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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"




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BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
UBl^RY 





I 



I 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO 49.] 

Cfje Commonttiealtl) of iMasigacjjus^etts; 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Police Commissioner 



CITY OF BOSTON 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1932 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



I 



/5^ 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 5 

Introductory 5 

Public Welfare investigation 6 

Communication system 25 

Bureau of records 27 

Criminal identification 32 

Police school 36 

Prosecution for nuisances 37 

Traffic 37 

Hackney carriages and stands 39 

Plant and equipment 39 

Personnel 41 

Expenditures 43 

Receipts 43 

Arrests 44 

Uniform crime record reporting 45 

Conclusions 45 

The Department 47 

Police Force 47 

Signal service 47 

Employees of the Department 47 

Recapitulation 47 

Distribution and changes 48 

Civilian changes 48 

Police oflScers injured while on duty 48 

Work of the Department 48 

Arrests 48 

Drunkenness 49 

Nativity of persons arrested 50 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 51 

Automobile division 51 

Homicide division 53 

Lost and stolen property division 54 

General 55 

Special events 55 

Miscellaneous business 58 

Adjustment of claims 59 

House of detention 60 

Police Signal Service 60 

Signal boxes 60 

Miscellaneous work 60 

Harbor service 62 

Horses 63 



4 CONTENTS. 

Page 

Vehicle service 63 

Automobiles . . .63 

Combination ambulances .63 

List of vehicles used by the Department . . . . . 65 

Hackney Carriages 66 

Special, public and private hackney stands 67 

Sight-seeing automobiles . .67 

Wagon licenses 68 

Listing Work in Boston 69 

Listing expenses 70 

Number of policemen employed in listing 70 

Police work on jury lists 70 

Special police 71 

Railroad police 7l 

Miscellaneous licenses 71 

Musicians' licenses 72 

Itinerant 72 

Collective 72 

Carrying dangerous weapons 73 

Public lodging houses 73 

Pensions and benefits 74 

Financial .... 74 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the Police Force, 

Signal service and employees 76 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 78 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 79 

List of officers retired . . . 80 

List of officers promoted 82 

Number of men in active service 84 

Men on the Police Force and year born 85 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness 86 
Complaints against officers ...... ^ . .87 

Number of arrests by police divisions 89 

Arrests and offences 90 

Age and sex of persons arrested 106 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 107 

Licenses of all classes issued 108 

Dog Hcenses .110 

Wagon licenses 110 

Financial statement ,. . .111 

Payments on account of signal service 112 

Accidents 113 

Male and female residents listed 115 



tCfje Commontoealtl) of jWassatljusetts. 



REPORT. 

/ 
Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1932. 

To His Excellency Joseph B. Ely, Governor. 

Your Excellency. — In accordance with the provisions 
of chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the 
honor to submit, as PoHce Commissioner for the City of Boston, 
the following report for the year ending November 30, 1932. 

During the past year extreme economy has been practiced 
in the Department, both in regard to purchases and personnel, 
but every effort has been made to further remodel the police 
force of the city to enable it to deal more effectively with present- 
day conditions. 

At the present time there are one hundred and fifty-seven 
(157) vacancies in the grade of patrolman below the quota 
estabhshed for the Department in conformity with chapter 291 
of the Acts of 1906. The method adopted in this Department 
of reducing payrolls by not filling vacancies, but using every 
effort to utilize the man-power available to its fullest extent 
as well as keeping the morale of the Department up to the 
highest possible standard, is, in my opinion, sound economy. 
It is interesting to note that in spite of the reduction in num- 
bers of personnel, the Department during the past year brought 
to a successful conclusion, so far as its powers go, probably 
a larger percentage of the serious crimes which occurred than 
in previous years since the establishment of the Department. 
This has been possible by the greater interest in their work 
and the closer co-operation among the members of the Depart- 
ment than had previously existed. It is the purpose of the 
Commissioner to continue the above policy which was inau- 
gurated in March, 1931, to the fullest extent that conditions 
in the city warrant. 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Public Welfare Investigation. 
On July 21, 1932, His Honor the ^Mayor requested the 
co-operation of this Department in making a complete investi- 
gation of all persons receiving aid from the Public Welfare 
Department of the City of Boston; the purpose of this investi- 
gation being to weed out from the list of persons receiving aid 
at that time those individuals not legally entitled to city aid 
and permit of their immediate prosecution. In accordance 
with this request of the Mayor there was created in the office 
of the Commissioner a special board consisting of the Superin- 
tendent of Police and a Deputy Superintendent who would 
consider all reports made to it by a special division directly 
under the charge of the Deputy Superintendent assigned to 
the Commissioner's board. ^lembers of the Department 
were instructed to make a thorough and impartial investi- 
gation and report on each case sent to them, always bearing 
in mind that those in needy circumstances through no fault 
of their own should receive careful consideration and kindness, 
as well as justice, but that those who were not legally entitled 
to aid must be detected and suitable action taken to purge 
the Public Welfare rolls of such individuals. A questionnaire 
was prepared for the preliminary investigation which was 
made by the various divisions. When the information re- 
quested on the forms was received, it was forwarded to the 
special board created for consideration. The Commissioner 
was informed that there were approximately twenty thousand 
(20,000) cases on the Public Welfare rolls which would be 
referred to this Department for investigation. On August 4th, 
the first cases were received from the Public WeKare Depart- 
ment for our investigation. On August 30, 1932, the following 
report was sent to His Honor the Mayor: 

"In compHance with your request of July 21 that the Police 
Department conduct an investigation for the purpose of weed- 
ing out from the list of persons receiving aid from the PubUc 
Welfare Department individuals not entitled to the same, in 
order to speedily purge the Public Welfare rolls of all persons 
receiving aid to which they are not legally entitled and to per- 
mit of the immediate prosecution of such persons, there was at 
once organized in this Department a special bureau in charge 
of a Deputy Superintendent to conduct the investigation 
requested by you, which I understand would include over 
twenty thousand cases. 

"So far, this Department has received only 2,685 names of 
persons on the Welfare list, although our organization was 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 7 

created to speedily take care of the preliminary investigation 
of the entire number of cases. At the present rate of receipt 
of names from the Welfare Department, it will be about a 
year before the police have even the names of those now on 
the Welfare rolls, which you wished to have investigated. It 
would be especially helpful to this Department to receive all 
names as soon as possible in order that the preliminary police 
investigation may be made promptly. This is necessary so 
that those cases which are apparently deserving may be sepa- 
rated from those requiring further examination and attention. 
A complete list of all the names on the rolls of the Public 
Welfare Department is absolutely essential if the police are to 
properly perform their duty in cooperation with your announced 
purpose to speedily purge the PubHc Welfare rolls of all persons 
receiving aid to which they are not legally entitled. 

"The first group of names of recipients of pubhc aid supplied 
by the Pubhc Welfare Department, numbering 499, was 
received by the police on August 4. The special bureau on 
Pubhc Aid Investigation of this Department was immediately 
instructed to take the first 500 cases received and make a 
thorough pohce investigation of each case, analyzing the 
results by dividing the cases into three groups, namely: 
'Possible Worthy', 'Possible Unworthy' and 'Cases Possibly 
Warranting Prosecution', and submit the same to the Superin- 
tendent of Pohce and myself for consideration. It was thought 
that this division would be the most helpful to you in deter- 
mining what policy you would adopt in regard to the Public 
Aid situation in this city. 

"As soon as this analysis and report was made bj^ the special 
bureau it was decided that before making a report to you it 
was desirable and necessary to check the 'Possible Unworthy' 
and 'Possible Prosecution Cases' with the records of the Public 
Welfare Department. It was soon found that for reasons 
enumerated later, this would delay any report being made to 
you for an intolerable time. 

"In view of the seriousness of the pubhc aid situation, and 
in order to make a report to you at this time, the grouping was 
changed to 'Possible Worthy' and 'Possible Unworthy' cases. 

" The analysis of the 500 cases under two headings is as 
follows : 

Possible Worthy 294 

Possible Unworthy 206 

The latter class includes not only cases which from information 
obtained by the police warrant further consideration by the 
Welfare authorities, but also those cases which would appear to 
justify prosecution against the recipient of aid or some other 
person concerned in the case, if the irregularities discovered 
by the pohce should be found to be accurate on comparison 
with the records in the Pubhc Welfare Department. 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

"Under the 294 cases listed as 'Possible Worthy' no dis- 
crepancy or question has come to the attention of the police in 
their preliminary investigation, and unless additional evidence 
is obtained indicating that further examination should be 
made, it would appear unnecessary to devote special attention 
to these cases. 

"For this report it was intended to check the police investi- 
gation with the records of the Public Welfare Department in 
all cases originally classed as ' Possible Unworthy ' and ' Possible 
Cases for Prosecution. ' 

"An effort was made to examine the original applications of 
the recipients of aid, to check against pay cards, and to compare 
other records of the Public Welfare Board with the police 
report where apparent irregularities were found. This work 
was begun last Thursday, but it is reported to me as progressing 
very slowly and entirely unsatisfactory to the police. In fact, 
it has been possible to get only partial information in 25 cases 
up to Monday morning, whereas at least 100 cases a day 
should be cleaned up by comparison with the appHcation of 
the recipient, a fundamental record, simple financial figures 
and other pertinent data which ought to be readily available. 
In regard to the request for copies of the pay cards in nine 
cases, my investigators report that four of the nine cases 
were returned to them with the pencil notation 'not in file', 
but no copies of the pay cards as promised were produced in 
any case for the purposes of the police report. It appears 
from our inability to acquire simple information that ought 
to be on file that the Public Welfare office is either unable or 
unwilling to furnish the police with the records necessary to 
complete our check within a reasonable length of time. Not 
until sufficient data can be secured from the Public Welfare 
office in regard to cases under the heading of 'Possible Un- 
worthy' will it be possible to submit to you a more definite 
report on the result of the police investigation, 

"Herewith is a summary of certain data compiled from the 
first 500 reports made by the poHce : 

Group 1. 

False addresses 28 

Moved 27 

Vacant lots, office buildings, stables, 

garages, etc 6 

Recipient dead 5 

Group total 66 

Group 2. 

Possible owners of realestate ... 45 

Possible bank accounts .... 23 

Aid from other sources .... 56 

Group total 124 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

Group 3. 

Difference in stated aid and aid received by- 
recipient 26 

Inconsistent with basis of disbursements 

for persons having no dependents . . 15 

(According to formula, should be $4.00 or 
less per week.) 

Group total 41 

Number of persons with no dependents . 24 
Residents of Boston only since January 1, 

1931 6 

Non-residents 2 

Telephones 13 

Automobiles 9 

Refuse to answer questions by investi- 
gating officer 3 

Total number having court records . . 101 

Aliens 182 

Recipients reporting that they have not 
been visited within the past three 
months by the PubHc Welfare Visitors 
or Assistants 240 

Group 1, 
False addresses, moved, vacant lots, office 
buildings, stables, garages, etc., and 
recipients dead 66 

"In all these cases the police investigators have made dili- 
gent search to find the alleged recipient of aid. Before a 
definite statement can be made to you in regard to these cases 
the police must secure records from the Public Welfare Depart- 
ment which would either show that a mistake has been made 
in reporting the case to the police or that there is some other 
reason for what appears to be a relatively large number of 
false and fictitious addresses or persons. 

Group 2. 
Possible owners of real estate, possible 

bank accounts, aid from other sources . 124 

"It is, of course, perfectly evident that these cases require a 
more careful checking of our reports with those of the Public 
Welfare Department. 

Group 3. 

"The 26 cases found by the poHce where the recipient 
reported receiving less aid than that stated by the Public 
Welfare Department must be carefully checked for possible 
errors. Again, the 15 cases inconsistent with the basis of 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

disbursements for persons ha\-ing no dependents, must be 
carefully checked with the records of the Pubhc AVeKare 
Department. 

''The 6 cases of residents of Boston only since Januan^ 1, 
1931, non-residents of the City of Boston and those refusing to 
answer questions by investigating officers should be carefully 
considered as to whether their aid should be continued. 

"The total nimaber of persons ha^Tng court records is listed 
as 101. These records include various crimes for which penal- 
ties were inflicted, from fines, one month in jail to State Prison 
terms. A complete hst of these cases with the criminal record 
of the recipient will be furnished, as it would appear that this 
information is necessarv' and should be of importance to those 
responsible for the granting of pubhc aid. 

"It will be noted that of the 500 cases recei\nng pubhc aid, 
182 were ahens, or nearh' 40 per cent of the entire number of 
cases under consideration. This involves such an important 
matter of pubhc policy as to how far citizens should be taxed 
to support aliens that I am transmitting this information to 
you for consideration without comment. 

"You will also note that in 240 cases, or almost 50 per 
cent of the cases considered, our officers report that the recipi- 
ents state that they have not been \'i5ited ■within the past 
three months, and in some cases not for two years, bj' a repre- 
sentative of the Pubhc Welfare Department. 

''Not until sufficient data is secured from the Pubhc Welfare 
Department in regard to the cases under the heading 'Possible 
Unworthy' will it be possible for the Pohce Department to 
submit to you a more definite report of its pohce investigation. 
I felt, however, that 3'ou would be interested in recei\'ing this 
report of the progress which is being made by the police and 
the problems encountered. I am inclosing here^sith a hst of 
the names and addresses of the recipients in this group of 500 
classified under the headings of 'Possible Worthy' and 'Possible 
Unworthy', marked Exhibits 'A' and 'B' respective!}'." 

On September 19, 1932, a supplement arj- report to that of 
August 30, 1932, was sent to His Honor the Mayor, as follows: 

"This report is supplementary to one made to you dated 
August 30, 1932, in regard to the investigation being made by 
the Pohce Department at your request for the purpose of weed- 
ing out from the list of persons receiving aid from the Public 
Welfare Department indi\'iduals not entitled to the same and 
permit of the prosecution of those recei\ing aid illegally. 

"Your action at the conference in your office on August 
31 designating Nathan A. Heller, Esquire, a member of the 
Overseers, as your representative \N-ith whom the police should 
deal, has resulted in a substantial improvement in the matter 
of furnishing records of the Pubhc Welfare Department to the 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

police. Mr. Heller has responded promptly to all calls made 
upon him, and the jx)lice appreciate his assistance. Reports 
of responsible senior police officials show that the delay in 
supphing, and the inability to furnish, records on the part 
of the Pubhc Welfare Department are due entirely to condi- 
tions existing in that office and should not reflect upon the 
efforts of Mr. Heller. 

"Taking the 500 cases on which a preliminary' report was 
made on August 30, no records could be obtained from the 
Public Welfare Office in 17 cases, and in many cases only an 
incomplete record was supplied to the poHce. However, as 
there are over 20,000 welfare cases to be examined by the 
police, no good purpose would be served by further delay until 
these missing records can be produced. Therefore, this report 
is made from the information at hand. PoHce investigation 
and examination discloses that facts in 76 cases warrant the 
conclusion that there exists a prima facie case for criminal 
prosecution imder charges of larcency, conspiracy, or perjurj-. 
In 70 cases it appears that the provisions of the 'Destitute 
Parent Law' could be invoked. Due to the fact that some 
cases are included in both groups the total number of individual 
cases involved amounts to 126. To illustrate cases coming 
under these two classifications, there are quoted below five 
examples: 

Police Report. 

"This man 'X' has been dead S years. His son, , has 

been receiving the money. Captain reports that 'X' has been 

dead for S years and his son. , has been dravring aid on 

his father's card since June, 1931, and stated that the Welfare 
Department gave him permission to do this. There is one 
boarder and a nephew, and son receiving S7.00 per week welfare 
aid. WhUe son was being questioned, one of the friends in the 
house told him in a foreign language (which was tmderstood by 
the pohce officer) not to tell the officer anything about the 
boarder. 

Public Welfare. 

Original apphcation made by "X" January IS, 1922. Did 
not contain an affidavit. Second application June 23. 1931. 
in name of "X" idead^ and wife contained an affidavit signed 
by son. although his name does not appear on the body of the 
apphcation. Third apphcation made October 6, 1931, in 
name of wife is blank and affidavit is not signed. Visitor's 
report on June 25. 1931, states that husband died about 6 years 
ago leaving 1 child, son, about 35 years of age. Visitor's report 
on October 14. 1931, son still out of work. ReappUes for aid 
and given SS.OO cash and work card. 

There is no record of any individual apphcation made by 
son at any time. Notation on Visitor's report on outside page 
states that "X" reapplied on July 23, 1931, and again on 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

October 6, 1931, and also that case was reopened October 14, 
1931. Pay card states aid given from October 14, 1931. 
Police report states that "X" is dead 6 years. Card still has 
name of "X" and money being paid to son in his deceased 
father's name. Amount on police report states $7.00. Pay 
card says $8.00 for 23 weeks, $13.00 for 2 weeks, and $7.00 
for 9 weeks. There is no mention made on any record received 
that "X" ever received $13.00 a week, and no mention in 
amount of reductions of aid. Affidavit made in name of wife, 
but signed by son. Date of appHcation January 18, 1922, 
June 3, 1931 and October 6, 1931. Visitor's report incom- 
plete. Last report March 13, 1932. 



Conclusion. 
The "X" of record has been dead about 8 years. During 
the past 2 years his son has been receiving aid under his father's 
name. Apparently this must have been done with the knowl- 
edge of the Public Welfare Board. No application was ever 
made by the son. By whose authority and orders is he receiv- 
ing this money? Pay card also states that during the month 
of November, 1931, a quarter of ton of coal was given to "X" 
and during the months of January, February and March, a 
half a ton was given each month. No question of prosecution 
on son. Serious question of conspiracy on part of some indi- 
vidual other than son. Query on the amount of money that 
has been paid in view of the fact that card sent to the police 
stated $7.00. Pay card has $8.00 for 23 weeks, and $13.00 
for 2 weeks. Public Welfare Records in very poor condition 
in this case. Affidavits signed improperly. 

Note. 
Check up on the record of son. Further investigation 
should be made as to who at the Public Welfare paid this 
money and where son received his money. Note that second 
application was made on June 23, 1931, in the name of "X" 
who is dead, and the affidavit was signed by the son. It is 
further interesting if the application made on June 23, 1931, 
could be further looked at as to the answers made on the 
various questions in the application. It should also be noted 
that Visitor's report on June 25, 1931, states that husband 
died about 6 years ago. Apparently there must have been 
collusion somewhere. It should be also noted that no apph- 
cation was made by son at any time. Look up name of Visitor 
who reported on June 25, 1931, and on October 14, 1931. It 
should also be noted that the Visitor stated that "X" reapplied 
on July 23, 1931, on October 6, 1931, and the case was reopened 
on October 14, 1931. Does this mean the dead man? Appar- 
ently it must be, because no original application or reapplication 
can be found according to our officer's report. 



1933.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. * 13 



Police Report. 

"X" recipient alien. Lived in Boston 7 years. Pays no 

rent because he owns house. Children: Daughter 11; son 4; 

son 2; son 7 months. Claims dependents, wife and 4 children. 

Income of $12.00 a month from flat rented in house he owns. 

Has brother, . "X" states he works 3 days a week for 

Welfare Board, 1 day a week reports to Overseers of Public 
Welfare, another day he collects his money and hasn't any 
time to look for work. Last visit Public Welfare, January, 
1932. Owns three-family eleven-room wooden frame building 

at Street, . Received aid eight months, $12.00 a 

week for seven weeks, $11.00 a week since. 

Public Welfare. 

No affidavit. Date of appfication February 1, 1924. Re- 
appHcation December 17, 1931. Visitor's report shows last 
visit was made December 18, 1931. Visitor recommends 
$12.00 in cash. Pay cards show man receiving $12.00 weekly 
from December 24, 1931, to June 10, 1932, when it was reduced 
to $11.00 a week. Visitor's report made on December 18, 
1931, stated that the house has been vacant for 13 months 
except for occupancy "X" recipient who owns the three-family 
house. Pohce report states that he is receiving $12.00 a month 
for rent. 

Conclusion. 

Note the fact that recipient owns three-family house, lives in 
the house and receives $12.00 a month rent. Note the fact 
that recipient states he has not time to look for work due to the 
fact that he works 3 days a week for the Welfare, 1 day reports 
to the Overseers of the Public Welfare, and another day has 
to collect his money. Note the fact that the last visit was 
made on December 18, 1931, and at this time the statement 
was made that the house was vacant and now it is occupied 
and the recipient receiving a rental. Possible prosecution. 
No affidavit. Alien, living in Boston 7 years. 



Police Report. 
States that "X" recipient does not live at Street. 

Public Welfare. 
Records incomplete; no affidavit. Date of application Jan- 
uary 23, 1931; aid started May 23, 1932, at $11.00, decreased 
to .$10.00 on June 14, 1932. Last payment of $10.00 on August 
30, 1932. Last report of Visitor August 24, 1932. Records 

show man resided at Street, Everett, until about May 

15, 1932. Made application and was receiving aid in Everett 
up to May 15, 1932, when he moved to Boston giving address 

Street. Receiving aid of $11.00 per week cash beginning 

May 23, 1932. The application in this case contains only 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

one fold and apparently has been made on recent date. No 
check is made on brother or sister, real estate, banks or insurance 

on Records of Public Welfare. Visitor's report states , 

Street. No affidavit. 

Conclusion. 

Note fact that the man is not living at Street, address 

given on card sent to police by Welfare Board. Note the 
fact that record at the Public Welfare shows that recipient 
lived in Everett until May 15, 1932, and received aid in Everett 

up to that date, then moved to Boston giving address 

Street and received aid eight times after moving to Boston 
of $11.00 a week. Note the fact that the last payment was 
made on August 30, 1932, after police investigation had com- 
menced. No record of why pajonent was stopped. Note 
the fact of no visit in May, 1932, to ascertain whether recipient 
lived at Street. Note the fact of condition of applica- 
tion. Note the fact of no check made on brothers or sisters, 
real estate, banks or insurance. Note recipient made applica- 
tion in Boston before moving from Everett. Did Visitor 
visit Street? Possibihty of court action. 



Police Report. 

"X" recipient states children: Son 22; earnings $30.00 

weekly. Son 16; son 14; son 12; son 6. Dependents, wife 

and four children. Purchased goods on installments in 

October, 1931. Cost $102.00. Pays at the rate of $8.00 a 

month. Still owes $40.00. Mother, , Uves in Belmont. 

Brother, — — , lives in Revere, owns house and receiving wel- 
fare from Revere. Sister, , husband works for telephone 

company. Sister, , Waverly, owns house; sister, , 

owns house. Last visit by Public Welfare Investigator two 
months ago. Recipient states he owns house jointly with 

son, , also states that mother, brother and two sisters own 

houses. States that he has $4.35 in ■ Savings Bank. 

Does not know whether rest of family has any savings. 
Received aid since December, 1931. First at $8.00 a week 
and $3.00 grocery order; now $7.00 a week and $3.00 grocery 

order. States his son, , owns an automobile. Captain 

calls attention to fact that recipient owned house by himself 

up to October, 1931, when his son, , took a half interest 

in the house. 

Public Welfare. 
Apphcation filed November 12, 1931. Aid started Decem- 
ber, 1931; $8.00 a week, $3.00 grocery order; aid cut to 
$7.00 a week and $3.00 grocery order, June 14, 1932. Dif- 
ference in the spelling of last name. Police records show he 
had $4.35 in savings bank on August 15, 1932. Visitor's 
report made August 31, 1932, states he had no account in 



1933.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

the savings bank. Police report states he has no other income 
from any source. Welfare Records show that he is getting 
$58.00 a month from house which he owns. In 1923, record 
of the Welfare Department shows he paid S2,300 down on 
purchase of $8,000 house and Visitor reports family badly in 
need. 

Conclusion. 

Possible action under Destitute Parent Law, and contribu- 
tions from blood relatives. Note the discrepancies in the fact 
that on August 15, 1932, recipient stated to police that he had 
$4.35 in the savings bank and Visitor's report of August 31, 
1932, states that he has no account with said bank. Note fact 
that in police report recipient stated he had no income from 
any source, whereas Welfare report shows he is getting $58.00 
a month from the house he owns. Note fact that son acquired 
half interest in house less than a month before application for 
aid was made. 

Note. 

Possibility of prosecution. 



Police Report. 
"X" recipient alien. Living in Boston 32 years. Children: 
Son 38; son 33; son 22; son 21; daughter 18; son 16. Claims 

dependents, wife. Brother, , earns $24.00 a week. Last 

visit Public AVelfare two weeks prior to August 13, 1932. Son, 

, owns three-family house and automobile; son, , 

owns automobile; brother, -, owns house and automobile. 

Receiving aid since January, 1931, first $14.00, then $12.00, 
now $11.00 per week. Commanding officer states that one son 
owns property where recipient is living and that the father has a 
radio in his home. 

Public Welfare. 

Recipient stated to poHce on August 13, 1932, son 

owns house and automobile; son owns an automobile; 

brother owns house and automobile. Recipient states 

in his apphcation January 19, 1931, that neither he nor any 
member of his family owns real estate. Visitor's report 
September 7, 1932, states recipient has six children; one 38, 
one 33, one 22, one 21, one 18 and one 16. Also states recipi- 
ent's niece has an automobile which is owned by recipient. 

According to Visitor's report of September 7, 1932, son 

working during all this time. No record of any sons reporting 
to work yard until September 6, 1932. No affidavit. 

Conclusion. 

Note fact that one son owns property where recipient resides, 

also owns automobile. Another son owns an automobile. 

Note fact that according to Visitor's report of September 7, 

1932, applicant owns an automobile and that another son is 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

working. Note fact that from police report son owns house 
and automobile and another son owns an automobile. Brother 
owns house and automobile. In this family there are three 
members owning automobiles and two members owning houses. 
Possible action under Destitute Parent Law and possible action 
for brother to contribute. Note fact that recipient stated in his 
apphcation January 19, 1931, that no one in his family owned 
real estate. Possible prosecution. No affidavit. Alien, living 
in Boston 32 years. 



"The pohce investigation shows 216 cases where the recipient 
of aid has relatives who may come within the classes contained 
in the 'Kindred Law' of those hable to be called upon for the 
support of their poor relatives. In the 216 cases there are 
many examples which indicate ability for such support and no 
indication that the Public Welfare Board has made any effort 
to investigate the ability of those who by consanguinity may be 
called upon for such support. 

"The foregoing cases where the facts show a prima facie 
case for criminal prosecution, or where the information obtained 
by the police indicates that action may be taken to relieve the 
city, at least in part, of the payment of aid total 278 out of the 
500 cases, some of the cases coming under more than one 
classification." 

"At the conference on August 31 in your office you did not 
appear particularly interested in the number of recipients who 
were aliens or those who had court records. Of course, I agree 
with you that these persons and their families should not be 
allowed to starve, but one of the first things a police investiga- 
tion determines is whether or not the person under investiga- 
tion is a citizen and the kind of a court record he may have. It 
appears that 180 of the 500 cases are aliens and in 167 cases the 
recipients have court records. If the percentage of aliens holds 
throughout the entire 20,000 or more cases, the Support of 
destitute aliens is a problem of great public importance. In 
the case of the alien, he usually does not maintain nor does he 
expect to live on the same standard of living as our citizens, 
and what would be a starvation allowance to an American 
family may be a luxury income to a destitute alien. This is, 
I appreciate, a matter of policy for those responsible for the 
disbursement of aid to determine. 

"While many of the court records of recipents of aid are of a 
minor nature, there are a great many others involving such 
charges as non-support of family, habitual drunkenness, larceny, 
assaults on wife and children, and felonies, which should have 
an important bearing on the disbursement of public aid to such 
recipients. Little good is accomplished by the payment of 
money to this class of individuals, the families of those with 
criminal records are in general the persons who should be 
assisted. 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



17 



"In these 500 cases the poUce list 27 cases as 'Owners of real 
estate', 15 recipients who have 'bank accounts', 9 recipients 
who are 'owners of automobiles', and 35 non-residents. In 
three cases recipients refuse to give any information to the 
police. 

"Some of the irregularities encountered by the police in 
making its investigation are as follows : 

Aid not received by applicant ... 22 

Aid not received by recipient ... 6 

No such person 8 

False and incorrect addresses ... 84 

Recipient dead 6 

Discrepancy in amount of aid reported . 133 

To what extent inaccurate records of the Public Welfare De- 
partment and other reasons account for these discrepancies 
cannot be stated at this time, but the police, from their training 
and experience, cannot help regarding such records with 
suspicion. 

"Appreciating that this investigation is directed primarily 
towards the recipients of aid, the police have not attempted to 
follow up in the short space of time during which it has been 
engaged in this work and ascertain the reasons for these dis- 
crepancies; nevertheless, the fact that they exist cannot be 
ignored. 

"In further connection with the records of the Public Welfare 
Department, I am informed that the police were furnished 
many incomplete reports of cases, such as: 

No appHcation 9 

Affidavit not signed by applicant . . 17 

No affidavit 203 

No recent Visitor's report .... 190 

No record of vote of Overseers ... 35 

No pay cards 6 

Incomplete pay cards 40 

Possibly all these discrepancies can eventually be explained, 
but the chaotic condition of the Pubhc Welfare Records offers 
so great an opportunity for possible fraud that I feel it my duty 
to call this condition to your attention. 

"I have given above the general conditions found by the 
pohce in this group of 500 cases in summarized form. I am 
enclosing herewith a brief summary and analysis of each individ- 
ual case. These analyses are based on statements made to or 
reported by the police and records concerning these cases as 
furnished to the police by the Public AVelfare Department. 
There is on file at Police Headquarters a complete record con- 
cerning each of the foregoing cases, and I shall be pleased to 
permit any one authorized by you to have access to the same. 

"You will, no doubt, desire to have particular attention 
given to the 76 cases where the facts warrant the conclusion 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

that there exists a prima facie case for criminal prosecution 
under charges of larceny, conspiracy or perjury, and to those 70 
cases where the provisions of the 'Destitute Parent Law' may 
be invoked. Further, a fertile field which should yield financial 
savings to the city are the 216 cases where the so-called 'Kindred 
Law' may be used to compel persons to contribute to the 
support of their poor relatives. The Overseers of Public Wel- 
fare are authorized by law to institute legal proceedings in the 
various cases referred to above. 

"It is significant to note that Payment Has Been Stopped 
in 45 or nearly 10 per cent of these 500 cases since the police 
investigation commenced; this fact was not considered in 
making the foregoing analysis. 

"This police investigation is directed towards the recipients 
of public aid rather than the Public Welfare Department. 
During the past six weeks the police have exercised great 
forbearance and patience, particularly in dealing with the Wel- 
fare Department. Incomplete and inaccurate records, as fur- 
nished the police by the Welfare office, have seriously delayed 
the progress of this investigation. The time consumed in 
investigating these 500 cases indicates that unless more rapid 
progress is made in examining the Welfare Department records 
in the large number of remaining cases, the city will not receive 
until two years the full benefit of the savings made possible 
by this police investigation. For the police investigation to 
proceed with reasonable speed the records of the PubHc Welfare 
Department must be straightened out. Therefore, I respect- 
fully suggest that there be a new registration of all recipients of 
aid as soon as possible, and that each appUcant's case be exam- 
ined by different visitors than those who had previously passed 
on the case before being determined finally by the Overseers. 
Further, that the appKcation, examination and accounting 
records be kept in a modern, business-like manner. This sug- 
gestion seems to me to be the most practical method of cleaning 
up an intolerable condition in a speedy and effective manner." 

On October 3, 1932, the department transmitted to His Honor 
the Mayor, a report on the next thousand cases investigated by 
this department, said report being as follows: 

"In your letter of July 21 requesting the PoUce Department 
to investigate persons receiving public aid, you request informa- 
tion, first, which will allow the purging of the Public Welfare 
rolls of those unworthy, and second, information which will 
permit the prosecution of those obtaining aid illegally. The 
second proposition immediately raised the question in those 
cases where prosecution is possible — ' Who shall prosecute, the 
police or the Overseers of the Public Welfare Department?' 
In nearly all cases so far reported on, if criminal action is possi- 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

ble, it would be for larceny, perjury, conspiracy, or action under 
the 'Destitute Parent Law.' These criminal actions would 
depend for successful prosecution upon the facts and testimony 
of the Public Welfare Department and its records, together 
with what information the police have been able to obtain. 
Not wishing to take precipitate action, particularly without 
the opportunity to discuss this matter with you, but desiring 
to find out as soon as possible, what the attitude of the Welfare 
Department would be if the police attempted to prosecute, I 
cited in my second report to you five typical cases. The public 
answers of the Overseers and their counsel in these five cases 
make it clear that if the poHce had taken the cases into court 
they could not have maintained their charges due to the testi- 
mony of the Public Welfare Department, which had not dis- 
closed to the police the alleged additional facts as given in their 
public statements. Therefore, if the police had attempted to 
take court action they would have been left in a trap and 
would have been made to look ridiculous and held up to public 
contempt; this, of course, I cannot conscientiously allow. 
Irrespective of the public statements made in regard to the 
police report, I am informed that aid has been discontinued in 
83 out of the 500 cases, or nearly 17 per cent, included in my 
report to you on September 19. 

"I am transmitting herewith police reports in 1,000 cases 
which included the preliminary report in 200 cases in which 
it is stated that aid has been discontinued by the Welfare 
Department. From the information obtained by the police 
and that furnished by the Welfare office in the remaining 800 
cases there are 176 cases, which in the opinion of the police, 
warrant consideration for legal action by the Overseers of the 
Public Welfare. 

"This group includes cases which from the records furnished 
to the police by the Public Welfare Department and informa- 
tion secured by the police, indicate deception in securing aid 
by recipients. If the Overseers are of the opinion that they 
have not been criminally deceived and they are satisfied with 
the terms and conditions under which the recipient receives 
aid, no matter what the records may show then he could not 
be prosecuted criminally with any expectation of success. 
Furthermore, Sections 29 and 31 of chapter 117 of the General 
Laws dealing with the power and duties of the Overseers states : 
Section 29. Whoever knowingly and wilfully 
makes any false written representations to the 
Overseers, to their agent or to the Department of 
Public Welfare or its agents, for the purpose of 
causing any person to be supported in whole or in 
part as a pauper by a town or by the commonwealth, 
shall be punished by a fine of not more than two 
hundred dollars or by imprisonment for not more 
than one year. 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Section 31. In actions and prosecutions founded 
on the preceding sections, the Overseers of any 
town or any person appointed by a writing under 
their hands shall appear and prosecute or defend 
the same in behalf of such town. 

Thus, it is evident that the law authorizes the Overseers of 
Public Welfare, who disburse the aid for the city and determine 
the conditions under which it is granted, to appear in court 
and prosecute persons not legally entitled to such aid. 

"This group also includes cases which come under the pro- 
visions of the 'Destitute Parent Law,' namely: 

Section 20. Any person, over twenty-one, 
who, being possessed of sufficient means, unreason- 
ably neglects or refuses to provide for the support 
and maintenance of his parent, whether father or 
mother, residing in the commonwealth, when such 
parent through misfortune and without fault of 
his own is destitute of means of sustenance and 
unable by reason of old age, infirmity or illness to 
support and maintain himself, shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than two hundred dollars or by 
imprisonment for not more than one year, or both. 
No such neglect or refusal shall be deemed unreason- 
able as to a child who shall not during his minority 
have been reasonably supported by such parent, if 
such parent was charged with the duty so to do, nor 
as to a child, who, being one of two or more children, 
has made proper and reasonable contribution toward 
the support of such parent. 

Section 21. Proceedings under the preceding 
section shall be begun, if in the superior court, in 
the county in which is situated the place where 
the defendant or the parent lives, and, if begun in a 
district court, in the court having such place within 
its judicial district. Complaints in district courts 
under the preceding section may be made by any 
such parent, by any child of such parent, by the 
Overseers of the Poor of the town where such parent 
has a settlement, or by any other public relief 
officer. 

Section 22. Before trial, with the consent of 
the defendant, or after entry of a plea of guilty 
or nolo contendere, or after conviction, the court 
may make for the benefit of such destitute parent 
orders similar to those provided in section five ; and 
the practice established by the first ten sections of 
this chapter shall, so far as applicable, apply to 
proceedings under this and the two preceding 
sections. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

"There are two courses of procedure open to the Welfare 
authorities. The Overseers may request interested parties to 
attend a conference and by the exercise of moral suasion the 
Pubhc Welfare authorities may bring about an arrangement 
whereby the working children of the parent receiving aid make 
regular contributions, within their means, for the support of 
their parent, in this way cutting down if not eliminating the 
payment of public aid. In cases where the children neglect or 
refuse to co-operate with the Overseers, then the provisions of 
Chapter 273 of the General Laws, quoted above, may be 
invoked. 

"It would probably be necessary in only a few cases to 
invoke the provisions of this law and have the case adjudicated 
by the court. I am making this statement, not from theory, 
but from my own personal experience while I was at the State 
House in which the efficacy of moral suasion as a practical 
measure of administration was demonstrated in thousands of 
cases yearly. It would be a simple matter for the Corpora- 
tion Counsel, the legal advisor of the Overseers, to bring action 
in such cases as the Welfare authorities are unable, by the 
exercise of moral suasion, to reach a satisfactory solution. 

"To illustrate certain cases coming under the foregoing 
classification, there are summarized below five examples: 

Recipient applied for aid in December, 19.30. Family con- 
sists of man, wife and two sons, ages 17 and 15 years. Records 
at the Welfare Department disclose the fact that in July, 1931, 
the recipient received three Slo payments, one $14 payment 
and from July, 1931, to November 27, 1931, $13.00 cash 
weekly with .$5.00 cash extra in November. From December 
31, 1931, to June 10, 1932, the recipient received $13 weekly 
with two allotments of fuel. Pay card shows that from June 
18, 1932, to September 17, 1932, $12.00 weekly was paid, 
although records at Public Welfare dated August 3, 1932, 
state "recipient and wife working." 

The poHce investigation discloses the fact that wife of 
recipient has been employed under an assumed name from 
January, 1931, and her earnings during this period to Septem- 
ber 20, 1932, were $831.13. 

The recipient's wife has been employed and received sub- 
stantial wages while her husband received aid from the city. 
This is a clear case of deceit in order to obtain unearned money 
from the city. 



Recipient began to receive aid in 1926 at $12 a week; dis- 
continued at various times and then granted again. In 
January, 1932, he received $40.00, February, 1932, he received 
$30.00, April, 1932, he received $12.00, May, 1932, he received 
$48.00, June, 1932, he received .$57.00, July, 1932, he received 
$44.00, and in August, 1932, he received $55.00. In Septem- 
ber, 1932, up to the 19th of the month he had received $22.00. 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The police investigation discloses the fact that this man 
has worked while receiving aid. The recipient is a longshore- 
man and has worked as recently as September 29 and 30 of 
1932, for which two days he received $10.20. His employers 
stated that if recipient would remain sober they would employ 
him continuously enabling him to support his family. 
Recipient has, apparently, no desire to work, and is an habitual 
drunkard, and as long as he is given money which allows him 
to buy liquor, he will not work and support his family. 



Recipient has been receiving $14.00 a week aid from June 20, 
1932, until August 24, 1932, according to the records at the 
Public Welfare Department. On September 19 the records 
of the Pubhc Welfare did not show whether or not the case 
was still open after August 24. 

The police investigation discloses the fact that the recipient 
had on deposit in a bank $345.00 which was withdrawn on 
June 30, 1932, ten days after receiving the first aid payment 
from the city. No action to prosecute or recover money paid 
has been taken by the Overseers of Public Welfare. 



Recipient is 57 years old and has three sons, 31, 26 and 24 
years old, respectively, one daughter 29 years old, and one 
son 17. Receiving aid from the Welfare since July 1, 1932, 
at $10.00 a week. 

Records at Welfare office carry this case under the name of 
both the husband and wife, two cards being sent to the police, 
but apparently these cards include only one case. 

The Commanding Officer of the station in which this family 
resides states that the family is large enough and old enough, 
in his opinion, to contribute to their parents' support. No 
record has been furnished the police by the Welfare that any 
attempt, as yet, has been made to compel the adult children 
to contribute to the support of their parents in this. case. 

Recipient, 55 years old, lives with his wife. He has four 
children, ages 35, 33, 30 and 28, two living at home. He has 
been receiving $10.00 weekly from the Public Welfare 
Department. 

Police investigations disclose the fact that one of his sons 
is a practising attorney and another son is employed by an 
insurance company. No effort has been made by the Over- 
seers of Public Welfare to ascertain whether action could be 
brought in this case under the "Destitute Parent Law" against 
any of the sons. 



"In addition to the foregoing definite provisions of law. 
Chapter 117, General Laws, Sections 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, 
provides that certain kindred of poor persons shall be bound 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

to support such persons in proportion to their abihty, and it 
further provides that a justice of the superior court sitting in 
equity may assess and apportion upon such kindred as it finds 
of sufficient abihty such amount as he considers reasonable 
towards the support of the relatives of such kindred. I am 
calling to your attention 309 cases of the 800 mentioned above 
where either moral suasion or the provisions of this law may be 
exercised. Similar to the procedure mentioned above under 
the 'Destitute Parent Law,' the so-called kindred law offers a 
splendid opportunity to cut down, if not eliminate, the pay- 
ment of aid in many cases. It will be noted that the insti- 
tution of action under the so-called 'Kindred Law' and the 
'Destitute Parent Law' rests either with the city or with the 
Overseers. LTnder such conditions the danger of creating 
friction and dissension among families is minimized and, in 
fact, as I see it, these laws provide the Overseers with a weapon 
by which families can be more closely united, and made to be 
self-supporting, which is a fundamental American principle. 

"In 200 cases a brief summary of the police report is given 
with the notation that aid was discontinued according to 
advices received from the Public Welfare Department. There 
are several hundred other such cases which will be sent to you 
as soon as they are put in proper form. Whether or not the 
activities of the police had any influence in bringing about a 
discontinuance of aid in these cases I do not know, but I 
thought it would be helpful and of interest to you to have the 
information so far collected by the pohce in these cases, as it 
may be possible that some of them require further action by 
the Welfare authorities. In this connection no provision has 
been made to notify the police if aid is recommenced, as the 
Welfare records show that aid may be discontinued for a short 
while and then, without even making a new application to 
explain the facts confronting the apphcant, aid is recommenced 
on an old application. It should be borne in mind that the 
police report on these cases in which aid has been discontinued 
by the Public Welfare is limited, but I believe it would be 
unnecessary effort, in view of the number of cases involved, 
to attempt to make a further investigation of the so-called 
'closed cases' when such notification is received from the 
Pubhc Welfare Department. 

"Herewith is a summary of certain data compiled from these 
800 cases referred to above: 



Aliens 

Aid from other sources 
Bank accounts 
Court records 
Owners of automobile 
Owners of real estate 



229 

109 

12 

477 

15 

33 



Refused to furnish information to police, 1 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

''The foregoing information is included with the police 
report of each case for such consideration as may be deemed 
necessary. In regard to the criminal records, many are of a 
minor nature, although some recipients of aid have serious 
criminal records, while others have acquired criminal records 
during the period that they have been receiving aid. Knowl- 
edge of the type of criminal record of the recipient ought to 
be of practical value to the welfare authorities in determining 
who should handle the money awarded to needy families, thus 
preventing the waste of public money by habitual drunkards 
and incompetent persons. 

''Some of the irregularities encountered by the police in 
making its investigation of these 800 cases are listed below: 



Aid not received by applicant 


35 


Aid not received by recipient 


8 


Affidavit not signed by applicant 


18 


False and incorrect address 


64 


No application .... 


12 


No recent Visitor's report . 


361 


No record of vote of Overseers . 


48 


No affidavit 


. 304 



"Possibly the Overseers of Public Welfare may be able 
eventually to explain all these discrepancies in regard to the 
records, but I regard the existence of such a condition of so 
much importance that I feel it my duty to call it to your 
attention. I also desire to reiterate that the police, from 
their training and experience, cannot help regarding such 
incomplete and inaccurate records with suspicion. 

' ' To give you a general picture of the present status of the 
activities of the police in regard to welfare, the following 
summary is submitted: 

Cases sent to police by AVelfare Depart- 
ment since August 5 . . . . 9,876 

At station house for preliminary investiga- 
tion 3,462 

At Headquarters in Special Bureau on 

Public Aid Matters . . . . . 4,207 

Discontinued according to the Welfare 

Department 707 

Reported on to the Mayor .... 1,500 

"When the cards are received from the Public Welfare 
Department a form is sent to the station house where the 
recipient resides with instructions that certain information 
be obtained and reported to Headquarters. At Headquarters 
a selected group of officers examine each report and check it 
with the records furnished by the Welfare office. 

"At the present time arrangements have been made with 
the Welfare authorities to check 600 cases weekly, although 



ii 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

this figure has not yet been reached. To prevent the accu- 
mulation of cases at Headquarters, it will be necessary to 
double the number checked each week and this matter is 
receiving the consideration of your representative, Mr. Heller, 
with whom I have taken it up. I appreciate the difficulties 
confronting Mr. Heller, but I am hopeful that it will be pos- 
sible to speed up the checking of records at the Welfare office. 

''Altogether nearly 25,000 cases are, as I understand, to 
be referred to the police. Furthermore, you specifically 
request speedy action; therefore, the plans of the police were 
made to make a preliminary report promptly of all cases with 
a view of ascertaining first those cases of recipients receiving 
aid which merit particular investigation and attention. 

''Inasmuch as reasonable progress by the police and the 
accomplishment of satisfactory results are largely dependent 
upon clear, complete and adequate records, being readily 
available for examination, this report and previous reports of 
the Police Department have dealt primarily with the chaotic 
conditions of records found to exist at the Welfare office. 
Furthermore, whatever the policy may be in regard to grant- 
ing of aid, whether it is liberal or conservative, I believe you 
will agree with me that adequate records must be maintained. 
I submit for your consideration that the most effective measure 
of weeding out those persons not entitled to aid is a rigid 
requirement that suitable records be established and main- 
tained in each and every case. This requirement offers the 
greatest opportunity to assist in accomplishing in a speedy 
manner the purpose expressed in your letter of July 21, in 
regard to welfare matters." 

This report together with previous report covered a total 
of 1,500 Public Welfare cases with detailed information for 
the Mayor'3 consideration. On October 7, 1932, His Honor 
the Mayor requested the Police Commissioner to discontinue 
forthwith the investigation of Public Welfare cases by the 
Police Department. 

Communication System. 
Further investigation of the Police Signal System in use in 
this city, begun in 1930, discovered so little co-ordination as 
well as so much worn out and obsolete equipment, that the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology was requested to make 
a study of the present system and what was needed to make 
a proper communication system for this department. As a 
result of this request a contract was executed between this 
department and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
under which a thorough study was made not only of the Police 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Signal System of this city but in other cities to decide what a 
Police Department should have in the way of a communica- 
tion system to meet present day conditions. This service 
was rendered at cost by the Institute as a contribution to the 
City of Boston. On May 26, 1932, the report of the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology with its recommendations 
was submitted to the Police Commissioner. The report in 
brief stated that a communication system sufficient to properly 
meet the needs of the city must be able to perform the follow- 
ing principal functions : 

1. Provide for any communication between the pubhc 
and the police. 

2. Provide for receiving emergency calls by calling 
a signal telephone number. 

3. Provide that accurate records be made of all alarms 
both at general headquarters and also at the division 
headquarters concerned. 

4. Provide for communication between the patrolmen 
and their senior officers. 

5. Provide for communication between the Pohce 
Department of the City of Boston and the departments 
of the neighboring municipalities. 

6. Provide for communication from general head- 
quarters to patrolling automobiles and harbor pohce boats. 

7. All of the above shall be rapid, reUable, accurate, 
secret and simple in execution. 

This report went into great detail in regard to cost and spec- 
ifications of the equipment recommended and, so far as we 
know, is the first report made by a scientific institution on what 
a modern police communication system should contain and 
how it should function. This report was transmitted to His 
Honor the Mayor on June 14 with the following letter: 

"In further reference to the Orders of the Honorable City Council 
relative to the use of the radio in the Boston Police Department, I have the 
honor to transmit herewith a copy of the report dated May 26, 1932, from 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This report covers the 
status and needs of the communication system of the Boston 
Police Department. It will be noted that the work was done at cost by 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a public service to the 
City of Boston. 

"The importance of an efficient and up-to-date communication system 
for the proper functioning of the police cannot be overstated. When I 
became Police Commissioner I devoted special study to the signal system 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

of the Department. It was obsolete and of little or no help in enabling the 
force to act quickly and in unison and of no value to the public directly 
in need of police service. Some important changes and improvements 
have already been made, but recognizing the necessity for having a com- 
plete and modern communication system for the Department, it was deemed 
necessary to have competent expert advice which has been received from 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

"The comprehensive report of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, after careful study and investigation designs a model pohce 
communication system for the City of Boston. I accept the recommenda- 
tions and submit them to you and the Honorable City Council for your 
consideration. I also request that the necessary funds be made available 
to carry out the changes and improvements recommended in this report." 

The Police Commissioner was informed by His Honor the 
Mayor on June 14, as follows : 

"I beg to acknowledge receipt of communication and report of investiga- 
tion conducted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology relative to 
the installation of a system of radio communication and the completion of 
the blinker system of transmission of information from police stations to 
officers on routes. 

" I have been most pleased to this day refer the same to the City Council, 
but am frank to say that I know of no way in which the money can be 
provided this year for the installation as recommended." 

During the past year Divisions 6 and 16 were completely 
equipped with the Hayes Signal System which allows citizens 
to sound a police alarm from each patrol box and provides 
for the control of members of the Department who are on 
street duty and may be needed for emergencies. The com- 
pletion of these two divisions makes a total of five divisions 
now equipped in this manner which is part of the system recom- 
mended by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in their 
report on the Police Communication System. 

Bureau of Records. 

The Bureau of Records was established October 17, 1931, 
and that part of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation known 
as the Criminal Identification Division was merged with the 
Bureau of Records. 

Further changes were made during this year to simpHfy the 
keeping of pohce records as well as making the records of the 
department uniform in all its branches. For example, a new 
system of arrest records at pohce divisions and Headquarters 
was inaugurated. This not only simphfies the clerical work 
at station houses, but provides uniformity in keeping these 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

fundamental records. A new loose-leaf form of Arrest and 
Summons book was designed and installed as well as a new 
form for reporting and filing of arrests. As a result of these 
changes many books and reports formerly kept with great 
labor and expense by the Department were consolidated into 
a new simple, much more available form. 

The efficiency of this division has been greatly increased 
by the installation of complete and thoroughly modern criminal 
identification equipment. 

To the rectigraph. fingerprint cameras, copjdng and enlarg- 
ing cameras, view cameras and photo-record machine which 
were in use in the Identification Division were added this year : 
one additional Folmer Graflex camera, one Folmer laboratory- 
stand for cop^'ing purposes, fluorescent screens for photography 
without the use of a camera, and one photographing machine 
to be used principally to establish and build up the one finger- 
print system of classifying and fifing. This machine will 
enable us to go into our standard fingerprint files and take 
out for temporary use any and all standard ten fingerprint 
cards that we deem desirable and photograph each finger- 
print thereon separately on a sensitized 3 by 5 card appro- 
priate for filing. It is our intention to go back five years in 
our main file and select the fingerprints of subjects who have 
been arrested for crime in the commission of which finger- 
prints might be left at the scene of crime and all such subjects 
which are brought to us for fingerprinting in the future will 
be fingerprinted in the regular manner and also single finger- 
printed and these single fingerprints, as well as those repro- 
duced by photography will be classified and filed in their 
proper division in the one fingerprint file,' With the aid of 
this machine, the work can proceed much more rapidly than 
by any other method thereby quickly building up the single 
fingerprint file and at the same time maintaining our standard 
file with the maximum efficiency because of the fact that this 
machine is so fast in its action, the standard print is out of its 
proper classification division but a very few minutes. 

The single fingerprint file has great potential value in making 
identifications of persons committing crime. Heretofore, 
single fingerprints or two or three, as it might be, taken at the 
scene of crimes, were valuable only for comparison with the 
ten fingerprints of the suspect whether the suspect's prints 
were then in our files or would be taken at the time he was 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

brought in on suspicion of the said crime. There was no 
method or sj^stem for filing latent prints taken at scenes of 
crimes up to the time of the origination of the one fingerprint 
system by Chief Inspector Battley of the Fingerprint Di\i- 
sion of Scotland Yard, England. It is announced by the 
English authorities that 123 positive identifications were 
made by the one fingerprint system during the past year. 

It is the Battley system of single fingerprint classification 
that is being installed in the Bureau of Records. This does 
not, in any way, weaken the standard system of filing prints, 
but it is a very valuable addition thereto. 

By using the fluorescent screens, any printed matter may be 
reproduced without the aid of camera. It is a valuable aid in 
disclosing forgeries on documents. It may be used to photo- 
graph any part of the printed matter of any book. As an 
illustration, if there is a register entry in a hotel or an item in 
anj^ particular book in the Pubfic Library or any other place 
to which we would have access but which we could not obtain 
to bring to the Bureau of Records for the purpose of photo- 
graphing, the fluorescent screens can be used by merely cover- 
ing the screens and the hands with a closely woven cloth, 
getting the negative result, protecting it by means provided 
and returning same to the Bureau of Records and developing it. 

The Folmer Graflex revoking back camera recently added 
to the equipment makes the total three in the Bureau of 
Records which seems to be a sufficient number to cover all 
demands made upon the Bureau of Records for outside photog- 
raphy within the size. Besides the Folmer Graflex cameras 
there is a 5 by 8 camera, and an 8 by 10 camera. AU the 
varying sizes can be enlarged with our enlarging apparatus to 
a 16 by 20 size. 

The rectigraph is a photograph machine verj' fast in its 
action and enables the operator to turn out in the course of a 
day a very large number of photographs if operated to the 
maximum. As an illustration, in the American Legion week, 
this machine turned out well over 7,000 photographs in two 
days at an approximate cost, labor, materials, etc., of about 
S65. I am advised by commercial photographers it would 
probably take three weeks at a cost of at least 83,000. 

The laboratory stand added to the equipment this year is a 
valuable addition and enables enlarging to be done quickly 
and of a fine grade of work. The Holophane fighting unit 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

recently installed for group photography will meet all demands 
made upon it as to sufficient amount and proper diffusion of 
light for good photography. 

Photograph films of varying sizes are filed in proper order in 
files adaptable to the purpose, the enlarged photographs, 
16 by 20 inches, being filed in a filing cabinet especially built 
to accommodate this size. These enlarged views are prin- 
cipally the scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, suspi- 
cious fires and are highly valuable for court purposes. Many 
commendations have been received because of the value of 
these photographs particularly in arson cases, the jury being 
unable to plainly determine the conditions of the burned 
premises and a very decided effect is obtained by their intro- 
duction and exhibition in court. This same effect on juries 
obtains in homicides and hit-and-run cases. The photographic 
unit of the Bureau of Records is, to-day, one of the finest 
equipped in the entire country. Upon the installation of the 
one fingerprint equipment, no fingerprint system in the 
country can excel that in this department. 

The balHstic unit, with the addition of certain pieces of 
apparatus now purchased and to be delivered before the first 
of the new year will be as fully equipped a unit for ballistics 
as exists in the country with a fully competent balhstician in 
charge thereof. 

Ballistics being inseparable from photography in many 
important essentials, it is plain that the Bureau of Records is 
amply equipped in every way to properly undertake any 
ballistics problem which presents itself. 

The files in this office contain records of all atrests and 
assignments made at the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, 
also records of all arrests throughout the department where the 
offences are of sufficient seriousness to require fingerprints and 
photographs. Also on file in this office are reports of all 
felonies committed within the city and all reports of the 
investigation of those felonies. 

In the Identification Division, records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory and the Reformatory Prison for women, including 
their fingerprints and photographs, also the records of all 
inmates of Suffolk County House of Correction and their 
fingerprints. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

In addition to the foregoing, the files contain many thousands 
of photographs, fingerprints, correspondence, records, cfippings, 
and histories of criminals arrested or wanted in various parts 
of the United States and foreign countries. 

The main index file was thoroughly modernized by alpha- 
betical arrangement during the past year and much of the 
obsolete index matter removed so that, with the additions to 
this file made in the course of the past year, there are now 
approximately 360,000 persons recorded in the files of this 
bureau. 

During the year 37,720 circulars containing photographs and 
fingerprints of persons wanted in this city for various crimes 
were drafted and mailed from this office to every city and 
town in the United States with a population of 5,000 or more, 
State Bureaus of Identification, all Army and Navy Recruiting 
Stations, United States Immigration offices and Customs Sta- 
tions and to a number of the larger cities in foreign countries. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police and 
photographs received from other sources are now filed in 
segregated cabinets and are constantly being added to. Photo- 
graphs received from outside departments are placed in the 
foreign segregated file and those taken by this department are 
placed in the local segregated file. The photographs of the 
criminals are segregated into four distinct sections, namely, 
white, negro, yellow and gypsy. Each of these groups is 
subdivided according to sex and they are also classified under 
the heading of the crime in which they specialize. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other police departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and 
in many instances, important identifications have been made. 
Valuable assistance has also been rendered to government offi- 
cials of the following branches: Post Office Department, 
Treasury Department, Secret Service Department, Depart- 
ment of Justice and Prohibition Department. Similar services 
have also been rendered to railroad and express companies. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the 
Bertillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 
the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
through the fingerprint files in this division, for this and other 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

departments. Among the most important of these identifi- 
cations were those of persons wanted for murder and robbery- 
while armed. 

Members of this division visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and, 
in many instances, secured photographs of fingerprints of 
the persons who committed these crimes, and in a number 
of cases took photographs of the scenes where crimes were 
committed. The figures and other data submitted as a part 
of this report show a decided increase in the volume of work 
done in this unit in the past year. 

Criminal Identification. 
This table gives a brief outline of the more important ac- 
complishments of the criminal identification unit of the Bureau 
of Records. The table refers to the number of individuals 
photographed and fingerprinted, also the number of prints 
or copies prepared. 

Identifications of criminals arrested locally 1,846 

Identifications of criminals arrested elsewhere .... 690 

Scenes of crimes photographed 363 

Circulars sent out by identification unit 37,720 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1931 ...... 131,113 

Made and filed during the year 3,137 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 2,468 

Number on file November 30, 1932 136,718 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1931 85,719 

Taken and filed during the year 3,137 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 3,345 

Number on file November 30, 1932 92,201 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 3,137 

Other cities and states 2,145 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of 

Justice 3,137 

State Bureau of Identification 3,285 

Other cities and states 1,974 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Supplementary. 

Number of scenes of crime visited 

Number of scenes of crime photographed, large camera 

Number of exposures, large camera 

Number of prints, large camera 

Number of enlargements: 

16 by 20 inches 

11 by 14 inches 

8 by 10 inches 



Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 

Prints made from same .... 

Number of rectigraph photographs . 

Number of photographs of police officers 

Number of civilian employees photographed 

Number of negatives of criminals 

Number of prints made from same . 

Number of fingerprints investigations (latent) 

Number of finger print investigations, positive 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed 

Number of prints made for modernizing photograph files 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 

Police officers 

Special police officers 

Taxi drivers 

Civilians 



1,072 
363 

1,567 
2,178 

461 

1,875 
305 



6,423 

8,610 

19,674 

14 

7 

3,752 

23,474 

714 

436 

1,458 

10,500 



14 

247 

1,454 

7 



Missing Persons. 
The missing persons file is now part of the Bureau of Records. 
The following table shows the number of persons lost or run- 
away during the year 1932: 

In Boston, Mass., total number reported 1,271 

Total number found, restored to friends, relatives, etc. . . . 1,175 
Total number still missing 96 





Age and Sex of Such Persons. 








Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 


335 

240 
274 


74 

223 
125 


327 

220 

248 


70 

194 
116 


8 

20 
26 


4 

29 
9 


Totals 


849 


422 


795 


380 


54 


42 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the 96 persons who still stand on the records as missing, 
no doubt many will be located in time as the greater part of the 
96 persons were reported missing at a comparatively recent date. 

I am submitting herewith, also, a table of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston, the total 
number of which is 1,283. By a careful checkup with reporting 
agencies, the records show the number found is 421 and the 
total number reported as still missing is 862. Of the 421 persons 
reported found, the missing persons' unit was active in assisting 
in locating them. 



and Sex of Such Persons. 





MiSSINO. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years. 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 

Over 21 years. 


233 

346 
318 


61 

225 
100 


77 

104 
86 


27 

89 
38 


156 
242 

232 


34 

136 

62 


Totals . 


897 


386 


267 


154 


630 


232 



The missing persons' unit also handled approximately 1,231 
pieces of correspondence during the year 1932 other than 
cases appearing on the tables. These were requests for assist- 
ance wherein the police could not take any active part and the 
correspondents were so informed promptly and courteously. 



Warrant File, 
The warrant file for the entire PoUce Department is now kept 
in the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued or 
received by the Department is sent out each day on the mani- 
fold and every officer in the Department receives this list. 
Twenty-four hours after the issuance of the warrant, if an 
arrest has not been made, a card provided for the station 
houses is forwarded to the Bureau of Records with all the 
data pertaining to the warrant and case. These cards are 
filed alphabetically so that instantaneously it can be told if a 
warrant exists in the Department for any person that may be 
named. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

Upon service of the warrant, another card goes forward to 
the Bureau of Records with the necessary information of 
service. All warrants received from outside departments are 
cleared through the Warrant Department of the Bureau of 
Records. All correspondence pertaining to the movement of 
warrants outside of the city proper is carried on through the 
Bureau of Records. 

Under the rules of the Department, immediately upon 
registering of an arrest in the station, if it is upon a warrant, 
either for the Boston Police Department or another police 
department, or if it is without a warrant and in the judgment 
of the officer in command it is sufficiently serious in its nature, 
he immediately notifies the warrant unit, reporting the arrest. 
This applies to every hour of the day and night. The files are 
immediately searched and if it appears that there is a warrant 
for the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the officer in 
command of the arresting division is immediately notified, 
given full particulars, and the police division in Boston or 
outside jurisdiction is immediately notified that the person is 
under arrest. 

The line-up for the entire Police Department is held at the 
Bureau of Records. When a line-up is to be held, all divisions 
in the Department are notified to bring forward witnesses, also 
Metropolitan Boston is notified by teletype. A record of all 
that transpires at the line-up is taken by the Bureau of Records' 
stenographer and there have been a great number of identifi- 
cations made during the past year. This procedure has 
resulted in much closer co-operation between the various police 
departments, particularly in Metropolitan Boston. When 
identifications are made, not only in cases within our Depart- 
ment, but in cases concerning other jurisdictions, the stenog- 
rapher types all information pertaining to that case and many 
times our stenographer is called into other jurisdictions with 
his notes. 

Our fingerprint men are often called upon to testify both 
in our courts and courts of other jurisdictions when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints, also where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. The 
photographers of the Bureau of Records are called principally 
before the courts of this city, but on the occasions where con- 
nections are made with latent prints for outside cities, the 
photographer who enlarges the prints by photography for the 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

purpose of charting them for presentation as evidence in court 
is also summoned into court to enable the photographs to be 
properly introduced. 

There have been several occasions in the past where, when 
chiefs of police of outside towns and cities have asked for the 
service of a fingerprint man and camera in consequence of crime 
committed in their jurisdiction, we have co-operated by sending 
a fingerprint man properly equipped to survey the scene of 
crime and reproduce any prints that may be there. 

The Bureau of Records obtained from the Massachusetts 
Probation Commission during the period in which we conducted 
investigation of public aid cases a total of approximately 6,900 
records of individuals, which records were transcribed from the 
photographs furnished by the Probation Commissioner on to 
our yellow record forms. 

Police School. 
The school was established for the purpose of increasing 
the knowledge and efficiency of members of the Department 
and was opened officially on November 16, 1931, finishing its 
first term on March 24, 1932. The operation of this school 
was placed under the control of an administrative board con- 
sisting of three deputy superintendents. All patrolmen with 
the exception of those who had reached the age of sixty years 
or were excused by the administrative board for sufficient 
reason were compelled to attend sessions of the school on other 
time than that required for the performance of police duty. 
Four sessions of the school were held each day on Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of each week. Each 
officer attending school was furnished with a copy of the day's 
lecture and ten questions to answer in writing. During the 
first term of this school two hundred and ten sessions were held 
and a total of 1,898 patrolmen attended. Instruction was given 
in fifteen different subjects, such as court procedure, discipline 
and deportment, report writing, arrests, narcotic drugs, care 
and use of department equipment, etc. Special instruction 
was also given to officers of rank on different subjects, such as 
arrests, care of department equipment and the proper use of the 
Bureau of Records. This year the administrative board was 
enlarged to seven members, consisting of two deputy super- 
intendents and five captains. Lectures and instruction are 
given by a much larger number of officers than in the preceding 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

year, as this is believed to be desirable in improving the knowl- 
edge of the officers giving the instruction. The second term of 
the police school was opened on November 28, 1932, and will 
cover subjects additional to those taught last year. It will also 
provide different courses of instruction for officers of the rank 
of sergeant. 

Prosecution for Nuisances. 
The method for the suppression and control of vice by 
equity process established in 1930 has been continued and found 
to be effective as in the past. 

Traffic. 

For many years the regulation of traffic and the enforce- 
ment of traffic regulations were practically centered in two 
traffic divisions which covered only part of the city. The 
men attached to these divisions had little or no opportunity 
to engage in or improve themselves in general police work 
and while they were young and active members of the depart- 
ment were not given the opportunity to become thoroughly 
trained in general police work, nor was the regulation of traffic 
in the city uniformly handled, as one of the traffic division 
headquarters was located in the Back Bay and one in the 
business section of the city. This organization led many 
commanding officers to believe that they had no responsibility 
in regard to the enforcement of traffic regulations, nor the 
regulation of traffic in their divisions. 

On September 23, 1932, the two traffic divisions were 
abolished and the duties performed hitherto by these divisions 
were placed upon the various divisions, making clear to the 
division commanders that the responsibility for traffic control 
and safety of the public using the highways was an essential 
and important part of their duties and should be carried on in 
the same manner as all other police functions. 

The duties of the Bureau of Traffic were changed, the force 
in that bureau being increased and the duty of inspection of 
traffic in the entire city placed upon it. The method in brief 
being that the Bureau of Traffic through its well trained traffic 
officers will take suitable action to remedy promptly any 
deficiencies or lack of attention that may be found to exist 
in any division, reporting the same to the Superintendent of 
Police. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There was also established in the Bureau of Traffic a traffic 
school for the instruction of officers engaged in whole or in 
part on traffic work. Altogether this change has made a 
super\dsing and co-ordinating agency to study and regulate 
traffic matters throughout the city so far as they affect the 
Police Department. 

The conditions that prevailed in the previous year mth 
reference to the enforcement of traffic rules and regulations 
have not been remedied. The traffic rules and regulations are 
promulgated by the Boston Traffic Commission and it is the 
duty of the police to enforce such rules. The Bureau of 
Traffic reports on the matter of enforcement during 1932 that 
some 90,103 tags were placed upon motor vehicles for various 
\iolations of the traffic rules and regulations as compared vnth 
89,291 tags placed upon motor vehicles during 1931. Of this 
number 62,846 tags were turned in by the operators and 
27,257 tags were not turned ia. Of the tags turned in, 9,154 
were presented to the courts for prosecution. In reference 
to the tags that were not turned in, the names of 6,386 o^Miers 
of cars tagged were submitted to the Registrar of ^^lotor 
Vehicles. 

Until the latter part of 1931 prosecution was successfully 
made in the lower courts against owners of vehicles which had 
been tagged and the tag not returned. An adverse decision 
of the Superior Court in November of 1931 stopped this pro- 
cedure. A new regulation to meet this situation was enacted 
by the Boston Traffic Commission and became effective 
December 14, 1931, providing for the prosecution of the regis- 
tered owTier of a vehicle which was found parked in violation 
of the traffic regulations. This failed to allow successful 
prosecution as the courts refused to grant summonses. 
Apparently, the justices of the courts were of the opinion that 
this regulation as enacted would not permit the prosecution of 
registered owners of motor vehicles. Another obstacle encoun- 
tered was that the justices of the Central ^Municipal Court 
refused to grant simimonses against operators of motor vehicles 
which were tagged unless the officers had either seen the 
defendant park the car, or drive it away, or had an admission 
from him that he had left the car at the location where it was 
tagged. This required the presence in court of the tagging 
officer and the desk officer who received the tag when it was 
turned in at the station. 

Until a proper and legal regulation is promulgated by the 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

Boston Traffic Commission, the enforcement of the traffic 
rules and regulations by the poHce will continue to be seriously 
hampered. 

During the past year over one million persons were handled 
to and from the many baseball, football games and political 
events, particularly during the presidential campaign, without 
a person being injured or property damage of an appreciable 
extent. 

Hackxey Carriages and Stands. 

For the two years operating under the provisions of chapter 
392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the new rules and regulations relative to hackney carriages 
and stands established on February 1, 1931, by the Police 
Commissioner have worked out very well. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year 
3,743 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
One thousand, seven hundred and twenty-nine suspensions 
ranging from one to thirty days, according to the offense, and 
24 revocations were made, the remainder being reprimanded 
and warned and a record filed for future reference. This sys- 
tem of discipline has continued to result in relieving the courts 
of many minor cases which would tend to congest their dockets. 
Any driver, in accordance with the hackney rules, who is 
dissatisfied with the findings of the Bureau of Traffic may 
appeal to the Commissioner, and during the past year an 
appeal was taken in less than half a dozen cases. There still 
continues to be a minimum of crime among the 3,846 drivers 
who have been licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

At present there are 164 locations for special stands as com- 
pared with 161 locations during the past year, and 299 loca- 
tions of public stands with a capacity of 749 cabs as compared 
with 299 locations with a capacity of 745 cabs during the 
preceding year. The total licensed hackney carriages at pres- 
ent are 2,034 as compared with 2,461 in the pre\ious year. 
During the year there were approximately 200 taxi stands, 
both special and public, that were established, removed or 
relocated in the interest of public necessity and convenience. 

Plant and Equipment. 
The central office of the Property Clerk which was formerly 
located at Division 2 on ^Nlilk Street was moved to Head- 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

quarters on November 29, 1931, and this has proven of material 
advantage in the conduct of this branch of the Department's 
business. 

A new style overcoat has been adopted to replace the long 
overcoat, winter riding coat, wagon and boat reefer, and 
traffic reefer. This coat will be used for all purposes, eliminat- 
ing the necessity of providing some of the members of the 
force with two styles of garment, and will save the City of 
Boston a considerable sum of money. 

Careful consideration has been given to the care of the 
firearms of the Department, and all are in excellent condition. 
The revolvers carried by the men have been regularly inspected 
and repairs made where required. The value of this inspec- 
tion has been shown by the decreasing number of major repairs 
this year over last. 

There are now 20 horses in the Department, two of which 
were purchased during the year. 

The Department has traded 47 automobiles and purchased 
during the year 16 additional automobiles, and there are now 
175 motor vehicles in the Department, divided into the follow- 
ing types : 

9 Utility wagons. 

1 Auto ambulance. 

20 Combination auto patrols and ambulances (patrol wagons). 
90 Automobiles, including sedans, trucks, coupe and tow wagon. 

2 Motor prison vans. 
53 Motorcycles. 

The lost and found branch of the Department has been 
active during the year as shown by the following schedule: 
Articles on hand December 1, 1931 ' . . " . . 1,509 
Articles received during the year 1,141 

Total 2,650 

Disposed of: 

To owners, through efforts of the Property Clerk's 

Office 209 

To owners in response to advertisements ... 23 

Worthless or junk 540 

Sold at public auction 681 

Perishable articles destroyed, being decayed or unfit 

for use 18 

Number of packages, containing money, paid to the 

Chief Clerk 128 

Total number of articles disposed of 1,599 

Total number of articles on hand December 1, 1932 1,051 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

The method of obtaining written proposals on bids for the 
larger quantities of supplies and materials used by the Depart- 
ment, as well as for repairs to Department property, labor 
and materials, which was put into general operation last year, 
has been continued and this competitive bidding has proven 
most satisfactory and resulted in much saving of money for 
the City of Boston. 

The Superintendent of Police Buildings, who was placed in 
charge of all buildings under the control of the Police Depart- 
ment last year, and who is in charge of general repairs and 
needed alterations, has maintained all police buildings in a 
proper condition. 

Personnel. 

The members of the Police Force in the past year have 
conducted themselves on the whole with tact, alertness, ability 
and courage. Not a single member on any occasion has hesi- 
tated to risk his life either in apprehending criminals or render- 
ing assistance to the sick and injured. During the year 
ending November 30, 1932, the strength of the uniform force 
showed a decline, numbering 2,289 officers at the end of the 
year as compared to 2,380 officers on December 1, 1931. Other 
employees remained practically unchanged. On November 30 
of this year there was a total of 2,454 persons on the roll of 
the Police Department. 

Division Commanders have made a number of reports 
through the Superintendent recommending that certain officers 
of their respective divisions be commended in General Orders 
for meritorious work in the apprehension of law violators or 
for saving lives. The Commissioner, during the past year, 
commended in General Orders 1 deputy superintendent, 3 
captains, 8 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant-inspector, 40 sergeants, 
and 190 patrolmen. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and the 
annual Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed in December 
of 1930. The Superintendent and Deputy Superintendents 
acting as a Board of Merit reviewed the meritorious and 
courageous acts performed by members of the force in 1929 
and recommended the following officers for special recognition 
due to acts performed during that year: 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor. — Patrolman James J. McGowan, 
now of Division 5. 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Department Medals of Honor. — Patrolman James J. Mc- 
Gowan, now of Division 5, Sergeant Frank E. Oilman, now of 
Division 16, and Patrolman Archibald N. Rintoul, now of 
Division 5. 

The medals were presented at the annual ball of the Boston 
Police Relief Association held in January, 1931. 

On the evening of January 12, 1932, the medals for 1930 
and 1931 were awarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, and the following officers were selected for 
1930 and 1931 to receive the Walter Scott Medals for Valor 
and the Department Medals of Honor: 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1930 and Department Medal 
of Honor. — Patrolman Owen F. Donovan, Division 2. 

Department Medals of Honor. — Sergeant John P. J. Maune, 
now of Division 11, Patrolman John J. Falvey, formerly of 
Division 10, and Patrolman Lewis S. Morrissey, Division 10. 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1931 and Department Medal 
of Honor. — Patrolman Chester A. Guilford, now of Division 16. 

Department Medals of Honor. — Patrolman Edward W. 
Crickard, Division 2, Patrolman Daniel L. Donahue, Divi- 
sion 5, Patrolman Robert C. White, Division 8, and Patrol- 
man Edward F. Harrington, Division 13. 

On January 11, 1933, at the annual ball of the Boston 
Police Relief Association it is contemplated awarding the 
medals for 1932 and the following officers have been selected 
for that year to receive the Walter Scott Medal for Valor and 
the Department Medals of Honor : 

For 1932. 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and the' Department Medal of 

Honor. 

Patrolman Elmer R. Ogston, Division 4. 

The Department Medal of Honor. 
Patrolman Frederick V. Perry, Division 10. 
Patrolman Herbert J. Langlois, Division 10. 
Patrolman Cyril Montgomery, Division 15, 
Patrolman Joseph Gilleo, Division 1. 
Patrolman Leo V. Devlin, Division 9. 
Patrolman William B. Boy den. Division 10. 
In 1932, 3,032 days were lost by officers of the Department 
by reason of injuries received while on duty, affecting 222 
officers. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

During the year 42 patrolmen have been punished for 
violation of Police Rules and Regulations by either suspension 
with loss of pay during term of suspension, extra duty, repri- 
mands or the placing of complaints against them on file; 
3 cases against patrolmen were continued for final disposition. 

One sergeant and 6 patrolmen after hearing, were discharged 
from the service; 4 patrolmen resigned while charges against 
them were pending and complaints against 2 sergeants and 
5 patrolmen were dismissed after hearing. 

On December 1, 1931, Sergeant John P. M. Wolfe of Traffic 
Division 20, died as a result of injuries sustained while in the 
performance of duty. His widow was rendered all possible 
aid in presenting her case to the Mayor and the City Council, 
wherein jurisdiction lies in the matter of providing allowances 
for the support of dependents of officers killed or who have 
died from injuries received while in the performance of duty. 



Expenditures. 

During the twelve months period ending November 30, 
1932, the total expenses of the Boston Police Department 
amounted to $6,044,329.59. This included the pay of the 
police and employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing 
(the annual enrollment on April 1 of all persons 20 years 
of age or over). In the corresponding period for 1931 the 
expenditures totaled $6,173,296.24. The decrease of 
.S128,966.65 was due in a substantial part to the fact that 
vacancies in the grade of patrolman were not filled in 1932, 
and less was expended for police equipment. 

There was, however, an increase in the amount paid for 
pensions, due to the large number added to the police pension 
roll. 

In the latter part of this report the financial statement 
shows the expenditures of the Department in detail. 



Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1932, receipts 
totaled $85,369.58, as compared to $98,858.25 in the previous 
year, and this decrease of $13,488.67 in receipts is largely 
due to the fact that less has been received for miscellaneous 
licenses and from the sale of condemned, lost, stolen and 
abandoned property. 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Arrests. 
For the twelve months ending November 30, 1932, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1931, 
a brief comparison of the number of cases reported and arrests 
for major offences may be of interest and is submitted below: 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1931. 


Year Ending 

November 30. 

1932. 




Cases 
Reported. 


.Arrests. . 


Cases 
Reported. 


Arrests. 


Offences Against the Person. 










Murder 


10 


8 


13 


21 


Manslaughter 


98 


100 


75 


86 


Rape (including attempts) 


62 


68 


99 


110 


Robbery (including attempts) 


350 


284 


558 


384 


Aggravated assault 


124 


123 


184 


151 


Offences Against Property 
CoMMiTTED With Violence. 










Burglary, breaking and entering (includ- 
ing attempts) 


1,464 


536 


1,926 


731 


Offences Against Property 
Committed Without Violence. 










Auto thefts (including attempts) 


5,402 


343 


4,898 


339 


Larceny (including attempts) . 


5,440 


2,767 


5,867 


2,573 


Offences Against the Liquor Law. 










Liquor law, violation of (State) 


3,739 


2,899 


1,842 


1,842 


Drunkenness 


36,620 


36,113 


34,372- 


34.372 


Offences not Included in the 
Foregoing. 










Auto, operating under the influence of 
liquor (first offence) .... 


614 


608 


556 


556 


Auto, operating under the influence of 
liquor (second offence) 


42 


42 


43 


• 43 


Totals 


53,965 


43,891 


50.433 


41,208 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offences, such as traffic violations, violation of city ordi- 
nances, gaming, and miscellaneous offences. Total arrests 
for the year amounted to 82,001 of which 76,631 were males 
and 5,370 were females. This total compares to 92,131 for the 
preceding year. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

In connection with the arrests record it is exceedingly inter- 
esting to note that 21,245 persons or 25.90 per cent of the total 
arrests during the past year were of persons residing outside 
the city limits of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to 
which Boston is called upon to perform police work for non- 
residents. 

The Police Commissioner has attempted to find out what 
percentage of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not kept 
of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind 
in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, either of 
the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 25.90 per cent 
of the arrests in Boston is of nonresidents, whereas other cities 
have but a negligible percentage of arrests of nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 

This Department during the past year has continued its 

efforts of co-operation in furnishing returns to the National 

Division of Identification and Information of the Department 

of Justice, Washington, D. C, of the following serious offences: 

1 . Felonious homicide : 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny. 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

A summary of the returns to the Federal authorities on these 
offences is to be found in the table immediately preceding, 
under the heading of "Arrests." 

Conclusions. 
The large number of commendatory letters which have been 
received from the public during the past year expressing 
appreciation of the service rendered by members of the Depart- 
ment show that the Department has gained the confidence of 
the public. 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

During the past year a senior officer of this Department 
visited all the courts in our jurisdiction and talked with the 
members of the judiciary, including the clerk of each court, 
inquiring as to the appearance of the officers, their methods 
and manner of testifying, making out of complaints, tardiness, 
and whether or not there were any faults in general and if there 
were any recommendations that they could make to aid in 
obtaining greater assistance to the courts by the police. The 
judges and the clerks were unanimous in stating that they had 
no complaints to make and that the officers were conducting 
their cases in a very efficient manner and that there had been a 
marked improvement in the handling of court cases during the 
past year. 

The following suggestions are presented for your con- 
sideration : 

It would be very helpful to the police if they were 
empowered with the authority to arrest without a warrant 
drivers who operate motor vehicles while under the in- 
fluence of intoxicating liquor. 

The Registrar of Motor Vehicles should be empowered 
with authority to revoke registrations and hcenses of all 
persons convicted of felonies, and such hcenses or registra- 
tions should not be reissued to them except on approval 
of the police. 

The pohce should have the authority to destroy all 
property seized without warrants where the owners are 
unknown if such property has been used for illegitimate 
purposes. 

The law in reference to lost or abandoned property 
coming into the possession of the pohce should be amended 
by not requiring the police to sell the lost or abandoned 
property by auction in cases where the property is of 
nominal value. 
The activities of the Department are reported upon in greater 
detail in the following sections of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1933.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Comahssioner. 1 

Secretary. Legal AD^^soR. 2 

Chief Clerk. 1 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-Inspectors 



Sergeants 
Patrolmen 

Total 



175 
2,016 

2,289 



Director 

Signalmen . 

Operator and Repairman 

Linemen 

Chauffeur . 



Signal SER\acE. 



Painter 

Telephone Operators 

Total . 



20 



Employees of the Department 



Property Clerk 

Clerks ". . 

Stenographers 

Chauffeurs . 

Cleaners 

Elevator Operators . 

Engineers on Police 

Steamers 
Firemen, ^L1rine 
Firemen, Stationary . 
Hostlers .... 
Janitors .... 



Laborer 

Matrons 

Mechanic 

Repairmen 

Steamfitter 

Superintendent of Build- 
ings 

Superintendent of. Repair 
Shop .... 

Tailor 

Total .... 



141 



Recapitulation. 
Police Commissioner 
Secretary, Legal Advisor and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Emploj'ees 



2,289 

20 

141 



Grand Total 



2,454 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the PoHce Force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 1 patrolman was reinstated; 1 sergeant and 
6 patrolmen were discharged; 6 patrolmen resigned (4 while 
charges were pending); 24 patrolmen were promoted; 1 deputy 
superintendent, 9 captains, 8 lieutenants, 4 lieutenant- 
inspectors, 10 sergeants and 35 patrolmen were retired on 
pensions; 2 lieutenants, 4 sergeants and 6 patrolmen died. 
(See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Civilian Changes. 

Thomas S. Gill, Acting Chief Clerk, was appointed and 
designated as Chief Clerk of the Department; effective as of 
March 3, 1932. 

Timothy A. J. Hayes, Provisional Director of the PoHce 
Signal Service, was appointed and designated as Director of 
that Unit; effective as of April 28, 1932. 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1931. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1932. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1931. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


51 
31 

59 

81 


.670 
506 

1,505 
351 


462 
214 

887 
390 


Totals . 


222 


3,032 


1,953 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a 

separate person, was 82,001 as against 92,131 the preceding 

year, being a decrease of 10,130. The percentage of decrease 

and increase was as follows: 



1933.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 



Offences against the person 

Offences against property committed with violence 
Offences against property committed without 

violence . . ' 

Malicious offences against property 
Forgery and offences against the currency . 
Offences against the license laws . 
Offences against chastity, morality, etc. 
Offences not included in the foregoing . 



Per Cent. 

Increase 9 . 63 
Increase 36.38 

Decrease 2.90 
Increase 35.92 
Decrease 21.37 
Decrease 27.59 
Decrease 5 . 76 
Decrease 17.95 



There were 14,729 persons arrested on warrants and 46,847 
without warrants; 20,425 persons were summoned by the 
court; 54,572 persons were prosecuted; 26,383 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 
1,046 were dehvered to outside authorities. The number of 
males arrested was 76,631; of females, 5,370; of foreigners, 
18,540, or approximately 22.60 per cent; of minors, 9,891. Of 
the total number arrested 21,245, or 25.90 per cent, were non- 
residents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1928 to 1932, inclusive, was $385,007.22; in 
1932 it was $209,730, or $175,277.22 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
54,289; in 1932 it was 48,751, or 5,538 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $15,442.99; 
in 1932 it was $17,254.45, or $1,811.46 more than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 94. 
There were 1,741 less persons arrested than in 1931, a decrease 
of 4.82 per cent ; 16.97 per cent of the arrested persons were non- 
residents and 31.16 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table XL) 

The number of arrests for all offences for the year was 82,001, 
being a decrease of 10,130 over last year, and 9,094 less than the 
average for the past five years. There were 34,372 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 1,741 less than last year and 
1,069 less than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of 5.21 
per cent in males and an increase of 5.73 per cent in females 
from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year, 82,001, 466 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one arrest in 
175 was for such offence or .56 per cent. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Fifty-eight and thirty-six hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty and forty. 
(See Table XII.) 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 
Denmark 
Turkey . 
South America 
Australia 
Holland 
Belgium 
Albania 
Switzerland . 
Mexico . 
Africa . 
East Indies . 
Hungary 
Japan . 
Roumania 
Wales . 
Asia 

Arabia . 

Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico . 
Unknown 

Total . 



United States 








63,461 


Ireland . 






5,767 


British Provinces 






3,123 


Italy . . 






2,788 


Russia . 








2,075 


Poland . 








833 


Sweden . 








593 


China . 








133 


England 








372 


Scotland 








375 


Greece . 








332 


Lithuania 








582 


Portugal 








214 


Norway 








198 


Germany 








208 


Finland 








128 


Syria 








156 


Armenia 








74 


Austria . 








65 


Spain 








45 


France . 








63 


West Indies 








73 



73 
62 

28 

42 

30 

15 

1 

7 

3 

1 

6 

13 

14 

11 

2 

24 

6 

3 

1 

1 



82,001 



The number of persons punished by fine was 16,554 and the 
fines amounted to $209,730. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred and eighty-nine persons were committed to the 
State Prison, 2,591 to the House of Correction, 36 to the 
Women's Prison, 239 to the Reformatory Prison, 2,385 to other 
institutions, and 1 to the Bridgewater State Criminal Asylum. 

The total years of imprisonment were 2 life, 3,184 years 
5 months (555 sentences indefinite) ; the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 48,751, and the witness fees 
earned by them amounted to $17,254.45. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$151,724. 

Seven witnesses were detained at station houses; 888 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 376 from last year. 
There was a decrease of 5.84 per cent in the number of sick and 
injured persons assisted and a decrease of about 4.94 per cent 
in the number of lost children cared for. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the five 
years from 1928 to 1932, inclusive, was $1,546,231.94; in 1932 
it was $920,736.60 or $625,495.34 less than the average. The 
amount of property stolen which was recovered by the Boston 
Police was $602,540.75 as against $2,117,014.35 last year. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

This Bureau, which is a central detective agency of the 
Department, is operated on a scale much larger than hereto- 
fore because of a considerable increase in the personnel and 
additional equipment. It is now operating more efficiently. 
The Bureau is open during the twenty-four hours subject to 
call for police service at all times. 

The activities of this unit cover such a wide field that a 
statement of the work of some of its subdivisions may be of 
interest. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles reported 
stolen and is in daily communication with police departments 
all over the country. 

The automobile index contains records of 400,000 automo- 
biles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other 
places, cars reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners 
are wanted and cars whose operators are wanted for various 
offences. This index is constantly increasing. Many arrests 
are made by officers of the Department and the automobile 
division through information obtained from the index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are inves- 
tigated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations 
are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

In addition to recovering many stolen automobiles, members 
of this division during the year identified a number of auto- 
mobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on police 
divisions, and have assisted in restoring these vehicles to the 
owners. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the First, Second 
and Third Classes. 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



During the year 225 applications for such Hcenses were 
received, 221 of which were granted (5 "without fee") and 4 
were rejected. 

Of the hcenses granted 15 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 24 transferred to new locations. One appli- 
cation for transfer to new location was rejected, 4 licenses were 
suspended indefinitely and 1 license was suspended for seven 
days. (See Table XIV.) 

Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1932. 



Month. 


Reported 
stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1931. 










December 


567 


538 


21 


8 


1932 












January . 






371 


352 


15 


4 


February . 








276 


266 


7 


3 


March 








389 


367 


15 


7 


April . 








429 


410 


13 


6 


May . . 








438 


421 


10 


7 


June . 








376 


366 


6 


4 


July . . 








354 


331 


14 


9 


August 








372 


342 


12 


18 


September 








407 


379 ' 


10 


18 


October . 








483 


463 


7 


13 


November. 








439 


416 


4 


19 


Totals . 


4,901 


4,651 


134 


116 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



53 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1932. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1931. 








December 


2,218 


1,876 


740 


1932. 








January .... 


2,549 


2,028 


869 


February 






2,305 


1,615 


498 


March . 






3,087 


2,607 


928 


AprU . 






2,596 


2,475 


1,237 


May . 






3,063 


2,748 


1,282 


June 






3,478 


2,985 


1,144 


July . 






3,732 


2,769 


1,012 


August . 






3,885 


3,080 


1,023 


September 






3,065 


2,394 


921 


October . 






2,585 


1,912 


766 


November 






2,713 


1,943 


617 


Totals 


35,276 


28,432 


11,037 



Homicide Division. 

This division investigates all deaths by violence and pre- 
pares all cases for inquest. It examines and records all reports 
of accidents and cases of serious injury. Officers attached to 
this division, with police stenographers, are subject to call at 
any hour of the day or night. The homicide files contain 
complete reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, a record 
of all inquests and a record of all deaths and serious accidents 
which are reported to the Police Department. 

Officers of this division detailed to assist the medical examin- 
ers report having investigated 761 cases of death from the 
following causes: 



64 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Abortion 

Alcoholism 

AsphjTciation . 

Automobiles . 

Bleeding (accidental) 

Burns 

Coasting . 

Drowning 

Elevators 

Exposure 

FaUs . . . 

Falling objects 

Fright . 

Glass, cut by . 



15 

15 

122 

1 

13 
2 

39 
6 
3 

49 
5 
1 
1 



Homicide 

Machinery 

Motorcycle 

Natural causes 

Poison 

Railway 

Railroad 

StiUborn 

Suicide 

Shooting (accidental) 

Shot by officer 

Electricity 

Total 



24 

1 

1 

352 

4 

16 

12 
4 

62 
1 
3 
1 

761 



Of the total number, the following cases were prosecuted in 



the courts: 

Automobiles . 

Abortion 

Accessory to abortion 

Manslaughter 

Murder . 



110 
10 



13 



Railway 9 

Shot by officer resisting 
arrest 1 



Total 



160 



The following inquests were held during the year: 



Automobiles 

Abortion 

Alcoholism 

AsphjTciation 

Bums 

Coasting . 

Elevator . 

Falls 

Falling object 

Fright 



118 
3 

1 
1 
3 
1 
5 
7 
3 
1 



Homicide 
Machinery 
Motorcycle 
Street railway 
Railroad . 
Sudden death 
Wagon . 



Total 



25 

1 
1 
16 
12 
3 
1 

202 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

In addition, members of this bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or 
purchased for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this bureau which were 
investigated during the year is' 20,814. There are 55,460 
cases reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose, 
and reports made on these cases are filed away for future 
reference. Complaints are received from many sources, includ- 
ing cases referred to the bureau by justices of courts and the 
district attorney, in addition to cases reported direct to the 
Police Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation are included in the statements of the general work of 
the Department, but as the duties of this bureau are of a special 
character, the following statement may be of interest. 

Number of persons arrested 2,524 

Fugitives from justice from other States arrested and 

delivered to officers from those States .... 59 

Number of cases investigated 20,814 

Number of extra duties performed 22,756 

Number of cases of homicide, etc 24 

Number of cases of abortion, etc 25 

Number of days spent in court by police officers . . 3,741 
Number of years imprisonment, 396 years, 3 months, 1 

life term and 3 indefinite terms. 
Amount of stolen property recovered $141,821.48 

Special Events. 
The following is a Ust of the special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each : 

I93I. Men. 

Dec. 1, Funeral of Patrolman William L. Abbott ... 59 



Dec. 3, Funeral of Sergeant John P. M. Wolfe 

Dec. 22, Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Dec. 23, Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Dec. 24, Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Dec. 24, Christmas Eve, West End, traffic duty 

Dec. 24, Christmas Eve, Boston Common 

Dec. 24, Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1931. Men. 

Dec. 31, New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 9 

Dec. 31, Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common .... 8 

Dec. 31, Special duty on Division 4 51 

1932. 

Jan. 3, Commonwealth Pier, deportation of William Murdoch 112 

Jan. 4, New City Council organizing 9 

Jan. 4, Odd Fellows' building, fire 58 

Jan. 12, Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Asso- 
ciation 214 

Jan. 14, Back Bay Station, arrival of Ex -Governor Alfred E. 

Smith 40 

Jan. 14, Hotel Statler, arrival of Ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith, 22 

Jan. 15, Laying corner stone, new post office building . . 24 

Jan. 15, Back Bay Station, departure of Ex-Governor Alfred 

E. Smith 70 

Jan. 28, Fire at 137 Beach street 18 

Feb. 8, Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's Ball .... 39 

Mar. 17, South Boston, Evacuation Day parade .... 335 

Apr. 9, Cathedral Club road race 40 

Apr. 10, International Labor Defence meeting .... 13 

Apr. 19, Marathon race 252 

Apr. 19, Patriots' Day celebration 85 

Apr. 22, Boston Common, exhibition by Police Riot Company, 112 

Apr. 26, Details at Presidential Primary ... 465 

Apr. 26, Newspaper bulletin boards 18 

Apr. 30, Funeral of Patrolman Patrick McCool .... 47 

May 1, Boston Common, May Day fete 18 

May 15, Beer parade 55 

May 29, Cemeteries and vicinities 194 

May 30, Cemeteries and vicinities. Memorial Day . . . 224 

June 3, Parade, Boston School Cadets 375 

June 4, Dorchester Day celebration . . . . . . 162 

June 4, Boston Common, parade and meeting. Boy Scouts * . 132 

Jvme 5, Police Memorial Sunday exercises . ' . . . . 135 

Jime 6, Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 360 

Jime 11, Brighton, band concert 12 

June 14, Flag Day, parade and exercises, Boston Common . 16 

June 16, Roxbury district, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day . 25 

June 16, Charlestown " Night Before, ' ' Bunker Hill Day . . ' 89 

June 17, Roxbury district. Bunker Hill Day 64 

June 17, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day 44 

June 18, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebration ... 61 

Jime 19, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 272 

June 19, Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 13 

June 21, Sharkey-Schmelling fight. New York — bulletin 

boards 22 

June 22, Boston Common, parade and review, 211th Artillery, 22 

June 23, Boston Common, Masonic celebration .... 21 

June 29, Visit of Mrs. Amelia Earhart Putnam .... 109 



1933.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

1932. Men. 

June 29, Braves Field, athletic carnival 59 

July 3, Columbus Park, South Boston, concert and bonfire 34 

July 4, Columbus Park, South Boston, concert and fireworks, 25 

July 4, Boston Common, reception to Mayor James M. 

Curley 143 

July 21, Dedication of Frederick W. Bartlett Square, Mattapan, 100 

July 25, Dedication, boring through East Boston Tunnel . 30 

July 26, Outdoor broadcast by Mayor James M. Curlev, City 

Hall ' . . 40 

Aug. 3, Funeral of Patrolman Daniel F. Calvin .... 60 

Aug. 16, Funeral of Lieutenant Patrick J. McAuliffe ... 60 

Aug. 29, Communist meeting, City Hall 50 

Aug. 30, Funeral of Sergeant Dennis A. Shea .... 60 

Sept. 1, Parade, Boston Roosevelt Club 125 

Sept. 1, Boston Common, Park Department circus ... 30 

Sept. 8, Parade, 101st Infantry Veterans Association, A. E. F., 162 

Sept. 8, Carnival, 101st Infantry Veterans Association, A. E. F., 66 

Sept. 9, Carnival, 101st Infantry Veterans Association, A. E. F., 66 

Sept. 10, Carnival, 101st Infantry Veterans Association, A. E. F., 66 

Sept. 20, State Primary 2,200 

Sept. 23, East Boston Airport, searchlight demonstration . 30 

Sept. 28, World's Series baseball, bulletin boards .... 50 

Sept. 29, World's Series baseball, bulletin boards .... 50 

Sept. 30, Home-coming reception to Mayor James M. Curley . 150 

Oct. 1, World's Series baseball, bulletin boards .... 50 

Oct. 1, Harvard-Buffalo football game 70 

Oct. 2, World's Series baseball, bulletin boards .... 50 

Oct. 12, Annual dress parade and review of the Boston Police 
Regiment, composed of superior officers, officers of 
rank and patrolmen. The regiment was divided 
into three battalions of eight companies each, each 
battalion in command of a major, so designated. To 
each battalion was assigned a military band. The 
regiment included a sergeant and seventeen men 
mounted on department horses, a colonel command- 
ing, with his adjutant and staff officers from the 
respective police divisions and units in military com- 
pany formation, shotgun companies, patrolmen with 
Thompson sub-machine guns and a motorcycle unit 
and four emergency patrol wagons, each with two 
officers. 

The regiment was reviewed at a reviewing stand 
at City Hall by the Honorable James M. Curley, 
Mayor; at the State House by His Excellency 
Joseph B. Ely, Governor, and on the Boston Com- 
mon by the Honorable Eugene C. Hultman, Police 
Commissioner, who had as guests on the reviewing 
line, Adjutant-General John H. Agnew and members 
of the Governor's staff. Army, Navy and Police 
officials 1,650 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1932. Men. 

Oct. 15, Harvard-Pennsylvania football game .... 70 

Oct. 22, Harvard-Dartmouth football game 100 

Oct. 27, Visit of Ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith . . . .450 

Oct. 29, Harvard-Brown football game 75 

Oct. 31, Boston Arena, Roosevelt rally 350 

Nov. 5, Arrival of West Point Cadets and parade . . . 300 

Nov. 8, Details on Presidential and State election day . . 2,200 

Nov. 11, Boston Common, Armistice Day meetings, etc. . . 25 

Nov. 11, Armistice Day parade 285 

Nov. 12, Harvard-Holy Cross football game 100 

Nov. 13, Funeral of Patrolman Laurence L. Riley ... 23 
Nov. 20, R. H. White Company band and parade ... 20 
Nov. 23, Back Bay Station, arrival of Mrs. Franklin D. Roose- 
velt 20 

Nov. 24, Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade ... 116 

Nov. 28, City Hall, hunger marchers 11 

Note. — December 1 to December 8, 1931, inclusive, a total of 561 officers 
were on duty for that period of the so-called longshoremen's 
strike, in Divisions 6, 7, 12 and 15. 



Miscellaneous Business. 





1929-30. 


1930-31. 


1931-32. 


Abandoned children cared for . . . 


3 


6 


7 


Accidents reported 


10,099 


10,515 


14,132 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,489 


3,011 


2,475 


Cases investigated 


98,049 


83,440 


55,584 


Dangerous buildings reported 


14 


11 


11 


Dangerous chimneys reported 


• 7 


7 


4 


Dead bodies recovered 


224 


294 


263 


Defective cesspools reported .... 


20 


3 


12 


Defective drains and vaults reported . 


— 


3 


. 5 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported . 


10 


2 


4 


Defective gas pipes reported .... 


14 


2 


5 


Defective hydrants reported .... 


62 


27 


59 


Defective lamps reported .... 


5,897 


5,047 


4,758 


Defective sewers reported .... 


82 


170 


26 



1933.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



MiscELLANEors BrsiNESs. — Concluded. 





1929-30. 


1930-31. 


1931-32. 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 


9,770 


5,845 


2,265 


Defective water pipes reported 




65 


138 


37 


Disturbances suppressed 








701 


370 


389 


Extra duties performed . 








35,862 


37,276 


35,971 


Fire alarms given 








3,984 


4,562 


5,661 


Fires extinguished . 








1,113 


1,058 


1,064 


Insane persons taken in charge 








354 


378 


409 


Intoxicated persons assisted . 








22 


70 


52 


Lost children restored 








1,789 


1,719 


1,634 


Persons rescued from drowning 








26 


19 


10 


Sick and injured persons assisted 








6,701 


7,115 


6,699 


Stray teams reported and put up 








21 


21 


18 


Street obstructions removed . 








1,842 


810 


239 


Water running to waste reported 








495 


458 


432 


Witnesses detained . 








14 


10 


7 



Adjustment of Claims. 

For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $614.70; 
turned in and receipted for at the Chief Clerk's office, $532.25, 
making a grand total of $1,146.95, either received by or credited 
to this Department for such police property damage. 



Requests for Information from Police Journals. 

The officer detailed to impart information from the police 
journals on file at Headquarters reports services performed as 
follows : 



Number of requests complied with for information from the 

police journals in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 14,295 
Days in court 5 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

House of Detention. 

The house of detention for women is located in the court 
house, Somerset street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston, Brighton and 
Roxbury Crossing districts are taken to the house of detention 
in a van provided for the purpose. The}' are then held in 
charge of the matron until the next session of the court before 
which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprisonment they 
are returned to the house of detention and from there conveyed 
to the jail or institution to which they have been sentenced. 

During the year 2,179 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 1,194 

Larceny 303 

Night walking 45 

Fornication 102 

Idle and disorderly 127 

Assault and battery 15 

Adultery 29 

Violation of liquor law 30 

Keeping house of ill fame 12 

Various other causes 322 

Total 2,179 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 115 

From county jail 340 

Grand total . 2,634 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 558. Of these 420 are 
connected with the underground system and 138 witji the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 
In the past year the employees of this service responded to 
2,337 trouble calls; inspected 558 signal boxes; 18 signal desks 
and 1,105 batteries. Repairs have been made on 201 box 
movements; 120 registers; SO polar bells; 102 locks; 91 time 
stamps; 6 garage motors; 5 garage registers; 37 vibrator 
bells; 20 relay's; 16 pole changers; 8 electric fans. Beginning 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 61 

July 1 this Department took over the installing and main- 
tenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all stations and 
Headquarters building. There have been made: 300 plungers; 
200 box fittings; 300 line blocks; 200 automatic hooks. A 
complete all conduit entrance and meter service board has been 
installed at Division 16 by this unit to meet with the require- 
ments of the Electric Wire Inspection Department. 

One new box was added on Division 11, at Ronan Park; 
three new boxes on Division 13, one on the Jamaicaway and 
two in Franklin Park; four new boxes were added on Di\'ision 
16. Three remodelled signal registers were installed. Two 
complete signal systems, including the citizens' call and bhnker 
light system, were installed on Divisions 6 and 16. Connected 
with the police signal boxes there are 72 signal and 72 telephone 
circuits; 1,580,020 telephone messages and 3,200,915 "on 
duty" calls were sent over these lines. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype 
installations and minor teletype machine repairs throughout 
the Department. 

Plans have been completed and contracts drawn up for an 
improved signal system on Divisions 1, 4 and 5. These divi- 
sions are to be serviced with a paper insulated multi-conductor 
underground cable. The desks are to be of a tji^e which will 
enable the station to talk to Headquarters and all patrol boxes 
over Department-owned Hnes. 

Contracts have been let for the relocating of several pohce 
signal boxes as follows: Di\asion 1, 17 boxes; Di\'ision 4, 17 
boxes; Di\'ision 5, 18 boxes. Three new boxes are to be added 
to Division 5. 

There are assigned to this unit, one White truck, 2h tons 
capacity; one utility truck, h ton capacity; one Ford sedan; 
one four-door Plj-mouth sedan, and the Director's car, a 
Chrysler four-door sedan. 

During the year the automobile patrol wagons made 59,309 
runs, covering an aggregate distance of 126,579 miles. There 
were 38,667 prisoners convej^ed to the station houses, 3,589 
runs were made to take injured or insane persons to station 
houses, hospitals or their homes and 200 runs were made to 
take lost children to station houses. There were 4,626 runs to 
fires and 230 runs for liquor seizures. 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal 
Service at the present time: 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



14 close circuit signal desks 
6 open circuit blinker type 
signal desks 
120 circuits 
558 signal boxes 
12 garage annunciators 
52 test boxes 
960 cells of caustic soda, pri- 
mary cell type batt«ry 
350 cells of sulphuric acid stor- 
age type battery 



726,650 feet underground cable 
233,400 feet of overhead cable 
31,143 feet of duct 
67 manholes 
18 motor generator sets 
6 motor-driven flashers 

1 White truck 

2 Ford trucks 

1 Fordor sedan 
1 Plymouth sedan 
1 Chrysler sedan 



Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the poHce of Division 8 
comprising the harbor and islands therein were as follows: 

Value of property recovered consisting of boats, riggings, 

float stages, etc $41,128 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 480 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 80 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 3 

Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 9 

Nimiber of alarms of fire attended on the water front . . 17 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm .... 4 

Number of boats challenged 53 

Nimaber of boats searched for contraband 44 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted .... 3 

Number of cases investigated 145 

Number of dead bodies recovered 20 

Number rescued from drowning 7 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 9 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered ... 84 

Number of obstructions removed from channel . . . ' . 49 

Niunber of vessels assigned to anchorage . 1,182 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 

in harbor 50 

Nimaber of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 9 

Number of dead bodies cared for 1 

Number of hours of grappling 140 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,297, 
5,421 of which were from domestic ports, 457 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, 1,419 from foreign ports. Of the latter 
962 were steamers, 32 were motor vessels, and 7 schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay nightly 
from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge with the launch 
''E. U. Curtis" from July 26th to October 16th. There 
were 10 cases investigated, 6 boats challenged for contraband, 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

1 obstruction removed from the channel, 2 cases where assist- 
ance was rendered to boats in distress by reason of disabled 
engines, stress of weather, etc., 1 dead body cared for, 1 boat 
ordered to put up sailing lights, and 1 hour was spent in 
grappling. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1931, there were 20 horses in 
the service. During the year 2 were delivered to the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals on 
account of age and 2 were purchased. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 122 automobiles in the service at the present 
time: 35 attached to Headquarters; 20 in the city proper 
and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5; 8 in the South 
Boston district attached to Divisions 6 and 12; 5 in the East 
Boston district, attached to Division 7; 10 in the Roxbury 
district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 7 in the Dorchester 
district, attached to Division 11; 5 in the Jamaica Plain 
district, attached to Division 13; 6 in the Brighton district, 
attached to Division 14; 5 in the Charlestown district, attached 
to Division 15; 7 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, attached 
to Division 16; 4 in the West Roxbury district, attached to 
Division 17; 6 in the Hyde Park district, attached to Divi- 
sion 18, and 4 in the Mattapan district, attached to Division 19. 
(See page 65.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs $13,112 38 

Tire repairs and battery charging 569 83 

Storage and washing 6,993 03 

Gasolene 27,425 48 

Oil 2,843 71 

Prestone, polish, patches, plugs, etc. 1,214 50 

License fees 197 50 

Total $52,356 43 

Combination Ambulances. 
The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 1 
and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18 and 19. 



64 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



2,595 
832 
163 
136 



During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) 

Calls where services were not required 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Psychopathic Hospital 

Home 

Morgue 

Carnej- Hospital 

Massachusetts General Hospital . . . . . 

Forest Hills Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Boston State Hospital 

Children's Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Chelsea Xaval Hospital 

Police Station-houses 

Southern Mortuary 

Strong Hospital 

Silas Mason Hospital 

Floating Hospital 

Audubon Hospital 

Bay State Hospital 

Boston L\ing-in Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Fenway Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Hart Hospital 

Homeopathic Hospital . 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Women's Free Hospital 



Total 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

List of Vehicles Used by the Department. 



Divisions. 



















a 


-S 












e 


< ^ 


^o 








^ 
^ 


1 


111 




1 


1 




>. 


S 




mi 


1 


1 


o 

3 


D 


< 


1 ^ 


< 


S 


S 




2 


- 


- 


33 


- 


- 


35 


- 


1 


1 


3 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


5 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


2 


3 


- 


3 


8 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


2 


6 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


5 


10 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


2 


6 


1 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


3 


4 


- 


3 


10 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


3 


7 


1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


9 


1 


- 


1 


4 


- 


4 


10 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


3 


8 


1 


- 


- 


4 


2 


7 


14 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


4 


8 


- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


2 


8 


1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


6 


9 


1 


20 


91 


2 


53 


175 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 . 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 9 
Di\ision 10 . 
Division 11 . 
Division 12 . 
Division 13 . 
Division 14 . 
Division 15 . 
Division 16 . 
Division 17 . 
Division 18 . 
Division 19 . 
Unassigned . 
Totals . 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,034 * carriage licenses granted, 
being a decrease of 427, as compared with last year; 2,032 
motor carriages were licensed, being a decrease of 427 as com- 
pared with last year. 

There have been 2 horse-drawn carriages licensed during 
the year. 

There were 143 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were turned 
over to the Bureau of Traffic; 28 of these were restored to the 
owners and the balance placed in the custody of the Lost 
Property Bureau. 

Commencing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1932, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were finger-printed by the Department and 
their records, if any, searched for in the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . 2,036 

Number of carriages licensed 2,034 

Number of licenses transferred 28 

Number of licenses canceled 333 

Number of licenses suspended 5 

Carriage owners stripped of credentials . . . ; . 4 

Niunber of carriages inspected •. 2,169 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported upon - . . . . 3,911 

Number of complaints against owners and drivers investigated, 3,444 

Number of days spent in court 33 

Articles left in carriages reported by citizens .... 34 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 81 

Drivers' applications for licenses rejected "71 

Drivers' applications for licenses reconsidered and granted 6 

Drivers' licenses granted 1 3,846 

Drivers' licenses revoked 24 

Drivers' licenses suspended 40 

Drivers' licenses canceled 1 

Drivers' stripped of credentials 1,627 

Number of replaced windshield plates and badges ... J 256 

*286 regrants. t 1 granted "no fee". + 5 granted "no fee". 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the PoHce 
Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 
hcensee or Hcensees a designated portion of a pubHc way abut- 
ting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public or 
semi-public building as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 173 applications for such stands (with a 
total capacity of 528 hackney carriages) were received; 164 
locations for 514 carriages were granted, and 9 locations for 15 
carriages were rejected. 

Of these special hackney stand licenses, 9 locations (capacity 
37 carriages) were subsequently canceled or revoked; 155 
locations (capacity 492 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions, other than sidewalks, of public ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 
owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 1,067 applications for hackney carriage 
licenses for such public stands were granted. 

Of these public stand licenses 9 were suspended and 5 revoked. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for the 
occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon property) 
by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 24 applications (capacity 370 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing auto- 
mobile" was defined as follows: 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this act, shall mean an 
automobile, as defined in section one of chapter ninety of the General 
Laws used for the carrying for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing 
purposes in or from the city of Boston and in or on which automobile guide 
service by the driver or other person is offered or furnished". 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire". 

A further important change in the licensing of the sight- 
seeing automobiles was occasioned by the provision in Chapter 
399 of the Acts of 1931, referred to, providing that before 
licensing such vehicles (which are not to be classified as "re- 
newals" up to and including February 29, 1932), a certificate of 
"public convenience and necessity", requiring the operation of 
such vehicle, shall be obtained from the Department of Public 
Utilities. 

During the year ending November 30, 1932, there have been 
issued licenses for 34 * sight-seeing automobiles and 28 special 
stands for the same. 

Of this number there has been 1 license for sight-seeing auto- 
mobile revoked; 1 license canceled; 1 license for special stand 
for sight-seeing automobile revoked and 2 applications for 
special stands for sight-seeing automobiles rejected. 

"New" sight-seeing automobile drivers for the year com- 
mencing as of March 1, 1932, were fingerprinted as in the case 
of "new" hackney carriage drivers, and their records, if any, 
searched for in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There have been 35 drivers' licenses granted and 1 appli- 
cation for drivers' license rejected. 

Wagon Licenses. 
Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. During the 
year 2,726 applications for such licenses were received; 2,725 
of these were granted and 1 rejected. Of these licenses 14 
were subsequently canceled for nonpayment of license fee and 
1 because it was surrendered. (See Tables Xn\ XVL) 

* 1 regrant. 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was "not at a 
designated stand in the highway.'^ 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "for a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 2,725 granted, 2,551 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 174 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


19031 .... 


181,045 


1918 .... 


224,012 


1904 








193,195 


1919 . 








227,466 


1905 








194,547 


1920 . 








235,248 


1906 








195,446 


1921* . 








480,783 


1907 








195,900 


1922 . 








480,106 


1908 








201,552 


1923 . 








477,547 


1909 








201,391 


1924 . 








485,677 


19102 








203,603 


1925 . 








489,478 


1911 








206,825 


1926 . 








493,415 


1912 








214,178 


1927 . 








495,767 


1913 








215,388 


1928 . 








491,277 


1914 








219,364 


1929 . 








493,250 


1915 








220,883 


1930 . 








502,101 


1916=' 








- 


1931 . 








500,986 


1917 








221,207 







' 1903 to 1909, both inclusive listing was on May 1. 

2 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

' 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

« 1921 law changed to include women in listing 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year : 

Male . 240,960 

Female 258,798 

Total 499,758 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $39,270 32 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list . . 22,695 00 

Newspaper notices 715 07 

Circulars and pamphlets 346 50 

Stationery 377 44 

Interpreters 635 61 

Telephone 10 23 

Total $64,050 17 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 1 1,279 

April 2 1,210 

April 4 961 

April 5 597 

April 6 211 

April 7 31 

Aprils 4 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Police Department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The poUce findings in 1932 may be summarized as follows: — 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,244 

Physically incapacitated ' 199 

Convicted of crime 204 

Unfit for various reasons 468 

Apparently fit 6,049 

Total 8,164 

In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent to 
the Police Department for delivery 6,276 summonses to persons 
for jury service. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the apphcation 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen 
for the year commencing as of April 1, 1932, were fingerprinted 
by the Department and their records, if any, searched for in 
the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1932, there were 
1,133 special police officers appointed; 9 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause, 93 appointments were 
canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as 
follows : 

From United States Government 20 

From City Departments 60 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 32 

From other corporations and associations 753 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 215- 

From private institutions 24 

From churches 28 

Total 1,133 

Railroad Police. 

There were 4 persons appointed railroad policemen during 
the year, 2 of whom were employees of the Boston, Revere 
Beach & Lynn Railroad and 2 of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad. Sixteen appointments were canceled; 
12 of whom were employees of the Boston, Revere Beach & 
Lynn Railroad and 4 of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous ficenses 
received was 24,467. Of these 24,290 were granted, of which 
54 were canceled for nonpayment, leaving 24,236. During 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[J^ 



the year 426 licenses were transferred, 572 canceled, 52 revoked 
and 177 applications were rejected. The officers investigated 
3,813 complaints arising under these Ucenses. The fees 
collected and paid into the citj^ treasury amounted to S72,571.25. 
(See Tables XIV, XVII.) 

Musicians' Licenses. 
ItiJierant. 

During the year there were 36 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted; 1 license 
was subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment of 
license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with a 
quahfied musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September of 
each year. 

During the year 36 instrmnents were inspected with the 
following result : 



Kind of Instrcment. 



Number 
Inspected. 



Number 
Passed. 



Street pianos 
Hand organs 
Violins 
Accordions . 
Banjos 
Clarinets 
Flutes . 
Trumpets . 
Guitars 

Totals . 



36 



36 



Collective. 
Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 



1933.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



73 



The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon: 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1928 


223 


221 


2 


1929 


209 


207 


2 


1930 


212 


210 


2 


1931 


216 


216 


- 


1932 


270 


269 


1 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 

The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the 
number of such applications granted, the number refused and 
the number revoked : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1928 .... 


2,954 


2,904 


50 


1 


1929 .... 


3,025 


2,224 


70 


1 


1930 .... 


2,967 


2,902 


65 


5 


1931 .... 


3,097 


2,998 


99 


2 


1932 .... 


3,190 


*3,115 


75 


12 



■ Twenty-four canceled for nonpayment. 



Public Lodging Houses. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (amended by Chapter 45 of the Acts of 1927) 
and Sections 33 to 36, both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the 
General Laws, the location of each house and the number of 
lodgers accommodated: 



74 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Location-. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis street . 
8 Kne street 
79 Shawmut avenue . 
1202 Washington street 
1025 Washington street 



38,386 
142,355 
17,070 
29,749 
14.386 



Total 241,946 

Pexsioxs and Benefits. 

On December 1. 1931, there were 278 persons on the roll. 
During the year 17 died, ^iz., 1 captain. 2 inspectors, 3 sergeants, 
10 patrolmen and 1 lineman. Seventy-one were added, a^z., 
1 deput}' superintendent, 8 captains, 8 lieutenants, -4 lieutenant - 
inspectors. 10 sergeants, 35 patrolmen, 1 engineer, 1 lineman 
and the widows of Lieutenant-Inspector Joseph L. A. 
Cavagnaro, Sergeant John P. ^I. Wolfe and Patrolman William 
L. Abbott, who died from injuries received in the performance 
of duty, leaA-ing 332 on the roU at date, 299 pensioners and 33 
annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to 8308,743.71 and it is estimated that 8343,463.16 
wiU be required for pensions in 1933. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to 8207,550. There are 57 beneficiaries at the present- time and 
there has been paid to them the sum of 87,498.80 during the 
past 5'ear. 

FlNANCL\L. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age or 
more, and the maintenance of the police signal service, were 
86,044.329.59. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was 894.307.68. (See Table XMII. j 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., 
was 885,369.58. (See Table XIV.j 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(75) 





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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 •-" 1 


■83uipima 
JO ^uapua^uuadng 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO 


•j{jai3 X;jadoj<j 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ --C 1 ^ 1 


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JO nBaang 


1 1 1 1 1 1^1 ''^il^' l.-^-il 1 


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1 

1 
< 


S8,000 

5,000 

5,000 

3,500 

7,000 

4,500 

4,000 

2,700 

2,700 

2,500 
1,600 to 2,100 

2,100 

3,600 

750 to 3,600 

1,100 to 3,500 

1,600 to 1,800 

1.200 


RANK OR POSITION. 


.__... 


Police Commissioner . 
Secretary . 
Legal advisor 
Chief clerk . 
Superintendent . 
Deputy superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants . 
Lieutenant-inspectors 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen . 
Patrolwomen 
Property clerk . 
Clerks .... 
Stenographers 
Chauffeurs . 
Cleaners 



-"^^sss-^^^-^-^-"-^-^ --" 


i 




§ 




5 


^ ' 


S 


llllO-Hrtlllllllll III 


2 


1 1 1 1 1 '-I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


'''''"''" ' 


2 


'-'''' '^ ' ' ' ' 


§ 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


§ 


1 1 1 1 1 C^ 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


1 


lltNXI^IIIIIIIIII III 


c<5 


1 1 1 1 1 rt 1 1 « 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


t 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


o 


1 1 1 1 1 C-4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


s 


1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


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1 1 1 1 1 C-J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


!N 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


2 


1 1 1 1 1 C^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


1 




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s 




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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


t^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


o 




s 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 


5 


3,350 
1,000 to 1,600 
2,100 to 2,700 
1,700 to 2,000 

1,600 
1,600 to 1,800 

1,600 

1,600 to 2,300 

400 to 1,800 

2,000 

2,100 

1.900 
1,800 to 2,000 

2,100 

1,700 

3,000 

2,200 

2,000 

1,600 to 1,800 








1 




Director signal service 

Elevator operators . 

Engineers 

Firemen 

Hostlers 

Janitors. 

Laborer. 

Linemen 

Matrons 

Mechanic 

Operator and repairnmn 

Painter .... 

Repairmen . 

Signalmen . 

Steamfitter . . 

Superintendent of building 

Superintendent of repair 
shop 

Tailor .... 

Telephone operators . 



1 I 

Q I 

o g 

a - 

13 _g 



i HI 






o. o e C 

c "^.Hco 

K c ■=•= a 

O 0) " TJ Q, 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 







Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1932. 


Nov. 30, 
1932. 


Jan. 1, 
1932. 


Nov. 30, 
1932. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plu8 or 
Minus.) 


Police Commissioner . 

Secretary 

Legal Advisor . 

Superintendent . 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants 

Lieutenant-Inspectors 

Sergeants . 

Patrolmen . 

Patrolwomen 




1 

1 
1 
1 

3 

29 

55 

18 

187 

2,149 

8 


1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

29 

55 

18 

187 

2,149 

8 


1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

29 

54 

18 

187 

2,080 

5 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

22 

60 

13 

175 

2,011 

5 


Minus 1 
Minus 7 
Plus 6 
Minus 5 
Minus 12 
Minus 69 


Totals . 


2,453 


2,453 


2,380 


2,292 


Minus 88 



The last column (Net Gain or Loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



79 






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Ph 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1932, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the 
Number of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Allen, William H. . . . 


Age 


65 Vi2 years 


4111/12 years 


Armstrong, Ainsley C. 






Age 


65 


41 >/l2 " 


Benjamin, Wylie H. . 






Age 


67 Vi2 " 


431/12 " 


Boetwick, Tuffil . 






Age 


65 5/12 " 


41 V12 " 


Brooks, George . 






Age 


69 


39 


Brown, Thomas F. 






Age 


67 "/i2 " 


43 »/i2 " 


Bullock, Charles H. . 






Age 


67 5/i2 " 


43 6/12 " 


Burke, John F. . 






Age 


65 


373/12 " 


Burns, Harry P. . 






Age 


65 '/i2 " 


36Vi2 " 


Carmichael, Tholnas D. 






Age 


69Vi2 " 


36 V.2 " 


Casey, Michael . 






Age 


63 Vi2 " 


3211/12 " 


Chisholm, William V. 






Age 


67Vi2 " 


356/12 " 


Clifford, John T. . 






Age 


65 Vi2 " 


3911/12 " 


Connare, John A. 






Age 


67 Vi2 " 


36 9/12 " 


Conway, Edward T. . 






Age 


68 '/i2 " 


411'/l2 " 


Corser, Frederick H. . 






Incapacitated 


5510 /,2 " 


22 6/12 " 


Cratty, James J. . 






Age 


66 6/12 " 


38 1/12 " 


Daniels, Almon L. 






Age 


65 7i2 " 


35 V12 " 


Dennessy, James A. . 






Age 


67 '/n " 


371/12 " 


Desmond, Dennis F. . 






Age 


68 5/'i2 " 


44 5/12 " 


Doherty, William J. . 






Age 


68 ■/i2 " 


3Q8/12 " 


Dolliver, John B. 






Age 


65 "A. " 


32 '/i" " 


Donahue, John S. 






Age 


67Vi2 " 


42 =/,2 " 


Donahue, Thomas J. 






Age 


66'0/,o " 


39 


Donovan, Cornelius H. 






Age 


66 '/i2 " 


41 3/,, " 


Downey, John J. . 






Age 


66»/i2 " 


37»,i2 ." ' 


Driscoll, John E. . 






Age 


67 


37 5/12 " 


Duffy, Kieran 






Age 


66 3/12 " 


32 V12 " 


Eaton, Norman A. 






Age 


67V.2 " 


33 V12 " 


Eustace, Edward J. . 






Age 


68 9,12 " 


35 '/,2 " 


Farley, Owen 






Age 


66 9,12 " 


40 '/rj " 


Galligan, Thomas H. . 






Age 


66 :/,2 " 


36 2/12 " 


Goff, Michael J. . 






Age 


64 6/,2 " 


38 6/12 " 


Goodwin, Herbert W. 






Age 


66 '/i2 " 


42 «/,2 " 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



Table IV. — Concluded. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Gustafson. Gustaf 


Age 


65 years 


36 V12 years 


Halligan, James E. 




Age 


65 Vi2 " 


393/12 " 


Harking, John N. 




Age 


6810/12 " 


41 Vn " 


Higgins, Walter F. . 




Age 


65 1/12 " 


37Vi2 " 


Hines, Daniel J. . 




Age 


65 


37Vi2 " 


Hoisington, Charles W. 




Age 


66V.2 " 


43-/12 " 


Hoppe, Bernard J. 




Age 


64"/,2 " 


3110/12 " 


Hyland, William J. . 




Age 


66 Vi2 " 


43 «/.2 " 


Laffey, James 




Age 


65 «/i2 " 


3910/12 " 


Loughlin, Joseph F. . 




Age 


65 


393/12 " 


McNeil, Peter A. 




Age 


65 


31 V12 " 


McTiernan, Thomas . 




Age 


66 '/i2 " 


37 V 12 " 


Monahan, Patrick J. . 




Age 


6610/12 " 


36 V.2 " 


Montgomery, Edwin L. 




Age 


65 


3510/12 " 


Muldoon. Michael J. 




Age 


67Vi2 " 


38Vi2 " 


Murdoch, William A. . 




Age 


66 '/i2 " 


37 '/12 " 


Munro, Murray . 




Age 


65 '/i2 " 


41 6/12 •• 


Newell, Charles A. . 




Age 


6810/12 " 


4IV12 ■' 


O'Neil, Philip E. . 




Age 


65 


39 


Pyne, John W. . 




Age 


65 


37Vi2 " 


Ready, William . 




Age 


67 6/.2 " 


44V.2 '• 


Riordan, Jeremiah J. . 




Age 


66>/i2 " 


33 V12 " 


Robertson, Ernest W. 




Age 


60 Vis " 


28V12 " 


Rooney, John J. . 




Age 


65 3/12 " 


39 »/i2 " 


Ryan, Charles B. 




Age 


65 


36»/i2 " 


Small, Frank E. . . 




Age 


68 Vi2 " 


36 V12 " 


Smith, Joseph W. 




Age 


66V12 " 


378/12 " 


Stewart, John A. . 




Age 


65 


36 6/12 " 


Sullivan, Maurice 




Age 


69 V:2 " 


42" /,2 " 


Sweeney, John H. 




Age 


6010 /12 " 


353/12 " 


Waldron, James H. . 




Age 


65 


36 


Wallace, William H. . 




Age 


65 Vw " 


36ViJ " 


* Walkins, James J. . 




Age 


70 


45 V12 " 



* Retired under the Boston Retirement System which went into effect February 1, 1923. 



82 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

List of Officers wlio were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 



Rank and Name 



Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


Dec. 


25, 1931 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


July 


15, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 



Lieutenant Thomas S. J. Kavanagh to the rank of 

Captain. 
Sergeant Hugh D. Brady to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Francis J. Murphy to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Joseph E. Rollins to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant James T. Sheehan to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Stanley A. Gaw to the rank of Detective- 
Sergeant. 

Patrolman Coleman S. Joyce to the rank of Detective- 
Sergeant. 

Patrolman Thomas F. Joyce to the rank of Detec- 
tive-Sergeant. 

Patrolman Mark Morrison to the rank of Detective- 
Sergeant. 

Patrolman John F. Cullinan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman William L. Daniel to the rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant-Inspector Stephen J. Flaherty to the 
rank of Captain. 

Sergeant George V. Augusta to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Patrick J. McAuliffe to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Thomas W. O'Donnell to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Lawrence J. Waitt to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Michael J. Adley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William H. Britt'to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John T. Clifford, Jr., to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman John J. Coughlan, Jr., to the rank of 
Sergeant. 

Patrolman Harold C. Hickey to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Francis E. Lanagan to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Marcus E. Madden to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Raymond A. L. Monahan to the rank of 
Sergeant. 

Sergeant Louis DiSessa to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant William D. Donovan to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 



1933.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 83 

Table V. — Concluded. 



Kank and Name. 



Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 


Nov. 


24, 1932 



Sergeant John F. Fitzpatrick to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Thomas F. Harvey to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Edward J. Keating to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant CorneHus F. Leary to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 

Sergeant Hugh F. Marston to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Justin McCarthy to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Harold G. Mitten to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Melvin A. Patterson to the rank of Lieu- 
tenant. 
Sergeant Benjamin A. Wall to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Orrington Waugh to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Herbert B. Dwyer to the rank of Sergeant, 

Patrolman Thomas F. Friel to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Joseph F. Lawless to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman William H. Long to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Leo C. J. Masuret to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 

Patrolman Thomas F. McLaughlin to the rank of 
Sergeant. 

Patrolman John V. Miller to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Andrew J. Neely to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Francis W. Russell to the rank of Ser- 
geant. 
Patrolman William Shirar to the rank of Sergeant. 



84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date 
Appointed. 


1 

s 


1 

ji 


§ 

■J 

6 


13 

a 


II 

u 


c 

1 


c 
S 
2 


Totals. 


1888 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1900 
1901 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 








1 


2 


1 

3 

2 
5 
2 
3 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


2 

1 
7 
2 
2 
7 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 

4 

1 
2 
3 
16 
3 


- 


3 
5 

1 
3 

8 
6 

10 
5 
4 
3 
3 

11 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

60 

19 

16 

3 

6 


1 

6 

1 

6 
6 
3 
7 
4 
2 
1 
6 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 

2 

1 

521 

165 

•112 

72 

104 

79 

96 

315 

126 

92 

209 

47 

18 


2 

4 

18 

2 

2 

12 

27 

14 

23 

17 

9 

6 

14 

20 

6 

6 

9* 

2 

2 

1 

4 

5 

598 

187 

128 

75 

110 

79 

96 

315 

126 

92 

209 

47 

18 


Tot 


als 






1 


2 


22 


60 


13 


175 


2,016 


2,289 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



Table VII. 

Men. on the Police Force on November SO, 1932, who were Born 

in the Year Indicated in the Table Below. 



Date of Birth. 


a 

-§ 

a 

1 


a 

-0 

a 

u 


a 
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O 


00 

g 

1 

3 


11 

3 


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1 


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Totals. 


1863 . . . 














1 


1 


1866 








1 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1867 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


1868 








- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


8 


4 


14 


1869 








- 


2 


3 


3 


- 


3 


4 


15 


1870 








- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


2 


2 


7 


1871 








- 


- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


5 


11 


1872 








_ 


_ 


1 


4 


1 


4 


9 


19 


1873 








- 


- 


2 


4 


_ 


14 


3 


23 


1874 








- 


- 


2 


2 


3 


6 


4 


17 


1875 








- 


- 


3 


2 


- 


5 


- 


10 


1876 








- 


- 


3 


2 


1 


3 


2 


11 


1877 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 


7 


13 


1878 








- 


_ 


- 


2 


- 


5 


4 


11 


1879 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


4 


4 


10 


1880 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


3 


1881 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


4 


2 


10 


1882 








- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


4 


_ 


9 


1883 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


3 


1884 








- 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


3 


2 


7 


1885 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


17 


19 


1886 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


29 


32 


1887 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


44 


46 


1888 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


2 


51 


57 


1889 








- 


_ 


- 


2 


- 


3 


74 


79 


1890 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


63 


64 


1891 








_ 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


4 


94 


99 


1892 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


8 


131 


141 


1893 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


15 


139 


157 


1894 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


16 


162 


179 


1895 








_ 


- 


- 


4 


- 


12 


161 


177 


1896 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


11 


187 


200 


1897 








- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


19 


173 


196 


1898 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


157 


164 


1899 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


111 


112 


1900 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


147 


148 


1901 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


106 


106 


1902 








_ 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


49 


49 


1903 








- 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


44 


44 


1904 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


20 


20 


1905 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals . 


1 


2 


22 


60 


13 


175 


2,016 


2,289 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1932, is 
38.57 years. 



86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1932. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 5 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 8 
Division 9 
Division 10 . 
Division 11 . 
Division 12 . 
Division 13 . 
Division 14 . 
Division 15 . 
Division 16 
Division 17 . 
Division 18 . 
Division 19 . 
Division 20 * 
Division 21 * 
Totals . 



2,114 
4,388 
4,463 
4,575 
6,406 
11,611 
4,314 
6,266 
51 
5,177 
4,448 
2,632 
2,454 
1,277 
1,994 
5,211 
3,258 
1,006 
954 
1,361 
1,775 



401 
121 
406 
310 
336 
1,049 
236 
266 

242 

344 

125 

112 

60 

148 

315 

365 

69 

58 

96 

209 

102 



2,515 
4,509 
4,869 
4,885 
6,742 
12,660 
4,550 
6,532 
51 
5,419 
4,792 
2,757 
2,566 
1,337 
2,142 
5,526 
3,623 
1,075 
1,012 
1,573 
1,984 
998 



76,631 



5,370 



82,001 



* Traffic Divisions 20 and 21 abolished as of September 23, 1932. 



90 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



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1;^ >> 


£i 


C 


^H 


tT 






c3 


03 _^ 


bC 




'3 


03 






1 


■s is 

T3 T! 


M C 

:S _Q 

-^ 03 










M 


M M 


M M 


C M 


M 


ac 




fa 


C 


C .C 


.S _c 


■C c 


_C 


c 




o 


■n 






1 1 








w 


i^ 


J ^ 


1 ^ 


-2 


M 




Pi 


c 


a c 


s = 


oj a 


(S 


a 




t) 


0) 


aj a> 


<U 4j 


OJ 


a> 


<u 




H 


TS 


T3 --3 


'^^'^ 


1 « 

^^03 


13 


-0 


• 


5 


c 


c'S c 


SH « 


Ci 


c 




'Z 


c3 


o3 ^ 03 


03^ c3 


03 


o^ . 


CO 




M 


M Cm 


toC 2-M 




M 


^3 

:5 b 


3 




.2 


s s s 


.s s.s 


15 


e2 




03 




o3 Ji 03 


o3 


03 






2i 


i-s i 


« C3 gi 


2 


gi 








m 


CQ PQ 


« m 


m m 


pq 


pq 





1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


1 


on 


fN 


t^ 




•* 


t^ 


t^ 


IC 


tp 


05 


r^ 


■>* 


(M 




00 


(N 


Tf 


CD 


05 


t^ 


■* 














(M 




s 


IM 


CO 




t- 


§5 


rti 




■«*< 




CO 


IM 


ro" 


1 


iO 


' 


1 


1 


' 


1 




1 


(N 


t;-; 


(M 


2 


S 


t^ 


1 


(M 


1 


s 


g 


1 


00 


00 


^ 


^ 


1 


1 


00 


CC 


(M 


lO 


00 




CO 






1 


00 


_, 


CO 


IC 


^ 




n 












00 


1^ 










t^ 










(M 


CO 


o 


1 


00 


^ 


1 


lo 


»o 


CO 


■rt< 


S 


»o 


C5 


(M 


o 


CO 


CO 


^ 


05 


(M 


lO 


t^ 


^ 


























































■* 
























o 


1 


' 


' 


1 


■* 


(N 


'^ 


?^ 


28 


(N 


' 


*"• 


'"' 


'~* 


1 


' 


CO 


^ 


t^ 


(M 


g 


1 


(N 


" 


" 


1 


1 


(N 


g 


GO 


IM 


CO 


CD 


00 


g 


TJH 


' 


1 


1 


^ 


g 


1 


00 


o 


o 


1 


o 


lO 


Tf^ 


CO 


00 


iO 


^ 


r^ 


CO 


^ 




(N 


00 


lO 


05 


CD 






OS 










IM 


' 


„ 


(N 


IC 




"5 


?5 


CO 




CO 




IM 


^ 


(M 


00 


<N 


t^ 


^ 


■* 


t^ 


I^ 


lO 


CD 


S 


r^ 


-* 


fN 


^ 


00 


IM 


■<*< 


CD 


05 


t^ 


Tt< 


















00 






t^ 




-* 




■«*< 








IC 
















kC 










(M 












(M 


Oi 


















^ 
























CO 


1 


iO 


1 


1 


(N 


^ 


CO 


?D 


^ 


1 


CO 


1 


■* 


(N 


1 


1 


o 


1 


^ 


CD 


t^ 










































s 


00 


t^ 


t^ 


^ 


M 


o 


■»*< 


05 


IC 


S 


•* 


Tf 


00 


O 


00 


(M 


rf< 


CO 


00 


^ 


r^ 
























































•<** 












Ol 












(M 


CO 
CO" 














^ 






1 

c3 






























>% 


C 




J 


I 




3 

i 


e 

B 


-tJ 




& 


s 


> 

O 

8 


a 
8 


1 

bC 

■> 
8 












c 




a 


o 


> 


3 
> 


s 


■s 

s 


-2 


s 




"rt 


i 




i 








-c 




c 
a 

3 


>i 




-c 


b4 


C 


c 


3 


« 


^ 


a> 


0) 


^ 


g 


s 






1 


3 

1 


1 


3 

■5 

3 


9i 
> 






i 


i 


1 


c 
1 




1 

3 


5 


^ 
3 


^ 


_^ 


bC 

si 






3 


^ 




3 


^^S 




b 


s 


S 


^ 


c« 


c3 


(J3 


S,p 


awx" 






.e 


1 




_>^ 


^ 

^ 


•Si 

J= a; 




3 
>> 


.2 .^ 


>> 


cS 
>> 


^O 


"o 
>> 


•o 




^ & 


. 


a; 

3 


6 


c 

6 


B 
O 




i 
o 
ii 
H 


3 


c 

1 


5 


|l 


.3 


1-1 


a 

cS 


a 




c 


11 


1 

o 


^1 


1 

H 


H 



94 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



X S 



CO 



<3 





















, * 














iff . 














0^ 














o 






























^ 


fQ 


^ 


?S 


t^ 




"S •£ 










CO 




Oif-H 














M 














£ 


1 


1 


fN 


CO 


lO 














■* 




;;; 














•* 














m 


(M 


^ 


_, 


CD 


o 




A G 






»-^ 




CSI 


















Z-s 










































k 


CO 


(N 


O 


05 


rt< 














(M 














































Pc, 














illl 


1 


1 


u 


l^ 


s 




-i^a 














"S-2 


(M 


1 


Oi 


^ 


CD 




o c 






(M 




CO 














































^^' 














d 


CO 


lO 


-^ 


-* 






If 






CO 


o 


^ 


















^ 














OQ 


o 


lO 


05 


CO 


I> 






o 


(N 


00 


Oi 


CD 




■t; 










CO 




H 
















£ 


_ 


O 


■* 


CO 


o 








r- 1 








Tf 




x d 


c 






























s« 
















l« 




05 


o 


kO 


t^ 


t^ 






^ 






r^ 


00 


u 




































>> 














2 










w 




CO 










o 














% 




t; 


















gg 






M 


M 




































o 


C 


C 










3 


3 




— < 










S 


.2 


§ 






^ 


:S 


■fl 


% 


& 






^4, 


o 

3 


o 
a 

=3 


O 


rs 


s 

o 










« 


3 


H 








< 


-< 


-3 







' 


1 


' 


1 


1 


CO 


t^ 


S 


00 


§ 


1 


■"^ 


Oi 


' 


o 


CM 


" 


S 


c^ 


CO 




CO 

1 


00 

1 


CM 

1 


1 


- 


CO 


Tf 


, 


00 


CM 


Tf 


00 


00 


05 


CO 


l> 


s 


00 


§ 


' 


" 


l> 


' 


00 


CO 


o 


s 


00 


00 


































bc 
























M 






rt 




c 






fx, 


bC 


CO 






„ 


c 


2 






5? 


^ 


a 








.y 




c 


s 


3 


S 
^ 

o 


OQ 


,y. 


.Si 


a 


fj{ 


03 






>, 


^ 


■s 


a 

3 


c 

3 


:t3 


H 


O 


6 


fe 





1933.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 95 



1 


1 


' 


1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


1 


1 


1 


1 


' 


1 


1 


' 


lO 


(N 


^ 


<M 


^ 


00 




C^J 


_ 




lO 


05 


^ 


(N 


^ 


(N 


CO 


^ 


i2 
















00 




C^) 


s 










S^ 








1 


1 


' 


1 


1 


'"' 


1 


(M 


1 


-* 


s 


1 




' 


1 


Ir^ 


1 




S 


" 


" 


' 


1 


' 


1 


1 


" 


" 


CO 


§ 


1 




(M 


' 


CO 


1 




(M 


lO 




1 


^ 




CO 


^ 


■* 




^ 


•* 


05 




1 


1 


■* 


^ 




CO 


IM 














IC 




00 


g 










?5 






■<* 


(M 




^ 


^ 


1 


■* 




t^ 


1 


on 


§ 


O 




1 


^ 


^^ 


<N 


^ 


CO 
















t^ 














CO 








■«*< 


1 


' 


1 


' 


1 


1 


' 


1 


CO 




(N 




1 


' 


00 


1 




s 


05 


fN 


1 






■* 


CO 


lO 


_^ 


t^ 


»o 


^ 


^ 


(N 


1 


o 


^ 




00 




















ZD 




















lO 




^ 




^ 


cr^ 




(M 


^ 


r^ 


o 


C5 


^ 


(M 


^ 


<N 


CO 


^ 


»o 


(N 














00 




(N 


1 










o 






05 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


1 




" 


CO 


CO 


IM 


' 


1 


" 


' 


1 




1 


lO 


r^i 




(M 




C5 


t^ 


r^ 


1 


lO 


^ 


1> 


^ 


C^ 


1 


(M 


CO 


^ 


ln> 


(M 














IC 




00 


K 










^ 






05 




^ 






































3 
1 










c 








1 

X 










J2 




"o 


• 


c 


1 


'a 

a 


G 

.2 


c 


g 




1 

'a 




1 

c 
'a, 

4i 


O 

.2 


3 




a 
.2 


o 

1 

CO 


"o 


c 

> 
oT 




> 

S 

S 

■— 

I 


3 

a.. 

a 

1 

c 

< 


1 

c c 

< 


.2 
> 


.2 

> 

1 
1 


1 
> 

t 

.1 


E 3 M 


3 

o 
c 

1 


1 
1 

o 


2 ijM 

l"2 


1 

IS 


a 

a 

1 


;2 
> 

i 


o 

1. 


g 


1 

"in 

1 


1 

1 

1 



96 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Dis- 
charged. 


1 1 1 I.I 


1 


Held for 
Trial. 


— 1 00 (N TfH (M 






1 1 lO 1 1 






1 Tf< O (M 1 


§ 


p 


, CO O CO , 


1 


Bin 


1 1 (M ^ (N 


S 


If 


, ^ ^ , , 


1 


of 


-^ t^ CC CO 1 


1 


c6 


-H CO (N '^ <N 

2 




11 


i 

i 


1 -H (N 1 1 


^ 


1 


^ t^ O ■* (M 




O 

O 
W 




• "3 ^ 
^ =r 

•3 1 1 g -S 
.2 3 ~ .2 

:2 -i ^ 1 :§ 

> -.^ -o -E > 

dn Ph Cl, C^ QQ 


03 

e2 



1 


1 


1 


1 


, 


I 


1 


(T) 


































oo 


CO 


o 


CD 


Of) 


r^ 


CO 


1 






(N 












(M 


1 


""* 


CO 


'"' 


S 


^ 


»o 


'"' 


'"' 


(N 


S 


■"* 


CO 


' 


2 


(M 


(M 


05 




C< 


g 


' 


?;; 


' 


1 


' 


' 


CD 


(N 


' 


' 


(N 


Id 


o 


00 


' 


1 


(N 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


CO 


C^ 


g 


" 


' 




CO 


o 


CD 


00 


t^ 


CO 


00 






(M 






t2 




" 


' 


CO 


00 


^ 


' 


1 


' 


s 


00 


o 


(N 


'on 


00 


r^ 


CO 


a> 








CD 








00 














3 


• 














































































■t^ 
















eJ 


• 






























o 






T) 










r 






i 


-S 










• 






b 




3 








a 


C3 






5 




S' 


*i >> 


■3 

3 


C 

.2 

1 


c 

.2 

o 


1 

3 


1 




•.;3 

a 

c 




X: 






T3 






o 


< 


< 


< 


<J 


< 


CQ 


O 


U 



1933.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



' 


1 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 




1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


1 


1 


' 


1 


' 


' 


1 


' 


fN 


00 


CO 


<N 


■* 


■^ 


lO 




fN 




<N 


'^t^ 


O 


(M 


t> 


lO 


on 


■* 


05 


■* 


o 




(M 




CO 

CO 






CO 






CO 














Ol 










' 


CO 


1 


i 


^ 


^ 


CO 




1 


s 


^ 


^ 


'"' 


CI 


(M 


CO 


s 


' 


(M 


' 


(N 


' 


CO 


1 


CO 
00 


(M 


■"^ 


o 




1 


1> 


1 


^ 


' 


t^ 


' 


- 


u 


'"' 


CO 


' 


•* 


(N 


(N 


'"' 


CO 


' 


1 


o 




""^ 


CO 


' 


00 
CO 


o 


(N 


CO 


CO 


g 


'"' 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


(N 


lO 


' 


iO 


' 


i 


1> 




1 


(M 


(N 


1 


' 


I 


1 


' 


1 


' 


1 


CO 


' 






1 








^ 






CO 


1 


CD 


(M 


(M 


1 


o 


o 


(M 


Id 


1 


CO 








00 












00 




CD 


(N 






^ 


t>J 












Oi 


CO 


s 


CO 


-* 


1^ 




(N 


CD 


1 


on 


00 


1 


t^ 


lO 


00 


<N 


•^ 


^ 


'^J* 






















t^ 






























































(N 


00 


CO 


(M 






lO 




(M 


^ 


(N 


tH 


o 


(M 


r^ 


IC 


00 


■* 


C5 


tH 


o 




(N 




CO 
CO 






CO 






CO 




^ 










(N 










' 


00 


1 




1 


' 


(M 




" 


g 


1 


t^ 


^ 


t> 


(N 


' 


S 


Tt* 


g 


S 




(N 


§ 


CO 


1 

CO 

CO 


Tt< 


-* 


?? 




'"' 


s 


(M 


?2 


2 


lO 


lO 


s 




1 


' 


IM 


05 














-C 


















































































































£ 












;C 




a 
















• 






bC 

CI 




1 










■1 

3 


1 




3 














i 


1 


bC 




^ 














^ 








-?= 


03 


^ 






K 


3 


■-3 




?n 




03 

S 

B 

a 
Q 


8 

1 

i 

-2. 

.2 

Q 


§ 

s 

a 
8 

1 

c 
2 
Q 


i 

c 

G 

2 

Q 


.S 

a 
£ 


a 

is 

3 

1 


o 
c 

1 

if 

1 


|.s 
If 

If 


1 


.2 

c 

_o 

o 

1 


1 

C3 


o 

o 
.a 

bjD 

g 

'a 
o 


3 

c 

1 

c 

1 

c 

1 

o 

s 


1 


a 

c 

1 


o 
« 

CO 

.2 
> 

1 

C3 

1 


03 

bC 

C 

a 

a 

oS 




'i 

i 
a 

03 

1 


-2 

■a 

1 

1 



98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






o 

*<! 12; 

<1 





."S 


1 


, 


1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


. 


1 


« 




00 cm 




























ps 




























ja 
























































s . 


ec 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 


10 


•* 


03 


(N 


»o 


t: 




^1 


S 






r^ t- 


"-^ 




(N 


(M 


CO 


CO 


c^ 


^ 




2^ 
























co" 




K 
























00 




<« 


1/5 


1 


1 


1 'O 


^ 


1 


(M 


•* 


»o 


, 


CO 


^ 




a 






















(M 


8 




% 
























i-T 




<D 


TjH 


c^ 


1 


^ CO 


^ 


^ 


(N 


(N 


s 


00 


1> 


(N 




gS 


















(N 




;i! 


CO 




11 
























0" 




(O 
























































t 


•^ 


(N 


^ 


CO CO 


1 


^ 


^ 


00 


t^ 


OS 





s? 


























t^ 


t^ 

























































^ 




fa 
























^ 




, "d a) ^ 


^ 




1 


(N 00 


, 


1 


, 


1 


, 


1 


1 


U3 




SS5| 
























-* 




3 ^0 




























■gi 


Oi 






CO i> 


(M 


^ 


05 


00 





a> 





(N 












■* 










(N 




t^ 






li 
























00 




























»o" 




l| 
























CO 




i 


cc 


(M 


CD 


00 10 


05 


(M 





CO 





CO 


lo 


00 




c 


CO 




















"3 






a rt 
























00 




ot: 




























SJ 




























^ 






























fO 


(M 


CO 


CD 


^ 


CO 


10 


■* 


Oi 


w 


10 


»o 




3 


10 






rH t^ 


^ 




(M 


(M 


CO 


CO 


?5 






^ 
























^ 






» 


t^ 


(M 


^ 


t^ 


■* 


CO 


~T~ 


(M 


CO 


(M 


^ 


§ 






"3 




























"g 


g 
























cf 




































fa 






























s 


1 


lO 


Oi ■* 


t^ 


1 


10 


(N 


CO 


2 


•* 


00 




■3 






CO 






(N 


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1933.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



99 



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100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



101 



' 


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1 


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1 


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1 


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00 


lO 


^ 


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S 










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CO 


i^ 


c^ 




^^ 




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^ 




1 


1 


lO 


1 


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1 


CO 


' 


1 


■* 


CD 


CD 


CD 


1 


s 


' 


s 


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'"' 




(N 


1 


t^ 


00 


CO 


■* 
§ 


1 


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' 


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IM 


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00 
CO 


CO 


1 


^ 


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o 


^ 




IN 


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lO 


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lO 


i 


CO 


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1 


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o 


05 


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cs 


CO 

CD 


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>> 








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102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



,i> 




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1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



1 


, 


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I 


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1 


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1 


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104 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUiMENT — No. 49. 



105 



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1 


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106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



■S 1 



"^ i 



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— ci rt -^ i.- e t^ « 

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J5 



1933.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



lo; 



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POLICE COMMTSSIOXER. 



^Tan. 



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^2 — — — XXX xx:^ — — — - 



1933.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



Ifl C CC fO 




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• • '-^ 5 • • 


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Jill 


1 

o 


utomohile r(>mistration 

n hospital service 

n otlicers' hond 

n automoliiles al)andoned 

n court t'osts 

II United States jiostage 

1 police expenditure 

'ineiit for lost and damage 


•nt. . 
record hooks 
property 
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110 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


54 


16 


2 


1 


73 


2 


6 


1 


- 


- 


7 


3 


226 


68 


24 


- 


318 


4 


56 


31 


3 


_ 


90 


5 


352 


96 


25 


_ 


473 


6 .... . 


190 


46 


6 


_ 


242 


7 


589 


132 


22 


- 


743 


8 


2 


1 


- 


- 


3 


9 


739 


134 


69 


12 


944 


10 


605 


122 


57 


1 


785 


11 


1,041 


131 


141 


- 


1,313 


12 


430 


77 


32 


- 


539 


13 


583 


62 


86 


2 


733 


14 


680 


114 


103 


1 


898 


15 


315 


71 


15 


1 


402 


16 


452 


115 


78 


1 


646 


17 


1,010 


141 


181 




1,332 


18 


584 


79 


80 


1 


744 


19 


503 


57 


57 


- 


617 


Totals . 


8,417 


1,494 


981 


10 


10,902 



Breeders' license at $50. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 ... 568 


Division 12 ... 44 


Division 2 . 






886 


Division 13 






65 


Division 3 








42 


Division 14 






46 


Division 4 








217 


Division 15 






16 


Division 5 








166 


Division 16 




* 


27 


Division 6 








282 


Division 17 






44 


Division 7 








38 


Division 18 






52 


Division 9 








107 


Division 19 






■ 41 


Division 10 






33 




Division 11 






51 


Total . . . .12,725 



14 canceled for nonpayment 



1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Ill 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1932. 





Expenditures. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


$5,164,060 51 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


5,213 46 




3. 


Unassigned .... 


240 29 


$5,169,514 26 






B. Service Other Than Personal: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$1,242 65 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


1,503 44 




4. 


Transportation of persons . 


13,025 54 




5. 


Cartage and freight 


280 89 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


35,132 50 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


7,702 78 




12. 


Bond and insurance pre- 








miums 


353 00 




13. 


Conamunication 


29,518 09 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and 








care 


22,314 59 




15. 


Motorless vehicle repairs 


1 60 




16. 


Care of animals 


3,444 82 




18. 


Cleaning 

Removal of ashes, dirt and 


3,085 01 




19. 








garbage .... 


150 00 




22. 


Medical 


10,154 11 




28. 


Expert 


14,556 81 




29. 


Stenographic, copying, list- 








ing 


64,122 59 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


1,412 30 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 








ing 


596 07 




39. 


General plant .... 


68,640 49 




42. 


Music 


493 35 


277,730 63 






C. Equipment: 






1. 


Apparatus, cable, wire, etc., 


$8,764 80 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


55,029 32 




6. 


Stable 


320 57 




7. 


Furniture and fittings . 


6,417 71 




9. 


Office 


7,649 99 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


232 75 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


2,717 25 




14. 


Live stock .... 


700 00 




16. 


Wearing apparel . 


60,044 91 




17. 


General plant .... 


28,227 49 


170,104 79 


D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office 


$37,857 43 




2. 


Food and ice . 


7,688 36 




3. 


Fuel 


17,652 04 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,424 69 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


216 27 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


3,910 07 




11. 


Motor vehicle 


31,483 69 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants . 


1,102 87 




16. 


General plant .... 


11,847 81 




17. 


Electrical .... 


3,052 97 


118,236 20 


F. 7. 


Pensions and annuities . 




308,743 71 




Total 




$6,044,329 59 



112 POLICE COMMISSIOXER. [Ja 

Table XVII. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement for Year ending November 30, 1932. 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . S46,030 25 

For dog licenses (credited to school department ) . . 26.541 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,606 66 

For license badges, copies of Ucenses, conmiissions on ' 
telephone, interest on deposits, report blanks, use of 

police property, etc 2.456 34 

Refunds . '. 7.514 83 

For damage to poUce property 532 25 

Miscellaneous 73 55 

Total SS4,754 88 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 

to police property 614 70 



Grand total 885,369 58 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 

ending November 30, 1932. 

(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls $42,823 08 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies .... 39,597 79 

Rent and taxes on part of building 1,102 95 

Purchase of Ford sedan 574 00 

Storage and repair of motor vehicles 1,069 70 

Furniture and fittings 598 94 

Printing, blueprints, etc 510 24 

Fuel 38 92 

Incidentals 13 21 

Technical survey of communication systems . . 7,978 85 

Total .S94.307 68 



1933.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 





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1933. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



117 



INDEX. 



iquor 



Accidents .... 

caused by automobile 

number of, reported . . 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 
Adjustment of claims 
Ambulance service 
Arrests 

age and sex of . 

comparative statement of 

for drunkenness 

foreigners .... 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc, 

minors .... 

nativity of ... 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions . 

number of, punished by fine 

on warrants 

summoned by court 

total number of 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants 
Auctioneers .... 
Automobiles .... 

accidents due to 

deaths caused by 

operating under influence of 1 

police .... 

public .... 

sight-seeing 

stolen .... 

used .... 
Ballistics .... 
Benefits and pensions 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported 

found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Bureau of Records . 

criminal identification 

missing persons 

warrant file 
Carriages, public 

articles left in 

automobile 

number licensed 
Cases investigated . 
Children 

abandoned, cared for 

lost, restored 
City ordinances, arrests for violation of 
Civilian changes 
Claims, adjustment of 
Collective musicians 
Commitments .... 
Communication system . 
Complaints ..... 

against miscellaneous licenses 

against police officers 
Courts 

fines imposed by . . , 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 

number of persons summoned by 
Criminal Investigation, Bureau of 

automobile division . 

general 

homicide division 

lost and stolen property division 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 



Page 

5.3,58,113,114 

54,113,114 

58 

113, 114 



55 



44 



64 

89, 90-107 

106 

107 

44, 49, 60, 97 

49, 90-105 

49, 96, 105 

49, 96-106 

50 

45, 90-105 



49, 90 
49, 90 
44,49 
49, 
49, 90- 

99, 113, 
113, 

54, 113, 
44 
40 



49, 55 
49 





51 




27 




32 




33 




34 




39,66 




66 




66 




66, 108 




55,58 




50,58 




58 




50,59 




49, 100 




48 




59 




72, 108 




50,60 




25 


72 


87, 108 




72, 108 




43,87 


59 


90-107 


49 


59, 107 


55 


59, 107 


49 


90-105 




51 




51 




55 




53 




54 




107 




107 



118 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Dangerous weapons 73 

Dead bodies 58, 62 

recovered 58, 62 

Deaths 43,48,53.79,113,114 

by accident, suicide, etc. 53,113,114 

of police officers . . .43,48,79 

Distribution of force 48, 76 

Disturbances suppressed 59 

Dogs 108, 110 

amount received for licenses for 108 

number licensed 108, 110 

Drivers 39, 66, 108 

hackney carriage 39, 66, 108 

sight-seeing automobile 68, 108 

Drowning, persons rescued from 59, 62 

Drunkenness 44, 49, 60, 97 

arrests for, per day 49 

decrease in number of arrests for 49 

foreigners arrested for 49, 97 

nonresidents arrested for 49, 97 

total number of arrests for 49, 97 

women committed for 60 

Employees of the Department 47, 76 

Events, special 65 

Expenditures 43, 74, 111 

Extra duties performed by oflBcers 59 

Financial 43, 74, 111 

expenditures 43, 74, 111 

pensions 74, 111 

receipts 43. 74, 112 

miscellaneous license fees 72,109,112 

signal service 74, 112 

Fines 49, 50, 107 

amount of 49, 50, 107 

average amount of 49, 107 

number punished by 50 

Finger print 28, 32 

Fire alarms 58, 59 

defective, reported 58 

number given 59 

Fires 59, 62 

extinguished 59 

on water front attended 62 

Foreigners, number arrested 49,90-105 

Fugitives from justice 55 

Gaming, illegal 101 

Hackney carriage drivers 39,66,108 

Hackney carriages 39, 66, 108 

Hand carts 108 

Harbor service 62 

Homicide division 53 

Horses 40, 63 

House of detention 60 

House of ill fame, keeping . . . 60, 97 

Hydrants, defective, reported 58 

Identification division 27 

Imprisonment 50, 107 

persons sentenced to 50 

total years of 50, 107 

Income 43, 74, 112 

Information from Police Journals, request for 59 

Inquests held 54 

Insane persons taken in charge 59 

Intoxicated persons assisted 59 

Itinerant musicians 72, 108 

Junk collectors 108 

Junk shop keepers 108 

Jury lists, police work on 70 

Lamps, defective, reportetl 58 

Licenses, miscellaneous 71, 108 

Listing, police 69,111,115,116 

expenses of 70, 111 

number listed 70,115,116 

number of policemen employed in 70 

Lotlgers at station houses 50 

Lodging houses, public 73, 108 

applications for licenses 108 

authority to license 73 

location of 74 

number of persons lodged in 74 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 40, 46,54. 112 

Lost children 50, 59 



p. D. 49. 



119 



Medals .... 

Walter Scott 

Department 
Medical examiners' assistants 

cases on which inquests were held 

causes of death 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued . . . , 

number transferred . 
Missing persons ... 

age and sex of . 

number found .... 

number reported 
Musicians 

collective .... 

itinerant .... 
Nativity of persons arrested . 
Nonresident offenders 
Offences 

against chastity, morality, etc 

against license laws . 

against liquor law 

against the person . 

against property, malicious 

against property, with violence 

against property, without violence 

forgery and against currency 

miscellaneous 

recapitulation . 
Parks, public .... 

accidents reported in 
Pawnbrokers .... 
Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 

number of persons on rolls 

payments on account of . 
Personnel . 
Photographic, etc. 
Plant and equipment 
Police .... 

special 
Police charitable fund 
Police department . 

annual dress parade of 

authorized and actual strength of 

distribution of . 

horses in use in 

how constituted 

officers absent sick . 
arrests by . 
complaints against . 
date appointed . 
detailed, special events 
died .... 
discharged . 
injured 
nativity of 
promoted . 
resigned 
retired 
school 

vehicles in use in 

work of ... . 
Police listing .... 
Police signal service 

miscellaneous work . 

payments on account of . 

property of . . . 

signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of 
Property 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 

stolen . 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Prosecution for nuisances 



40, 46, 50 



PAGE 

41 
41 
41 
53 
54 
54 
49, 90-106 
58 

71, 108.112 

72, 109, 112 
72, 108 
72, 109 
72, 109 
72, 109 



33 
33 

72, 108 

72, 108 

72, 108 

50 

49, 90, 105 

49, 90-106 

49,96, 105 

49, 95, 105 

44 

49, 90, 105 

49, 94, 105 

44,92, 105 

44,92, 105 

49,94,105 

49,100,105 

105 

113, 114 

113, 114 

108 

74 

74 

74 

74, 111 

41,47,76 

28,32 



48 



76, 78, 84 
48 



43,48 
43 
42 



48 

11, 115, 116 

47, 60, 112 

60 

112 

62 

60 

50 

54, 55, 107 

40, 46, 54 

55, 107 

109, 112 

44, 52, 54 

50 

37 



120 P- ^- 49- 

PAGE 

Public carriages ^^' 7^' inl 

Public lodging houses /^, iu» 

Public Welfare investigation • • yj 

Railroad police y^ jQg^ jj2 

Receipts ■„ '. V ' i ' ' "iQ 

Requests for information from Police Journals yg j^| 

Revolvers ^^. ^^^ 

licenses to carry 76 

Salaries 3g 

School, police 108 

Second-hand articles jqq 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealer ^^ 

Sewers, defective, reported 50 59 

Sick and injured persons assisted ' gg 

Sickness, absence on account of gy^ j^g 

Sight-seeing automobiles 25 47 60' 112 

Signal service, police '55 

Special events 71 

Special police 50 

Station houses 50 

lodgers at " 50 

witnesses detained at ^ ■ 52', 54, 55, 107 

Stolen property 51,107 

recovered 51^ 107 

value of ' loQ 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters '59,113,114 

Streets ' 113' n^ 

accidents, reported in '59 

defective, reported 5g 

obstructions removed ^g 

Teams . . . • • ' 53 

stray, put up ' 37 

Traffic 45 

Uniform crime record reporting g.2 igg 

Used cars ; 52', 108 

licensed dealers 53 

sales reported ."39,40,63 

Vehicles g3 

ambulances g3 

automobiles 40 65 

in use in police department 39, 66 

public carriages ' gg 

wagons g2 

^fSBch : : ; 68,108,110 

Wagons . 110 

number licensed by divisions gg jos 

total number licensed 34 

Warrant file 59 

Water pipes, defective, reported 59 

Water running to waste, reported yg 

Weapons, dangerous ^q 50 59, 107 

Witnesses 49 107 

fees earne<l by officers as • • ,• a-' 49 107 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as - ■ "• 

number of , detained at station houses . . 60 

Women committed to House of Detention 



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