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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




;^ 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

VL\)t CommontDealtl) of ittasisiacijusietts; 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPQRT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1934 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



3)35 r, [^^3(h 






S^ 



CONTENTS. 



Letter to Governor 

Introductory 

Police administration 

Personnel .... 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 

Department Medal of Honor 

Organization 

Communications System . 

Bureau of records 

Criminal identification 

Missing persons . 

Persons lost or runaway in Boston 

Requests for information from Police Journals 

Warrant file 

Police school 

Traffic 

Hackney carriages and stands 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriages violations 

Plant and equipment 

Arrests . 

Uniform crime record reporting 

Receipts 

Expenditures 
The Department 

Police Force 

Signal service 

Employees of the Department 

Recapitulation 

Distribution and changes . 

Police officers injured while on duty 
Work of the Department . 

Arrests 

Drunkenness 

Nativity of persons arrested 
Detective Bureau 

Automobile division . 

Lost and stolen property division 

General 
Supervisor of Cases Unit 

Line-up 

Homicide squad . 

Court supervision 
Special events 
Miscellaneous business 
Adjustment of claims 



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4 CONTENTS. 

Page 

House of Detention 57 

Police Signal Seivice 57 

Signal boxes 57 

Miscellaneous work 57 

Harbor service 58 

Horses 59 

Vehicle service 60 

Automobiles 60 

Combination ambulances 60 

List of vehicles used by the Department . . . . .62 

Hackney Carriages 62 

Limitation of hackney carriages 63 

Special, pubhc and private hackney stands 64 

Sight-seeing automobiles 65 

Wagon licenses 66 

Listing Work in Boston 67 

Listing expenses . 68 

Number of policemen employed in listing 68 

Police work on jury lists 68 

Special police 68 

Railroad police 69 

Miscellaneous licenses 69 

Musicians' licenses 69 

Itinerant 69 

Collective 70 

Carrying dangerous weapons 71 

Public lodging houses 71 

Pensions and benefits 71 

Financial 72 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the Police Force, 

Signal service and employees 74 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 76 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 77 

List of officers retired 78 

Number of men in active service and year appointed ... 79 

Men on the Police Force and year born 80 

Number of days' absence from dutj' by reason of sickness . 81 

Complaints against officers 82 

Number of arrests by police divisions 86 

Arrests and offenses 87 

Age and sex of persons arrested 109 

Comparative statement 110 

Licenses of all classes issued Ill 

Dog licenses 113 

Wagon licenses 113 

Financial Statement 114 

Payments on account of signal service 115 

Accidents 116 

Male and female residents listed 118 



tifje Commontoealtl) of ifllassattiufiettB. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1934. 

To His Excellency Joseph B. Ely, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — In accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the honor 
to submit, as PoUce Commissioner for the City of Boston, the 
following report for the year ending November 30, 1934. 

Police Administration. 

The duties and functions of a Pohce Commissioner for the 
City of Boston are many and varied. He appoints special 
police officers, licenses all dealers in second-hand articles, 
pawnbrokers, dealers in second-hand motor vehicles, sight- 
seeing automobiles and operators, all hackney carriage and 
taxicab operators, establishes and assigns all special and public 
stands for taxicabs, licenses certain large lodging houses, issues 
licenses for firearms, receives all applications for licenses to be 
granted by the Boston Licensing Board, and reports violations 
of the terms of the licenses to the Board, and prosecutes if 
there is a violation of the law; investigates and reports on all 
applicants for licenses granted by the Mayor of Boston, reports 
on all applicants to the Secretary of State for chartered clubs 
to be located in Boston or when any of the incorporators reside 
in Boston. He also licenses the following: Auctioneers (class 
1: licensing the person to auction); (class 2: licensing the 
premises upon which to auction certain lines of merchandise) ; 
(special: for nonresidents to operate under class 2 as licensed 
auctioneers); collective musicians (bands); dogs; hand carts 
(common carriers) ; itinerant musicians; junk collectors; junk- 
shojj'keepers; street railway conductors, motormen and starters; 
and wagons (common carriers). 

The Police Commissioner has the responsibility for listing all 
residents of the city who are twenty years of age and over. 



6 . POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

from which records the Election Commissioners compile a 
voting list and the assessors compile a list of persons subject 
to poll and personal taxes, as well as the additional responsi- 
bility of taking a census for the City of Boston. 

When primaries or elections are to be held, the Police Com- 
missioner is charged with seeing that they are honestly con- 
ducted from the time of receiving the ballots and distributing 
them to the polling places, until the Department takes the 
ballots and ballot boxes back to a vault at the office of the 
Board of Election Commissioners. The ballots are then under 
police guard until the time for recount is passed or if a recount 
is held, the police are responsible for the guarding and preserva- 
tion of the ballots. 

The Police Commissioner is a member of the Traffic Com- 
mission for the City of Boston, is Chairman of the Listing Board, 
and is a member of the Board composed of the Mayor and the 
Chief Justice of the Municipal Court of the City of Boston, 
which hears and considers all complaints made against theaters 
and amusement places where it is alleged improper performances 
are conducted. 

In addition to all the above varied duties, the Police Com- 
missioner enforces the criminal laws and statutes and city 
ordinances. 

When the Police Commissioner first assumes office, he is 
confronted with the problem of deciding whether or not it is 
necessary to make internal changes as a result of deficiencies 
which may have existed under previous administrations. Due 
to inexperience in that feature of work, he is unable to determine 
at once what improvements are necessary in equipment and 
what methods are desirable to increase the efficiency of the 
Department. 

Upon assuming the office of Police Commissioner in May of 
1930, in order to regain public respect for the Department due 
to conditions existing at that time and to rehabilitate the 
Department, I was faced with the task of a complete reorganiza- 
tion. At that time, the records of the Police Department 
were in a chaotic condition. Therefore, the first important 
step was to install a complete and co-ordinated system of 
records. On October 17, 1931, there was estabhshed in the 
Department a Bureau of Records, under the direction of a 
Deputy Superintendent, which Bureau proceeded to install a 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 7 

complete, uniform system of criminal and police records for 
the entire Department. Before the establishment of this 
Bureau, the classifications of photographs and fingerprint 
impressions were in such condition that the Department was 
many years behind the times. Before the estabhshment of 
this Bureau, no two divisions nor units kept their records in 
the same manner, nor was there a division at Headquarters by 
which the head of the department or the various divisions 
could obtain information in regard to the records of the various 
units: for example, one division might have a warrant for 
the arrest of a certain criminal and neither Headquarters nor 
any other division in the Department have knowledge of the 
issuance of such warrant. Further, officers prosecuting cases 
in-court from one division had no knowledge nor method within 
the Department of finding out what previous experience the 
Department may have had with the person being prosecuted. 
To obtain such necessary knowledge, for proper prosecution, 
it was necessary to search loosely kept records of every unit 
and division in the Department. This was, of course, an 
intolerable and inefficient condition. One of the functions of 
the Bureau of Records is to have available at all times this 
complete information. This Bureau is open twenty-four hours 
a day, as records of this nature are of little value to the police 
unless instantly available when their use is necessary. 

The identification of criminals by classification of finger- 
prints and photographs was loosely under the control of the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation. The fingerprint system 
in existence was obsolete and not used by any other large 
department in the world. The fingerprints of some 125,000 
criminals have been changed from the system in use in this 
Department known as the Flak Conley System to that of the 
Renno Henry System, which is commonly used by the United 
States Government and all modern police departments in the 
world so that the free interchange of fingerprints taken in the 
past or taken currently are immediately interchangeable with 
all other police departments. The first step taken by the 
Bureau of Records was the start of the centralization, prepara- 
tion and uniformity of all records and making them available 
at an instant's notice. The annual reports of the Police Com- 
missioner from May, 1930, to date will show the various steps 
taken in this Department and the many improvements which 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

have resulted from the creation of the Bureau of Records, 
which is now recognized as one of the best record bureaus of 
any poUce department. 

In May, 1930, I found that the Department had no facihties 
for photography. When photographs were considered neces- 
sary, a commercial photographer, who had no knowledge of 
what it was desirable to show in the picture, was secured at 
a great expense and delay. The result of this practice was 
that many photographs which should have been taken both 
of criminals and at the scenes of crimes and accidents were 
not obtained. A photographic unit has been installed in the 
Department with equipment and personnel second to none 
in the country, made up of men experienced in police work 
and whose services are available at any moment of the night 
or day for either photographing criminals or the scenes of 
accidents and crimes. 

Previous to May of 1930 little or no attempt had been made 
to study the personnel of the Department. A system of 
personnel records has been installed, giving each member's 
complete history in the Department, together with the par- 
ticular work with which they may be familiar in order to 
assign the officers to the branch of police work for which they 
are best adapted and for which they may have a special desire 
to engage in, in order to encourage them in their ambition to 
render good service. Due to a careful study of personnel 
together with a redistribution of officers in the city during the 
last four years, the twenty-one divisions which existed in 
May, 1930, have' been consolidated into fifteen divisions and 
the number of patrolmen reduced by 243 while crime in the 
city has been reduced. 

A Ballistics Unit has been established in the Department in 
charge of an officer of experience with the title of Armorer. 
The office of the Armorer is equipped with the latest modern 
apparatus for the identification of weapons and bullets and 
the present Armorer is qualified to act as ballistics expert for 
the Department. The Armorer further has charge of all 
offensive and defensive weapons of the Department and inspects 
and repairs all weapons of the Department. This has resulted 
in not only the saving of money but in maintaining the equip- 
ment of this nature in its most efficient condition. This unit 
has been of great assistance to other police departments and 
the courts in the preparation and presentation of cases involv- 
ing the use of weapons. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

Previous to 1930 the Department had no school for training 
either recruits or members of the Department. Therefore, 
there has been estabhshed a department school which functions 
under the direction and control of the Superintendent of Police 
and the Administrative Board of three Deputy Superintendents. 
All patrolmen excepting those excused by the Administrative 
Board for sufficient reason attend the sessions of the school. 
The school instructs the officers in all matters affecting police 
work and the improvement shown by the work of the officers 
has been already commented on by judges, prosecuting officials 
and the public. 

The Department was open to justifiable criticism in the 
matter of presenting cases before the courts. There was no 
general supervision of this work which is, of course, of the 
utmost importance, nor was there any uniformity in practice. 
A unit has been established under the command of a captain 
designated as the Supervisor of Cases with assistants whose 
duty it is to prepare and supervise the presentation of all 
criminal cases in the various courts. This unit has received 
approbation from many judges and prosecutors. 

Previous to 1930, for several years, there had been no instruc- 
tions given to officers as to how to properly handle the weapons 
with which they are equipped when on duty. There has been 
established in West Roxbury a shooting range and every officer 
in the Department is required to attend revolver practice and 
qualify as a marksman each year. For this purpose a corps of 
competent instructors has been created and the outdoor range 
is open during the clement months of the year while practice 
is continued in indoor ranges during the winter. Various 
revolver teams are chosen in the Department, which have 
competed with other police departments throughout the country 
with great success and honors, and the entire uniform force of 
the Department is now over 90 per cent qualified as marksmen 
with a revolver. Other departments in the Commonwealth 
have taken advantage of the invitation of the Police Com- 
missioner to send their men to this range for training and they 
feel that the service rendered by our instructors has been of 
value to them. 

In May, 1930, I found the signal system, the importance of 
which to a modern police department cannot be exaggerated, 
to be obsolete in its design and in such bad repair that its 
functioning was unsatisfactory and entirely unreliable. The 
police today must have speedy, sure and secret transmission 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of alarms and information both from the pubHc to the pohce 
and from the pohce to its various arms. Due to the co-opera- 
tion of the Mayor of Boston and the City Council, we are now 
in the process of establishing a communications system which, 
when finished, will give greater control of the Department and 
extend to the public the greatest opportunity to obtain police 
protection of any communicating system yet devised for police 
work. 

There has been established the office of Biological Chemist, 
who works in conjunction with the Medical Examiners of 
Suffolk County, and who has appropriate equipment and 
ability to make such tests and examinations as are required by 
the Pohce Department and the Medical Examiners. This 
Department is the only police department in New England 
which is so equipped. 

For proper inspection of divisions, the city has been divided 
into three major districts, each under the inspectional super- 
vision of a Deputy Superintendent, whose duty it is to inspect 
all divisions within his district, report delinquencies and make 
recommendations for the improvement of the service to the 
Superintendent of Police. 

In 1930 the Department of Justice, Washington, D. C, 
instituted a system of uniform crime reporting based on volun- 
tary co-operation by the various local police departments. 
This Department, since the beginning, has received much 
commendation from that department for its co-operation. 
The purpose of these reports was not only to obtain uniform 
crime statistics, which are exceedingly difficult to collate in 
this country, but create a competitive spirit between different 
police departments. As an elaboration of this system, all 
divisions of this Department make to Headquarters monthly a 
report on identical lines with that employed by the Depart- 
ment of Justice, the results of which are tabulated on a per- 
centage basis and published to the Department as the rating of 
divisions. While this method within the Department has only 
been in existence something less than a year, the results of this 
competition are surprisingly gratifying. Since the installation 
of this competitive method, the percentage of founded cases 
cleared by arrests in the Department has averaged 81.15 per 
cent, and for the month of November was 85.47 per cent. 
This system, together with the efficient method of prosecuting 
in the lower courts under the direction of the Supervisor of 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

Cases, which obtains approximately 84 per cent of convictions, 
shows that of all the major crimes committed in the city 
approximately 70 per cent are successfully prosecuted. 

On July 11, 1934, there was created in the Office of the 
Superintendent a Bureau of Operations, which is in charge of 
an executive officer designated by the Superintendent. The 
Bureau is responsible for the many operations of the Depart- 
ment, in that it handles all calls from the public for assistance 
under the new emergency telephone system recently installed, 
dispatches men to the scene of complaint or a crime, and am- 
bulances to the scene of accident or disorder, disseminates with 
the utmost dispatch all information necessary for the appre- 
hension of criminals and for the assistance that the Depart- 
ment can render the public in times of emergency, fires and 
explosions, or even minor complaints, contacts all other police 
departments by radio, teletype, telegram and telephone to 
either give other departments information which may be of 
value to them and to obtain information from them which 
is necessary for our speedy functioning. 

In 1930 there was little or no automotive equipment except 
patrol wagons available for police work in this Department. 
At present we have seventy-four cruising cars on the streets 
equipped with radio and necessary weapons to enable immediate 
attention to calls transmitted to these units. Further, these 
cruising cars are designated by signs illuminated at night to 
enable the public to call for assistance directly if they need it. 
The large increase in automotive equipment has made it 
necessary to install a system for the proper maintenance and 
garaging of some 140 automobiles. This entire work is sys- 
tematized and controlled by a Supervisor of Automotive 
Equipment with headquarters and reasonable equipment at 
the Maintenance Shop, Station 4. Further, there are avail- 
able at all times of the day or night for police work automo- 
biles from this garage on a livery system in order to conserve 
expense. 

I also desire to call to your attention certain statements 
made in the annual report of the Police Commissioner for 
the year ending November 30, 1933, relative to the chief evil 
in many police departments, that is, the insecure and short 
tenure of service of the executive head of the Police Force. 
This short term and insecurity of his tenure, where it 
exists, makes the tenure of office of subordinates much more 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

secure than that of the head who is responsible for them. 
This results in poor discipline and tends to lower the morale of 
the Department as well as to expose the head to continued 
attempts to subject him to the control, in the discharge of 
his duties, of those seeking special privileges through political 
influences and threats that he may be easily removed from 
office or, at best, fail to be reappointed at the end of his term 
of office if he does not comply with those requests. Political 
control of the police by the short tenure of office of the respons- 
ible head is dangerous to the community because, in addition 
to continual shifting of policy, the person who is appointed 
to replace the deposed official has before him at all times the 
threat of the political removal of his predecessor. All reports 
on investigation of police departments and study of police 
conditions agree in the general proposition that this insecurity 
of tenure is the cause of much of the inefficiency in police 
departments in this country, and only this last year the report 
of the Special Crime Commission appointed by Your Excellency 
has further reiterated this proposition from which the following 
excerpt is taken: "When a new Police Chief is appointed 
merely because the political control of a locality has been 
changed, the advantage of the former chief's experience is 
lost. Another man must be educated in the performance of 
his duty at the public's expense." This matter has been gone 
into at great length in the admirable report recently pub- 
lished by the Harvard University Press, entitled, "Police 
Administration in Boston." 

I wish to reiterate the statements contained in my last 
annual report, namely, that the pohce come properly under 
the judicial branch of our government. Massachusetts 
determined many years ago that its judicial officers should be 
far removed from political influence as it was possible under 
our form of government and I am convinced that, in so far as 
police administration is concerned in the crime situation, 
the most important step should be that police heads be pro- 
tected in their tenure in a similar manner as other judicial 
officers are in this Commonwealth. 

I also again reiterate that the second most important step 
to bring about efficient police administration is to make a change 
in the present method of selecting men to be police officers 
and promotion of officers within the Department. The selec- 
tion of ranking and superior officers today is governed entirely 
by the rules and regulations of the Civil Service Commission 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

and by competitive Civil Service examinations in making 
appointments and promotions to all grades of the service. 
The examination for promotion is limited to persons of the 
next lowest rank. The eligible lists are furnished by the 
Civil Service Commission and promotions must be made from 
these lists. The record of all applicants is determined solely 
on the basis of the apphcant's disciplinary record in the Depart- 
ment and his length of service. Thus, if the record shows 
that an applicant for promotion has not been charged with 
a violation of the rules and regulations of the Department 
but has rendered no particular service, he receives the same 
mark on his record as a man would receive who had rendered 
the most distinguished service and had the greatest ability 
in the way of tact, initiative, courage and capacity for police 
work. The Civil Service Commission grades an applicant 
with a seniority rating or mark. The practice of giving some 
credit for seniority in the examination of the record of the 
applicant and as to whether or not he has violated any rule 
or regulation of the Department, as a matter of fact, is wholly 
negative in its result. The present Civil Service examination 
for promotion gives absolutely no credit for meritorious work 
performed by members of the Department. A mere absence 
of disciplinary action indicates nothing as to the character 
of the man or the work done by the applicant for promotion. 

Under the present schedule of record rating, a mediocre 
man, if he can avoid an open breach of the rules and regula- 
tions, as most of them can do without a great deal of effort, 
is placed on an equal footing, as far as the record goes, with 
the energetic, able police officer who has also kept out of trouble. 
No attempt is made to give credit in a positive way for valuable 
work performed. Considering the promotional examination 
as a whole, it is not well adapted for the proper selection of 
men, or fitting them for the tasks which promotion will impose 
upon them. That is, as far as the mere attainment of pro- 
motion is concerned, there is no adequate reward, hence, 
no adequate stimulus for the accomplishment of superior 
work. Superior qualifications in men, for example, integ- 
rity, executive ability and the natural disposition to take the 
initiative are not taken into consideration in the present system 
of promotional examinations. Instead, facility in arithmetic 
and spelling and ability to answer certain commonplace, 
practical questions are the major requirements for present 
examinations of what an applicant knows and not what he 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

can do, what he has had the opportunity to do and what he 
has done. Judgment, too, fits for promotion in work where 
initiative and zeal play so large a part and must take into 
account the experience basis for determining the difference 
between the hard-working and the lazy, between the thorough 
workers and the hasty or careless, between the backward-pulling, 
disgruntled and the enthusiastic, forward-looking man. Any 
method of selection which omits this sort of requirement is 
inadequate and hence is unfair to the men involved and inimical 
to the efficiency of the Department as a whole. 

Opportunities for preparation and for obtaining high 
marks in the examination are unequal. We all know that it is 
possible to cram for any examination and generally the examina- 
tion is much like the one previously held for promotion for the 
same rank and the applicants devote much time and thought 
in preparing for it. In this case it should be observed that 
an officer, for example, who has an assignment in a quiet dis- 
trict or one who is in some position where he may have con- 
siderable leisure, has the important advantage of time at his 
disposal during which he may prepare for an examination. 
In this way he has an advantage over an officer who is energetic, 
carrying on his work in a busy district and continuing it to 
such hours that he has neither energy nor time left for pro- 
ductive study. There are many men in the Department who 
have received four or more commendations, some as many as 
ten, for excellent police work, but, unfortunately, they cannot 
be promoted because they are not in a position on the Civil 
Service list to be certified to the Po lice Commissioner. 

I reiterate the statements made in the annual report of the 
Police Commissioner for the year ending November 30, 1933, in 
which report I emphatically stated the matter of police pro- 
motions should be put squarely up to the head of a police 
department and it should be his duty and responsibility, by 
investigation and examinations, to choose his subordinate 
officers. This method can be inaugurated in Boston with the 
consent of the Civil Service Commission, and I call again on 
Your Excellency to request the Civil Service Commission to 
permit the Boston Police Commissioner to make promotions 
in this manner, based upon merit and efficiency, in order that 
the men in this department who have shown ability, energy 
and devotion to duty may be rewarded by promotion. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

The co-operation which has previously existed between this 
Department and nearby poHce departments has been extended 
and strengthened during the past year, so that now this Depart- 
ment furnishes daily or weekly reports to some thirty depart- 
ments in the Metropolitan District. Also, this Department 
has worked in close co-operation with the Federal Department 
of Justice in many cases, and the United States Treasury 
Department on narcotics. Due to the excellent work and 
co-operation of this Department with others in the Millen 
case, the Governor of the Commonwealth awarded medals to 
two members who, due to their excellent and unremitting 
work, helped to a great extent in solving these brutal murders. 

During the year much work in the nature of cataloging and 
re-indexing files at Headquarters, in addition to painting several 
police buildings, has been accomplished through the assistance 
and co-operation offered by local administrators of the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration by means of the C. W. A., 
P. W. A. and E, R. A. agencies. The work of the E. R. A. 
employees, especially in connection with modernizing the 
fingerprint system under the direction of officers of this Depart- 
ment, has been most gratifying, both in the nature of 
the work accomplished and in the spirit displayed. 

I do not desire, at this time, to recommend legislation except 
to again call to Your Excellency's attention the recommenda- 
tions made in the annual report of the Pofice Commissioner for 
1933, none of which were enacted into law, namely: 

1. Revamping of our present criminal procedure, 
which in many cases defeats justice and prevents or delays 
incarceration of criminals. 

2. Amendment to the laws for the proper control of 
chartered clubs. 

3. An amendment to the law relating to suspicious 
persons apprehended by the police so that they may be 
properly identified before being released. 

4. An amendment to the law relating to idle and dis- 
orderly persons. 

5. An amendment to the law relating to barricades on 
premises where vice conditions exist. 

6. An amendment to the law relating to dangerous 
weapons. 

7. Amendments to laws relating to automobiles, 
designed to curb the stealing of automobiles and thus 
prevent many fatal accidents. 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

All these proposed amendments are outlined in detail in 
the report of the Police Commissioner for the year ending 
November 30, 1933. 

Personnel. 

The members of the Police Force during the past year have 
conducted themselves with tact, alertness, courage and effi- 
ciency. Not a single member has hesitated to risk his life 
on any occasion that involved the apprehension of criminals 
or the saving of human life. During the year ending November 
30, 1934, the strength of the uniformed force was reduced from 
2,229 to 2,176 officers by deaths, retirements, resignations and 
dismissals, with no appointments being made to the grade of 
patrolman. Other employees remained practically unchanged. 
On November 30, this year, there was a total of 2,342 persons 
on the rolls of the Department. 

During the year Division Commanders have made a number 
of reports, through the Superintendent, recommending that 
certain officers of their respective divisions be commended in 
General Orders for meritorious work in the apprehension of 
criminals or for the saving of human life. 

In addition, the Commissioner has received many com- 
mendatory letters from citizens, organizations and officials of 
cities and towns, praising members of the Department and the 
Department as a whole as a result of services rendered. 

The repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment on December 5, 
1933, placed an additional responsibility upon this Department 
with respect to the investigation and submission of reports to 
the Licensing Board on a large number of applications for 
liquor licenses of the various classes. This work also entailed 
the installation and maintenance of record files of all cases 
reported upon by this Department to the Licensing Board. 

On numerous occasions during the past year, in response to 
calls from various hospitals, officers have freely offered and have 
given of their blood in urgent cases where blood transfusions 
were necessary to reheve suffering and to preserve the lives of 
persons who were gravely ill, and in some instances such ready 
response has been the means of preserving hfe. 

During the year, in General Orders, the Commissioner has 
either commended members of the Department or brought to 
the notice of the Department favorable communications con- 
cerning them as well as the whole Department in the following 
numbers : 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

Superintendent, 1; Deputy Superintendents, 2; Captains, 6; 
Lieutenants, 12; Acting-Lieutenant, 1; Lieutenant-Inspectors, 
3; Sergeants, 33 ; Acting-Sergeant, 1; Patrolmen, 184; Patrol- 
women, 3; Civilian Employee, 1; and the Department in 
General, 22. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and the 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed in December, 1930. 

Annually, since that time, the Superintendent and the 
Deputy Superintendents, acting as a Board of Merit, have 
reviewed the meritorious and courageous acts performed by 
members of the force and have recommended the following 
officers for special recognition: 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor. 
Year. To Whom Awarded. 

1929. Patrolman James J. McGowan, formerly of Division 4. 

1930. Patrolman Owen F. Donovan of Division 2. 

1931. Patrolman Chester A. Guilford of Division 17. 

1932. Patrolman Elmer R. Ogston of Division 4. 

1933. Sergeant Francis W. Russell of the Detective Bureau. 

Department Medal of Honor. 

1929. Sergeant Frank E. Gilman of Division 7. 
Patrolman James J. McGowan, formerly of Division 4. 
Patrolman Archibald N. Rintoul of Division 4. 

1930. Sergeant John P. J. Maune of Division 11. 
Patrolman John J. Falvey, formerly of Division 10. 
Patrolman Lewis Morrissey of Division 10. 
Patrolman Owen F. Donovan of Division 2. 

1931. Patrolman Edward W. Crickard of Division 2. 
Patrolman Daniel L. Donahue of Division 4. 
Patrolman Robert C. White of Division 1. 
Patrolman Edward F. Harrington (now retired), form- 
erly of Division 13. 

Patrolman Chester A. Guilford of Division 17. 

1932. Patrolman Frederick V. Perry of Division 10. 
Patrolman Herbert J. Langlois of Division 10. 
Patrolman Cyril Montgomery of Division 1. 
Patrolman Joseph Gilleo of Division 1. 
Patrolman Leo V. Devlin of Division 9. 
Patrolman William B. Boyden of Division 10. 
Patrolman Elmer R. Ogston of Division 4. 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1933. Sergeant Francis W. Russell of the Detective Bureau. 

Patrolman Andrew K. Adair of Division 2. 

Patrolman George W. Burke of Division 2. 

Patrolman John J. Dever of Division 4. 

Patrolman Henry F. Brogan of Division 14. 

Patrolman Daniel Fitzgerald of Division 14. 

Patrolman Thomas J. Mundy of Division 14. 

Patrolman Henry A. Weiss of Division 14. 

Patrolman Daniel J. Feeney of Division 16. 
On January 15, 1935, at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, medals for 1934 will be awarded to the 
following-named officers : 

For 1934. 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor. 
Patrolman James J. Mooney of Division 2. 

Department Medal of Honor. 

* Sergeant Charles F. Eldridge of Division 16. 

* Patrolman Edward A. McDonnell of Division 9. 
Patrolman James J. Mooney of Division 2. 
Patrolman James F. Mulhern of Division 2. 

In 1934, 6,656 days were lost by officers of the Department 
by reason of injuries received while on duty. 

During the year two sergeants and fifty-five patrolmen have 
been punished for violation of Police Rules and Regulations by 
either suspension with loss of pay, extra duty or the placing of 
the complaints against them on file. The complaint against 
one patrolman was continued for final disposition. 

Five patrolmen, without hearing, and twelve patrolmen, 
after hearing, were discharged from the service ; one lieutenant 
and four patrolmen resigned while charges against them were 
pending, and complaints against two patrolmen were dismissed 
after hearing. 

Organization. 

On December 9, 1933, the city was divided into three major 
police districts in order to provide for a proper inspection of 
personnel and general conditions existing in each division, each 
district being under the supervision of a Deputy Superintendent, 
whose duty it is to inspect all divisions within his district, 

(* Note. — The officers whose names are designated by asterisks were 
awarded the Department Medal of Honor on June 11, 1934.) 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

report delinquencies, and make recommendations for the 
improvement of the service to the Superintendent of Police. 

On January 26, 1934, the central detective agency of the 
Department was designated as the Detective Biu-eau, which 
was formerly known as the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The office of Biological Chemist was created on February 
17, 1934. The duties of the Biological Chemist consist of 
making such tests and examinations as are required of him by 
the Superintendent of Police and the Medical Examiners of 
Suffolk County. 

There was created in the officB of the Bureau of Records the 
position of Supervisor of Photography on July 5, 1934. The 
Supervisor of Photography, under the direction of the Com- 
manding Officer of the Bureau of Records, has charge of the 
care and custody of all photographs, equipment and materials 
coming into the possession of the Department. This unit is 
also responsible for the photographing of criminals, and scenes 
of crimes and accidents, whenever such service is required by 
the Department. 

On July 11, 1934, there was created in the Office of the 
Superintendent a unit known as the Bureau of Operations. 
The Bureau of Operations is the responsible Bureau of the 
Department for the handling of all communications received 
and transmitted by radio, telephone, teletype and telegraph, 
and also handles all calls from the public for assistance that are 
made by means of the new emergency telephone system recently 
installed. In addition to the varied responsibilities of this 
Bureau, it is charged with the duty of contacting other police 
departments by radio, teletype, telegraph and telephone, in 
the dissemination of valuable information, or obtaining from 
these police departments any information that is necessary for 
the proper functioning of this department. Officers assigned to 
radio patrol cars are amenable to orders that are dispatched 
from the Bureau of Operations. At the present time, there 
are seventy-four department cars equipped with the conven- 
tional one-way radio system, and the ultra-high frequency 
two-way (Duplex) system will be installed and in operation in 
the spring of 1935. 

On November 12, 1934, the practice of detaining and con- 
fining female prisoners in cells at various station houses of this 
Department was discontinued. All female prisoners, after 
being properly booked at a station house, are sent as soon as 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

possible in the Department ambulance of the arresting division 
to the House of Detention, where they are searched and placed 
in the care and custody of a matron as long as they shall remain 
therein. 

Communications System. 
The Signal Service Division, which is responsible for the 
maintenance of the communications system of the Depart- 
ment, laid new type cable in the Sumner Tunnel, which con- 
nected Stations 1 and 7, and involved the installation of seven 
additional police signal boxes in the Tunnel. This unit, in 
addition to its regular duties, during the past year has been 
assisting the firm of Jackson & Moreland, who have been 
engaged as consulting engineers in connection with the installa- 
tion of a two-way radio and wire system for this Department. 
This work has been progressing rapidly, and when these proj- 
ects are completed this Department will be equipped with the 
most modern communications system available. 

Bureau of Records. 
The Bureau of Records was estabhshed October 17, 1931, 
and that part of the Detective Bureau known as the Criminal 
Identification Division was merged with the Bureau of Records. 
Additional changes have been made to simplify the maintenance 
of police records, as well as to make the records of the Depart- 
ment uniform in all its branches. The efficiency of this Bureau 
has been greatly increased by the installation of complete and 
thoroughly modern identification equipment, consisting of the 
following machines and photographic apparatus : 

3 4x5 Graflex. 

1 8x10. 

1 4x5 photo record. 

1 enlarging, reducing and copying, size 8x10. 

2 fingerprint cameras, used at scenes of crime. 
1 Rectigraph. 

1 Dexigraph. 

1 complete set of fluorescent screens. 

Lenses for magnification photography and much other 

equipment used in photography. 
1 Multilith machine. 
1 Violet ray machine. 

During the past year a multihth machine was purchased in 
order to enable this Department to prepare and complete 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

the printing of circulars containing photograph and finger- 
prints of lost persons or those wanted for criminal offenses. 
Cameras for the preparation of half tones are a part of this 
equipment which, incidentally, add to the modern equipment 
of the photographic unit. This machine is capable of printing 
descriptive circulars of persons wanted in approximately two 
hours, and in some cases it is possible to complete and mail 
such circulars to outside cities before a person wanted arrives 
at a destination. 

During the year 38,000 circulars containing photographs 
and fingerprints of persons wanted in this city for various 
crimes were drafted and mailed from this office to every city 
and town in the United States with a population of 5,000 or 
more, State Bureaus of Identification, all Army and Navy 
recruiting stations, United States Immigration offices, and 
Customs Stations, and a number of the larger cities in foreign 
countries. In addition, there were 10,000 photographic circu- 
lars, containing photographs and descriptions of persons wanted 
for crimes, sent to departments within a radius of one hundred 
miles of Boston. The impressions made on this machine 
during the past year, including circulars, standard forms for the 
Department, and other bulletins were over a million and a half. 

The photographic unit of this Department suppUes the 
Medical Examiners with a complete set of enlarged photographs 
in homicide cases. The photographic unit of the Bureau is one 
of the finest and most modern equipped in the entire country. 
Photographic films in various sizes are filed in proper order in 
files adapted for the purpose. The enlarged photographs are 
filed in cabinets especially built to accommodate the size. 
The enlarged photographs are principally the scenes of homi- 
cides, hit-and-run accidents, and suspicious fires, and have 
proven invaluable for court purposes. Many communica- 
tions have been received as a result of the value of these photo- 
graphs, particularly in arson cases. Juries have been greatly 
assisted in determining the condition of the burned premises 
by the introduction and exhibition of these photographs in 
court. This same effect prevails in homicides and hit-and-run 
cases. 

The files in this office contain records of all assign- 
ments made in the Detective Bureau, also all records of arrests 
made throughout the Department. On file also are reports 
of all felonies committed within the city and all reports of the 
Investigation of those felonies. 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. . [Jan. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints and 
photographs, also records of all inmates of the Suffolk County 
House of Correction and their fingerprints. In addition to 
the foregoing, the files contain many thousands of photographs 
and fingerprints, correspondence, records, clippings and his- 
tories of criminals arrested or wanted in various parts of the 
United States and foreign countries. 

The Main Index File has been thoroughly modernized by 
alphabetical arrangement. Practically all the obsolete index 
matter has been removed so that, with the additions to this 
file made in the course of the past year, there are now approxi- 
mately 403,000 persons recorded in the files of this Bureau. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police 
and photographs received from other sources are filed in 
segregated cabinets. Photographs received from outside 
departments are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and 
those taken by this Department are placed in the "Local 
Segregated" file. The photographs of all criminals are segre- 
gated into four distinct sections, namely, white, yellow, negro 
and gypsy. Each of these groups is sub-divided according to 
sex and is also classified under the head of the crime in 
which the subjects specialize. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and 
in many instances important identifications have been made 
which have resulted in arrests. Valuable assistance has also 
been rendered to government officials of the following branches : 
Post Office Department, Treasury Department, Secret Service 
Department, Department of Justice and the Prohibition 
Department. Similar services have also been rendered to 
railroad and express companies. 

Members of this division visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and, in 
many instances, secured photographs of fingerprints of the 
persons who committed these crimes, and in several cases took 
photographs of the scene where the crime was committed. 
The figures and other data in connection with this work are 
contained in a subsequent part of this report. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

The Bureau has been furnished during the past year with an 
ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black light." This 
type of lamp is used for the detection of forgeries in checks and 
altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counterfeit moneys, 
fake antiques, and also for the photographing of blood-stained 
fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not be photo- 
graphed are now photographed with ease through the use of 
luminous powders such as anthracene, or luminous zinc sulphide, 
due to the radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The photographic unit, during the past year, completed over 
three hundred tests with infra-red rays on blood-stained fabrics, 
blood-stained instruments used in assaults, human hair and 
other telltale clues left at the scenes of serious crimes. These 
tests were for research, and at present excellent results are 
obtained with this type of plate. The use of this plate is com- 
paratively new in the detection of crime, and has proven 
a valuable addition to our photographic equipment. The 
Bureau is frequently called upon by other departments for 
assistance in photography of this type. 

A modern development of the photographic unit is the instal- 
lation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photographs 
of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are first sent 
to various agencies in an effort to identify these dead. Failing 
in this, they are filed in this Bureau for future reference. 
Through this method, three out of the first five dead persons 
fingerprinted and photographed were identified. 

The single fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crimes. Hereto- 
fore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might be, 
taken at the scene of a crime, were only valuable for comparison 
with the ten fingerprints of the subject, whether the suspect's 
prints were then in our files or taken later. There was no 
method of fifing latent prints taken at the scene of crime up to. 
comparatively recent origination of the single fingerprint system 
of fifing by Chief Inspector Battley of the Fingerprint Division 
of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley System of single 
fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of Records, and does 
not weaken in any way the standard system of filing finger- 
prints, but it is a very valuable addition thereto. 

The fingerprint system has practically efiminated the Ber- 
tillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 
the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

for this and other departments through the fingerprint files 
of this division. The identification of persons wanted for 
murder or robbery while armed was among the most important 
made. 

The fingerprint file containing the fingerprints of persons 
licensed by the Police Commissioner has been expanded, so 
that, at the present time, it contains the fingerprints of 6,629 
taxi drivers, 206 sight-seeing car operators, and 2,415 special 
officers. The fingerprints of the entire personnel of the De- 
partment will also be placed in this file. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of the more important accom- 
plishments of the criminal identification unit of the Bureau 
of Records. 

The table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of prints or copies prepared. 

Identifications of criminals arrested locally 1,498 

Identifications of criminals arrested elsewhere .... 556 

Scenes of crimes photographed 2,879 

Circulars sent out by identification unit 38,000 

Photograph File 

Number on file November 30, 1933 142,075 

Made and filed during the year 2,918 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 1,692 

Number on file November 30, 1934 . . . . . . 146,685 

Finger-print File 

Number on file November 30, 1933 98,609 

Taken and filed during the year 3,605 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 2,562 

Number on file November 30, 1934 104,776 

Photographs sent to 

State Bureau of Identification 3,566 

Other cities and states 1,537 

Fingerprints sent to 

Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Justice, 3,605 

State Bureau of Identification 3,605 

Other cities and states 1,494 

Supplementary. 

Number of scenes of crime visited 2,400 

Number of scenes of crime photographed, small camera . . 2,879 

Number of exposures, small camera 8,100 

Number of prints, small camera 10,000 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

Number of enlargements 

16 by 20 inches 800 

11 by 14 inches 5,000 

8 by 10 inches 2,000 

Miscellaneous Department Photography 

Films 11,160 

Prints made from same 5,000 

Number of rectigraph photographs 35,260 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 1 

Number of civilian employees photographed .... 8 

Number of negatives of criminals 2,918 

Number of prints made from same 23,344 

Number of fingerprint investigations (latent) .... 1,870 

Number of fingerprint investigations, positive . . . 1,216 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed . 3,045 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals 

Police officers 1 

Special police oflficers 320 

Taxi drivers 730 

Civilians 8 

The Conley Flak System of fingerprint classification and 
filing which had been in operation in the Boston Police Depart- 
ment since the installation of fingerprints in 1908, was entirely 
displaced and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended 
System of Fingerprint Classification and Filing, as used in the 
Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. In order to effect 
this change, some 150,000 fingerprints were carefully checked 
by operatives, the formula on each was revised, and a new type 
of fifing card made out for each set of fingerprints, together 
with the complete criminal record of each subject typed thereon, 
showing the dealings of the individual with the various law 
enforcement agencies throughout the country. In such 
cases where a criminal subject uses one or more aliases, cross 
reference cards were made and filed in addition to the "main 
card." 

In order to make sure that every record of each subject will 
be as complete and accurate as possible, this Bureau is under- 
taking to forward daily to the United States Department of 
Justice at Washington, D. C, a large quantity of fingerprints 
which the Department of Justice operatives will compare 
with their fingerprints and forward complete criminal records 
of each person whose fingerprints are sent. 

Such records received from the Department of Justice will 
be compared with the records already typed on the fingerprint 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

cards and any additional information furnished by the Depart- 
ment of Justice will be added to the cards now on file in this 
Bureau, thus bringing our records up to date in every particular. 

In effecting the transformation of systems from the Conley 
Flak to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons who are either 
now dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely at an 
end, were removed from the active file and placed in a separate 
file for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates were taken 
from the files and placed in other inactive files . A final exami- 
nation has recently been concluded to insure correct filing of 
every fingerprint card. At this writing, it can be truthfully 
said that the fingerprint system of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment, including method of fifing, quality and amount of finger- 
print equipment and skilled operatives, is comparable to the 
practically infallible files of the Department of Justice at 
Washington, D. C, after which this department's new system 
was designed. 

Missing Persons. 

The missing persons file is a part of the Bureau of Records. 
The attached table shows the number of persons lost or runaway 
during the year 1934 in Boston, Mass.: 

Total number reported 1,666 

Total number foimd 1,543 

Total number still missing 123 

I am submitting herewith also a table of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston, total number 
reported 2,742. By careful checking with recording agencies, 
the record of the number found is 2,321 and the total number 
still missing is 421. Of the 2,321 reported found, the Missing 
Persons' Unit was active in assisting to locate them. The 
Missing Persons' Unit handled approximately 1,899 pieces of 
correspondence other than cases appearing in the tables. It 
sent out 3,700 photostatic descriptive circulars of missing 
persons, and succeeded in establishing the identity of five 
persons suffering from amnesia. 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



27 



Persons Lost or Runaway in Boston. 
Age and Sex of Such Persons. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Table No. 1. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 


469 

298 
331 


122 

275 
171 


462 

275 
303 


119 

226 
158 


7 

23 

28 


3 

49 
13 


Totals 


1,098 


568 


1,040 


503 


58 


65 



The following table shoVs the number of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston, Mass.: 



Total number reported 
Total number found 



2,742 
2,321 



Total number still missing 421 

Of the latter table this Department has kept a complete 
record of 2,742 persons reported missing. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Table No. 2. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


559 


144 


518 


142 


41 


2 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 


801 


416 


657 


336 


144 


80 


Over 21 years. 


646 


176 


517 


151 


129 


25 


Totals . 


2,006 


736 


1,692 


629 


314 


107 



Nine hundred and twenty-three lost children were restored to 
their parents by officers attached to the various stations in 
Boston during the year 1934. The record does not appear in 
Table No. 1, because they were found within a few hours after 
they were lost. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer, attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from the poHce journals on file at Head- 
quarters reports services performed as follows: 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

poHce journals in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 14,486 
Days in court 8 

Warrant File. 

The warrant file for the entire Police Department is now kept 
in the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued or 
received by the Department is sent out each day on the mani- 
fold, and every officer in the Department receives a copy of 
this list. Twenty-four hours after the issuance of the warrant, 
if an arrest has not been made, a card provided for the station 
houses is forwarded to the Bureau of Records with all the data 
pertaining to the warrant and the case. These cards are 
alphabetically filed, so that almost instantaneously it can be 
ascertained whether a warrant exists in the Department for any 
person that may be named. On service of the warrant, another 
card goes forward to the Bureau of Records with the necessary 
information of service. 

All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant file of the Bureau of Records. All cor- 
respondence pertaining to the movement of warrants outside 
the city proper is carried on in the Bureau of Records. Com- 
manding Officers of stations are required, under the rules and 
regulations, to notify the warrant unit of an arrest on warrants 
issued to the Boston Police Department and all other police 
departments, also when arrests are made without a warrant 
involving serious crimes. This rule applies to this procedure 
every hour of the day and night. The warrant files are imme- 
diately searched and if it appears that there is a warrant for the 
arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the officer in command 
of the arresting division shall be immediately notified and given 
full particulars and the police division in Boston or outside 
jurisdiction is immediately notified that the person is under 
arrest. 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also where 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

identifications have been made through latent prints. The 
photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally before 
the courts of this city, but on occasions, where connections 
are made with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photog- 
rapher who enlarges the prints for the purpose of charting 
them for presentation as evidence in court is also summoned 
into court to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. 
There have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of 
police of outside cities and towns have asked for the services of 
fingerprint and photography experts in consequence of crime 
committed in their jurisdiction, and the Department co- 
operated by sending a fingerprint man, properly equipped, to 
survey the scene of crime and reproduce any prints that may 
be available. One outstanding instance of the current year 
was the dispatching of a corps of photographers and finger- 
print men to the scene of the famous Needham Bank murders 
in which the defendants were later apprehended and prosecuted. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are fur- 
nished by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of 
convictions for presentation in courts, both here and in other 
cities. 

A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the service 
of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who drafts the 
scenes of crime for presentation as evidence in court to aid the 
prosecution in showing the jury the exact location, and sur- 
roundings at the scene. 

Police School. 
The third term of the police school was opened November 20, 
1933. The operation of this school was placed under the 
control of the Superintendent of Police and the administrative 
board consisting of three Deputy Superintendents and five 
Captains. All patrolmen, with the exception of those who 
had reached the age of sixty years or were excused by the 
administrative board for sufficient reason, were compelled to 
attend sessions of the school on time other than that required 
for the performance of regular police duties. Four sessions 
of the school were held, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Thursday of each week; two day sessions for officers on 
night duty; two evening sessions for officers on day duty. All 
officers attending each week's lecture were given a copy thereof 
with instructions for study in preparation for a final examina- 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

tion to be given at the close of the school term. In addition 
to the regular classes of instruction, all officers attending the 
police school during February and March were given instruc- 
tions in the handling and use of the shotgun at the close of 
the regular school lecture. During this term of the school 
approximately 1,847 officers attended the lectures, an average 
.of ninety officers being reported absent weekly on account 
of sickness, court attendance, and other necessary causes. 
Instruction was given in sixteen different subjects, such as 
discipline and deportment in the poUce department, court 
procedure and evidence, homicides, arrests and processes, 
alcohohc beverage law, traffic, juvenile supervision in crime 
prevention, and forensic ballistics. 

Instruction was also given to sergeants on January 12 and 
13, on the "Duties of Sergeants," a total of 163 sergeants 
attending this lecture. 

During this school term, all instructors were selected from 
officers of rank in the Department by the Administrative Board 
who, so far as possible, chose the junior and most efficient 
ranking officers for this duty, and these instructors, assisted 
by a Captain of Police, prepared their own lectures and were 
excused from other pofice duties while instructing the classes. 

The lecture delivered on forensic balUstics was very compre- 
hensive and instructive to officers, and has proven of great 
value. 

All officers are identified on their examination papers by 
number instead of name. 

The fourth term of the school was opened on November 19, 
1934, and will embrace additional subjects, as well as those 
taught last year. Prominent among the additional subjects 
to be taught is general instruction in radio. 

Traffic. 
The Bureau of Traffic at Police Headquarters, acting under 
the direction of the Superintendent, is the responsible agency 
for the uniform handling of traffic. As a result of this responsi- 
bihty, the Bureau of Traffic, with its well-trained inspection 
force, has taken up with the commanding officers of the various 
divisions all problems pertaining to traffic, and especially 
having to do with the regulation and free flow of traffic in the 
vicinity of such places as the North Station, Boston Garden, 
Mechanics Building, Boston Arena, Symphony Hall, Boston 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

Opera House, Harvard Stadium, Braves Field, Fenway Park, 
South Station, the theatrical section, and steamboat wharves, 
together with the making of necessary arrangements for the 
movement of traffic at all large gatherings for observing the 
road races that were held throughout the year in the various 
parts of the city, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery parade, 
the parade of the Boston School Cadets, the Memorial Day 
exercises at the various burial grounds, the American Legion 
parade on Armistice Day, the largely attended funerals, as well 
as the operation of every-day traffic conditions that prevailed 
throughout the year, and the handling of all these various 
functions by the Bureau of Traffic under the direction of the 
Superintendent has met with great success. 

It is the duty of the Bureau of Traffic to make an inspection, 
study and report in all matters of complaint in regard to traffic, 
and to make corrections and remedy any deficiencies that 
may be discovered. 

One of the duties successfully accomphshed during the 
past year was the handling of approximately 900,000 persons 
who attended baseball and football games at Braves Field, 
Fenway Park and Harvard Stadium, political events, a number 
of large funerals, and also the handling of about 30,000 children 
who were in attendance at an open-air mass held on the grounds 
of Boston College at Cardinal O'Connell's Jubilee in celebra- 
tion of the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination to the 
priesthood. 

This Bureau co-operates and works in conjunction with 
the Boston Traffic Commission, particularly in cases of emer- 
gency in regard to the detouring of traffic, and the placing of 
signs for various purposes throughout the city for the regula- 
tion of traffic. 

During the past year the inspecting officers of the Bureau 
have visited all of the station houses and dehvered instructive 
talks to all police officers in the department in order that they 
may increase their knowledge with respect to the duties re- 
quired of a traffic officer. This procedure of instructing officers 
as to the duties required in the proper handling of traffic will 
be continued during the forthcoming year. 

During the past year there has been created in the Bureau 
of Traffic an information bureau where an officer is always 
available to answer inquiries of strangers and tourists in this 
city. 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The records of the tagging office of the Bureau of Traffic 
show that in the enforcement of traffic regulations during 
the period of time from December 1, 1933, up to October 1, 1934, 
69,591 tags were placed upon motor vehicles for various viola- 
tions; of this number 37,152 tags were turned in by the operators 
of automobiles concerned, and 32,439 tags were not turned in. 
Of the number of tags placed on automobiles, 7,510 were 
presented to the various courts for prosecution, as compared 
with 6,581 tags presented to the various courts for prosecu- 
tion during the entire year of 1933, up to December 1, which 
is a substantial increase in percentage over the previous year. 
A decision from the Supreme Court upholding Section 31, 
Article 5 of the Traffic Rules and Regulations was rendered 
on March 27, 1934, which enabled the Police Department to 
prosecute owners of cars if the operators failed to turn in the 
tags. 

This section reads as follows: 

"No person shall allow, permit or suffer any vehicle 
registered in his name to stand or park in any street, way, 
highway, road or parkway under the control of the city 
in violation of any of the rules and regulations of the 
Traffic Commission of the City of Boston." 

Of the 32,439 tags issued and not turned in by the owners of 
cars that were tagged, a notice was sent by the Bureau of 
Traffic to each one, either by the service of a police officer or by 
registered mail, notifying such owners that their cars had been 
tagged and requesting them to appear at this bureau within a 
certain period. 

Several thousand tags which were to be presented to the 
courts for prosecution both on the date of the Supreme Court 
decision and on October 1, 1934, were nullified by the Police 
Commissioner, the latter date being the time when the new 
non-criminal parking law, as enacted by the legislature, became 
effective. 

Hackney Carriages and Stands. 

For the four years operating under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the new rules and regulations relative to hackney car- 
riages and stands established on February 1, 1931, by the 
Police Commissioner have worked out very well. 

At the present there are 146 locations for special stands, with 
a capacity of 467 carriages, as compared with 155 locations 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

with a capacity of 485 carriages during the previous year, and 
288 locations for public stands with a capacity of 722 cabs, as 
compared with 292 locations with a capacity of 730 cabs during 
the preceding year. The total number of licensed hackney 
carriages at present is 1,525 as compared with 1,697 in the 
previous year, this number being limited in accordance with 
Chapter 280, Acts of 1934. During the year there were 
approximately 13 taxi stands, both special and public, that 
were established, removed or relocated in the interest of public 
necessity and convenience. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year 
1,032 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Five hundred twenty-three suspensions ranging from one to 
thirty days, according to the seriousness of the offense, and 
thirteen revocations were made, the remainder being repri- 
manded and warned and a record filed for future reference. 
This system of discipline has continued to result in relieving 
the courts of many minor cases which would tend to congest 
their dockets. Any driver, in accordance with the hackney 
rules, who is dissatisfied with the findings of the Bureau of 
Traffic may appeal to the Commissioner, and during the past 
year no such appeals have been made. There still continues 
to be a minimum of crime among the 3,242 drivers who have 
been licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

During the past year the Supervisory Force of the Bureau of 
Traffic has been very busy in the Blue Hill avenue section of 
Boston, suppressing the activities of taxicab operators who 
engage in the illegal practice of bringing the so-called "loads" 
to the intown section of the city and many prosecutions have 
been made in the municipal courts of Dorchester and Roxbury, 
as well as in the Central Municipal Court, under Section 1, 
Chapter 408, Acts of 1931, which reads as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any public way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for hire 
in such a. manner as to afford a means of transportation 
similar to that afforded by a railway company, by indis- 
criminately receiving and discharging passengers along 
the route on which the vehicle is operated or may be 
running .... " 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum and this procedure will be followed unceasingly 
until such illegal practices have ceased. 

Plant and Equipment. 
The office of the Property Clerk is divided into the following 
branches: 

General Office. 

Stock Rooms. 

Lost and Found. 

Liquor. 

Automobile Maintenance. 

Motorcycle Maintenance. 

Ballistics. 

Handwriting and Document Analyses. 

The Property Clerk is responsible for the care and custody 
of all seized liquor and implements coming into the possession 
of the Department. Careful consideration has been given to 
the care of the firearms of the Department and all are in 
excellent condition. The ballistics unit of the office of the 
Property Clerk has been greatly expanded during the past 
year, being furnished with additional scientific equipment 
and the installation of a filing system, with all the appurte- 
nances, which has greatly improved the work and the efficiency 
of this unit. Under the direction of the Armorer, inspections 
are made weekly of the twelve-gauge, Model 97, riot guns 
that are assigned to radio patrol cars in all divisions, as well 
as periodic inspections of gas masks, canisters and other pro- 
tective equipment for the purpose of having all such equip- 
ment in proper condition. 

During the past year an officer assigned to the office of the 
Property Clerk has been designated to become qualified and 
experienced so that all specimens of handwriting and docu- 
mentary analyses that are brought to the attention of the 
Police Department for investigation may be handled and 
examined by him. 

The firearms of the Department have been inspected and kept 
in repair at a great saving to the City of Boston by officers who 
are properly qualified and experienced in this work. Ninety 
riot guns have been added to the equipment of the Department. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. . 35 

The uniforms of the members of the force have been cleansed 
and repaired during the year and replacements have been made 
where necessary. 

Supplies have been furnished on requisition to the entire 
Department. 

There are now twenty saddle horses in the Department. 
Some replacements of saddle equipment have been made dur- 
ing the past year. 

The Department has traded thirty-two automobiles during 
the year and has purchased seventeen additional automobiles 
and there are now one hundred and ninety-one motor vehicles 
in the Department, divided into the following types: 
5 Utility wagons. 
25 Combination auto ambulances. 
115 Automobiles. 

9 Trucks. 
37 Motorcycles. 

The Lost and Found branch of the Department has been 
active during the past year as shown by the following schedule : 

Articles on hand December 1, 1933 2,356 

Articles received during the year to November 30 . 1 ,752 

Total 4,108 

Disposed of: 

To owners, through efforts of the Property Clerk's 

office 317 

To owners, in response to advertising ... 3 

Delivered on orders from divisions .... 203 

Worthless or junk 541 

Sold at public auction 462 

Perishable articles destroyed, unfit for use or 

decayed 6 

Number of packages, containing money, paid to the 

Chief Clerk " . . . 43 

Total number of articles disposed of 1 ,575 

Articles on hand December 1, 1933, and received during the 

year to November 30 4,108 

Total number of articles disposed of . . . . . 1,575 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1934 . 2,533 

The method of obtaining written proposals on bids for the 
larger quantities of supplies and materials used by the Depart- 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

ment, as well as for repairs to Department property, labor 
and materials, which was put into general operation in 1931, 
has been continued. Competitive bidding has proven most 
satisfactory, and has resulted in a substantial saving of money 
for the City of Boston. 

The Maintenance Shop, located in the basement of Station 4, 
at Berkeley street and Warren avenue, has been expanded by 
the addition of automotive equipment for the servicing of cars, 
and by the increase of personnel, which has proven of great 
advantage in the servicing of all Department automobiles, and 
in the enlarged repair service that is now furnished. 

The servicing of all radios installed in Department cars 
is done at the Maintenance Shop and this service is available 
twenty-four hours daily, whenever necessary. 

The boat equipment of the Boston Police Department for 
patrolling Boston Harbor and for the protection of the various 
islands in the Harbor is obsolete. The financial condition of 
the city is the only reason that money has not been expended 
in the purchase of proper boat equipment necessary to ade- 
quately police Boston Harbor. 

The police boat "Watchman" is very old, is propelled by 
steam, and ought to be replaced. It has had general repairs 
during the past year, and is greatly in need of more extensive 
repairs, the estimated cost of which would be large. 

The launch "E. U. Curtis" was built in 1923, is propelled by 
gasoline, and is unsuitable for use for harbor service, as well as 
unsafe in rough weather. 

The launch "Argus" was built in 1917, and it is now in need 
of extensive repairs. This boat should also be replaced. 

On November 30, 1934, the Pohce Department vacated Con- 
stitution Wharf, which was used as a pier for docking police 
boats, thereby saving an annual rental of $1,200. As a result 
of the co-operation of his Honor the Mayor, the North Ferry 
shp and shanty, north side, were transferred to the Police 
Department in order to be utilized as a pier for our boats, and 
for the storage of boat and other equipment. 

On May 25, 1934, the Police Department vacated what was 
known as the traffic sign shop, located at Station 16, thereby 
saving an annual rental of $150. The work that was formerly 
handled in the sign shop is now being done in Department 
buildings. 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



37 



Arrests. 
For the twelve months ending November 30, 1934, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1933, a 
brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1933. 



Arrests. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1934. 



Arrests. 



Offenses Against the Person. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offenses Against the Liquor Law. 
Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 
Drunkenness 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

-Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (first 
offence) 

Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (second 
offence) 

Totals 



33 


24 


92 


107 


88 


87 


395 


325 


242 


165 



712 



716 



332 


252 


2,178 


2,166 


1,241 


397 


36,941 


43,825 


544 


654 


21 


18 



42,819 



48,736 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violation of city 
ordinances, gaming, and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 
the year totalled 83,156, of which 77,475 were males and 5,681 
were females. This total compares with 81,418 for the 
preceding year. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In connection with arrests recorded it is interesting to note 
that 19,795 persons or 23.80 per cent of the total arrests during 
the past year were persons residing outside of the city Umits of 
Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called on to perform police work for nonresidents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, 
either of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 
23.80 per cent of the arrests in Boston is of nonresidents, 
whereas other cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests 
of nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department, during the past year, has continued its 
co-operation in furnishing returns to the National Division 
of Identification and Information of the Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, of the following serious offenses: 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny : 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1934, receipts 
totalled $76,750.45, as compared to $83,276.98 in the previous 
year, and this decrease of $6,526.53 in receipts is due to the 
fact that less has been received for miscellaneous items. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1934, the 

total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 

$5,063,231.14. This included the pay of the police and 

employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($63,451.01 — 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

the annual listing on April 1 of all persons twenty years of 
age or over) and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 
In the corresponding period for 1933, expenditures totalled 
$5,378,083.73. The decrease of $314,852.59 was due in a sub- 
stantial part to the fact that vacancies in the grade of patrol- 
men were not filled in 1934, and salary reductions of 1933 were 
continued. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 



The Commissioner desires at this time to express his grateful 
appreciation for the co-operation and support given to him 
by all members of the Department. 



The activities of the Department are reported on in greater 
detail in the following section of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. HULTMAN, 

Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner. 1 

Secretary. Legal Adviser. 2 

Chief Clerk. 1 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-Inspectors 



1 

3 

17 

58 
11 



Sergeants 
Patrolmen 

Total 



172 
1,914 

2,176 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Chauffeur . 
Laborer 
Linemen 



Signal Service. 

Painter 
Signalmen . 
Telephone Operators 



Total 



1 
4 
3 

19 



Employees of the Department. 



Armorer 

Chauffeurs 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks . 

Elevator Operators 

Engineers, Marine 

Firemen, Marine 

Firemen, Stationary 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Matrons 



1 
2 
1 

11 
1 

31 
5 
2 
8 
5 

10 

30 

4 

. 7 



Mechanics .... 3 

Repairmen .... 3 

Signalmen .... 3 

Steamfitter .... 

Stenographers . 

Superintendent of Build- 
ings ..... 

Supervisor of Automotive 
Equipment 

Supervisor of Photog- 
raphy .... 

Tailor 

Total .... 143 



Recapitulation. 



Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Legal Adviser and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service . . . . - 
Employees 

Grand Total .... 



1 
3 

2,176 

19 

143 

2,342 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



41 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the Pohce Force is shown by Table I, 
During the year 1 patrolman, retired, was reinstated; 17 
patrolmen were discharged; 1 lieutenant resigned while charges 
were pending; 6 patrolmen resigned (4 while charges were 
pending); 1 patrolman was given a new civiUan designation; 
7 sergeants and 6 patrolmen were retired on pensions; 1 
lieutenant-inspector, 1 sergeant and 13 patrolmen died. (See 
Tables III, IV.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost by 
them and the number of duties lost by police officers during the 
past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1933. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1934. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1. 1933. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


102 
14 

94 

74 


784 
. 2S0 

2,037 
674 


126 
600 

1,102 
1,053 


Totals . 


284 


3,775 


2,881 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 

a separate person, was 83,156, as against 81,418 the preceding 

year, being an increase of 1,738. The percentage of decrease 

and increase was as follows: 



Offenses against the person 

Offenses against property committed with violence 
Offenses against property committed without violence 
Malicious offenses against property 
Forgery and offenses against the currency 
Offenses against the license laws 
Offenses against chastitj'^, morality, etc. 
Offenses not included in the foregoing . 



Per Cent. 

Decrease 0.88 
Increase 
Decrease 
Increase 

Decrease 20.00 

Decrease 48.72 

Increase 11.97 

Decrease 12.08 



2.38 

1.95 

10.67 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were 12,797 persons arrested on warrants and 54,195 
without warrants; 16,164 persons were summoned by the court; 
49,246 persons were prosecuted; 32,515 were released by- 
probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 1,395 
were deUvered to outside authorities. The number of males 
arrested was 77,475; of females, 5,681; of foreigners, 15,587, 
or approximately 18.74 per cent; of minors, 8,685. Of the 
total number arrested 19,795, or 23.80 per cent, were non- 
residents. (See Tables IX, X.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1930 to 1934, inclusive, was $260,344.02; in 
1934 it was $171,079, or $89,265.02 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
47,424; in 1934 it was 46,468, or 956 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $14,243.64; 
in 1934 it was $10,758.93, or $3,484.71 less than the average. 
(See Table XII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 120, 
There were 6,884 more persons arrested than in 1933, an increase 
of 18.63 per cent; 14.66 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 25.35 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table X.) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 83,156, 
being an increase of 1,738 from last year, and 3,303 less than 
the average for the past five years. There were 43,825 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 6,884 more than last year and 
8,805 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 
17.53 per cent in males and an increase of 43.89 per cent in 
females from last year. (See Tables X, XII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (83,156), 297 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say, that one arrest 
in 280 was for such offense or .35 per cent. 

Fifty-six and seventy-nine hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty-one and 
forty. (See Table XL) 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



4S 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 






67,569 


Turkey 


42 


Ireland 






5,314 


South America . 


32 


British Provinces 






2,765 


Australia . 


7 


Italy . 






1,812 


HoUand . 


30 


Russia 








1,274 


Belgium 


17 


Poland 








652 


Switzerland 


5 


Sweden 








528 


Mexico 


10 


China . 








49 


Africa .... 


9 


England 








327 


East Indies . 


2 


Scotland 








307 


Hungary 


14 


Greece 








271 


Japan .... 


5 


Lithuania 








1,031 


Roumania . 


9 


Portugal 








180 


Asia .... 


2 


Norway 








164 


Philippine Islands 


12 


Germany 








180 


Porto Rico . 


8 


Finland 








81 


Cuba .... 


r 


Syria . 








69 


Serbia .... 


2 


Armenia 








83 


India .... 


2 


Austria 








93 


Albania 


22 


Spain . 








31 


Wales .... 


1 


TTranf*!:* 








36 
44 






JL" 1 dllC'C 

West Indies 






Total . 


. 83,156 


Denmark 








58 







The number of persons punished by fine was 13,751, and the 
fines amounted to $171,079. (See Table XII.) 

Two hundred eight persons were committed to the State 
Prison, 2,848 to the House of Correction, 11 to the Women's 
Prison, 232 to the Reformatory Prison, 2,394 to other institu- 
tions, and 2 to the Bridge water State Criminal Asylum. 

The total years of imprisonment were 2 life, 2,713 years 
(1,095 sentences were indefinite); the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 46,468, and the witness 
fees earned by them amounted to $10,758.93. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$102,245.76. 

Three hundred thirteen witnesses were detained at station 
houses; 67 were accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 
95 from last year. 

There was an increase of 27.91 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted and a decrease of about .19 per 
cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen in the city for the 
five years from 1930 to 1934, inclusive, was $1,160,106.25; 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

in 1934 it was S575,298.22, or $584,808.03 less than the average. 
The amount of property stolen which was recovered by the 
Boston Police was S379,204.41, as against $327,013.25 last 
year. (See Table XII.) 

Detective Bureau. 

This Bureau, which is a central detective agency of the De- 
partment, consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a 
large scale and in an efficient manner. 

In addition to its division for the investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen and a division for lost and stolen property, 
squads, to cover the following phases of police work and investi- 
gation, operate day and night from the Bureau: automobile, 
arson, banking, express thieves, general investigation, hotels, 
lost and found property, pawnbrokers and general investiga- 
tion, safe and loft, narcotic, shopping, pickpocket, radical and 
night-time. 

Not only is the work of this Bureau confined to the juris- 
diction of the City of Boston, but it also handles the work of 
all fugitives from justice, matters of investigation from the 
various police departments in the United States, also from 
foreign countries, and, further, co-operates in every way 
possible with all outside police departments. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made 
in co-operation with the Department of Justice, Post Office 
Department and Immigration authorities of the United States. 

The automobile division index contains records of 600,000 
automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen 
in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, cars for 
which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons and 
cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. This 
index is constantly increasing. Many arrests are made by 
officers of the Department and the automobile division through 
information obtained from this index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their hcenses. 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



45 



Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this division during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the First, Second 
and Third Classes. 

During the year 214 applications for such licenses were re- 
ceived; of these 206 were granted (3 without fee), 3 were rejected, 
4 filed without action and 1 was canceled for nonpayment. 

Of the licenses granted, 9 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 10 were transferred to new locations. (See 
Table XIIL) 

Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1934. 



Month 




Reported 

Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1933. 












December . 




519 


486 


24 


9 


1934 












January . 








421 


403 


15 


3 


February . 








239 


228 


7 


4 


March 








326 


310 


10 


6 


April . 








390 


374 


14 


2 


May . 








362 


350 


10 


2 


June . 








332 


320 


10 


2 


July . 








320 


308 


9 


3 


August 








252 


233 


10 


9 


September 








420 


403 


8 


9 


October 








437 


411 


9 


17 


November 








453 


432 


3 


18 


Totals 








4,471 


4,258 


129 


84 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to 
this Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1934- 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1933. 








December 


2,997 


1,785 


674 


1934. 








January .... 


3,232 


1,960 


966 


February 






2,820 


1,654 


488 


March . 






4,131 


2,655 


1,092 


April 






4,459 


2,839 


1,705 


May 






5,684 


3,854 


1,573 


June 






4,490 


2,707 


1,288 


July . 






4,268 


2,575 


1,071 


August . 






3,906 


2,534 


925 


September 






3,735 


2,177 


852 


October . 






4,255 


2,509 


939 


November 






4,001 


2,479 


694 


Totals 






47,978 


29,728 


12,267 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost 
or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased 
by dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 



1935.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 



General. 

The number of cases reported at this Bureau which were 
investigated during the year is 6,181. There are 61,140 cases 
reported on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and 
reports made on these cases are filed away for future reference. 
Complaints are received from many sources, including cases 
referred to the Bureau by justices of courts and the district 
attorney, in addition to cases reported direct to the Pohce 
Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Detective Bureau are 
included in the statements of the general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties of this Bureau are of a special character, 
the following statement may be of interest. 

Number of persons arrested 2,076 

Fugitives from justice from other States arrested and 

delivered to officers from these States .... 68 

Number of cases investigated 6,181 

Number of extra duties performed 8,818 

Number of cases of abortion 1 

Number of days spent in court by poHce officers . . 1,911 
Number of years imprisonment, 435 years, 10 months, 

20 days and 16 indefinite terms. 
Amount of property recovered $121,191.35 

Supervisor of Cases Unit. 
This Unit is the central agency of the Department for the 
supervision, preparation and presentation of all criminal cases 
brought by members of the force in the criminal courts within 
our jurisdiction; the interrogation of all prisoners and witnesses 
in cases of homicides or other serious felonies, and the super- 
vision of the daily line-up of all prisoners arrested for serious 
offenses. The officers attached to this Unit work under the 
direction of the Supervisor of Cases and are assigned to duty 
in the several courts, and at the office of the District Attorney 
of Suffolk County. There is a special squad of experienced 
officers for homicide work. The Unit since its inception has 
been of great value not only to the members of the Department 
but also to the District Attorney and the various courts. The 
bench has praised the efficiency of this Unit in presenting cases 
to the Court, commending the dispatch and orderly manner in 
which the evidence is presented. 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following is a brief outline of the activities of this Unit. 

Line-U'p. 

The line-up for the entire Police Department, of prisoners 
arrested for serious offenses, is held in Room 403, in Police 
Headquarters, at 8 a. m. on every week day. 

On January 29, 1934, the supervision of the line-up was 
transferred from the Detective Bureau to the Supervisor of 
Cases and is now conducted under the personal direction of the 
Captain of this Unit. When a line-up is to be held, all divi- 
sions in the Department are notified to bring forward witnesses, 
and the various Police Departments of Metropolitan Boston 
are notified by teletype. Each morning prior to the appearance 
of the prisoners held for the line-up the officer supervising same 
is furnished with a line-up sheet giving the prisoner's history 
and details of his offense, and in addition, his criminal record, 
should he have one, is provided by the Bureau of Records. 
When prisoners or witnesses are being interrogated at the 
line-up, a competent police stenographer is present to take 
down verbatim all questions and answers. A daily transcript 
of the stenographer's notes is made and filed in this office for 
future reference. There have been numerous identifications 
of prisoners in the line-up during the past year which assisted 
greatly in the prosecution of criminals. 

Since January 29, 1934, there have been 1,638 prisoners 
appearing in the line-up, and of this number 709 have been 
found to have previous criminal records. 

Homicide Squad. 
On January 29, 1934, the homicide officers were transferred 
from the Detective Bureau to the Supervisor of Cases Unit. 
It is their duty to interrogate all persons involved or having 
knowledge of the commission of crimes of murder, man- 
slaughter, abortion or other crimes of violence. The officers 
assigned to homicide work, with police stenographers, are 
subject to call at any hour of the day or night, and have been 
very successful in obtaining confessions and valuable state- 
ments. They are also required to prepare cases when inquests 
are necessary. The homicide files contain complete reports of 
all deaths by violence in Boston, inquests and also a record of 
all serious accidents which are reported to the Police Depart- 
ment. 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



The following is a brief summary of the cases handled by 
Homicide officers: 



Abortions 


2 


Homicides 


39 


Alcoholism 


116 


Horse and wagon . 


5 


Asphyxiation . 


11 


Machinery 


3 


Automobiles . 


144 


Natural causes 


315 


Baseball (struck by) 


1 


Poison .... 


7 


Burns .... 


10 


Railway, street 


11 


Coasting .... 


1 


Railroad, steam 


11 


Drowning 


39 


Railroad truck 


1 


Elevated 


2 


Shooting, accidental 


1 


Explosion 


1 


Stillborn .... 


11 


Exposure 


2 


Suicides .... 


87 


Falls .... 


59 






Falling objects 


. . 2 


Totals . 


881 



Of the total number, the following cases were prosecuted in 
the courts: 



Abortion .... 

Assault and battery 
Assault and battery to 

murder .... 
Assault and battery with 

dangerous weapon 
Assault and battery to rob . 
Robbery (armed) . 



2 Manslaughter 



14 

17 

25 
2 
5 



Manslaughter (automobile), 
Manslaughter, accessory 

(automobile) 

Murder 

Railway 

Total .... 



14 

112 

1 

14 

5 



211 



The following inquests were held during the year: 



Automobiles 

Drowning 

Elevators 

Explosion 

Falls 

Homicides 

Machinery 



12 
1 
1 
1 
4 
5 
2 



Natural causes 
Railroad (street) 
Railroad (steam) 
Suicide . 



Total 



1 

6 
7 
1 

41 



One hundred and thirty-five cases of violent deaths were 
investigated on which no inquests were held by a court of 
justice, acting under authority of chapter 118 of the Acts of 
1932. 

Court Supervision. 

A supervising officer under the direction of the Supervisor 
of Cases, is assigned to each municipal or district court in 
Boston, for the supervision and prosecution of criminal cases. 
They receive from the complaining officers having criminal 
cases before the courts a report giving a concise statement of 
facts, evidence obtained, names of witnesses, name and descrip- 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



tion of defendant. The supervising officer then assists in 
preparing and presenting the case before the court. At the 
end of each day, the supervising officer submits a report, on a 
form provided for this purpose, giving a complete history of 
the case, with the findings and disposition by the court. When 
an appeal is taken in a lower court for trial in the Superior 
Court, the folder containing the history of the case is for- 
warded to the supervising officer in the District Attorney's 
office for the information of the District Attorney and his 
assistants. 

A filing system installed in this office contains a card index 
of all major cases supervised, a record of each case under its 
proper classification and a folder which contains the original 
reports of every officer on each case. Each month a report 
is compiled showing the number of cases supervised, name of 
the court, name of the presiding justice, classification of the 
offense and disposition of same. 

The following is the number of cases supervised during the 
months named therein: 



Month. 



Personal 
Supervision. 



General 
Supervision. 



1933. 

December . 

1934. 

January- 
February 
March 
April . 
May . 
June 
July . 
August 
September . 
October 
November . 

Totals . 



777 



942 



860 


1,070 


632 


865 


846 


1,023 


1,077 


1,070 


993 


1,031 


811 


1,293 


832 


1,093 


855 


1,112 


715 


1,021 


751 


1,115 


788 


927 



9,937 



12,562 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



51 



Special Events. 
The following is a list of the special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at each : 



1933. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


4. 


Dec. 


5. 


Dec. 


6. 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


22. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


27. 



Dec. 31. 



Dec. 


31. 


Dec. 


31. 


1934. 


Jan. 


1. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


16. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


5. 


Feb. 


5. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


25. 



Feb. 26. 

Mar. 7. 
Mar. 7. 
Mar. 16. 
Mar. 17. 
Mar. 21. 
Mar. 23. 
Mar. 29. 



Funeral of Patrolman Thomas H. Soutter 

Norwood, Mass., for Tannery strike duty 

Norwood, Mass., for Tannery strike duty 

Norwood, Mass., for Tannery strike duty 

Mystic Docks, Charlestown, labor trouble 

Mystic Docks, Charlestown, labor trouble 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Christmas Eve, West End, traffic duty 

Christmas Eve, Boston Common . 

Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 

Faneuil Hall, Meeting of State Recovery Board 

N. R. A 



New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common . 

New Year's Eve, celebration on Division Four . 



Men. 

35 

11 
11 
11 

38 
15 
10 
10 
10 
30 
10 

10 

14 

10 

8 

22 

Men. 

Symphony Hall, Inauguration Exercises for Mayor- 
elect Frederick W. Mansfield 75 

Various meetings on Divisions 4, 16 and 19 . . 95 
Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Asso- 
ciation 252 

Visit of General Joseph Haller of Poland ... 20 

Special Delegate Election 1,935 

First Methodist Church, West End, Hitler meeting . 20 

Hotel Statler, President Roosevelt's Birthday party . 35 
Meeting of workers demanding employment, at State 

House 50 

Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's Ball ... 35 

Faneuil Hall, Abraham Lincoln Exercises ... 10 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas Donahue, retired . 15 
St. James Church, church details for Reverend Philip 

J. O'Donnell, Pastor of St. James CathoUc Church, 25 
Funeral details for Reverend Philip J. O'Donnell, 

Pastor of St. James Catholic Church ... 80 

Funeral of Sergeant William Hartigan, retired . . 15 

Back Bay Station, arrival of Russian Ambassador . 15 

Funeral of Lieutenant-Inspector Timothy F. Donovan, 55 

South Boston, Evacuation Day Parade . . . 320 

Repertory Hall, Mass Meeting 20 

Funeral of Patrolman George J. Hanley ... 75 
Wellington Auditorium, Mattapan, Workers and 

School students, protest rally 15 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1934. Men. 

Mar. 30. 1029 Tremont street, Young Communist League, pro- 
test meeting 15 

Mar. 31. Franklin Park, Easter-Egg hunt 50 

April 7. Oak Square, Brighton, Ten-Mile road race 35 

April 8. Colonial Theatre and Steinert Hall, Armenian Meeting, 85 

April 9. John Hancock Building, Lecture by Russian Club of 

Boston 35 

April 14. Cathedral Club road race 40 

April 18. Funeral of Patrolman Thomas P. Burke ... 35 

April 19. Marathon Race 490 

April 24. Party primaries 2,022 

April 25. International Labor Defence parade .... 42 

April 27. Boston Arena, Children's Spelling-Bee .... 45 

April 27. Funeral of Ex-Lieutenant Governor William S. 

Youngman 35 

May 1. May-Day details (including police demonstration on 

Boston Common) 275 

Irish-American A. A. Ten-Mile road race ... 55 

Exercises and parade celebrating return of "Old 

Ironsides,"IT.S.S. "Constitution" . ... 225 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas F. A. Daley ... 35 

U. S. Navy Y'ard, Charlestown, communistic demon- 
stration in connection with arrival of German S. S. 

"Karlsruhe" 165 

Hotel Brunswick, reception to the crew of the German 

S. S. "Karlsruhe" 30 

East Boston Airport, arrival of German Ambassador, 

Dr. Hans Luther 35 

Hotel Ritz-Carlton, arrival of German Ambassador, 

Dr. Hans Luther 35 

U. S. Navy Yard, Charlestown, visit of German 
Ambassador, Dr. Hans Luther, to German S. S. 

"Karlsruhe" 75 

May 20. Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade 

and Field Mass at Fenway Park .... 85 
May 21. Eliot Square, Roxbury, band concert .... 22 
May 21. Details in connection with visit of German Ambas- 
sador, Dr. Hans Luther 75 

May 23. Charlestown Municipal Court, court trial of com- 
munists 65 

May 24. Charlestown Municipal Court, court trial of com- 
munists 65 

May 25. Funeral of Patrolman Walter W. S. Fielding . . 35 

May 26. Boston Garden, Jordan-Traveler Junior Aviation 

League, airplane competition 25 

May 26. Charlestown Municipal Court, court trial of com- 
munists 65 

May 27. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Sunday . . 125 



May 

May 


5. 
13. 


May 
May 


15. 
17. 


May 


18. 


May 


19. 


May 


19. 


May 


19. 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



sa 



1934. 

May 30. 
June 3. 
June 4. 
June 7. 
June 8. 
June 8. 

June 9. 



June 


9. 


June 


10. 


June 


10. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


16. 


June 


16. 


June 


16. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 


18. 


June 


20. 


June 


25. 


June 27. 


June 29. 


July 


1. 


July 


3. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


7. 


July 


8. 


July 


16. 


July 


17. 


July 


22. 


July 


24. 


Aug. 


5. 


Aug. 


6. 


Aug. 


22. 



Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Da}' . 
Police Memorial Sunday exercises .... 
Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
Funeral of Patrolman James T. Malloj- 
Parade, Boston School Cadets .... 
Cathedral of Holy Cross, Golden Jubilee Mass in 

honor of His Eminence, WiUiam Cardinal O'Connell, 
Commonwealth avenue and Lake street, Brighton, 

Golden Jubilee celebration at Boston College, in 

honor of His Eminence, Wilham Cardinal O'Connell, 
Harvard Day Commencement exercises .... 
Fenway Park, Field Mass in honor of His Eminence, 

William Cardinal O'Connell .... 
Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises . 
Boston Common, review of First Corps of Cadets 
Boston Common, Flag Day celebration 
St. John's Seminary, Brighton, concert by parochial 

school bands 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 
Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day con 

cessions 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Dav 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade . 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions 
Fens Stadium, Athletic Meet . 
Charlestown, day after Bunker Hill Day 
Charlestown, day after Bunker Hill day, concessions 
Harvard Class-Day baseball game at Harvard Stadium 
South Boston, Hagenbeck- Wallace Circus parade 
Charlestown, benefit performance for the family of 

Patrolman James T. Malloy 
Sumner Tunnel, opening celebration 
Symphony Hall, motion pictures of the late Arch 

bishop Tourian .... 
Smith Playground, Allston, bonfire 
World War Memorial Park, East Boston, bonfire 
Smith Playground, Allston, fireworks 
East Boston, Fourth of July parade • 
Boston Common, fireworks and band concert 
Franklin Park, New England model plane Derby 
Fens Stadium, E. R. A. band concert 
Faneuil Hall, meeting of longshoremen 
Funeral of George Borden 
Fens Stadium, E. R. A. band concert 
Funeral of Patrolman Peter F. McCoj' 
Fens Stadium, E. R. A. band concert 
Funeral of Patrolman Michael J. Lydon 
North End, Scottsboro' Day demonstration 




Men. 
330 
190 
205 
145 
255 

135 



95 
70 

130 
33 

28 
55 

20 

86 

32 
45 
322 
55 
15 
26 
30 
40 
45 

20 
65 

30 
20 
20 
20 
80 
36 
22 
15 
25 
60 
15 
35 
15 
55 
26 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Men. 

Boston Common, Park Department circus ... 31 

Braves Field, Welfare Program for Needy ... 36 
Dudley and Vine Streets, Roxbury, political rally, 

Governor Joseph B. Ely, guest speaker ... 61 

Funeral of Sergeant John E. Tevnan .... 62 

Charlestown, labor trouble 12 

Charlestown State Prison, emergency call, reported 

outbreak 308 

Charlestown, labor trouble 27 

Police Division Four, political rallies .... 19 

State-Primary election 2,030 

Faneuil Hall, Truck Drivers' Union meeting . . 36 

Harvard-Bates football game 27 

Funeral of Patrolman John G. Ralph .... 34 

Funeral of Chief Matron Elizabeth A. Kirby, retired, 25 
North End Post, American Legion Columbus Day 

parade 42 

North Square, band concert 17 

Harvard-Brown football game 36 

New Monastery of the Poor Clare Sisters, Jamaica 

Plain, laying of corner-stone 16 

Funeral of Mr. James J. Phelan 37 

Harvard-Holy Cross football game .... 71 

Division 4, Harvard-Holy Cross crowds at hotels, etc., 19 

Harvard-Dartmouth football game .... 71 

Division 4, Harvard-Dartmouth crowds at hotels, etc., 19 

Boston Common, Red Cross disaster drill ... 32 

Harvard-Princeton football game 69 

Division 4, Harvard-Princeton crowds at hotels, etc., 18 

Franklin Park, Park Department bicycle race . . 16 

Tremont Temple, political rallies 58 

Boston Garden, Hon. James M. Curley political rally, 105 
Parker and Ruggles Streets, Roxbury, Dedication 

exercises of Greek Orthodox Cathedral of New 

England 14 

Nov. 5. Bunker Hill and Lexington Streets, Charlestown, 

political rallies 25 

State election 2,083 

Visit of United States Corps of West Point Cadets to 

Boston 219 

Harvard-West Point football game .... 79 
Division 4, Harvard-West Point crowds at hotels, etc., 22 
Lieutenant Norman E. Prince Post, Veterans of For- 
eign Wars parade 68 

Nov. 12. American Legion, SuiTolk County Council, Armistice 

Day parade 309 

Nov. 17. Frankhn Park, Park Department cross-country race . 14 

Nov. 17. Harvard-New Hampshire football game ... 45 



1934. 


Aug. 


29. 


Aug. 


31. 


Sept. 


7. 


Sept. 


8. 


Sept. 


13. 


Sept. 


13. 


Sept. 


14. 


Sept. 


16. 


Sept. 


20. 


Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


4. 



Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


11. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

i934. Men. 

Nov. 24. Hyde Square, Roxbury, Norfolk House Centre, 15- 
Mile road race 31 

Nov. 28. Funeral of Patrolman James Brickley .... 124 

Nov. 29. Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade . . . 389 

Note.— December 1 to December 19, 1933, inclusive, a total of 868 
officers was on duty in the drive to close speakeasies, clubs 
and other places suspected of violating the liquor laws. 

October 8 to November 13, 1934, inclusive, a total of 1,104 
officei-s was on duty for that period of the so-called Fish 
Workers' Strike, in Division 6, South Boston district. 

October 8 to November 13, 1934, inclusive, a total of 506 officers 
was on duty for that period of the so-called Fish Workers' 
Strike, on Division 7, East Boston district. 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Miscellaneous Business. 



[Jan. 





1931-32. 


1932-33. 


1933-3i. 


Abandoned children cared for 


7 


4 


13 


Accidents reported 




14,132 


9,983 


10,440 


Buildings found open and made secure 




2,475 


2,851 


2,968 


Cases investigated 




55,584 


46,071 


43,753 


Dangerous buUdings reported 




11 


18 


40 


Dangerous chimneys reported 




4 


6 


24 


Dead bodies recovered .... 




263 


285 


382 


Defective cesspools reported . 




12 


25 


19 


Defective drains and vaults reported . 




5 


10 


11 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 




4 


6 


5 


Defective gas pipes reported . 




5 


9 


18 


Defective hydrants rei)orted . 




59 


19 


34 


Defective lamps reported 




4,758 


4,575 


4,883 


Defective sewers reported 




26 


31 


99 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 




2,265 


2,427 


2,442 


Defective water pipes reported 




37 


53 


45 


Disturbances suppressed 






389 


829 


1,682 


E.xtra duties performed . 






35,971 


35,905 


25,678 


Fire alarms given 






5,661 


5,201 


5,546 


Fires extinguished . 






1,064 


892 


994 


Insane persons taken in charge 






409 


363 


387 


Intoxicated persons assisted . 






52 


24 


549 


Lost children restored 






1,634 


1,506 


1,503 


Persons rescued from drowning 






10 


11 


150 


Sick and injured persons assisted 






6,699 


6,233 


7,973 


Stray teams reported and put up 






18 


18 


30 


Street obstructions removed . 






239 


427 


612 


Water running to waste reported 






432 


352 


745 


Witnesses detained . 






7 


3 


313 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

Adjustment of Claims. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $1,149.48; 
turned in and receipted for at the Chief Clerk's office, $134.94; 
making a grand total of $1,284.42, either received by or credited 
to this Department for such police property damage. 

House of Detention. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the court 
house building, Somerset street. All women arrested in the 
city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They are then 
held in charge of the matron until the next session of the court 
before which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprison- 
ment they are returned to the House of Detention and from 
there conveyed to the jail or institution to which they have been 
sentenced. 

During the year 2,749 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 1,957 

Larceny 140 

Night walking 58 

Fornication 90 

Idle and disorderly 125 

Assault and battery 10 

Adultery 26 

Violation of liquor law 3 

Keeping house of ill fame 10 

Various other causes 330 

Total 2,749 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 135 

From county jail 367 

Grand total 3,251 

Police Signal Service. 

Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 571. Of these 433 are 
connected with the underground system and 138 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Wo7'k. 
In the past year the employees of this service responded to 
3,879 trouble calls; inspected 571 signal boxes; 15 signal desks; 
170 old type and 525 new type batteries. Repairs have been 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

made on 150 box movements; 70 registers; 80 locks; 24 time 
stamps; 1 garage motor; 3 garage registers; 28 vibrator bells; 
43 relays, and 9 electric fans. This unit has the installing 
and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all 
stations and Headquarters building. There have been made 
150 plungers; 150 box fittings; 100 line blocks and 100 automatic 
hooks. 

Seven new signal boxes were added in the East Boston 
Tunnel. 

Connected with the police signal boxes there are 130 signal 
and 120 telephone circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
Department. 

Specifications have been completed and contracts let to 
complete the communications system, including both duplex 
radio and the Hayes system. All divisions are to be serviced 
with a paper-insulated, multicolored, underground cable. 
The desks are to be of a type which will enable the station to 
talk to Headquarters and all patrol boxes over Department- 
owned lines. 

There are assigned to the unit one White truck, 2^ tons 
capacity; three utility trucks, | ton capacity each; one four-door 
PljTiiouth sedan and the Director's car, a Chrysler four-door 
sedan. 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal Service 
at the present time: 

7 close circuit desks 45 traffic booths 

8 open circuit blinker type 726,650 feet underground cable 

signal desks 233,400 feet of overhead cable 

240 circuits 31,143 feet of duct 

12 garage annunciators 67 manholes 

52 test boxes 18 motor generator sets 

70 cells of caustic soda, pri- 6 motor-driven flashes 

mary cells type battery 1 White truck 

400 cells of sulphuric acid stor- 3 Ford trucks 

age type battery 1 Plymouth sedan 

2,100 taxicab signs 1 Chrysler sedan 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the harbor police, formerly 
styled Division 8,* comprising the harbor and the islands 
therein, were as follows: 

* Division 8 consolidated with Division 1 , May 8, 1933. 



1935. ] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, 

float stages, etc $60,732 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 547 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 78 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 3 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 12 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the waterfront . . 12 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm .... 3 

Number of boats challenged 36 

Number of boats searched for contraband 37 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted .... 4 

Number of cases investigated 224 

Number of dead bodies recovered 30 

Number rescued from drowning 6 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 9 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered ... 81 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 74 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 1,793 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deUver oil 

in harbor 23 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 9 

Number of dead bodies cared for 12 

Number of hours grappling . 167 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,857, 
5,418 of which were from domestic ports, 684 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, 1,755 from foreign ports. Of the latter 
1,192 were steamers, 356 were motor vessels, and 207 were 
schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay daily and 
nightly, from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge, with launch 
"E. U. Curtis," from June 1st to November 30th. There 
were 22 cases investigated, 5 boats challenged for contraband, 
15 cases where assistance was rendered to boats in distress, 
by reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., 4 dead 
bodies cared for, 5 boats ordered to put up saiUng lights, 14 
hours spent in grappling, 12 persons rescued from drowning, 
10 boats warned about speeding amongst boats, 8 obstructions 
removed from channel. 

Horses. 
On the 30th of November, 1933, there were 20 horses in the 
service. During the year 3 were delivered to the Massa- 
chusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
on account of age, 1 was humanely killed, and 4 were 
purchased. 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 154 automobiles in the service at the present time: 
47 attached to Headquarters; 22 in the city proper and attached 
to Divisions 1, 2 and 4; 9 in the South Boston district, attached 
to Division 6; 7 in the East Boston district, attached to Divi- 
sion 7; 14 in the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 
10; 9 in the Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 7 in 
the Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; 7 in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14 ; 6 in the Charlestown 
district, attached to Division 15; 6 in the Back Bay and the 
Fenway, attached to Division 16; 6 in the West Roxbury dis- 
trict, attached to Division 17; 6 in the Hyde Park district, 
attached to Division 18, and 8 in the Mattapan district, 
attached to Division 19. (See page 62 for distribution of 
automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs $12,873 50 

Storage 939 25 

Gasolene £6,789 97 

Oil 2,690 46 

Anti-freeze fluids, polish, patches, plugs, etc 945 65 

License fees 161 00 

Total $54,399 8 3 

Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automobile 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 4,432 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . . . 1,676 

Calls where services were not required 450 

Psychopathic Hospital 254 

St. Ehzabeth's Hospital 243 

Southern Mortuary 179 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) ... 144 

Home 112 

Morgue 87 

Carried foricard 7,577 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 61 

Brought forward 7,577 

Massachusetts General Hospital 48 

Police Station Houses 43 

Forest Hills Hospital 30 

Beth Israel Hospital 29 

Boston State Hospital 26 

Carney Hospital 18 

Faulkner Hospital 16 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 11 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 10 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 6 

Children's Hospital 5 

Strong Hospital 4 

Deaconess Hospital 3 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 3 

New England Hospital for Women 2 

Bay State Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital . . . 

Fenway Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Milton Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

Women's Free Hospital 

Total 7,839 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



List of Vehicles Used by the Department. 



Divistoi>fS. 


o 
an 


"O IB 


i 

13 


1 


1 

o 
o 


"3 
o 
5- 


Headquarters 


— 


2 


36 


9 


— 


47 


Division 1 


— 


2 


4 


— 


3 


9 


Division 2 


— 


2 


5 


— 


1 


8 


Division 4 


— 


*4 


5 


— 


2 


11 


Division 6 


— 


3 


6 


— 


3 


12 


Division 7 


1 




5 


— 


4 


11 


Division 9 


— 


^ 


5 


— 


— 


6 


Division 10 


1 




6 


— 


— 


8 


Division 11 


1 




7 


— 


— 


9 


Division 13 


1 




5 


— 


4 


11 


Division 14 


— 




5 


— 


4 


11 


Division 15 


1 




4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 16 


— 




5 


— 


4 


10 


Division 17 


— 




5 


— 


4 


10 


Division 18 


— 




5 


— 


— 


6 


Division 19 


— 




7 


— 


4 


12 


Unassigned 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


4 


Totals 


5 


25 


115 


9 


37 


191 



* Includes 1 van. 

Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,083 * Hcenses to set up and use 
hackney carriages granted, being a decrease of 134 as compared 
with last year. 

There were no horse-drawn carriages Ucensed during the 
year. 



* 433 regranta. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

There were 239 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the Bureau of Traffic; 84 of these were restored 
to the owners and the balance placed in the custody of the Lost 
Property Bureau. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1934, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 
Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 2,084 

Number of carriages licensed 1,650 

Number of carriages licensed (regrants) 433 

Number of carriage applications rejected 1 

Number of licenses transferred 15 

Number of licenses canceled 524 

Number of carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1934 . . 1,525 
Number of "setups" suspended and stripped of credentials . 19 

Number of "setups" revoked 1 

Number of carriages inspected 2,077 

Number of applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . . 3,293 
Number of complaints against owners, drivers and "setups" 

investigated 3,684 

Number of days spent in court 172 

Number of articles left in carriages reported by citizens . . 101 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by drivere . . 239 

Number of drivers' applications for licenses rejected ... 51 

Number of drivers' licenses granted 3,242 

Number of drivers' licenses revoked 13 

Number of drivers' licenses suspended and stripped of credentials . 523 

Number of replaced windshield plates and badges .... 318 

Number of drivers' licenses reconsidered and granted ... 1 

LiMiTATiOisr OF Hackney Carriages. 
Under the provisions of Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, effective 
June 12, 1934, the Pohce Commissioner was required to fix a 
limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be issued, 
which limit shall be based upon the number of licenses then 
issued and outstanding but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and 
he may from time to time, after reasonable notice and a hearing 
decrease the number so fixed, but in no event to a number less 
than 900. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner on July 
20, 1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number 
of hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license by 
reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses limited 
under the Act referred to, has been issued, the Department of 
Public Utilities, on petition of such applicant, may after a 
hearing determine that public convenience and necessity 
require a higher limit than that fixed by the Police Commissioner 
or previously established by said Department, and shall estab- 
lish the limit so required, in which case the limit set by said 
Department shall be considered final until changed as herein 
provided. 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 
Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 
licensee or licensees a designated portion of a public way 
abutting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public or 
semi-public building as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 170 applications for such stands (with a 
total capacity of 507 hackney carriages) were received; 154 
locations for 483 carriages were granted and 16 locations for 
24 carriages were rejected; 2 locations for 4 carriages were 
reconsidered and granted. 

Of these special hackney carriage stand licenses, 6 locations 
(capacity, 14 carriages) were subsequently canceled or revoked; 
148 locations (capacity, 470 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was direc|;ed to designate 
certain portions other than sidewalks, of public ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 
owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 949 applications for hackney carriage 
licenses for such public stands were granted. 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

Of these public stand licenses 19 were suspended and stripped 
of credentials and 1 revoked. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for the 
occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon property) 
by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 16 applications (capacity, 299 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing auto- 
mobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight -seeing automobile' as used in this act, 
shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one of 
chapter ninety of the General Laws used for the carrying 
for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes in 
or from the City of Boston and in or on which automobile 
guide service by the driver or other person is offered or 
furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the transpor- 
tation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department of 
Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public convenience 
and necessity require such operation; and further, it is provided 
that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate said automo- 
bile as a driver in or from said city unless he is licensed so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1934, there have been 
issued Hcenses for 30 sight-seeing automobiles and 24 special 
stands for the same. 

"New" sight-seeing automobile drivers for the year com- 
mencing as of March 1, 1934, were fingerprinted as in the case of 
"new" hackney carriage drivers, and their records, if any, 
searched for in the Bureau of Records. 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the apphcation to drive. 
There were 18 drivers' Hcenses granted. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. During the year 
2,008 applications for such licenses were received; 2,006 of 
these were granted and 3 rejected, one of the rejected applica- 
tions being subsequently reconsidered and granted. Of these 
licenses 31 were subsequently canceled for nonpayment of 
license fee and 1 because it was surrendered. (See Tables XIII, 
XV.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was ^'Not at a 
designated stand in the highway. " 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was ^^For a designated wagon stand in 
the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 2,006 granted, 1,911 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 95 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



67 



Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Ye.ir. 


Canvass. 


19031 .... 


181,045 


1919 








227,466 


1904 








193,195 


1920 








235,248 


1905 








194,547 


1921^ 








480,783 


1906 








195,446 


1922 








480,106 


1907 








195,900 


1923 








477,547 


1908 








201,552 


1924 








485,677 


1909 








201,391 


1925 








489,478 


19102 








203,603 


1926 








493,415 


1911 








206,825 


1927 








495,767 


1912 








214,178 


1928 








491,277 


1913 








215,388 


1929 








493,250 


1914 








219,364 


1930 








502,101 


1915 








220,883 


1931 








500,986 


1916^ 








- 


1932 








499,758 


1917 . 








221,207 


1933 . 








501,175 


1918 








224,012 













U903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

21910 listing changed to April 1. 

'1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

<1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
April of the present year: 

Male 241,252 

Female 261,684 



Total 



502,936 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $39,468 05 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list . . 22,469 00 

Newspaper notices 721 10 

Circulars and pamphlets . . 306 00 

Stationery 272 00 

Interpreters 175 13 

Table 28 70 

Telephone 11 03 

Total $63,451 01 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

April 2 1,289 

April 3 1,184 

April 4 807 

April 5 474 

April 6 101 

April 7 16 

April 8 4 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 

The police findings in 1934 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,340 

Physically incapacitated 97 

Convicted of crime 173 

Unfit for various reasons 366 

Apparently fit 5,956 

7,932 

In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent to 
the Police Department for dehvery 5,956 summonses to persons 
for jury service. 

Special Police. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a Department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1934, were fingerprinted 



1935.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

by the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1934, there were 1,207 
special pohce officers appointed; 12 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause, 84 appointments were canceled 
and 1 appointment was revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 

From United States Government 46 

From State Departments 7 

From City Departments 43 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 35 

From other corporations and associations 808 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 210 

From private institutions 20 

From churches 37 

Total 1,207 

Railroad Police. 

There were 4 persons appointed railroad poUcemen during 
the year, all of whom were employees of the Boston Terminal 
Company. Five appointments were canceled, all of whom 
were employees of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 21,768. Of these 21,573 were granted, of which 
82 were canceled for nonpayment (4 "no fee"), and 4 filed on 
which no action was taken, leaving 21,487. During the year 
230 licenses were transferred, 779 canceled, 19 revoked and 
191 appHcations rejected. The officers investigated 4,065 
complaints arising under these licenses. The fees collected 
and paid into the city treasury amounted to $66,139.25. (See 
Tables XIH, XVI.) 

Musicians' Licenses. 

Itinerant. 
During the year there were 28 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted; 3 
licenses were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment 
of license fee. 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is grunted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 47 instruments were inspected with the 
following result: 



Kind of Instrument. 



Number 
Inspected. 



Number 
Passed. 



Hand organs 
Street pianos 
Violins 
Accordions . 
Clarinets 
Banjos 
Guitars 
Pianos 
Mandolins . 
Totals . 




Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1930 


212 


210 


2 


1931 


216 


216 


- 


1932 


270 


269 


1 


1933 ....... 


226 


226 


- 


1934 


184 


181 


3 



1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the 
number of such applications granted, the number refused and 
the number revoked : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1930 .... 


2,967 


2,902 


65 


5 


1931 .... 


3.097 


2,998 


99 


2 


1932 .... 


3.190 


3.115 


75 


12 


1933 .... 


3,130 


* 3,010 


120 


2 


1934 .... 


3,173 


t 3,063 


110 


2 



* 25 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 25"fee" licenses and 4 "no fee" licenses canceled. 

Public Lodging Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (Ter. Edit.) and Sections 33 and 36, both inclu- 
sive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Ter. Edit.), and the 
location of each house and the nuntber of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

8 Pine Street 

79 Shawmut Avenue 

1202 Washington Street 

* 1025 Washington Street 


30,162 

110,489 

13,235 

19,800 

880 


Total 


174,566 



* License expired April 30, 19.34. 



Pensions and Benefits. 
On December 1, 1933, there were 347 persons on the roll. 
During the year 19 died; viz., 4 captains, 1 lieutenant, 3 ser- 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

geants, 9 patrolmen, 1 chief matron and 1 fireman. One 
retired patrolman was restored to duty. Sixteen were added; 
viz., 7 sergeants, 6 patrolmen, 1 chief matron and the widows 
of patrolmen George J. Hanley and James T. Malloy, both of 
whom died from injuries received in the performance of duty; 
leaving 343 on the roll at date, 309 pensioners and 34 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $361,771.69 and it is estimated that $374,545 
will be required for pensions in 1935. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550, There are 61 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $8,357.17 during 
the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for poHce purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age 
or more, and the maintenance of the police signal service were 
$5,063,231.14. (See Table XVI.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $62,491.77. (See Table XVII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
from licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., 
was $76,750.45. (See Tables XIII and XVI.) 

# 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(73) 





3 




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Q 


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00 


liliii,-ifol«nioiiii'-'lilil 


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NO 


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■n 


illlll^COIt^Ollll^lllll 

00 


•T 


IIIIIIt-^CvIIOOiIiIIIIIIIIII 

03 


"^ 


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00 


- 


llllil^coit^--liil-<illll 


© 


llllll-HCOIOQglllli.^11111 


»■ 


illlil^iNioocoiiiiiiiiil 


l> 


||||||r-<(Mr-iI>OOIIIIIIIIII 

00 


>e 


|lllll«COIO"5llli"lllll 


•V 


1 1 1 1 1 1 « -U" 1 c-i 00 1 1 i 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 

•-I 00 


N 


llllllrtlN-HOgllllillll 

(N 


- 


||||||-HT|>|CO--l|lll-^IIIIC') 


•3[jaiO X^jadojj 


illlllllll®l'HI'^l'*llll 


•sauipimg 
}0 ^napaaiuiiadng 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 u:) 1 


■aoiAjag iBuaig 


llllllllllllll'^ll'^'Hll 


•uopuajaQ 
' JO aBnofj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 « C') 1 1 1 1 1 


UOSUJ A^IQ 


llllllli-HlcOCOIIIIIIIIII 


JO ncajng 


llliiliniioooiiiliiiiii 


epjooaij 
JO nBajng 


||||||-^rH|-«<COIIII|COIIII 


ntjajng 
aApoa^aQ 


1 1 1 1 1 |,-.T)<Tj<coto«ni«i i>ni 1 1 1 


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II! 


$6,800 
4,250 
4,250 
2,975 
5,950 
3,825 
3,400 
2,295 to 2,316.25 

2,295 

2,125 to 2,146.25 

1,530 to 1,806.25 

1,785 

1,785 

2,040 

1,440 to 1,530 

1,080 

807.50 to 3,060 

2,847.50 

1,785 

990 to 1,440 

1,785 to 2,295 




id 

o 

H 
m 
O 

O 

< 


Commissioner ..... 

Secretary . 

Legal adviser 

Superintendent 

Deputy superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants-inspectors 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen 

Armorer 

Chauffeurs 

Clerks 

Director, signal service 
Assistant director, signal service 

Engineers 



CC»OCO>Ot~t^Tl 



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76. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Ac 


ruAL Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1934. 


Nov. .30, 
1934. 


Jan. 1, 
1934. 


Nov. 30, 
1934. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Legal Adviser 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


Deputy Superintendents . 


3 


3 


3 


3 


— 


Captains .... 


29 


23 


17 


17 


— 


Lieutenants 


60 


60 


59 


58 


Minus 1 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


13 


13 


12 


11 


Minus 1 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


178 


172 


Minus 6 


Patrolmen .... 


2,149 


2,149 


1,948 


1,909 


Minus 39 


Patrolwomen 


8 


8 


5 


5 


— 


Totals .... 


2,453 


2,447 


2,226 


2,179 


Minus 47 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



77 



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78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30 y 
1934, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the 
Number of Years^ Service of each. 



Name. 








Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Breed, Ferdinand E. . 


Incapacitated 


51 years 


22 10/12 years 


■Chubbuck, Harry 








Incapacitated 


39 


15 


Fetridge, Henry . 








Age 


65 


38Vi2 " 


Healy, Jeremiah S. 








Age 


65 


3410/12 " 


Horton, Walter G. 








Age 


65Vi2 " 


38Vi2 " 


KimbreU, Glennie E. 








Incapacitated 


38Vi2 " 


14 V12 " 


Leavitt, Linwood S. 








Age 


65 


281' /12 " 


Mitchell, George H. 








Age 


65 


38Vi2 " 


Murray, Thomas F. 








Incapacitated 


39i''/i2 " 


13 V12 " 


Norton, Peter J. . 








Age 


64 5/l2 " 


35 V12 " 


Ryan, Thomas F. 








Incapacitated 


54 6/l2 " 


28Vi2 " 


Taylor, Orrin L. . 








Incapacitated 


37i»/i2 " 


13"/l2 " 


Thorn, Frederick J. 








Age 


62 8/12 " 


35 6/12 " 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



79 



Table V. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 

who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date Appointed. 


a 
v 

a 
_"£ 

1 

3 


a 

V 

•a 
a 

"S 

Q 


S 
'3 

a 

OS 

O 


a 

1 

'►3 


o a. 

3 a 


<u 


c 


Totals. 


1894 .... 












1 


_ 


1 


1895 . 








- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


- 


3 


7 


1896 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1897 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1898 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


— 


2 


4 


8 


1900 . 








- 


1 


3 


6 


1 


5 


3 


19 


1901 . 








1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


4 


3 


11 


1903 . 








- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


8 


6 


20 


1904 . 








- 


- 


- 


7 


1 


4 


2 


14 


1905 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


2 


8 


1906 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1 


6 


1907 . 








- 


- 


1 


3 


1 


3 


4 


12 


1908 . 








- 


_ 


2 


2 


2 


9 


3 


18 


1909 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 . 








_ 


- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


1 


5 


1911 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1912 . 








- 


- 


'- 


4 


- 


2 




9 


1913 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1914 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1916 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1919 . 








- 


- 


2 


18 


- 


17 


491 


582 


1920 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


20 


159 


182 


1921 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


106 


123 


1922 . 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


67 


73 


1923 . 








— 


_ 


— 


1 


_ 


7 


99 


107 


1924 . 








_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


- 


1 


74 


75 


1925 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


93 


93 


1926 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


307 


307 


1927 . 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


120 


120 


1928 . 








- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


90 


90 


1929 . 








— 


- 


— 


_ 


- 




204 


204 


1930 . 








— 


— 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


42 


42 


1931 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


17 


Totals 








1 


3 


17 


58 


11 


172 


1,914 


2,176 



80 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1934, who were Born 
in the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 





c 


s 

■73 














Date of Birth. 


a 
a 

0- 

3 


if 

Q 


'S 
ft 
O 


a 

03 

a 
o 

3 
» 

3 


c2 

IS o 

a » 

"3 S 
3 


a 

u 

01 

m 


d 

s 
1 


Totals. 


1868 












1 


_ 


1 


1869 








- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 


5 


1870 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2 


5 


1871 








- 


- 


1 


3 




1 


3 


8 


1872 








- 


- 


1 


4 


1 


3 


8 


17 


1873 








- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


11 


2 


19 


1874 








- 


1 


1 


2 


3 


5 


3 


15 


1875 








1 


- 


2 


2 


- 


5 


- 


10 


1876 








- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


2 


10 


1877 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 


7 


13 


1878 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


3 


10 


1879 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


3 


4 


9 


1880 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


3 


1881 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


1 


8 


1882 








- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


4 


- 


9 


1883 








- 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


— 


2 


1884 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1885 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


17 


19 


1886 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


27 


31 


1887 








- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


42 


45 


1888 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


50 


54 


1889 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


70 


78 


1890 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


58 


61 


1891 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


92 


97 


1892 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


9 


125 


136 


1893 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


20 


131 


154 


1894 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


17 


155 


174 


1895 








_ 


- 


- 


4 


- 


12 


151 


167 


1896 








— 


- 


- 


4 


- 


12 


179 


195 


1897 








— 


- 


1 


4 


- 


20 


164 


189 


1898 








_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


8 


152 


160 


1899 








— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


104 


107 


1900 








— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


144 


145 


1901 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


103 


103 


1902 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1903 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


43 


1904 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


1905 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals 


? 






1 


3 


17 


58 


11 


172 


1,914 


2,176 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1934, 
was 40.14 years. 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



05 



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82 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






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1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 




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86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IX. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1934. 



Divisions. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 
Division 4 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 13 
Division 14 . 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Division 18 
Division 19 

Totals 



1,779 

6,121 

7,086 

15,110 

11,509 

4,125 

5,201 

4,750 

3,993 

1,303 

2,642 

6,657 

4,043 

771 

861 

1,524 



77,475 



267 

294 

706 

1,311 

523 

193 

320 

483 

221 

72 

167 

287 

617 

44 

51 

125 



5,681 



2,046 

6,415 

7,792 

16,421 

12,032 

4,318 

5,521 

5,233 

4,214 

1,375 

2,809 

6,944 

4,660 

815 

912 

1,649 



83,156 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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1935.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 91 



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1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



» 


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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 





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1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



99 



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IH 


ce-gS 


^ 


<: 



100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



■^ 



O 





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1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



101 



1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


y-i GO 


CO 


■* 


CD 


05 


,_! 


Tt< 


t^ 





CO 


10 


T^ 


1* 


00 


O '^ 


•* 


t— I 


lO 


O) 




CO 












CO 












t^ 




















IC Ol 


lO 


o 


1> 


C5 


^ 


•* 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 ^ 


00 


00 










r^ 




















02 O 


Tt< 


(M 


CD 


CO 


1 


CD 


IC 





CO 


1 


^ 1 


00 


Oi 


1-1 lO 


(N 


»o 




■* 


















(M 


05 00 


TJH 


CO 


t^ 





1 


CO 


M< 


^ 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


Oi 






























o t^ 


t^ 


lO 


C5 


,_, 


1 


1 


,_, 


1 


1 


CO 


CO 1 


1 


•* 


^ (M 


(N 


o 




CD 
10 




















<N CO 


1 


r— 1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1-H 


1 


05 


05 CO 


O 


00 


r^ 


CD 


1 








10 


CO 


(N 


^ 1 


■^ 


IC 


•rj< T-H 


i—i 




CO 


Oi 




(N 












CO 


1^ 




























10 


-H CO 


CO 


•* 


CD 


05 


,_! 


■* 


l> 


"3 


CO 


»o 


C5 1-1 


•* 


00 


CO •* 


■^ 


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»o 


05 




CD 












ro 












t^ 




















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1 


c^ 


rH 


U3 


1 


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1 


1 


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05 


05 

CO 


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CO 


c^ 


»o 


■* 


1—1 


05 


CO 


ICI 


CO 


rt< 


1> 1-1 


«o 





»Cl -* 


■* 


1-H 


lO 






10 












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t^ 


















CO 


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t« 






CO 












3 
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1 






c c 


o 






3 



















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^^ 




















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3 3 








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m 






03 o3 


a 

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c 


3 
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c3 


3 















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2 






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3 


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top af 
top af 


o 

a. 
o 


s 

& 
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a* 


« 
3 
03 

3 


3 


3 
03 












1 

3 


bC 
3 

'5 






'ailing to s 
erson. 
failing to s 


o 

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ar3 

2^ 


0) 



a, 


CO 

a 

o3 




3 




bC 
3 


3 
a; 


bC 

3 

3 
13 


fully, 
awfully sol 

ride on . 




g 

3 
3 




0.2 


S 


a> 




s 









3 



^3 S 




"a; 


3r:s 


•^o 


o-.o 


X> 


^ 


3 


in 







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cb' 


a r/T* "cS 






O >50 


C'" 


a> 








% 




CS 


! 


3 5K . a; 




pr 


utom 
injur 
utom 


3^ 

■" 3 


MB 
^ 


a 


3 




CO 
0) 


aT 

'C 


a> 



3 



_B 

'co 
3 


own 
usine 

walk 
us, st 


03 


^ 

2 
2 


<; < 


<: 


<i 


<i 


<i 


W 


m 


m 


PQ 


pq 


« 


m fQ 









102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



'T3 

■IS 
O 



X 
< 






o 

O 

o 

H 
« 
O 

w 

HI 



Q 
(^ 

Q 

t— I 

Eh 
O 

CZ2 

o 



o 
12; 



T3 




T3 


, 


! 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


Q2° 


OS 




























j3 


"S 




























" 


ai 
































, 


■* 


t> 


t^ 


ot 


GO 


Tf< 


(M 


^ 




CO 


U3 


^^ 






O 


(>» 




Ol 






CO 


)-H 


C^) 










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CI 


















































2h 






























w 






























ai 




, 


■* 


t^ 


•* 


1 


1 


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1 


^ 




CO 


1 


1 


^ 




o 


(N 




t^ 




















C 




■—1 


■—I 
























S 






























m 




<M 


lO 


1 


CO 


1 


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1 


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CO 


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1 


C^ 










ta 






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II 






























v 






























u 






























c 




1 


(M 


1 


c 


w 


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1 


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1 


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fa 






























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1 


1 





1 




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c 






00 


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s 


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1 


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0; 




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a! 






























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C^ 


GO 


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05 


. 




CO 


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a. 










c^ 










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t-- 


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t> 


lO 


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1 


1 


1 






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CO 
























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s 




























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S; 




fa 




























Si 



































































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CO 


1 


(M 


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O 


IM 


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,-, 




CO 


10 


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a> 


■^ 


im 




<^ 






^ 




a 














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C-l 
























§ 










































_ 






^ 






















u 


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X 






s 






















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_g- 






5 

























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&. 






















c 








CC 








OJ 


W 












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1 






c 








'-^ 


00 












S 






rt 




>. 


« 


3 


Z 










'o 


*^ 






~ 




_3 


C/3 


-t3 


fa 
O 












1 


Z 






S 
+3 






-»-> 


-u 

'? 


fa 

o 










3 

^ 




c 






3 




s 


CI 

3 


bC 


< 




T3 
Oi 

« 
'5b 

41 

a 


c 
o 

3 
tn 




c 

c3 
C 


c 

'3 

c 


OS . 03 


s 

1 


(/J 


a 

o3 
-0 


bi 








1 


>> 


hi 
c 






0) 






-a 


o 


2 c 





c 





c 


o3 


03 


1 






2 




2 


o 


s 

S 


11 


S 

s 


s 
e 


w 

ill 


03 


CD 

c 


m 

a 








^ 


JS 


IS 




o 


























o 


o 


o 


O 


O 








u 













U 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



1 


1 


1 


1 


IM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


N 


o 


^ 


CD 


1 


IN 


^^ 


«c 


(N 


»o 


OC 


t^ 


CO 


r^ 


00 


^ 


.—1 


CO 


oo 










CO 






t^ 


(M 




t^ 


■* 




1 


lO 


s§ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


»o 


1 


'"' 


- 


l>. 


1 


05 




^ 


(N 


t- 


CO 


,_^ 


^_^ 


1 


1 


C: 


^ 


1 


t^ 


^^ 


1 


(M 


■* 


1 






Tj* 
















<M 






CO 






1 


(M 


CO 


I> 


1 


'"' 


•"* 


'■^ 


^^ 


(N 


00 


5 


^ 


00 


CO 


1 


1 


^^ 


1 


■^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^^ 


1 


'"' 


'^ 


Tf 


1 


1 


1 


lO 


1 




C^ 


- 


1 


oc 




■* 


oc 


8 


1 




CO 


1 


(N 


Tf 


^ 


^ 


1 


_ 


__ 


QC 


^ 


1 


c 


— 


(M 


a-. 


IC 


1 




(M 


















t> 


•* 










<N 


O 


^^ 


«D 


C^ 


C^l 


^ 


.- 


(N 


"0 


oc^ 


1^ 


CO 


r^ 


oc 


^ 




CO 


00 










CO 






t^ 


(M 




t>. 


'*' 




1 


<o 


§ 


lO 


1 


O) 


1 


1 


1 


1 


oc 


c: 




t^ 


1 


1 


(N 


"* 


^ 


_ 


(M 


o 


^ 


-^ 


Ol 


lO 


o 


oc 


(M 


o 


00 


, 




<M 


■* 
t^ 










CO 






t^ 


-^ 




t^ 


•* 




-^ 


























o 


CO 


• 


O 

c 








>. 
> 
o3 






bfl 








. 




"i 


bC 




CO 












c 

o 
a 






'c 
c 








S 

CO 






e 
J 






O 
C 


s 


"5 
c 


Oh 

a 

O 


tn 
br 




CO 


bC 


9J 

5. 

be 
c 


c 

ci 
o3 

Q 


iM 


bC 

a 
S 






Xi 




o 


, 




s 


> 


o 


a 


.3 


^ 


Ul 


O 


+3 

El 
S 

o 


4J 




CO 


o 


3 


bC 

c 


-4^ 


aj 

s 

03 


s 

o 


bC 

-O 


oT 


CO 

C 
a; 

a 


3 


bC 

c 

<A 


c 


"o 






o 


& 


p 


M 


« 


■73 
C 
e3 

a 


cc 
3 


c 




a 


o 
o 


.4.3 

i 




cc 


_03 

i 

• 0! 


m 
> 
c 


s 

Lh 

9 




bC 


'bC 


O 
S 


ming im 
ound. 
ming on 




O 


0) 


OJ 


0) 


X 




^ 




3 


c3 


03 


03 


- 03 


(u-o 


O 


O 


W 


P 


P 


W 


W 


fe 


fe 


fe 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 



104 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



O 





a 




^ 








o 




C3 




w 




« 




n 




fe 






ST' 


W 


'«Si 


K 


*f^ 


H 








g 


1 


Q 


• 


W 


1^ 


Q 




P 


w 


I-! 


►J 


U 


pq 


12; 


< 


1— 1 


H 


H 




O 




^ 




rn 




W 




71) 




^ 




H 




b 




U< 




o 



00 

6 



•a 


•d 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


, a 


c; 




























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o 


rt 
































CO 


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^ 


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CO 




^^ 




— 








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a 






























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1 


1 


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1 


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1 










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t. 










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c 






























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1 


'^ 


1 


rt< 


1 


to 


1 


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1—1 


1 


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t^ 




05 














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t^ 






















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ec 


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00 


T-H 


1 


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05 










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k. 


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fe 






























1 


1 


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o 




















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1 


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1 


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1 


1 


1 


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=■ 


CO 


a-s 












o 














o 


o 


3 












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^ 




























































Si 




























CD 


(M 


CO 


1^ 


1 


(M 


1 


1 


^ 


^ 


^ 








^ 


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c 


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a 


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cc 




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CO 

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15 



1935.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 105 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



■*(M(Me005(MOCCrt^O'-ir^fO»00 
O^iMiMlM Oi (MOO 

CO 



— I I (N I> I CO l> (M I 



^IIMIeOiMI I I I I 1^1 IC5 



CO I imot^cOTf^-Hco^ leo^co 
■<ti rt ^ rt rt CO 00 

CO 



I I I oi I — 1 Tt< ^ I 



-D 



.-1 —I CO 



a, B( 3 c 

d 2 tH o 9 "-*3 o' 



S - -i^ -• fi c ■ ^ Sf I g a -3 



«« <:3"oj O^o; C C fcH iH^fc. 3^3 3 <^ CD 
OOPhP-(P-iPuPlhP-,PhPl,P-iPhP-(P-iP5P:^ 



106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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C 


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1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



107 



I (N I 

00 
CO 



I I I I o> 



>-i 1> CC t^ 



^1 I (N ^ 



CI 00 ^ 



I (N I I t^ 



I Tt< rt —I Tj< 



C<5 I CO 



-H O ^ I I 



Tt< <N I 



I — I I -H lO 



•<* I I 



O (T^ CO 



^ (N CO 
CM 00 
CO 



^ <N I 



S; ^^ 



^ > 



d 
02 



05 




O. 


• 


bl) 




c 












<u 


Cl 




(1 
11 


03 . 


-<J 


-D C 


<a 


Ss 


S 


>.-^ 


r/T 




-4^ 



« :3 fc. r; 



H >; ^ ^ ^ ^ 



1G8 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



"W 




%> 




Ti 






^ 




O 

H 


O 


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1 


1—' 




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1 1 1 1 1 


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05 


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CO 


O 


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CO 




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C 


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02 


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CO 


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lo 






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1—1 














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1> 




■* 


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05 


05 


lo 


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CO 


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S S g :g g 
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^ 


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W O (S -ki h-^ 


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ti. 






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in 


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s 

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to 
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iz; 


^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 


^ 


;?; 





1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



X 











O 


1 -■ c) 


1 


M 




o 

CO 


o 
o 








f^ 














IM 




























00 


i '-a t~ 


i 


to 


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rs^ 


CD 










t^ 


>o 




CO 


00 


CO 


05 






o 


§ 












CO 


co" 












1 




IM 




lO 






















00 






i« So 


^ 


























o 


^^ 


00 


CO 


















CO 


05 


•00 






T3 


h 1 










n 


CO 


t^ 






c3 


A 










0» 




c^ 














C3 


o 


lO 


o 




























T3 


U 










C<l 




CO 






o gift 






















lO 




P-, 


Cj 


Tt* 


,— < 


oo 










00 -H 






IC 


o 


CD 






■o 


^-^ 










CO 


00 








e3 


<5 










CO 




■* 








^^ 






■* 


o 


00 


o 






^ 














o 










1^ 




















-C3 

U5 So 


























T^ 


^H 


CD 


05 


CD 














r- 


t^ 


•CO 


OS 






T3 


^_, 


M 








--0 










C 


<5 












,_H 


CO 




"Ih 


























o 




1 


^H 


05 


■>!< 


IM 








CO 


CO 




C<1 


C-l 


r^ 






bl) 


O Si« 












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CD 


CO 


OS 




Tl 






M C-1 O) 




o 


o 








1 


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§ 


c<5 


C<1 






t^ 


o 








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r^ 


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CD 


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CO 










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05 


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CO 


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fe 




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s 


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ta 




















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52 


.. 




p^ 


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110 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 








o 




(SO 




Ci 




>-l 




-^ 




5- 




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^ 


1— I 


»»^ 


H- ( 


rt 


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05 


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00 


CO 


•panjBg 8aaj[ 


CO 


o 


lO 


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lO 


■* 


saanii^ jo ^nnomy 


o 


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t>r 


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112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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dog tags . . . . 

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and Telegraph Company 
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police expenditure . 
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1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



Table XIV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1934. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


95 


20 


5 




120 


2 












125 


30 


21 


- 


176 


4 












285 


54 


29 


- 


368 


6 












510 


80 


36 


- 


626 


7 












691 


152 


31 


- 


874 


9 












561 


75 


55 


2 


693 


10 












462 


74 


55 


- 


591 


11 












1,028 


90 


150 


- 


1,268 


18 












502 


63 


102 


1 


668 


14 












630 


82 


111 


1 


824 


15 












202 


40 


14 


1 


257 


16 












444 


85 


107 


1 


637 


17 












939 


92 


220 


- 


1,251 


18 












569 


43 


96 


1 


709 


19 












426 


32 


55 


- 


513 


1 


'otal 


3 








7,469 


1,012 


1,087 


7 


9,575 



Table XV. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . . 420 


Division 14 


32 


Division 2 . 






629 


Division 15 


10 


Division 4 . 






184 


Division 16 


24 


Division 6 . 






366 


Division 17 


40 


Division 7 . 






22 


Division 18 


39 


Division 9 . 
Division 10 






87 
23 


Division 19 


44 










Division 11 






37 


Total . 


. * 2,006 


Division 13 






49 







* 31 canceled for non-payment. 



114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVI. 

Financial Statement Jar the Year ending November 30, 1934. 





Expenditures 


3. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


.$4,174,366 44 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


7,816 48 


$4,182,182 92 






B Service Other than Personal: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$643 52 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


1,404 85 




4. 


Transportation of persons . 


17,432 96 




5. 


Cartage and freight 


252 10 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


33,834 62 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


1,765 25 




12. 


Bond and insurance premi- 








imis 


732 62 




13. 


Communication 


26,672 59 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and 








care 


16,291 70 




16. 


Care of animals 


3,072 05 




18. 


Cleaning 


2,067 28 




19. 


Removal of ashes, dirt and 








garbage .... 


150 00 




22. 


Medical 


11,092 15 




28. 


Expert 


987 34 




29. 


Stenographic, copying . 


45 56 




30. 


Listing 


63,451 01 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


1,245 71 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 








ing 


124 23 




39. 


General plant .... 


38,584 62 











219,850 16 


C. Equipment: 






1. 


Apparatus, cable, wire, etc. . 


$5,062 33 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


51,458 90 




6. 


Stable 


1,605 39 




7. 


Furniture and fittings . 


4,464 09 




9. 


Office 


9,127 13 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


85 91 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


3,422 88 




14. 


Live stock .... 


1,389 50 




16. 


Wearing apparel . 


60,951 72 




17. 


General plant 


21,524 36 


159,092 21 


D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office 


$34,171 10 




2. 


Food and ice . 


8,857 09 




3. 


Fuel 


28,350 83 




4. 


Foi-age and animal 


3,797 47 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory, 


458 05 




8. 


Laundrj^, cleaning, toilet 


4,290 54 




11. 


Motor vehicles 


40,426 08 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants. 


1,439 71 




16. 


General plant .... 


12,947 58 




17. 


Electrical .... 


3,495 19 


138,233 64 


F. 7. 


Pensions and annuities . 




361,771 69 


H. 


Emergencey Relief Project materials 

Total 


2,100 52 




$5,063,231 14 



1935. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



115 



Table XVI. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1934- 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . S43,767 25 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) . . . 22,372 00 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,205 92 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposits, report blanks, use of police 

property, etc 2,483 39 

Refunds and reimbursements 5,614 08 

For damage to police property 134 94 

Miscellaneous 23 39 

Total S75,600 97 

Credit bj^ the City Collector for money received for damage 

to police property 1,149 48 

Grand total $76,750 45 



Table XVII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1934. 
(Included in Table XVI.) 



Pay rolls 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies 
Pavement and sidewalk surface restoration 

Fm-niture and fittings 

Printing, blueprints, tracings 

Car fares 

Incidentals 



.$35,340 68 

21,657 84 

4,577 48 

679 60 

152 56 

47 70 

35 91 



Total 



J,491 77 



116 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1935.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



117 





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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 





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p. D. 49. 121 



INDEX. 



Page 

Accidents 48,56,116,117 

caused by automobile 49, 116, 117 

number of, reported 56 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 116,117 

Adjustment of claims 57 

Ambulance service 60 

Arrests 37,41,47,86-110 

age and sex of 109 

comparative statement of 110 

for drunkenness 37, 42, 57, 97 

foreigners "*^ . . .42, 87-108 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. 41,96,108 

minors 42, 87-109 

nativity of 43 

nonresidents 42, 87-108 

number of, by divisions 86 

number of, punished by fine 43 

on warrants 42, 87-108 

summoned by court 42, 87-108 

total number of 41, 108 

violation of city ordinances 42, 102 

without warrants 42, 87-108 

Auctioneers Ill 

Automobiles 11, .32, 35, 37, 44, 45, 99 

accidents due to 116,117 

deaths caused by 49,116,117 

operating under influence of liquor 37, 99 

police 35, 60 

public 32, 64, 111 

sight-seeing 65, 111 

stolen 37, 44. 45 

used 44,46, 111 

Benefits and pensions 71 

Biological chemist 10, 19 

Buildings 56 

dangerous, reported 56 

found open and made secure 56 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. {See Detective Bureau.) 

Bureau of Operations 11 

Bureau of Records 20-28 

criminal identification 22, 24 

missing persons 26 

warrant file .... . . 28 

Bureau of Traffic 30 

Carriages, public 32,62,111 

articles left in 63 

number licensed 63, 111 

stands for 32, 64 

Cases investigated 47, 56, 59 

Children 27, 43, 56, 101 

abandoned, cared for 56 

lost, restored 27, 43, 56 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 42, 102 

Claims, adjustment of 57 

Collective musicians 70, 111 

Commitments 43, 57 

Communications system 20 

Complaints 18, 69, 82, 111 

against miscellaneous licenses 69, 111 

against police officers 18, 82 

Courts 28,42,47,87-108,110 

fines imposed by 42, 110 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 28,42,47,110 

number of persons summoned by 42, 87-108 

Criminal work 110 

comparative statement of 110 

Dangerous weapons 71 

Dead bodies 56, 59 

recovered 56, 59 



122 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Deaths 41,49,77,116,117 

by accident, suicide, etc. 49, 116, 117 

of police officers 41, 77 

Detective Bureau 19, 44 

automobile division 44 

lost and stolen property division 46 

general 47 

Distribution of force 41, 74 

Disturbances suppressed 56 

Dogs 111,113,115 

amount received for licenses for 111,115 

number licensed 113 

Drivers 63, 111 

hackney carriage 63, 111 

sight-seeing automobile 65,111 

Drowning, persons rescued from 66, 59 

Drunkenness 37, 42, 57, 97 

arrests for, per day 42 

foreigners arrested for 42, 97 

increase in number of arrests for 42 

nonresidents arrested for 42, 97 

total number of arrests for 42, 97 

women committed for 57 

Employees of the Department 40, 74 

Events, special 51 

Expenditures 38,72,114 

Extra duties performed by officers 47 

Financial 38, 72, 114 

expenditures 38,72, 114 

pensions 72, 114 

receipts 38,72,115 

miscellaneous license fees 69, 111, 115 

signal service 72, 115 

Fines 42,43.110 

amount of 43, 110 

average amount of 42, 110 

number punished by 43 

Finger print 21, 24 

Fire alarms , . 56 

defective, reported . 56 

number given 56 

Fires 56, 59 

extinguished 56 

on water front attended 59 

Foreigners, number arrested 42, 87-108 

Fugitives from justice 47 

Gaming, illegal 103 

Hackney carriage drivers 63, 111 

Hackney carriages 32,62,111 

Hand carts Ill 

Harbor service 36, 58 

Homicide squad 48 

Horses 35, 59 

House of detention 57 

Houee of ill fame, keeping 57, 97 

Hydrants, defective reported 56 

Imprisonment 43,47,110 

persons sentenced to 43 

total years of 43, 110 

Income 38,72,115 

Information from Police Journals, request for 28 

Inquests held 49 

Insane persons taken in charge 56 

Intoxicated persons assisted 56 

Itinerant musicians 69, 111 

.Junk collectors Ill 

Junk shop keepers Ill 

Jury lists, police work on 68 

Lamps, defective, reported 56 

Licenses, miscellaneous 69, 111 

Line-up of prisoners 48 

Listing, poUce 67, 114, 118, 119 

expenses of 68, 114 

number listed 67,118,119 

number of policemen employed in 68 



p. D. 49. 123 

Page 

Lodgers at station houses 43 

Lodging houses, public 71, 111 

applications for licenses Ill 

authority to license 71 

location of . . 71 

number of persons lodged in 71 

Lost, abandoned and stolen property 35, 46, 112 

Lost children 27, 43. 56 

Maintenance shop 36 

Medals 17 

Department 17 

Walter Scott 17 

Medical examiners' assistants 10 

cases on which inquests were held 49 

causes of death 49 

Minors, number arrested 42, 87-109 

Miscellaneous business 56 

Miscellaneous licenses 69, 111, 115 

amount of fees collected for 69, 111. 115 

complaints investigated 69, 111 

number canceled and revoked 69, 111 

number issued 69, 111 

number transferred 69, 111 

Missing persons 26 

age and sex of 27 

number found 27 

number reported 26 

Musicians 69, 111 

collective 70, 111 

itinerant 69, 111 

Nativity of persons arrested 43 

Nonresident offenders . . ' 38, 42, 87-108 

Offenses 37,41,87-108 

against chastity, morality, etc 37,41,96,108 

against license laws 41,93, 108 

against liquor law 37,94 

against the person 37,41,87,108 

against property, malicious 41,92,108 

against property, with violence 37,41,90,108 

against property, without violence 37,41,91,108 

forgery and against currency 41,93,108 

miscellaneous 37,41,99,108 

recapitulation 108 

Parks, public 116,117 

accidents reported in 116, 117 

Pawnbrokers Ill 

Pensions and benefits 71 

estimates for pensions 72 

number of persons on rolls 72 

payments on account of 72,114 

Personnel 16, 40, 74 

Photographic, etc • . 20, 24 

Photography, supervisor of 19 

Plant and equipment 34 

Police administration 5 

Police 68 

special 68 

Police charitable fund 72 

Police department 18,32,35,41,59,60,78-80,82,86-110 

authorized and actual strength of 76 

distribution of 41 

horses in use in 35, 59 

how constituted 40 

officers absent sick 81 

arrests by 41,86-110 

complaints against 18, 82 

date appointed 79 

detailed, special events 51 

died 41,77 

discharged 18, 41 

injured 18, 41 

nativity of 80 

resigned 18, 41 

reinstated 41 

retired 41,78 

school 29 

vehicles in use in 32, 35, 60 

work of . 41 

Police listing 67,114,118,119 



124 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Police signal sendee 20,40.57,72,115 

miscellaneous work ................ 57 

payments on account of 72, 115 

property of 58 

signal boxes 57 

Prisoners, nativity of 43 

Property 35,43,44,46,110,112,115 

lost, abandoned and stolen .35,46.115 

recovered 47, 110 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 112, 115 

stolen 44, 110 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 43 

Public carriages 32, 62, 111 

Public lodging houses 71, m 

Railroad police 69 

Receipts 38,69,72,111 

Requests for information from Police Journals 28 

Revolvers . . 71, 111 

licenses to carry 71, m 

Salaries 74 

School, police 29 

Second-hand articles Ill 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealer Ill 

Sewers, defective, reported 56 

Sick and injured persons assisted 43, 56, 59 

Sickness, absence on account of ...... . 81 

Sight-seeing automobiles 65,111 

Signal service, police 20,40,57,72,115 

Special events 51 

Special police 68 

Station houses 43 

lodgers at 43 

witnesses detained at 43 

Stolen property 43,44,45,110 

recovered 44, 45 

value of 44, 110 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters Ill 

Streets 56, 116, 117 

accidents, reported in 116, 117 

defective, reported 56 

obstructions removed 56 

Supervisor of Cases unit 47 

line-up of prisoners 48 

homicide squad 48 

court supervision 49 

Supervisor of Photography 19 

Teams 56 

stray, put up 56 

Traffic 30 

Uniform crime record reporting 38 

Used cars .44,46, 111 

Hcensed dealers 44, ill 

sales reported 46 

Vehicles 32,35,60 

ambulances 60 

automobiles 35, 60 

in use in police department 35, 62 

public carriages 32,62 

wagons 66,111,113 

Vessels 59 

Wagons 66,111,113 

number licensed by divisions 113 

total number licensed 66,111,113 

Warrant file 28 

Water pipes, defective, reported 56 

Water running to waste, reported ,56 

Weapons, dangerous 71 

Witnesses ■ 42,43,56,110 

fees earned by officers as 42,43,110 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as 42, 43, 110 

number of, detained at station houses 43, 56 

Women committed to House of Detention 57 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 











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