into the possession of 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the police and were turned over to the Property Clerk, 155 
were delivered to persons and companies of rightful possession, 
and 59 were sold at public auction as lost, stolen or abandoned 
property. 

The motor rolling stock consists of 106 automobiles (an 
increase of 28 over last year) and in addition the Depart- 
ment possesses 82 motorcycles, 66 of which are equipped with 
side cars (an addition of 19 side cars during the past year). 

The Department repair shop at Station 19 has been very 
busy throughout the year. While this shop is inadequate 
both in regard to size and personnel to do all the repair work 
of the Department, it has been helpful in keeping the motor 
equipment in good shape by regular inspections and minor 
repairs. 

Changes which have been made in the sub-basement of 
the station house of Police Division 19 have given additional 
space which has been of material help in improving this repair 
service. 

Over 300 found or seized motor vehicles (not Department 
property) were towed from the streets by the Department's 
tow wagon during the year, for which no charge was made. 

All number one or best uniforms, including summer and 
winter, of each member of the Department were collected, 
cleansed and repaired during the year, placed in the Depart- 
ment's storage plant at the PoHce Building, 229 Milk street, 
and returned in time to be worn at the proper season. 

The uniforms of the Department are in good condition. 
Such articles that required replacement were discarded and 
new ones supplied. All fabrics are tested before acceptance. 
A new style summer uniform with puttees and Sam Browne 
belt was adopted for all members of the Department and fur- 
nished to those who needed them, as specified by the Inspector 
of Uniforms. 

Personnel. 

The members of the Police Force in the past year have 
conducted themselves on the whole with tact, alertness, abihty 
and courage. Not a single member on any occasion has hesi- 
tated to risk his life either in apprehending criminals or render- 
ing assistance to the sick and injured. During the year 
ending November 30, 1931, the strength of the uniform force 
showed a small decline numbering 2,380 officers at the end 
of the year as compared to 2,424 officers on December 1, 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

1930. Other employees remained practically unchanged. On 
November 30 of this year there was a total of 2,555 persons 
on the roll of the Police Department. 

During the last year a large number of complimentary 
letters have been received from persons in all walks of life 
commending officers for services rendered or for the manner 
in which they conducted themselves while on duty. Division 
Commanders have made a number of reports through the 
Superintendent recommending that certain officers of their 
respective divisions be commended in General Orders for 
meritorious work in the apprehension of law violators or for 
saving lives. The Commissioner, during the past year, com- 
mended in General Orders 11 sergeants and 112 patrolmen. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and 
the annual Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed last 
year. The Superintendent and Deputy Superintendents act- 
ing as a Board of Merit reviewed the meritorious and courageous 
acts performed by members of the Force in 1929 and recom- 
mended the following officers for special recognition due to 
acts performed during that year: 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor. — Patrolman James J . 
McGowan of Division 21. 

Department Medals of Honor. — Patrolman James J. 
McGowan of Division 21, Sergt. Frank E. Oilman now of 
Division 16, and Patrolman Archibald N. Rintoul of Division 21. 

The medals were presented at the annual ball of the Boston 
PoHce Relief Association held in January, 1931. On the 
evening of January 12, 1932, it is contemplated awarding 
the Medals for 1930 and 1931 at the annual ball of the Boston 
Police Relief Association, and the following officers have been 
selected for 1930 and 1931 to receive the Walter Scott Medals 
for Valor and the Department Medals of Honor: 

For 1930. 

The Waller Scott Medal for Valor and the Department Medal of 
Honor. 
Patrolman Owen F. Donovan, Division 2. 

The Department Medal of Honor. 
Sergeant John P. J. Maune. Division 1. 
Patrolman John J. Falvey, Division 10. 
Patrolman Lewis S. Morrissey, Division 10. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

For 1931. 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and the Department Medal of 
Honor. 
Patrolman Chester A. Guilford, Division 19. 

The Department Medal of Honor. 
Patrolman Edward W. Crickard, Division 2. 
Patrolman Daniel L. Donahue, Division 5. 
Patrolman Robert C. White, Division 8. 
Patrolman Edward F. Harrington, Division 13. 

In 1931, 3,164 days were lost by officers of the Department by 
reasons of injuries received while on duty, affecting 283 officers, 
of which about 38 per cent were on traffic duty at the time of 
receiving their injuries. 

During the year two sergeants and fifty-eight patrolmen 
have been punished for violation of Police Rules and Regula- 
tions by either suspension with loss of pay during term of 
suspension, extra duty, reprimands, or placing of complaints 
against them on file, and three officers after hearing have been 
dismissed from the service. 

Three officers: Patrolman Frederick W. Bartlett, Lieu- 
tenant-Inspector Joseph L. A. Cavagnaro and Patrolman 
William L. Abbott, died as a result of injuries sustained while 
in the performance of their duties. In all cases, automobile or 
motorc3'cle accidents, in which the negligence of others was a 
factor, caused these deaths. The families of these deceased 
officers were rendered all possible aid in presenting their cases 
to the iNIayor and City Council, wherein jurisdiction lies in the 
matter of providing allowances for the support of dependents 
of officers killed or dying from injuries received in the perform- 
ance of duty. 

Conclusions. 

Organized originally to suppress crime, protect life and 
propertj^ and to preserve good order, the police at the present 
time have a great many associated duties and activities to 
perform. In addition to the detection and apprehension of 
criminals, the police enforce various municipal ordinances, 
traffic regulations, adjust neighborhood troubles, investigate 
applications for Ucenses of various sorts, list the age and occu- 
pation of all residents and perform many other duties. 

Under our form of government the police, to be successful, 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 25 

must have the confidence of the pubUc. Not only must the 
members of the Department have confidence in themselves but 
by their actions they must earn the confidence of the public. 
The Commissioner has made special effort to create a feeling 
on the part of the public of security in person and property 
and confidence in their police force by improving the morale 
of the Department. The large number of commendatory 
letters which have been received from the public expressing 
appreciation of the service rendered by members of the Depart- 
ment show that the Department is gradually gaining the 
position in the public esteem which it ought to occupy. 

The Commissioner desires to call to your attention the 
many hours of overtime work which the pohce have put in 
cheerfully during the past year. It must be understood that 
police officers cannot work on the time-clock system ordinarily 
used in industry. There seems to be no practical way to pay 
police officers for working extra hours, except by giving them 
sufficient wages to compensate them for the work which they 
may be called on at any time to perform, and then to distribute 
the extra work fairly and equitably. The Police Department 
is called on at all times, and almost continuously, for most of 
its members to put in extra hours of duty. For example: 
During the recent dock strike that has just terminated in this 
city the officers of this Department put in 45,000 hours of 
extra work for which they received no additional compensation. 
Even under the trying conditions which always surround a 
labor dispute they conducted themselves with so much self- 
restraint and efficiency that they caused the Police Commis- 
sioner to receive many letters of commendation from both 
sides of this unfortunate dispute. 

At this time the Commissioner desires to recognize officially 
the progress made by members of the Department during the 
past year to improve their knowledge of police work, to render 
more efficient service, and to so conduct themselves as to merit 
in a growing degree the confidence of the public. 

The following suggestions are presented for your consid- 
eration: 

It would be very helpful to the police if they were 
empowered with the authority to arrest without a warrant 
drivers who operate motor vehicles while under the 
influence of intoxicating liquors. 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The Registrar of ^lotor Vehicles should be empowered 
with authority to revoke registrations and licenses of all 
persons convicted of felonies, and such licenses or regis- 
trations should not be reissued to them except on approval 
of the police. 

The police should have the authority to destroy all 
property seized without warrants where the owners are 
unknown if such property has been used for illegitimate 
purposes. 

The law in reference to lost or abandoned property' com- 
ing into the possession of the police should be amended 
by not requiring the poHce to sell the lost or abandoned 
property by auction in cases where the property is of 
nominal value. 

The acti\'ities of the Department are reported upon in greater 
detail in the following sections of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1932.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — Xo. 49. 



27 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner . 1 

Secretary. Legal Advisor. 2 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants . 
Lieutenant-Inspectors 



Sergeants 
Patrolmen 



Total 



186 
2,092 



2,.380 



Director 

Signalmen 

Operator and Repairman 

Linemen 



biGXAL ^ERVICE. 
1 ! Chauflfuer 



Painter 



Total 



17 



Property Clerk 

Clerks '. . 

Stenographers 

ChaulTeurs . 

Cleaners 

Elevator Operators 

Engineers on Pol 

Steamers . 
Firemen, Marine 
Firemen, Stationary- . 
Hostlers 
Janitors 
Laborer 



Employees of the Department. 

1 Matrons 



Mechanic 
Repairmen . 
Steamfitter . 
Superintendent 



of Build- 



Superintendent of Repair 

Shop 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators . 

Total .... 



loo 



R ecapittlatiox. 

Police Commissioner 1 

Secretary and LegaLAdvisor 2 

Pohce Force . .' 2,380 

Signal Service 17 

Emploj'ees 155 



Grand total 



2,555 



2S POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Distribution and Chan'ges. 
The distribution of the PoUce Force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 20 patrohnen were appointed (two reappointed 
from resignations"*; 3 patrohnen were discharged; 14 patrohnen 
resigned (7 while charges were pending); 19 patrolmen were 
promoted; 1 patrolman was appointed aide to Pohce Com- 
missioner; 4 captains. 2 Heutenant-inspectors, 4 sergeants and 
15 patrolmen were retired on pensions; 2 captains, 1 lieutenant, 
1 heutenant -inspector, 1 sergeant and IS patrolmen died; and 
the grade of chief inspector was abohshed. iSee Tables III, 
IV. V. 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1930. 



Number of Duties 
Number of Men x- „i„, „fri„<.;-.= ' Lost this Year 
xT.^ Tv-TT-^.n I°J"r«l i° Year "^'i^^L^^P^J,*^'' bv Men on Ac- 

HowlNjTKED. j-^^j^ Lost by such count of Injuries 

Nov. 30. 1931. -^^^°- Received Previous 

to Dec. 1. 1930. 



52S 220 

223 330 



In arresting prisoners . 


6S 


In pursuing criminals . 


13 


Bv cars and other 
Vehicles . 


108 


Bj- stopping runaways, 


1 


Various other causes . 


93 



.589 



824 



1,791 



737 



Totals ... 283 3,164 3,078 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a 

separate person, was 92,131 as against 93,592 the preceding 

year, being a decrease of 1,461. The percentage of decrease 

and increase was as follows: 



I 



Per Cent. 


Decrease 


7.11 


Increase 


6.77 


Increase 


13.91 


Increase 


23.28 


Increase 


70.13 


Decrease 


17.61 


Increase 


6.09 


Decrease 


7.35 



1932.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 



Offences against the person 

Offences against property committed with violence . 
Offences against property committed without violence, 
Malicious offences against property .... 
Forger}- and offences against the currency . 

Offences against the Ucense laws 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. 

Offences not included in the foregoing .... 

There were 14,943 persons arrested on warrants and 49,391 
without warrants; 27,797 persons were summoned by the court; 
64,947 persons were prosecuted; 26,252 were released b}' pro- 
bation officers or discharged at station houses, and 932 were 
delivered to outside authorities. The number of males ar- 
rested was 86,159; of females, 5,972; of foreigners, 21,194 or 
approximately 23 per cent; of minors, 10,102. Of the total 
number arrested 25,708, or 27.90 per cent, were nomesidents. 
(See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1927 to 1931, inclusive, was §421,905.87; in 
1931 it was 8324,752.10, or 897,153.77 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
55.593; in 1931 it was 53,213, or 2,380 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,776.94; 
in 1931 it was S17.761.05, or 82,984.11 more than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Druxkexxess. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 99. 
There were 2,349 more persons arrested than in 1930, an in- 
crease of 6.95 per cent; 19.14 per cent of the arrested persons 
were nonresidents and 31.16 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XL) 

The number of arrests for all offences for the year was 92.131, 
being a decrease of 1,461 over last year, and 340 less than 
the average for the past five years. There were 36,113 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 2,349 more than last year, 
and 766 less than the average for the past five years. Of 
the arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase 
of 6.65 per cent in males and an increase of 15.78 per cent 
in females from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER, 



[Jan. 



Of the total number of arrests for the year, 92,131, 512 
were for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one 
arrest in 179 was for such offence or .55 per cent. 

Fifty-nine and eighty-eight hundredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty 
and forty. (See Table XII.) 



Natia'ity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 








70,937 


Denmark 


49 


Ireland 






6,518 


Turkey .... 


50 


British Provinces 






3,225 


South America . 


29 


Italy . 






3,141 


Australia 


23 


Russia . 








2,746 


Holland . . . 


31 


Poland . 








972 


Belgium 


31 


Sweden . 








602 


Albania 


6 


China . 








356 


Switzerland . 


5 


England 








434 


Mexico .... 


2 


Scotland 








396 


Iceland .... 


11 


Greece . 








518 


Africa .... 


4 


Lithuania 








532 


East Indies . 


7 


Portugal 








249 


Hungary 


12 


Norway 








222 


Japan .... 


11 


Germany 








194 


Roumania 


11 


Finland 








113 


Wales .... 


2 


Syria 








166 


Asia .... 


1 


Armenia 








116 


Arabia .... 


2 


Austria . 








134 


PhiUppine Islands 


3 


Spain 








56 


Porto Rico 


5 


France . 








121 






West Indies 








88 


Total . . . 


92,131 



The number of persons punished by fines was 24,542 and 
the fines amounted to $324,752.10. (See Table XIII.) 

Eighty persons were committed to the State Prison, 2,554 
to the House of Correction, 39 to the Women's Prison, 192 
to the Reformatory Prison, 2,492 to other institutions and 1 
to the Bridgewater State Criminal Asylum. 

The total years of imprisonment were 5 life, 2,492 years 
9 months (491 sentences indefinite) ; the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 53,213, and the witness 
fees earned by them amounted to $17,761.05. 

The value of the property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $197,315.37. 

Ten witnesses were detained at station houses; 512 were 
accommodated \\ath lodgings, an increase of 204 from last year. 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

There was an increase of G.17 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 3.91 per 
cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in and out of the city 
for the five years from 1927 to 1931, inclusive, was $1,646,430.84; 
in 1931 it was $1,453,850.97, or $192,519.87 more than the 
average. The amount of property stolen in and out of the 
city, which was recovered by the Boston Police, was $2,117,- 
014.35, as against $2,683,603.22 last year, or $566,588.87 less. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

This Bureau, which is a central detective agency of the 
Department, is operated on a scale much larger than heretofore 
because of a considerable increase in the personnel and addi- 
tional equipment. It is now operating more efficiently. The 
Bureau is open during the twenty-four hours subject to call for 
police service at all times. 

The activities of this unit cover such a wide field that a 
statement of the work of some of its subdivisions may be of 
interest. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles reported 
stolen and is in daily communication with poHce departments 
all over the country. 

The automobile index contains records of 300,000 auto- 
mobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other 
places, cars reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners 
are wanted and cars whose operators are wanted for various 
offences. This index is constantly increasing. Many arrests 
are made by officers of the Department and the automobile 
division through information obtained from the index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

In addition to recovering many stolen automobiles, members 
of this division during the year have identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on police 
divisions, and have assisted in restoring these vehicles to the 
owners. 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as L^sed Car Dealers of the First, 
Second and Third Classes. 

During the year 228 apphcations for such Ucenses were 
received, 223 of which were granted (2 "without fee") and 
7 were rejected, 2 of which were later reconsidered and granted. 

Of the licenses granted 10 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 19 transferred to new locations. One appUca- 
tion for transfer to new location was rejected, one hcense was 
suspended indefinitely, and one license was suspended for two 
days. (See Table XIV.) 



Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1931. 



Month. 


stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1930. 










December 




534 


508 


17 


9 


1931 












Januaiy 




567 


548 


11 


8 


February 










362 


349 


10 


3 


March 










386 


365 


15 


6 


April . 










453 


426 


19 


8 


May . 










466 


447 


12 


7 


June . 










328 


302 ■ 


10 


16 


July . 










307 


282 


14 


11 


August 










357 


339 


10 


8 


September 








397 


369 


15 


-13 


October . 








538 


508 


10 


20 


November 








641 


620 


- 


21 


Totals 






5,336 


5,063 


143 


130 



1932.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November SO, 1931. 



Month. 


Hought bv 


Sold by 


Sold by 


Dealers. 


Dealers. 


Individuals. 


1930. 








December 


2,695 


2,092 


806 


I93I. 








January .... 


2,579 


2,089 


688 


February 








2,272 


1,881 


422 


March . 








3,179 


2,836 


960 


April . 








3,777 


4,110 


1,265 


May 








4,586 


3,875 


2,083 


June 








3,254 


3,875 


1,036 


July 








4,168 


3,259 


1,008 


August . 








2,998 


2,971 


793 


September 








2,855 


2,406 


831 


October . 








2,529 


2,348 


745 


November 








2,088 


1,946 


489 


Totals 








36,980 


33,688 


11,126 



Homicide Division. 

This division investigates all deaths by violence and pre- 
pares all cases for inquest. It examines and records all reports 
of accidents and cases of serious injur>^ Officers attached to 
this division, with police stenographers, are subject to call 
at any hour of the day or night. The homicide files contain 
complete reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, a record 
of all inquests and a record of all deaths and serious accidents 
\vhich are reported to the Police Department. 

(Jfficers of this division detailed to assist the medical 
examiners report having investigated 815 cases of death from 
the following causes: — 



Aljortion 






5 


Motorcycle . 


1 


.Alcoholism 






19 


Natural causes . 


378 


Asphyxiation 






11 


Poison .... 


28 


Burns 






8 


Railroad (steam) 


19 


Coasting 






2 


Stillborns 


11 


Drowning 






39 


Suffocation . 


4 


Elevators 






12 


Suicides . . 


62 


Falls . . 






52 


Homicides 


154 


Falling objects 






3 







Machinery . 






7 


Total 


815 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the total number, the following cases were prosecuted in 
the courts: — 



Automobiles 
Manslaughter 
Murder . 
Railroad (steam) 
Railroad (street) 



113 
12 
9 
2 
15 



Shot l>y officer resisting 

arrest .... 3 



Total 



154 



The following inquests were held during the year; 



Abortion 

Accidental shooting 

Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Automobiles . 

Burns 

Drowning 

Elevators 

Explosion 

Exposure 

Falls . . 

Falling objects 

Homicides 



1 
1 
5 
1 
111 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
9 
5 
12 



Machinery . 


4 


Poison .... 


2 


Railway (street) . 


17 


Railroad (steam) 


19 


Railroad truck 


1 


Sat on pen . 


1 


Shot by officer 


1 


Stick thrown 


1 


Suicides 


2 


Wrestling match . 


1 



Total 



205 



Members of this division visited the scene of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires, and other crimes and in 
many instances secured photographs of fingerprints of the 
persons who committed these crimes and in a number of cases 
took photographs of the scenes where crimes were committed. 

The figures and other data submitted as part of the report 
of the identification division show a decided increase in the 
volume of the work handled by this unit during the past year. 

Lost and Stolen Property Division. 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city are filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward Hsts of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

In addition, members of this bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this Bureau, which were 
investigated during the year, is 38,931. There are 51,740 
cases reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose, 
and reports made on these cases are filed away for future 
reference. Complaints are received from many sources, includ- 
ing cases referred to the Bureau by justices of courts and the 
district attorney, in addition to cases reported direct to the 
Police Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation is included in the statements of the general work of the 
Department, but as the duties of this Bureau are of a special 
character, the following statement may be of interest: — 

Number of persons arrested 3,001 

Fugitives from justice from other states arrested and de- 
livered to officers from those states .... 157 

Number of cases investigated 38,951 

Number of extra duties performed 9,731 

Number of cases of homicide, etc. 270 

Number of cases of abortion, etc. ...... 10 

Number of days spent in court by police officers . . 5,368 
Number of years of imprisonment, 181 j^ears, 3 months, 

1 life term and 40 indefinite terms. 
Amount of stolen property recovered $468,951 28 

Bureau of Records. 

The Bureau of Records was established by General Order 

number 313, as of October 17, 1931, when that part of the 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation known as the Criminal 

Identification Division was merged with the Bureau of Records. 

Identification Division. 
The efficiency of this division has been greatly increased 
through the installation of complete and thoroughly modern 
criminal identification equipment. The rectigraph, finger- 
print cameras, copying and enlarging cameras, view cameras 
and photo record machine now in use in the identification 
diN-ision make it possible to render a service which will compare 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

favorably with the service rendered by any other identification 
bureau in this country. The files in this office contain records 
of all arrests and assignments made at the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation, also records of all arrests throughout the Depart- 
ment where the offence is of sufficient seriousness to require 
fingerprints or photographs of the defendants. 

In the identification division records are kept of all persons 
committed to Massachusetts State Prison, including their 
fingerprints and photographs. Photographs and records of the 
inmates of the Massachusetts Reformatory, Women's Reforma- 
tory, and records of the inmates of the Suffolk County House 
of Correction are also filed in this Bureau. In addition to the 
foregoing, the files contain many thousands of photographs, 
fingerprints, correspondence, records, cUppings and histories of 
criminals arrested or wanted in various parts of the United 
States and foreign countries. There are now approximately 
365,000 persons recorded in the files of this Bureau. 

During the year 32,394 circulars containing photographs and 
fingerprints of persons wanted in this city for various crimes 
were drafted and mailed from this office to every city and town 
in the United States of 5,000 population or more, to state 
bureaus of identification, to all army and navy recruiting 
stations, United States Immigration and Customs Stations, 
and to a number of the larger cities in foreign countries. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police 
Department and photographs received from other sources are 
now filed in segregated cabinets. Pictures received from out- 
side departments are placed in the foreign segregated file and 
those taken by this Department are placed in the local segre- 
gated file. 

The photographs of the criminals are segregated into four 
distinct sections, namely, white, negro, yellow and gypsy. 
Each of these groups is subdivided according to the sex and 
they are all classified under the heading of the crimes in which 
they specialize. 

The identification division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to local and out of town officers in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated files to victims of 
robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and in many 
instances important identifications have been made. Valuable 
assistance has also been rendered to government officials. Post 



1932.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

Office Department, Treasury Department, Secret Service, 
Department of Justice, Prohibition Department and railroad 
and express companies. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the Ber- 
tillon system as a means of criminal identification. During the 
year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
through the fingerprint files in this division, for this and other 
Departments. Among the most important of these identifica- 
tions were those of several persons who were wanted for murder. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outHne of the more important accom- 
plishments of the Criminal Identification Bureau. The table 
refers only to the number of individuals who are photographed 
and fingerprinted, and not to the number of prints or copies 
prepared. 

Identifications of criminals arrested locally 1,161 

Identifications of criminals arrested elsewhere .... 809 

Scenes of crimes photographed 203 

Latent prints obtained and photographed 120 

Circulars sent out by Identification Bureau 32,394 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1930 125,361 

Made and filed during the year 2,414 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 3,338 

Number on file November 30, 1931 131,113 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1930 79,713 

Taken and filed during the year 2,710 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 3,296 

Number on file November 30, 1931 85,719 

Photographs sent to: 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of 

Justice 165 

State Bureau of Identification 2,230 

Other cities and states 1,397 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of 

Justice 2,197 

State Bureau of Identification 2,710 

Other cities and states 1,245 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Supplementary. 

Scenes of crimes visited 451 

Number of scenes photographed, large camera .... 83 

Number of exposures, large camera . . . . . . . 590 

Number of prints, large camera 990 

Number of enlargements: 

11 by 14 inches 150 

16 by 20 inches 12 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 332 

Prints made from same 1 ,200 

Number of rectigraph photographs 10,714 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 2,422 

Number of civilians' photographs 177 

Number of negatives of criminals 2,414 

Number of prints from same 16,784 

Number of fingerprint investigations (latent) ... 368 

Number of fingerprint investigations, positive 120 

Number of fingerprint photographs developed . . 1,404 



Fingerprints taken other than criminals: — 

(a) Police officers 2,422 

(b) Special police officers 1,103 

(c) Taxi drivers 4,100 

(d) Civilians 177 

Lost, Abaxdoxed or Stolen Property in Custody of 
Property Clerk. 

On December 1, 1930, there were 2,473 articles of lost, stolen 
or abandoned property in the custody of the Property Clerk, 
and during the year 1,635 were received; 740 articles were 
sold at pubhc auction and the proceeds, $1,080.98, were turned 
over to the Chief Clerk. 

Six hundred and thirty-two packages containing money 
amounting to $3,050.99 were turned over to the Chief Clerk; 
16 pieces containing perishable articles were destroyed as 
decayed or unfit for use; 732 worthless articles were destroyed 
or sold as junk, and the entire proceeds, $121.02, turned over 
to the Chief Clerk; 423 articles were returned to owners through 
efforts of the Property Clerk, and 56 articles were returned to 
owners in response to advertisements, leaving 1,509 on hand. 



1932.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 



Special Events. 

The following is a list of special events transpiring during the 
year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at each: — 

1930. Men. 

Dec. 8, Courthouse, anticipated demonstration by Communists, 24 

Dec. 9, Courthouse, anticipated demonstration by Communists, 24 

Dec. 13, Funeral of Patrolman Frederick W. Bartlett ... 100 

Dec. 23, Funeral of Patrolman Wilfred F. Boudreau ... 60 

Dec. 24, Christmas Eve, West End, traffic duty .... .30 

Dec. 24, Boston Common, Christmas Eve 15 

Dec. 24, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Midnight Mass ... 10 

Dec. 31, Boston Common, New Year's Eve 10 

Dec. 31, Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Midnight Mass ... 8 



1931. 

Jan. 6, Mechanics' Hall, Ball of Boston Police Relief .Association, 225 

.Jan. 12, Funeral of James M. Curley, Jr 215 

Jan. 19, City Hall, visit of unemployed 90 

Jan. 31, North End, funeral of Carmello Guiffre .... 83 
Feb. 2, Mechanics' Hall, Boston Firemen's ball .... 37 
Feb. 5, Funeral of Patrolman Walter P. Murphy .... 59 
Feb. 10, Boston Common and State House, Communists demon- 
stration 264 

Feb. 11, Funeral of Captain Samuel Dunlap 64 

Feb. 15, Funeral procession of Major General Clarence R. 

Edwards 549 

Feb. 16, Funeral of Lieutenant Allen V. Xixon .... 32 
Feb. 23, Funeral of Patrolman Joseph J. Cadigan .... 23 
Feb. 25, Boston Common, State House and City Hall, Com- 
munist demonstration 209 

Mar. 4, Boston Common, Communist Demonstration ... 61 

Mar. 17, Evacuation Day Parade 363 

Mar. 18, Funeral of Patrolman .\ndrew Brauer .... 23 

-Apr. 11, Cathedral Club road race 40 

.\pr. 11, City Point, dedication of Municipal Bath House . . 27 

-\pr. 14, Boston Common, exhibition by Police Riot Comjiany . 103 

Apr. 16, Funeral of Patrolman Bernard J. McXally ... 24 

-Vpr. 20, Marathon race 252 

-Apr. 20, Patriots' Daj' celebration 80 

Apr. 21. Funeral of Captain James J. Hoy 69 

Apr. 23, South Station, arrival of Prince and Princess Takamatsu 

of Japan 44 

Apr. 27, Funeral of Patrolman Vincent W. Blackl>urn ... 24 
Apr. 27, Xorth Station, departure of Prince and Princess Taka- 
matsu 30 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1931. Men. 

May 1, Boston Common, meeting of Communists . 361 

May 9, Funeral of Patrolman John J. Criffin 24 

May 23, Lawley's shipyard, launching of new police boat . 13 

May 24, Fenway Park, memorial service 35 

May 24, East Boston Airport, arrival of airplanes . . 117 

May 24, Boston Common, reception to aviators .... 49 

May 25, East Boston Airport, arrival of airplanes .... 115 

May 25, City Point, airplane maneuvers 197 

May 26, High School of Commerce, 25th anniversary celebration, 40 

May 30, City cemeteries 28 

May 30, Streets in vicinity of cemeteries, traffic duty . 120 

May 30, St. Joseph's Cemetery, Police Post memorial service . 129 

Maj' 30, Boston Common, dog show 32 

June 1, Parade of Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 360 

June 5, Parade of Boston School Cadets 374 

June 6, Dorchester Day, games and l)and concerts . 139 

June 7, Police Headquarters, dedication of memorial tablet . 145 
June 11, Back Bay station, return from Europe of Hon. James 

M. Curley 15 

June 16, Roxbury district, "Night Before" of Bunker Hill Day, 21 

June 16, Charlestown ," Night Before" of Bunker Hill Day . . 120 

June 17, Koxbury district, Bunker Hill Day 21 

June 17, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day, parade, fireworks and 

band concerts 382 

June 17, Erookline Country Club races 19 

June 20, Brookline Country Club races 15 

June 22, Boston Common, Review of 241st Coast Artillery Com- 
pany 31 

June 24, Boston Common, Review of First Corps Cadets . 26 

June 27, Parade, Dorchester Post American Legion . 104 

June 28, Franklin Field, \\'omen's Athletic Meet .... 29 

July 3, Columbus Park, bonfire 133 

July 3, Boston Common, rehearsal of Fourth of July pageant . 52 

July 4, Boston Common, Fourth of July, celebration . . 127 

July 4, Columbus Park, fireworks 102 

July 13, Funeral of Sergeant Henry J. Laskey .... 23 

July 13, Funeral of Patrolman William H. Leonard ... 23 

July 21, Reception to Post and Gatty, around the world flyers . 357 
July 24, Funeral of Patrolman Frederick C. Stewart . . - 23 

July 28, Roxbury Old Home Week, band concerts .... 46 

July 29, Roxbury Old Home Week, band concerts .... 44 

July 30, Braves Field, wrestling match 45 

July 30, Roxbury Old Home Week, l)and concerts .... 61 

July 31, Roxbury Old Home Week, band concerts .... 46 

Aug. 1, Funeral of Patrolman Harold F. Fitzsimmons ... 27 

Aug. 1, Boston Common, Communist meeting .... 87 

Aug. 1, Roxbury Old Home Week, band concerts and parade 107 

Aug. 8, Funeral of Patrolman Joseph J. McAllister ... 42 
Aug. 9, Boston Common, Army and Navy Legion of Honor 

exercises 42 



1932.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



41 



1931. 
Aug. 10, 

Aug. 25, 



to Boardman and Poland 



Aug. 


25, 


Aug. 


31, 


Sept. 


4, 


Sept. 


4, 


Sept. 


8, 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


19 


Sept. 


22 


Oct. 


1, 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


4, 


Oct. 


5, 


Oct. 


6, 


Oct. 


7^ 


Oct. 


0, 


Oct. 


10, 


Oct. 


12, 




Oct. 24, 
Oct. 31, 

Nov. 7, 

Nov. IL 
Nov. 14, 

Nov. 21, 
Nov. 21, 



Boston Common, Army and Navy Legion of Honor 

exercises 
Columl)us Park, reception 

flyers 

East Boston Airport, arrival of Boardman and 
Boston Common, Park Department circus 
Funeral of Rev. George J. Patterson . 
Funeral of Patrolman Walter E. McAuley 
Boston Common, meeting of Communists 
Franklin Park, golf tournament . 
Schoolboys' Stadium, women's 01ymi)ic trials 
Dedication of Mary E. Curley school 
Bulletin hoards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Boston Common, meeting of Communists 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series l^aseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Bulletin boards, world's series baseball game 
Annual dress parade and review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of 
rank, and patrolmen. The regiment was divided into 
three battalions of eight companies each, in command 
of a major, so designated. To each battalion was 
assigned a military band. The regiment included a 
sergeant and nineteen men mounted on department 
horses, a colonel commanding, with his adjutant and 
stafT officers from the respective police divisions and 
units in military company formation, shotgun com- 
panies, patrolmen with Thompson sub-machine guns 
and a motorcycle unit. 

The regiment was reviewed at a reviewing stand at 
City Hall by the Honorable James M. Curley, Mayor, 
where he was host to Lord Mayor George F. Titt of 
Manchester, England; at the State House by Adjutant- 
General John H. Agnew, representing His Excellency 
the Governor, and on the Boston Common by Adjutant- 
General John H. Agnew, Honorable James M. Curley, 
Mayor, Lord Mayor George F. Titt and the Police 
Commissioner, Honorable Eugene C. Hultman 
Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-Texas football game 
Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-Virginia football game . 
Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-Dartmouth football 

game 

Aimistice Day parade 

Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-Holy Cross football 

game 

Stadium and vicinity, Harvard-Yale football game . 
Funeral of Lieutenant-Inspector Jo.seph L. A. Cavagnaro, 



Men. 

109 

113 
25 
48 
36 
24 
26 
60 
27 
30 
22 
22 
20 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 



1,568 



114 
237 



119 
145 
97 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



I93I. Men. 

Nov. 26, Stadium and vicinity, Boston College-Holy Cross foot- 
ball game 80 

Nov. 28, Stadium and vicinity, Dartmouth-Stanford football 

game 97 

Missing Persons. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or run- 
away during the year: — 

Total number reported 1,101 

Total number found 1,009 



Total number still missing 

Age and Sex of Such Persons. 



92 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years. 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years. 


257 

226 
262 


77 

188 
91 


247 

210 

228 


73 

175 
76 


10 

16 
34 


4 

13 
15 


Totals 


745 


356 


685 


324 


60 


32 



Miscellaneous Business. 



Abandoned children cared for 

.\ccidents reported 

Buildings found open and made secure. . 

Cases investigated 

Dangerous buildings reported 

Dangerous chimne^-s reported 

Dead bodies recovered 

Defective cesspools reported 

Defective drains and vaults reported . . . 
Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 
Defective gas pipes reported 



1928-29. 


1929=30. 


4 


3. 


9,793 


10,099 


3,205 


3,489 


75,345 


98,049 


15 


14 


8 


7 


55 


224 


40 


20 


3 


- 


13 


10 


5 


14 



6 

10,515 

3,011 

83,440 

• 11 

294 
3 
3 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

Miscellaneous Business. — Concluded. 



43 



1928-29. 


1929-30. 


52 


62 


5,889 


5,897 


65 


82 


8,931 


9,770 


81 


65 


949 


701 


46,072 


35,862 


4,437 


3,984 


1,171 


1,113 


355 


354 


31 


22 


1,454 


1,789 


28 


26 


6,546 


6,701 


28 


21 


1,917 


1,842 


424 


495 


11 


14 



Defective hydrants reported 

Defective lamps reported 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective sidewalks and streets reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained 



27 

5,047 

170 

5,845 

138 

370 

37,276 

4,562 

1,058 

378 

70 

1,719 

19 

7,115 

21 

810 

458 

10 



Inspector of Claims. 
The officer detailed to assist in the adjustment of claims of 
the Department for damage to its property and to impart 
information from the police journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports service performed as follows: — 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

police journals in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 14,439 

Amount collected for damage to police property . -SI, 340 43 

Days in court 15 

House of Detention. 
The House of Detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset street. All the women arrested in the city 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston, Brighton and 
Roxbury Crossing districts are taken to the House of Detention 
in a van provided for the purpose. They are then held in 
charge of the matron until the next session of the court before 
which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment they 
are returned to the House of Detention and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 
During the year 2,333 were committed for the following: — 



Drunkenness 
Larceny .... 
Night walking 
Fornication 
Idle and disorderly 
Assault and battery 
Adultery 

Violation of liquor law- 
Keeping house of ill fame 
Various other causes 



Total 



1,186 

329 

61 

169 

135 

9 

41 

46 

21 

336 

2,333 



From municipal court 
From county jail . 



Grand total 



Recomviitments. 



146 
365 

2,844 



Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 

The total number of boxes in use is 551. Of these 411 
are connected with the underground system and 140 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year the employes of this service responded 
to 2,169 trouble calls; inspected 551 signal boxes; 18 signal 
desks, and 1,200 batteries. Repairs have been made on "231 
box movements; 116 registers; 130 polar bells; HI locks; 
84 time stamps; 8 garage motors; 6 garage registers; 60 
vibrator bells; 18 relays; 22 pole changers; 11 electric fans; 
and electric light work at various stations. There have been 
made 400 plungers; 150 box fittings; 250 line blocks; 250 
automatic hooks, and other general supervision and mainte- 
nance work has been engaged in. 



1932.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

One new signal box was added to Division 14; three new- 
boxes on Station 4, located on Boston Common; two new boxes 
on Division 13; three new boxes on Division 11; one new box 
on Division 10; five boxes were transferred from Division 17 to 
Division 13, one having been made a two-way box to serve 
both stations. Three boxes were disconnected on Division 6. 
Four of the new type signal desks were installed on Divisions 2, 
11, 13 and 14. Four remodelled signal registers were installed. 
Four complete police registers and citizen's call systems were 
installed on Divisions 2, 11, 13 and 14. Connected with the 
police signal boxes there are 72 signal and 72 telephone cir- 
cuits; 770,016 telephone messages and 3,961,079 ''on duty" 
calls were sent over these lines. 

The Signal Service Unit now supervises all telephone and 
teletype installations throughout the Department. This unit 
also supplied and supervised the new lighting system on the 
pohce boat "Watchman." 

Twelve hundred taxi cab signs were produced for the Bureau 
of Traffic of the Department. 

There are assigned to this unit, one White truck, 2j tons 
capacity; one utility truck, ^-ton capacity; one Ford coupe, 
business model; one four-door sedan, the Director's car; and 
one four-door Plymouth sedan. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 55,884 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 111,804 miles. There 
were 31,519 prisoners conveyed to the station houses, 3,978 runs 
were made to take injured or insane persons to station houses, 
hospitals or their homes and 243 runs were made to take lost 
children to station houses. There were 3,766 runs to fires and 
311 runs for Uquor seizures. 

The foUoAving list comprises the property in the Signal 
Serv^ice at the present time: — 



20 signal desks 
120 circuits 
551 signal boxes 
14 garage annunciators 
70 test boxes 
1,200 cells of battery 
691,543 feet of underground cable 
241,335 feet of overhead cable 
25,294 feet of duct 



67 manholes 
18 motor generator sets 
4 motor-driven flashers 

1 White truck 

2 Ford trucks 
1 Ford coupe 

1 Pl_vmouth sedan 
1 Chrysler sedan 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the poHce of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein were as follows: — 

Value of property recovered consisting of l:)oats, rigginos, float 

stages, etc $44,780 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 571 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 115 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger. 1 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargo in 

stream 4 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the water front 2.3 

Number of boats challenged 453 

Number of boats searched for contraband 437 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 3 

Number of cases investigated 213 

Number of dead bodies recovered 24 

Number rescued from drowning 3 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 2 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 77 

Numl)er of obstructions removed from the channel ... 88 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 1,384 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 

in harbor 138 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge 17 

Number of dead bodies cared for 4 

Number of hours grappling 83 1 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,297; 
5,911 of which were from domestic ports; 435 from the British 
Provinces in Canada and 951 from foreign ports. Of the latter 
919 were steamers, 28 were motor vessels and 4 schooners. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1930, there were 19 horses in 
the service. During the year one was delivered to the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals on 
account of age, 1 was humanely killed, and 3 were purchased. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses, attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 

Automobiles. 

There are 106 automobiles in the service at the present time: 

34 attached to Headquarters; 1 at the House of Detention. 

used as a woman's van and kept at Division 4; 14 in the city 



1982.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; 6 in the 
South Boston district attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 5 in the 
East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 9 in the Roxburj- 
district, attached to Di\'isions 9 and 10; 4 in the Dorchester 
district, attached to Division 11; 4 in the Jamaica Plain 
district, attached to Division 13; 5 in the Brighton district, 
attached to Division 14; 4 in the Charlestown district, attached 
to Division 15; 3 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, attached 
to Division 16; 3 in the West Roxbury district, attached to 
Division 17; 5 in the Hyde Park district, attached to Division 
18; 4 in the Mattapan district, attached to Division 19; 2 
assigned for use of the traffic divisions, and 3 unassigned. (See 
page 48.) 

Cost of Running A utomobiles. 

General repairs .$17,785 51 

Tire repairs and ))attery charging 842 70 

Storage and washing 6,401 23 

Gasolene 21,445 56 

Oil 3,079 13 

Prestone, i)olish, patches, plugs, etc 891 73 

License fees 151 00 

Total $50,596 86 

Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
and 19, and there are 2 unassigned. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: — 

City Hospital 2,545 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . 822 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) 153 

Calls where services were not required 99 

Psychopathic Hospital 70 

Carney Hospital 64 

Morgue 62 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 60 

Massachusetts General Hospital 52 

Home 48 

Forest Hills Hospital 30 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 19 

Faulkner Hospital 12 

Boston State Hospital 9 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Beth Israel Hospital 

Chelsea Xaval Hospital 

Children's Hospital 

Memorial Hospital 

Xew England Hospital 

Norwood Hospital (Norwood) 

Police station houses 

Deaconess Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Haynes Memorial Hospital 

New England Baptist Hospital 

Old Couples' Home 

Reynolds' Hospital (Quincy) 

Roxbury Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Total .... 



4,079 



List of Vehicles Used by the Department. 







S 


s 

3 


,. 






^ 






1 


1 
3 


111 


Tk 


i 


1 






Divisions. 




J2 

B 
< 
S 

< 


111 


ini 
< 


> 


1 


u 


1 


Headquarters 


1 


_ 


_ 


32 


1 


_ 


_ 


34 


Division 1 








— 


1 




2 


_ 


1 


1 


6 


Division 2 








- 


- 




2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Division .3 








- 


- 




1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Division 4 








- 


_ 




1 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Division 5 








- 


- 




2 


- 


5 


4 


12 


Division 6 








- 


- 




2 


- 


3 


3 


9 


Division 7 








1 


- 




3 


- 


5 


5 


15 


Division 9 








- 


- 




2 


- 


3 


• 1 


7 


Division 10 








1 


- 




4 


- 


2 


1 


9 


Division 11 








- 


- 




3 




4 


2 


10 


Division 12 








- 


- 




o 


- 


4 


4 


11 


Division 13 








1 


- 




3 


- 


7 


7 


18 


Division 14 








1 


- 




3 


- 


9 


8 


22 


Division 15. 








1 


_ 




2 


- 


5 


3 


12 


Division 16 








1 


- 




2 


- 


9 


3 


- 15 


Division 17 








- 


- 




2 


- 


9 


9 


21 


Division 18 








_ 


- 




4 


- 


3 


3 


11 


Division 19 








1 


- 




2 


- 


6 


6 


16 


Division 20 










_ 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 


5 


Division 21 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


2 


5 


Unassigned 








8 


1 


2 




1 


3 


2 


S 


Totals 








18 


76 


3 


82 


66 


254 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,461 * carriage licen.ses granted, 
being a decrease of 429, as compared with last year; 2,459 
motor carriages were licensed, being a decrease of 427 as com- 
jmred with last year. 

There have been 2 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 260 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the Bureau of Traffic; 38 of these were restored to the 
owners, and the balance placed in the custody of the Lost 
Property Bureau. 

Commencing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1931, appHcants for hackney carriage drivers' 
licenses were fingerprinted by the Department and their records, 
if any, searched for in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the appHcation to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : — 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received 2,46.3 

Number of carriages licensed 2,461 

Number of licenses transferred 26 

Number of licenses canceled .379 

Number of licenses suspended 2 

Number of applications for carriage licenses rejected ... 2 
Number of applications for carriage licenses reconsidered and 

granted 1 

Number of carriages inspected 2,981 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon .... 4,329 

Number of complaints against owners and drivers investigated . 1,536 

Number of days spent in court 30 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens 50 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 210 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected 87 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted . 14 

Drivers' licenses granted 4,242 

Drivers' licenses revoked 23 

Drivers' licenses suspended 21 

Drivers' licenses canceled 52 

Drivers stripped of credentials 719 

Number of replaced windshield plates and badges .... 66 

* .Seven granted "no fee." 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands, 
(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Sjyecial Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 
Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 
licensee or hcensees a designated portion of a pubhc way abut- 
ting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public or semi- 
pubhc building as a special hackney stand. 

Commencing as of February 1, 1931, 275 applications for 
such stands (with a total capacity of 791 hackney carriages) 
were received; 175 locations for 588 carriages were granted, 
and 100 locations for 203 carriages were rejected. 

Of these special hackney stand Hcenses, 11 locations (capacity 
22 carriages) were subsequently canceled or revoked, leaving 
161 locations (capacity 569 carriages) now in force. 

Public Hackney Sta7ids. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions, other than sidewalks, of pubhc ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 
owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney car- 
riages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

Commencing as of February 1, 1931, 1,277 applications for 
hackney carriage licenses for such public stands were re- 
ceived, 1,276 of which were granted and 1 rejected. 

Of these public stand licenses 1 was suspended. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon prop- 
erty) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

Commencing as of February 1, 1931, 29 applications (capacity 
360 carriages) for such private hackney stands were received, 
28 of which were granted (capacity 358 carriages) and 1 
(capacity 2 carriages), rejected. Of these private hackney 
stand licenses 1 (capacity 4 carriages) was subsequently can- 
celed, leaving 27 (capacity 354 carriages) now in force. 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Sight^Seeing Automobiles. 

By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing auto- 
mobile" was defined as follows: — 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile,' as used in this act, shall mean an 
automobile, as defined in section one of chapter ninety of the General 
Laws, used for the carrying for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing 
purposes in or from the city of Boston and in or on which automobile 
guide service by the driver or other person is offered or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire." 

A further important change in the licensing of the sight- 
seeing automobiles was occasioned by the provision in Chapter 
399 of the Acts of 1931, referred to, providing that before licens- 
ing such vehicles (which are not to be classified as "renewals" 
up to and including February 29, 1932) a certificate of "public 
convenience and necessity," requiring the operation of such 
vehicle, shall be obtained from the Department of Public 
Utilities. 

During the year ending November 30, 1931, there have 
been issued licenses for 55 sight-seeing automobiles and 33 
special stands for the same. 

Of this number there have been 2 applications for sight- 
seeing automobiles rejected, 1 license for sight-seeing auto- 
mobile canceled, and 1 license for special stand for sight-seeing 
automobile transferred. 

Sight-seeing automobile operators for the year commencing 
as of March 1, 1931, were fingerprinted, as in the case of 
hackney carriage drivers, and their records, if any, searched 
for in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
a part of and considered with the application to operate. 

There have been 60 operators' licenses granted and 1 appli- 
cation for operator's license rejected. 

Wagon Licenses. 
Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During the 
year 3,011 appUcations for such licenses were received; 3,009 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



of these were granted and 2 rejected. Of these hcenses 5 were 
subsequently canceled for nonpayment of license fee, 2 because 
they were surrendered, 2 were revoked and 15 transferred to 
new locations. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon hcenses 
were issued : — 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was ^'?iot at 
a designated stand in the highway." 

2, For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "for a designated wagon stand in 
the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 3,009 granted, 2,845 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 164 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 









Listing Work in Boston. 








Ye 


\R. 


Canvass. Year. Canvass. 


1903^ . 




181,045 


1917 .... 


221,207 


1904 










193,195 


1918 . 






224,012 


1905 










194,547 1919 . 






227,466 


1906 










195,446 


1920 . 






235,248 


1907 










195,900 


192V . 






, 480,783 


1908 










201,552 


1922 . - . 






480,106 


1909 










201,391 


1923 . 






477,547 


1910= 










203,603 


1924 . 






485,677 


1911 










206,825 1925 . 






489,478 


1912 










214,178 1926 . 






493,415 


1913 








215,388 1! 1927 . 






495,767 


1914 








219,364 


L928 . 






491,277 


1915 








220,883 


1929 . 






493,250 


1916' 








I 


1930 . 






502,101 






■ 1 

-: 


903 t 
910 1 


8t 


909, both incluf 
ng changed to A 


ive, listing was on Ma 
Lpril 1. 


• 1. 







1916 listing done by Board of .Assessors. 
1921 law changed to include women in listing. 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: — 

Male 241,813 

Female 259,173 

Total 500,986 

Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows : — 

Printing police list $39,812 00 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list 21,795 00 

Newspaper notices 692 85 

Circulars and pamphlets 365 80 

Stationery 321 84 

Interpreters 448 50 

Steel racks 60 00 

Telephone 10 77 

Total $63,506 76 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 1 1,302 

April 2 1,184 

April 3 1,097 

April 4 559 

April 6 81 

April 7 9 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The PoHce Department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1931 may be summarized as follows: — 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,828 

Physically incapacitated 140 

Convicted of crime 75 

Unfit for various reasons 518 

Apparently fit 10,457 

Total 13,018 

Special Police. 
Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of a department of the City of Boston, or on the apphcation 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be Hable for the 
official misconduct of the jjerson appointed. 

Applicants for appointment as special policemen for the 
year commencing as of April 1, 1931, were fingerprinted by 
the Department and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1931, there were 
1,159 special pofice officers appointed; 15 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause, 82 appointments were 
canceled and 3 appointments were revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as 
follows : — 

From United States Government 31 

From State Departments 2 

From City Departments 59 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 35 

From other corporations and associations 759 

From theaters and other places of amusement .... 224 

From private institutions 21 

From churches 27 

Total 1,159 

Railroad Police. 

There were 5 persons appointed railroad poHcemen during 
the year and 18 appointments canceled,' all of whom were 
employees of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 29,960. Of these 26,745 were granted, of which 
58 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 26,687. During 
the year 363 licenses were transferred, 690 canceled, 31 revoked 
and 215 appHcations were rejected. The officers investigated 
2,040 complaints arising under these licenses. The fees 
collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
§81,136.75. (See Tables XIV, XVII.) 



19.32. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



55 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 50 apphcations for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, 4 of which were disapproved 
and 4 Hcenses were subsequently canceled on account of non- 
payment of Hcense fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such insti-uments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 55 instruments were inspected with the 
following result : 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos 




17 


17 


Violins 












11 


11 


Hand organs 












8 


8 


Accordions . 














7 


7 


Bag-pipes . 














3 


3 


Banjos 














3 


3 


Guitars 














3 


3 


Flutes . 














2 


2 


Clarinet 














1 


1 


Totals . 














55 


55 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen 3'ears of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of apphcations made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon: 



YE.4R. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1927 


193 


192 


1 


1928 


223 


221 


2 


1929 


209 


207 


2 


1930 


212 


210 


2 


1931 


216 


216 


~ 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked : 



Year. 


.\l)plications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1927 .... 


3,052 


2,975 


77 


2 


1928 .... 


2,954 


2,904 


50 


1 


1929 .... 


3,025 


2,224 


70 


1 


1930 .... 


2,967 


2,902 


65 


5 


1931 .... 


3,097 


2,998' 


99 


2 



' 25 canceled for nonpayment. 

Public Lodging Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Pohce Commissioner under Chapter 121 of 
the General Laws (amended by Chapter 45 of the Acts of 
1927) and Sections 33 to 36, both inclusive, of Chapter 140 
of the General Laws, the location of each house and the num- 
ber of lodgers accommodated: 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis street . 
1202 Washington street 
1025 Washington street 
Total . 



37,560 
23,437 
13,903 
74,900 



Pensions and Benefits. 
On December 1, 1930, there were 285 pensioners on 
the roll. During the year 33 died, viz., 3 captains, 1 
lieutenant-inspector, 3 lieutenants, 25 patrolmen and 1 signal- 
man. Twenty-six were added, viz., 3 captains, 2 lieutenant - 
inspectors, 4 sergeants, 15 patrolmen, 1 signalman and 1 



1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

annuitant, the widow of Patrolman Frederick W. Bartlett, 
who died from injuries received in the performance of duty, 
leaving 278 on the roll at date, 248 pensioners and 30 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to S266,970.27 and it is estimated that $289,666.66 
will be required for pensions in 1932. This includes partial 
provision for 1 superintendent, 3 captains, 3 lieutenant-inspec- 
tors, 3 lieutenants, 9 sergeants and 27 patrolmen, all of whom 
are 65 years old or more and are entitled to be pensioned on 
account of age and term of service. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to S207,550. There are 56 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,338.50 during 
the past 3'ear. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age 
or more and the maintenance of the police signal service, 
were $6,173,296.24. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was $79,256.94. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the poUce have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, uniform cloth, 
etc., was $98,858.25. (See Table XIV.) 









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" " " 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 QO 


.,,.,,,, 


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1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' O 


1 1 1 1 O ■M — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 


''•''-' ' 'IS 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 III 


2 


1 ,,.,.,,, ^ 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 ' ' ' fe 


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1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 


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00 


1 1 1 1 1 C^ 1 1 « 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


''-=■'' -^ ''' ' ' '''15 


' ' ' ' ' ^' ' ' '^ ' ' '''12 


-H ''jo 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ' ' 1 1 2 


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-. , ,-.Dll-^ll-l 1 '''^ 


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-^11 — 11 1 '^'"'1^ 


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3.350 
1.000 to 1.600 
2,100 to 2.700 
1,700 to 2,000 

1.600 
1.600 to 1,800 

1,600 

2,000 to 2,300 

400 to 1,800 

2,000 

2,100 

1,900 
1,800 to 2,000 

2,100 

1,700 

3,000 

2,200 

2,000 

1,600 to 1,800 










Director signal scrviic 
Elevator operators . 
Engineers . 
Firemen 

Janitors 

l.nboror . 

Linemen . 

Matrons . 

Mechanic . 

Operator and repairnmn 

Painter 

Repairmen 

Signalmen . 

Steamfitter 

Superintendent of huilc 
ings 

Superintendent of repair 
shop 

Tailor . . . 

Telephone operators 






"t; c 



ii 






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nil 

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60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


.\ctual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1. 
1931. 


Nov. 30, 
1931. 


Jan. 1, 
1931. 


Nov. 30, 
1931. 


Net Gain 
or Loss, 
(Plus or 
Minus.) 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 




Legal Advisor 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Plus 1 


Superintendent 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendents 


2 


2 


2 


3 


Plus 1 


Chief Inspector 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Minus 1 


Captains .... 


29 


29 


29 


29 


- 


Lieutenants .... 


50 


50 


46 


51 


Plus 5 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


23 


23 


23 


18 


Minus 5 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


187 


186 


Minus 1 


Patrolmen .... 


2,149 


2,149 


2,123 


2,087 


Minus 36 


Patrolwomen 


8 


8 


5 


5 


- 


Totals .... 


2,452 


2,453 


2,419 


2,383 


Minus 36 



The last column (Net Gain or Loss) represents the difference between 
the actual strength on January 1 and on Novemloer 30. 



i 



1932.J 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 



61 



i 

v. 

1 
1 

1 


1 


Automobile accident. 

Myocarditis. 

Erysipelas. 

Hernia operation. 

Pneumonia. 

Pneumonia. 

Heart disease. 

Abscess. 

Pneumonia. 

Pneumonia. 

Suicide. 

Tuberculosis. 

Cerebral hemorrhage. 

Heart disease. 

Automobile accident. 

Drowning. 

Appendicitis operation. 

Heart disease. 

Cancer. 

Cerebral hemorrhage. 

Hodgkin's disease. 

Automobile accident. 

Motorcycle accident. 


i 

Q 
G 


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Frederick W. Bartlett 
Frank H. Shepherd . 
Wilfred F. Boudreau . 
Walter P. Murphy . 
Samuel Dunlap . 
Allen V. Nixon . 
Joseph J. Cadigan 
Andrew Brauer . 
Bernard J. McNally . 
James J. Hoy 
Vincent W. Blackburn 
John J. Griffin . 
William H. Leonard . 
Henry W. Laskey 
Frederick C. Stewart . 
Harold F. Fitzsimmons 
Joseph J. McAllister . 
Joseph P. Lobinsky . 
Norman F. Garland . 
Walter E. McAuley . 
Basil H. Leonard 
Joseph L. A. Cavagnaro 
William L. Abbott 














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62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 
List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1931, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the 
Number of Years' Service of each. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time 
)f Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



Augusta, Delbert R. 
Burns, Willie H. . 
Bussey, George W. 
Corey, Charles T. 
Desmond, John F. 
Doyon, Fred 
Duncan, Andrew W. 
Fenderson, George L. 
Goodwin, George W.* 
Hurley, Michael R. 
Kelley, Michael A. 
Kennedy, George D. 
Maguire, John J. . 
Mitchell, John F. 
Montgomery, Charles 
Mosher, Jeremiah N. 
Nye, Emerson H. 
O'Brien, Bartholomew 
O'Neill, Hugh . 
Ridlon, John S. . 
Rourke, Hugh A. 
Smith, James P. . 
Sonneman, Fred W. 
Spring, Francis 
Tighe, Charles M. 



Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 



70 


years 


65 


/l2 ■ " 


64 


/l2 " 


65 




62 


/l2 " 


36 


/l2 " 


60 




66 


/l2 '■ 


619 


/l2 " 


65 




65 




65 




64' 


/v: ■■ 


65 




66 6 


/.2 " 


61 


hi ■■ 


69 


/■■: '• 


70 




56 


/i; 


65 




65 




62' 


/i: 


59' 


/.2 " 


65 




60 = 


/. '• 



41 '/i2 years 

36 3/12 " 

35"' /i2 " 

37'/,. " 

36 3/12 " 

11 -/l2 " 

3010/12 " 

36 2 /u " 

42 2/12 " 

36«/i2 " 

38 '/i2 " 

30 '/i. " 
34 
39 

38 3/12 " 

351/12 " 

38 '/12 " 

38»/i2 " 
27 

3b8/i2 " 

36 •/i2 " 

36 5/,2 " 

34»/i2 " 

37-/12 " 

342/12 ■'• 



* Signalman, Signal Service. 



1932. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



Police Officers and Employees Retired during the Year under 
the Boston Retirement System., which went into effect Feb- 
ruary 1, 1923. 



Name. 


Position. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age 
at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Harriman, Capt. Joseph 
Oliver, Egbert X. . 

Pierce, Elizabeth V. . 


Chief Clerk 
Marine Fireman 

Telephone Operator 


Age 

Incapaci- 
tated 

Age 


70 years 

64V.2 " 
65«/i2 " 


44 9 /i2 years 

75/12 " 
25=/... " 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November SO, 1931. 



Rank -AND Name. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 



5 


1930 


5 


1930 


5 


1930 


24 


1930 


24 


1930 


24 


1930 


23 


1931 


23 


1931 


23 


1931 


20 


1931 


20 


1931 


8 


1931 


8 


1931 


8 


1931 


29 


1931 


29 


1931 


29 


1931 



Patrolman John J. Crimmins to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Donald B. Fitzpatrick to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Herbert E. Schultz to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John D. Holmes to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Warren H. Liese to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Francis I. Mullen to the rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant Harry T. Grace to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant James F. Blaney to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman George W. Gardner to the rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant James J. Hoy to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant Norman S. Ramsay to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Joseph P. Leahy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George F. Snell to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Tesorero to the rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant William Lewis to the rank of Captain. 
Sergeant James J. Hinchey to the rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Gustav F. Hollstein to the rank of Lieutenant. 



64 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Table V. — Concluded. 



[Jan. 



Raxk and Name. 



Sergeant Bernard J. Graham to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Leonard E. J. O'Connell to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Maurice F. Murphy to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Leonard T. Banks to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John Laidlaw, Jr., to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrohnan Francis H. McGeever to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 
Patrohnan Francis P. McGuire to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Eugene E. O'Meara to the rank of Serjeant. 

Patrolman Thomas J. Shaw to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant-Inspector James R. Clafiin to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant-Inspector Thomas F. Gleavy to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant Edward W. FaUon to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant Joseph A. Buccigross to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Thomas E. McMurray to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Cornelius Shea to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrohnan James V. Crowley to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrohnan Clarence E. Hyde to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John J. Walkins to the rank of Sergeant. 

Chief Inspector Ainsley C. Armstrong to tlie rank of 

Deputy Superintendent. 
Patrolman John F. Lyons designated as Aide to the 

Police Commissioner. 



Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7, 1931 


Oct. 


7. 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17. 1931 


Oct. 


17. 1931 


Oct. 


17. 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Oct. 


17, 1931 


Mar. 


6, 1931 



1932. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Datk 
Appointed. 


z 
1 


i 


1 


4 

5 
1 


il 


1 


1 


Totals. 


1886 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 








1 


1887 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1888 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


5 


7 


1889 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


9 


1890 


- 


- 


1 


2 




1 


1 


6 


1891 


- 


1 


- 


- 




1 


1 


4 


1892 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 




1 


1893 


- 


- 


3 


2 




2 


3 


11 


1894 


- 


- 


1 


- 




3 


_ 


4 


1895 


- 


2 


6 


4 




8 


20 


41 


1896 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 


4 


6 


1897 


- 


- 


- 


1 




1 


1 


4 


1898 


- 


- 


2 


2 




4 


8 


16 


1900 


- 


- 


6 


5 




11 


9 


32 


1901 


- 


- 


2 


2 




7 


3 


15 


1903 


- 


- 


3 


1 




11 


7 


23 


1904 


- 


- 


- 


6 




6 


5 


18 


1905 


- 


- 


1 


1 




4 


2 


9 


1906 


- 


- 


- 


1 




3 


1 


6 


1907 


- 


- 


1 


3 




5 


6 


16 


1908 


- 


- 


- 


3 




11 


3 


20 


1909 


- 


- 


- 


- 




3 


2 


6 


1910 


- 


- 


1 


2 




1 


2 


6 


1911 


- 


- 


- 


- 




2 


1 


4 


1912 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


3 


3 


10 


1913 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1914 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


- 




1 


1916 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


2 


4 


1917 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


1 


5 


1919 


- 


- 


1 


8 


- 


60 


539 


608 


1920 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


173 


187 


1921 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


13 


117 


130 


1922 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


73 


75 


1923 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


109 


111 


1924 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


79 


79 


1925 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


96 


96 


1926 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


317 


317 


1927 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


126 


126 


1928 


- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


92 


92 


1929 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


209 


209 


1930 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1931 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


Totals . 


1 


3 


29 


51 


18 


186 


2,092 


2,380 



66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1931, who were Born 
in the Year Indicated in the Table Below. 



Date of 
Birth. 


c 

1 

1 
1 


1 

c 
c 


i 

1 
6 


i 

c 


P 


i 

c 

i 


1 


Totals. 


1861 






1 










1 


1862 








_ 


- 




_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


1863 








_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


2 


6 


8 


1864 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


8 


11 


1865 








- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


12 


1866 








1 


- 


2 


3 


- 


2 


4 


12 


1867 








_ 


1 


4 


4 


1 


5 


9 


24 


1868 








_ 


- 


2 


- 


1 


8 


6 


17 


1869 








_ 


2 


3 


3 


_ 


4 


6 


18 


1870 








_ 




2 




1 


2 


3 


8 


1871 








- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


2 


6 


13 


1872 








_ 


- 


1 


3 


1 


5 


9 


19 


1873 








_ 


_ 


2 


3 


_ 


14 


2 


21 


1874 








_ 


_ 


2 


2 


3 


7 


4 


18 


1875 








_ 


- 


3 


2 




5 


- 


10 


1876 








_ 


- 


3 


2 


1 


3 


3 


12 


1877 








_ 


_ 




3 


1 


2 


7 


13 


1878 








- 


- 


- 


2 




5 


4 


11 


1879 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


4 


4 


10 


1880 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1 


5 


1881 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


4 


2 


10 


1882 








_ 


- 


1 


2 


2 


4 


- 


9 


1883 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


4 


1884 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


2 


7 


1885 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


17 


19 


1886 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


29 


32 


1887 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


^5 


47 


1888 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


52 


58 


1889 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


74 


79 


1890 








_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


65 


65 


1891 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


96 


100 


1892 








_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


9 


132 


142 


1893 








_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


15 


143 


159 


1894 








_ 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


13 


167 


181 


1895 








- 


- 


- 




- 


13 


166 


- 179 


1896 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


11 


188 


200 


1897 








_ 


- 


1 


1 


- 


13 


182 


197 


1898 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


160 


164 


1899 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


114 


114 


1900 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


149 


149 


1901 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


106 


106 


1902 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


49 


1903 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


44 


44 


1904 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


20 


20 


1905 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Tot 


als 






1 


3 


29 


51 


18 


186 


2,092 


2,380 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1931, is 
38.43 years. 



1932.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



67 



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68 



POLICE COISOIISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1932. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



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POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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-H M< — (M CO -H 



1932. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 



Table X. 

Number nf Arrests by Police Divisions diirimj the Year eliding 
November, 30, 1931. 



Totals 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 . 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
ision 6 . 
ision 7 
ision 8 
ision 9 . 
ision 10 
ision 11 
ision 12 
ision 13 . 
ision 14 
ision 15 
ision 16 . 
ision 17 . 



Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 



Division 18 
Division 19 
Division 20 
Division 21 
Totals 



2,387 
4,934 
5,787 
6,349 
8,290 
10,076 
4,176 
6,575 
26 
6,103 
4,522 
2,561 
3,334 
1,188 
2,282 
6,782 
3,844 
1,078 
723 
1,505 
2,237 
1,400 



613 

136 

409 

333 

488 

1,140 

247 

199 

1 

353 

313 

133 

124 

47 

189 

243 

489 

63 

37 

68 

206 

141 



3,000 
5,070 
6,196 
6,682 
8,778 
11,216 
4,423 
6,774 
27 
6,456 
4,835 
2,694 
3,458 
1,235 
2,471 
7,025 
4,333 
1,141 
760 
1,573 
2,443 
1.541 



86,159 



5,972 



92,131 



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Larceny of motorcycle 

I^eased property, concealing, conveying, selling, etc. 
Leased property, using to keep and convey liquor . 
Lost property, failing to report finding «' 
Mortgaged property, concealing, convevitiK, spiling, etc. 

Stolen gcjods, buying, receiving, etc 

Trespass 


3 

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a 

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Arson and other burnings 

Arson, attempt 

Gas meter, tampering with 

Gas pipes, moving unlawfully 

Malicious mischief 

Wilful damage and trespass 


1 





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Counterfeit money, passing, etc . 

Forgery and uttering 

Worthless check passing .... 


1 


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llllllllll-HlllllllltOllllllllt^ 


■paeeiuistp asBQ 


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to t^ 


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. 1 1 , , , , , , , 25| , - , . , 1 , , , , 1 , , , . 1 


•pgpuadsns 3inj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rsoo 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 o 


•juauiuoeud 
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' '— IS 


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J 


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■p3puadsns ijuatuag 


f ,2,-.,,-,.,,,,,^,|S 


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ajBjg aqj oj paoua^uag 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (N 


•pajnoaeojj sasBj 


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Alien firearm law, violation of ... . 
Amusement tickets, reselling without a licenpc 

Attorney, assuming to be 

Auctioneer law, violation of 

Cigarette law, violation of 

Dentistry, practising unlawfully .... 

Dog law, violation of 

Electrician, assuming to be 

Firearms and ammunition, selling to minor 
Firearms, selling without a license 

Liquor, unlawful sale of 

Liquor, unlawful keeping and exposing for sale . 
Liquor, unlawful manufacture of .... 
Liquor, unlawful transportation of 
Lodging house law, violation of .... 
Merchandise, sale and storage of in public place 

Milk law, violation of 

Peddling without a license 

Physician, practising unlawfullv .... 
Pistol or revolver, carrying without license . 
Poolroom, maintaining unlicensed 
Pooland billiardroom, unlawfully admitting minor to 
Publicamusement,unlawfullymaintaining . 
Second-hand articleslicense law, violation of 

Soft drink law, violation of 

Used automobiles, selling without license 
Wood alcohol, selling unlabeled .... 


1 






XI 





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-— l--^-'--!-" to- 


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IIIIIIIIIIIIMI- I* 


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1 1 1 1 <N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 II 


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^^^^^ , ,^^ ,^,g , , ^^ 


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1 1 1 i C|4 i !MtD 1 1 ■* 1 OS 1 — -*X 


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j 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 
( 


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1 -H 1 1 - i 1 „ 1 1 1 , ^, 1 1 ,1 


■p9pll9dsng 30U9JU3g 


1 '''''''"''"'-' ' '- 


•aag b o) paoua^uag 


, 1 1 ,5,... .10,0.1 to2 


■papuadsns 30U9fU3g 


-1 1 loj, ,0,, , ■ .||- ., 


•snot^n^ 
-peni jaqio o? paoriainag 


! CO 


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ajBjg aqj o) paouajuag 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 


■pajnoasojd saaBj 


O! t^ lO ■>«' t^ . 1^ t» 05 |iM<00-HCO to. 

2 2 " 2 "S5 




mox 


«— §-2gnp«2-- ^^ 


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l..,..,,,.«.^^,. .^ 


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to" 




i 

O 

« 


Abduction 

Abortion or attempt .... 
Abortion, accessory to ... . 
Abortion, conspiracy to commit 

Adultery 

Adultery, attempt to commit 

Animals, cruelty to 

Bastardy 

Conception, sale, etc., of article to prevent , 

Disorderly 

Disturbing the peace .... 

Drunkard, common 

Drunkenness .... 

Eavesdropping 

Enticing to unlawful intercourse . 
Female, annoying or accosting with 
oflfensive language .... 
Fornication 



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ll"l 1 1 1 1 1 |rt|-<| 


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■papuadsns fiutuuosijduij 




111 1 1 ir^-i , , 1-1 


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luaiuuosud 
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IIICOI ICOINI 1 1 1^1 


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.Advertisement, publishing false 
Aircraft law. violation of . . . 
.\utomobile, improperly equipped 
Automobile, operating under influence 

of liquor (Ist offence) 
Automobile, operating under influence 

of liquor (2d offence) 
Automobile, operating under influence 

of liquor (3d offence) 
Automobile, operating negligently, 

endangering public safety 
Automobile, operating after revocation 

or suspension of license . 
Automobile, operating after revocation 

or suspension of registration . 

on person 

.\utomobile, operating without regis- 
tration on person .... 

Automobile, operating so as to exceed 
speed limits 

Automobile, operating without license 
so to do . 

.\utomobile, failing to slow down at 
at intersecting way .... 



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Fire alarm, giving false or tampering 

with 

Fireworks law, violation of 

Fish and game law, violation of . 

Fugitive from justice .... 

Gaming and being present at . 

Gaming house, keeping 

Gaming implements, being present 

where found ..... 
Gaming on the Lord's Day and being 

present at 

Health law, violation of . . . 

Jewelry, peddling 

Justice, obstructing .... 
Labor law, violation of . . . 
Law of the road, violation of 
Lotteries and prize enterprises . 
Military law, violation of . . 

Mittimus 

Narcotic drug law, violation of . 
(officer, assuming to be 
Officer, refusing to assist . 
Officer, obstructing .... 
Oil, discharging, in harbor waters 
Parole, violation of conditions of 



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Police alarm, giving false 

Prisoner, escaped 

Prisoner, aiding to escape. . 

Prisoner, rescue or attempt to rescue, 

Prisoner, giving liquor to . 

Probation, violation of conditions of. 

Railroad law, violation of . 

Refusing to pay fare .... 

Regulations of Fire Commissioner, 
violation of 

Regulations of Park Commissioner, 
violation of 

Regulations of Police Commissioner, 
violation of 

Regulations of School Committee, 
violation of 

Regulations of Street Commissioner."* 
(traffic), violation of 

Runaways 

Safe keeping 

Securities sales act, violation of 

Sight^seeing automobile, using un- 
licensed 

Street car, operating negligently 

Street car, obstructing .... 

Street railway transfer, misuse of 

Sunday law, violation of . . . 

Suspicious persons .... 

United States Customs Law, violation 
of 

United States Drug Act (Harrison), 
violation of 

United States Flag Law, violation of . 

United States Immigration Law, 
violation of 

United States Prohibition Act, viola- 
tion of 

Weights and measures law, violation 

Winning more than 85 at one sitting 

(cards) 

Witness, material 









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1 

C 
V; 

2: 


No. 1 . Offences against the Per- 
son .... 

No. 2. (Jffencesagainst Property 
committed with vio- 
lence, .... 

No. 3 . Offences agai nst Property 
committed without 
violence 

No. 4. Maliciousoffencesagainst 
Property . 

No. 5. Forgery and offences 
against the Currency . 

No. 6. Offences against the Li- 
cense Laws . 

No. 7. (Jffences against Chas- 
tity, Morality, etc. . 

No. 8. Offences not included in 
the Foregoing 


1 



1932.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



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1932.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1931. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 . . . . . 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 


58 

7 
262 
67 
386 
184 
608 
1 
839 
649 

1,229 
473 
628 
775 
315 
491 

1,265 
537 
537 


21 
2 

81 

34 
111 

49 
139 

167 
153 
181 

78 
117 
125 

77 
133 
194 

79 

79 


2 

26 
4 

33 
6 

22 

67 
70 

154 
34 
96 

125 
23 
89 

234 
70 
83 


1 

21 

1 ^ 
1 

23 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


82 
9 
371 
105 
531 
240 
769 
1 

1,075 
873 

1,564 
585 
842 

1,026 
416 
714 

1,694 
686 
699 


Totals . 


9,311 


1,820 


1,138 


13 


12,282 



' One breeder's license at $50. 

- Breeder's license at $50. 

3 One breeder's license at $50. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 

Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . . 625 


Division 12 


37 


Division 2 . 






968 


Division 13 


72 


Division 3 . 






18 


Division 14 


53 


Division 4 . 






185 


Division 15 


63 


Division 5 . 






203 


Division 16 


. 76 


Division 6 . 






292 


Division 17 


45 


Division 7 . 






43 


Division 18 


50 


Division 9 . 






124 


Division 19 


44 


Division 10 
Division 11 






46 
65 










Total . 


3,009 » 



Five canceled for nonpayment of license fee. 



1932.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



Table XVII. 
Financial State mejit for the Year ending November 30, 1931. 





Expenditures 




A. Personal Service: 




1. 


Permanent employees . 


$5,263,158 57 


2. 


Temporary employees . 


4,415 40 


3. 


Unassigned .... 


553 72 




$o,^oo, iz< oy 


B. Service Other Than Personal: 




1. 


Printing and binding 


$1,264 30 


3. 


Advertising and posting 


7,440 45 


4. 


Transportation of persons . 


16,345 65 


5. 


Cartage and freight 


474 81 


8. 


Light, heat and power . 


32,884 01 


10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


7,287 88 


12. 


Bond and insurance pre- 






miums 


364 50 


13. 


Communication 


29,876 68 


14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and 






care 


27,503 45 


15. 


Motorless vehicle repairs 


64 34 


16. 


Care of animals 


3,763 60 


18. 


Cleaning 


5,570 50 


19. 


Removal of ashes, dirt and 






garbage .... 


150 00 


22. 


Medical 


8,482 17 


28. 


Expert 


1,713 19 


29. 


Stenographic, copying, in- 






dexing 


1,025 38 


35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


1,421 63 


37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 






ing 


61 57 


39. 


General plant .... 


53,136 95 


42. 


Music 


495 00 

1 Ci(\ onci f\a 




l:f:>,oZD UO 


C. Equipment: 




1. 


Apparatus, cable, wire, etc., 


$7,532 89 


4. 


Motor vehicles 


68,824 93 


5. 


Motorless vehicles . 


10 00 


6. 


Stable 


789 53 


7. 


Furniture and fittings . 


8,079 66 


9. 


Office 


11,127 73 


12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


263 80 


13. 


Tools and instruments . 


3,134 16 


14. 


Live stock .... 


1,050 00 


16. 


Wearing apparel 


110,874 85 


17. 


General plant .... 


31,866 70 
— 243.554 25 



92 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVII.— Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1931. 



D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office 


$40,641 90 




2. 


Food and ice . 


8,829 80 




3. 


Fuel 


35,287 48 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,694 96 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


313 78 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


3,507 79 




11. 


Motor vehicle 


25,416 42 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants. 


1,112 45 




16. 


General plant .... 


10,209 54 




17. 


Electrical .... 


2,797 09 


131,811 21 


F. 7. 


Pensions and annuities . 


$266,970 27 




14. 


Listing 


63,506 76 


330,477 03 








Total 




$6,173,296 24 




Receipts. 






For all licenses issued bv the Police Commissioner . 


S50,738 75 


For do^ 1 


icenses (credited to school department) 


30,398 00 


Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 


5,549 05 


For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 




phone, 


interest on deposits, uniform cloth, 


use of police 








2,784 63 
7,961 45 
1,408 87 


Refunds 


•^ 




For damage to police property 




Refund c 


-edited to Police Charitable Fund 
1 




17 50 


Tota 


$98,858 25 









Table XVIII. . 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1931. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls $39,794 22 

Signaling apparatus, repairs and supplies 33,816 70 

Prescribed underground work 175 25 

Rent and taxes on part of building 1,091 35 

Purchase of two sedans and one truck 2,517 83 

Storage and repair of motor vehicles 1,171 60 

Furniture and fittings 537 57 

Printing, blueprints, etc 126 85 

Incidentals 25 57 

Total $79,256 94 



1932.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



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1932.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 97 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Accidents 35, 42, 93, 94 

caused by automobile 35, 93, 94 

number of, reported 42 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 93, 94 

Ambulance service 47 

Arrests 8, 28, 35, 71, 72-87 

age and sex of 86 

comparative statement of 87 

final disposition of 72-85 

for drunkenness 9, 29, 44, 78 

foreigners 29, 72-84 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. 29, 78, 84 

minors 29, 72-84, 86 

nativity of 30 

nonresidents 29,72-84 

number of, by divisions 71 

number of, punished by fine 30 

on warrants 29 

summoned by court 29 

total number of 29, 84, 87 

violation of city ordinances 30,81 

without warrants 29 

Auctioneers 88 

Automobiles 9,21,31,34,36,46,80,93.94 

accidents due to 93, 94 

deaths caused by 34, 36 

operating under influence of liquor 9 

police 22, 45, 46 

pubhc 13, 49, 88 

sight-seeing 51,88 

stolen 9, 31, 32 

used 31, 33, 88 

Benefits and pensions 56 

Buildings 42 

dangerous, reported 42 

found open and made secure 42 

Bureau of Criminal Investigatirn 11,31 

Bureau of Records 6, 15, 35 

criminal identification 37 

identification division 35 

Carriages, public 13, 49, 88 

articles left in 49 

automobile 49 

number licensed 49,88 

Cases investigated 35, 38, 42 

Children 31, 42, 43 

abandoned, cared for 42 

lost, restored 31, 43 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 30, 81 

Claims, inspector of 43 

Collective musicians 55, 88 

Commitments 30, 44 

Communications 6, 18, 21 

Complaints 54, 68, 88 

against miscellaneous licenses 54, 88 

against police oflScers 68 

Courts 29, 30, 35, 43, 87 

fines imposed by ■. 29, 87 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 29, 30, 35 43, 87 

number of persons summoned by 29 

Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 31 

automobile division 31 

general 36 

homicide division 33 

lost and stolen property division 34 

Criminal work 87 

comparative statement of 87 

Dangerous weapons 56 

Dead bodies 42, 46 

recovered 42, 46 



p. D. 49. 



PAGE 

Deaths 28, 33, 61, 93. 94 

by accident, suicide, etc. 33, 93, 94 

of police officers 28, 61 

Department, police 27 

Distribution of force 28, 58 

Disturbances suppressed 43 

Division lines changed 7 

Dogs 7, 88, 90, 92 

amount received for licenses for 88, 92 

number licensed 88, 90 

Drivers, hackney carriage 49, 90 

Drowning, persons rescued from 43, 46 

Drunkenness 9, 29, 44, 78 

arrests for, per day 29 

increase in number of arrests for 29 

foreigners arrested for 29, 78 

nonresidents arrested for 29, 78 

total number of arrests for 29, 78 

women committed for 44 

Employees of the Department 27, 58, 63 

Events, special 39 

Expenditures 8, 57, 91 

Extra duties performed by officers ■ 38, 43 

Financial 8,57,91 

expenditures 8, 57, 92 

pensions 56, 92 

receipts 8, 57, 88, 92 

miscellaneous license fees 54, 88, 92 

signal service 57, 92 

Fines 29, 30, 87 

amount of 29, 30, 87 

average amount of 29, 87 

number punished by 30 

Finger-print system 37 

Fire alarms 42, 43 

defective, reported 42 

number given 43 

Fires 43, 46 

extinguished 43 

on water front attended 46 

Foreigners, number arrested 29, 72-84 

Fugitives from justice 38 

Gaming, illegal 82 

Hackney carriage drivers 49, 88 

Hacknev carriages 13, 49, 88 

Hand carts 88 

Harbor service 21, 46 

steamer "Stephen O'Meara" accepted 21 

Homicide division 33 

Horses 46 

House of detention 43 

House of ill fame, keeping 43, 79 

Hydrants, defective, reported 43 

Identification division ................ 35 

Imprisonment 30, 38, 87 

persons sentenced to • . . . 30 

total years of 30, 38, 87 

Income '. 8, 57, 88, 92 

Inquests held 34 

Insane persons taken in charge 43 

Inspector of claims 43 

Intoxicated persons assisted 43 

Itinerant musicians 55, 88 

Junk collectors 88 

Junk shop keepers . . .............. 88 

Jury lists, police work on ." . 53 

Lamps, defective, reported 43 

Legal advisor appointed 8 

Licenses, miscellaneous 54, 88, 92 

Listing, police 52, 92, 95, 96 

expenses of 53, 92 

number listed 52, 95, 96 

number of policemen employed in 53 

Lodgers at station houses 30 

Lodging houses, public 56, 88 

applications for licenses 88 

authority to license 56 

location of 56 

number of persons lodged in 56 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 34, 38, 92 

Lost children 31, 43 

Medals 23 

Walter Scott 23 

Department 23 



p. D. 49. 99 

PAGE 

Medical examiners' asaistaiits 35 

cases on which inquests were held . . . 36 

causes of death 35 

Minors, number arrested 29,72-84,86 

Miscellaneous business '42 

Miscellaneous licenses ! ! . ! 54, 88, 92 

amount of fees collected for 54^ 88, 92 

complaints investigated ' 54] gg 

number canceled and revoked 54] 88 

number issued 54, 88 

number transferred 54, 88 

Missing persons 42 

age and sex of 42 

number found 42 

number reported 42 

Musicians 55, 88 

coUective 55, 88 

itinerant 55, 88 

Nativity of persons arrested 30 

Nonresident offenders 10, 29, 72-84 

OfTences 9, 29, 72-85 

against chastity, morality, etc 9,29,78,84 

against license laws 29, 77, 84 

against liquor law 9 

against the person [ ' 9, 29, 72, 84, 85 

against property, malicious 29, 75, 84 

against property, with violence 9, 29, 73, 84, 85 

against property, without violence 9, 29, 74, 84, 85 

forgery and against currency 29, 76, 84 

miscellaneous ' 9, 29, 80, 84 

recapitulation 84 

Operators 51, 88 

Parks, public 93, 94 

accidents reported in 93^ 94 

Pawnbrokers 88 

Pensions and benefits . . . 56, 92 

estimates for pensions 57 

number of persons on rolls . . . 57 

payments on account of 57, 92 

Personnel 22, 58 

Photographs 13, 15, 35 

Plant and equipment 20 

Police 54 

special 54 

Police charitable fund 57 

Police department 24, 27, 28, 41, 46, 59, 63,' 66, 67, 68, 72-84, 87 

annual dress parade of 41 

authorized and actual strength of 60 

distribution of 28, 58 

horses in use in 46 

how constituted . . . 27 

oflBcers appointed 28 

absent sick . 67 

arrests by 28, 59, 71, 72-84, 87 

complaints against ~ 24,68 

date appointed 65 

detailed, special events 39 

died 24, 28. 61 

discharged 24, 28, 68 

injured 24, 28 

nativity of 66 

promoted 24, 63 

resigned 28 

retired 28, 62, 63 

school established 6 

vehicles in use in ' 48 

work of 28 

Police listing 52, 92, 95, 96 

Police signal service 6,18,21,27,44,57,92 

"Flashing lights" 6,18,21 

miscellaneous work 44 

payments on account of 57, 92 

property of 45 

signal boxes 44 

Prisoners, nativity of 30 

Property 30, 31, 34, 35, 37, 87, 89, 92 

lost, abandoned and stolen 34, 38 

recovered 35, 87 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 35, 89, 92 

stolen 31, 87 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 30 

Prosecution for nuisances 16 

Public carriages 13, 49, 88 

Public lodging houses 56, 88 



100 p. D. 49 

PAGE 

Railroad police 54 

Receipts 8, 57, 92 

Revolvers 56, 88 

licenses to carry 56, 88 

Salaries 58 

School, police 6 

Second-hand articles 88 

Sewers, defective, reported 43 

Sick and injured persons assisted 31, 43, 46 

Sickness, absence on account of 67 

Sight-seeing automobiles 51, 88 

Signal service, police 6, 18, 21, 27, 44, 57, 92 

Special events 39 

Special police 53 

Station houses 30 

lodgers at 30 

witnesses detained at .............. . 30 

Stolen property 38, 87 

recovered 38, 87 

value of 38, 87 

Street railways, conductors, niotormen and starters 88 

Streets 43, 93, 94 

accidents reported in 93, 94 

defective, reported 43 

obstructions removed 43 

Teams 43 

stray, put up 43 

Traffic 11 

Uniform crime record reporting 10 

Used cars 31,32,33 

licensed dealers 31, 32 

sales reported 31, 33 

Vehicles 13, 46, 48, 49, 88 

ambulances 47 

automobiles 46 

in use in police department 46, 48 

public carriages 13, 49, 88 

wagons 51, 88, 90 

Vessels 46 

Wagons 51, 88, 90 

number licensed by divisions 90 

total number licensed 52, 88 

Water pipes, defective, reported 43 

Water running to waste reported 43 

Weapons, dangerous 56 

Witnesses 29, 30, 43. 87 

fees earned by officers as 29, 30, 87 

number of days'attendance at court by officers a.s . . 29, 30, 87 

number of, detained at station houses 30, 43 

Women committed to House of Detention 44 



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