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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"




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BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

arije CommontDealtl) of iMasisiacfjusiettsi 



TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1933 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 5 

Introductory 5 

Police administration 5 

Judiciary power 10 

Law enforcement 15 

Liquor 15 

Control of criminals 15 

Chartered clubs .17 

Suspicious persons 17 

Idle and disorderly persons ....... 18 

Barricades 18 

Concealed dangerous weapons 19 

Automobiles 20 

Co-operation with neighboring Police Departments ... 21 

Personnel 22 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 23 

Department Medal of Honor 23 

Organization 25 

Communications system 25 

Bureau of records 26 

Criminal identification 30 

Supplementary 31 

Miscellaneous Department photography .... 31 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals 31 

Missing persons 31 

Warrant file 33 

Police school 33 

Traffic .34 

Hackney carriages and stands 36 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations .... 36 

Plant and equipment 37 

Arrests 39 

Uniform crime record reporting 41 

Receipts 41 

Expenditures 41 

The Department 43 

Police Force 43 

Signal service 43 

Employees of the Department 43 

Recapitulation 43 

Distribution and changes 43 

Divisional changes 44 

Police officers injured while on duty 44 

Work of the Department 45 

Arrests 45 

Drunkenness 45 

Nativity of persons arrested 46 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 47 

Lineup 47 

Automobile division 48 

Homicide division 50 



4 CONTENTS. 

Page 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation: 

Lost and stolen property division 51 

General 52 

Special events 52 

Miscellaneous business 56 

Adjustment of claims 57 

House of Detention 57 

Police Signal Service 58 

Signal boxes 58 

Miscellaneous work 58 

Harbor service 59 

Horses 60 

Vehicle service 60 

Automobiles 60 

Combination ambulances 61 

List of vehicles used by the Department 62 

Hackney Carriages 62 

Special, public and private hackney stands 63 

Sight-seeing automobiles 64 

Wagon Licenses 65 

Listing Work in Boston 66 

Listing expenses 66 

Number of policemen employed in listing 67 

Police work on jury lists 67 

Special police 67 

Railroad police 68 

Miscellaneous licenses 68 

Musicians' licenses 68 

Itinerant 68 

Collective 69 

Carrying dangerous weapons 70 

Public lodging houses 70 

Pensions and benefits 70 

Financial 71 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the Pohce Force, 

Signal Service and employees 74 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 76 

List of police officers in actual service who died .... 77 

List of officers retired 78 

List of officers promoted 79 

Number of men in active service 81 

Men on the Police Force and year born 82 

Number of days absence from duty by reason of sickness . 83 

Complaints against officers 84 

Number of arrests by police divisions 86 

Arrests and offences 87 

Age and sex of persons arrested 104 

Comparative statement 105 

Licenses of all classes issued 106 

Dog licenses 108 

Wagon hcenses 108 

Financial Statement 109 

Payments on account of signal service 110 

Accidents Ill 

Male and female residents listed 113 



^t)e Comtnontoealtt) of jnasfsacfiugettsi. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1933. 

To His Excellency, Joseph B. Ely, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — In accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the 
honor to submit, as PoHce Commissioner for the City of Bo.s- 
ton, the following report for the year ending November 30, 
1933. 

During the past year the policy of extreme economy has 
been continued, both in regard to purchases and personnel. 

I desire to present to you for your consideration the result 
of my experience and study as Police Commissioner for the 
City of Boston during the last three years, with suggestions 
for the improvement in the methods of preventing and detecting 
crime. 

Police Administration. 

In the study of reports of various bodies on crime condi- 
tions, I can find no reference in regard to the fundamental 
proposition as to where police departments belong under our 
frame of government. 

Both the federal constitution and the constitution of this 
Commonwealth provide three major branches of government: 
the Legislative, the Executive and the Judiciary. 

The Legislative consists of the General Court. The Execu- 
tive consists of the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, etc. 
It is evident that the police do not belong to either of these 
branches. Therefore, police must come under the judiciary 
branch. Police is the active arm of the Judiciary. 

The word "pohce" has three significations. The first is the 
apprehension of those who have committed crimes; also under 
this heading all the activities of the police in preventing crimes 
by apprehending criminals contemplating the commission of 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

crimes, or interfering with the activities of criminals during 
the commission of crime. The second signification is to 
enforce laws and ordinances in regard to safety, cleanliness, 
health, etc., and to maintain order. The third signification 
comprehends the laws and ordinances which require citizens 
to exercise their rights in a particular form. 

Police has also been divided into administrative police 
which has for its object to constantly maintain public order 
in every part of the general administration, and judicial police 
which is intended principally to prevent crimes by punishing 
the criminal. In other words, the judicial police is to bring 
to punishment those committing crimes which the adminis- 
trative police have been unable to prevent. The foregoing 
clearly proves that police belong to the Judiciary branch of our 
Government. The police, as we ordinarily use the term, 
apprehend the criminal and deliver him to the other branches 
of the police, namely, the judicial police, or as we have com- 
monly called it, the courts. 

In a study of crime conditions and causes, one of the essential 
subjects is, of course, police administration. 

It is my intention to outline some of the evils that appear 
in our present day administration of police departments. 
The chief evil lies in the insecure tenure and short term of 
service of the executive hea,d of the police force which makes 
him subject to control, in the discharge of his duties, by those 
seeking special privileges through political influence. On his 
refusal to be so controlled he may be easily removed from 
office, or at best, fail to be reappointed at the end of his term of 
office. 

Police administration in this country has developed in a 
comparatively few years from that of controlling a few watch- 
men, to a highly technical profession dealing with the detec- 
tion and pursuit of criminals who know how to use, and have 
at their command scientific processes. 

It goes without saying that any corporate business of mag- 
nitude conducted under a system of frequently changing chief 
executives with short terms of service would have worried, 
careless or indifferent employees, and would soon find itself 
bankrupt. This would be particularly so if the chief executive 
were without control in the selection of his employees, without 
the power of rewarding those who render good service, by 
promotion, or as in many police departments without authority 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 7 

to punish serious shortcomings in service. The foregoing 
is almost exactly a picture of police administration as it exists 
today, and success in police administration cannot be looked 
for while short terms of service by the executive head continue 
to be the rule. 

The control which special privilege acting through politi- 
cians demands as well as those favors which politicians claim 
for themselves is a notorious evil and is a detriment to fair 
treatment and honest service in many communities. 

In Massachusetts the chief executive of the Police Depart- 
ment is usually appointed by the Mayor, subject to confirma- 
tion by the City Council or Board of Aldermen. Generally 
speaking, if such a chief desires to remain in office he is subject 
to the whims of the Mayor or influential members of the 
City Council or Board of Aldermen, and even his attempts 
to maintain discipline are subject to review by those holding 
local elective office. In so far as the Boston Police Department 
is concerned, it is fortunate that the Chief Executive of the 
Commonwealth has the appointing and removing power sub- 
ject to the approval of the Governor's Council. Even in 
Boston the Police Commissioner is appointed for a specific 
term, namely five years, and his tenure is insecure. 

A study of many cities in this country shows that in the 
larger cities where a high type of police administration is 
necessary and constant leadership is imperative, the average 
tenure of police heads is only a fraction over two years. Even 
in reasonably efficient police departments this insecurity 
of tenure of office of the chief not only prevents the carrying 
out of a well thought out and orderly program of improvement 
but prevents the carrying out or even the presentation of ideas 
to the chief by efficient subordinates on account of their fear 
that on the removal of the efficient chief they, the efficient 
subordinates, will be punished by the powers which secured 
the change in administration. 

In this Department, in the past three years, many innova- 
tions have been put into effect, some of which are outlined 
in previous annual reports. 

In view of the hostility to improved methods sometimes 
apparent in old established organizations it is of great import- 
ance that chief executives be retained in office long enough to 
win confidence and support for their improved methods. Too 
rapid changes generally result in failure. The organization 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

may seem to respond to the new methods, but behind this 
seeming activity there is an absence of understanding and 
spirit. Where the employee does just what he is told and 
nothing more, there will be found inefficiency. 

Co-operation of the kind that makes success in police organi- 
zation is that sort where the man gives the best that is in him — 
something beyond that contained in rules or orders issued by 
the head. True co-operation is a freewill offering and means 
giving of service without hope of reward, irrespective of re- 
muneration, and without even the expectation of thanks. 
This type of service can never be commanded. It is the only 
kind of service, however, that is worthwhile in protecting 
the life and property of a community. To win this type of 
service, an executive must be given the opportunity to know 
the police business from beginning to end and earn the loyalty 
and confidence of his subordinates. 

Constant vigilance and numerous experiences are absolutely 
necessary to the chief executive in order to prevent human 
parasites who infest every community from using chance 
acquaintance with the police head to prey upon the ill-informed, 
ignorant and gullible. These leeches attempt to visit the police 
head frequently, call him by his first name, or when telephoning 
in the presence of others call him by his first name in order 
to impress other people with the intimacy of the boasted 
acquaintance. They also try to be seen with the police head 
in public as often as they can contrive opportunity, and other- 
wise do everything possible to prove that they are confidants 
of the police executive. 

Police morale must be built on a foundation of honest, 
intelligent and continuous leadership. No single factor has 
contributed so greatly to police demoralization than has the 
practice of limiting the tenure of department heads. Not 
until this stupid practice is discontinued can we ever hope 
to make material progress in police administration, not only 
in this state, but in any state in the country. Regardless of 
ability, a department head cannot hope to make a strong 
impression upon a large police department in the brief period 
that he is permitted to serve the public. It takes an executive 
many years to become acquainted with the problems of crime, 
vice and traffic, to say nothing of the political, social and eco- 
nomic problems of a community. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

If we could gaze into the future and there view the evils 
that follow in the wake of continuous changes in police leader- 
ship, it is doubtful if the taxpayers would accept the situation 
complacently. Rather would they find cause for alarm. 
Communities which are able to see beyond their petty local 
politics and retain in office competent executives are least 
likely to be attacked by professional crooks. 

In cities where the chief is appointed by the Mayor the 
chief knows perfectly well to whom he owes his appointment. 
He knows when he accepts office that he must, in the adminis- 
tration of it, yield the interest of the public in the preven- 
tion of crime and detection and prosecution of criminals with 
political alliances to the powerful protection of his own patrons. 
The chief, being subject to arbitrary dismissal in many cities 
when by any action he displeases the Mayor or politicians who 
put him in office, must, if he desires to retain office, necessarily 
be cautious in the discharge of his duties, and heed the admoni- 
tions of his patrons. 

That the office of the police head is a sinecure is another 
common fallacy. No other branch of governmental service 
is as exacting in its demands. The leader's time is never his 
own. He is on duty morning, noon and night. Every offence 
is an occasion for newspaper men and others to call him up on 
the telephone regardless of the hour. 

One requires a broad perspective and historical background, 
together with a scientific knowledge of human behavior, to 
understand the difficulties that the police encounter in their 
efforts to suppress vice in its various forms. Students of this 
problem maintain that the police never have and probably 
never will be able to prevent prostitution, gambling and boot- 
legging by repressive measures. True, honest enforcement 
of law is possible and vice can be reduced to a minimum. 

Among the public misconceptions is the idea that the police 
are to blame when professional criminals roam at large pro- 
tected by the laws of the land. Every person is privileged to 
go about without interference of the police. A police officer 
must have reasonable knowledge that a person has committed a 
crime before he can be apprehended. 

I reiterate the fact that the police fall within the judiciary 
branch of our Government. Massachusetts determined many 
years ago that its judicial officers should be as far removed 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

from political influence as it was possible under our form of 
government. In fact, our Constitution provides, Chapter 3, 
Article 1, Constitution of Massachusetts: 

Judiciary Power. 
"The tenure, that all commission officers shall by law 
have in their offices, shall be expressed in their respective 
commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, com- 
missioned and sworn, shall hold their offices during good 
behavior." 

I am convinced that in so far as police administration is 
concerned in the crime situation the most important step should 
be that police heads be protected in their tenure in a similar 
manner as are other judicial officers in this Commonwealth. 
The following act would accomplish this purpose: 

Section 1. — All police commissioners, chief marshals 
or chiefs of police in the several cities or towns in the 
Commonwealth having a population of over 12,000 in the 
last state census, shall hold their office during good 
behavior. 

Section 2. — Said police commissioners, chief marshals 
or chiefs of police may be removed by a majority of the 
justices of the Supreme Judicial Court upon a bill or 
petition or other process, upon a summary hearing or 
otherwise, if sufficient cause is shown therefor, and it 
appears the public good so requires. 

Section 3. — This act shall apply to the offices of the 
police commissioners, chief marshals or chiefs of police 
holding office at time of the passage of this act. 

Section 4. — All vacancies occurring in such offices 
shall be filled in the manner provided by law in the several 
cities and towns of the Commonwealth. 

Section 5. — All acts and parts of acts inconsistent 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

The second most important step to bring about efficient 
police is to make a change in present methods employed in 
selecting men fit to be police officers, and promotions of officers 
within the department. The present method of examination 
may possibly test what an applicant knows, but what he can 
do, what he has the spirit to do and what he has done are 
vital considerations which are altogether omitted. Judgment 
of fitness for promotion where courage, initiative and zeal are 
so important should take into account experience and record 
of performance for determining differences between the hard 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

workers and the lazy, between thorough workers and the 
hasty and careless; between backward-pulling and disgruntled 
disturbers and the enthusiastic forward-looking men. The 
present method of selection omits this test and is, therefore, 
inadequate and unfair to the men involved and inimical to the 
public welfare. 

It is possible to cram for any examination, and generally the 
examination to be taken is much like previous examinations 
held for promotion to the same rank. Therefore, applicants 
devote much time and thought to studying the few questions 
that may be asked. In this connection it may be observed 
that an officer who has an assignment in a quiet district or is in 
some position which may allow him leisure, has a great 
advantage over an officer who is energetically carrying on his 
work on a busy assignment, and continuing it to such hours 
that he has neither energy nor time left for cramming for an 
examination. The energetic man on the active assignment 
is building up an experience in performing his service which 
is of great value to the public, but it is of no value to him in 
securing advancement. 

Another serious objection is the present method of an inde- 
pendent body determining who the subordinate leaders of 
police forces shall be instead of their being chosen by the 
person who is responsible for the efficiency of the force. The 
present method does not consider the important personal 
attributes of the candidate for promotion with which the 
superior officers of the department alone can be acquainted. 

Theodore Roosevelt, in his autobiography, in connection 
with this feature of police administration expressed himself 
as follows : 

" I absolutely split off from the bulk of my Civil Service 
reform friends when they advocated retaining competitive 
examinations for promotion. In the police department, 
I found these examinations a serious handicap in the 
way of getting the best men promoted, and never, in any 
office, did I find that the written competitive promotional 
examination did any good. The reason for a written 
competitive entrance examination is that it is impossible 
for the head of the police or the candidate's prospective 
immediate superior himself to know the average candi- 
date or to test his ability. But when once in office, the 
best way to test any man's ability is by long experience 
in seeing him actually at work. His promotion should 
depend upon the judgment formed of him by his superiors." 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The matter of police promotions should be put squarely up 
to the head of a police department and it should be his duty 
and responsibility by investigations and examinations to choose 
his subordinate officers. For example, in the Boston Police 
Department, I can conceive of no better method than to have 
a promotion board consisting of senior officials who have 
reached a grade higher than that now covered by Civil Service 
examinations to advise the chief executive, after their careful 
investigation and examinations, as to what members of the 
department are best qualified to hold the different grades of 
rank in the department. This method can be inaugurated in 
Boston with the consent of the Civil Service Commission. On 
August 23, 1933, I wrote on this subject to the Civil Service 
Commissioner as follows: 

"August 23, 1933. 
James M. Hurley, Commissioner 
Department of Civil Service 
State House, Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir, — In order that there may be a better selection of persons 
to fill future vacancies in the grades of sergeant, lieutenant and captain 
in this department, I hereby request that candidates for promotion shall 
be subjected to a non-competitive examination. Your Board has the 
authority to allow the Police Commissioner to submit names for promotion 
under non-competitive examination. 

My purpose in making this request is that I am of the opinion that 
candidates for promotion in police service should be given credit for 
meritorious work performed, as well as for their knowledge of police 
duties. I have in mind the establishment of a Board of Promotion for 
this Department, consisting of officers of high rank, whose duty it would 
be to make recommendations for promotion to me after thorough investiga- 
tion and examination of each applicant. 

I should like to discuss this entire matter with you in order that you 
may clearly understand what I have in mind, if you will advise me when 
it is convenient for you to see me. 

Very truly yours, 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Co7n7nissioner.'^ 

In addition to changing methods of promotion is the equally 
important matter of choice of personnel for police work. The 
age of new members for police departments in this Common- 
wealth is altogether too high for the development of proper 
police officers. As the law now stands, applicants who have 
reached the age of thirty-seven years may be certified to the 
appointing officer; and applicants must be at least twenty- 
five years of age before admission. This law should be changed 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



13 



to allow men to come into police work, who may be desirable 
at the age of twenty-one years, and no person who is more than 
twenty-seven years of age should be admitted to the service. 
The following is an analysis of ages and physical specifica- 
tions of the first twenty-five candidates for appointment to 
the Police Department of the City of Boston, furnished by the 
Civil Service Commission : 



Civil Service Eligible List. 



Name. 


Date of Birth. 


Present 
Age. 


Weight. 


Height. 


Schooling. 


Applicant . 


Sept. 


19, 1898 


34 


195 


6-1 


High. 


Applicant 






Dec. 


17, 1901 


31 


162 


5-8 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






June 


30, 1898 


35 


200 


5-11 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






Sept. 


19, 1896 


36 


162 


5-9 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






July 


17, 1896 


37 


208 


5-11 


Evening High. 


Applicant . 






April 


11, 1901 


32 


155 


6 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






Oct. 


1, 1898 


34 


168 


6-1 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






May 


20, 1900 


33 


155 


5-10^ 


High (2 years). 


Applicant . 






Jan. 


31, 1898 


35 


168 


5-11 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






Aug. 


20, 1899 


34 


150 


5-10 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






May 


4, 1903 


30 


175 


5-91 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






Oct. 


22, 1897 


35 


172 


5-11 


High (2 years). 


Applicant . 






Jan. 


28, 1897 


36 


198 


5-11 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






July 


9, 1899 


34 


145 


5-10 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






Nov. 


16, 1896 


36 


148 


5-8 


High (J year). 


Applicant . 






Oct. 


13, 1897 


35 


165 


5-11 


High (2 years). 


Applicant . 






March 


31, 1898 


35 


160 


5-10 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






Oct. 


10, 1897 


35 


196 


5-1 U 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






July 


19, 1896 


37 


186 


6-1 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






June 


24, 1897 


36 


170 


5-1 U 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






June 


22, 1899 


34 


155 


5-101 


Grammar. 


Applicant . 






June 


13, 1900 


33 


175 


5-10 


High (1 year). 


Applicant . 






March 


27, 1901 


32 


230 


5-llJ 


Grammar. 



The following proposed amendment to the General Laws 
would remedy the condition outlined above : 

Section 1. — Section 4 of Chapter 31 of the General 
Laws as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition thereof 
is hereby amended by striking out the words, 

". . . and except further that no rule shall pre- 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

scribe a maximum age limit for applicants for positions 
in police or fire departments lower than thirty-five 
years." 

in the fourth paragraph of said Section 4, and inserting 

in place thereof, the following : 

". . . and except further that no rule shall pre- 
scribe a maximum age limit for applicants for position 
in police or fire departments greater than twenty-seven 
years, and further that the minimum age limit for 
applicants for positions in police or fire departments 
shall be twenty-one years." 
Section 2. — All acts and parts of acts inconsistent 

herewith are hereby repealed. 

Another important matter in regard to police personnel is 
the slowness of promotion existing in most police departments. 
This stultifies and destroys initiative, and allows the higher 
positions to be held by men who have reached an age which 
renders it difficult for them to keep their ideas and their actions 
abreast of the times; and in the lower ranks allows men to 
be retained in the service who are of little or no value for 
police work. 

In this department, under the most favorable pension laws 
applying to it, the man, unless discharged for discipline or 
retired for total physical disability, is allowed to remain until 
he reaches the age of sixty-five years, and is retirable only 
by action of the Mayor. Under the contributory retirement 
system which applies to a large percentage of the police force 
in Boston, members will not be retirable until they reach the 
age of seventy years. The Chief Executive of the Police 
Department should be allowed to retire men, upon a liberal 
pension, who have served twenty-five years, and if an officer 
of rank, five years in the grade from which he will be retired, 
if in the judgment of the police executive it is desirable to do so. 

To accomplish the above purpose the following amendment 
to the law is suggested : 

Section 1. — The Police Commissioner for the City of 
Boston may retire from active service any member of the 
Police Department in good standing, who has performed 
active service in the Department for twenty-five con- 
secutive years, and if such member of the Police Depart- 
ment is an officer of rank he shall not be retired from active 
service unless he has served five years in the grade from 
which he is to be retired; said member of the Police De- 
partment who is retired from active service shall be placed 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

upon a pension roll and his pension shall be an amount not 
exceeding one-half the annual salary or compensation of 
the office from which he is retired. 

Section 2. — All acts and parts of acts inconsistent 
herewith are hereby repealed. 

Law Enforcement. 
Liquor. 
Due to the repeal of the prohibition amendment, whatever 
the difficulties experienced in regard to the enforcement of the 
law against the illegal sale of liquor during the last fifteen years, 
little can be gained by an elaborate study of the troubles 
experienced by the police in enforcing the liquor laws during 
that period. Lender the new licensing system the matter of 
preventing the illegal sale of intoxicating liquor will be sim- 
phfied. 

Cojitrol of Criminals. 

The continued study of criminals with long records, some of 
which are contained in the official document known as House 
Bill 1578 of 1933, to my mind has been very illustrative of the 
manner in which criminals and so-called gangsters are developed. 

A study of these cases, shows that our present legal pro- 
cedure obstructs justice and is the best friend the criminal has. 
Not only must the police apprehend the criminal, but generally 
speaking, in cases of felons they must secure their detention for 
the Grand Jury in the lower court where the police must dis- 
close practically all the evidence the government has up to that 
time. Frequently there has been very little time to secure 
complete evidence before being required to present the case in 
court. If the criminal wins in the first stage of the case, the 
government is stopped from further prosecution. If the 
government wins, the defendant goes before the Grand Jury. 
If the criminal wins, there again the governrhent is stopped. If 
the government wins, the criminal then goes before the Superior 
Court and a jury. Again if the criminal wins he is cleared. If 
the government wins, the criminal then has the advantage of 
appeal on points of law to the Supreme Court of the State and 
possibly to the Supreme Court of the United States. If the 
criminal is finally locked up, he then has the parole system and 
the pardoning power to which to make appeal. All through this 
system the government has no right of appeal to have points of 
law determined. The lack of the right of appeal by the govern- 
ment in all these criminal procedures makes it impossible for 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the police to even obtain a judicial interpretation of the criminal 
law from the Supreme Court. This results in a peculiar handi- 
cap as the police are confronted by much diversity in the 
rulings of the lower court judges. What the proper solution is 
for all this unnecessary procedure is a problem. There are 
three alternatives: (1) abohsh the Grand Jury and permit an 
appeal direct to the Superior Court, thereby hastening criminal 
procedure; (2) permit lower courts to have petit juries where 
a defendant may be tried by a jury; and (3) permit the Dis- 
trict Attorney to make complaint direct to a judge of the 
Superior Court. I call these alternatives to your attention as 
I believe something must be done to obtain justice for the 
public as against the criminal. 

In the case of one of the chances that a criminal has against 
the government, I call to your attention the probation and the 
parole systems. There are many men walking the streets 
today who have been convicted of serious felonies and are 
either on parole or on probation. An examination of our 
criminal identification files reveals the startling fact that about 
fifty per cent of those who are arrested for felonies are out on 
parole or on probation. This situation is naturally discourag- 
ing to the police. Generally speaking, a police officer is in 
jeopardy of his life or liable to serious injury every time he arrests 
one of these felons. If, after repeated arrests, a policeman 
meets a felon recently arrested and released, it is natural that 
the policeman should say to himself, "What is the use of risking 
my life and the welfare of my family in taking this man in 
again?" I have no doubt that our parole officials have the best 
of motives in recommending paroles, but nevertheless, more 
rigid standards should be set before the criminal can obtain a 
parole. In connection with this whole subject it may be that 
promptness and certainty of punishment to follow a breach of 
law is the cure. 

I would call to your attention that so far as I know the only 
offence under our criminal laws for which a criminal cannot be 
placed on probation for the second offence is for operating an 
automobile while under the influence of intoxicating liquor. If 
this provision were applied to the law governing many other 
crimes it would act as a great deterrent to those inclined to 
criminal acts. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

Chartered Clubs. 
I would suggest the following amendment to our General 
Laws, which will have a tendency to properly control the many 
chartered clubs which have sprung up due to the weakness of 
our present law: 

Chapter 180, General Laws, is hereby amended by in- 
serting after Section 5 the following new section: 

Section 5a. — If the head of a police department of a 
city or town is of the opinion that the nature of the busi- 
ness and the activities conducted on the premises occu- 
pied by any corporation formed for any purpose described 
in Section 2 is an attempt to shield any illegal business 
or practice or is not within the scope of the expressed 
corporate power he shall forthwith transmit in writing to 
the Secretary of State, a statement of the activities of 
such corporation. The Secretary of State upon receipt 
of such report from the said police head of a city or town, 
shall suspend the charter of such corporation until a 
hearing can be held to determine whether or not the busi- 
ness activities of such corporation are improper. The 
Secretary of State shall within fifteen days after the sus- 
pension of said charter, set a date for a hearing and after 
such hearing, shall determine whether or not the charter 
of such corporation shall become void and of no effect. 

Suspicious Persons. 
With the rapid means of transportation today criminals 
operate over a large territory, and unless known as individuals 
to the police the question of identification is a serious and 
important matter with insufficient time, under the present 
law, at the command of the police, to carry out this important 
function. If a police department is to function properly it 
must have more time in which to establish the identity of 
criminals who may come into its hands. I would, therefore, 
recommend the following amendment to the General Laws: 

Chapter 41, General Laws, is hereby amended by in- 
serting after Section 98, the following new section; Sec- 
tion 98a : 

Section 1. — A person known to be a pickpocket, thief 
or burglar, or one who has no visible means of support, 
or one who is without lawful employment, shall be deemed 
to be a suspicious person. A person so suspected may be 
arrested by the police and may thereafter be safely kept 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

as a prisoner or otherwise unless released in a manner 
provided by law, and taken before a district court or trial 
justice and examined and prosecuted. Persons found to 
be suspicious persons within the meaning of this section 
shall be punished by imprisonment in the State Prison 
for not more than three years or in jail for not more than 
two and one-half years, or by a fine of not more than two 
thousand dollars. 

Idle and Disorderly Persons. 
I call your attention to Chapter 272, Sections 53 and 68, 
General Laws, relating to idle and disorderly persons and 
pickpockets. Officers of this department report to me that 
they have extreme difficulty in securing convictions of per- 
sons under both these sections of law. I am of the opinion, 
however, that the law as written is sufficient, but apparently 
many lower court judges require the police to offer more 
evidence than is legally necessary. 

Barricades. 
I would also suggest that Chapter 271, Sections 25 and 26, 
be amended so as to include obstructions placed in premises 
resorted to for the illegal keeping and exposing of intoxicating 
liquors and narcotic drugs, so as to have said sections provide 
as follows : 

Section 25. — If a captain of police in Boston or marshal 
or chief of police in any other city or town in the com- 
monwealth finds that access to any building, apartment 
or place which he has reasonable cause to believe is re- 
sorted to for the illegal keeping and exposing of intoxi- 
cating liquors or narcotic drugs, or for unlawful gaming, 
is barred by any obstruction, such as a door, window, 
shutter, screen, bar or grating of unusual strength, other 
than what is usual in ordinary places of business, or any 
unnecessary number of doors, windows or obstructions, 
he shall order the same removed by the owner or agent 
of the building where such obstruction exists, and if any 
of said officers cannot find either of the persons men- 
tioned so as to make personal service, said notice shall be 
posted upon the outside of the apartments and on the 
outside of said building, and upon the neglect to remove 
such obstruction for seven days from the date of said 
order or posting of said notices, any of said officers shall 
cause such obstruction to be removed from such build- 
ing, and the expense of such removal shall be a lien on said 
building and be collected by the officer removing such 
obstruction in the manner in which a mechanic's lien is 
collected. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

Section 26. — If, within one year after removal of said 
obstruction, the premises are again obstructed as above 
defined, the captain of police or marshal or chief of police 
shall have the same power of removal as provided in the 
preceding section, and in addition the owner or agent 
when such second order of removal is given, either by per- 
sonal service or by posting on the building, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine or not less than two hundred and fifty nor 
more than five thousand dollars, and the amount of said 
fine shall be a lien on said building and be collected in 
like manner as provided in the preceding section. And 
for every subsequent obstruction as above defined, at any 
time within two years of the giving of the second notice, 
as above provided, said officers shall have the same powers 
as provided in the preceding section for removing the 
obstructions, and the owner or agent at the time of such 
third or subsequent order of removal is given, either by 
personal service or by posting on the building, shall be 
punished by a fine of not less than five hundred nor more 
than one thousand dollars or may be punished by im- 
prisonment for one year, and the amount of said fine shall 
be a lien upon the said building, and shall be collected in 
like manner as above provided. Obstructions as above 
defined, erected more than two years after the giving of 
the notice of the third offence, shall be construed to be a 
first offence under this section. 

The law amended as outlined above, to include obstructions 
placed on premises resorted to for keeping and exposing in- 
toxicating liquors and narcotic drugs, would give the police 
an effective weapon against premises which are heavily barred. 

Concealed Dangerous JVeapons. 
The present law. Chapter 269, Section 10, General Laws, 
Ter. Ed., provides for State Prison sentences for those illegally 
carrying dangerous weapons, but many lower courts impose 
fines or light sentences. I believe that the judges in the lower 
courts should not take jurisdiction in these cases as at present, 
but should decline jurisdiction and refer them to the Superior 
Court in order that defendants found guilty may be sentenced 
to the State Prison. 

The following amendment to the General Laws would be 
helpful : 

Section 121, Chapter 140, General Laws, Ter. Ed., is 
hereby amended by striking out the following words in the 
fourth, fifth and sixth lines : 

" . . . and of which the length of barrel, not 
including any revolving, detachable or mazagine breech, 
does not exceed twelve inches ..." 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

so that said Section shall read as follows: 

Section 121. — In sections one hundred and twenty-two 
to one hundred and twenty-nine inclusive, "firearms" 
includes a pistol, revolver, machine gun or other weapon 
of any description, loaded or unloaded, from which a shot 
or a bullet can be discharged. 

This amendment of law will require a license for the sale of 
firearms whether or not the length of the barrel exceeds twelve 
inches. The police find that many weapons are purchased 
with a longer barrel than twelve inches and the barrel is then 
sawed off by the criminal to a length which makes it readily 
concealable. This amendment will aid in the prosecution of 
those possessing dangerous weapons under the terms of Chapter 
269, General Laws, Section 10. 

Automobiles. * 

The following proposed amendments to the present law are 
suggested : 

The registrar shall suspend any certificate of registration 
or any license issued to a person under the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 90, who has been convicted 
of a felony and sentenced to the State Prison. The reg- 
istrar of motor vehicles shall not issue a certificate of 
registration or any license to a person whose registration 
or license has been revoked under the provisions of this 
section, unless the head of the police department in the 
city or town in which such person resides approves same. 
No license or registration of a motor vehicle shall be issued 
until the registrar forwards to the police authorities of 
the city in which the applicant resides the name and address 
of the applicant with a request that the police verify the 
name and address of the applicant. The registrar shall 
not issue a license until he has received from said police 
authorities a report in writing verifying the applicant's 
name and address. 

I also wish to call your attention to the following proposed 
amendment : 

Section 28, Chapter 266, General Laws, Ter. Ed., is 
hereby amended by striking out said section and inserting 
in place thereof, the following: 

Section 28. — Whoever steals an automobile or motor- 
cycle or whoever uses a motor vehicle without authority 
knowing that such use is unauthorized, or receives or 
buys an automobile or motorcycle knowing same to have 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

been stolen, or conceals any automobile or motorcycle 
thief knowing him to be such, or conceals any automobile 
or motorcycle knowing the same to have been stolen, or 
takes an automobile or motorcycle without the authority 
of the owner and steals from it any of its parts or acces- 
sories, or without the authority of the owner operates an 
automobile or motorcycle after his right to operate without 
a license has been suspended or after his license to operate 
has been suspended or revoked and prior to the restoration 
of such right or license to operate or to the issuance to 
him of a new license to operate, shall be punished by im- 
prisonment in the State Prison for not more than ten years 
or imprisonment in jail or house of correction for not more 
than two and one-half years. 

The following words contained in the tenth and eleventh 
lines of Section 24 of Chapter 90, General Laws, Ter. Ed., are 
hereby stricken out of said section: 

"or whoever uses a motor vehicle without 
authority knowing that such use is unauthorized . . . " 

The above amendments to our automobile law are recom- 
mended for the following reasons : 

The registrar of motor vehicles should be empowered to 
revoke the driver's license of every person convicted of a felony 
and such license should not be restored without the approval 
of the local police authorities. In nearly all cases of serious 
crime, the stolen automobile plays an important part. The 
penalty for stealing an automobile under the present law, due 
to the "unauthorized use" makes the use of an automobile by 
other than a properly authorized person a slight offence. If 
the use of an automobile without proper authority were made 
a felony it would safeguard the public using the highways as 
well as assist in the apprehension of criminals. 

Co-operation with Neighboring Police Departments. 
The co-operation which has previously existed between this 
department and nearby police departments has been extended 
and strengthened materially during the past year. Several 
conferences have been held at Boston Headquarters between 
committees of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association 
for the purpose of co-ordinating police work in the metropolitan 
district. This Department is now furnishing all other depart- 
ments within approximately twenty-five miles of Boston with 
photographs, fingerprints and descriptions of persons and 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

history of the offence of wanted persons by any of the co-op- 
erating departments. The Boston Department also has agreed 
to make circulars and forward the same containing the above 
information to each of the co-operating departments, enabling 
each of the departments to maintain an up-to-date "Persons 
Wanted" file. 

For the purpose of sending out teletype alarms of serious 
crimes a standard form for recording all the material facts has 
been adopted and each city and town equipped with teletype 
is enabled to file these descriptions under the principles of 
modus operandi. This service quickly informs the co-operating 
departments of crimes committed, the method of operation, a 
description of the criminals and vehicles used. 

This Department also furnishes weekly to the co-operating 
departments a list of all persons paroled during the preceding 
week from the various places of detention. 

Personnel. 

On July 24, 1933, Augustine J. Gill for many years a member 
of the Department was promoted and appointed Secretary to 
the Police Commissioner. 

On January 30, 1933, Captains John M. Anderson and 
Martin H. King were promoted and appointed Deputy Super- 
intendents. Deputy King was designated as Inspector of 
Divisions. 

On August 28, 1933, Deputy Superintendent Martin H. King 
was promoted and appointed Superintendent of Police. 

On August 28, 1933, Captain William W. Livingston was 
promoted and appointed Deputy Superintendent. 

The members of the Police Force in the past year have 
conducted themselves with tact, alertness, ability and courage. 
Not a single member on any occasion has hesitated to risk his 
life either in apprehending criminals or the saving of human 
life. During the year ending November 30, 1933, the strength 
of the uniformed force was reduced from 2,289 to 2,229 officers 
by deaths and retirement with no appointments being made to 
the grade of patrolman. Other employees remained practically 
unchanged. On November 30 of this year there was a total 
of 2,394 persons on the rolls of the Department. 

During the year, Division Commanders have made a number 
of reports, through the Superintendent, recommending that 
certain officers of their respective divisions be commended in 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

General Orders for meritorious work in the apprehension of 
criminals, or for saving of human life. 

In addition, the Commissioner has been in receipt of many- 
commendatory letters from citizens, organizations, cities and 
towns, praising members of the Department, and the Depart- 
ment as a whole. 

On numerous occasions during the past year, in response to 
calls from various hospitals in this city, officers have freely 
offered and have given of their blood in urgent cases where 
blood transfusion was necessary to relieve the suffering of and 
to preserve the lives of persons who were gravely ill, and in 
some instances this has been the means of saving life. 

During the year, in General Orders, the Commissioner has 
either commended members of this Department, or brought to 
the notice of the Department favorable communications 
concerning them, as well as the whole Department, in the 
following numbers: Deputy Superintendents, 3; Captains, 3; 
Lieutenants, 4; Lieutenant Inspectors, 2; Sergeants. 34; Patrol- 
men, 207; Civilian employees, 3; the Department in General, 
10. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and 
the Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed in December 
of 1930. 

Annually, since that time, the Superintendent and Deputy 
Superintendents, acting as a Board of Merit, have reviewed 
the meritorious and courageous acts performed by members 
of the force, and have recommended the following officers for 
special recognition for acts performed. 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor. 
Year. To Whom Awarded. 

1929. Patrolman James J. McGowan, formerly of Division 4. 

1930. Patrolman Owen F. Donovan of Division 2. 

1931. Patrolman Chester A. Guilford of Division 17. 

1932. Patrolman Elmer R. Ogston of Division 4. 

Department Medal of Honor. 

1929. Sergeant Frank E. Gilman of Division 7. 
Patrolman James J. McGowan, formerly of Division 4. 
Patrolman Archibald N. Rintoul of Division 4, 

1930. Sergeant John P. J. Maune of Division 11. 
Patrolman John J. Falvey, formerly of Division 10. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1930. Patrolman Lewis S. Morrissey of Division 10. 
Patrolman Owen F. Donovan of Division 2. 

1931. Patrolman Edward W. Crickard of Division 2. 
Patrolman Daniel L. Donahue of Division 4. 
Patrolman Robert C. White of Division 1. 
Patrolman Edward F. Harrington (now retired), for- 
merly of Division 13. 

Patrolman Chester A. Guilford of Division 17. 

1932. Patrolman Frederick V. Perry of Division 10. 
Patrolman Herbert J. Langlois of Division 10. 
Patrolman Cyril Montgomery of Division 15. 
Patrolman Joseph Gilleo of Division 1. 
Patrolman Leo V. Devlin of Division 9. 
Patrolman Wilham B. Boyden of Division 10, 
Patrolman Elmer R. Ogston of Division 4. 

On January 16, 1934, at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, medals for 1933 will be awarded to the 
following-named officers : 

For 1933. 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor. 
Sergeant Francis W. Russell of the Bureau of Criminal Inves- 
tigation. 

Department Medal of Honor. 

Sergeant Francis W. Russell of the Bureau of Criminal Inves- 
tigation. 
Patrolman Andrew K. Adair of Division 2. 
Patrolman George W. Burke of Division 2. 
Patrolman John J. Dever of Division 4. 
Patrolman Henry F. Brogan of Division 14. 
Patrolman Daniel Fitzgerald of Division 14. 
Patrolman Thomas J. Mundy of Division 14. 
Patrolman Henry A. Weiss of Division 14. 
Patrolman Daniel J. Feeney of Division 16. 

In 1933, 5,758 days were lost by officers of the Department 
by reason of injuries received while on duty. 

During the year 47 patrolmen have been punished for viola- 
tion of Police Rules and Regulations by either suspension with 
loss of pay, extra duty, reprimands or the placing of the com- 
plaints against them on file. One captain and 2 sergeants 
were reprimanded in General Orders for neglect of duty. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

Eight patrolmen after a hearing were discharged from the 
service; 5 patrolmen resigned while charges against them 
were pending and complaints against 3 patrolmen were dis- 
missed after a hearing. 

Organization. 

On April 6, 1933, there was created in the Office of the Prop- 
erty Clerk the position of Supervisor of Automotive Equip- 
ment. The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment has charge 
of the assignment and care of all Department automobiles and 
motorcycles and has charge of the new garage and maintenance 
shop for automobiles in Station 4. 

On July 20, 1933, there was created in the Office of the Com- 
missioner a Supervisor of Cases. The Supervisor of Cases has 
supervision of the preparation and presentation of all cases 
brought by members of the Force in the courts of the Common- 
wealth, and it is also the duty of the Supervisor of Cases to 
co-operate with the District Attorney of Suffolk County. A 
detail of officers has been assigned to the Supervisor of Cases 
to work under his direction and they are assigned to duty 
in the several courts to supervise the preparation and presen- 
tation of all criminal cases. 

The bench has praised the efficacy of this unit in presenting 
cases to the court, commending the dispatch and orderly manner 
in which the evidence is presented. 

On November 2, 1933, there was created in the office of the 
Property Clerk the position of Armorer. The Amorer, under 
the direction of the Property Clerk, has charge of the care and 
custody of all weapons and explosives coming into the possession 
of the Department. The Armorer also acts as ballistic expert 
for the Department and is proving to be of great value in the 
preparation and presentation of cases involving the use of 
weapons. 

Communications System. 

During the past year, Divisions 4 and 5 were consohdated 
and housed in the new building at Berkeley street and Warren 
avenue, as Division 4, and Divisions 6 and 12 were consolidated 
and housed in the building occupied by Division 6 on D and 
Athens street, South Boston, as Division 6, and Division 1 
located in the new building on North street, near Cross street, 
have been equipped with the flashing light and citizens' alarm 
system, and a part of Division 3 which has been merged with 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Division 1 is also equipped with the same system. The re- 
maining portion of Division 3 has been merged with Division 
2 located on Milk street at Sears street, but due to the old type 
cable and its poor condition, this division cannot be equipped 
with the new system until new cable is installed. Division 15, 
City square, Charlestown, is about ninety per cent equipped 
with the new system, and will shortly be completed. 

The engineering firm of Jackson & Moreland has been 
engaged to prepare plans and specifications for the purchase 
and installation of a two-way radio and wire system for this 
Department. The work has been progressing rapidly and 
bids will shortly be asked for the installation of a two-way 
radio system with proper cables, as the cable plant of this 
Department is in a very bad condition, unreliable and inade- 
quate. 

Bureau of Records. 
The Bureau of Records was established October 17, 1931, and 
that part of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation known as the 
Criminal Identification Division was transferred to the Bureau 
of Records. Further changes have been made to simplify the 
keeping of police records as well as making the records of the 
Department uniform in all its branches; for example, a new 
system of arrest records at Police Headquarters has been in- 
augurated. A new loose-leaf form of arrest and summons 
book has been designed and installed as well as a new form for 
reporting and filing arrests, also a card system installed in the 
City Prison and the House of Detention, eliminating a cumber- 
some book system. As a result of these and other changes, 
many books and reports formerly kept with great labor and 
expense by the Department were consolidated and simplified. 

The efficiency of this bureau has been greatly increased by 
the installation of complete and thoroughly modern criminal 
identification equipment. 

The photographic apparatus includes the following cameras: 

3 4x5 Graflex. 

1 8x10. 

1 4x5 photo record. 

1 enlarging, reducing and copying, size 8x10. 

2 fingerprint cameras used at scenes of crime. 
1 Rectigraph. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

1 Dexigraph. 

1 complete set of fluorescent screens. 
Lenses for magnification photograph and much other 
equipment used in photography. 

The Dexigraph is used principally in photography of finger- 
prints in building up the one fingerprint system of classifying 
and filing. This machine enables us to go into standard finger- 
print files and take out for temporary use any standard ten- 
fingerprint cards of those who were arrested for crimes in the 
commission of which fingerprints might be left at the scene of 
the crime and photograph every finger separately for filing. 
All subjects as above who are brought to us for fingerprinting 
in the regular manner are also "single fingerprinted" and these 
single fingerprints, as well as those reproduced by photography, 
are classified and filed in the proper division of the single- 
fingerprint files. With the aid of this machine the work pro- 
ceeds much more rapidly than by any other method, thereby 
quickly building up the single-fingerprint file, and at the same 
time maintaining our standard file with the maximum effi- 
ciency. Because of the fact this machine is so fast in its action, 
a standard print is out of its proper classification but a very 
few minutes. 

The Single- Fingerprint File has great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crimes. Here- 
tofore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might be, 
taken at the scene of crime were almost valueless. There was 
no method of filing latent prints taken at the scene of crime up 
to comparatively recent origination of the single-fingerprint 
system of filing. 

Fluorescent Screens make possible the reproduction of any 
printed matter without the aid of a camera. They are also of 
value in disclosing forgeries on documents. They may be 
used to photograph any part of the printed matter of a book. 
As an illustration, if there is a register entry in a hotel or an 
item in any particular book of the public library or any other 
place to which we would have access, but which we could not 
bring to the Bureau of Records for the purpose of photograph- 
ing, the fluorescent screens can be used by merely covering the 
screens and the hands with a closely woven cloth, getting the 
negative result, protecting it by means provided and returning 
it to the Bureau of Records for development. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The Rectigraph is a photograph machine, very fast in its 
action, and enables the operator to turn out quickly a large 
number of photographs. As an illustration : during the Ameri- 
can Legion Week, this machine turned out over 7,000 photo- 
graphs in two days at an approximate cost, labor, materials, 
etc., of about $65. If done by commercial photographers 
this work would probably have taken three weeks at a cost of 
at least $3,000. 

The Combined Holophane and Cooper-Hewitt Lighting 
Unit installed for group photography meets all demands made 
upon it as to sufficient amount and proper diffusion of light for 
good photography. 

Photograph Films of varying sizes are filed in proper order 
in files adaptable to the purpose. The enlarged photographs 
are filed in cabinets especially built to accommodate the size. 
These enlarged photographs are principally the scenes of homi- 
cides, hit-and-run accidents, suspicious fires, and are very 
valuable for court purposes. Many commendations have been 
received because of the value of these photographs, particularly 
in arson cases, the jury being enabled to plainly determine 
the condition of the burned premises, and a very decided effect 
is obtained by the introduction and exhibition of these photo- 
graphs in court. This same effect on juries obtains in homi- 
cides and hit-and-run cases. 

This bureau supplies the Medical Examiner with complete 
set of enlarged photographs in homicide cases. The photo- 
graphic unit of the Bureau of Records is today one of the finest 
equipped in the entire country. 

The files in this office contain records of all assignments made 
in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records of 
arrests made throughout the department; also on file in this 
office are reports of all felonies committed within the city and 
all reports of the investigation of those felonies. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory and Massachusetts Reformatory for Women, 
including their fingerprints and photographs, also records of all 
inmates of the Suffolk County House of Correction and their 
fingerprints. In addition to the foregoing, the files contain 
many thousands of photographs, fingerprints, correspondence, 
records, clippings and histories of criminals arrested or wanted 
in various parts of the United States and foreign countries. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

The Main Index File has been thoroughly modernized 
recently by alphabetical arrangement. Much of the obsolete 
index matter was removed so that, with the additions to this 
file made in the course of the past year, there are now 
approximately 396,472 persons recorded in the files of this 
bureau. 

During the year 36,800 circulars containing photographs 
and fingerprints of persons wanted in this city for various 
crimes were drafted and mailed from this office to every city 
and town in the United States with a population of 5,000 or 
more. State Bureaus of Identification, all Army and Navy 
Recruiting Stations, United States Immigration Offices and 
Customs Stations and to a number of the larger cities in foreign 
countries. In addition to this, 9,315 photographic circulars 
containing photographs and descriptions of persons wanted 
for crimes were sent to the departments within a radius of 
one hundred miles of Boston. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 
cabinets and are constantly being added to. Photographs 
received from outside departments are placed in the "foreign 
segregated" file and those taken by this Department are 
placed in the "local segregated" file. The photographs of 
the criminals are segregated into four distinct sections, namely, 
white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each of these groups is sub- 
divided according to sex and they are also classified under 
the heading of the crime in which they specialize. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other police departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and 
in many instances, important identifications have been made. 
Valuable assistance has also been rendered to government 
officials of the following branches: Post Office Department, 
Treasury Department, Secret Service Department, Depart- 
ment of Justice and Prohibition Department. Similar services 
have also been rendered to railroad and express companies. 

Members of this division visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires, and other crimes and, 
in many instances, secured photographs of fingerprints of the 
persons who committed these crimes, and in a number of cases 
took photographs of the scene where the crime was committed. 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The figures and other data submitted as a part of this report 
show the work of the past year. 

During the past year, a fingerprint file has been set up con- 
taining the fingerprints of persons hcensed by the PoHce Com- 
missioner as special police officers, and drivers of hackney 
carriages and sight-seeing automobiles. The file contains the 
fingerprints of 6,012 taxi drivers, 107 sight-seeing car drivers, 
and 2,095 special police officers, and fingerprints of the entire 
personnel of the Department. 

Our fingerprint men are often called upon to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints, also where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. The 
photographers of this unit are called principally before the 
courts of this city, but on the occasions where identifications 
are made by latent prints for outside cities, the photographer 
who enlarges the prints by photography for the purpose of 
charting them for presentation as evidence in court is also 
summoned into court to enable the photographs to be properly 
introduced. There have been many occasions in the past 
when Chiefs of Police of outside cities and towns have asked 
for the services of fingerprint men and camera, in consequence 
of crime committed in their jurisdiction, and we have co-operated 
by sending a fingerprint man properly equipped to survey the 
scene of crime and reproduce any prints that may be there. 

Criminal Identification. 
This table gives a brief outline of the more important accom- 
plishments of the criminal identification unit of the Bureau of 
Records. The table shows the number of individuals photo- 
graphed and fingerprinted, also the number of prints or copies 
prepared. 

Identifications of criminals arrested locally 1,916 

Identifications of criminals arrested elsewhere .... 628 

Scenes of crimes photographed 430 

Circulars sent out by identification unit 44,519 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1932 136,718 

Made and filed during the year 3,321 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 2,036 

Number on file November 30, 1933 142,075 



1934.J PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

Fingerpri7it File: 

Number on file November 30, 1932 92,201 

Taken and filed during the year 3,321 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 3,087 

Number on file November 30, 1933 98,609 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 2,702 

Other cities and states 1,412 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Jus- 
tice 3,321 

State Bureau of Identification 3,321 

Other cities and states 1,400 

Supplementary. 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,390 

Number of scenes of crime photographed, small camera . . 430 

Number of exposures, small camera 1,539 

Number of prints, small camera 266 

Number of enlargements: 

16 by 20 inches 500 

11 by 14 inches 2,340 

8 by 10 inches 840 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 6,194 

Prints made from same 3,131 

Number of rectigraph photographs 23,164 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 4 

Number of civilian employees photographed .... 3 

Number of negatives of criminals 3,561 

Number of prints made from same 18,342 

Number of fingerprint investigations (latent) .... 960 

Number of fingerprint investigations, positive . . 411 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 1,345 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 

Police officers 3 

Special police officers 308 

Taxi drivers 617 

Civilians 4 

Missing Persons. 
The missing persons file is kept by the Bureau of Records. 
The following table shows the number of persons reported 
missing during the year 1933 in Boston, Mass. : 

Total number reported 1,414 

Total number found 1,115 

Total number still missing 299 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Table No. 1. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


421 


125 


362 


122 


59 


3 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


279 


210 


214 


142 


65 


68 


Over 21 years. 


264 


115 


195 


80 


69 


35 


Totals . 


964 


450 


771 


344 


193 


106 



The following table shows the number of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston, total number 
2,128. By careful checking with reporting agencies, the record 
of the number found is 794 and the total number still missing, 
1,334. Of the 794 persons reported found, the missing per- 
sons' unit was instrumental in locating them. 





Age and Sex of Such Persons. 








Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 



Under 15 years, 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 



516 


140 


262 


84 


254 


503 


285 


129 


104 


374 


498 


186 


151 


64 


347 


1,517 


611 


542 


252 


975 



56 

181 
122 



Totals 



359 



Of the latter table this Department has kept a complete 
record of the 2,128 persons reported missing from cities and 
towns outside of Boston, Mass. 

The Missing Persons Division handled approximately 1,582 
pieces of correspondence other than cases appearing in the 
tables. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

Warrant File. 

The warrant file for the entire PoUee Department is now kept 
in the Bureau of Records. A Hst of all warrants issued or 
received by the Department is sent out each day on the mani- 
fold and every officer in the Department receives a copy of 
this list. Twenty-four hours after the issuance of the war- 
rant, if an arrest has not been made, a card provided for the 
station houses is forwarded to the Bureau of Records with all 
the data pertaining to the warrant and case. These cards are 
alphabetically filed so that almost instantaneously it can be 
told whether a warrant exists in the Department for any per- 
son that may be named. Upon service of the warrant, another 
card goes forward to the Bureau of Records with the necessary 
information of service. 

All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant file of the Bureau of Records. All corre- 
spondence pertaining to the movement of warrants outside of 
the city is handled by the Bureau of Records. Under the 
rules of this Department, immediately upon registering of an 
arrest in a station, if it is upon a warrant, either for the Bos- 
ton Police Department or another police department, or if 
it is without a warrant and in the judgment of the officer in 
command, if it is suflEiciently serious in its nature, he imme- 
diately notifies the AVarrant Unit, reporting the arrest. This 
applies to every hour of the day and night. The files are 
immediately searched and if it appears that there is a warrant 
for the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the oflacer 
in command of the arresting division is immediately notified 
and given full particulars. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, also all criminal records requested 
by outside departments. 

Police School. 
The second term of the police school was opened on Novem- 
ber 28, 1932. The operation of this school was placed under 
the control of an administrative board consisting of two Deputy 
Superintendents and five Captains. All patrolmen with the 
exception of those who had reached the age of sixty years or 
were excused by the administrative board for sufficient reason, 
were compelled to attend sessions of the school on other time 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

than that required for the performance of poHce duty. Four 
sessions of the school were held each day, on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday of each week; two day sessions for 
officers on night duty; two evening sessions for officers on 
day duty. Each officer attending the school was furnished 
with a copy of the day's lecture and given five questions to 
answer in writing. During the second term of the school a 
total of 1,870 patrolmen attended. Instruction was given 
in fourteen different subjects, such as court procedure, evidence, 
crimes against the person, crimes against property, crime 
prevention, homicides, investigations and reports, etc. Instruc- 
tion was also given to sergeants at two different lectures on 
"Duties of Sergeants" with a total of 167 sergeants attending 
the lectures. In addition to the above, twenty-seven special 
sessions of the school, consisting of one hour's duration each, 
were held for those patrolmen who had signified their intention 
of taking the Civil Service examination for patrolman to the 
grade of sergeant, attendance being voluntary on the part of 
the officers, and an average of 620 patrolmen attended these 
lectures. During this school term all the instructors were 
selected from officers of the Department. The third term of 
the school was opened on November 20, 1933, and will embrace 
subjects in addition to those taught last year. 

Traffic. 
The Bureau of Traffic at Police Headquarters, acting under 
the direction of the Superintendent, is the responsible agency 
for the uniform handling of traffic. As a result of this respon- 
sibility the Bureau of Traffic, with its well-trained inspection 
force, has taken up with the commanding officers of the various 
divisions all problems pertaining to traffic and especially 
having to do with the regulation and free flow of traffic in 
the vicinity of such places as the North Station, Boston Garden, 
Mechanics Building, Boston Arena, Symphony Hall, Boston 
Opera House, Harvard Stadium, Braves Field, South Station, 
theatrical section and steamboat wharves together with the 
making of the necessary arrangements for the movement of 
traffic at all large gatherings for observing the road races 
that were held throughout the year in the various parts of the 
city, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery parade, the parade 
of the Boston School Cadets, the Rotary World Convention, 
Memorial Day exercises at the various burial grounds, the 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

American Legion parade on Armistice Day, the largely attended 
funerals, as well as the operation of e very-day traffic con- 
ditions, that prevailed throughout the year and the handling 
of all these various functions by the Bureau of Traffic under 
the direction of the Superintendent have met with great 
success. The Commissioner has received many reports com- 
mending the police for the fine manner in which traffic con- 
ditions were handled on these occasions. 

It is the duty of the Bureau of Traffic to make an inspection, 
study and report on all matters of complaint in regard to 
traffic and to make corrections and remedy any deficiencies 
that may be discovered. 

One of the duties successfully accomplished during the past 
year was the handling of approximately one million people 
who attended the baseball and football games, political events, 
and the many large funerals without injury to person or 
property. 

A traffic school was opened in the Bureau of Traffic on 
April 25, 1933, all officers performing traffic duty or detailed 
on school crossings being required to attend a one-hour session 
of school on their own time and in uniform for the purpose of 
instructing them as to the proper method of directing traffic 
in accordance with the rules and regulations; also as to their 
conduct and deportment while on duty. All night officers, 
amounting to forty-four, attended a day session of this school 
on April 25, from 11 a. m. to noon; all day officers, amounting 
to 483, being split up into groups and attending an evening 
session from 7 to 8 p. m. 

The records of the tagging office of the Bureau of Traffic 
show that in the enforcement of traffic regulations during the 
year 1933, 110,206 tags were placed upon motor vehicles for 
various violations as compared with 90,103 tags placed on 
motor vehicles during the year 1932; of this number 59,744 
tags were turned in by the operators and 50,462 tags were 
not turned in. Of the number of tags placed upon automo- 
biles, 6,581 were presented to the various courts for prose- 
cution, as compared with 9,154 for the year 1932. This 
difference in the number of prosecutions between the years 
1932 and 1933 may be attributed to the decision of the courts. 
In prosecutions under Section 31, Article 5 of the Traffic 
Regulations, the court will not entertain a complaint against the 
owner of a car that has been tagged unless an officer has found 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

him in the act of parking, or unless he acknowledges that he 
parked the car. At the present time there are cases in relation 
to Section 31, Article 5 of the Traffic Regulations pending in 
the Supreme Court, and until such time as a decision is rendered 
by that court, we will have to proceed as heretofore. 

Of the 50,462 tags issued and not turned in by the owners 
of cars that were tagged, a notice was sent by the Bureau of 
Traffic to each one, either by the service of a police officer 
or by registered mail, notifying them that their car had been 
tagged and requesting them to appear at this bureau within 
a certain period. Of this number, 4,180 took no notice of 
our request and, in consequence thereof, the Registrar of 
Motor Vehicles was notified of this fact by sending to him 
their names, addresses, number of times each car was tagged 
and the date of each tag. 

Hackney Carriages and Stands. 

For the three years operating under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the new rules and regulations relative to hackney carriages 
and stands established on February 1, 1931, by the Police 
Commissioner have worked out very well. 

At present there are 155 locations for special stands, with 
a capacity of 485 carriages, as compared with 164 locations 
with a capacity of 514 carriages during the previous year; 
and 292 locations for public stands with a capacity'" of 730 
cabs, as compared with 299 locations with a capacity of 749 
cabs during the preceding year. The total number of licensed 
hackney carriages at present is 1,697 as compared with 1,747 
in the previous year. During the year there were approxi- 
mately 148 taxi stands, both special and public, that were 
established, removed or relocated in the interest of public 
necessity and convenience. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage ^'IOLATIONS. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year 
2,209 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
One thousand one hundred and three suspensions ranging 
from one to thirty days, according to the seriousness of the 
offence, and 16 revocations were made, the remainder being 
reprimanded and warned and a record filed for future reference. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

This system of discipline has continued to result in relieving 
the courts of many minor cases which would tend to congest 
their dockets. Any driver, in accordance with the hackney 
rules, who is dissatisfied with the findings of the Bureau of 
Traffic may appeal to the Commissioner, and during the past 
year no such appeals have been made. There still continues 
to be a minimum of crime among the 3,229 drivers who have 
been licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

This unit has been very active in the suppression of the 
so-called "loading" by hackney carriage drivers from Dor- 
chester to down-town Boston and return, as a result of com- 
plaints being made by the Boston Elevated Railway Co. 
These complaints have been investigated and offences have 
been tabulated by a detail of officers from this unit, the offending 
drivers being "stripped" of their credentials. Hearings on 
such complaints have been held at the Bureau of Traffic. In 
order to effectively combat this practice of hackney carriage 
drivers in carrying "loads" from Dorchester to the city proper 
and return, against whom drastic action has been taken, it 
was deemed advisable to penalize the owners of cabs that were 
used more than twice in carrying "loads" in violation of Sec- 
tions 8, 17 and 20 of the Hackney Carriage Regulations. This 
system requires notices to be sent to the owners of cabs for the 
first two offences and on the third offence the cab license is 
suspended for a period of at least ten days. When cab owners 
realize the severity of the action of the Police Department in 
its determined drive to stop this practice of running jitneys 
with licensed hackney carriages, this abuse will cease. 

Plant and Equipment. 
The office of the Property Clerk is divided into the following 
branches : 

General Office. 

Stock Rooms. 

Lost and Found. 

Liquor. 

Automobile Maintenance. 

Motorcycle Maintenance. 

Ballistics. 

The custody of all seized liquors was transferred to the 
-office of the Property Clerk during the past year. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Careful consideration has been given to the care of the fire- 
arms of the Department, and all are in excellent condition. 
The revolvers carried by the men have been regularly inspected 
and repairs have been made where required. The value of 
this inspection has been shown by the decreasing number of 
major repairs this year over last. 

The uniforms of the members of the force have been cleansed 
and repaired during the year and replacements made only 
where necessary. 

Supplies have been furnished on requisition to the entire 
Department. 

There are now 20 horses in the Department, two of which 
were purchased during the year. 

The Department has traded 68 automobiles during the year 
and purchased 15 automobiles, and there are now 186 motor 
vehicles in the Department, divided into the following types: 

7 Utility wagons. 

1 Auto ambulance. 
22 Combination auto ambulances. 
98 Automobiles. 

9 Trucks. 
49 Motorcycles. 

The Lost and Found branch of the Department has been 
active during the year as shown by the following schedule: 

Articles on hand December 1, 1932 1,051 

Articles received during the year to November 30 . . 2,287 

Total 3,338 

Disposed of: 

To owners, through efforts of the Property Clerk's 

office 157 

To owners in response to advertisements ... 8 

Worthless or junk 285 

Sold at public auction 364 

Perishable articles destroyed, being decayed or unfit 

for use 11 

Number of packages, containing money, paid to the 

Chief Clerk 26 

Total number of articles disposed of .... 851 
Articles on hand December 1, 1932, and received during the 

year to November 3,338 

Total number of articles disposed of .... 851 

Total number of articles on hand November, 1933. . 2,487 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

The method of obtaining written proposals on bids for the 
larger quantities of supplies and materials used by the Depart- 
ment, as well as for repairs to Department property, labor and 
materials, which was put into general operation in 1931, has 
been continued and competitive bidding has proven most 
satisfactory and has resulted in much saving of money for 
the City of Boston. 

A maintenance shop in the basement of Station 4, at Berkeley 
street and Warren avenue, has been installed for the servicing 
of all Department automobiles, in addition to a garage that 
will house a large number of automobiles. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department motor- 
cycles has been installed at Division 16 on Boylston street. 

The boat equipment of the Boston Police Department for 
patrolling Boston Harbor and for the protection of the various 
islands in the harbor is obsolete. The financial condition of 
the city is the only reason that money has not been expended 
in the purchase of proper boat equipment necessary to ade- 
quately police Boston Harbor. 

The police boat "Stephen O'Meara," which was designed 
under the previous administration, proved to be ill-adapted 
for police work owing to the fact that it was too large, with 
deep draught and low speed. This boat was transferred from 
this Department to the Institutions Department of the city 
during the year. 

The police boat "Watchman" is a very old boat, propelled 
by steam, and should be replaced. It has had general repairs 
during the past year and is in need of more extensive repairs, 
the estimated cost of which would be large. 

The launch "E. U. Curtis" built in 1923 and propelled by 
gasoline is more or less top-heavy and unfit for use for harbor 
service, as well as unsafe, in rough weather. 

The launch "Argus" was built in 1917 and is now in need of 
extensive repairs, and this boat also should be replaced. 

Arrests. 
For the twelve months ending November 30, 1933, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1932, a 
brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offences 
may be of interest and is submitted on the following page. 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1932. 



Arrests. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1933. 



Arrests. 



Offences Against the Person. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robberj' (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offences Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offences Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offences Against the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) 

Drunkenness 

Offences not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (first 
offence) 

Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (second 
offence) 

Totals 



21 

86 

110 

384 

151 



731 



339 
2,573 



1,842 
34,372 



556 
43 



33 
92 

88 
395 

242 



712 



332 
2,178 



1,241 
36,941 



544 
21 



41,208 



42,819 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offences, such as traffic violations, violation of city 
ordinances, gaming, and miscellaneous offences. Arrests for 
the year totalled 81,418, of which 76,150 were males and 5,268 
were females. This total compares with 82,001 for the pre- 
ceding year. 

In connection with arrests recorded it is interesting to note 
that 21,545 persons or 26.46 per cent of the total arrests during 
the past year were persons residing outside of the city limits 
of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called upon to perform police work for nonresidents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what percentage 
of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This percentage is 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of this class 
of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in making 
comparisons of Boston with other cities, either of the cost of 
pohcing or of criminal statistics, that 26.46 per cent of the 
arrests in Boston is of nonresidents, whereas other cities have 
but a negligible percentage of arrests of nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department during the past year has continued its 
co-operation in furnishing returns to the National Division of 
Identification and Information of the Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, of the following serious offences: 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny. 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1933, receipts 
totalled $83,276.98 as compared to $85,369.58 in the previous 
year, and this decrease of $2,092.60 in receipts is due to the 
fact that less has been received for miscellaneous licenses. 

Expenditures. 
During the twelve months ending November 30, 1933, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$5,378,083.73. This included the pay of the police and em- 
ployees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($62,676.89 — the 
annual listing on April 1 of all persons twenty years of age or 
over) and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. In the 
corresponding period for 1932, expenditures totalled $6,044,- 
329.59. The decrease of $666,245.86 was due in a substantial 
part to the fact that vacancies in the grade of patrolman were 
not filled in 1933. Less was expended for the Police Depart- 
ment, and further, all salaries were reduced commencing as of 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

April 21, 1933. There was, however, an increase in the amount 
paid for pensions due to the large number added to the police 
pension roll. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 



The Commissioner desires at this time to express his grateful 
appreciation for the co-operation and support given to him by 
all the members of the Department. 

It is with extreme regret that the Commissioner reports 
the death of Bernard P. Scanlan, Esquire, Secretary to the 
Commissioner, on December 16, 1932. Mr. Scanlan was an 
able, patriotic, conscientious citizen, who gave nearly the whole 
of his active life to the public service. 

On August 22, 1933, the Department lost by death Superin- 
tendent Michael H. Crowley, who, for eighteen years, was 
Superintendent of the Police Force and an acknowledged 
authority on police matters, and his passing was a great loss to 
the department. 

The activities of the department are reported upon in 
greater detail in the following section of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



43 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner. 1 

Secretary. Legal Adviser. 2 

Chief Clerk. 1 

The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 




1 


Sergeants .... 


180 


Deputy Superintendents 




3 


Patrolmen .... 


1,956 


Captains 




17 






Lieutenants 




59 


Total .... 


2,228 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 




12 








Signal Service. 




Director 




1 


Painter .... 


1 


Signalmen . 




8 


Telephone Operators 


3 


Operator and Repairman, 




1 




— 


Linemen 




6 


Total .... 


21 


Chauffeur . 




1 






Employ 


EES 


OF THE Department. 




Armorer 




1 


Matrons .... 


8 


Chauffeurs . 




2 


Mechanics .... 


2 


Cleaners 




12 


Repairmen .... 


3 


Clerk, Property . 




1 


Steamfitter 


1 


Clerks .... 




33 


Stenographers . 


8 


Elevator Operators . 




5 


Superintendent of Build- 




Engineers, Marine . 




2 


ings 


1 


Firemen, Marine 




8 


Supervisor of Automotive 




Firemen, Stationary 




5 


Equipment 


1 


Hostlers 




10 


Tailor 


1 


Janitors 




32 






Laborers 




2 


Total .... 


138 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Legal Adviser and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 



Grand Total 



1 
3 

2,228 

21 

138 

2,391 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table L 
During the year 8 patrolmen were discharged; 7 patrolmen 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



resigned (5 while charges were pending) ; 1 deputy superintend- 
ent, 3 captains, 2 Ueutenants, 4 sergeants and 24 patrolmen 
were promoted; 1 sergeant and 1 patrolman were given new 
civilian designations; 4 captains, 2 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant- 
inspector, 12 sergeants and 14 patrolmen were retired on pen- 
sions; 1 superintendent, 1 deputy superintendent, 1 lieutenant, 
2 sergeants and 6 patrolmen died. (See Tables III. IV, V.) 

Divisional Changes. 



Date. 



Subject. 



February 27, 1933 . 

March 13, 1933 . 

May 8, 1933 . 

August 14, 1933 . 

August 28, 1933 . 



New Station 4 at 7 and 9 Warren avenue 
opened and old Station 4, La Grange street, 
and Station 5, East Dedham street, closed. 

New Station 1 at 150 North street opened and 
old Station 1 on Hanover street, near Cross 
street, closed. 



Division 8 abolished. 
Division 1. 

Division 12 abolished. 
Division 6. 

Division 3 abolished. 
Divisions 1 and 2. 



Duties combined with 
Work combined with 
Work combined with 



Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1932. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1933. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1932. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


48 
17 

86 
124 


460 
601 

1,070 
1,072 


173 

605 

886 
891 


Totals . 


275 


3,203 


2,555 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 
The total number of arrests counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person was 81,418, as against 82,001 the preceding 
year, being a decrease of 583. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

Offences against the person Decrease 8 . 05 

Offences against propertj^ committed with violence . Decrease 2 . 59 

Offences against property committed without violence. Decrease 13. 53 

Malicious offences against property .... Decrease 15.80 

Forgery and offences against the currency . . . Increase 1.94 

Offences against the license laws Decrease 28 . 00 

Offences against chastity, morality, etc. . Increase 6.44 

Offences not included in the foregoing .... Decrease 3.68 

There were 12,689 persons arrested on warrants and 48,373 
without warrants; 20,356 persons were summoned by the 
court; 51,335 persons were prosecuted; 28,745 were released by 
probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 1,338 
were delivered to outside authorities. The number of males 
arrested was 76,150; of females, 5,268; of foreigners, 15,136, or 
approximately 18.59 per cent; of minors, 9,843. Of the total 
number arrested 21,545, or 26.46 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1929 to 1933, inclusive, was $320,367.02; in 1933 
it was S170,376, or $149,991.02 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 49,337; 
in 1933 it was 34,975, or 14,362 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,767.26; 
in 1933 it was $11,411.60, or $3,355.66 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 101. 
There were 2,569 more persons arrested than in 1932, an in- 
crease of 7.47 per cent; 15.20 per cent of the arrested persons 
were nonresidents and 25.08 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XL) 

The number of arrests for all offences for the year was 81,418, 
being a decrease of 583 from last year, and 6,800 less than the 
average for the past five years. There were 36,941 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 2,569 more than last year and 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1,500 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 
7.25 per cent in males and an increase of 12.82 per cent in 
females from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year, 81,418, 472 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say that one arrest 
in 172 was for such offence or .21 per cent. 

Fifty-six and four hundredths per cent of the persons taken 
into custody were between the ages of twenty-one and forty. 
(See Table XII.) 





Nativity of Persons Arrested 


United States . . . 66,282 


West Indies . 


Ireland . 






4,588 


Denmark 


British Provinces 






2,640 


Turkey . 


Italy 






2,170 


South America 


Russia . 








1,543 


Australia 


Poland . 








778 


Holland 


Sweden . 








501 


Belgium 


China . 








81 


Switzerland . 


England 








310 


Mexico . 


Scotland 








313 


Africa . 


Greece . 








257 


East Indies . 


Lithuania 








617 


Hungary 


Portugal 








180 


Japan . 


Norway 








218 


Roumania 


Germany 








153 


Central America . 


Finland 








97 


Asia 


Syria 








87 


Philippine Islands 


Armenia 








78 


Porto Rico . 


Austria . 








91 




Spain 








40 


Total . 


France . 








37 





54 

61 

48 

36 

4 

26 

20 

3 

9 

9 

5 

6 

8 

19 

1 

26 

14 



81,418 



The number of persons punished by fine was 14,225 and the 
fines amounted to $170,376. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred eighty-seven persons were committed to the 
State Prison, 2,463 to the House of Correction, 37 to the 
Women's Prison, 227 to the Reformatory Prison, 2,505 to 
other institutions and 1 to the Bridgewater State Criminal 
Asylum. 

The total years of imprisonment were 2 life, 2,486 years 
(806 sentences were indefinite) ; the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 34,975, and the witness fees 
earned by them amounted to $11,411.60. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$65,534.49. 

Three witnesses were detained at station houses; 162 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 726 from last year. 

There was a decrease of 6.95 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted and a decrease of about 7.83 per 
cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the 
five years from 1929 to 1933, inclusive, was $1,366,455.93; in 
1933 it was $617,743.32 or $748,712.61 less than the average. 
The amount of property stolen which was recovered by the 
Boston Police was $327,013.25 as against $602,540.75 last 
year. (See Table XIII.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
This Bureau, which is a central detective agency of the Depart- 
ment, consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a 
large scale. Not only is the work of this Bureau confined to 
the jurisdiction of the City of Boston, but matters are sent to 
this Bureau for investigation from the various police depart- 
ments in the United States, also from foreign countries, which 
are cheerfully accepted and investigated thoroughly. 

Line-iip. 
The line-up for the entire Police Department of prisoners 
arrested for serious offences is held in Room 403 on the fourth 
floor in Police Headquarters at 8.30 o'clock a. m., on every 
week day. When a line-up is to be held, all divisions in the 
Department are notified to bring forward witnesses, also 
Metropolitan Boston is notified by teletype. The line-up is 
held under the direct supervision of the Deputy Superintendent 
in charge of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, who interro- 
gates or causes to be interrogated by a capable officer, all 
prisoners in the line-up, who have been identified or who have 
been accused of serious crimes. When necessary, there is 
present a competent departmental stenographer to make notes 
of everything said by prisoners and witnesses in reference to 
the particular crime in question. There have been numerous 
identifications made during the past year. This procedure 
has resulted in much closer co-operation between the various 
police departments, particularly in Metropolitan Boston. 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

When identifications are made, not only in eases within our 
Department, but in cases concerning other jurisdictions, the 
stenographer types all information pertaining to that case, and 
many times the stenographer is called into other jurisdictions 
and even into other states with his notes. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles reported 
stolen and is in daily communication with police departments 
all over the country. 

The automobile index contains records of 500,000 auto- 
mobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other 
places, cars reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners 
are wanted and cars whose operators are wanted for various 
offences. This index is constantly increasing. Many arrests 
are made by officers of the Department and the automobile 
division through information obtained from the index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

In addition to recovering many stolen automobiles, mem- 
bers of this division during the year identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on 
police divisions, and have assisted in restoring these vehicles to 
the owners. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the First, 
Second, and Third Classes. 

During the year 196 applications for such licenses were 
received, and granted (4 "without fee"). 

Of the licenses granted 13 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 9 transferred to new locations. One applica- 
tion for transfer to new location was rejected. (See Table 
XIV.) 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



Record of All Automohiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1933. 



Month. 


Reported 
Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1932 












December 




459 


429 


17 


13 


1933 












January 








346 


332 


10 


4 


February . 








362 


354 


7 


1 


March 








446 


428 


10 


8 


April . 








420 


399 


12 


9 


May . 








370 


351 


14 


5 


June . 








389 


372 


14 


3 


July . 








481 


456 


15 


10 


August 








468 


4.54 


6 


8 


September 








444 


412 


9 


23 


October 








463 


446 


6 


11 


November 








460 


416 


— 


44 


Totals 








5,108 


4,849 


120 


139 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1933. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1932. 








December 


2,464 


1,641 


867 


1933. 








January .... 


2,775 


1,893 


995 


February- 








2,839 


1,741 


573 


March . 








2,640 


1,736 


789 


April 








3,890 


2,499 


1,222 


May 








• 4,627 


3,053 


1,396 


June 








4,982 


3,495 


1,454 


July . 








4,397 


2,896 


1,138 


August . 








4,491 


2,955 


1,061 


September 








4,237 


2,748 


841 


October . 








4,248 


2,478 


799 


November 








3,710 


2,333 


628 


Totals 








45,300 


29,468 


11,763 



Homicide Division. 

This division investigates all deaths by violence and pre- 
pares all cases for inquests. It examines and records all re- 
ports of accidents and cases of serious injury. Officers attached 
to this division, with police stenographers, are subject to call 
at any hour of the day or night. The homicide files contain 
complete reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, a record 
of all inquests and a record of all deaths and serious accidents 
which are reported to the Police Department. 

Officers of this division detailed to assist the medical exam- 
iners report having investigated 733 cases of death from the 
following causes : 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



51 



Abortion 

Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Automobiles 

Burns 

Childbirth 

Coasting 

Drowning 

Elevators 

Explosion 

Falls 

Falling objects 

Flying . 

Homicides 



3 

74 

15 
124 

13 
1 
1 

48 
6 
1 

48 
4 
3 

24 



Horse and wagon . 
Knife cut 

Leg wound, bleeding from 
Natural causes 
Poison .... 
Railway (street) . 
Railroad (steam) 
Shot by officer 
Shooting (accidental) . 
Stillborn .... 
Suicide .... 
Syncope .... 



Total 



1 
1 
1 
258 
1 
7 
8 
2 
1 
6 
81 
1 

733 



Of the total number the following cases were prosecuted in 
the courts: 



Abortion .... 
Accessory to abortion . 
Assault and battery 
Assault, intent to kill . 
Assault to rob 
Assault with dangerous 

weapon .... 
Conspiracy to commit 

abortion .... 



14 Manslaughter (by auto) . 106 

9 Manslaughter (by horse and 

10 wagon) .... 1 

28 Manslaughter (by violence), 4 

2 Manslaughter (by railway), 1 
Murder 14 

17 Practising medicine . . 2 

3 Total .... 211 



7 


Falling wall . 


1 


1 


FaUs . . . 


. . 1 


2 


Convulsions . 


1 


2 




— 


1 


Total 


. . 17 


1 







The following inquests were held during the year : 

Automobiles . 
Abortions 
Elevators 
Railroad . 
Railway . 
Falling objects 

One hundred and seven cases of violent deaths investigated, 
on which no inquests were held by a court of justice, acting 
under authority of Chapter 118 of the Acts of 1932. 

Lost and Stolen Property Division. 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found in 
this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding cities 
and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost 
or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased 
by dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this bureau which were 
investigated during the year is 12,047. There are 58,679 cases 
reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and 
reports made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
Complaints are received from many sources, including cases 
referred to the bureau by justices of courts and the district 
attorney, in addition to cases reported direct to the Police 
Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation are included in the statements of the general work of 
the Department, but as the duties of this bureau are of a special 
character, the following statement may be of interest. 



Number of persons arrested 



2,074 



and 



56 

12,047 

12,002 

24 

13 

3,080 



Fugitives from justice from other States arrested 

delivered to officers from those States 
Number of cases investigated 
Number of extra duties performed . 
Number of cases of homicide, etc. . 
Number of cases of abortion, etc. . 
Number of days spent in court by pohce officers 
Number of years imprisonment, 207 years, 1 month and 

20 indefinite terms. 
Amount of stolen property recovered $122,521.75 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of the special events transpiring 
during the year and gives the number of police detailed for 
duty at each : 

1932. Men. 
Dec. 12. Funeral of Patrolman Thomas P. Walsh ... 45 
Dec. 15. Arrival of Governors of Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
and Mr. Farley of the Democratic National Com- 
mittee 105 



1932 


1. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


22. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

Men. 

Funeral of Bernard P. Scanlan, Secretary to the Police 

Commissioner 205 

Funeral of Lieutenant William H. Allen, retired . . 30 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Christmas Eve, West End, traffic duty ... 15 

Christmas Eve, Boston Common 8 

Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 8 

Dec. 31. New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 8 

Dec. 31. Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common ... 8 

Funeral of Captain Joseph Harriman, retired . . 24 
Funeral of Captain John S. Ridlon, retired ... 24 
Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Asso- 
ciation 218 

Funeral of Sergeant Frank J. Kuhlman ... 23 
Funeral of Deputy Superintendent Thomas F. Goode, 128 
Funeral of Captain Frederick W. Garrett, Metropoli- 
tan District Police 27 

Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's ball .... 37 

Funeral of Lieutenant Joseph B. Rollins ... 32 

Visit of Hollywood stars to Boston .... 68 

Girl Scouts' Carnival, Boston Arena .... 20 
Visit of Secretary of War, Honorable George Henry 

Dern 30 

Mar. 18. Visit of Secretary of War, Honorable George Henry 

Dern 30 

South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . . 330 

Funeral of Reverend Father John F. Cummins . . 55 

Boston Garden, Boston Emergency Relief Fund . 20 

Ten-mile road race. Oak square, Brighton ... 30 

Faneuil Hall, protest Hitler actions .... 45 

Cathedral Club road race 40 

Arrival of Dempsey and Schmelling .... 32 

Marathon race 485 

Funeral of Mrs. Margaret C. Crowley, wife of Super- 
intendent Michael H. Crowley 45 

May Day details 145 

Hunger march of Unemployed Council of Massachu- 
setts 55 

Cemeteries and vicinities on Memorial Sunday . . 127 

Cemeteries and vicinities. Memorial Day . . . 342 

Parade, Boston School Cadets 265 

Dorchester Day celebration 135 

Police Memorial Sunday exercises 195 

Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 245 

New England Amateur baseball games. Fens stadium, 11 



1933 




Jan. 


8. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


11. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


25. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


27. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mar. 


6. 


Mar. 


11. 


Mar. 


17. 



Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


22. 


Mar. 


22. 


April 


1. 


April 


3. 


April 


8. 


April 18. 


April 


19. 


April 19. 


May 


1. 


May 


2. 


May 


28. 


May 


30. 


June 


2. 


June 


3. 


June 


4. 


June 


5. 


June 


10. 



54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1933. 

June 11. 
June 11. 
June 13. 
June 14. 
June 15. 

June 16. 
June 16. 
June 16. 

June 17. 
June 17. 
June 17. 
June 17. 
June 17. 
June 21. 
June 24. 
June 25. 
June 26. 
June 27. 
June 27. 



June 27 
June 28 
June 28 
June 29 
June 30 
July 3 
July 
July 
July 
July 



3. 
3. 
4. 
4. 
July 16. 

July 26. 

Aug. 1. 

Aug. 16. 
Aug. 20. 

Aug. 25. 
Aug. 30. 
Aug. 30. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 13. 



Dedication of new American Legion Highway 
Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises . 
Special Delegate Election day .... 

Boston Common, review of First Corps of Cadets 
Boston Common, Mass Meeting, Boston Building 

Trades Council 

Roxbury district, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 
Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day . 
Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 

concessions 

Roxbury district, Bunker Hill Day 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade . 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions 
Arrival of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in Boston 
Arrival of Ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith in Boston 
Boston Common, meeting of Anti-Fascist committee 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
Music Festival and illumination of Rose Garden in the 

Fens Stadium 

Boston Common, review of 241st Coast Artillery 
Boston Arena, meeting of Grand Lodge of Masons 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
Mechanics Building, World Rotary convention . 
100th Anniversary of East Boston, parade . 
100th Anniversary of East Boston, bonfire . 
Smith Playground, Allston, bonfire 
Smith Playground, Allston, fireworks . 
Boston Common, band concert and fireworks 
Parade and meeting of Suffolk County Council, the 

American Legion 

Back Bay Station, arrival of Honorable James M 

Curley, Mayor of Boston 

Boston Common, New England Anti-War Leagu 

meeting 

Funeral of Honorable Martin M. Lomasney . 

Arrival and reception to Wiley Post, solo around the 

world flyer 

Funeral of Superintendent Michael H. Crowley 

Boston Common, Park Department circus . 

Visit of General Hugh Johnson, National Recovery 

Administrator 

Braves Field, Braves-Giants baseball game 

Visit of Honorable James A. Farley, Postmaster-Gen 

eral, for dedication of new post office 
National Recovery Act parade 



1933 




Oct. 


7. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


28. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


7. 


Nov. 


11. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

Men. 

Harvard-Bates football game 31 

Funeral of Patrolman John W. Farrell .... 59 

East Boston, Columbus Day celebration . . . 138 

Harvard-New Hampshire football game ... 31 

Funeral of Captain John E. Driscoll, retired . . 28 

Harvard-Holy Cross football game .... 72 

Harvard-Dartmouth football game .... 72 

Harvard-Lehigh football game 37 

Details on city election day 2,172 

Visit of United States Corps of West Point Cadets to 

Boston 225 

Nov. 11. American Legion, Suffolk County Council, Armistice 

Day parade 315 

Nov. 1 1 . Harvard-West Point football game .... 81 

Nov. 13. Funeral of Patrolman Winfield S. Thompson . . 24 
Nov. 15. Election Commissioners' office. City Hall, recount of 

ballots, mayoralty election 26 

Nov. 16. Election Commissioners' office, City Hall, recount of 

ballots, mayoralty election 26 

Nov. 17. Election Commissioners' office, City Hall, recount of 

ballots, mayoralty election 26 

Nov. 18. Harvard-Brown football game 72 

Nov. 19. Dedication of Joseph L. Logan Square, Hyde Park . 20 
Nov. 20. Election Commissioners office. City Hall, recount of 

ballots, mayoralty election 26 

Nov. 21. Election Commissioners' office, City Hall, recount of 

ballots, mayoralty election 26 

Nov. 25. Harvard-Yale football game 103 

Nov. 25. Division 4, Harvard-Yale crowds at hotels, etc. . . 35 
Nov. 26. Ford Hall, address by Professor F. Schoenerarm, 

"Why I Believe in the Hitler Government" . . 130 

Nov. 30. Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade . . . 395 

Note. — March 4 to March 14, 1933, inclusive, a total of 8,715 officers was 

on duty for that period on account of the Bank Holidays. 
May 16 to June 3, 1933, inclusive (Sundays excepted), a total of 

455 officers was on duty for that period of the so-called Garment 

Workers' strike, in Division 4. 
September 19 to October 24, 1933, inclusive (Sundays excepted), 

total of 552 officers was on duty for that period of the so-called 

Cloth strike, in Division 4. 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Miscellaneous Business. 



[Jan. 



1930-31. 1931-32. 1932-33. 



Abandoned children cared for 

Accidents reported 

Buildings found open and made secure 

Cases investigated . 

Dangerous buildings reported 

Dangerous chimneys reported 

Dead bodies recovered . 

Defective cesspools reported . 

Defective drains and vaults reported 

Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 

Defective gas pipes reported . 

Defective hydrants reported . 

Defective lamps reported 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective sidewalks and streets reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed . 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished . 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted . 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed . 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained . 



6 

10,515 

3,011 

83,440 

11 

7 

294 

3 

3 

2 

2 

27 

5,047 

170 

5,845 

138 

370 

37,276 

4,562 

1,058 

378 

70 

1,719 

19 

7,115 

21 

810 

458 

10 



7 

14,132 

2,475 

55,584 

11 

4 

263 

12 

5 

4 

5 

59 

4,758 

26 

2,265 

37 

389 

35,971 

5,661 

1,064 

409 

52 

1,634 

10 

6,699 

18 

239 

432 

7 



4 

9,983 

2,851 

46,071 

18 

6 

285 

25 

10 

6 

9 

19 

4,575 

31 

2,427 

53 

829 

35,905 

5,201 

892 

363 

24 

1,506 

11 

6,233 

18 

427 

352 

3 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

Adjustment of Claims. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $672.92; 
turned in and receipted for at the Chief Clerk's office, $637.18; 
making a grand total of $1,310.10, either received by or credited 
to this Department for such police property damage. 

Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer detailed to impart information from the police 
journals on file at Headquarters reports services performed as 
follows : 

Number of requests complied with for information from the police 

journals in regard to accidents and thefts 13,781 

Days in court 9 

House of Detention. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the court 
house, Somerset Street. All the women arrested in the city 
proper and in the Charlestown, South Boston, Brighton and 
Roxbury Crossing districts are taken to the House of Deten- 
tion in a van provided for the purpose. They are then held 
in charge of the matron until the next session of the court 
before which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprison- 
ment they are returned to the House of Detention and from 
there conveyed to the jail or institution to which they have 
been sentenced. 

During the year 2,248 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 1,370 

Larceny 177 

Night walking 41 

Fornication 100 

Idle and disorderly 126 

Assault and battery 21 

Adultery 30 

Violation of liquor law 16 

Keeping house of ill fame 20 

Various other causes 347 

Total 2,248 

Recommitments. 

From municipal cotut 106 

From county jail • 357 

Grand total 2,711 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Police Signal Service. 

Signal Boxes. 

The total number of boxes in use is 562. Of these 424 are 
connected with the underground system and 138 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year the employees of this service responded to 
3,337 trouble calls; inspected 562 signal boxes; 16 signal 
desks; 450 old type and 400 new type batteries. Repairs 
have been made on 201 box movements; 121 registers; 52 
locks; 86 time stamps; 6 garage motors; 5 garage registers; 
37 vibrator bells; 20 relays; 8 electric fans. July 1, 1932, 
this Department took over the installing and maintenance of 
all electric wiring and equipment at all stations and head- 
quarters building. There have been made 350 plungers; 
250 box fittings; 250 line blocks and 200 automatic hooks. 

One new box was added on Division 4, at West Newton 
street and Shawmut avenue, and one new box on Division 13, 
at Centre and Allandale streets. 

Three remodeled signal registers were installed. Three 
complete signal systems, including the citizens' call and blinker 
light system, were installed on Divisions 1, 4 and 6. Con- 
nected with the police signal boxes there are 130 signal and 
120 telephone circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
Department. 

Plans ■ and specifications are being prepared for a complete 
communications system, including both duplex radio and the 
Hayes system. All divisions are to be serviced with a paper 
insulated multi-colored underground cable. The desks are to 
be of a type which will enable the station to talk to Head- 
quarters and all patrol boxes over Department-owned lines. 

Contracts have been let for the relocating of several police 
signal boxes on Divisions 1, 4 and 6. 

There are assigned to the unit one White truck, 2| tons 
capacity; two utility trucks, | ton capacity; one four-door 
Plymouth sedan and the Director's car, a Chrysler four-door 
sedan. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal 
Service at the present time : 

7 close circuit desks 726,650 feet underground cable 

8 open circuit blinker type 233,400 feet of overhead cable 

signal desks 31,143 feet of duct 

240 circuits 67 manholes 

■12 garage annunciators 18 motor generator sets 
52 test boxes 6 motor-driven flashers 

75 cells of caustic soda, pri- 1 White truck 

mary cells type battery 2 Ford trucks 

400 cells of sulphuric acid stor- 1 Plymouth sedan 

age type battery 1 Chrysler sedan 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the harbor police, formerly 
styled Division 8,* comprising the harbor and the islands 
therein, were as follows : 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 

stages, etc $45,002 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 482 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 100 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 5 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 9 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the waterfront . . 14 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm .... 2 

Number of boats challenged 50 

Number of boats searched for contraband 42 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted .... 2 

Number of cases investigated 221 

Number of dead bodies recovered 32 

Number rescued from drowning 5 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 10 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered . . 77 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 93 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 1,219 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 

in harbor 46 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 11 

Number of dead bodies cared for 9 

Number of hours grappling 165 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,236, 
5,223 of which were from domestic ports, 586 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, 1,427 from foreign ports. Of the latter 
1,065 were steamers, 227 were motor vessels and 135 were 
schooners. 

* Division 8 consolidated with Division 1, May 8, 1933. 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay nightly, 
from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge, with the launch 
''E. U. Curtis," from May 18th to November 30th. There 
were 8 cases investigated, 3 boats challenged for contraband, 

4 cases where assistance was rendered to boats in distress by 
reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., 2 dead 
bodies cared for, 2 boats ordered to put up sailing lights and 
8 hours were spent in grappling. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1932, there were 20 horses in 
the service. During the year 2 were delivered to the Massa- 
chusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
on account of age and 2 were purchased. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 137 automobiles in the service at the present 
time: 50 attached to Headquarters; 21 in the city proper 
and attached to Divisions 1, 2 and 4; 8 in the South Boston 
district, attached to Division 6; 5 in the East Boston district, 
attached to Division 7; 11 in the Roxbury district, attached 
to Divisions 9 and 10; 6 in the Dorchester district, attached 
to Division 11; 5 in the Jamaica Plain district, attached to 
Division 13; 6 in the Brighton district, attached to Division 14; 

5 in the Charlestown district, attached to Division 15; 5 in 
the Back Bay and the Fenway, attached to Division 16; 4 in 
the West Roxbury district, attached to Division 17; 4 in the 
Hyde Park district, attached to Division 18; 4 in the Mattapan 
district, attached to Division 19, and 3 unassigned. (See 
page 62 for distribution of automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs $16,139 87 

Storage and washing 3,169 17 

Gasolene 31,889 88 

Oil 2,409 86 

Anti-freeze fluids, polish, patches, plugs, etc 824 21 

License fees 148 00 

Total $54,580 99 



1934.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 61 



Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with an ambulance at Division 
1 and combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in 

Divisions 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 2,986 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . - . 846 

Calls where services were not required 190 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 147 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) . . . 107 

Southern Mortuary 98 

Psychopathic Hospital 94 

Home 62 

Boston State Hospital 35 

Morgue 2& 

Massachusetts General Hospital 24 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 21 

Forest Hills Hospital 20 

Police station houses 1^ 

Beth Israel Hospital 18^ 

Faulkner Hospital 16 

Carney Hospital H 

New England Hospital 9' 

Children's Hospital 6 

Chelsea Naval Hospital • • 3 

Strong Hospital ^ 

Deaconess Hospital 2 

Cambridge Hospital 1 



Commonwealth Avenue Hospital 1 

Dedham Hospital 
Harley Hospital . 
Homeopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 



Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 1 

McLeod Hospital 

New England Hospital for Women 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Vernon Hospital 

Total 4,756 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



List of Vehicles Used hy the Department. 



Divisions. 


§ 

1 


§ 

a 
"a 

a 

< 
o 
a 
< 


il 

IS 

O 




3 


JO 

"a 

1 
o 


"a 
o 


Headquarters 










2 


- 


2 


38 


8 


3 


53 


Division 1 . 










- 


1 


1 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Division 2 . 










- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


1 


7 


Division 4 . 












- 


*4 


5 


- 


3 


12 


Division 6 . 










- 


- 


2 


6 


- 


5 


13 


Division 7 . 










1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


5 


10 


Division 9 . 












- 


1 


4 


- 


2 


7 


Division 10 










1 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Division 11 










- 


- 


1 


5 


- 


3 


9 


Division 13 










1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


3 


8 


Division 14 










- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


4 


10 


Division 15 










1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


3 


8 


Division 16 










- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


7 


12 


Division 17 










- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


4 


8 


Division 18 










- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


2 


6 


Division 19 










1 


- 


- 


3 


- 


4 


8 


TJnassigned 










- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


- 


3 


Totals 


7 


1 


22 


98 


9 


49 


186 



* Includes one van. 

Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,217* hcenses to set up and use 
hackney carriages granted, being an increase of 183, as com- 
pared with last year. 

There were no horse-drawn carriages Hcensed during the year. 

There were 105 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 



* 20 regranta. 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

turned over to the Bureau of Traffic ; 46 of these were restored 
to the owners and the balance placed in the custody of the 
Lost Property Bureau. 

Commencing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1932, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . 2,219 

Number of carriages licensed 1,697 

Number of carriages licensed (regrants) 520 

Number of carriage applications rejected 2 

Number of licenses transferred 3 

Number of licenses canceled 543 

Number of "setups" suspended and stripped of credentials . 34 

Number of "setups" revoked 2 

Number of carriages inspected 2,382 

Number of applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . 3,290 
Number of complaints against owners, drivers and "setups" 

investigated 5,504 

Number of days spent in court 71 

Number of articles left in carriages reported by citizens . . 28 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by drivers . 105 

Number of drivers' applications for licenses rejected . . 61 

Number of drivers' licenses granted 3,229 

Number of drivers' licenses revoked 16 

Number of drivers' licenses suspended and stripped of creden- 
tials 1,103 

Number of replaced windshield plates and badges . . . 181 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 

Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 

licensee or licensees a designated portion of a public way 

abutting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public 

or semi-pubHc building as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 168 applications for such stands (with a 
total capacity of 504 hackney carriages) were received; 155 
locations for 485 carriages were granted, and 13 locations for 
19 carriages were rejected. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Of these special hackney stand licenses, 6 locations (capacity 
10 carriages) were subsequently canceled or revoked; 152 
locations (capacity 478 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions other than sidewalks, of public ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 
owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 1,067 applications for hackney carriage 
licenses for such public stands were granted. 

Of these public stand licenses 34 were suspended and stripped 
of credentials, and 2 revoked. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for the 
occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon property) 
by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 18 applications (capacity 275 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing auto- 
mobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this act. 
shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one of 
chapter ninety of the General Laws used for the carrying 
for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 
in or from the city of Boston and in or on which auto- 
mobile guide service by the driver or other person is 
offered or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 391, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 



1934.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department 
of Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public con- 
venience and necessity require such operation; and further, it 
is provided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate 
said automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is 
licensed so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1933, there have 
been issued licenses for 25 sight-seeing automobiles and 15 
special stands for the same. 

Of this number there has been 1 license for sight-seeing 
automobile canceled. 

"New" sight-seeing automobile drivers for the year com- 
mencing as of March 1, 1932, were fingerprinted as in the 
case of "new" hackney carriage drivers, and their records, 
if any, searched for in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There have been 12 drivers' licenses granted; 1 application 
for drivers' license rejected and 3 new drivers' badges issued. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. During the year 
2,137 applications for such licenses were received and granted. 
Of these licenses 7 were subsequently canceled for nonpay- 
ment of license fee and 1 because it was surrendered. (See 
Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon hcenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, 
garage, stable or order box, the license stated that it was 
^^Not at a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representa- 
tives of abutting property. 



66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the 2,137 granted, 2,041 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 96 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


19031 .... 


181,045 


1918 .... 


224,012 


1904 










193,195 


1919 








227,466 


1905 










194,547 


1920 








235,248 


1906 










195,446 


1921^ 








480,783 


1907 










195,900 


1922 








480,106 


1908 










201,552 


1923 








477,547 


1909 










201,391 


1924 








485,677 


1910^ 










203,603 


1925 








489,478 


1911 










206,825 


1926 








493,415 


1912 










214,178 


1927 








495,767 


1913 










215,388 


1928 








491,277 


1914 










219,364 


1929 








493,250 


1915 










220,883 


1930 








502,101 


19163 










- 


1931 








500,986 


1917 










221,207 


1932 








499,758 



' 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

2 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

3 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year : 



Male 
Female 



Total 



240,937 
260,238 

501,175 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows : 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



67 



Printing police list 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list 

Newspaper notices 

Circulars and pamphlets 

Stationery 

Interpreters . 

Telephone 



Total 



$39,394 30 
21,580 00 
728 45 
306 00 
313 23 
342 00 
12 91 



$62,676 89 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 



April 1 
April 2 
April 3 
April 4 
April 5 
April 6 
April 7 
April 8 



1,435 

121 

1,293 

803 

498 

136 

21 

9 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Police Department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in 1933 may be summarized as follows: 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 


1,454 


Physically incapacitated 


112 


Convicted of crime 


203 


Unfit for various reasons 


382 


Apparently fit 


6,486 


Cards not returned 


110 


Total 


8,747 



In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent 
to the Police Department for delivery 5,980 summonses to 
persons for jury service. 

Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
oflacial misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen 
for the year commencing as of April 1, 1933, were fingerprinted 



68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



by the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
a part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1933, there were 
1,172 special pohce officers appointed; 8 appHcations for 
appointment were refused for cause, 79 appointments were 
canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows: 



From United States Government 

From State Departments . 

From City Departments 

From County of Suffolk 

From railroad corporations 

From other corporations and associations 

From theaters and other places of amusement 

From private institutions 

From churches 

Total 



33 
5 

67 
1 

38 

758 

214 

36 

30 



1,172 



Railroad Police. 

There were 6 persons appointed railroad policemen during the 
year, 4 of whom were employees of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad and 2 of the Boston and Albany Rail- 
road. Three appointments were canceled; all of whom were 
employees of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 22,645. Of these 22,443 were granted, of which 
80 were canceled for nonpayment (7 "no fee"), leaving 22,363. 
During the year 449 licenses were transferred, 773 canceled, 
24 revoked and 202 applications rejected. The officers inves- 
tigated 5,794 complaints arising under these licenses. The 
fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
i.383.75. (See Tables XIV, XVH.) 



Musicians' Licenses. 

Itinera7it. 

During the year there were 37 applications for itinerant 

musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted; 3 

licenses were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment 

of license fee. 



1934.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged 
with a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, 
that such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 53 instruments were inspected with the 
following result : 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos 
















12 


12 


Hand organs 
















12 


12 


Accordions . 
















9 


9 


Violins 
















9 


9 


Banjos 
















3 


3 


Clarinets 
















3 


3 


Guitars 
















3 


3 


Flute 
















1 


1 


Mandolin 
















1 


1 


Totals 


53 


53 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1929 


209 


207 


2 


1930 


212 


210 


2 


1931 


216 


216 


- 


1932 


270 


269 


1 


1933 


226 


226 


- 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the 
number of such applications granted, the number refused and 
the number revoked: 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1929 .... 


3,025 


2,224 


70 


1 


1930 ... 


2,967 


2,902 


65 


5 


1931 .... 


3,097 


2,998 


99 


2 


1932 .... 


3,190 


3,115 


75 


12 


1933 ... 


3,130 


*3,010 


120 


2 



* 35 canceled for nonpayment. 

Public Lodging Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) and Sections 33 and 
36, both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Ter- 
centenary Edition), the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis street . 
8 Pine street 
79 Shawmut avenue . 
1202 Washington street 
1025 Washington street 
Total . 



33,684 

107,255 

4,600 

22,054 

11,511 



179,104 



Pensions and Benefits. 
On December 1, 1932, there were 332 persons on the roll. 
During the year 20 died; viz., 3 captains, 1 lieutenant, 1 lieuten- 



1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

ant inspector, 1 sergeant, 13 patrolmen and 1 annuitant. One 
annuitant remarried. Thirty-six were added, viz., 4 captains, 
2 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant inspector, 12 sergeants, 12 patrolmen, 
1 chief matron, 1 assistant chief matron, 2 signal men and the 
minor children of Patrolman Franklin B. Dreyer, who died 
from injuries received in the performance of duty, leaving 347 
on the roll at date, 315 pensioners and 32 annuitants. 

The pa5niients on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $357,724.50 and it is estimated that $375,814, 
will be required for pensions in 1934. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 60 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,929.17 during 
the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age 
or more, and the maintenance of the police signal service, 
were $5,378,083.73. (See Table XVII.j 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $91,595.80. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
from licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., 
was $83,276.98. (See Table XIV.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(73) 





"a 

H 


_H_j_l.-lrHC0t^C3C^Ol-l>C'-IC0INC0-l 

rH lO -H 00 "O rt CO 



> 


»> 


1 1 1 1 1 \ ^ Oi \ to •« \ 1 l-^l 1 

00 


00 


1 1 1 1 1 1 -H C-) 1 t» O 1 1 1 '- 1 1 


r» 


1 1 1 1 1 1 —c I-) 1 00 00 1 1 1 1 1 1 


« 


lllll|.-iCO|(NWIillll 

F-< CD 


i« 


00 


■V 


liiiii— iiNloooiiiiii 


•^ 


llllllllMIOOt^llllll 

00 


=: 


1 1 1 1 1 IrHMIosOOl 1 1 — 1 1 


© 


1 1 1 1 1 |r-i(N|00(Nl 1 I — I 1 


Ov 


llllll-ilMIOOOOIillll 


rx 


llllllrtMIOOINllllll 

05 


>o 


1 1 1 1 1 1— COI'-JHOOI 1 1 — 1 1 


•V 


1 1 1 1 1 iT-HCOIIMCOl 1 1 — 1 1 


N 


lillii— co|<Nn4iiiiii 


- 


1 1 1 1 1 irtUSlTjIrtI 1 |„| 1 

IM 


•uon 
-na^aa Jo aerioH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 i-H M 1 1 


•aoiAjag jBuSig 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 .-H 


•ssuipjing 
JO !juapuaiauadng 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 1 1 


■3[ja|3 A^jjadojj 


llillilllllll-l— ITJII 


•epjooa'jj 
JO ncajng 


1 1 1 1 l^^l IIM^I , 1 ICOl 


JO n^ajng 


lllllll>'5|>Cl'-(||||rH| 

IN 


•(aojo^ •0%9Q) 
UOI^BSl^saAUJ 

jBniiuuQ nBajng 


1 1 1 1 1— I-IOINCOIOU51 1 It^l 
,— ( t-t — to 


•saa^JBnbpBaH 


,-1— i,-(rti-i— crtt^|tOt>.| 1 1 1001 


J^2 

C<uco 
03-t^O 

ill 


$6,800 

4,250 

4.250 

2,975 

5.950 

3,825 

3,400 

2.295 

2,295 

2,125 

1,440 to 1,785 

1,785 

1,785 

1,440 to 1,530 

1,080 

712.50 to 3,060 

2,847.50 


o 

H 

o 

(in 

o 

« 
2: 






Police Commissioner . 

Secretary 

Legal advisor 

Chief clerk . 

Superintendent 

Deputy superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants . 

Lieutenant-inspectors . 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen . 

Armorer .... 

Chauffeurs 

Cleaners .... 

Clerks .... 

Director signal service . 



"3NroOC^'M;D00C^)-^-^-<CC00— lOO-H— ,_icO 


n 

(N 


— 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


to 


1 ' ' ' " 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 o 


IIIO — >-^ill||||||]|||| 


OS 


1 1 1 1 -- 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


g 


1 1 1 1 -- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


§ 


., 1 1 .... 1 - i ..,,.,,,, 1 , 


o 
o 


....-:.....,,,,,,,,, 


■ IN 


......... 1 . 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 


"5 
<N 


.... C-) 1 1 ^ 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CO 


1 o 

1 - 


1 ... 'M 1 1 I 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 . 1 IN -- . 1 . i . . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


IN 


1 1 ...... 1 ... 1 1 . 1 1 1 { 1 


O 

5^ 


.T^OOIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIll T)< 


. . . 1 . . 1 ■* . 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 1 t^ 


IIIIIISOII'-'HIIOOIIIIIM « 


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. 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 -M 1 . -H ,-H 1 1 1 I „ rf 1 


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. 1 . 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 IM 1 i i 1 O 


1 1 ... 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 { 1 . 1 1 1 


<N 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 , — 1 1 1 1 


§ 


1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 .... 1 1 . >0 1 { 1 1 


o 


950 to 1,440 

1,785 to 2,295 

1,445 to 1,700 

1,440 

1,440 to 1.530 

1,440 

1,440 to 1,955 

380 to 1,530 

1,700 

1,785 

1,615 

3,060 

1,530 to 1,700 

1,785 

1,445 

950 to 1,785 

2,550 

2,125 

1,700 

1,440 to 1,530 




. _ 


uipment 




Elevator operators 

Engineers 

Firemen .... 

Hostlers .... 

Janitors .... 

Laborers .... 

Linemen .... 

Matrons .... 

Mechanics 

Operator and repairman 

Painter .... 

Property clerk 

Repairmen 

Signalmen 

Steamfitter . 

Stenographers 

Superintendent of buildings 

Supervisor of automotive eq 

Tailor .... 

Telephone operators . 


o 



Q .- 



a aj o) 
O ^ o 

c-o 2 

a> C 1; 
£ » ° 

rs a <» 

ja o-q 






£ S 

o ^ ^ 0) 

» is «o S 

See* 



3 



76 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Str 


DNGTH. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1933. 


Nov. 30, 
1933. 


Jan. 1, 
1933. 


Nov. 30, 
1933. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


— 


1 


Plus 1 


Legal Advisor 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Deputy Superintendents . 


3 


3 


2 


3 


Plus 1 


Captains .... 


29 


29 


21 


17 


Minus 4 


Lieutenants 


60 


60 


60 


59 


Minus 1 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


13 


13 


13 


12 


Minus 1 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


186 


180 


Minus 6 


Patrolmen .... 


2,149 


2,149 


1,992 


1,951 


Minus 41 


Patrolwomen 


8 


8 


5 


5 


— 


Totals .... 


2,453 


2,453 


2,282 


2,231 


Minus 51 



The last column (Net Gain or Loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1934.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



77 



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78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1933, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement mid the 
Number of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service 


Augusta, Amasa E. . . . 


Age 


64 Vi2 


^ears 


37 Vi2 


years 


Campbell, John .... 


Age 


6I'»A2 


" 


28Vi2 


"• 


Connorton, Thomas S. 


Age 


63 Vi2 


" 


37" /i2 


" 


Curtis, Ibri W. H. 


Age 


65 


« 


39 3/,o 


" 


Donahoe, Thomas H. . 


Age 


65 


" 


32 6/,2 


" 


Farrell, George J. . . . 


Age 


64 3/12 


" 


37 


" 


Fisher, Dana W 


Age 


619/12 


" 


32 Vi2 


" 


Fitzpatrick, Thomas F. 


Incapacitated 


58'i/i2 


" 


25 Vi2 


" 


French, Walter M. 


Age 


60 


" 


29 8/12 


" 


Gallivan, Jeremiah F. 


Age 


64 Vi2 


« 


38Vi2 


" 


Gibbs, Thomas A. . . . 


Age 


60 Vi2 


" 


30 i/i= 


" 


Hanlon, James .... 


Age 


65 


' 


353/12 


" 


* Harrington, Edward F. . 


Incapacitated 


37 Vi2 


" 


3Vi2 


« 


Hartigan, William 


Age 


65 


" 


32 2/,2 


" 


Healy, Michael .... 


Age 


63 • fi2 


" 


33i'/i2 


" 


Inglis, Edmund R. . . . 


Incapacitated 


59" /i2 


" 


28 3/12 


^ 


Kellard, Timothy F. . . . 


Age 


64 4/l2 


« 


37i«/i2 


" 


Kerrigan, Dennis 


Age 


65 


" 


37Vi2 


" 


Keyes, George E. ... 


Age 


60 


" 


32 3/12 


" 


* Lahey, Patrick J. . . . 


Age 


70 


« 


4410/12 


" 


Lutz, Louis E 


Age 


64 


« 


38 1/12 


" 


Macbeth, William 


Age 


64Vi2 


" 


35 


" 


Manning, John J. 


Incapacitated 


57 


" 


24" /12 


" 


Metcalfe, Alfred E. . . . 


Incapacitated 


36Vi2 


« 


11 V12 


" 


Murphy, Patrick .... 


Age 


65 


• 


32 V12 


' 


Necco, John 


Incapacitated 


51 6/l2 


« 


22 6/12 


" 


Perry, Ross A 


Age 


62 Vi2 


" 


32 5/12 


" 


Porter, Joseph H. 


Age 


63 Vi2 


" 


32 ^'i2 


« 


Quinan, William D. . . . 


Incapacitated 


59Vi2 


" 


29 Vi2 


" 


Randolph, Wiswall W. 


Age 


65 


" 


38Vi2 


" 


Sullivan, Daniel F. . . . 


Age 


64 »/i2 


" 


37>»/i2 


" 


Sullivan, Michael 


Age 


64 8/l2 


« 


31 V12 


" 


Toomey, Daniel F. . . 


Age 


65 


" 


37" /12 


« 



* Retired under the Boston Retirement System, which went into effect February 1, 1923. 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



79 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1933. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1932. 



Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


Dec. 


23 


1933 




Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


30 


Jan. 


30 


Mar. 


9 


May 


5 


May 


5 


May 


5 



Patrolman Benjamin R. Beers to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William Belle to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Wayland H. Blanding to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph H. Bradley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph F. Condon to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Patrick J. Connolly to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Devine to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Francis V. Donovan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph B. Fallon to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Albert R. Hagan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John L. Hunt to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John H. Molloy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Benjamin F. Poole to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William F. Smith to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Eugene J. Sullivan to the rank of Sergeant. 

Captain John M. Anderson to the rank of Deputy 

Superintendent. 
Captain Martin H. King to the rank of Deputy 

Superintendent. 
Patrolman Charles J. Hunter to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman John F. Lyons to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman James R. McLaughlin to the rank of Sergeant. 

Sergeant John McArdle to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Thomas G. Duggan to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Carleton B. Perry to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Francis M. Tiernan to the rank of Lieutenant. 



80 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Table V. — Concluded. 



[Jan. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1933. 



May 


5 


M ay- 


5 


May 


5 


May 


5 


May 


5 


May 


5 


July 


17 


July 


24 


Aug. 


28 


Aug. 


28 



Patrolman Charles Bailey to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward J. Boyle to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank Bohmbach, Jr., to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank P. Luzinski to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Arthur M. Tiernan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Ward to the rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant Thomas F. Casey to the rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant James F. Daley to the rank of Captain. 

Deputy Superintendent Martin H. King to the rank of 

Superintendent. 
Captain William W. Livingston to the rank of Deputy 

Superintendent. 



1934.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



Table VI. 

Number oj Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 

























-^ 
















^ 


V 
















a 


"H 














Date 


-a 


o 




00 


^ £ 






Totals. 


Appointed. 


0) 


a 




a 


a ^ 




S 












d 


=3 9-. 




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>>o 


s 


a 


C S 


a 








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3 


-s a 


'3 

a 

a 


3 


OJ a 
3 a 

3 








1894 . 


_ 


_ 








1 




1 


1895 








- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


3 


3 


10 


1896 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1897 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1898 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


3 


5 


10 


1900 








- 


1 


3 


6 


1 


6 


3 


20 


1901 








1 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


3 


12 


1903 








- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


8 


6 


20 


1904 








^ 


- 


- 


7 


1 


4 


2 


14 


1905 








- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


4 


2 


9 


1906 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


T 


6 


1907 








- 


- 


1 


3 


] 


3 


5 


13 


1908 








- 


- 


2 


2 


2 


9 


3 


18 


1909 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 








-- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


1 


5 


1911 








_ 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1912 








- 


- 


- 


4 




2 


3 


9 


1913 








- 


- 


- 


- 




1 


1 


2 


1914 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1916 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 








_ 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


T 


4 


1919 








_ 


— 


2 


18 


- 


72 


501 


593 


1920 








_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


- 


20 


162 


185 


1921 










_ 


_ 


- 


- 


17 


108 


125 


1922 








_ 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


6 


69 


75 


1923 








_ 


_ 


— 


1 


- 


7 


100 


108 


1924 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


76 


77 


1925 








_ 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


95 


95 


1926 








_ 


_ 




_ 


- 


- 


313 


313 


1927 








_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


125 


125 


1928 








_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


90 


90 


1929 








_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


206 


206 


1930 








_ 


_ 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


46 


46 


1931 








- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


18 


18 


Tot< 


Us 






1 


3 


17 


59 


12 


180 


1,956 


2,228 



82 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1933, who were Born 
in the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 







oi 


















C 


















(U 
















Z 


-c 














Date of Birth. 


'2 






to 


. E 






Totals. 




0) 






-fj 


c2 


m 


c 












5 


C3 Cj 










'u. 

3 




C3 


'3 




5 

4) 








M 


Q 


o 


'tJ 


^ 


X 


Ph 




1868 . 












3 




3 


1869 








- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


3 


2 


9 


1870 








- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1871 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


1 


4 


9 


1872 








- 


- 


1 


4 


1 


3 


8 


17 


1873 








- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


11 


2 


19 


1874 








- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


3 


15 


1875 








1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


5 


- 


10 


1876 








- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


10 


1877 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 


7 


13 


1878 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


4 


11 


1879 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


4 


4 


10 


1880 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


3 


1881 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


1 


8 


1882 








- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


4 


- 


9 


1883 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


3 


1884 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1885 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


17 


19 


1886 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


27 


31 


1887 








- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


42 


45 


1888 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


51 


56 


1889 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


71 


79 


1890 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


60 


63 


1891 








_ 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


4 


94 


99 


1892 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


9 


128 


139 


1893 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


20 


132 


155 


1894 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


17 


158 


177 


1895 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


12 


157 


173 


1896 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


12 


182 


198 


1897 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


21 


167 


193 


1898 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


155 


163 


1899 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


107 


110 


1900 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


146 


147 


1901 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


106 


106 


1902 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1903 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


44 


1904 








_ 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


20 


20 


1905 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Tot 


als 






1 


3 


17 


59 


12 


180 


1,956 


2,228 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1933, is 
39.21 years. 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



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84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1933. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters 


1,673 


376 


2,049 


Division 1 


5,785 


194 


5,979 


Division 2 


5,904 


532 


6,436 


Division 3 * 


3,824 


230 


4,054 


Division 4 (old) f . ... 


1,421 


130 


1,551 


Division 4 (new) 


12,371 


969 


13,340 


Division 5 t 


2,379 


214 


2,693 


Division 6 


5,669 


207 


5,876 


Division 7 


4,967 


228 


5,195 


Division 8 J . ' 


16 


— 


16 


Division 9 


4,446 


226 


4,672 


Division 10 


4,886 


365 


5,251 


Division 11 


3,060 


127 


3,187 


Division 12 § 


2,212 


79 


2,291 


Division 13 


1,380 


53 


1,433 


Division 14 


2,383 


146 


2,529 


Division 15 


5,127 


266 


5,393 


Division 16 


4,977 


697 


5,674 


Division 17 


1,256 


88 


1,344 


Division 18 


1,038 


49 


1,087 


Division 19 


1,376 


92 


1,468 


Totals 


76,150 


5,268 


81,418 



* Division 3 consolidated with Divisions 1 and 2, August 28, 1933. 

+ Old Division 4 and Division .5 consolidated into new Division 4, February 27, 1933. 

X Division 8 consolidated with Division 1, May 8, 1933. 

§ Division 12 consolidated with Division 6, August 14, 1933. 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 





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1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



89 





1 


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ro 


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CO 


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40 








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CM 






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cm" 


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IC 


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CM 












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CO 
of 


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1 


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cc 


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a building 
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90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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h-i 


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hJ 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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o 


^^ 


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GO 


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CO 



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rh 00 I lO ■* CO ^ Gi 



CO I I CC .-H l:^ I O 



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92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



95 



IC 05 05 "-H CD 1— I 
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1 U3 Oi .-H 



t^ C^ I I l> I I I 



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96 



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1934.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 97 



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98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1934.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 99 



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100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1934.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 101 



I I I I I 



■># ^ ■— ( t^ »f3 lO l-- 



O-^t^iO ICncC— I l<M lOOcOCO 1-^ IO00(N 



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T o^-o^- 00000,0^- _ p^ Q, g b£ p -fS :^ ^ j^ 

2 S? 3g3g3o3^3g3g-9 -S S -^ a: tu 3 ° "S -^ -2 



102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



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u 


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104 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



-ts ~ 



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1934.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



105 



GO 









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sr 


w 




n 




< 





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o 





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1> 


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CO 


to 


;:;; 


CD 


se8U}i\^ JO junouiy 


CO 


o_ 


r^ 


M 


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l2 




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t>r 


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^ 










m 




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TfH 


CO 


^^ 


"3 


I> 


•jjnoQ 


CO 


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1— 1 


lO 


l^ 


CO 


ye aouBpua^^v 


o 


t> 


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t^ 


O 


CO 


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s 


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00 


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106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



T3 



Si 



GO 
SO 



'^ -^ 



-« 


^ 


*Ka 


o 




^ 


Ci 


535 


!^ 


s= 


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^ 


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a.2 ¥ 



OOOOOOOOOOO 1 OOO VCOOOO 

OOOOOOOOOOO iC O O (M O O O lO 

CO O C<J 00 lO 05 O O Tti O lO CD O O 05iC-*0'0 

QOt^iCio OfN'* 001>iM ^OiO O 00 iM CO C^ 

eg "^"^.O^ "^."^^ 1— ICO (NCO'-^ ^t^ -H_ 



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I I I 1 CO 1 t^<M I I ^ I I coo -H I I 



I I I CDC^ I -H -H 1 I 



-Hi I CO I lON-H COCO 
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I I I I I I I 1> I 



COt^COOSt^OJOOOOO-*-* 
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S a^ e 
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"S 1= kh =0 M « 
M M^ c3 S ° 



1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



107 



U3 00 00 00 ■* CO '-I 
i-H lf3CQ(N <N ■* 
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00 



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■<*i CO irj 
to 



I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I 



I I I I I I I 



II I I I I I I I III 



O 



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108 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1933. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


52 


12 


2 




66 


2 












16 


4 


1 


- 


21 


8* 












164 


50 


26 


- 


240 


4 












279 


67 


28 


- 


374 


5* 












9 


3 


1 


- 


13 


6 












142 


27 


7 


- 


176 


7 












571 


104 


25 


- 


700 


8* 












1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


9 












574 


73 


51 


3 


701 


10 












506 


88 


52 


1 


647 


11 












1,045 


103 


150 


- 


1,298 


12* 












357 


47 


35 


- 


439 


13 












637 


72 


104 


1 


814 


14 












637 


87 


121 


- 


845 


15 












280 


52 


12 


- 


344 


16 












421 


101 


82 


1 


605 


17 












921 


113 


209 


- 


1,243 


18 












530 


53 


78 


1 


662 


19 












382 


38 


43 


- 


463 


1 


rotal 


s 








7,524 


1,095 


1,027 


7 


9,653 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the Citij by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 






407 


Division 12 * 






34 


Division 2 






752 


Division 13 






52 


Division 3 * 






5 


Division 14 






35 


Division 4 






201 


Division 15 






9 


Division 5 * 






3 


Division 16 






26 


Division 6 






302 


Division 17 






46 


Division 7 






27 


Division 18 






42 


Division 9 






89 


Division 19 






38 


Division 10 






23 








Division 11 






46 


Total . 1 2,137 



* Division consolidations: Division 3 with Divisions 1 and 2, August 28, 1933; Divi- 
sion 5 with Division 4, February 27, 1933; Division 8 with Division 1, May 8, 1933, and 
Division 12 with Division 6, August 14, 1933. 

t 7 canceled for nonpayment. 



1934.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1933. 





Expenditures. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


$4,518,373 07 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


10,542 48 




3. 


Unassigned .... 


6 00 


$4,528,921 55 






B. Service Other than Personal: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$4,415 25 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


1,484 15 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


14,973 98 




5. 


Cartage and freight 


589 83 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


36,110 54 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


5,947 29 




12. 


Bond and insurance pre- 








miums 


278 00 




13. 


Communication 


27,576 38 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and 








care 


21,662 32 




16. 


Care of animals 


3,205 32 




18. 


Cleaning 


2,641 41 




19. 


Removal of ashes, dirt and 








garbage .... 


150 00 




22. 


Medical 


9,291 25 




28. 


Expert 


1,766 55 




29. 


Stenographic, copying, list- 








ing 


62,733 59 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


610 16 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 








ing 


447 45 




39. 


General plant .... 


32,401 50 


226,284 97 


C. Equipment: 






1. 


Apparatus, cable, wire, etc.. 


$27,254 75 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


46,985 53 




6. 


Stable 


504 55 




7. 


Furniture and fittings . 


3,208 96 




9. 


Office 


9,350 75 




12. 


Medical, surgical, labora- 








tory 


116 53 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


3,469 22 




14. 


Live stock .... 


1,050 00 




16. 


Wearing apparel 


38,673 79 




17. 


General plant .... 


16,515 75 


147,129 83 


D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office 


$34,123 46 




2. 


Food and ice . 


7,966 76 




3. 


Fuel 


21,693 87 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,180 32 




5. 


Medical, surgical, labora- 








tory 


303 21 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


2,826 53 




11. 


Motor vehicles 


35,123 95 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants, 


1,021 05 




16. 


General plant .... 


10,839 13 




17. 


Electrical .... 


944 60 


118,022 88 






F. 7. 


Pensions and annuities . 




357,724 50 




Total 




$5,378,083 73 



110 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1933. 



Receipts. 
For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner 
For dog licenses (credited to school department) 
Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposits, report blanks, use of police 

property, etc 

Refunds and reimbursement 

For damage to police property 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for 
to police property 



Grand total 



$42,631 75 

22,752 00 

3,070 10 



2,358 09 

11,149 94 

637 18 

5 00 

$82,604 06 

672 92 

$83,276 98 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1933. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies 
Rent of part of building .... 
Storage, care and repair of motor vehicles 

Furniture and fittings 

Printing, blue prints, tracings 

Fuel 

Carfare 

Incidentals 

Total 









$41,154 49 








48,601 10 








499 96 








675 00 








77 72 








408 57 








83 20 








60 55 








35 21 




$91,595 80 



1934.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1934. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



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114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1934.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 115 



INDEX. 



Accidents ■ •, ., 51, 56, 57, 111, n2 

caused by automobile 51 m 112 

number of, reported '56 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 111,112 

Adjustment of claims 57 

Ambulance service gj 

Armorer, position of, created 25 

Arrests 39, 45, 46, 52, 86-105 

age and sex of 1Q4 

comparative statement of . IO5 

for drunkenness 40, 45, 57, 94 

foreigners ] _ 45, 87-103 

for offences against chastity, morality, etc. 40, 45, 94, 103 

minors .'45', 87-104 

nativity of 4g 

nonresidents 40, 87-103 

number of, by divisions 86 

number of, punished by fine 46 

on warrants . 45, 87-103 

summoned by court . 45, 87-103 

total number of 40, 45, 103 

violation of city ordinances ' 45, 98 

without warrants 45, 87-103 

Auctioneers 106 

.\utomobiles 20, 38, 48, 49, 96, 111, 112 

accidents due to Ill, 112 

deaths caused by 51, m, 112 

operating under influence of liquor 40, 96 

police 38, 60 

public 36, 62, 106 

sight-seeing 64, 106 

stolen 40, 48, 49 

used 48, 50, 106 

Benefits and pensions 70 

Buildings 56 

dangerous, reported 56 

found open and made secure 56 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 47 

Bureau of Records 26 

criminal identification 30 

missing persons 31 

warrant file 33 

Carriages, public 36, 62 

articles left in ... _ 63 

number licensed . . * 63, 106 

stands for 63 

Cases investigated 52, 56, 59 

Children 47, 56 

abandoned, cared for 56 

lost, restored 56 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 46, 98 

Claims, adjustment of 57 

Collective musicians 69, 106 

Commitments 46, 57 

Communications system 25 

Complaints 24, 68, 84, 106 

against miscellaneous licenses 68, 106 

against police officers 24, 84 

Courts 45, 46, 57, 87-105 

fines imposed by 45, 46, 105 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 45, 46, 57, 105 

number of persons summoned by 45, 87-103 

Criminal investigation. Bureau of 47 

automobile division 48 

general 52 

homicide division 50 

lost and stolen property division 51 

Criminal work 105 

comparative statement of 105 



116 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Dangerous weapons 19, 70 

Dead bodies 56, 59 

recovered 56, 59 

Deaths 42,44,51,52,111,112 

by accident, suicide, etc. 51, 111, 112 

of police officers 42, 44, 77 

Distribution of force 43, 74 

Disturbances suppressed 56 

Divisional changes 44 

Dogs 106, 108, 110 

amount received for licenses for 110 

number licensed 108 

Drivers 36, 63, 106 

hackney carriage 36, 63, 106 

sight-seeing automobile 65, 106 

Drowning, persons rescued from 56, 59 

Drunkenness 40, 45, 57, 94 

arrests for, per day 45 

foreigners arrested for 45, 94 

increase in number of arrests for 45 

nonresidents arrested for 45, 94 

total number of arrests for 45, 94 

women committed for 57 

Employees of the Department 43, 74 

Events special 52 

Expenditures 41, 71, 109 

Extra duties performed by officers 56 

Financial 41, 71, 109 

expenditures 41, 71, 109 

pensions 71, 109 

receipts 41, 71, 110 

miscellaneous license fees 71, 107, 110 

signal service 71, 110 

Fines 45, 46, 105 

amount of 45, 46, 105 

average amount of 45, 105 

number punished by 46 

Finger print 31 

Fire alarms 56 

defective, reported 56 

number given 56 

Fires 56, 59 

extinguished 56 

on water front attended 59 " 

Foreigners, number arrested 45, 87-103 

Fugitives from justice 52 

Gaming, illegal 99 

Hackney carriage drivers 36, 63, 106 

Hackney carriages 36, 62, 106 

Hand carts 106 

Harbor service 39, 59 

Homicide division 50 

Horses 38, 60 

House of detention _ 57 

House of ill fame, keeping ' 57, 95 

Hydrants, defective, reported 56 

Imprisonment 46, 105 

persons sentenced to 46 

total years of 46, 105 

Income 41,71,107 

Information from Police .Journals, request for 57 

Inquests held 51 

Insane persons taken in charge 56 

Intoxicated persons assisted 56 

Itinerant musicians 68, 106 

Junk collectors 106 

.Junk shop keepers 106 

Jury lists, police work on 67 

Lamps, defective, reported 56 

Law enforcement 15 

Licenses, miscellaneous 68, 106 

Line-up of prisoners 47 

Listing, police 66, 109, 113, 114 

expenses of 66, 109 

number listed 66, 113, 114 

number of policemen employed in 67 



p. D. 49. 117 

Page 

Lodgers at station houses 47 

Lodging houses, public 70, 106 

appHcations for licenses 106 

authority to license ^ 70 

location of 70 

number of persons lodged in 70 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 38,51,110 

Lost children 47, 56 

Medals 23 

Department 23 

Walter Scott 23 

Medical examiners' assistants 50 

cases on which inquests were held 51 

causes of death 51 

Minors, number arrested 45, 87-103 

Miscellaneous business 56 

Miscellaneous licenses 68. 106, 110 

amount of fees collected for 68, 106, 110 

complaints investigated 68, 106 

number canceled and revoked 68, 106 

number issued 68, 106 

number transferred 68, 106 

Missing persons 31 

age and sex of 32 

number found 32 

number reported 32 

Musicians 68, 106 

collective 69, 106 

itinerant 68, 106 

Nativity of persons arrested 46 

Nonresident offenders 40.45,87-103 

Offences 40, 45, 87-103 

against chastity, morality, etc 40, 45, 94, 103 

against license laws 45, 92, 103 

against liquor law 40 

against the person 40. 45, 87, 103 

against property, malicious 45, 91, 103 

against property, with violence 40, 45, 89, 103 

against property, without violence 40, 45, 90, 103 

forgery and against currency 45, 92, 103 

miscellaneous 40. 45. 96, 103 

recapitulation 103 

Parks, public 111,112 

accidents reported in lUi 112 

Pawnbrokers 106 

Pensions and benefits 70 

estimates for pensions 71 

number of persons on rolls 71 

payments on account of 71, 109 

Personnel 22, 42 43, 74 

Photographic, etc 26, 30 

Plant and equipment 37 

Police administration 5 

Police 67 

special 67 

Police charitable fund 71 

Police department 22.24,33,38.43,44,52,74.76,86,87 

authorized and actual strength of 76 

distribution of 43,74 

horses in use in 60 

how constituted 43 

officers absent sick 83 

arrests by 45. 86, 87-103 

complaints against 24, 84 

date appointed 81 

detailed, special events 52 

died 42,44,77 

discharged 25, 43 

injured 24, 44 

nativity of 82 

promoted 22,44,79 

resigned 25, 44 

retired 44, 78 

school 33 

vehicles in use in 38, 62 

work of 45 

Police listing 66,109,113,114 



118 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Police signal service 25,43,58,110 

miscellaneous work 58 

payments on account of 110 

property of 58 

signal boxes 58 

Prisoners, nativity of 46 

Property 38,47.49,51,105,107,110 

lost, abandoned and stolen 38,51, 110 

recovered 51, 105 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 107, 110 

stolen 49, 51 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 47 

Public carriages 36, 62, 106 

Public lodging houses 70, 106 

Railroad police 68 

Receipts 41,106,110 

Requests for information from Police Journals 57 

Revolvers 70, 106 

licenses to carry 70. 106 

Salaries 74 

School, police 33 

Second-hand articles 106 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealer . 106 

Sewers, defective, reported 56 

Sick and injured persons assisted 47, 56, 59 

Sickness, absence on account of 83 

Sight-seeing automobiles 64, 106 

Signal service, police 25,43,58,110 

Special events 52 

Special police 67 

Station houses consolidated 44 

Station houses 47 

lodgers at 47 

witnesses detained at 47 

Stolen property 44, 49, 52, 105 

recovered 49. 52, 105 

value of 52, 105 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters 106 

Streets 56,111,112 

accidents, reported in Ill, 112 

defective, reported . . . . 56 

obstructions removed 56 

Supervisor of Automotive Equipment, position of, created 25 

Teams 56 

stray, put up 56 

Traffic 34 

Uniform crime record reporting 41 

Used cars 48, 50, 106 

licensed dealers 48, 106 

sales reported 50 

Vehicles 36,38,61 

ambulances 61 

automobiles 36, 60 

in use in police department 38, 62 

public carriages 36, 62 

wagons 65 

Vessels 59 

Wagons 65, 106, 108 

number licensed by divisions 108 

total number licensed 65, 106, 108 

Warrant file 33 

Water pipes, defective, reported 56 

Water running to waste, reported 56 

Weapons, dangerous 19, 70 

Witnesses 45, 46, 47, 56, 105 

fees earned by officers as 45. 46, 105 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as 45, 105 

number of, detained at station houses 47, 56 

Women committed to House of Detention 57 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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