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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.1 

®f)e Commonknealtt) of iWasisiacijugetts 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1935 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



CONTENTS. 



4-/ 3 5 



Letter to Governor 

Introductory 

No replacements in Force in nearly five years 

Two-way radio .... 

Shortage of existing man power 

Safe and sane Fourth of July , 

Offenses reported, cleared . 

Harbor service .... 

Condition of station houses 

Police Training School at Washington, D. C, 
superior officer of Department 

Inventory of all Department property 

Tear-gas equipment, etc., provided 

Value of such equipment demonstrated at State Prison 

Personnel 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 

Department Medal of Honor 

Organization and administration 

Communications system 

Plant and equipment . 

Maintenance shop 

Legislation 

Arrests .... 

Nativity of persons arrested 

Uniform crime record reporting 

Receipts 

Expenditures 
The Department 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees of the Department 

Recapitulation 

Distribution and changes 

Police officers injured while on duty 
Work of the Department . 

Arrests 

Drunkenness .... 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 

Automobile division . 

Lost and stolen property division 

Homicide squad .... 

Biological chemist 

General 



ttended 



break 



bv a 



Page 

7 

7 

8 

9 

11 

II 

14 

16 

17 

17 
18 
18 
18 
19 
20 
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21 
23 
24 
24 
25 
28 
29 
30 
30 
30 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 
33 
33 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
37 
38 
39 
41 



CONTENTS. 



Bureau of Records 

Criminal identification 

Missing persons . 

Request for information from police journals 

Warrant file 
Police School 

Traffic .... 

Supervisor of Cases Unit . 

Line-up 

Court supervision 
Bureau of operations . 
Special events 
Miscellaneous business 
Adjustment of claims 
House of Detention . 
Police Signal Service . 

Signal boxes 

Miscellaneous work 
Harbor service 

Horses 

Vehicle service 

Automobiles 

Combination ambulances 

List of vehicles used by the Department 
Hackney Carriages 

Limitation of hackney carriages 

Special, public and private hackney stands 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Wagon licenses . 
Listing Work in Boston 

Listing expenses . 

Number of policemen employed in listing 
Police work on jury lists 
Special police 
Railroad police . 
Musicians' Licenses 

Itinerant 

Collective 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
Public lodging houses 
Miscellaneous licenses 
Pensions and benefits 
Financial . . '. 
Statistical Tables 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the 
Signal Service and employees 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 

List of pohce officers in active service who died 

List of officers retired 



Police Force 



CONTENTS. 



Statistical Tables: Page 

List of officers promoted 88 

Number of men in active service 90 

Men on the Police Force and year born 91 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness 92 

Complaints against officers 93 

Number of arrests by police divisions 96 

Arrests and offenses 97 

Age and sex of persons arrested .116 

Comparative statement 117 

Licenses of all classes issued 118 

Dog licenses 120 

Wagon licenses 120 

Financial statement 121 

Payments on account of Signal SeiA^ice 122 

Accidents 123 

Male and female residents listed 125 



^i)e Commontuealti) of JHassiattusittts. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1935. 

To His Excellency James M. Curley, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — I have the honor to present, in com- 
pliance with the provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, 
as amended, a report of the Boston Police Department for the 
year ending November 30, 1935. 

Introductory. 

On February 23, 1935, I became Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston. During the preceding two months this 
ofl&ce was held by two different commissioners, namely, 
Eugene C. Hultman and Joseph J. Leonard, the former having 
resigned December 27, 1934, and the latter having been 
appointed December 28, 1934, and resigned February 23, 1935, 
after having served only eight weeks and two days. 

On assuming the office it was perfectly obvious to me and to 
the general public that the morale of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment was at an extremely low ebb, due, in some measure, to 
sudden changes of Police Commissioners, which was without 
precedent in the history of the Department. The first vitally 
essential necessity confronting me was that of upbuilding the 
morale and instilling into the minds of all members of the 
Department a feeling of encouragement, hope, enthusiasm and 
confidence that efficient amd meritorious service would be 
justly recognized. 

It is my experience that one of the most essential factors in 
any efficient organization is a spirit of enthusiasm, mutual 
interest and co-operation. Any general dissatisfaction on the 
part of members of any large police department is not only 
apparent by their demeanor and indifference to duty, but will, 
if the cause is not ascertained and speedily corrected, result 
in a gradual but steady impairment of morale and efficiency. 
It was obvious, from my intensive study of conditions, that 
several long-established departmental regulations were the 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

source of constant dissatisfaction and irritation, for example, 
a regulation which had been in effect for many years requiring 
officers to perform an " Evening-on-the-floor " and "Morning- 
in," in addition to their regular tour of duty. This rule 
required night officers to spend one night in six in the station 
house, year in and year out, even on Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. 

I found that our modern means of police communication, 
including radio and fast motor transportation, enabled the 
Department to mobihze officers at any given place much more 
quickly than these men in station houses could get dressed, 
appear upon the floor, and be transported to such destination. 
Therefore, on April 26, 19.35, this regulation was abolished. 

Many other obsolete rulings and customs were also scrapped. 
Here are some of the things that were done: 

Discarded the harmful leather puttees and Sam Brown 
belts. 

Adopted a new and comfortable uniform. 

Granted the privilege of working without coats in the 
heat of the summer. 

Granted the privilege of changing into winter coats, 
irrespective of fixed calendar dates. 

Installed heaters in the cruising cars (previously known 
in the Department as the pneumonia details). 

The members of the force very quickly began to show their 
appreciation of the keen interest taken in their general welfare 
by demonstrating a renewed interest in their duties. This 
spirit of active co-operation has been steadily fostered and 
encouraged by prompt and public recognition of efficient and 
meritorious service, all of which has been tremendously helpful 
in overcoming the great shortage of patrolmen which has 
handicapped the Department during the past year. 

There have been no Replacements of Officers in the 
Boston Police Department for Nearly Five Years. 

At the end of the police year, November 30, 1931, there were 
on duty 2,092 patrolmen. At the end of the current police 
year, November 30, 1935, there were 1,871 patrolmen. No 
appointments have been made to this grade since March, 1931. 
The number of patrolmen has gradually dwindled by resigna- 
tions, dismissals, deaths, retirements, etc., until at the present 
time there is, in this grade, a shortage of 278 men. 

The demands upon the Department for special service in the 
interests of the citizens are constantly increasing. Not only 
must the most modern methods be used for prevention of 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

crime and detection and apprehension of criminals, but the 
safeguarding of the homes and property and business estabHsh- 
ments of the people of Boston requires an ever-increasing 
vigilance and supervision, due to the exigencies of the times in 
which we live. 

The operation of special departmental units has been found 
to be of vital necessity and, day by day, these units have 
completely demonstrated their value. 

The Bureau of Operations, controlling the communications 
system, including radio car patrol and teletype, has definitely 
proved its worth. 

Two-Way Radio. 

With the completion of the two-way radio system now in 
process of installation, Boston will be the first large city in the 
world equipped with two-way radio. 

When I took office as Police Commissioner for the City of 
Boston on February 23, 1935, I was confronted with a con- 
dition in relation to our two-way radio installation which 
involved many perplexing legal and other problems. 

The then existing contract between the General Electric 
Company and the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston 
provided, among other things, that installation was to have 
been completed by February 23, 1935, the same day I assumed 
the office of Police Commissioner and, further, that broad- 
casting was to have been operative within the limits of a speci- 
fied wave band. The contract was definitely breached by the 
failure of the General Electric Company to meet these two 
conditions as provided in the contract. 

I was then faced with the option of granting additional time 
to the General Electric Company to complete installation and 
of modifying the specifications to permit a much wider wave 
band, which would militate against the selectivity of the radio 
system, or of taking advantage of the breaches, cancelhng the 
General Electric Company contract, and attempting to nego- 
tiate a new contract with some other company. In this latter 
event, it was apparent that the Police Department would be 
without radio service for an indefinite period, and the City of 
Boston would be without the proven valuable protection which 
the radio has afforded. 

The existing contract with the General Electric Company 
called for the installation of a broadcasting outfit at Police 
Headquarters and receiving set in only one division and the 
equipment of only five police cars operating with two-way 



10 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



radio in said division, the remaining seventy-two cars through- 
out the city being merely equipped with one-way radio, that 
is, receiving sets without transmitting facihties. The contract 
price for this was $89,800. Prior to my taking office, the 
General Electric Company submitted a figure of $63,743 for 
the installation of receiving sets in the remaining fourteen 
divisions and the equipment of the said seventy-two one-way 
cars with two-way radio. The total estimated cost, therefore, 
of a complete two-way installation for the entire city would 
have been $153,543. 

As a result of constant negotiations and conferences, aided 
by expert engineering and legal advice, the Department suc- 
ceeded in securing a written agreement from the General 
Electric Company, which saves the City of Boston approxi- 
mately $40,000 to $60,000 and guarantees for a period of five 
years non-interference with the radio system. 

Whereas, a city-wide two-way radio system would have cost, 
as estimated by the General Electric Company, $153,543, the 
Department has now secured the same two-way radio with 
complete city coverage for $89,800. 

A factor of the utmost importance for the protection of the 
lives and property of the citizens of Boston is that these nego- 
tiations, at times most delicate and trying, covering a period 
of over ten months, have been conducted without a single 
moment's cessation of our existing radio service. 

In this connection, it is interesting to note that a comparison 
of breaking and entering and robbery cases, showing one full 
year's operation before the installation of one-way radio on 
August 1, 1934, with one full year's operation after its installa- 
tion, definitely proves the tremendous advantage of this new 
police ally: 



Offense. 


Number of 
Cases. 


Arrests. 


Per Cent. 


Breaking and entering and robbery 
cases reported during year before 
use of radio 

Breaking and entering and robbery 
cases reported during year since use 
of radio 


2,702 
1,513 


965 
897 


35.71 
59.35 


Decrease 


1,189 


68 


* 23.64 



* Increased percentage of arrests. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

An even more powerful adjunct to police work will be func- 
tioning when the two-way radio installation now in progress is 
completed. 

The Bureau of Records has steadily forged ahead during the 
past year by the installation of the latest, most modern machine 
and photographic equipment, and continued improvement in 
the system of recording of criminals' records. 

The Bureau of Traffic, contending daily, as it must, with a 
perfect labyrinth of narrow and short streets which were road- 
ways in colonial days, constantly faces a tremendous problem 
which requires a greater number of officers for proper regula- 
tion of both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. In the business 
district an officer is necessary at almost every busy intersection. 

The safeguarding of the lives and safety of school children 
has had special attention during the past year. There are 296 
school crossings at which officers should be stationed when 
children are going to and from school daily during the school 
term. 

Due to the shortage of patrolmen, 48 school crossings are 
without police protection. Patrolmen assigned to patrol car 
duty, and all other available officers, are stationed at school 
crossings to furnish protection to school children. 

It is estimated that approximately 1,500,000 persons who 
live outside the city limits enter and leave the city daily. 

The shortage of existing man power has necessitated com- 
manding officers of every division in the city to double and 
triple the routes covered daily by foot patrolmen. Officers 
on foot are vitally essential, not only as guardians and pro- 
tectors of the citizens, but also in performing their many other 
duties, such as trying doors of business establishments, noting 
defects in sidewalks and streets, and establishing a personal 
relationship with merchants and residents that cannot be done 
as efficiently by officers in patrol cars. 

Police work, to be good, cannot be confined to the preven- 
tion and detection of crime. Those matters which intimately 
affect the whole people are matters of important police concern. 

I believe that the functions of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment should embrace a much wider scope than the prevention 
and detection of crime. For example, prior to this year, the 
citizens of Boston anticipated the annual Fourth of July cele- 
bration with very definite fear of the consequences from the 
careless use of fireworks which, in many cases, had previously 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

resulted in the loss of lives and serious personal injury. Further- 
more, the horrifying and unnecessary noises created in the 
vicinity of hospitals and homes where the ill were confined had 
a most serious effect upon the health of the patients. 

To this end, an intensive "Safe and Sane" Fourth of July 
program was initiated and conducted by the Department this 
year with gratifying results. 

Signs were placed about all hospitals, homes for the aged 
and infirm, sanitariums, and private dwellings where illness 
prevailed. These signs displayed warnings in bold type, and 
requested the co-operation of the public in maintaining peace 
and quiet. 

Large posters and placards were displayed on all police 
traffic boxes. Posters were placed in store windows and at 
other points of vantage throughout the city. The Police Com- 
missioner personally delivered a radio message to the public 
on this subject. 

It is significant that not a fatal or serious injury was reported 
from the use of fireworks. The Department was highly com- 
mended by hospital officials, patients, the Press, and the 
general public for the success of the campaign. The following 
excerpts from letters written by the Superintendent and the 
Physician-in-Chief of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, and 
others, illustrate the value of this special service to the 
community: 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 

721 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

July 5, 1935. 
Commissioner McSweeney, 
Boston Police Department, 
154 Berkeley Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dear Mr. Commissioner, — I watched with great interest your efforts to 
bring about a quiet and safe Fourth of July celebration and particularly 
your efforts to make it quiet about the hospitals. The success which met 
your efforts must have been very satisfactory to you. 

Here at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital it was Definitely 
Quieter and More Peaceful Than I Know of During any Fourth 
of July Period. 

Our patients appreciated this and I personally on their behalf and for 
myself take this opportunity to express to you our thanks. 
Very truly yours, 
s. Henry A. Christian, Physician-in-Chief, 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 

721 Huntington Avenue, 

Boston, Mass. 

.July 5, 1935. 
Mr. Eugene McSweeney, 
Police Commissioner of Boston, 
Boston, Mass. 

My dear Mr. McSweeney, — I am writing on behalf of the patients of 
the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, to express our thanks for your efforts 
to reduce noise around the hospital during the 4th of July. 

I Think I May Fairly State that it was the Quietest Fourth I 
Recall. 

Yours sincerely, 

s. J. B. Howland, 
Superintendent. 



The Salvation Army, 

202 West Newton Street, 

Boston. 

July 5, 1935. 
Police Commissioner McSweeney, 
Boston Police Department, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

My dear Sir, — I want to take this opportunity of thanking you for 
your splendid co-operation with our hospital on July 4th. 

Very truly yours, 

s. K.\therine Eckerle, 

Superintendent. 



Home for Aged Men, 

133 West Springfield Street, 

Boston, Massachusetts. 



July 6, 1935. 



Commissioner McSweeney, 
Boston Police Department, 
154 Berkeley Street, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dear Mr. Commissioner, — We greatly appreciate your efforts, in our 
behalf, to make our street quiet on the 4th. 

Very truly yours, 

s. Agnes A. Walton, 

Superintendent. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Boston Protective Department, 

3 India Square, 

Boston. 

July 15, 1935. 
Eugene M. McSweeney, Esq., 

Police Commissioner, 
154 Berkeley Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

My dear Commissioner, — Congratulations on your two recent orders 
which resulted in such comfort to the people of Boston, namely the lovely 
quiet of the Fourth of July, and the change of police uniforms. 

Everybody is grateful to you! 

Sincerely yours, 

s. Peter E. Walsh, 

Acting Superintendent. 

I believe that the primary obUgation of a poHce depart- 
ment is the protection of the Uves and property of the citizens, 
and to make the homes, streets, and places of business, safe for 
our people at all hours of the day and night by concentrating, as 
far as is humanly possible, with the depleted force available, 
every effort toward the prevention of crime. 

The new morale established in the Boston Police Department 
during the last nine months of the current police year, with 
over two thousand men co-operating whole-heartedly for the 
protection of the public, has produced gratifying results in the 
reduction of crime. 

The following comparative tables show the number of 
certain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 
1934, to November 30, 1935, as against December 1, 1933, to 
November 30, 1934: 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

A recapitulation of the above tables shows the following: 

Cases Reported. Cleared. 

1935 9,243 8,662 

1934 12,436 9,229 

Per Cent. 
Cleared. 

1935 93.71 

1934 74.21 

A comparison shows an increase in clearances over 1934 of . . 19.50 

There was a decrease in cases reported, as compared with 
1934, of 3,193, or 27.28 per cent. 

Of equal importance with any other phase of police work is 
the necessity for protecting the lives and safety of the citizens 
on the water as well as on land. Boston has a water area of 
58.7 square miles, for the patrolling and protection of which the 
Boston Police Department is responsible. 

Boston Harbor is one of the largest and busiest in the country. 
The policing of it and its tributaries is of vital importance. 

Approximately 4,400,000 persons, composed largely of women 
and children, sail on boats plying Boston Harbor each year. 
The present boat equipment is in a deplorable condition and 
greatly hampers proper service by the officers assigned to 
policing the harbor. In stormy weather it is practically impos- 
sible to navigate the two boats now in commission because of 
their unseaworthiness. In the event of an unforeseen disaster 
it is apparent that the Police Department, on account of its 
inadequate boat equipment, would be unable to render efficient 
service. Boston has been fortunate in not having any harbor 
disasters similar to the burning of the excursion boat ''General 
Slocum" in the East river with a loss of over one thousand 
lives, and the overturning of the "Eastland" in the Chicago 
river with a toll of over eight hundred lives. There is no 
reason to feel that Boston will be forever immune from catas- 
trophes of this kind. 

Some of the harbor duties are assigning steamers to proper 
anchorages in upper and lower harbor to Boston Light, render- 
ing assistance to disabled boats, saving lives, grappling and 
recovering bodies of drowned persons, and giving assistance to 
Coast Guard and Naval boats in the enforcement of all maritime 
laws. 

At the present time, the boats assigned to the harbor patrol 
are the steamer "Watchman" and the launch "E. U. Curtis." 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

The steamer "Watchman" was built in 1896 at a cost of 
$13,000 and was rebuilt in 1926 from the water line up, at a 
cost of $19,000. 

The launch "E. U. Curtis" was built in 1923 at a cost of 
about $4,000. 

The launch "Argus," which has been in use until about a 
month ago, has been condemned and decommissioned. 

Three new boats are required and will be provided by the 
Department to properly police and patrol Boston Harbor. 

Civil War days saw the building of some of the station houses 
now serving as division headquarters for the members of the 
force. Many of these ancient buildings are naturally in 
extremely poor condition, necessitating periodical repairing 
and renovating to make them sanitary and habitable. 

This is an expensive and unsatisfactory condition. For 
example. Station 9, 409 Dudley street, Roxbury, was built in 
1860 to accommodate 100 officers. There are 125 officers 
assigned to this station at the present time. 

Station 10, 1170 Columbus avenue, Roxbury, was built in 
1869 to accommodate 100 officers. There are 117 officers 
assigned to this station at the present time. 

Station 13, 28 Seaverns avenue, Jamaica Plain, was con- 
structed in 1870 to accommodate 60 officers. There are 91 
officers now assigned to this station. 

Station 17, 1891 Centre street. West Roxbury, is a wooden 
structure and was built in 1859 for a clubhouse. It was pur- 
chased by the city in 1904 and attached to Division 13. The 
building was slightly remodeled in 1912, at which time it was 
estabUshed as Station 17 as a result of Division 13 being 
divided into two police districts. 

Considerable work has been done during the past year, such 
as painting and making necessary alterations and repairs, both 
on the exterior and interior of police buildings. 

Several new buildings should be provided. 

In July of this year, J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D. C, extended an 
invitation to designate an official of this Department to attend 
the Pohce Training School at Washington for a twelve weeks' 
intensive course of study and training in poHce organization, 
administration and scientific aids in crime detection. A 
superior officer was selected by the Commissioner to attend the 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

school. The knowledge gained by him will be imparted to all 
members of the force in a series of lectures. 

It is interesting to note that, so far as I have been able to 
learn, the Boston Police Department has never taken a com- 
plete and thorough inventory of all property belonging to the 
Department. 

Therefore, on August 19, I assigned the Property Clerk to 
personally make an inventory of all departmental property. 
This sound business practice will be followed annually hereafter. 

I found on investigation that the Department was not pro- 
vided with proper and modern tear-gas equipment, which is so 
vitally necessary in quelling strike disorders and mob uprisings 
of various kinds. To enable the Department to better cope 
with such conditions, a modicum of several types of tear gas 
implements was purchased. The present supply of tear gas 
equipment will be sufficiently augmented so that the Depart- 
ment will be adequately prepared to deal with such exigencies. 

After rigid tests, the Department purchased, during the 
year, 60 new and improved bullet-proof vests, capable of with- 
standing bullets from high velocity side-arm cartridges, which 
included cartridges for the Colt 38-calibre super-automatic 
pistol. These vests will furnish maximum protection for 
members of the Department. 

The value and need of tear gas equipment and bullet-proof 
vests was efficaciously demonstrated at the recent State Prison 
outbreak, as expressed in the following General Order: 

Boston, December 3, 1935. 
General Order No. 117. 

The Commissioner desires to express his deep appreciation for the out- 
standing demonstration of modern poHce efficiency shown this morning 
by officers of the Boston PoHce Department when an emergency call 
from State Prison was received reporting a jail break by dangerous crim- 
inals. Five desperate convicts broke loose from the Prison at 9.30 o'clock 
this morning. At 11 o'clock all of the prisoners were captured. The 
Superintendent, three Deputy Superintendents, two Captains, four Lieu- 
tenants, nine Sergeants, and 144 Patrolmen arrived at the prison within 
approximately seven minutes of the time of the outbreak. Thirty-six 
radio patrol cars, some of which were equipped with the modern two-way 
radio system, and containing riot guns, arrived at the same time, thereby 
enabling radio-telephone communication to be established immediately 
with police departments of surrounding cities and towns. 

Tear-gas grenades, an important part of the department emergency 
equipment, were used effectively in forcing, without the use of guns, the 
surrender of two of these desperate characters. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

The Commissioner takes great pleasure in commending every officer 
who participated in this splendid demonstration of efficient police work. 

EUGEXE M. McSwEENEY, 

Police Comtnissioner. 

In this connection, the Commissioner of Correction and the 
Warden of State Prison wrote letters of appreciation and com- 
mendation of the work of the Department. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Department of Correction, 

State House, Boston. 

December 12, 1935. 
Mr. Eugene M. McSweeney, 
Police Commissioner, 
City of Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Dear Commissioner McSweeney, — The extraordinary and efficient 
work of the Boston Police force during the recent break at State Prison 
deserves the very highest commendation. All of your officers and men 
did their work so well that I feel it would be almost unfair to single out 
any for special reference. The public response to their work couldn't 
have been better. 

We in the Department of Correction, and the warden and officers of 
State Prison, are more than duly grateful. 

Sincerely yours, 

s. Arthur T. Lyman, 
Commissioner of Correction. 

Personnel. 

On January 21, 1935, Leo Schwartz resigned as Legal Advisor 
to the Police Commissioner. 

On February 13, 1935, Augustine J. Gill resigned as Secretary 
to the Police Commissioner. 

On April 18, 1935, Andrew J. Gorey was appointed Secretary 
to the Police Commissioner. 

During the year ending November 30, 1935, the total strength 
of the uniformed force was reduced by twenty-four men, from 
2,176 to 2,152 by deaths, retirements, resignations and dis- 
missals. One retired sergeant, and a patrolman who had 
resigned, were reinstated. Other employees remained prac- 
tically unchanged. On November 30 of this year there was a 
total of 2,318 persons on the rolls of the Department. 

Many officers were commended in General Orders for meri- 
torious work in the apprehension of criminals and the saving 
of human life. 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In addition, the Commissioner has received many commenda- 
tory letters from citizens, organizations and officials of cities 
and towns, expressing appreciation to members of the Depart- 
ment and the Department as a whole for services rendered. 

During the year the Commissioner, in General Orders, has 
commended officers or brought to the attention of the Depart- 
ment favorable communications as follows: 

Superintendent, 1; Deputy Superintendent, 1; Captains, 2; 
Lieutenants, 2; Sergeants, 14; Patrolmen, 76; and the Depart- 
ment in General, 8. 

It is with great pride I report that during 1935 the members 
of the Police Department contributed approximately $40,000 
to the Emergency Relief Campaign Fund for charitable 
purposes. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and the 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed in December, 1930. 

Annually, since that time, the Superintendent and the 
Deputy Superintendents, acting as a Board of Merit, have 
reviewed the meritorious and courageous acts performed by 
members of the force and have recommended officers for special 
recognition. 

On January 14, 1936, at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, medals for 1935 will be awarded to the 
following-named officers: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department Medal of 
Honor to Patrolman John A. Leach of Division 16. 
Patrolman John A. Leach, at the risk of his life, entered a 
burning building in the early morning of November 9, 1935, 
arousing the occupants and removing several of them to a 
place of safety, including a woman who had collapsed on the 
fifth floor. 

Department Medal of Honor To: 
Patrolman Joseph Brooks, Jr., of Division 2, for meritorious 
service performed on July 10, 1935, while off duty, in swimming, 
fully clothed, to a small boy and rescuing him when he was in 
imminent danger of drowning. 

Patrolman John J. Smith of Division 1, for meritorious duty 
performed on March 10, 1935, in swimming, fully clothed, to 
a person who had jumped into the Charles river and rescuing 
him when he was in imminent danger of drowning. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

In 1935, 5,500 days were lost by officers by reason of injuries 
received while on duty. 

During the year one sergeant and forty-three patrolmen were 
punished for violation of Police Rules and Regulations by 
suspension with loss of pay, or extra duty, or both. Two 
patrolmen were reprimanded in General Orders. 

Five patrolmen were discharged from the service after 
hearings by trial boards composed of three captains; five 
patrolmen resigned while charges against them were pending, 
and complaints against five patrolmen were dismissed after 
hearing. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts awarded one thousand 
dollars each to Lieutenant Charles F. Eldridge and Patrolman 
Edward A. McDonnell as their respective shares of the reward 
for the apprehension and conviction of the Needham bank 
robbers and murderers. The prompt and intelligent action of 
these officers, who gave unstintedly and unselfishly of their 
extra time and service, aided very materially in the successful 
termination of these cases. Both these officers are distin- 
guished medal members of the Department, and have been 
commended in the past for outstanding police duty. While 
a thousand dollars could have been used to good advantage by 
each of them, they insisted upon and did turn over their 
respective shares, totalling two thousand dollars, to widows of 
the two civilian victims. This was a most generous, unusual 
and commendable act on their part and reflects great credit 
and much honor upon them, their families and the Department 
as a whole. 

Organization and Administration. 

The city had been divided into three inspectional districts, 
each district supervised by a Deputy Superintendent. On 
March 15, 1935, the city was rearranged by me into two 
inspectional districts, thereby relieving one Deputy Super- 
intendent who was placed in charge of the Bureau of Operations, 
Bureau of Traffic and the Police School. 

On March 15, 1935, the Bureau of Criminal Investigation was 
reorganized by a readjustment of the various squads and 
personnel for the purpose of promoting greater efficiency. In 
this Bureau but one officer had been assigned to narcotic duty, 
which was woefully inadequate to cope with this important 
branch of police work. Therefore, four officers were assigned 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



by me to compose a Narcotic Squad ; two officers being detailed 
to day duty and two officers to night duty. This change has 
already been justified by the splendid results obtained in the 
increased number of arrests and convictions, as well as enabling 
the Department to co-operate more effectively with the Federal 
Narcotic Agents. 

The following table shows the number of arrests made by 
the Bureau of Criminal Investigation for violation of the drug 
law during the past five years: 



Year Ending November 30. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 



67 
82 

74 
93 



5 
15 

13 
9 



72 
97 
65 
87 
102 



The Homicide Squad was transferred from the Office of 
Supervisor of Cases to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation on 
March 15, 1935. 

A Special Mobile Service Squad, consisting of several units, 
was created in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation to cover 
the entire city from 5.30 p. m. to 8 a. m. daily. This squad 
supplements regular night officers assigned to foot patrol and 
radio patrol cars. 

The Biological Chemist was transferred from the Office of 
the Superintendent to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
on March 15, 1935. 

The civilian position of Armorer was abolished on October 11,. 
1935. In its place was created the position of Sergeant- 
Balhstician, thereby restoring the duties connected therewith 
to a member of the Force. The Sergeant-Ballistician, together 
with the activities concerning ballistics, handwriting and 
document analyses, were transferred from the Office of the 
Property Clerk to that of the Superintendent. 

On October 11, 1935, the civilian position of Supervisor of 
Photography in the Bureau of Records was abolished, and an 
officer of that unit was assigned to supervise the photographic 
work of the Department. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

The position of Sergeant-Chief Radio Operator was created 
on October 11, 1935, in the Bureau of Operations for the purpose 
of supervising and directing the technical requirements of the 
radio system. 

Initial steps have already been taken to replace police officers 
performing clerical and mechanical duties, with civilian em- 
ployees. This procedure has been adopted in the interest of 
economy and efficiency. 

Communications System. 

The Signal Service Unit is responsible for the maintenance of 
the communications system of the Department. This unit, 
in addition to its regular duties, has been assisting the firm of 
Jackson and Moreland, consulting engineers for the Depart- 
ment, in connection with the installation of a two-way radio 
and a wire system. This work is now nearing completion, 
and when the project is completed this Department will be 
equipped with the most modern communications system in 
America. 

During the past year, it supervised the installation of two 
signal boxes in Division 7, East Boston district. 

Several miles of cable were placed underground in con- 
formance with law. Ten new signal boxes were added to the 
underground from the overhead service. 

Officers' Recall and Citizens' Alarm features, now operative 
in seven police divisions, are now being extended to include all 
patrol boxes in the city. Individual line telephone service for 
each patrol box (as contrasted with party line service) has 
been found advantageous in four divisions in which it was 
provided some years ago, and this feature is also being extended 
to include all patrol boxes. 

Apparatus is to be provided in the radio dispatching room at 
Pohce Headquarters for centralized recording of citizens' and 
officers' code calls at all patrol boxes. This will furnish the 
radio dispatcher instantaneous information for dispatching 
radio cars to the box at which the call originates. 

About one hundred miles of new cable is required to provide 
these features and to replace outworn cable which in some cases 
is as much as forty years old. The installation of the new 
cable is near completion. Necessary changes in patrol box 
equipment, the fixtures at Headquarters and various police 
stations, are included. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Arrangements have been completed with the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company for a unified police tele- 
phone system utihzing police-owned cables and patrol box 
equipment in conjunction with leased apparatus in pohce 
buildings. This system, including a dial switchboard at 
Headquarters and a manual switchboard at each station 
house, will provide complete service both inside and outside 
the Police Department for all department telephones, including 
patrol box telephones. 

Plant and Equipment. 

The Property Clerk is the custodian of all lost, stolen and 
abandoned property, money or other property alleged to have 
been illegally obtained, and all articles and property taken 
from persons arrested for any cause He is also responsible 
for, and the custodian of, all seized liquor and gaming imple- 
ments which come into the possession of the Department. 

During the past summer, a distinctly new style summer 
uniform, made of blue serge, was adopted for the purpose of 
comfort and economy, and it has proved very satisfactory. 

The eight-point style police cap was likewise adopted and 
has resulted in a considerable saving, as well as adding to the 
comfort and appearance of the officers. 

There are now twenty saddle horses in the Department. 
Replacements of saddle equipment have been made during the 
past year. 

A new motor boat has been purchased for patrol duty in the 
Charles river. West Roxbury District, replacing one that has 
been condemned for further use. 

Maintenance Shop. — A maintenance shop for the servicing 
of Department automobiles is located in the basement of 
Station 4. The shop is operating twenty-four hours daily. 
An average of thirty cars per day passes through it for the 
purpose of repairing or lubrication. The Department has a 
wrecker for towing motor vehicles. From December 1, 1934, 
to November 30, 1935, it was called into service on 408 occa- 
sions. There is also Department radio service attached to 
the maintenance shop. The Department operates a motor- 
cycle repair shop located in the rear of the station house of 
Division 16. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all Department vehicles and automotive 
equipment in the Department garages at the various divisions. 
He is required to investigate and report on all accidents involv- 
ing Department vehicles. 

Legislation. 
For the purpose of more effectively preventing crime, and 
to assist in the administration of the Police Department of the 
City of Boston, I have presented to the Massachusetts Legis- 
lature for consideration certain bills, as follows: 

1. Senate 382, an Act making it a criminal offense to carry a 
firearm, the serial number of which has been destroyed in any 
manner. 

In numerous cases, firearms having the serial numbers 
defaced, altered, or obliterated, were found in the possession 
of a person arrested and charged with the commission of crime. 
It is obvious that these numbers were tampered with for 
definite reasons. The firearms may have been stolen and the 
numbers defaced to prevent identification by the serial number, 
or were purchased legitimately and the numbers filed off or 
drilled out when they were to be used in the commission of 
crime, in order to prevent tracing of the same to the owner 
The proposed legislation would amend Chapter 140 of the 
General Laws, Ter. Ed., by adding a section numbered 131C, 
under which any person found with a firearm in his possession, 
the serial number of which had been defaced or mutilated in 
any manner, would be guilty of a misdemeanor, and if the fire- 
arm was used in the commission of a felony or attempted com- 
mission of a felony, the person carrying the firearm would be 
guilty of a felony. 

2. Senate 356, an Act to amend the description of persons 
deemed to be vagabonds. 

Considerable difficulty has been experienced in prosecutions 
under the vagabond law. Chapter 272, Section 68, General 
Laws, Ter. Ed. Different interpretations have been placed 
on this statute. One of the difficulties is the meaning of the 
words, "a person known to be a pickpocket, thief or burglar." 
To successfully prosecute under this law, it has been held 
that at the time of the arrest the officer must have personal 
knowledge that the person arrested is a pickpocket, thief, or 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

burglar. This nullifies, to a large extent, the successful prose- 
cution of many cases. Under this bill the words, "a person 
known to be a pickpocket" will be struck out, and in place 
thereof the following words would be inserted: "Any person 
who has a record of conviction as a pickpocket, thief or burglar, 
or for attempting to pick a pocket, attempted larceny or 
attempted burglary . . ." so that the amended section 
would read as follows: "Any person who has a record of 
conviction as a pickpocket, thief or burglar, or for attempting 
to pick a pocket, attempted larceny, or attempted burglary, if 
acting in a suspicious manner around any steamboat landing, 
railroad depot or any electric railway station, or place where 
electric railway cars stop to allow passengers to enter or leave 
the cars, banking institution, broker's office, place of public 
amusement, auction room, store, shop, crowded thoroughfare, 
car or omnibus, or at any public gathering or assembly, shall 
be deemed a vagabond, and shall be punished by imprison- 
ment in the house of correction for not less than four nor more 
than twelve months." 

3. Senate 364, an Act making it a criminal offense for any 
person at race tracks to give or attempt to give certain informa- 
tion on races, owners, or any information of any nature what- 
soever that would tend to influence a person to place a bet on 
the races. 

Since Massachusetts legalized pari-mutuel betting at race 
tracks, the tracks have been infested, more or less, with persons 
known as "touts" who prey upon the patrons of the track and 
at times mulct them of large sums of money by pretending to 
have advance information on the races, and that they were 
personally acquainted with jockeys, owners and managers, 
and, in some instances, that they have paid jockeys to "throw" 
the races. There is no law in Massachusetts at the present 
time covering the situation, and this conduct is not a criminal 
offense. The enactment of this legislation would afford pro- 
tection to the patrons of race tracks, and also to the managers. 

4. Senate 352, an Act providing for further regulation and 
limitation of hackney licenses in the City of Boston. 

At the present time, under Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
as amended by Chapter 280 of the Acts of 1934, the holder of a 
hackney hcense, at any time within one year after the expiration 
of said hcense, shall be entitled as of right, upon payment of 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

the proper fee, to a renewal of such Hcense unless after a hearing 
before the Police Commissioner it appears that he has good 
cause to refuse to issue the same. The Police Commissioner 
is limited, at the present time, to the issuing of 1,525 licenses. 
If an owner of a license does not desire to renew said license, 
the Commissioner, under the law, cannot issue licenses in place 
thereof until one year after the expiration date. When holders 
do not renew their licenses other persons are deprived of the 
opportunity to make a living as a hackney licensee until after 
the expiration of the one-year period. Under the law, these 
licenses are assignable subject to the approval of the Police 
Commissioner, and the practice of assigning has been commer- 
cialized. This, also, prevents many persons from obtaining a 
license and making a livelihood. In order to make this law 
more equitable, a bill has been filed providing that on the 
death, insolvency or bankruptcy of the hackney licensee, the 
license shall be deemed to continue in force as a valid license 
until the end of the license year, or until the ownership of 
such license is transferred for the balance of the license term 
only, by the legal representative of the estate of such owner, 
whichever occurs first. Under the bill, the hackney license 
law is further amended by preventing the assigning of hackney 
licenses. The passage of this bill would permit the hcense to 
be in full force and effect until the end of the license year 
only. 

5. House 1187, an Act providing for ascertaining whether 
or not the residents of Boston who are police listed annually 
are citizens or not. 

This bill provides that Section 4 of Chapter 51 of the General 
Laws, as amended by Section 5 of Chapter 254 of the Acts of 
1933, as further amended by Chapter 345 of the Acts of 1935, 
would be further amended by removing the obligation of the 
police listing board to ascertain the nationahty, if not a citizen 
of the United States, of every person who is police listed, and 
in place thereof, the listing board would obtain information as 
to whether or not the person listed was a citizen of the United 
States. 

The ascertaining of the nationality, if not a citizen, places a 
substantial obligation on the person listed as Well as the listing 
officer. For police listing purposes it is sufficient to ascertain 
whether or not the person is a citizen. Information as to 
nationality may be obtained at the taking of a census. 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Akrests. 
For the twelve months endirg November 30, 1935, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1934, 
a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1934. 



Arrests. 



Yeah Ending 

November 30, 

1935. 



Arrests. 



Offenses Acvinst the Person. 

Murder 

Maaslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Ag.mnst Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offenses Against the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 
Drunkenness 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto, operating under the iniluence of liquor (first 
offense) 

Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (second 
offense) 

Totals 



24 


16 


107 


98 


87 


100 


325 


270 


165 


152 



716 



252 
2,166 



397 
43,825 



654 
18 



688 



217 
1,958 



198 
39,872 



583 



48,736 



44,161 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violation of city 
ordinances, gaming, and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 
the year totalled 75,724, of which 70,214 were males and 
5,510 were females. This total compares with 83,156 for the 
preceding year. 



1936.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — NO. 49. 



29 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 

British Provinces 

Ireland 

England 

France 

Germany 

Italy . 

Russia 

China . 

Greece 

Sweden 

Scotland 

Spain . 

Norway 

Poland 

Australia 

Portugal 

Lithuania 

Finland 

Denmark 

Austria 

Holland 



62,368 Wales . 

2,203 East Indies 

4,214 West Indies 

267 Turkey 

46 South America . 

129 Switzerland 

1,733 Belgium . 

1,217 Armenia 

86 Africa . 

261 Hungary 

454 Asia 

282 Mexico 

28 Japan . 

181 Syria . 

614 Rumania 

9 x\lbania 

161 Servia . 

865 Cuba . 

106 Philippine Islands 

52 Porto Rico . 
73 
27 Total . 



2 

2 

35 

30 

25 

7 

32 

75 

4 

1 

5 

4 

3 

72 

7 

20 

2 

7 



75,724 



The number of persons punished by fine was 13,212, and 
the fines amounted to $154,277.50. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred sixty-seven persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 2,591 to the House of Correction; 16 to the 
Women's Prison; 201 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2,409 to 
other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were: 1 sentenced to death; 
1 life; and 2,397 years (868 sentences were indefinite); the 
total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 
33,893 and the witness fees earned by them amounted to 
$11,516.50. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$93,104.87. 

Two witnesses were detained at station houses; 52 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 43 from last year. 

There was a decrease of .05 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted and an increase of about 19.76 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the city 
for the five years from 1931 to 1935, inclusive, was $829,443.50; 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

in 1935 it was $579,588.40 or $249,855.10 less than the aver- 
age. The amount of property stolen this year which was 
recovered by the Boston Police was $388,289.01 as against 
$379,204.41 last year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded it is interesting to note 
that 17,673 persons or 23.33 per cent of the total arrests during 
the past year were persons residing outside of the city limits 
of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called on to perform police work for nonresidents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, 
either of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 
23.33 per cent of the arrests in Boston are of nonresidents, 
whereas other cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests 
of nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department, during the past year, has continued its 
co-operation in furnishing returns to the National Division of 
Identification and Information of the Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, of the following serious offenses: 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value. 

(b) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1935, receipts 
totaled $80,971.47, as compared with $76,750.45 in the previous 
year. The increase of $4,221.02 in receipts is due to the fact 
that more has been received for dog licenses and for miscel- 
laneous items. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1935, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$5,728,010.85. This included the pay of the poHce and em- 
ployees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($58,638.22 — 
the annual listing on January 1 of all persons twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 
In the corresponding period for 1934, expenditures totaled 
$5,063,231.14. The increase of $664,779.71 was principally 
due to the fact that basic pay rates of police and civilian per- 
sonnel were restored as of January 1, 1935. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my deep personal apprecia- 
tion to the members of the Department for the splendid 
co-operation and good will I have received from them during 
the past year. 

I am not unmindful of the fine support the Department has 
received during the year from the newspapers of Boston, the 
radio broadcasting stations, and the keen interest of the citizens 
in the progress and welfare of the Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner. 

Secretary. Assistant Secretary. 

Chief Clerk. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-I nspectors 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Chauffeur . 
Laborer 
Linemen 



The Police Force. 

Sergeants 
Patrolmen 



1 

4 

19 

60 

9 



Total 



Signal Service. 

Painter 
Signalmen . 
Telephone Operators 



Total 



Employees of the Department. 



Chauffeurs . 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks . 

Elevator Operators 

Engineers, Marine 

Firemen, Marine 

Firemen, Stationary 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Matrons 

Mechanics 



2 
1 

10 
1 

33 
5 
1 
8 
5 
9 

26 
4 
7 
7 



Repairmen .... 

Signalmen .... 

Steamfitter 

Stenographers . 

Superintendent of Build- 
ings 

Assistant Superintendent 
of Buildings . 

Supervisor of Automotive 
Equipment 

Tailor 

Total .... 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 



Grand Total 



183 

1,876 

2,152 



1 
4 
3 

19 



3 

3 

1 

13 

1 

1 

1 
1 

143 



1 

3 

2,152 

19 

143 

2,318 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the PoHce Force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 1 sergeant (retired) and 1 patrolman (resigned) 
were reinstated; 2 civilians were restored as patrolmen; 
5 patrolmen were discharged; 5 patrolmen resigned (while 
charges were pending); 22 patrolmen were promoted; 2 cap- 
tains, 2 sergeants and 2 patrolmen were retired on pensions; 
1 lieutenant, 4 sergeants and 7 patrolmen died. (See 
Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1934: 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1935. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on .Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1934. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


72 
14 

77 
102 


865 
170 

1,194 
1,255 


28 

92 

1,272 
624 


Totals . 


265 


3,484 


2,016 



Work of the Department. 

Ajrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 

a separate person, was 75,724, as against 83,156 the preceding 

year, being a decrease of 7,432. The percentage of decrease 

and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

Offenses against the person Decrease 11. 12 

Offenses against property committed with violence Decrease 3 . 56 

Offenses against property committed without violence, Decrease 9 . 39 

Malicious offenses against property • . . Decrease 5.84 

Forgery and offenses against the currency . . . Increase 41 . 66 

Offenses against the license laws Decrease 14. 10 

Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. . . Decrease 8.96 

Offenses not included in the foregoing .... Decrease 8.68 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were 11,874 persons arrested on warrants and 49,392 
without warrants; 14,458 persons were summoned by the 
court; 45,195 persons were prosecuted; 29,477 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 
1,052 were dehvered to outside authorities. The number of 
males arrested was 70,214; of females, 5,510; of foreigners, 
13,367, or approximately 17.65 per cent; of minors, 7,322. 
Of the total number arrested 17,673, or 23.33 per cent, were 
nonresidents. (See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1931 to 1935, inclusive, was $206,042.92; in 
1935 it was $154,277.50, or $51,765.42 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 
43,460; in 1935 it was 33,893, or 9,567 less than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $13,740.50; 
in 1935 it was $11,516.50, or $2,224 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 109. 
There were 3,953 less persons arrested than in 1934, a decrease 
of 9.02 per cent; 14.21 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 22.65 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XL) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 75.724, 
being a decrease of 7,432 from last year, and 7,162 less than the 
average for the past five years. There were 39,872 persons 
arrested for drunkenness, being 3,953 less than last year and 
1,648 more than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of 9.34 
per cent in males and a decrease of 2.88 per cent in females 
from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (75,724), 201 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say, that one arrest 
in 376 was for such offense or .26 per cent. 

Fifty-four and ninety-one hundredths per cent of the persons 
taken into custody were between the ages of twenty-one and 
forty. (See Table XII.) 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
On March 15, 1935, the name of "Bureau of Criminal Inves- 
tigation" was restored to this unit. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

This Bureau, which is a central detective agency of the 
Department, consists of several subdivisions, and is operated 
on a large scale and in an efficient manner. 

In addition to its division for investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen, divisions for lost and stolen property and 
homicide investigation, — squads, to cover the following phases 
of police work and investigation, operate day and night from the 
Bureau: Automobile, arson, banking, express thieves, general 
investigation, hotels, lost and found property, pawnbrokers, 
safe and loft, narcotic, shopping, pickpocket, radical and 
night-time. 

Members of this Bureau investigate every felony committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also handle 
all cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of 
investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they co-operate in every possible way with 
outside pohce departments in the investigation of crime and 
the prosecution of criminals. 

On March 15, 1935, the Biological Chemist of the Depart- 
ment was transferred from the office of the Superintendent of 
Police to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

A summary of his work is included within the report on this 
Bureau. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in 
co-operation with the Department of Justice, Post Office 
Department and Immigration authorities of the United States. 

The automobile division index contains records of 700,000 
automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen 
in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, cars for 
which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons and 
cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. This 
index is constantly increasing. Many arrests are made by 
officers of the Department and the automobile division through 
information obtained from this index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this 
division during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms 
and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the First, 
Second and Third Classes. 

Dui'ing the year 211 applications for such licenses were 
received; of these 206 were granted (3 without fee), 2 were 
rejected and 3 filed without action. 

Of the licenses granted, 12 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 11 were transferred to new locations. (See 
Table XIV.) 



Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1935. 



Month. 


Reported 

Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1934 












December . 




453 


439 


8 


6 


1935 












January 










318 


308 


7 


3 


February 










260 


250 


5 


5 


March 










346 


339 


5 


2 


April . 










274 


263 


9 


2 


May . 










285 


275 


7 


3 


June . 










266 


258 


4 


4 


July . 










317 


297 


14 


6 


August 










361 


327 


19 


15 


Septembc r 








320 


299 


7 


14 


October 








419 


399 


7 


13 


November 








400 


381 


1 


18 


Totals 








4,019 


3,835 


93 


91 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



37 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1935. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1934. 








December 


2,867 


1,815 


880 


1935. 








January .... 


3,504 


1,907 


952 


February 






2,535 


1,550 


546 


March . 






4,378 


2,479 


1,183 


April 






5,238 


3,318 


1,504 


May 






4,753 


3,587 


1,559 


June 






3,662 


3,733 


1,118 


July 






3,597 


2,907 


997 


August . 






3,836 


2,961 


908 


September 






3,346 


2,367 


750 


October . 






2,753 


2,252 


793 


November 






2,552 


2,066 


625 


Totals 






43,021 


30,942 


11,815 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost 
or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased 
by dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property inde.x 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Homicide Squad. 

On March 15, 1935, the homicide officers were transferred 
from the Office of Supervisor of Cases to the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation. It is their duty to interrogate all persons involved 
or having knowledge of the commission of crimes of murder, 
manslaughter, abortion or other crimes of violence. The 
officers assigned to homicide work, with police stenographers, 
are subject to call at any. hour of the day or night, and have 
been very successful in obtaining confessions and valuable 
statements. They are also required to prepare cases when 
inquests are necessary. The homicide files contain complete 
reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, inquests and also 
a record of all serious accidents which are reported to the 
Police Department. 

Following is a brief report of the Homicide Unit of the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported to this 
Department for the period, December 1, 1934, to November 30, 
1935, inclusive: 



Abortion 


7 


Homicide . . . 


26 


Alcoholism 


89 


Horse and wagon . 


2 


Asphyxiation . 


16 


Lightning, struck by . 


1 


Automobile . 


136 


Machinery 


5 


Buildings collapsed 


2 


Motorcycle 


1 


Burns .... 


13 


Natural cause 


365 


Drowning 


38 


Poison .... 


6 


Elevator ... 


7 


Railroad (steam) . 


12 


Exposure 


4 


Railway (street) . 


6 


Fall .... 


82 


Shot by officer 


1 


Falling objects 


1 


Stillborn .... 


13 


Fire 


14 


Suicide .... 


95 


Cause of death under in 


- 






vestigation . 


1 


Total 


. 943 



Of the total number, the following cases were prosecuted in 
the courts: 

Manslaughter (automobile), 133 

Murder 5 

Practicing medicine with- 
out a license ... 1 
Violation of automobile law 

(accidents) .... 8 

Total . . . . 223 



Abortion 


5 


Accessory to abortion . 


4 


Assault and battery 


14 


A.ssault to kill 


24 


Assault with weapon . 


10 


Assault to rob 


2 


Armed robbery 


1 


Breaking and entering . 


1 


Manslaughter 


15 



1936.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



39 



The following inquests were held during the year; 



Automobile 
Elevator 
Fall 
Homicides 



Machinery 
Railroad (steam) 

Total 



2 
6 

26 



Two hundred and twenty-one cases of violent deaths were 
investigated on which no inquests were held by a court justice, 
acting under authority of Chapter 118 of the Acts of 1932. 

Biological Chemist. 
Summary of the Year's Work. 
The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department, 
located at the Southern Mortuary, was started February 19, 
1934. 

In the past year, there has been a decided increase in the use 
of the laboratory. 





Feb. 19, 1934, 

to 
Nov. .30, 1934. 
(9 mos. Period.) 


Dec. 1, 19.34, 

to 

Nov. 30, 193.5. 

(12 mos. Period.) 


Increase. 


Approximate 
Percentage 
of Increase. 


Tests .... 
Cases .... 


1 ,703 
83 


2,87.5 
173 


1,172 
90 


69% 
108% 


Totals . 


1.786 


3,048 







Statistical figures, however, give no clear idea of the work. 
A brief review of different phases of the work will yield a better 
picture. 

1. Bloodstains. — Since its start the laboratory has handled 
ninety cases in which there was a question of bloodstains. 
Individual tests for blood run into several hundred. Reports 
have been sufficiently numerous for this work to be familiar. 
The laboratory gives information on the following: 

1. Is the stain blood? 

2. Is the bloodstain human blood? 

3. What type of human blood is it (if enough stain is 
present) ? 

4. Possible sources of a given specimen? 

2. Tissues. — Fragments of tissue are sometimes found on 
articles. These are examined, permanent sections made, and 
identification of the type of tissue made. In some cases 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

such as hit-and-run cars where a question of origin may arise, 
the human protein test is apphed to show whether or not the 
tissues are of human origin. 

3. Hairs. — Hairs may be identified as of animal or human 
origin, and with a sample for comparison it is possible to state 
whether or not the two, known and unknown, are consistent in 
all characteristics. 

4. Miscellaneous. — In the course of the year the laboratory 
has had several cases of infrequent types, including some 
ingeniously contrived valerian and mustard oil stink bombs. 
The analysis of specimens of safe insulation and of seized 
material, believed to be safe insulation, was one. Others were 
the identification of various specimens of differing substances, 

5. Toxicology. — This phase of work carried out in co- 
operation with the medical examiners, although familiar to 
homicide men, may be of general interest, and may be illustrated 
by a few examples. 

In a recent case the finding of 47 per cent saturation of the 
blood of a victim with carbon monoxide showed that he was 
not dead when the fire was started, and that he died as a 
result of the fire. The finding of 0.17 per cent ethyl alcohol in 
his brain showed that he had been drinking. 

In two other deaths, originally diagnosed as botulism (a type 
of bacterial toxin poisoning), due to canned grapefruit juice, 
the finding of methyl (wood) alcohol in the tissues was of 
considerable importance. The value to the canning industry of 
freeing the canned juice from any blame for the deaths is 
obvious. 

In a fatal shooting case there were several unusual circum- 
stances. Analysis of the contents of the victim's stomach 
showed that he had been given chloral "knock-out drops" 
prior to the shooting. 

Ethyl alcohol or drunkenness is often a question in many 
of our cases. In a number of them, analysis of the brain for 
ethyl alcohol has shown concentration high enough for death, 
or high enough for drunkenness as a contributing factor to the 
accident. 

There have been a number of cases with particular features 
of interest to the analyst. One was a death from nitroprusside 
(a complex cyanide), an unusual agent for suicide, as it is 
generally considered of slight toxicity. Another was the 
securing of a positive test for cyanide in a death due to an 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

excessive dose of luminal. These cases were of primary 
interest to the chemist, but it can be seen that the tracing out 
of the chemical reactions and relations behind these unusual 
cases is necessary to elimination of all suspicion of a criminal 
relation. 

These few cases will give a brief idea of the toxicological 
phase of the laboratory's work. It may be noted that certain 
of them roughly parallel some of the much-cited cases, and 
brief mention has been given to show our work in that field. 

The chief features of the work at the laboratory have been 
briefly mentioned. There have also been a number of miscel- 
laneous items of infrequent occurrence. During the course of 
the year the laboratory has had a number of occasions for 
co-operation with the Department of Public Safety laboratory, 
and enjoyed very cordial relations with them. It also has 
had occasion to co-operate with other law enforcement agencies 
or medical men associated with it in given cases. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this Bureau, investigated 
during the year, was 6,990. There were 63,120 cases reported 
on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports on 
these cases are filed away for future reference. Complaints 
are received from many sources, including cases referred to the 
Bureau by justices of courts and the district attorney, in 
addition to cases reported direct to the Police Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation are included in statements of general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties of this Bureau are of special character, 
the following statement may be of interest: 

Number of persons arrested . • 2,250 

Fugitives from justice from other States arrested and 

delivered to officers from these States .... 61 

Number of cases investigated 6,990 

Number of extra duties performed 9,614 

Number of cases of abortion 8 

Number of days spent in court by officers .... 1,932 
Number of years' imprisonment, 216 years, 3 months, 15 

days and 17 indefinite terms. 
Amount of property recovered . ... . . $137,622.02 

Bureau of Records. 
The Bureau of Records was estabhshed October 17, 1931, 
and that part of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, known 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

as the Criminal Identification Division, was merged with the 
Bureau of Records. Additional changes have been made to 
simplify the maintenance of police records as well as to make 
the records of the Department uniform in all its branches. 
The efficiency of this Bureau has been greatly increased by the 
installation of complete and thoroughly modern identification 
equipment consisting of the following machines and photo- 
graphic apparatus: 

3 4x5 Graflex. 

1 8x10 camera. 

1 4x5 photo record. 

1 enlarging, reducing and copying, size 8x10. 

3 fingerprint cameras, used at scenes of crime. 

1 Rectigraph. 

1 Dexigraph. 

1 complete set of fluorescent screens. 

Lenses for magnification photography. 

1 Multilith machine. 

1 Violet ray machine. 

1 Fluoroscope. 

1 16 millimeter movie camera. 

A Multilith machine which had been purchased, in order to 
enable this Department to prepare and complete the printing 
of circulars containing photograph and fingerprints of persons 
who were either missing or wanted for criminal offenses, has 
been placed in charge of a newly appointed operator and 
under his supervision, approximately 1,272,450 impressions 
were run off. This includes 116 Department forms, 25 pohce 
school forms, 25 circular letters and 4 fugitive circulars contain- 
ing the photographs and fingerprints of persons wanted by 
this Department. 

Cameras for the preparation of half-tones are a part of the 
Multilith equipment, which, incidentally, add to the modern 
equipment of the photographic unit. This machine is capable 
of printing in approximately two hours descriptive circulars of 
persons wanted, and in some cases it is possible to. complete 
and mail such circulars to outside cities before the fugitive 
arrives at his destination. 

There were 706,620 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machine comprising daily manifolds, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins, circular letters and Police School lectures. 

During the year 20,000 circulars, containing photographs and 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed from 
this office to every city and town in the United States with a 
population of 5,000 or more, State Bureaus of Identification, 
all Army and Navy recruiting stations. United States Immi- 
gration offices and Customs Stations, and a number of the 
larger cities in foreign countries; in addition there were 10,000 
photographic circulars, containing photographs and descrip- 
tions of persons wanted for crime, sent to departments within 
a radius of 100 miles of Boston. 

The photographic unit of this Department supplies the 
Medical Examiners with complete sets of enlarged photographs 
in homicide cases. The photographic unit of the Bureau is 
one of the finest and most modernly equipped in the entire 
country. Photographic films in various sizes are filed in 
proper order in steel files equipped with locks. The enlarged 
photographs are filed in cabinets especially built to accommo- 
date the size. The enlarged photographs are principally the 
scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and suspicious 
fires, and have proven invaluable for court purposes. Many 
communications have been received as a result of the value 
of these photographs, particularly in arson cases. Juries have 
been greatly assisted in determining the condition of the 
burned premises by the introduction and exhibition of these 
photographs in court. This same effect prevails in homicides 
and hit-and-run cases. 

The files in this Bureau contain records of all assignments 
made in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records 
of arrests made throughout the Department. On file also are 
reports of all felonies committed within the city and all reports 
of the investigation of those felonies. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints and 
photographs, also records of all inmates of the Suffolk County 
House of Correction and their fingerprints. The keepers of 
the jails and Houses of Correction in the several counties of 
the Commonwealth have recently been requested to furnish 
this Bureau with a copy of the fingerprints of every inmate 
and they have responded. In addition to the foregoing, the 
files contain many thousands of photographs and fingerprints, 
correspondence, records, clippings and histories of criminals 
arrested or wanted in various parts of the United States and 
foreign countries. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

During the past year, the main index file has been thoroughly 
modernized by alphabetical arrangement. Practically all of 
the obsolete index matter has been removed so that, with the 
additions to this file made in the course of the past year, there 
are now approximately 758,206 persons recorded in the files 
of this Bureau. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 
cabinets. Photographs received from outside departments 
are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and those taken 
by this Department are placed in the "Local Segregated" file. 
The photographs of all criminals are segregated into four dis- 
tinct sections, namely, white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each 
of these groups is subdivided according to sex and is also 
classified under the head of the crime in which the subjects 
specialize. The local segregated file contains 16,460 photo- 
graphs and the foreign segregated file contains 8,762 photo- 
graphs. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and 
in many instances important identifications have been made 
which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valuable 
assistance has also been rendered to government officials of the 
following branches: Post Office Department, Treasury Depart- 
ment, Secret Service Department, Department of Justice and 
other government agencies. Similar services have also been 
rendered to railroad and express companies. 

Members of this Bureau visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and 
secured photographs of fingerprints, in many instances, of the 
persons who committed these crimes, and, in many cases, took 
photographs of the scene where the crime was committed. 
The figures and other data in connection with this work are 
contained in a subsequent part of this report. 

This Bureau has successfully continued in the operation of 
an ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black light." 
This type of lamp is used for the detection of forgeries in 
checks and altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counter- 
feit moneys, fake antiques, and also for the photographing of 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

blood-stained fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not be 
photographed are now photographed with ease through the 
use of luminous powders such as anthracene or luminous zinc 
sulphide, due to the radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The photographic unit, during the past year, completed 
over 71 tests with infra-red rays on blood-stained fabrics, 
blood-stained instruments used in assaults, human hair and 
other clues left at the scenes of serious crimes. These tests 
were for research, and at present excellent results are obtained 
with this type of plate. The use of this plate is comparatively 
new in the detection of crime, and has proven a valuable addi- 
tion to our photographic equipment. The Bureau is fre- 
quently called upon by other departments for assistance in 
photography of this type. 

There have been recently acquired by this Bureau two 
valuable pieces of scientific equipment. The first is known as 
the fluoroscope. When the rays of this instrument are trained 
on the subject or object before it, it reveals the presence of any 
foreign substance concealed either on or in his person; for 
instance, jewelry, metal or glass. The finding of glass in 
clothing of a person suspected of striking and killing a pedes- 
trian with an automobile is another example of what the 
instrument may accomplish in the detection of crime and 
criminals. The same is none the less true of inanimate ob- 
jects, such as packages containing bombs or concealed defects 
in the mechanism of an automobile or other object, which may 
be responsible for serious accidents or death of persons. The 
value of this device in thwarting criminals is very apparent 
and will make an important addition to the scientific equipment 
contained in this Bureau. 

The second piece of equipment is called the "White Drill," 
and was purchased for the purpose of repairing photographic 
equipment. This work had been done by commercial con- 
cerns but will now be performed by the photographers attached 
to this Bureau, resulting in a large saving. 

A modern development of the photographic unit is the instal- 
lation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photographs 
of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are first sent 
to the United States Department of Justice, Army, Navy and 
Marine Corps in such cases where the persons are of the enlist- 
ment age, in an effort to identify these dead. Failing in this, 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

they are filed in the Bureau of Records for future reference. 
Through this method a large proportion of the tentatively 
unidentified dead were later identified and their relatives, if 
any, notified. 

The single fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing a crime. Here- 
tofore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might 
be, taken at the scene of a crime were valuable only for com- 
parison with the ten fingerprints of the subject whether the 
suspect's prints were then in our files or taken later. There 
was no method of filing latent fingerprints taken at the scene 
of crime up to the comparatively recent origination of the single 
fingerprint system of filing by Chief Inspector Battley of the 
Fingerprint Division of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley 
system of single fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of 
Records, and does not weaken in any way the standard system 
of filing fingerprints, but is a very valuable addition thereto. 
There are at present on file in this Bureau 9,560 Battley single 
fingerprints and 226 latent fingerprints which are compared 
with all incoming single fingerprints. In the current police 
year 14 latent fingerprints were positively identified with the 
fingerprints of persons suspected of crime at the scenes of which 
the latent fingerprints were developed. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the Ber- 
tillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 
the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
for this and other departments through the fingerprint files 
of this Bureau. The identification of persons wanted for 
murder and robbery while armed was among the most important 
made. 

Another important development of this Bureau within the 
current police year was the institution of the civilian finger- 
print file wherein are kept the fingerprints of certain license 
applicants with a suitable index attached to it. 

By means of the segregated file it is impossible for a person 
with a criminal record whose fingerprints are on file to obtain 
a hcense under an assumed name, because by comparing his 
fingerprints with those in the civilian fingerprint file it is a 
matter of only a minute to determine whether or not the par- 
ticular applicant has ever had, or applied for, a license before. 
There are now contained in the civilian files the fingerprints 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

and criminal record, if any, of 7,435 hackney carriage opera- 
tors, 297 sight-seeing car operators and 2,550 Special Police 
Officers. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of the more important accom- 
plishments of the Criminal Identification Unit of the Bureau of 
Records. 

This table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of copies prepared. 

Identification of criminals arrested locally 1,437 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere 839 

Scenes of crime photographed 2,188 

Circulars sent out by identification unit 20,000 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1934 146,685 

Made and filed during year 2,246 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 1,550 

Number on file November 30, 1935 150,481 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1934 104,776 

Taken and filed during the year 2,246 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 3,033 

Number on file November 30, 1935 110,055 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 5,517 

Other cities and states 1,530 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Identification (United States Department 

of Justice) . . . . . . . . . . 2,246 

State Bureau of Identification 4,051 

Other cities and states ...» 1,459 

Supplementary. 

Number of scenes of crime visited . . . . . . . 2,188 

Number of exposures (small camera) 2,296 

Number of prints (small camera) 2,296 

Number of enlargements: 

16 by 20 inches 24 

11 by 14 inches 358 

8 by 10 inches 1,100 

Miscellaneous Department Photography : 

Films 2,827 

Prints made from same 2,800 

Number of rectigraph photographs 14,328 



48' POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Miscellaneous Department Photography: 
Number of photographs of poHce officers 
Number of civihan employees photographed . 
Number of negatives of criminals 
Number of prints from same .... 
Number of fingerprint investigations (negative) 
Number of fingerprint investigations (positive) 



I 

3 

3,294 

22,755 

444 

1,099 



Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 1,500 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 

Police officers 1 

Special police officers 259 

Taxi drivers 629 

Civilians 3 

The Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification and filing, 
which had been in operation in the Boston Police Department 
since the installation of fingerprints in 1908, was entirely dis- 
placed and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended 
System of fingerprint classification and filing as used in the 
United States Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

In order to effect the change, some 150,000 fingerprints 
were carefully checked by operatives, the formula on each 
was revised and a new type of filing card made out for each set 
of fingerprints, together with the complete criminal record of 
each subject typed thereon, showing the dealings of the indi- 
vidual with the various law-enforcement agencies throughout 
the country. In such cases where a criminal subject uses one 
or more aliases, cross reference cards were made and filed in 
addition to the main card. There are now on file in this 
Bureau the 8" by 8" record cards of 102,200 males and 9,845 
females. 

In order to make sure that every record of each subject will 
be as complete and accurate as possible, this Bureau is under- 
taking to forward daily to the United States Department of 
Justice at Washington, D. C, a large quantity of fingerprints 
which the Department of Justice operatives will compare with 
their fingerprints and forward complete criminal records on 
each person whose fingerprints are sent. 

Such records received from the Department of Justice will be 
compared with the records already typed on the fingerprint 
card and any additional information furnished by the Depart- 
ment of Justice will be added to the card now on file in this 
Bureau, thus bringing our records up to date in every particular. 

In effecting the transformation of systems from the Conley- 
Flak to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons who are either 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



now dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely at an 
end, were removed from the active file and placed in a separate 
file for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates were taken 
from the files and placed in other inactive files. A final exam- 
ination was then made to insure correct filing of every finger- 
print card. At this writing, it can be truthfully said that the 
fingerprint system of the Boston Police Department, including 
method of filing, quality and amount of fingerprint equipment 
and skilled operators, is comparable to the practically infallible 
files of the Department of Justice at Washington, D. C, after 
which this Department's new system was fashioned. 

Missing Persons. 
The Missing Persons Unit is a part of the Bureau of Records. 
The following Table No. I shows the number of persons lost or 
runaway during the year of 1935 in Boston, Mass. : 



Total number reported missing in Boston 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 

Total number still missing 

Age and Sex of Persons Missing in Boston. 



1,366 
1,309 

57 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Table No. 1. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Male.-?. 


Females. 


Under 15 years. 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 


376 

247 
300 


99 

195 
149 


372 

241 
273 


99 

186 
138 


4 
6 

27 


9 
11 


Totals 


923 


443 


886 


423 


37 


20 



I am submitting herewith also Table No. 2 of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston. 

Total number of persons reported missing from cities and towns 

outside of Boston, as shown by Table No. 2 . . . . 2,240 
Total number restored to relatives, etc 1,844 

Total number still missing 396 



Table No. 2 shows a clearance of approximately 82 per cent. 

By careful checking with recording agencies the table shows 

the number found is 1,844. The total still missing is 396. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Of the 1,844 reported found, the missing persons unit was active 
in assisting to locate them. The total number of State Wards 
reported as runaways is 209. The total number apprehended 
and returned, male and female, is 102, leaving 107 still at large. 

Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing from Cities 
AND Towns Outside of Boston, 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing, 


Table No. 2. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 

Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years, 


398 

597 
579 


127 

332 
207 


352 

487 
469 


109 

259 
168 


46 

110 
110 


18 

73 
39 


Totals . 


1,574 


666 


1,308 


536 


266 


130 



Of the latter table this Department has kept a complete 
record of 2,240 persons reported missing from cities and towns 
outside of Boston. 

There were recorded 159 identified dead cases, all of which 
were investigated by the various units of the Boston Police 
Department. 

Two thousand two hundred and seventy-seven lost children 
were restored to their parents by officers of the different divi- 
sions of this Department; this record does not appear in 
Table No. 1, because they were found a few hours after they 
were lost. 

Recorded and investigated 59 unidentified dead cases. 

Of the 102 state ward runaways located, this Department 
assisted in the apprehension and locating of 72 of them. The 
missing persons unit handled approximately 1,731 pieces of 
correspondence, sent out 3,606 tracers, and interviewed 2,473 
persons, relative to missing persons. It also sent out 4,435 
rectigraph and photostatic descriptive circulars of missing 
persons and succeeded in establishing the identity of six persons 
suffering from amnesia. 

Request for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from police journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports services performed as follows: 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

poUce journals in regard to accidents and thefts . 14,732 

Days in court 12 

WARRANy File. 

The warrant file for the entire PoHce Department is now 
kept in the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued 
to or received by this Department is sent out each day on the 
manifold and every officer in the Department receives a copy 
of this list. Twenty-four hours after the issuance of a warrant, 
if the person named therein has not been arrested, a card pro- 
vided for the station houses is forwarded to the Bureau of 
Records with all the data pertaining to the warrant and the 
case. These cards are alphabetically filed so that almost in- 
stantaneously it can be ascertained whether a warrant exists 
in the Department for any person that may be named. On 
the service of the warrant another card goes forward to the 
Bureau of Records with the necessary information of service. 

All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant files of the Bureau of Records. All corre- 
spondence pertaining to the movement of warrants outside 
the city proper is carried on in the Bureau of Records. Com- 
manding Officers of stations are required, under the rules and 
regulations, to notify the warrant unit of an arrest on warrants 
issued to the Boston Police Department and all other police 
departments, also when arrests are made without a warrant 
involving serious crimes. This rule applies to this procedure 
every hour of the day and night. The warrant files are imme- 
diately searched and if it appears that there is a warrant for 
the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the officer in 
command of the arresting division shall be immediately notified 
and given full particulars and the police division in Boston or 
outside jurisdiction is immediately notified that the person is 
under arrest. 

The following table sets forth data relative to the receipt of 
warrants by this Department and their disposition: 

Warrants received by Bureau of Records 4,422 

Arrested on warrants 2,364 

Warrants returned without service 1,451 

Warrants sent out to divisions within the Department and to 

other jurisdictions 2,322 

Active warrants on file issued to Boston Police 4,374 

Active w^arrants issued to Boston Police now out of state . 176 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police forwarded to other cities 

and towns in this state 59 

Warrants received from other states now on file at this Bureau . 79 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service in our files 76 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers .... 181 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. The 
photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally before 
the courts of this city, but on occasions, where connections are 
made with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photographer 
who enlarges the prints for the purpose of charting them for 
presentation as evidence in court is also summoned into court 
to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. There 
have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of police of 
outside cities and towns have asked for the services of finger- 
print and photography experts in consequence of crime com- 
mitted in their jurisdiction, and the Department co-operated 
by sending a fingerprint man, properly equipped, to survey the 
scene of crime and reproduce any prints that may be available. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of convic- 
tions for presentation in courts, both here and in other cities. 

A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the 
service of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who drafts 
the scenes of crime for presentation as evidence in court to aid 
the prosecution in showing the jury the exact location, and 
surroundings at the scene. During the course of the year the 
draftsman visited the scenes of various crimes where he took 
the measurements of the same and later drew to scale 58 indi- 
vidual plans which were used as exhibits in the following 
courts within the jurisdiction of Boston: 

Municipal Courts 35 days. 

Superior Court 42 days. 

Suffolk County Grand Jury ... 35 days. 

Police School. 
The fourth term of the police school was opened on Novem- 
ber 19, 1934, under the direction of the Superintendent and an 
administrative board, consisting of four Deputy Superin- 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

tendents and five Captains. All patrolmen, with the excep- 
tion of those who had reached the age of sixty years and those 
excused by the administrative board for good reasons, were 
compelled to attend sessions of the school on time other than 
that required for the performance of regular police duties. 
Four 45-minute sessions of the school were held each week, on 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday; two day ses- 
sions for officers on night duty; two evening sessions for officers 
on day duty. All officers attending each week's lecture were 
given a copy thereof with instructions to study same in prepara- 
tion for a final examination to be held at the close of the school 
term. 

During this term of the school 1,815 officers attended the 
lectures and instructions were given in twelve different sub- 
jects, such as "Prevention and Inv^estigation of Acci- 
dents"; "General Radio Instructions"; "Value of 
Photography in Securing Evidence at Crime Scenes"; 
"Crime Prevention and Juvenile Delinquency"; "Court 
Procedure"; "Forensic Ballistics," etc. 

In addition to the regular classes of instructions, a general 
review of the sLxteen lectures given during the third term of 
the school was held for the benefit of those patrolmen who 
failed to obtain a required percentage marking during the 
final examination at the close of the third term of the school 
satisfactory to the Board; a total of 425 patrolmen attending 
these lectures. 

Instruction was given to sergeants on February 8, 1935, on 
subject of "Methods of Instruction in Revolver, Shot- 
gun AND Gas Equipment," in order that they might properly 
instruct the patrolmen of their respective platoons along this 
line. On March 29, 1935, instruction was also given to ser- 
geants pertaining to their particular duties, all sergeants 
attending these lectures on their own time. 

During this term two of the lectures given in the school were 
demonstrated by the use of stereopticon slides, viz., "General 
Radio Instructions" and "Value of Photography in 
Securing Evidence at Crime Scenes." 

During this term all instructors were selected from available 
officers in the Department, by the administrative board, who, 
for the most part, chose the junior and more efficient officers 
for this duty, and these instructors, assisted by a member of 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the board, prepared their own lectures and were excused from 
other poHce duties while instructing the classes. 

After due deliberation by the administrative board, recom- 
mendation was made to the president of the school, the Police 
Commissioner, through the Superintendent, that at the ter- 
mination of this term of the school a final examination be 
held and that those officers who obtained a marking of 75 per 
cent or better be graduated and not required to attend regular 
sessions of the school in the future, which recommendation was 
approved by the Police Commissioner on February 7, 1935, 
and members of the Department so notified. 

The final examination was held in the police schoolroom 
during the week of April 22, 1935, all officers being identified on 
their examination papers by number instead of by name. Of 
the 1,815 patrolmen taking this examination, 1,804 officers 
received a percentage mark of 75 per cent or more and were 
graduated from the School of Instruction in Police Procedure, 
each officer being presented with a certificate to this effect. 
Eleven patrolmen who failed to pass this examination have 
been notified to this effect. 

The officials of this Department are of the opinion that this 
school has been of great benefit to the officers, the Police 
Department and the public, in general, by giving all officers a 
thorough knowledge of the essentials of proper police procedure. 

Traffic. 
The Bureau of Traffic at Police Headquarters, acting under 
the direction of the Superintendent, is the responsible agency 
for the uniform handling of traffic. As a result of this responsi- 
bility, the Bureau of Traffic, with its well-trained inspection 
force, has taken up with the commanding officers of the various 
divisions all problems pertaining to traffic, and especially hav- 
ing to do with the regulation and free flow of traffic in the 
vicinity of such places as the North Station, Boston Garden, 
Mechanics Building, Boston Arena, Symphony Hall, Boston 
Opera House, Harvard Stadium, Braves Field, Fenway Park, 
South Station, the Sumner Tunnel, Suffolk Downs Race 
Track in Orient Heights section of East Boston, the theatrical 
section, and steamboat wharves, together with the making of 
necessary arrangements for the movement of traffic at all large 
gatherings, such as the road races held throughout the year in 
the various parts of the city, the Ancient and Honorable 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

Artillery parade, the parade of the Boston School Cadets, the 
Memorial Day exercises at the various burial grounds, the 
American Legion parade on Armistice Day, the Santason 
parade on Thanksgiving Day, the largely attended funerals, as 
well as the operation of everyday traffic conditions that pre- 
vailed throughout the year, and the handling of all these 
various functions by the Bureau of Traffic, under the direction of 
the Superintendent, has met with great success. 

It is the duty of the Bureau of Traffic to make an inspection, 
study and report in all matters of complaint in regard to traffic, 
and to make corrections and remedy any deficiencies that may 
be discovered. 

One of the duties successfully accomplished during the 
past year was the handling, without a single mishap, of approxi- 
mately 800,000 persons who attended baseball and football 
games at Braves Field, Fenway Park and Harvard Stadium; 
approximately 500,000 persons who attended the horse races 
at Suffolk Downs; political events, a number of large funerals, 
as well as about 750,000 persons who attended the Santason 
parade along its route, an event held by the Jordan Marsh 
Company. 

This Bureau co-operates and works in conjunction with the 
Boston Traffic Commission and the Street Commissioners, 
particularly in cases of emergency in regard to the detouring 
of traffic, and the placing of signs for various purposes through- 
out the city for the regulation of traffic and also the necessary 
arrangements for street repairs with the Street Commissioners. 

During the past year the inspecting officers of the Bureau 
have visited all of the station houses and delivered instructive 
talks to all police officers in the Department in order that they 
may increase their knowledge with respect to the duties required 
of a traffic officer. This procedure of instructing officers as to 
the duties required in the proper handling of traffic will be 
continued during the forthcoming year. 

During the past two years there has been created in the 
Bureau of Traffic an information bureau where an officer is 
always available to answer inquiries of strangers and tourists 
in this city. 

As a means of co-operating with the Registrar of Motor 
Vehicles in an effort to lessen the number of automobile acci- 
dents in this city, the Bureau of Traffic, beginning on May 18, 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1935, up to and including November 30, 1935, has delivered 
to the Registrar 6,678 salmon-colored cards for the following 
automobile offenses: 

1. Passing intersection, not slowing down. 

2. Endangering pedestrian on highway. 

3. Too much speed for conditions. 

4. Cutting out of line dangerously. 

Also card reports of other dangerous conditions. 

These cards were all signed by the officer of the Police 
Division in which these violations had taken place, and a copy 
of all these salmon-colored cards that were forwarded to the 
Registrar of Motor Vehicles are filed in the office of the Bureau 
of Traffic, for ready reference. 

Supervisor of Cases Unit. 

This Unit is the central agency of the Department for the 
supervision, preparation and presentation of all criminal cases 
brought by members of the force in the criminal courts within 
our jurisdiction; the interrogation of all prisoners and witnesses 
in cases of serious felonies, and the supervision of the daily 
line-up of all prisoners arrested for serious offenses. The 
officers attached to this Unit work under the direction of the 
Supervisor of Cases and are assigned to duty in the several 
courts and at the office of the District Attorney of Suffolk 
County. The Unit, since its inception, has proved its great 
value not only to the members of the Department but, also, 
to the District Attorney, his assistants and the various courts. 
The presiding justices of the various courts have praised the 
efficiency of this Unit in presenting cases to the courts, com- 
mending the dispatch and orderly manner in which the evidence 
is presented, and the prompt attendance of members of the 
Department when appearing as witnesses. 

Brief outline of the activities of this Unit : 

Line-Uj). 

Every week day at 8 a. m. a line-up for the entire Police 
Department of all prisoners arrested for serious ojBfenses is 
held in Room 403 at Police Headquarters. 

The supervision of the line-up was transferred from the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation to the Supervisor of Cases, 
January 29, 1934, and is conducted under the personal direction 
of the Captain of this Unit. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

When persons are arrested for serious offenses, all Divisions 
in the Department are notified to bring forward witnesses, 
and the various Police Departments of Metropolitan Boston 
are notified by teletype to bring all witnesses and victims of 
crimes to view the line-up for the purpose of identification. 
Each morning, prior to the appearance of the prisoners held 
for the line-up, the officer supervising same, is furnished with 
records giving the prisoner's history and details of his offense. 
All criminal records of prisoners are furnished by the Bureau 
of Records. When prisoners or witnesses are being interrogated 
at the line-up, a competent police stenographer is present to 
take down verbatim all questions and answers. A daily 
transcript of the stenographer's notes is made and filed in this 
office for future reference. These statements have been the 
cause of convicting accused prisoners in a majority of cases 
tried before the Superior Court. The line-up, during the past 
year, was greatly responsible for the convictions of prisoners 
identified by victims and witnesses. 

From December 1, 1934, to November 30, 1935, there have 
been 1,700 prisoners appearing in the line-up, and a majority 
of them have been recorded as having previous criminal records. 
During the past year the largest number of prisoners present 
in the line-up in one day was 30, there being seven positive 
identifications for armed robbery by victims and witnesses. 

Court Supervision. 

A supervising officer, under the direction of the Supervisor 
of Cases, is assigned to each municipal or district court in 
Boston, for the supervision and prosecution of criminal cases. 
They receive from the complaining officers having criminal 
cases before the courts, a report giving a concise statement of 
facts, evidence obtained, names of witnesses, name and descrip- 
tion of defendant. The supervising officer then assists in 
preparing and presenting the case before the court. At the 
end of each day, the supervising officer submits a report, on a 
form provided for this purpose, giving a complete history of 
the case, with the findings and disposition by the court. When 
an appeal is taken in a lower court for trial in the Superior 
Court, the folder containing the history of the case is forwarded 
to the supervising officer in the District Attorney's office for 
the information of the District Attorney and his assistants. 



58 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



A filing system installed in this office contains a card index 
of all major cases supervised, a record of each case under its 
proper classification and a folder which contains the original 
reports of every officer on each case. Each month a report is 
compiled showing the number of cases supervised, name of the 
court, name of the presiding justice, classification of the offense 
and disposition of same. 

Following is the number of cases supervised during the months 
named therein: 



Month. 


Personal 
Supervision. 


General 
Supervision. 


1934. 
December 

1935. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 


842 

903 
714 
1,140 
1,096 
940 
831 
805 
789 
747 
711 
846 


967 

988 
842 
902 

1,167 

1,083 
965 

1,071 
936 
984 
931 

1,016 


Totals 


10,364 


11,852 



On numerous occasions presiding justices in the various 
courts often call upon the supervising officer of their respective 
courts to make personal investigations of certain complaints 
and prosecute same if necessary. Officers of this Unit have 
been detailed to investigate important matters for the Depart- 
ment; assigned to bombings; election day duty and other 
details. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

Bureau of Operations. 

This Bureau was created July 11, 1934. 

During the police year from December 1, 1934, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1935, the personnel of this Bureau have managed the 
transmission, reception and handling of: 

Approximately 1,642,500 telephone messages, and about 
5,300 toll calls made by the Department. 

87,934 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
the making and delivering of copies of such messages, 
as necessary, to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

80,984 radio messages, 6,300 of which were two-way, 
including keeping of log record of same. 

1,494 telegrams, including filing of same and the making 
and delivery of copies to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

2,240 forms for persons reported missing by other cities 
and towns filled out and delivered to the Bureau of Records, 
together with copies for the files of the Bureau. 

4,019 lost and stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the Automobile Unit, together with records 
made and delivered of all recovered cars, copies of both 
kept in the Bureau's files. 

A daily journal was kept in which all of the above, including 
such of the telephone messages as were toll calls, were recorded, 
together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents, and other 
matter submitted by divisions and units of the Department. 

Press bulletins were typed in every matter of importance, 
copies of which were delivered to the Police Commissioner, the 
Superintendent and the Press. 

A file was maintained of the entire police personnel of the 
Department, cross indexed by division, name, rank and cap 
number, together with the address, telephone number and date 
of appointment. 

The radio transmitter and ninety-three receiving sets were 
maintained and kept in repair by the personnel of the Bureau. 

The development and maintenance of a system of operations, 
insuring speedy response to any call for police assistance and 
rendering possible speedy dissemination of information or quick 
concentration of necessary police power at a point where it is 
needed, has been the outstanding accomplishment of this 
Bureau. 

This system has played its part in the apprehension of 
many criminals within a period of a few minutes from the time 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of their crime, has made possible speedy and adequate police 
protection and assistance at the scene of large fires and other 
catastrophies, and, in one instance, undoubtedly, prevented a 
riot which threatened to be of serious proportions. 

The existence of an efficient system of communications is in 
itself a restraining influence upon the criminal minded, as is 
evidenced by a decrease of over thirty per cent in the number of 
crimes of violence reported and an increase of better than 
twenty-three per cent of arrests for these crimes, since its 
inauguration. 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of the special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each: 

1934. Men, 
Dec. 8. New Pilot Building, 51 Franklin street, laying of 

corner stone 16 

Dec. 18. Boston Common, Tercentenary procession and 

exercises . 21 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 10 

Christmas Eve, Carol Singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

and Boston Common 104 

Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 12 

Boston American Publishing Company parade . . 32 

Funeral of Patrolman Winfield S. Wallace, retired . 18 

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common ... 12 

New Year's Eve, celebration on Division Four . . 37 
New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of Holy 

Cross 10 

State House, Inauguration Exercises of His Excellency, 

Governor James M. Curley 122 

Jan. 3. First Corps of Cadets Armory, reception and ball 
tendered to His Excellency, Governor James 

M. Curley 97 

Jan. 11. Funeral of Reverend Father P. J. McHugh, Dean of 

Boston College 21 

Funeral of Patrolman William J. Ahearn, retired . . 16 
Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Asso- 
ciation 321 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Driscoll ... 34 

Funeral of Sergeant Peter A. McNeil, retired . . 14 

Hotel Bradford, reception tendered to His Excellency, 

Governor James M. Curley 18 



Dec. 


22. 


Dec. 


23. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


25. 


Dec. 


31. 


Dec. 


31. 


Dec. 


31. 


Dec. 


31. 


1935. 




Jan. 


3. 



Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


15. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


28. 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



61 



1935. 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


23. 


Feb. 


27. 


Feb. 


28. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


19. 


April 


3. 


April 


5. 


April 


6. 


April 


7. 


April 


12. 


April 12. 



April 13. 

April 16. 
April 19. 
April 20. 
April 27. 
April 28. 
May 1. 

May 1. 



May 1. 

May 11. 
May 12. 

May 13. 
May 15. 
May 16. 
May 19. 
May 25. 
May 26. 
May 30. 
May 30. 



Boston Garden, President Roosevelt's Birthday party, 
St. Paul's Cathedral, High Mass for Armenian Bishop, 
Funeral of Patrolman William A. Murdock, retired 
Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's Ball .... 
Boston Garden, American Legion Musical Festival 
Beacon Park Railroad yard and vicinity, visit of 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt- to Harvard 

College 

Funeral of Lieutenant William J. Sheehan, retired 

Back Bay Station, arrival of George "Babe" Ruth 

South Boston, Evacuation Day Parade 

Funeral of Monsignor Ambrose T. Roche 

Hotel Statler, meeting of Business Men's Club of 

Boston 

Funeral of Patrolman Samuel G. Daly . 
Symphony Hall, Boston Herald-Traveler spelling-bee 
Oak square, Brighton, ten-mile road race 
Boston Garden, Army Day exercises sponsored by the 

Military Order of the World War 
Symphony Hall, Boston Herald-Traveler spelling-bee 
East Armory, Annual Boston School Cadets com 

petitive drill 

Roxbury, Michael J. O'Connell Post, American Legion 

road race 

Braves' Field, opening baseball game 

Marathon race 

Franklin Park, Easter egg hunt 

Cathedral Club road race 

Franklin Park, walking match 

Parade and demonstration under the auspices of the 

United Front May Day Committee .... 
Boston Common, Parkman Bandstand, May Day 

Rally under the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 

Boston Common, various events under the auspices 

of the Boston Common Tercentenary Committee 
Faneuil Hall, Parochial spelling-bee 
Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade and 

Field Mass at Fenway Park .... 
Funeral of Sergeant Patrick J. McNealy, retired . 
Funeral of Patrolman Daniel A. McCallum . 
Admiral Byi'd Welcome-Home parade . 
East Boston, Italian World War Veterans' Parade 
Park Drive, Roller Skating Contest 
Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Sunday 
Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . 
Memorial Day Services at St. Joseph's Cemetery under 

the auspices of Boston Police Post, the American 

Legion, and Boston Police Post, Veterans of Foreign 

Wars 



Men. 

89 
52 
12 
43 
93 



327 
14 
42 

363 
52 

123 
98 
12 
38 

149 

12 

73 

30 
45 
465 
52 
42 
18 

108 



34 

44 
23 

89 

12 

93 

156 

58 

18 

138 

322 



108 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1935. Men. 

June 1. Parade under auspices of Old Dorchester Post, Amer- 
ican Legion 49 

June 1. St. John's Seminary, concert by Parochial School 

bands 23 

June 1. Franklin Field, Junior Birdmen Outdoor Air Races . 38 

June 3. Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 221 

June 4. Parade, Boston School Cadets 263 

June 6. Charlestown State Prison, Millens and Faber Exe- 
cution 38 

June 8. Details for wedding of Miss Mary E. Curley and 

Lieut. -Colonel Edward C. Donnelly .... 258 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises .... 30 

Roxbury Historical Society Warren Day celebration . 36 

Fimeral of Sergeant Thomas F. Lyons .... 31 

Funeral of Captain James J. Walkins, retired . . 25 

Flag Day parade and celebration on Boston Common . 73 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 18 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Daj' . . 81 
Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 

concessions 28 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day 42 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 341 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 47 

Funeral of Lieutenant Melvin A. Patterson . . 85 

Fenway Park, wrestling carnival 28 

Smith Playground, Allston, bonfire .... 22 
Various band concerts under the auspices of Boston 

Public Celebrations Committee 85 

Parade, International Loj'al Order of Moose . . 262 
City of Boston Official Flag-Raising and Parade, City 

Hall to Boston Common 42 

Boston Common, band concert and fireworks . 43 
Various fireworks displays under the auspices of 

Boston Public Celebrations Committee ... 81 
July 9. New York City Fire Department Band and Police 
Officials' visit and parade in connection with the 
Boston Public Welfare Department Athletic and 

Musical Carnival 114 

July 9. Fenway Park, Boston Public Welfare Department Ath- 
letic and Musical Carnival 68 

July 11. Funeral of Patrolman Joseph F. Maloney ... 36 
July 27. Columbus Circle, South Boston, Boston Traveler Soap 

Box Derby 31 

July 28. Vicinity of Sterling and W^ashington streets, Ro.xbury, 
meeting at the Gospel Tent, Church of God and 

Christ 18 

July 30. Funeral of Patrolman McGrady L. Logan ... 85 

July 30. Braves' Field, O'Mahoney-George wrestling match 36 

Aug. 7. Hotel Statler, Catholic and Jewish meeting ... 16 



June 


9. 


June 


11. 


June 


13. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


15. 


June 


16. 


June 


16. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 21. 


June 


27. 


July 


3. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



1934. 

Aug. 11. 

Aug. 13. 



Aug. 27. 
Aug. 28. 

Aug. 31. 
Sept. 2. 
Sept. 7. 
Sept. 9. 
Sept. 13. 
Sept. 17. 
Sept. 19. 

Oct. 5. 
Oct. 5. 
Oct. 12. 

Oct. 12. 
Oct. 13. 
Oct. 13. 
Oct. 20. 
Oct. 26. 
Oct. 26. 
Nov. 2. 
Nov. 5. 
Nov. 5. 
Nov. 6. 
Nov. 9. 
Nov. 10. 

Nov. 11. 

Nov. 12. 
Nov. 13. 
Nov. 16. 
Nov. 23. 
Nov. 23. 
Nov. 24. 

Nov. 27. 
Nov. 28. 



Men. 

Faneuil Hall, visit of Ex-Premier Alexander Papanas- 

tasiou of Greece 15 

Boston Common, Boston Tercentenary, Spirming- 
Wheel Contest, Band Concert and Community 

Singing 45 

Funeral of Sergeant Thomas J. Sullivan ... 42 
South Boston Stadium, Annual Park Department 

Playground circus 51 

Funeral of U. S. District Attorney Joseph J. Hurley . 32 

Parade, Boston Central Labor Union .... 256 

Franklin Park, Playstead, E. R. A. band concert . 16 

Fenway Park, O'Mahoney-George wrestling match . 38 

Funeral of Patrolman James D. Hughes . . . 108 

Faneuil Hall, National Con.stitution Day exercises . 18 
Visit of Miss Colleen Moore, actress, with valuable 

Doll House 63 

Harvard-Springfield football game .... 29 

South Boston, Historical pageant 19 

Boston Common, City of Boston Columbus Day 

celebration 92 

Harvard-Holy Cross football game .... 68 

Parade, Order of Sons of Italj^ 273 

Boston Garden, Ma.ss Meeting, Order of Sons of Italy, 49 

Parade, Associated Polish organizations . . . 142 

Funeral of Sergeant Michael J. Muldoon, retired . 14 

Harvard-Dartmouth football game .... 70 

Harvard-Brown football game 39 

Funeral of Patrolman John J. Downey, retired . . 15 

City Election 2,074 

Funeral of Sergeant John P. Farrell .... 42 

Funeral of Sergeant Hugh J. Sullivan .... 48 
Parade, Lieutenant Norman E. Prince Post, Veterans 

of Foreign Wars 76 

American Legion, Suffolk County Council, Armistice 

Day parade 332 

C. F. Hovey Company, preview and house-warming . 20 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank E. Dudley, retired . 12 

Harvard-New Hampshire football game ... 43 

Harvard- Yale football game 78 

Division 16, Harvard- Yale crowds at hotels, etc. . . 15 
South Boston Stadium, Boston Park Department foot- 
ball game 32 

Funeral of Patrolman Daniel Broderick ... 48 

Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade . . . 436 



Note. — December 10 to December 18, 1934, inclusive, a total of 117 
officers was on duty for that period at the office of the Board 
of Election Commissioners, City Hall, during the recount 
of ballots cast at the State Election. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

April 5 to April 6, 1935, inclusive, a total of 74 officers was on 
duty for that period at the Boston American Building, in con- 
nection with anticipated bombing of the Hearst Building. 

May 2 to May 8, 1935, inclusive, a total of 105 officers was on 
duty for that period of the so-called Garment Workers' Strike, 
in Division 4. 

July 10 to August 10, 1935, inclusive, a total of 1,064 officers 
was on duty for that period directing traffic during the Horse 
Races at Suffolk Downs Race Track, in East Boston. 

August 26 to August 31, 1935, inclusive, a total of 90 officers 
was on duty for that period in Franklin Park, during the Band 
Concerts and Vaudeville at the Playstead. 

October 2 to October 19, 1935, inclusive, a total of 432 officers 
was on duty for that period directing traffic during the Horse 
Races at Suffolk Downs Race Track, in East Boston. 

November 14 to November 21, 1935, inclusive, a total of 104 
officers was on duty for that period at the office of the Board 
of Election Commissioners, City Hall, diu-ing the recount of 
ballots cast at the City Election. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

Miscellaneous Business. 



65 



1932-33. 



1933-34. 



1934-35. 



Abandoned children cared for 

Accidents reported 

Buildings found open and made secure 

Cases investigated . 

Dangerous buildings reported 

Dangerous chimneys reported 

Dead bodies recovered . 

Defective cesspools reported . 

Defective drains and vaults reported 

Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 

Defective gas pipes reported . 

Defective hydrants reported . 

Defective lamps reported 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective sidewalks and streets reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed . 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished . 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted . 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed . 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained . 





4 


13 




9,983 


10,440 




2,851 


2,968 




46,071 


43,753 




18 


40 




6 


24 




285 


382 




25 


19 




10 


11 




6 


5 




9 


18 




19 


34 




4,575 


4,883 




31 


99 




2,427 


2,442 




53 


45 




829 


1,682 




35,905 


25,678 




5,201 


5,546 




892 


■ 994 




363 


387 




24 


549 




1,506 


1,503 




11 


150 




6,233 


7,973 




18 


30 




427 


612 




352 


745 




3 


313 



23 

9,830 

2,838 

52,354 

47 

15 

411 

35 

22 

5 

31 

65 

4,705 

61 

1,950 

44 

827 

28,956 

5,702 

865 

403 

162 

1,800 

168 

7,969 

14 

1,023 

412 

2 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Adjustment of Claims. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $838.02; 
turned in and receipted for at the Chief Clerk's office, $95.44; 
making a grand total of $933.46, either received by or credited 
to this Department for such police property damage. 

House of Detention. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the court 
house building, Somerset street. All women arrested in the 
city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They are then 
held in charge of the matron until the next session of the court 
before which they are to appear. If sentenced to imprison- 
ment they are returned to the House of Detention and from 
there conveyed to the jail or institution to which they have 
been sentenced. 

During the year 3,231 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 2,213 

Larceny 162 

Night walking 29 

Fornication 123 

Idle and disorderly 157 

Assault and battery 15 

Adultery . 38 

Violation of liquor law 5 

Keeping house of ill fame 17 

Various other causes 472 

Total 3,231 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 157 

From county jail 403 

Grand total 3,791 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 573. Of these 443 are 
connected with the underground system and 130 with the 

overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year the employees of this service responded to 
3,760 trouble calls; inspected 573 signal boxes ; 15 signal desks; 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

170 old type and 525 new type batteries. Repairs have been 
made on 148 box movements; 68 registers; 200 locks; 20 time 
stamps; 1 garage motor; 4 garage registers; 30 vibrator bells; 
52 relays, and 12 electric fans. This unit has the installing 
and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all 
stations and Headquarters building. There have been made 
100 plungers; 100 box fittings; 50 line blocks and 60 auto- 
matic hooks. 

Connected with the police signal boxes there are 130 signal 
and 120 telephone circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
Department. 

Specifications have been completed and contracts let to com- 
plete the communications system, including both duplex radio 
and the Hayes system. All divisions are to be serviced with a 
paper-insulated, multi-colored, underground cable. The desks 
are to be of a type which will enable the station to talk to 
Headquarters and all patrol boxes over Department-owned lines. 

There are assigned to the unit one White truck, 2h tons 
capacity; three utihty trucks, h ton capacity each, and one 
four-door Plymouth sedan. 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal 
Service maintenance at the present time : 

7 close circuit desks 45 traffic booths 

8 open circuit blinker type 726,650 feet underground cable 

signal desks 233,400 feet of overhead cable 

240 circuits 31,143 feet of duct 

12 garage annunciators 67 manholes 

52 test boxes 18 motor generator sets 

70 cells of caustic soda, pri- 6 motor-driven flashes 

mary cells type battery 1 White truck 

400 cells of sulphuric acid stor- 3 Ford trucks 

age type battery 1 Plyniouth sedan 
2,100 taxicab signs 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the harbor police, formerly 
styled Division 8,* comprising the harbor and the islands 
therein, were as follows: 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, 

float stages, etc $54,691 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 534 

* Division 8 consolidated with Division 1, May 8, 1933. 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 87 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 5 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 4 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the waterfront . . 18 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm .... 4 

Number of boats challenged 27 

Number of boats searched for contraband 18 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted .... 15 

Number of cases investigated 317 

Number of dead bodies recovered 27 

Number rescued from drowning 9 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 5 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered ... 94 

Number of obstructions removed from channel . . . . 112 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 1,687 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver 

oil in harbor 14 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 4 

Number of dead bodies cared for 8 

Number of hours grappling 215 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,344, 
5,104 of which were from domestic ports, 597 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, 1,643 from foreign portfe. Of the latter 
1,076 were steamers, 314 were motor vessels and 253 were 
schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in Dorchester Bay daily and 
nightly, from Castle Island to Neponset Bridge, with launch 
"E. U. Curtis," from June 15th to November 15th. There 
were 40 cases investigated, 7 boats challenged for contraband, 
60 cases where assistance was rendered to boats in distress, by 
reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc.; 3 dead 
bodies cared for, 5 boats ordered to put up sailing lights, 25 
hours spent in grappling, 10 persons rescued from drowning, 
30 boats warned about speeding amongst boats, 40 obstruc- 
tions removed from channel, 3 alarms of fire attended. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1934, there were 20 horses in the 
service. 

On November 30, 1935, there were 20 in the service, all of 
which are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 154 automobiles in the service at the present time: 
49 attached to Headquarters; 20 in the city proper and at- 
tached to Divisions 1, 2 and 4; 9 in the South Boston district, 
attached to Division 6; 7 in the East Boston district, attached 
to Division 7; 15 in the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 
9 and 10; 9 in the Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 
6 in the Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; 7 in 
the Brighton district, attached to Division 14; 5 in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; 6 in the Back Bay and 
the Fenway, attached to Division 16; 6 in the West Roxbury 
district, attached to Division 17; 6 in the Hyde Park district, 
attached to Division 18; 6 in the Mattapan district, attached 
to Division 19, and 3 unassigned. (See page 71 for distribution 
of automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs $11,797 64 

Storage and towing 1,089 37 

Gasoline 40,536 98 

Oil and grease 2,539 89 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, polish, patches, plugs, etc. . 526 27 

License fees 60 00 

Total S56,550 15 

Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automobile 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 4,104 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . . 1,257 

Calls where services were not required 421 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 373 

Southern Mortuary 203 

Psychopathic Hospital 193 

Home 161 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) . . . 129 

Morgue 80 

Boston State Hospital 47 

Carried forward 6,968 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Brought forward .... 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Forest Hills Hospital .... 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Carney Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital .... 
Police Station Houses .... 
Beth Israel Hospital .... 
Children's Hospital .... 
Deaconess Hospital .... 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Boston Lying-in Hospital . 
Chelsea Naval Hospital 

Fenway Hospital 

Massachusetts MemoriarHospitals . 
Massachusetts Women's Hospital 
New England Hospital 
New England Hospital for Women . 
Riverbank Hospital .... 
St. Margaret's Hospital 

Strong Hospital 

Trumbull Hospital .... 
United States Marine Hospital . 
Women's Free Hospital 



6,968 

39 

35 

23 

17 

16 

14 

12 

11 

4 

3 

2 



Total 



7,156 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 





List of Vehicles Used by the Department 






Divisions. 


Ml 

II 

IS 

U 






1 

o 
o 


1 

o 
H 


Headquarters 


1 


39 


9 




49 


Division 1 












2 


4 


- 


3 


9 


Division 2 














2 


4 


- 


1 


7 


Division 4 














4 


4 


- 


2 


10 


Division 6 














3 


6 


- 


3 


12 


Division 7 














2 


5 


- 


4 


11 


Division 9 














1 


6 


- 


- 


7 


Division 10 














2 


6 


- 


- 


8 


Division 11 














2 


7 


- 


- 


9 


Division 13 














1 


5 


- 


4 


10 


Division 14 














2 


5 


- 


4 


11 


Division 15 














1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 16 














1 


5 


- 


4 


10 


Division 17 














1 


5 


- 


4 


10 


Division 18 














1 


5 


- 


- 


6 


Division 19 














1 


5 


- 


3 


9 


TJnassigned 














3 


- 


- 


5 


8 


Totals 














30 


115 


9 


37 


191 



k 



Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 1,859* Hcenses to set up and use 
hackney carriages granted, being a decrease of 224 as compared 
with last year. 

There were no horse-drawn carriages Hcensed during the year. 

There were 132 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 

* 311 regrants. 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

turned over to the Bureau of Traffic; 12 of these were restored 
to the owners and the balance placed in the custody of the 
Lost Property Bureau. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1935, "new" apphcants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : 

Hackney Carriage "Set-Ups." 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 1,860 

Number of carriages licensed * 1,548 

Number of carriage licenses (regrants) 311 

Number of carriage applications rejected 1 

Number of licenses transferred 2 

Number of licenses canceled 427 

Number of carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1935 . 1,441 

Number of carriages inspected 1,860 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Number of applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . f 3,067 

Number of drivers' licenses granted 3,011 

Number of drivers' applications for licenses rejected . . 26 

Number of drivers' licenses revoked 6 

Number of drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of 

credentials 228 

Number of drivers' licenses reconsidered and granted . . 5 

Miscellaneous. 

Number of complaints against owners, drivers and "set-ups" 

investigated 2,184 

Number of days spent in court 113 

Number of articles left in carriages reported by citizens . . 40 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by drivers . 132 

Limitation of Hackney Carriages. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, effective 

June 12, 1934, the Police Commissioner was required to fix a 

limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be issued, 

which hmit shall be based upon the number of licenses then 

* 107 changed ownership. 

t 30 withdrawn after investigation. 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 73 

issued and outstanding but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and 
he may from time to time, after reasonable notice and a hear- 
ing decrease the number so jfixed, but in no event to a number 
less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner on July 
20, 1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number 
of hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of hcenses 
limited under the Act referred to, has been issued, the Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities, on petition of such applicant, may 
after a hearing determine that public convenience and necessity 
require a higher limit than that fixed by the Police Commissioner 
or previously established by said Department, and shall estab- 
lish the limit so required, in which case the limit set by said 
Department shall be considered final until changed as herein 
provided. 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 
Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 
licensee or licensees a designated portion of a public way 
abutting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public or 
semi-public building as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 164 applications for such stands (with a 
total capacity of 518 hackney carriages) were received; 146 
locations for 480 carriages were granted and 18 locations for 
38 carriages were rejected; 1 location for 2 carriages was 
reconsidered and granted. 

Of these special hackney carriage stand licenses, 7 locations 
(capacity, 18 carriages) were subsequently canceled or revoked; 
139 locations (capacity, 462 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 
Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions other than sidewalks, of public ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 



74 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney- 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 851 applications to set up and use hackney 
carriages for such public stands were granted. 

Of these public stand licenses, none was suspended, stripped 
of credentials or revoked. 

Hackney Carriages and Special and Public Stands. 

For the five years operating under the provisions of Chapter 
392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the new rules and regulations relative to hackney carriages 
and stands established on February 1, 1931, by the Police 
Commissioner have worked out very well. 

As shown in foregoing figures, at the present time there are 
139 locations for special stands, with a capacity of 462 carriages, 
as compared with 148 locations, with a capacity of 470 carriages, 
during the previous year. 

There are 285 locations for public stands, with a capacity of 
717 cabs, as compared with 288 locations, with a capacity of 
722 cabs, during the preceding year. 

The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present is 
1,441 as compared with 1,525 in the previous year; this number 
being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts of 1934. 

During the year there were approximately 38 taxi stands, 
both special and public, that were established, removed or 
relocated in the interest of public necessity and convenience. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for the 
occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon property) 
by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 15 applications (capacity 304 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight^Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing auto- 
mobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this act, 
shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one of 
chapter ninety of the General Laws used for the carrying 
for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 



k 



1936.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 75 

in or from the City of Boston and in or on which automobile 
guide service by the driver or other person is offered or 
furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the transporta- 
tion of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department of 
Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public convenience 
and necessity require such operation; and further, it is pro- 
vided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate said 
automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is licensed 
so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1935, there have been 
issued licenses for 30 sight-seeing automobiles and 23 special 
stands for the same. 

Continuing with our practice, "new" sight-seeing auto- 
mobile drivers for the year commencing as of March 1, 1935, 
were fingerprinted as in the case of "new" hackney carriage 
drivers, and their records, if any, searched for in the Bureau of 
Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the appHcation to drive. 

There were 9 drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 
The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past j^ear 492 
tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Two hundred and twenty-eight suspensions ranging from one 
to thirty days, according to the seriousness of the offense, and 
six revocations were made, the remainder being reprimanded 
and warned and a record filed for future reference. This 
system of discipline has continued to result in relieving the 
courts of many minor cases which would tend to congest their 
dockets. Any driver, in accordance with the hackney rules, 
who is dissatisfied with the findings of the Bureau of Traffic 



76 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

may appeal to the Commissioner, and during the past year 
no such appeals have been made. There still continues to be a 
minimum of crime among the 3,011 drivers who have been 
licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

During the past year the Supervisory Force of the Bureau of 
Traffic has been very busy in the Blue Hill avenue section of 
Boston, suppressing the activities of taxicab operators who 
engage in the illegal practice of bringing the so-called "loads" 
to the intown section of the city and many prosecutions have 
been made in the municipal courts of Dorchester and Roxbury, 
as well as in the Central Municipal Court, under Section 1, 
Chapter 408, Acts of 1931, which reads as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any public way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for 
hire in such a manner as to afford a means of transporta- 
tion similar to that afforded by a railway company, by 
indiscriminately receiving and discharging passengers 
along the route on which the vehicle is operated or may 
be running ..." 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum and this procedure will be followed unceasingly until 
such illegal practices have ceased. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 1,791 applications for such licenses were 
received; 1,790 of these were granted and 1 rejected. Of these 
licenses 9 were subsequently canceled for non-payment of 
license fee and 5 because they were surrendered. (See Tables 
XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was ^^Not at 
a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



77 



Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 1,790 granted, 1,710 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 80 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 

Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


19031 




181,045 


1919 .... 


227,466 


1904 










193,195 


1920 










235,248 


1905 










194,547 


1921* 










480,783 


1906 










195,446 


1922 










480,106 


1907 










195,900 


1923 










477,547 


1908 










201,552 


1924 










485,677 


1909 










201,391 


1925 










489,478 


1910 2 










203,603 


1926 










493,415 


1911 










206,825 


1927 










495,767 


1912 










214,178 


1928 










491,277 


191.3 










215,388 


1929 










493,250 


1914* 










219,364 


1930 










502,101 


1915 










220,883 


1931 










500,986 


1916 3 










- 


1932 










499,758 


1917 
1918 










221,207 
224,012 


1933 
1934 










501,175 
502,936 



• 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on JMay 1. 

2 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

3 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

* 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

1935 First jear of listing as of January 1 instead of April 1 . 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year: 

Male 242,974 

Female 266,729 



Total 



509,703 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 



Printing police list 


$40,037 40 


Clerical services and material used in preparing list 17,240 00 


Newspaper notices 


737 10 


Circulars and pamphlets 


322 00 


Stationery 


151 85 


Interpreters . 


81 37 


Metal cabinet 


37 50 


Directories 


31 00 


Total 


$58,638 22 


Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 


January 2 


1,177 


January 3 




1,100 


January 4 




964 


January 5 




726 


January 6 




71 


January 7 




328 


January 8 




36 


January 9 




5 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 

The police findings in 1935 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 

Physically incapacitated 

Convicted of crime 

Unfit for various reasons 

Apparently fit 



Total 



1,691 
166 
359 
541 

7,333 

10,090 



In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent 
to the Police Department for delivery 7,333 summonses to 
persons for jury service. 

Special Police. 
Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a Department of the City of Boston, or on the application 



i 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



79 



of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1935, were fingerprinted by 
the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1935, there were 
1,192 special police officers appointed; 9 apphcations for 
appointment were refused for cause, 92 appointments were 
canceled and 1 appointment was revoked. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 

From United States Government 44 

From State Departments 5 

From City Departments 48 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 34 

From other corporations and associations 786 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 211 

From private institutions 21 

From churches 42 



Total 



1,192 



Railroad Police. 
No persons were appointed railroad policemen during the 
year. Four appointments were canceled; 3 of which were for 
employees of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, 
and 1 of the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad. 



Musicians' Licenses. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 26 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted; 2 licenses 
were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment of 
license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a hiember of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 



80 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



During the year 38 instruments were inspected with the 
following result: 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos 

Accordions 

Hand organs 

Clarinets .... 




10 

8 
7 
4 
4 
4 
1 


10 

8 
7 
4 


Guitars .... 




4 


Violins .... 




4 


Piano .... 




1 








Totals 


38 


38 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past j5ve years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1931 


216 


216 


- 


1932 


270 


269 


1 


1933 


226 


226 


- 


1934 


184 


181 


3 


1935 


194 


192 


2 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked: 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1931 .... 

1932 .... 
1933 

1934 .... 

1935 .... 


3,097 
3,190 
3,130 
3,173 
3,140 


2,998 

3,115 

3,010 

3,063 

* 2,954 


99 

75 

120 

110 

186 


2 

12 

2 

2 

7 



* 19 "fee" licenses and 6 "no fee" licenses canceled. 

Public Lodging Houses. 
The followmg shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) and Sections 33 and 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Tercen- 
tenary Edition), and the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated: 



I;OC.\TION. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis Street . 
8 Pine Street 
79 Shawmut Avenue 
1202 Washington Street 
Total . 



36,873 
88,313 
12,563 
42,071 



179,820 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 22,645. Of these, 232 were rejected, 5 filed on 
which no action was taken and 3 withdrawn, leaving a balance 
of 22,405 which were granted. 

Of the granted applications, 45 were canceled for nonpayment 
(plus 6 "no fee"), leaving in force a net of 22,354. 

During the year 241 licenses were transferred, 709 canceled, 
16 revoked and 232 applications rejected. 

The officers investigated 2,790 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $68,779. (See Tables XIV, XVII.) 



82 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1934, there were 343 persons on the roll. 
During the year 27 died; viz., 1 captain, 1 Heutenant, 1 lieu- 
tenant-inspector, 3 sergeants, 19 patrolmen, 1 assistant chief 
matron and 1 fireman. One retired sergeant was restored to 
duty. One annuitant remarried. Seven were added; viz., 
2 captains, 2 sergeants, 1 patrolman, and the widows of patrol- 
men James Brickley and Daniel McCallum, both of whom died 
from injuries received in the performance of duty; leaving 321 
on the roll at date, 286 pensioners and 35 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $352,844.49 and it is estimated that $366,084 will 
be required for pensions in 1936. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 58 beneficiaries at the present time and 
there has been paid to them the sum of $8,411.99 during the 
past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age or 
more, and the maintenance of the police signal service were 
$5,728,010.85. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the pohce signal service during the 
year was $49,393.77. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
from licenses over which the pohce have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., was 
),971.47. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(83) 



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2,700 

2,000 

1,700 

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1,600 
1,800-2,000 
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2,100 

1,900 

3,600 
1,800-2,000 

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1,800-2,100 

1,700 
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86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
193.5. 


Nov. 30, 
1935. 


Jan. 1, 
1935. 


Nov. 30, 
1935. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 




1 


— 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 




1 


— 


Assistant Secretary . 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Plus 1 


Legal Adviser 


1 


— 




— 


Minus 1 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 




1 


— 


Deputy Superintendents . 


4 


4 


4 


4 


— 


Captains .... 


23 


23 


21 


19 


Minus 2 


Lieutenants 


64 


64 


61 


60 


Minus 1 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


9 


9 


9 


9 


— 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


185 


183 


Minus 2 


Patrolmen .... 


2,149 


2,149 


1,889 


1,871 


Minus 18 


Patrolwomen 


8 


8 


5 


5 


— 


Totals .... 


2,448 


2,449 


2,178 


2,155 


Minus 23 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the diiTerence between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 






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zc 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1935, giving the Age at the Time of Retirement and the 
Number of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Corcoran, John T . . . 


Age 


62 Vi2 years 


34 2/i2 years 


Dickinson, Harry N. . 


Age 


611/12 " 


28Vi2 " 


Hanrahan, John J. . . . 


Age 


62Vi2 " 


32Vi2 " 


Melvin, Wilbur L. . . . 


Age 


63Vi2 " 


36 8/12 " 


Snow, Joseph L 


Incapacitated 


59Vi2 ' 


33Vi2 " 


Solan, Leo T.* . . . . 


Incapacitated 


42W/12 " 


IIV12 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement Svstem. 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1935. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1934. 



Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 



Captain James R. Claflin to the rank of Deputy Superin- 
tendent. 
Lieutenant Thomas F. Connolly to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant-Inspector Thomas F. Mulrey to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant Leonard E. J. O'Connell to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant James T. Sheehan to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant-Inspector Thomas M. Towle to the rank of 

Captain. 
Sergeant Edward B. Cain to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John E. Curran to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Charles F. Eldridge to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John Foley to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Edward J. Kelley to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Robert A. Lynch to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman John J. Biggins to the rank of Sergeant. 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



89 



Table V. — Concluded. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1935. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1934 




Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


24 


1935. 




Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


11 



Patrolman Francis M. Burke to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael Byrne to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph J. Callahan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas Conboy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William H. Foley to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Nicholas E. Kenney to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John F. McElhinney to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Cornelius F. O'Brien to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Patrick J. O'Dormell to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. O'Keefe to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Mortimer T. O'Connor to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William H. Owen to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James J. McWeeny, Jr., to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Frank H. Sliney to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George F. Smith to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James J. Sullivan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas J. Sullivan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John S. Wellings to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman George W. Burke to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Arthur H. Vickerson to the rank of Sergeant- 
Chief Radio Operator. 

Patrolman Edward J. Seibolt to the rank of Sergeant- 
Ballistician. 



90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 







B 
















^ 


s 
















G 


-o 


















o 




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m 


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i 


u 


Totals. 




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CO 


Q 


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a 
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1 

3 

.2 

1-5 


II 

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3 


5 
m 






1894 .... 












1 




1 


1895 . 








- 


1 


2 


1 


- 


- 


3 


7 


1896 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


1897 . 








- 


- 




- 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


1898 . 








- 


- 




1 


- 


2 


3 


7 


1900 . 








- 


1 


4 


5 


1 


4 


3 


18 


1901 . 








1 


- 




2 


- 


3 


3 


10 


1903 . 








- 


1 




2 


1 


8 


6 


19 


1904 . 








- 


- 


- 


7 


1 


3 


2 


13 


1905 . 








~ 


- 




1 


1 


3 


2 


8 


1906 . 








- 


- 




1 


- 


3 


- 


5 


1907 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


4 


11 


1908 . 








- 


■ - 


2 


2" 


2 


8 


3 


17 


1909 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 . 








- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1 


5 


1911 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1912 . 








- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


1 


3 


9 


1913 . 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


2 


1914 . 








- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


1915 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1916 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1919 . 








- 


- 


3 


19 


- 


75 


482 


579 


1920 . 








- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


19 


157 


180 


1921 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


104 


123 


1922 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


63 


72 


1923 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


10 


93 


104 


1924 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


71 


73 


1925 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


91 


92 


1926 . 








- 


- 


- 




- 


3 


302 


305 


1927 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


118 


118 


1928 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


89 


89 


1929 . 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


203 


203 


1930 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 


42 


1931 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


Totals 








1 


4 


19 


60 


9 


183 


1,876 


2,152 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1935, who were Born 
in the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 





c 


■a 














Date of Birth. 


S 

c 

0. 
3 


Q 


m 

c 

a 

u 


c 

C3 
C 
<s 

"S 

a) 

2 


c 3 

o 0. 

3 C 

OJI-C 


c 

01 


s 

E 
1 


Totals. 


1868 .... 












1 




1 


1869 . 








- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


1 


5 


1870 . 








- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


2 


5 


1871 . 








- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


2 


7 


1872 . 








- 


- 


1 


4 


1 


2 


8 


16 


1873 . 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


10 


2 


17 


1874 . 








- 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


14 


1875 . 








1 


- 


2 


2 


_ 


5 


_ 


10 


1876 . 








- 


1 


2 


2 


- 


1 


2 


8 


1877 . 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 


7 


13 


1878 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


2 


9 


1879 . 








- 


- 


1 




- 


3 


4 


9 


1880 . 








- 


- 


- 




1 


- 


1 


3 


1881 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


1 


8 


1882 . 








- 


1 


1 




2 


4 




9 


1883 . 








- 


- 


- 




- 


2 




3 


1884 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


2 


6 


1885 . 








- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


17 


18 


1886 . 








- 


- 


- 




- 


4 


26 


31 


1887 . 








- 


- 


2 




- 


2 


40 


44 


1888 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


1 


50 


54 


1889 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


70 


78 


1890 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


56 


59 


1891 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


92 


97 


1892 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


9 


123 


134 


1893 . 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


20 


129 


154 


1894 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


20 


153 


175 


1895 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


15 


147 


165 


1896 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


16 


172 


192 


1897 . 








- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


22 


160 


188 


1898 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


147 


157 


1899 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


102 


106 


1900 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


142 


143 


1901 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


102 


103 


1902 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1903 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


43 


1904 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


1905 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals 








1 


4 


19 


60 


9 


183 


1,876 


2,152 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1935, 
was 41.07 years. 



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1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



95 



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i. ^ 


+i 


-kJ 


+i 


-u *J 




.S ^ Xi ^ ^ 


-u *J 


03 


o3 


53 


o3 03 


c3 


03 03 03 o3 o3 


03 o3 


Ph 


fin 


Ph 


PhPh 


Oh 


Oh PhPiPUPh 


PhPh 


Tfl 


- 


(N 


IM rH 


- 


F-H r-<(M ,-1 r-l 


CO— 1 



96 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1934. 



Divisions. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Headquarters 
Division 1 
Division 2 
Division 4 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 . 
Division 13 . 
Division 14 . 
Division 15 . 
Division 16 
Division 17 . 
Division 18 
Division 19 
Totals . 



1,904 
6,840 
5,455 
13,931 
9,335 
4,149 
4,425 
4,966 
3,927 
1,629 
2,128 
5,286 
3,182 
1,000 
763 
1,294 



70,214 



316 

427 

547 

1,431 

491 

205 

269 

498 

189 

63 

132 

298 

495 

41 

23 

85 



2,220 
7,267 
6,002 
15,362 
9,826 
4,354 
4,694 
5,464 
4,116 
1,692 
2,260 
5,584 
3,677 
1,041 
786 
1,379 



5,510 



75,724 



[1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



lO 




eo 




Ci 




>-H 




^ 




O 




fn 






o 


fO 


W 


1^ 






tin 


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o 


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00 


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o 


i 


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T3 


■g 1 


1 


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1 


1 




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a 2i 
























v2_- 


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1 


CM 


GO 


o 


CI 


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05 


O 




C3 














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■a-5 
















CI 
































^H 
















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<£ 


1 


1 1 


, 


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2 
















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§ 
























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1 1 


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1 


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CO 


o 


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o 




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o 
























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i. 


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1 1 


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i 


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00 


05 


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bC 










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3 








^ 
















03 






a 


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z 




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s 


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to 










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t.— 


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>> 






to 


sault 
pon. 


o 




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p 
bC 


b 

^ 


c3 


^J 




H 
<< 

z 


3 
S3 


ssory to as 
ngerous wea 
ssory to mai 


o 
>> 


3 
o 

o 

>5 








Si 


3 
03 


3 
o ~ 






o 


S 


o 




-.^ 


-fj 


-kJ 


-ki 


a-*^ 








to 
to 


to 

to 


^ 


3 


3 


3 


3 


^ CO 






Qi 


(u 03 <a 


o 


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c« 




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o 


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o 


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to 




to 


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to 


to 


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<11 


< < 


< 


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< 



98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






■o 






:^ 



1 


!35 


CM 

H 
K 




;^ 


t—i 


■to 




X 




C 
< 


w 


•^ 




n 




(/J 


< 


CO 






o 


N 






O 




s: 






c 






CO 


i-H 










CO 






vu 


o 




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^ 



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i 


1 


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1 


1 


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1 


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1 




1 
























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^ • 




00 


CO 


«o 


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00 


CO 


(M 


i> 


IM 


<N 


tn 


**^'d 




CO 




Tt< 


I>. 


lO 






i-H 




I— 1 




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a 


























ai 




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^ 


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C5 


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^^ 


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s 


























»-• 




t>. 


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il 












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CO 


t^ 


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c 




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CO 


CC 


CO 






T-H 




1-H 




2 <g, 


























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00 


CO 


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CO 


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CO 




Tfl 


t^ 


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r-H 




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^ 


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1 


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fe 


















































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1 


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l> 


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l> 


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S 


CO 




■* 


t^ 








T-^ 




y—\ 




< 




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1 
3 










































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1 


























c3 
















C 

a 










o 
















c 










cc 




bfl 


W 










3 














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m 




















a. 




'■^ 


^: 










O 














u 














bC 








o 




-bb 


Cm 










C2 


J2 








o 




9^ 


C 








=*-. 


3 


"5 








3 




3 


c 








o 

3 


'g 


0^ 


-j-a 






03 




o 

be 


pip 






tx 


oT 


c 


O 


3 


XI 


a 




_s 


Pi 
< 

;2 




1 


_c 


e3 


-tj 
rt 


fcT 




s 


s 


:g 




's 
o 






o 


S 


a 

'-3 

'5b 


o 

c 

S 


o 


O 


o 


o 




T3 
3 
c3 






3 


-S 




o5 




c3 




o_ 








3 


-o 


-O 


-d 




'a 


'5- 


'& 


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a: 


S o 


1 






7^ 


772 


72 


7X2 


C 




C 


3 


3^ 






tri 


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J= 


^ 


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C 


o 


O 


C" 


'~' X 


c3 








< 


O 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


W 


fe 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



99 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




00 


00 


t^ 


■* 


00 


<N 


CD 


, 


t^ 


(M 


CO 


C^ 


C^ 


CD 


(M 


00 


05 




Tt< 




OS 






•* 




(M 


CO 


Tj* 


o 


(N 




00 


1> 






























CO 


05 


1 


CO 


1 


o 

(M 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


00 


c 


■* 


?1 


CO 


1 


CO 

CO 


00 


1 


CD 


CO 


00 
CO 


1 


1 


CD 


CO 


>0 


-* 


- 


CO 


I> 


- 


5! 
































-* 


CO 


1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1 


^ 


CD 


1 


CD 


»c 


CO 


o 


O 


(N 


00 


o 




(N 






















1-H 







(M 
































00 


1 


CO 


1 


1^ 


1 


1 


1 


^_ 


^^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CD 


00 






























^ 


o 


fN 


(N 


1 


CO 


1 


CO 


CO 


1 


CO 


CO 


, 


CO 


t^ 


1 


kO 










lO 






















CO 


•* 


^ 


Oi 


■* 


00 


c^< 


CO 


00 


CD 


00 


o 


^^ 


o 


o 


(M 


t^ 


02 




CO 




CO 






CO 






CO 


Tf< 


CI 






10 


CD 
































00 


CO 


t^ 


■* 


00 


<N 


CD 


, 


o- 


c^ 


CO 


(M 


c^ 


.^ 


(N 


00 


05 




-* 




05 






'^ 




(N 


CO 


rf 


o 


(M 




00 


l> 






























CO 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


»CI 


1 


(N 


(N 


00 


1 


1 


1 


1 


»CI 


1 


(M 
































00 


CO 


CD 


■* 


CO 


<N 


■* 


c; 


o 


<M 


CO 


IM 


<M 


^^ 


(M 


00 


05 




Tt< 




Oi 






CO 




IM 


CO 


■* 


o 


(N 




CD 


I> 






























05 

IN 






aJ" 
































































S 






























O 


bfi 






























O) 


s 
































eS 






























•ji 


■"' 






























o 


bfl 










o 




















^ 












-ti 


















i-t 

o 


3 












-^ 

S 














-Si 




a, 




(it 










_c 


, 












3 




p. 

3 




gi 










o 












S 




03 


o 












■£3 


c 










^^ 






o 




Tl 










& 


"43 

c3 








^ 




s 




M 


bC 


c 














o 




T3- 


p 


h 




c 


03 












o 






O 


o 








1 


s 

m 

3 


_o 
'■*3 
03 

1— ( 


bC 

c 

bb'o, 


s 

bC 

c 

o3 


s 


3 


3 
fcT 

3 


> 

i 


o 
a 
a 
Pi 


3 

03 
m 
m 

I 


3 

cc 
03 

-D 

O 
Pi 


g 
-3 

J 

-D 


c3 
C 

-D 


o 

bC 

'S 

1 






100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 









o 

O 



O 

H 
CO 



o 



o 









^1 



go 



3 O s^ O 






re Q 

a « 
^5 



'^ (M (N 



^ — I IM 



I I I 



I CO t^ i-H 



I lO I 



I ^ lO^ 



Tt< (M (N 



-* C>^ (N 



II I . I (N I I 



"o 


-o 






n1 


^ 






c3 


is 


3 


M M 




-c 


'73 








bC 

o 




MM 




>> 

bC 

a 


5P 




bX) 


bC 

1 ».■ 




ill 
bC 
















-73 
C 


-T3T3 
bC bC 

c c 




T3 
bO 

a 


n3 
bC 




3 

03 
bC 

C 


03 ig 

bc •*■ 
S M 


2 


0) (B 




■-1 


^ 




(1) 




03 

CD 


o3 
2 












c 


s 


•^' 


-O 


13 T3 




xs 


T3 




T^ 


■§ ^ 

=^^i 


O 


O 


C G 


■d 


c 


C'O 


03 




-»-i 
>. 


cS o3 


0) 


« 


03 


^ 




bCM 


& 


br 


br 


a 


br 


bC^ bC 


o 


o 


s.s 


ID 


3 


3 




3 


o 


d <u 


03 


« 


03 






S gi gi 


03 


s^ 


0) 


C3 


0) 


p^ OJ 



^ -*i 



a p 



bC c 



« « S. 



bo « ^ 
^ &.b 

03 Qi li 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



101 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1> 


(N 


<M 


^ 


^^ 


t- 


CO 


lO 


CO 


00 


,_, 




OS 


(M 


r^ 


(N 


C5 








? 




T— < 




GO 


00 


(M 


CO 




05 


(M 




O 










(M 


















'^ 


CO 








1 


" 


1 


05 
00 


1 


'^ 


1 


■* 


'^ 


1 


CSl 




U3 


CO 
IM 


' 


lO 


IM 


lO 




1 


o 


1 


(M 


(N 


CO 


1 


1 


00 




eo 


00 
CO 


^~' 


00 


1 


Ol 


' 


1 


c 


1 


CO 


1 




IM 


C 


1 




CO 


o 


CO 


»o 


1 


1 


1 


'"' 


<M 


^^ 


1 


1 


1 


c 


C^ 


1 




lO 


00 


' 


CO 


1 




1 


1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


CO 






o 




CN 


1-^ 


IM 


CO 


" 


■~o 


C<l 


^ 


05 


1 


r^ 


cc 


CJ 


(M 


«c 


(N 




IM 


t^ 


lO 


o 


00 








CD 




r—i 




00 


t^ 


^^ 


(N 




OJ 


lO 




Tf 










(N 


















■>* 










t^ 


<N 


(M 


^^ 


^^ 


t- 


CO 


»c 


CO 


00 


^^ 




Ol 


IM 


t^ 


IM 


05 








(32 




T-H 




00 


00 


(N 


CO 




OS 


IM 




CO 










(N 


















^ 


CO__ 








^^ 


1 


1 


(M 


'~^ 


1 


1 


05 


r^ 


t^ 


■* 




?2 


CO 
<M 
IM 


CO 


00 


1 


^ 


(>) 


IN 


a> 


1 


t^ 


CO 


CD 


CD 


1 


f^ 




1^ 


Oi 


^__i 


■* 


05 








00 




i-H 




t^ 


CD 


CO 


Oi 




(N 


05 


1—4 


U3 










<N 


















TJH 


o 












_ 




b£ 












., 










„ 








O 




-3 




















;-i 


9i 

3 


a 




v 


c3 




c 


O 










in 








a; 
> 
o 


c3 

> 


a 

o 






JL 


o 


a 


^ 






bC 




K 




,_^ 




-n 


_C 


o 




o 

a 


3 


c3 


M 


^ 
§ 














.a 
"3 


a; 




o 






03 


oj 


O 




a 






4. 
> 


bf 


3 
O 




> 


3 
> 


g 
©& 


"2 


a 


a 

u 

o 


O 

o 


O 
M 


■+3 


1 

o3 


c 
■> 

3 


T3 
3 

3 

bC 


"3 

m 

s 


3 


1 


bC 

-3 

S 
o 


0/ 

> 

o 

a 

bi)0 
3«^ 


i 

a; 

C 
3 


c 
o 

a 

o 


__3 

(3 

m 

a 

a 

o 


e3 

O 

K 
a 


Si 

o 


b 


o 


Xi 

o 


S 
3 


>rzn 


C 


s 


^ 

3 


-a oj 


>, 


>> 


X 


. e*-i 


>-, 




i 


a 

o 

3 


a 

o 




a 

CO 

C 
O 


c 

o 


0^ 


3 


s 

ci 




a 
3 


3 C 

11 


S3 


< 


< 


< 


< 


m 


pq 


O 


u 


N 


o 






J 


>A 


i-q 


i-:i 



102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



O 



X 

H 

m 

< 



O 



o 



(In 

o 



< 

O 



O 



•o 


■6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


. V V 
















Dis 

harg 

or 

eleas 
















" « 
















i^ 
















^_. 


o 


(N 


lO 


»o 


^-O O Tf< 


i> 


t^ 


)^'* 


T}< 


t^ 


tH 




CJ -H 05 


t^ 


CO 


TJ-- 














o 


gH 














CO 


m 


o 


O 


o 


^^ 


-H I ■<*< 


o 


kC 


o 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



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1936.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 105 



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1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



107 



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1936.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. Ill 



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'•♦3 
'o 




_3 


a 
o 


o 






03 


to 

o 




3 
bC 


O 
bD 

S 
3 


3 

.2 
'-t3 
03 


3 
O 

3 


^ 






a 

c 


t-l 
o 

03 


o3 


c3 

o 


^ -^ o 

03 O O 


1 


+3 
o 

o3 


C 

u 

3 


o3 


"> 
■p 


3 
c3 

3 


3 
_bC 

"o 








ffi 


X 


f-:; 


hJ 


J 


S " 




»^ 




^ 


O 


O 


Oh 


Ph 


Ph 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 






1 




1 




1 


10 


00 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 
































00 


10 

IC 














^ 


^ 


'x> 


o 


t^ 


^ 




10 


CO 




t^ 




^^ 




CO 


00 


1 


(M 


IM 


,_, 


CO 




,_ 






CO 


l^ 


00 


id 






IM 














CO 
















CO 


»— 1 


00 
CO 


00 


10 


1^ 

-»o 




1 


CO 
CO 




' 




1 




CO 


t^ 


(M 

CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


■* 


■* 


s 




CO 
CO 


CO 

CO 
CO 




-* 


00 
10 








1 




1 


IC 

CO 





1 


iM 


1 


c^ 




1 


CO 


Tt< 


s 


00 


f 


00 




^^ 


10 




^^ 




1 




'^ 


'"' 


(M 


(M 


1 


1 


.-H 




1 


1 


1 


'"' 


'^ 


00 


00 


id 




Tf< 


CO 




■* 




'"' 




CD 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


CD 


f 


CO 


CO 


^ 


00 




1 


CO 
?3 




1 




1 




1 


C5 


2 


' 


1 


' 


1 




1 


»o 


t^ 




(M 


s 


10 




" 







CO 




1 




t^ 


CO 

(M 


a> 

CO 


<M 


(M 


" 


CO 






,_, 


^^ 


CO 


o 


t^ 


-rt< 




«o 


CO 




r^ 




1 




CO 


CO 


00 


(N 


C< 


^^ 


CO 




^ 






CO 


l> 


00 


10 
id 






CD 














(N 


IC 














(N 


1 


CO 
CO 


1 


CO 


IC 
00 




1 


CO 




1 




1 




lO 


CO 


IC 
(N 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


05 


' 




o 


00 


CD 




10 







t^ 




»-H 




X 




CO 
CO 
10 


(N 


IM 


" 


CO 
















, 




, 


, 




, 




1 




1 










_ 


!-> 




bC 












to 




73 












'OJ 




C3 


















C 




a- 
3 

a; 








s 





"> 


> 




> 




e 















3 


CO 

a 




3 















* 
















.K 










.^ 




3 




CO 

o 






u 




c 









c 




u 

to 




P 






"o 


bC 

a 


"3 


-5 









3 

a 
S 


o 
'o 


o 









1 


to 

'a 

£ 






S 









a 

a 








c 


3 

3 


■5 

■5 


c 

03 

a 
3 

o3 


'0 
3 

Si 

c 





to 

C 
3 

8 





C3 


c 










^ 




u 




fD 












r* 


a 







C3 


o. 

u 

to 

o 
to 


i4 

O 

o 




■> 


^.2 


"o 






"o 

fin 




Ph 

'0 










< 

to 

CD 


3 


C 
3 









to 


> 


IS 


3 


to 


?5 


to 

c 


to . 


tZ! . 


to 



> 


to 

S3 


to 


bO 


^ 




CO 


^ 


tt 



•♦J 


o 

tc 


o 

'-3 


■3 


5P 

1 


^0 
3 


> 

c 


egulatio 
tion of. 
egulatio 
lation c 


^ 

"■§ != 
^ 

W)C3 

0; — 


'-3 

0:1 





egulatio 
tion of. 
unaway 


Oh 

3 


to 

.52 

3 






Si 

to 
bC 

3 


a 

3 


damage 
jliciting 
bonds. 


Ph 


al 


Ph 


« 


« 


K 




« 


p:l 




« 




« 




« 


rt 


m 


m 




CO 1 



114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan- 



i 



X 



o 



c 

I— t 

o 

CD 

« 
O 

H 

X 



o 5 



w 

Q 
►J 

t-H 

Eh 
O 

OS 

o 



O 



-a 


•d 


1 


1 


1 


1— ( 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


«o 


> ?. m 








(N 










CO 


■2 g?^:" 








OS 










>r3 


Q S = « 








00 










"* 


" fti 




















^_. 


o 


O 


CO 


1 


(M 


^ (M 


CO 


»o 


05 


as 




Ui 


(N 






(N 






05 


"^"B 








































2h 


















,_^ 


ffi 


















iM 


00 


l> 


(N 


_ 


CO 


1 


1 1 


1 


(M 


00 


o 








t^ 










o 


c 








Oi 










c^ 


§ 


















lO 


5 


IM 


1— t 


^_i 


CO 


1 


1 CO 


1 


1-H 


^ 










»o 










00 


l| 








t^ 




























o 


tH 




















c 


OJ 


GO 


» 


a> 


^ 


1 00 


c^ 


(N 


t^ 


M 




i-H 




^ 










CO 


'S t. 








■^ 










CO 


^ 0^ 




















O *^ 


















(N 


f^ 




















, "d « ^ 


(N 


00 


O 


1 


, 


1 lO 


CO 


1 


o 


S 2-9 "^ 




■^ 


(M 












■* 


















•^ 




















co" 


^1 


,^ 


1 


^^ 


^^ 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


IM 


r-H 






(N 










»c 








cn 










I> 










CO 










CO 




















i 


CO 


<M 


(M 


1 


,_ 


^ t^ 


1 


to 


CO 


c 


















t^ 


C 03 


















»o 


Ob 

ai 


















lO 


^ 






















!lO 


O 


CO 


^ 


IM 


^ (M 


CO 


to 


>r3 


-— 




lO 


(M 


c^ 




(M 






CO 


-M 








05 










t^ 


e2 








eo" 










U5 




i 


1 


1 


1 


(N 


^^ 


1 -H 


1 


rH 


05 




'c3 








Oi 










(M 




i 








^H 










C» 


si 




















Z K 

2* 


f^ 




















«w 






















a S 




o 


o 


CO 


05 


f— ( 


1-H ^H 


CO 


rf 


CO 


Ph « 


s 




to 


C^l 


(M 




cs 






CO 


< 










CO 










00 
CO 

(M 














i 




















3 


"3 


















t^ 


g 


















■t^ 


_o 


















M 












o 








OJ 


'-3 






e4 












c 


^ 






•z 




3 

02 








S 








P^ 


_o 


s 








-fj 


-V 






s 


*-^ 








a 


fe 






O 




»r 


"o 




"o 


a .=0 


_s 






P=< 

o 

< 

•z 


■> 

1 


'3 




m 

a 
o 

tn 
q; 

a 

O 


C 

■> 


> s s 

Is s 

— 3 - 


72 

3 

s 


3 

'C 

s 


3 

o 










03 

-a 

3 

CO 




C 


^ 






H 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



115 









X! 
m 



o 
< 





■a 


■a 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


00 CO 


■* 




. * S 










— ) CO 


00 




Dis 

harg 

or 

eleaf 










CO 10 






" tf 
















o . 


00 


CO r^ (M 


05 


^ 


-H Oi 







*""^ 


00 


CO IM 




^ 


t^ 05 


■* 




•o-r 




t^ CO 


1-H 


05 


Tf ^ 


a> 






















cc 


CO 






1-H ^H 















»*< CO 


t^ 




00 


CO 


t^ l« 05 


CO 


CO 


»C 00 


CO 




o 


CO 


t^ »0 CO 




CO 


l> 


CO 




C 


(N 


<N CO 




1— t 


t^ CO 


CO 




i 










IC 


t>r 




-2 


1 


05 ^ tH 


CO 


t^ 


Tt< ^ 


CO 




— c 


•* 


00 05 "5 


•* 


t^ 


05 00 


t^ 




II 


-* 


I> 






°l ""1 


CO 


























»o 


t>r 




4^ 










)-H 


1-H 




t-H 
















a 


oo 


00 05 t^ 


CO 


»C1 


t^ r^ 


t>- 




.s„- 


o 


00 




CO 


CO CO 


CO 




S E 


00 


CO 




CO 


CO CO 


CO 




!-• (» 
















r^ 










oT co" 


CO 




(^ 












'"' 




1 "5 »*: 


CD 


10 CO CO 


IC 


CO 





00 






"5 (M 




CO 


00 "* 


m 




C C-^ g 


■<* 






CO 


■* 


■* 




— o ^ o 










CO 


tJh" 




II 


lO 


CO 


t^ 


00 


CO CO 


CO 






t^ »0 CO 




CO 


,-< lO 


O) 




CO 


00 




CO 


t^ 


CO 




s| 










^ CO 


oT 












rJH 


"* 




i 


t^ 


Oi 0^ CO 


t>- 





CO CO 


-5t< 




e 


lO 


— 1 (N CO 





CO 


05 l> 


l^ 




C OS 


Tt< 


CO IM 




CO 


ITS 


00 




O fc 


(N 


cC 






»o 






^ 












'"' 






00 


CO t^ (M 


a> 


^^ 


05 »0 


"* 




"3 


00 


CO (M 







00 CO 


CO 






i^ CO 


1-H 





CO t^ 


t^ 




H 
















CO 


CO 






^ »c 


to 












Tt< CO 


I— 






0) 


o 


(N ■* 


CO 


CO 


t^ 









s 


(M 


00 CO 




1-H 


CO CO 








(M 


CO 




1—1 


00 05 


«o 




















O 


V 










CO .-H 


id" 




o ^ 

B5 g 


Cc 


































00 


-H CO CO 


CO 


s 


CO CO 


■* 






ID 




»o 


1-H 


00 


»0 CO 






^ 


Oi 


I> CO CO 


f-H 


t^ 


00 00 


CO 






CEJ 


















2 


(M 


CO 






00 CO 

















CO CO 


r>. 








1 1 -t:> 


OJ 


oT 


, 










sag 

•- 


^ 


^ 

^ 


>1 « 

■J3 










cS 


-»J 


tJ 


CO 








c 




cc 
C 




C3 CD 

^ -a 








-e +=0 


■3 


a 


*i 






2: 


1 


inst propel 
h vio ence. 
inst proper 
iiout violen 
offenses 


IK 





;3 


-0 






w 

o 


CO 


d 

to 






cc 


against 
ty, etc. 
not include 






o 


■3 


03 *^ cS -*^ 


.T3 


.'3 








cS 


" "^ CO *J 03 


03 






to 




S'S ^ « 


§.b 


Ct> ID 


S^ S bb 








CO 

C 


sS6^S| 




ffens 
mor 
ffens 
goin 


CO 







&H 








13 
















-*j 























-^ 


CO CO "^ 


id 


CO 


t>^ 06 


H 






6 


odd 


d 


d 


d d 








1 


;?; 


Z 1^ Z 


Z 


Z 


Z Z 





116 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



'^ .S 



5~ S 



1— ( 


g ^ 


1— 1 


o . 


X 


?^ i." 




<a 5 


w 


^^ 8 






< 






c^ .ii 




• '^ <u 




g « 




« § 




■to : 




!=5-- 



^ r 









•* 


1 


t~ 


^ 


I 


a- 


^ 


t^ 


o: 






(ij 














t^ 


CI 


CM 






























CO 


1 


1^ 


^ 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


•* 


CO 




> *o 




00 




CO 






CO 


C) 


CJ 


X 




O 


§ 














00 

CM 


N 


C4 

co" 








^M 


P 


» 


1 


1 


CI 


CI 


X 


1 05 






Cc,' 


'^ 












•>»< 




1 X 

1 " 




in 3^ 


























CC 


■* 


Tf 


lO 


,^ 


c 


^ 


X 


o 






o 




la 






■* 




o 


■* 




■u 
















co_ 


■* 


05 




c 

J! 


<5 














oi 




CM 








,_ 


P 


o 


ao 


T" 


CI 


00 


CO 


^ ~ 




01 


fa 


'"* 




CM 






'^ 


r~ 


CO 


M 




o Sin 


























t^ 


o~. 


r^ 


t^ 


00 


^^ 


CO 


_ 


CO 




Ui '^Ift 




ta 




o 






■V 


CO 


"O 


CO 




■0 

c 

si 


S 














CO 
eo" 


t^ 


■* 
■* 








o 


~ 


a-. 


1 


1 


CO 


t^ 


X 


CO 






fa 


•M 




-M 






CM 


o 

CO 


CO 


r- 

rf 




■A Bo 


























CH 


"oT 


C. 


»0 


CO 


•<»' 


^^ 


•^ 


C5 




^ ^1/5 




lO 




■* 


CM 




CO 


CO 


o 






T3 


S 


c^ 












CO 


CM_ 


T(l 




C3 














•"l*" 


"^ 


CO 








OI 


n 


t~ 


■V 


1 


cc 


^ 


C-. 


05 






fa' 


CO 




CO 










CO 


t>. 
















CO 




lO 




o Si« 


























lO 


o 


■* 


•o 


•o 


t^ 


o 


X 


05 




^ ^ 




lO 




CO 


CM 




OO 


CM 


CO 


t~ 




•o 


^ 


ro 




!M 








CM 


o 


05 




5 














•O 


CM 


t-T 








«5 


T" 


CD 


CO 


_ 


■* 


CO 


,_ 


CO 




•a 


fa 


CO 




X3 








o 


o 


















■>1" 


CO 


X 






>o 


^^ 


t^ 


t^ 


•a 


CI 


,^ 


CO 


■>* 




f^ ^ 




o 


■* 


CI 


CO 




C-. 


■^ 


CO 


C5 




T3 


§ 


•* 




CO 








CO 


o 


CM 




si 














co" 


CO 


O 








b- 


T^ 


CO 


c^ 


"~cT~ 


05 


t^ 


CO 


CO 




■a 
© Si« 


fa' 


Ci 




U3 








t^ 


Tjl 


















eo 


CO 


X 






o 


C 


^M 


•* 


o: 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


t- 




1-5 -^<-J 




CO 


t- 




•* 


CM 


t^ 


■o 


05 


>o 




c 
si 


s 


■* 




CO 










CM 

co- 


X 
05* 








o 


i 


O: 


_ t 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


ol 


>o 




1 

in So 


fa 


CO 




•a 








CO 




X 
















■* 


CO 


X 






ffi 


m 


^M 


a 


C! 


o 


CO 


X 


X 




<S "^^0 




■fl« 


CO 


IN 


:3 


CM 




CM 


"5 


X 




T3 


:s 


>o 




■* 






•— ' 


o 


Cl_ 


■* 




C 
03 














V 


V 


o 








t^ 


i 


^M 


,_ 


1 


CO 


,.^ 


X 


,_, 






fa' 


a 




iZ 








00 


05 


t- 
















CO 




CO 






TP 


CO 


»fl 


w 


•O 


>n 


o 


CM 


o 




r^ -^r^ 




>o 


■* 


>0 


■* 






U5 


05 


o 




■a 


s 


•* 




CO 






^^ 


cs 


CO 


t- 




si 














CM 


co" 


t-' 








t^ 


<N 


t^ 


1 


1 


CM 


X 


o 


CO 




0) 


fa' 






•* 








00 


<: 


g 






■* 


g 


:C 


O 


CO 


3 


o 


CO 


t^ 




— Pf 








O 


CO 




CO 


CO 








■o 


*— 1 


C) 


55 


CO 








CO 


T)H 


CO 




5 


«4 
















cf 


■* 








1 


i 


1 


i 


j 


1 


"5 


X 


eo 




-a 


fa' 
















o 

CM 


C) 






IN 


a: 


IM 


1 


1 


1 


CM 


«o 


t^ 




















>o 


CO 


05 




oi 


S 
















CM 
CM* 


CM 








1 


j 


1 


1 


j 


1 




CI 


CM 






fa' 
















-* 


■* 




a® 

2"" 


























1 


i 




\ 




1 




t^ 


r~ 




13 


s 
















"^ 


•o 








































































s] 
















































o 








-- 


IM 


CO 


Tf 


>o 


CO 


t^ 


X 


H 








d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 










Z 


Z 


2: 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 


Z 





1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



117 









lO 


to 


o 


CO 


o 


o 








o 


^ 


'^ 


05 


lO 


U3 






•pau.iBg saaj 


s 


•<* 

lO 


^ 


00 


s 


o 






ssau;ij^ JO ;unouiy 


t>^ 


(M 


5_ 


t^ 


>o 


t^ 








t^ 


l> 


^ 


o 


'-^'~ 


CO 








m 










m 






CO 


, 


lO 


00 


CO 


Q 






■jinoQ 




U3 


t^ 


CO 


05 


^ 






^■e aDUBpuajJV 


(N 


t-- 


o 


■* 


oo 


rt< 






,8.^BQ }o jaqumfij 


S 


oo" 


CO 


co" 


CO 
CO 


^ 






■janoo 


o> 


< 








r- 




•g 


.<q pasoduij luaui 


(M 

05 


00 


00 


CO 


05 


lO 




^ 


-uosudmi JO 8.iBa^ 


"^ 




-* 


t^ 


CO 


CO 




w 




(N 


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118 



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1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 



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120 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1935. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Breeders. 


Total. 


1 


101 


27 


6 


1 


135 


2 


126 


31 


29 


- 


186 


4 


386 


104 


38 


* 1 


529 


6 


534 


71 


54 


- 


659 


7 


807 


181 


35 


- 


1,023 


9 


612 


92 


80 


2 


786 


10 


571 


97 


55 


*1 


724 


11 


1,103 


97 


177 


- 


1,377 


13 


643 


72 


120 


1 


836 


14 


1773 


93 


141 


- 


1,007 


15 


242 


36 


11 


1 


290 


16 


526 


105 


120 


2 


753 


17 


1,121 


105 


286 


- 


1,512 


18 


635 


63 


118 


1 


817 


19 


491 


53 


77 


- 


621 


Totals 


8,671 


1,227 


1,347 


10 


11,255 



* No fee. 



t 1 removal, $0.2.5. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . . 363 


Division 14 


28 


Division 2 . 






559 


Division 15 


11 


Division 4 . 






182 


Division 16 


23 


Division 6 . 






311 


Division 17 


40 


Division 7 . 






22 


Division 18 


32 


Division 9 . 






83 


Division 19 


38 


Division 10 






16 








Division 11 






32 


Total . 


. * 1,790 


Division 13 






50 







* 9 canceled for nonpayment. 



1936.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



121 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statejuent for the Year ending November 30, 1935. 





Expenditures 






A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


$4,901,535 75 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


4,685 87 


$4,906,221 62 






B. Contractual Services: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


.$728 60 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


905 59 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


18,654 73 




5. 


Express charges 


257 20 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


35,879 67 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


800 90 




12. 


Bond and insurance premi- 








ums 


284 48 




13. 


Communication 


30,902 32 




14. 


Motor vehicles, repair and 








care 


14,308 51 




16. 


Care of animals 


2,876 38 




18. 


Cleaning 


2,758 49 




19. 


Removal of waste . 


25 00 




22. 


Medical 


11,970 11 




28. 


Expert 


1,101 40 




29. 


Stenographic and copying . 


6 00 




30. 


Listing 


58,638 22 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


675 18 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 








ing 


10 55 




39. 


General repairs 


40,782 28 


221,565 61 






C. Equ 


pment: 






3. 


Electrical .... 


.$2,826 98 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


2,403 88 




6. 


Stable 


292 48 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings 


2,329 41 




9. 


Office 


7,255 71 




10. 


Library 


676 61 




11. 


Marine 


1,417 42 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory, 


181 33 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


5,208 05 




15. 


Tires, tubes and accessories, 


8,449 87 




16. 


Wearing apparel . 


40,929 55 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


5,901 70 


77,872 99 






D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office 


$42,002 56 




2. 


Food and ice . 


9,505 98 




3. 


Fuel 


31,024 48 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,941 42 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory, 


473 82 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


4,510 99 




11. 


Gasoline, oil and grease 


43,872 66 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants. 


1,678 14 




16. 


Miscellaneous supplies . 


11,292 33 


148,302 38 




Carried forward 




$5,353,962 60 



122 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVII. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1935. 



Brought forward $5,353,962 60 

E. Materials: 

1. Building $2,413 71 

10. Electrical .... 4,904 99 

13. Miscellaneous materials . 7,391 80 

14,710 50 

F. Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities 352,844 49 

H. Emergency Relief Project materials .... 6,493 26 



Total $5,728,010 85 

Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . $42,384 75 

For dog licenses (credited to school department) 26,394 25 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,512 10 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, interest on deposits, report blanks, use of police 

property, etc. . . . 2,458 24 

Refunds and reimbursements 7,245 67 

For damage to police property 95 44 

Miscellaneous . . . ~ 43 00 



Total 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 
to police property 

Grand total 




Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1935. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 



Payrolls $37,751 92 

Signalling apparatus, repairs and supplies .... 7,499 30 

Pavement and sidewalk surface restoration .... 3,970 39 

Furniture and furnishings 69 35 

Printing and stationery 102 81 

Total $49,393 77 



1936. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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1 





1936.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 127 



INDEX. 



A. PAGE 

Accidents 25, 65, 123, 124 

caused by automobile 25, 123, 124 

number of, reported 65 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares, 123, 124 

Adjustment of claims 66 

Ambulance service 69 

Arrests 28, 29, 33, 41, 66, 96, 97-117 

age and sex of 116 

comparative statement of 117 

decrease in number of 33 

for drunkenness 28, 34, 66, 106 

foreigners 34, 97-115 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. .15, 33, 66, 106 

minors 34, 97-115 

nativity of 29 

nonresidents 30, 97-115 

number of, by divisions 96 

number of, punished by fine 29 

on warrants 34,97-117 

summoned by court 34, 97-115 

total number of 33, 115 

violation of city ordinances 34, 201 

without warrants 34,97-115 

Auctioneers 118 

Automobiles 24,25,28,35,36,38,71,74,123,124 

accidents due to 123, 124 

deaths caused by 38,123,124 

operating under influence of liquor 28, 108 

police 24, 69 

public 71, 118 

sight-seeing 74, 118 

stolen \ : 28, 35, 36, 102 

used 35, 37, 118 

B. 

Ballistician, sergeant 22, 89 

Benefits and pensions 82 

Biological chemist 22, 35, 39 

Breaking, entering , robbery cases 10 

Buildings 65 

dangerous, reported 65 

found open and made secure 65 



128 P. D. 49 

PAGE 

Bullet-proof vests 18 

Bureau of Criminal Inv^estigation 21, 22, 35-39 

automobile division 35 

biological chemist 39 

homicide squad 38 

lost and stolen property division 37 

Bureau of Operations 59 

Bureau of Records 11, 41, 47, 49 

criminal identification 47 

missing persons 49 

warrant file 51 

Bureau of Traffic 11, 54 

c. 

Carriages, public 71, 118 

articles left in 71 

number licensed 72, 118 

stands for 73 

Cases investigated 41, 65 

Children 11,29,65 

abandoned, cared for 65 

lost, restored 29, 65 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 34, 201 

Claims, adjustment of 66 

Collective musicians 80, 118 

Commitments 29, 66 

Communications system 23, 59 

Complaints 21,81,93,118 

against miscellaneous licenses 81. 118 

against police officers 21, 93 

Courts 34, 41, 57, 97-115, 117 

fines imposed by 34, 117 

number of daj^s' attendance at, by officers . . . 34, 41, 117 

number of persons summoned by 34,97-115 

Criminal work 117 

comparative statement of 117 

D. 

Dangerous weapons 80 

Dead bodies 65, 68 

recovered 65, 68 

Deaths 33, 38, 87, 123, 124 

by accident, suicide, etc 38, 123, 124 

of police officers 33, 87 

Distribution of force 33, 84 

Disturbances suppressed 65 

Dogs 118, 120, 122 

amount received for licenses for 118,122 

number licensed 120 



p. D. 49. 129 

PAGE 

Drivers 72, 75, 118 

hackney carriage 72, 118 

siglit-seeing automobile 75, 118 

Drowning, persons rescued from 65, 68 

Drunkenness 28, 34, 66, 106 

arrests for, per day 34 

decrease in number of arrests for 34 

foreigners arrested for 34, 106 

nonresidents arrested for 34, 106 

total number of arrests for 34, 106 

women committed for 66 

E. 

Employees of the Department 32, 84 

Events, special 60 

Expenditures 31, 82, 121 

Extra duties performed by officers 41, 65 

F. 

Financial 30. 31, 82, 121 

expenditures 31, 82, 121 

pensions 82, 122 

receipts 30, 82, 118, 122 

miscellaneous license fees 82, 118, 122 

signal service 82, 122 

Fines 29, 34, 117 

amount of 34, 117 

average amount of 34, 117 

number punished by 29 

Finger print 47 

Fire alarms 65, 68 

defective, reported 65 

number given 65 

Fires 65, 68 

extinguished 65, 68 

on water front attended 68 

Foreigners, number arrested 34, 97-115 

Fourth of July, safe and sane effort 12 

Fugitives from justice 41 

G. 

Gaming, illegal Ill 

H. 

Hackney carriage drivers 72, 118 

Hackney carriages 71, 118 

Hand carts 118 

Harbor service 16, 67 



130 



P. D. 49. 



Homicide squad 

Horses 

House of detention 

House of ill fame, keeping 

Hydrants, defective reported 



PAGE 

22, 38 

24, 68 

66 

66, 107 

65 



Imprisonment 

persons sentenced to ... . 

total years of 

Income 

Information from Police Journals, requests for 

Inquests held 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Inspectional districts of city rearranged 
Intoxicated persons assisted .... 
Inventory of police property taken 
Itinerant musicians 



30 



82, 



29, 41, 117 
29 

41, 117 
118, 122 
50 
39 
65 
21 
65 
18 

79, 118 



Junk collectors 
Junk shop keepers . 
Jury lists, police work on 



J. 



118 
118 

78 



Lamps, defective, reported 
Legislation proposed 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Line-up of prisoners 
Listing, police . 

expenses of 

number listed . 

number of policemen employed in 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, public . 

applications for licenses 

authority to license 

location of . . . 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost and stolen property division 
Lost childien .... 



77, 



78, 



121, 

77, 



65 

25 

81, 118 

56 

125, 126 

78, 121 

125, 126 

78 

29 

81, 118 

81 

81 

81 

81 

37 

29, 65 



M. 

Maintenance shop 24 

Medals 20 

Department 20 

Walter Scott 20 

Minors, number arrested 34,97-115 



p. D. 49. 



131 



Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses . 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued . . 

number transferred 
Missing persons 

age and sex of . 

number found . 

number reported 
Mobile service squad, special 
Musicians 

collective . 

itinerant . 



Narcotic squad 

Nativity of persons arrested 

Nonresident offenders . 



PAGE 

65 
81, 118, 122 
81, 118, 122 
81, 118 
81, 118 
81, 118 
81, 118 
49 
49 
49 
49 
22 
80, 118 
80, 118 
79, 118 



79 



N. 



22 

29 

30, 34, 97-115 



0. 



Offenses 

against chastity, morality, etc. 

against license laws 

against liquor law .... 

against the person .... 

against property, malicious . 

against property, with violence 

against property, without violence 

forgery and against currency 

miscellaneous 

recapitulation 

Organization and administration . 



15, 28, 33, 4], 97-115 

33, 106, 115 

33, 104, 115 

. 28, 104 

28, 33, 97, 115 

33, 103, 115 

. 28, 33, 100, 115 

. 28, 33, 101, 115 

33, 103, 115 

. 28, 33, 108, 115 

115 

21 



Parks, public . 

accidents reported in 

Pawnbrokers . 

Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 
number of persons on rolls 
payments on account of 

Personnel . 

Photographic, etc. . 

Plant and equipment 

Police administration 

Police 

special 



123. 124 

123, 124 

118 

82, 122 

82 

82 

82, 122 

19, 84 

42 

17, 24 

21 

78 

78 



132 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Police charitable fund 82 

Police department . .21, 32, 33, 52, 60, 68, 84, 86, 90-93, 96, 117 

authorized and actual strength of 86 

distribution of 33, 84 

horses in use in . . 22, 68 

how constituted 32 

officers absent sick 92 

arrests by 33, 96, 117 

average age of 91 

complaints against 21, 93 

date appointed 90 

detailed, special events 60 

died 33, 87 

discharged 21, 33, 93 

injured 21, 33 

nativity of 91 

promoted 88 

replacements omitted for five years 8 

resigned 21, 33 

reinstated 33 

retired 33, 88 

uniforms changed 24 

school 52 

vehicles in use in 71 

work of 33 

Police Hsting 77, 78, 121, 125, 126 

Police signal service 23, 66, 67, 82, 122 

miscellaneous work 66 

payments on account of 82, 122 

property of 67 

signal boxes 66 

Prisoners, nativitj" of 29 

Property 24, 29, 37, 41, 117, 119, 122 

lost, abandoned and stolen ..... 24, 37, 119, 122 

recovered 41, 117 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 119,122 

stolen 29, 117 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 29 

Public carriages 71, 118 

Public lodging houses 81, 118 

R. 

Radio installation 9 

Radio Operator, Sergeant-chief 23, 89 

Railroad police 79 

Receipts 30, 82, 118, 122 

Requests for information from Police Journals 50 

Revolvers 80, 118 

licenses to carry 80, 118 



p. D. 49. 



133 





O. 








PAGE 


Salaries 84 


School, police 








52 


Second-hand articles 








118 


Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 








. 35, 118 


Sergeant Ballistician 








. 22, 89 


Sewers, defective, reported . 








65 


Sick and injured persons assisted 








29, 65, 68 


Sickness, absence on account of . 








92 


Sight-seeing automobiles 








. 74, 118 


Signal service, police 










>3, 66, 67, 82, 122 


Special events . 










60 


Special police . 










78 


State Prison outbreak 










18 


Station houses 










. 17, 29 


condition of 










17 


lodgers at . 










29 


witnesses detained at 










29 


Stolen property 










29, 37, 119, 122 


recovered . 










. 30, 41, 117 


value of . . . 










. 41, 117 


Street railways, conductors, i 


notormer 


I and 


starters 




118 


Streets .... 










65, 123, 124 


accidents, reported in 










123, 124 


defective, reported . 










65 


obstructions removed 










65 


Supervisor of Cases unit 










56 


line-up of prisoners 










56 


court supervision 










57 


Supervisor of Automotive Eq 


uipment 








25 



T. 



Teams 


65 


stray, put up 


65 


Tear gas equipment 


18 


Theatrical agency 


118 


Traffic 


54 


Training school, police, at Washington, D. C, attended 


18 



u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 30 

Used cars 35—37,118 

licensed dealers 36, 118 

purchases and sales reported 37 



134 



P. D. 49. 



V. 



Vehicles 

ambulances, combination, 

automobiles 

in use in police department 

public carriages 

wagons .... 
Vessels 



PAGE 

69, 71 
69 

69, 71 
71 
71 

76, 118, 120 
67 



w. 

Wagons 

number licensed by divisions 

total number licensed 

Warrant file 

Water pipes, defective, reported . 
Water running to waste, reported 
Weapons, dangerous 
Witnesses 

fees earned by officers as 

number of days' attendance at court by officers 

number of, detained at station houses 
Women committed to House of Detention 



76, 118, 120 

120 

76, 118, 120 

51 

65 

65 

80 

65, 117 

34, 117 

34, 117 

29,65 

66 



29, 34 



CITY 0? BOSTON PBINTINO DETARTMBNT