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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

®i)e Commontoealtf) of iWas^s^acfjugetts 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1936 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 7 

Introductory 7 

No replacements in Force in nearly six years .... 7 

Inadequate harbor equipment 8 

Amendment to Civil Service Rule 23 in regard to position of 
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent of Police in 

Boston 8 

Civil Service permission granted to make selective appoint- 
ments for promotion to rank of Captain 9 

Repairs and remodeling of police buildings 9 

Reindexing in Bureau of Records continued 9 

Maintenance shop 9 

Aid and assistance to spring-flood sufferers 9 

Department contributions to Emergency Relief Campaign 

Fund 10 

Commendatory letters 10 

Personnel 10 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 10 

Department Medal of Honor 10 

Time lost by officers 11 

Officers punished for violation of police rules . . . . 11 

Organization and administration 11 

Communications system 12 

Plant and equipment 13 

Arrests 14 

Nativity of persons arrested 15 

Uniform crime record reporting 16 

Receipts 18 

Expenditures 18 

The Department 19 

Police force 19 

Signal service 19 

Employees of the department 19 

Recapitulation 19 

Distribution and changes 20 

Police officers injured while on duty 20 

Work of the Department 20 

Arrests 20 

Drunkenness 21 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 22 

Automobile division 22 

Lost and stolen property division -24 

Homicide squad 25 

Biological chemist 26 

General 30 



4 CONTENTS. 

Page 

Bureau of Records 30 

Criminal identification 35 

Missing persons 38 

Requests for information from Police Journals .... 39 

Warrant file 39 

Police School 41 

Traffic 41 

Tagging 43 

Safety educational automobile 43 

Supervisor of Cases Unit 44 

Line-up 44 

Court supervision 45 

Bureau of Operations 47 

Illuminated car control and radio panel 48 

Illuminated map 49 

Two-way radio 51 

Ballistic Unit 51 

Formation and duties 51 

Accomplishments 52 

Special Service Squad 55 

Special events 56 

Miscellaneous business 62 

Adjustment of claims 63 

House of Detention 63 

Police Signal Service 63 

Signal boxes 63 

Miscellaneous work 63 

Harbor service 64 

Horses 65 

Vehicle service 66 

Automobiles 66 

Combination ambulances 66 

List of vehicles used by the Department 68 

Hackney Carriages 68 

Limitation of hackney carriages 69 

Special, public and private hackney stands 70 

Sight-seeing automobiles , 71 

Wagon licenses 73 

Listing work in Boston 74 

Listing expenses 75 

Number of policemen employed in listing 75 

Police work on jury lists 75 

Special police 75 

Railroad police 76 

Musicians' licenses 76 

Itinerant 76 

Collective 77 

Carrying dangerous weapons 77 

PubUc lodging houses 78 

Miscellaneous licenses 78 



CONTENTS. 5 

Page 

Pensions and benefits 79 

Financial 79 

Statistical Tables 81 

Personnel, salary scales and distribution of the police force, 

signal service and employees 82 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 84 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 85 

List of officers retired 86 

List of officers promoted 87 

Number of men in active service 88 

Men on the police force and year born 89 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness . . 90 

Complaints against officers 91 

Number of arrests by police divisions 93 

Arrests and offenses 94 

Age and sex of persons arrested 113 

Comparative statement of police criminal work , . . .114 

Licenses of all classes issued 115 

Dog licenses 117 

Wagon licenses 117 

Financial statement 118 

Payments on account of signal service 119 

Accidents 120 

Male and female residents listed 122 



Wilt Commontoealti) of MaMati)mttt6. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1936. 

To His Excellency James M. Curley, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — I have the honor to present, in com- 
pHance with the provisions of Chapter 291, Acts of 1906, as 
amended, a report of the Boston PoHce Department for the 
year ending November 30, 1936. 

Introductory. 

On November 25, 1936, I took the oath of ofl&ce and assumed 
the duties of Pohce Commissioner for the City of Boston, 
replacing Eugene M. McSweeney who, after service of one 
year and nine months, was removed by the Governor, with 
the approval of the Executive Council. 

The depleted numerical effective strength of patrolmen in 
this Department is a subject which presents itself for serious 
consideration. It is important to note that there have been 
no appointments in the Boston Police Department for nearly 
six years. In spite of the gradual depletion of man power 
during this period, members of the Department have con- 
tinued to merit the confidence of the citizenry of Boston and 
its environs by their efficiency and loyal devotion to duty. 
As a result of the abnormal shortage of patrolmen that now 
exists in the Department, and the ever increasing demands for 
extra police service, members of the force are required to per- 
form many additional hours of duty without added compensa- 
tion. It is necessary to double and triple routes covered daily 
by foot patrolmen. 

At the close of the police year, November 30, 1931, the 
numerical strength of patrolmen was 2,092. At the end of 
the present police year, November 30, 1936, the numerical 
strength of patrolmen was 1,846, No additional patrolmen 
have been appointed since March, 1931. The number in 
that grade has gradually dwindled by resignations, dismissals, 
deaths, retirements, etc., until at the present time there is a 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

shortage of 311 patrolmen. For effective policing of this city, 
it is imperative that a substantial number of replacements in 
the grade of patrolman be made without unreasonable delay. 
The boat equipment of the Department at present is entirely 
inadequate to properly patrol Boston Harbor. There are two 
boats now in service, namely, the Steamer "Watchman" and 
the Launch "E. U. Curtis," which were built in 1896 and 
1923, respectively. These two boats have undergone extensive 
repairs in the past and are not considered sufficiently sea- 
worthy to properly poHce and patrol Boston Harbor. Pre- 
liminary arrangements are being made to replace the present 
obsolete boats in favor of three new modern types of the 
following descriptions: 

1. A patrol boat about sixty feet in length, with a 
maximum speed of twenty knots; similar in type to off- 
shore Coast Guard patrol boats. 

2. Two single-screw patrol boats, thirty feet in length, 
similar to cabin picket boats now in operation by the 
United States Coast Guard. 

3. One boat about twenty-six feet in length, similar to 
cabin picket boats, but equipped with a heavy-duty 
engine and extra heavy guards for towing and heavy duty 
around docks. 

The following amendment, effective November 18, 1936, 
was made to the Civil Service Rules relating to the offices of 
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent of Pohce, which 
amendment was submitted to the Governor and the Executive 
Council for approval : 

"Section 4 of Civil Service Rule 23 is hereby amended by 
adding the following new paragraph : 

"A member of the uniformed force of the Boston Police 
Department, appointed to the position of Superintendent 
of Police or Deputy Superintendent of PoHce, of the city 
of Boston, and who is not eligible for, or does not accept 
retirement from said position of Superintendent of Police 
or Deputy Superintendent of PoHce shall, upon ceasing 
to hold said position of Superintendent or Deputy Super- 
intendent, be forthwith reinstated to the same position in 
the classified rank or class in which he served prior to his 
appointment as Superintendent of Police or Deputy 
Superintendent of Police." 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

Under date of November 22, 1935, the Commissioner of 
Civil Service granted permission to the Pohce Commissioner 
to make selective appointments for promotion to the rank of 
Captain from a qualified list to be established after a promo- 
tional Civil Service examination. 

Extensive repairs and remodeling of police buildings have 
been made during the past year, resulting in improved housing 
and sanitary conditions for officers and prisoners. This work 
was carried on with the help and co-operation of local ad- 
ministrators of the Federal Public Works Administration. 

Oil burners were installed in ten additional police buildings, 
thus leaving but one building, namely. Station 18, not heated 
by oil. This station had been recently equipped with a modern 
coal-heating system and it was not deemed necessary to replace 
it with an oil burner. 

During the past year, further progress was made on cata- 
loging and reindexing records and files in the Bureau of Records. 
The work accomplished by employees of the Works Progress 
Administration, under supervision of officers of this Department, 
has been most satisfactory in results achieved. 

The Department automobile maintenance shop located in 
the basement of Station 4, is woefully inadequate to properly 
garage and repair Department cars. The Department, on 
account of present limited space available in the maintenance 
shop, is obhged to hire garage space in private and public 
garages throughout the city. I am hopeful that arrangements 
will be made during the coming year whereby adequate facilities 
for garaging and repairing Department cars will be provided. 

In March, 1936, large areas in the Connecticut and Merrimac 
River Valleys were inundated by the abnormal rise of water- 
ways, causing immeasurable distress and hardship to inhabit- 
ants, and wide-spread destruction to property. Members of 
this Department responded cheerfully and promptly with 
cash donations, and each station house was established as a 
repository for food and clothing which were delivered expedi- 
tiously to the unfortunate victims. Police details, equipped 
with floodhghts, were sent to stricken districts to render all 
possible assistance to local authorities. The Department also 
despatched to Haverhill two two-way radio cars, fully manned, 
that were utilized to estabUsh communication for police and 
fire headquarters, in addition to patrolling the city for a period 
-of seven days. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

I am pleased to report that during 1936 members of the 
Department made voluntary contributions to the Emergency 
Relief Campaign Fund for charitable purposes amounting to 
approximately $35,000. 

The large number of commendatory letters received from 
the public, expressing appreciation for the many police services 
performed by members of the Department during the past 
year, is an assurance of continued public esteem and confidence. 

Personnel. 

April 9, 1936, Captain Edward W. Fallon was designated 
Acting-Superintendent of Police. 

May 8, 1936, Martin H. King, Superintendent of Police, 
retired after thirty-four and nine-twelfths years of honorable 
and faithful service. 

September 18, 1936, Captain Edward W. Fallon, Acting- 
Superintendent, was appointed Superintendent of Police. 

November 24, 1936, Captain James T. Sheehan of Division 
10 was detailed to the Superintendent's Office and designated 
as Acting-Inspector of Divisions until further orders. 

During the year ending November 30, 1936, the total strength 
of the uniformed force was reduced by forty-two men, from 
2,152 to 2,110 by deaths, retirements, and resignations. Other 
employees were increased by twelve. 

On November 30, 1936, there was a total of 2,288 persons on 
the rolls of the Department. 

During the year, in General Orders, officers were commended 
as follows: 

Superintendent, 3; Deputy Superintendents, 6; Captains, 5; 
Lieutenants, 6; Lieutenant-Inspector, 1; Sergeants, 26; Patrol- 
men, 210, and the Department in General, 6. 

The practice of giving Department Medals of Honor and 
the Walter Scott Medal for Valor was resumed in December, 
1930. Annually, since that time, the Superintendent and the 
Deputy Superintendents, serving as a Board of Merit, have 
reviewed meritorious and courageous acts performed by 
members of the force, and have recommended officers for 
special recognition. 

On January 19, 1937, at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, medals for 1936 will be awarded to the 
following-named officer: 



1937.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department Medal of 
Honor to Patrolman George Brambilla of Division 15. 

Patrolman George Brambilla, for meritorious duty per- 
formed on May 25, 1936, at 1.25 o'clock a. m., without regard 
for his personal safety, jumped (fully clothed) from the Warren 
Avenue Bridge in Charlestown into the shipping channel of 
the harbor and rescued a woman from drowning. 

In 1936, 6,891 days were lost by officers by reason of injuries 
received while on duty. 

During the year, twenty-five patrolmen were punished for 
violations of Police Rules and Regulations by suspension with 
loss of pay or extra duty, or both. Three patrolmen were 
reprimanded in General Orders and one patrolman had a 
complaint against him placed on file. Three patrolmen 
resigned while charges against them were pending, and one 
complaint against a patrolman was dismissed after a hearing. 

Organization and Administration, 

April 15, 1936, Captain Thomas S. J. Kavanagh of Divi- 
sion 1 was appointed Harbor Master. The appointments of 
Captain John J. Mullen of Division 15 and Lieutenant Carleton 
B. Perry of Division 18 as Harbor Master and Assistant Harbor 
Master, respectively, were cancelled. 

' April 16, 1936, the Special Service Squad, on detail at the 
Superintendent's Office from January 22, 1936, was detached 
therefrom and established at Police Headquarters as a separate 
unit, designated as the Special Service Squad, under command 
of a deputy superintendent. 

May 22, 1936, the office of Inspector of Carriages was trans- 
ferred from the Bureau of Traffic to the Superintendent's 
Office. The wagon license division of the Bureau of Traffic 
was transferred to the Superintendent's Office. 

May 22, 1936, the Bureau of Traffic was abolished. 

May 22, 1936, the Traffic Division was estabhshed and 
included the territory within the boundaries of Divisions 1, 2, 
4 and 16, and the traffic post at Cottage Farm Bridge. 

June 22, 1936, a new arrest book, arrest ledger, daily report 
and arrest file were inaugurated. 

July 3, 1936, five patrolmen who, in the past, had been 
transferred to the service of the Health Department under 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

provisions of Chapter 450, Section 7, Acts of 1889, as amended 
by Chapter 287, Acts of 1911, were returned to service in the 
PoHce Department. 

August 7, 1936, the civiHan position of Supervisor of Auto- 
motive Equipment was abohshed. The incumbent was 
reinstated as a Sergeant in the Department and designated as 
Sergeant-Supervisor of Automotive Equipment. 

Communications System. 

The Signal Service Unit is responsible for the maintenance 
of the signal box system of the Department. This unit, in 
addition to its regular duties, has been working in conjunction 
with engineers for the Department, in connection with the 
installation of a two-way radio and wire system. This work 
is now nearing completion, and when the project is completed 
the Department will be equipped with the most modern com- 
munications system in America. 

During the year, three signal boxes were moved to new 
locations (one each on Divisions 4, 6 and 16). 

Several miles of cable were placed underground in conform- 
ance with law. Six police signal boxes were transfered from 
overhead to underground service. 

Officers' Recall and Citizens' Alarm features, now operative 
in seven police divisions, are being extended to include all 
patrol boxes in the city. Individual line telephone service 
for each patrol box (as contrasted with party-line service) has 
been found advantageous in four divisions in which it was 
provided some years ago, and this feature is also being ex- 
tended to include all patrol boxes. 

Apparatus is to be provided in the radio dispatching room 
at Police Headquarters for centrahzed recording of citizens' 
and officers' code calls at all patrol boxes. This will furnish 
the radio dispatcher instantaneous information for dispatch- 
ing radio cars to the box at which the call originates. 

About one hundred miles of new cable are required to pro- 
vide these features and to replace outworn cable which, in 
some cases, is as much as forty years old. Installation of new 
cable is near completion. Necessary changes in patrol box 
equipment and fixtures at Headquarters and various police 
stations are included. 

Arrangements have been completed with the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company for a unified police tele- 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

phone system, utilizing police-owned cables and patrol box 
equipment in conjunction with leased apparatus in police 
buildings. This system, including a dial switchboard at 
Headquarters and a manual switchboard at each station house, 
will provide complete service both inside and outside the 
Police Department for all Department telephones, including 
patrol box telephones. 



Plant and Equipment, 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause; and in 
its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming imple- 
ments which come into possession of the Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms and equipment are 
issued by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the 
cross-record system maintained for the purpose of comparing 
prices before such bills are prepared for payment. 

During the year, 140 abandoned automobiles came into 
custody of this office, of which 111 were restored to owners, 
leaving 29 still in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care and distribu- 
tion of uniforms and equipment to members of the police 
force, and also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed 
garments and equipment. An individual record of items of 
uniform and equipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is 
operated on a twenty-four hour basis. An average of thirty- 
five cars a day pass through the shop to be repaired or lubri- 
cated. A "wrecker" is assigned to it for towing motor vehicles. 
From December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936, the "wrecker" 
was called into service on 398 occasions. A radio repair shop 
is attached to the maintenance shop where a twenty-four 
hour daily service is maintained. The Department operates 
a motorcycle repair shop, now located in the rear of Division 
19, where motorcycles are repaired and serviced. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all Department vehicles, all garages in the 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



various divisions, and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving Department vehicles. 

Arrests. 
For the twelve months ending November 30, 1936, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1935, 
a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below. 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1935. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1936. 




Arrests. 


Arrests. 


Offenses Against the Person. 






Murder 


16 


15 


Manslaughter 


98 


99 


Rape (including attempts) 


100 


93 


Robbery (including attempts) 


270 


269 


Aggravated assault 


152 


159 


Offenses Against Property Committed 






\\iTH Violence. 






Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 


688 


1,174 


Offenses Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 






Auto thefts (including attempts) .... 


217 


245 


Larceny (including attempts) 


1,958 


2, .505 


Offenses Against the Licuor Law. 






Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 


198 


188 


Drunkenness 


39,872 


• 40,673 


Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 






Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (first 
offense) 


583 


576 


Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (second 


9 


9 


Totals 


44,161 


46,005 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violation of city 
ordinances, gaming, and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 
the year totalled 81,348, of which 75,347 were males and 6,001 
were females. This total compares with 75,724 for the pre- 
ceding year. 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



15 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 






68,593 


Spain . 






41 


Ireland 






4,170 


Holland 






25 


British Province 


3 




2,294 


Albania 






20 


Italy . 






1,599 


Turkey 






20 


Russia 








1,118 


Belgium 






19 


Lithuania 








739 


South America . 




19 


Poland 








544 


Cuba . 




16 


Sweden 








425 


Philippine Islands 




12 


Scotland 








269 


Switzerland 




10 


England 








234 


Mexico 




7 


Norway 








213 


Africa . 






6 


Greece 








170 


Porto Rico 






4 


Portugal 








161 


Rumania 






4 


Germany 








120 


Australia 






3 


Finland 








100 


Japan . 






3 


China . 








79 


Hungary 






2 


Austria 








62 


India . 






2 


Armenia 








51 


Wales . 






2 


Denmark 








49 


Asia 






1 


Syria . 








47 


Unknown 






3 


West Indies 






47 








France 








45 


Total 






81,348 



The number of persons punished by fine was 10,223, and 
the fines amounted to $150,027. (See Table XIII.) 

Two hundred sixty-two persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 3,001 to the House of Correction; 28 to the 
Women's Prison; 189 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2,858 
to other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were: 3 sentenced to life; 
and 3,859 years (474 sentences were indefinite) ; the total 
number of days' attendance at court by officers was 42,960 
and the witness fees earned by them amounted to S13,020.85. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$80,530.35. 

Three witnesses were detained at station houses; 33 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 19 from last year. 

There was an increase of 10.42 per cent in the number of 
sick and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 
9.72 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the city 
for the five years from 1932 to 1936, inclusive, was $601,348.92; 
in 1936 it was $313,378.07 or $287,970.85 less than the aver- 
age. The amount of stolen property which was recovered by 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the Boston Police this year was $370,869.07 as against 
$388,289.01 last year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to note 
that 18,315 persons or 22.51 per cent of the total arrests dur- 
ing the past year were persons residing outside the city limits 
of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called on to perform police work for nonresidents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what percent- 
age of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This percent- 
age is so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of 
this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in 
making comparisons of Boston with other cities, either of the 
cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 22.51 per cent 
of the arrests in Boston are of nonresidents, whereas other 
cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests of nonresidents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department, during the past year, has continued its 
co-operation in furnishing returns to the National Division of 
Identification and Information of the Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C, of the following serious offenses: 

1. Felonious homicide : 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

The following comparative tables show the number of cer- 
tain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 
1935, to November 30, 1936, as against December 1, 1934, to 
November 30, 1935: 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following: 

Cases Reported. Cleared. 

1936 7,348 6,654 

1935 9,243 8,662 

Per Cent. 
Cleared. 

1936 90.55 

1935 93.71 

A comparison shows a decrease in clearance over 1935 of 
3.16 per cent. 

There was a decrease in cases reported as compared with 
1935, of 1,895, or 20.50 per cent. 

Receipts. . 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1936, receipts 
totaled $80,640.57 as compared with $80,971.47 in the pre- 
vious year. The decrease of $330.90 is due to the fact that 
less has been received for miscellaneous items. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1936, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$5,832,104.15. This included the pay of the poHce and 
employees, pensions, supplies, expense of Usting ($58,843.71 — 
the annual listing on January 1 of all persons twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 
In the corresponding period for 1935, expenditures totalled 
$5,728,010.85. The increase of $104,093.30 was principally 
due to the fact that the payment for motor vehicles and for 
wearing apparel was more than in 1935. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 



The Commissioner desires to express his grateful apprecia- 
tion for the co-operation and support given to him by all 
members of the Department. 



The activities of the Department are reported on in greater 
detail in the following section of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Cojninissioner for the City of Boston. 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows : 

Police Commissioner. 1 

Secretary. Assistant Secretary. 2 

Chief Clerk. 1 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-Inspectors 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Chauffeur . 
Ivaborer 
Linemen 



1 

3 

25 

49 

7 



Sergeants 
Patrolmen 

Total 



Signal Service. 
1 Painter 



Signalmen 



Total 



Employees of the Department. 



Chauffeurs . 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks . . ' . 

Elevator Operators 

Engineers, Marine 

Firemen, Marine 

Firemen, Stationary 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Repairmen 



2 
1 

10 
1 

34 
8 
1 
8 
5 
9 

26 
4 
7 

11 
2 



Signalmen .... 

Statisticians 

Steamfitter 

Stenographers . 

Superintendent of Build- 
ings 

Assistant Superintendent 
of Buildings . 

Superintendent of Repair 
Shop .... 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators 

Total .... 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 



179 
1,846 

2,110 



1 

4 

16 



3 

2 

1 

15 



Grand Total 



1 
1 
4 

158 



1 

3 

2,110 

16 

158 

2,288 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the Pohce Force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 1 civiHan was restored as sergeant; 4 patrol- 
men resigned (3 while charges were pending) ; 1 captain, 9 
lieutenants were promoted; 1 superintendent, 1 deputy super- 
intendent, 2 captains, 3 lieutenants, 3 sergeants and 13 patrol- 
men were retired on pensions; 1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants and 
13 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1935. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1936. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1935. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In j)ursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


84 

15 

73 

102 


1,349 

195 

1,069 
1,043 


388 

480 

1,490 

877 


Totals . 


274 


3,656 


3,235 



Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 

a separate person, was 81,348, as against 75,724 the preceding 

year, being an increase of 5,624. The percentage of decrease 

and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

1. Offenses against the person Increase 7.99 

2. OfiFenses against property committed with violence, Increase 67.70 

3. Offenses against property committed without vio- 

lence Increase 23 . 70 

4. Malicious offenses against property . . . . Increase 29.50 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency . . Increase 32 . 77 

6. Offenses against the license laws .... Decrease 2.10 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

7. Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. . . . Increase 2 . 80 

8. OiJenses not included in the foregoing . . . Increase 1 1 . 20 

Note. — The inclusion of "Delinquents," as "Arrests," according to the 
offense charged, instead of under "Delinquency," as heretofore, accounts 
for increases in percentage for classes 1, 2, 3 and 4. 

There were 12,712 persons arrested on warrants and 52,498 
without warrants; 16,138 persons were summoned by the 
court; 48,546 persons were prosecuted; 31,481 were released 
by probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 1,321 
were deHvered to outside authorities. The number of males 
arrested was 75,347; of females, 6,001; of foreigners, 12,755, or 
approximately 15.67 per cent; of minors, 7,935. Of the total 
number arrested 18,315, or 22.51 per cent, were nonresidents. 
(See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1932 to 1936, inclusive, was $171,097.90; in 
1936 it was $150,027, or $21,070.90 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 41,409; 
in 1936 it was 42,960, or 1,551 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $12,792.46; 
in 1936 it was $13,020.85, or $228.39 more than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 111. 
There were 801 more persons arrested than in 1935, an in- 
crease of 2 per cent; 14.10 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 21.94 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table 
XL) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 81,348, 
being an increase of 5,624 over last year, and 619 more than 
the average for the past five years. There were 40,673 per- 
sons arrested for drunkenness, being 801 more than last year 
and 1,537 more than the average for the past five years. Of 
the arrests for drunkenness this year, there was an increase of 
1.47 per cent in males and an increase of 11.38 per cent in 
females from last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (81,348), 258 
were for violation of city ordinances; that is to say, that one 
arrest in 315 was for such offense or .31 per cent. 

Fifty-five and thirteen one-hundredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty- 
one and forty. (See Table XII.) 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

This Bureau, a central detective agency of the Department, 
consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a large 
scale and in an efficient manner. 

In addition to its divisions for investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen, lost and stolen property and homicide in- 
vestigation, — squads are assigned to cover the following 
phases of police work and investigation: arson, banking, 
express thieves, fraudulent claims, general investigation, 
hotels, narcotic, pawnbrokers, pickpocket, radical, shopping, 
and a reserve squad, nights. 

Members of this Bureau investigate every felony committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle all cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds 
of investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they co-operate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and pros- 
ecution of criminals. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made 
in co-operation with the Department of Justice, Post Office 
Department and Immigration authorities of the United States. 

The automobile division index contains records of approxi- 
mately 725,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons 
and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the Department and the 
automobile division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this division during the year identified a number of automo- 
biles which were recovered or found abandoned on police 



1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



23 



divisions, restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in 
solving many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Licenses have been granted since 1919 to individuals, firms, 
and corporations to act as Used Car Dealers of the First, 
Second and Third Classes. 

During the year 215 applications for such licenses were 
received; of these 212 were granted (2 without fee), 1 was 
rejected and 2 filed without action. 

Of the licenses granted, 9 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation and 20 were transferred to new locations. (See 
Table XIV.) 



Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1936. 



Month. 


Reported 
Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1935 












December 




359 


342 


15 


2 




936 












January 










274 


262 


8 


4 


February 










177 


169 


5 


3 


March 










239 


232 


5 


2 


April . 










275 


259 


9 


7 


May . 










230 


222 


5 


3 


June . 










191 


184 


5 


2 


July . 










204 


194 


4 


6 


August 










203 


187 


7 


9 


September 








244 


233 


5 


6 


October 








301 


287 


6 


8 


November 








234 


225 


- 


9 


Totals 










2,931 


2,796 


74 


61 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1936. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold bj- 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Indi vidua Is. 


1935. 








December 


2,836 


2,474 


907 


1936. 








January .... 


3,041 


2,081 


859 


February 








1,529 


1,812 


466 


March 








3,016 


2,691 


978 


April 








3,851 


3,476 


1,301 


May 








3,761 


3,731 


1,265 


June 








3,845 


3,919 


1,103 


July 








4,011 


3,624 


970 


August . 








2,913 


2,766 


897 . 


September 








3,122 


2,724 


651 


October . 








2,824 


2,711 


695 


November 








2,459 


1,937 


556 


Totals 








37,208 


33,946 


10,648 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places, to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth 
of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



25 



Homicide Squad. 

It is the duty of officers of this unit to interrogate all persons 
involved or having knowledge of the commission of crimes of 
murder, manslaughter, abortion or other crimes of violence. 
The officers assigned to homicide work, with police stenog- 
raphers, are subject to call at any hour of the day or night, 
a,nd have been very successful in obtaining confessions and 
valuable statements. They are also required to prepare cases 
when inquests are necessary. The homicide files contain 
complete reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, inquests 
and also a record of all serious accidents which are reported to 
the Pohce Department. 

Following is a brief report of the Homicide Unit of the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported to this 
Department for the period, December 1, 1935, to November 30, 
1936, inclusive: 



Abortions 

Airplane . 

Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Automobiles 

Burns 

Drowning 

Electricity 

Elevator . 

Exposure 

Falls 

Falling objects 

Fire . 



5 
1 

87 

11 

144 

12 

18 

1 

7 

3 

82 

4 

7 



Homicides 

Machinery 

Natural causes 

Poison 

Railroad (steam) . 

Railway (street) . 

Shooting (accidental) 

Skiing 

Stillborn . 

Suicides . 



Total 



27 

6 

462 

8 

14 

13 
1 
1 
6 

69 

989 



Of the total number, the following cases were prosecuted in 
the courts: 



Abortion 

Abortion (conspiracy) 

Abortion (accessory) . 

Adultery 

Assault and battery 

Assault to murder 

Assault (weapon) . 

Assault (knife) 



6 

3 

6 

2 

12 

10 

21 

2 



Assault to rob 

Breaking and entering . 

Manslaughter (automobile), 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Total .... 



The following inquests were held during the year 



Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Automobile 

Burns 

Drowning 

Falls 

Falling objects 



Homicides 
Natural causes 
Railroad (steam) 
Suicide . 



Total 



1 
2 
125 
6 
9 

205 



2 
1 
4 
1 

17 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Three hundred and eighteen cases of violent death were 
investigated on which no inquests were held by a court or justice, 
acting under authority of Chapter 118 of the Acts of 1932. 

Biological Chemist, 
Summary of the Year's Work. 

The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department, 
located at the Southern Mortuary, was started on February 19, 
1934. 

From December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936, number of 
days Biological Chemist was in attendance before courts and 
Grand Jury — 80. 

In the past year there has been a decided increase in the 
use of the laboratory. 





Dec. 1, 1934, 

to 
Nov. 30, 1935. 


Dec. 1, 1935, 

to 
Nov. 30. 19.36. 


Increase. 


Approximate 
Percentage 
of Increase. 


Tests .... 
Cases .... 


2,875 
173 


3,051 
276 


176 
103 


6% 
60% 



Of the two subjects (Tests and Cases) the number of cases, 
as a standard of judging, is the more sound. 

In some of the toxicological work a single test may be the 
culmination of a week's work, while a single blood identifica- 
tion test may require only a few minutes. Thus the number 
of tests rises and falls according to the types of cases examined. 
Since its start the laboratory has made more than 7,500 tests 
and handled 532 cases. 

Statistical figures, however, give no clear idea of the work. 
A brief review of different phases of the work will yield a 
better picture. 

The two most common problems occurring in the work of 
the laboratory are alcohoHsm and the identification of blood 
stains. 

Alcoholism. 

The use of alcoholic beverages is an increasing problem in 
our cases. This question has arisen in 176 cases either as the 
basic or contributing factor. In connection with these cases 
more than 350 separate analyses have been made. From 
analysis of the brain, we can secure an excellent indication of 
the conditon of the deceased: sober, under the influence, or 
drunk. The value of this information in accident cases is. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

obvious. In homicides it may similarly be of considerable 
value in explaining certain aspects of the case. 

In view of the importance of alcoholism in modern police 
problems, we have extended our analyses to provide data for 
the determination of the relations of alcohol content between 
the brain, blood, and urine, with a measure of the stability of 
these relations. The data taken from fatal cases will provide 
sound basis for interpretation of analytical figures for blood 
or urine from non-fatal cases. The practical application of 
such data is obvious. In the case of the blood-brain relation, 
we have had a sufficient number of cases analyzed for the 
mathematical constants to have become stable, from which 
certain other criteria being satisfied, we may consider the 
function to be a very close approach to the true physiological 
relation. Thus, the relation may be considered to be linear 
in nature and described by the equations : 

Alcohol Content of the Brain =0.02 — 0.99 (Alcohol Content of the 

Blood). 
Alcohol Content of the Blood =0.03 — 0.94 (Alcohol Content of the 

Brain). 

Brain alcohol may be estimated from the blood alcohol with 
an error of estimate of 0.037 per cent, and blood alcohol esti- 
mated from brain alcohol with an error of estimate of 0.038 per 
cent. So, for all practical purposes, we may consider the 
alcohol level of the brain and blood to be essentially the same. 
The other relations, based on fewer cases, have not yet suffi- 
ciently stabilized to warrant the citing of constants. The 
data will be sufficient in number for publication of an article 
in an appropriate scientific journal during the coming year. 

Bloodstains. 
The next most common problem encountered is the identifi- 
cation of bloodstains. This has been a factor in 139 of the 
laboratory's cases. The basic questions are: (1) is this stain 
blood? (2) is it human blood? (3) what type of human blood 
is it? Testimony has been given in court on all three of these 
questions. There are also various secondary questions — is 
the blood menstrual blood? from what particular locus did the 
blood come? how old is the stain? if it is not blood, what is it? 
Answers to any of these secondary questions may be given in- 
varying degree according to the circumstances of the case. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

One great need is a highly sensitive specific test for blood 
pigment. The most sensitive specific test we have found is 
the hemochromogen crystal test, widely used in Europe, but 
little known here. After several hundred tests, the laboratory 
introduced it into routine procedure and has now carried out 
more than 1,200 individual tests — about 600 having been 
made during the past year. 

For the past two years the laboratory has served as a source 
of supply of anti-human rabbit serum used in determining 
whether or not blood is human. The laboratory has itself 
made about 400 such tests during the past year. 

The typing of bloodstains is a difficult procedure and there 
are but few cases in which it is possible to secure wholly satis- 
factory results. However, during the past year tests were 
made on some 60-odd specimens of case material. Associated 
with these were tests on some 30-odd specimens secured before 
the blood had dried. 

Closely linked to bloodstains are various bits of evidence 
left behind on hit-and-run cars. We have had a number of 
cases in which such evidence was of material aid in securing 
admissions and conviction. These bits of evidence fall into a 
rather varied category: blood, tissue, hair, fibers, cloth, paint, 
glass, bits of bark and wood, etc. 

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. 
Deaths from carbon monoxide (fire, automobile exhaust 
gases) are another common type of case. The laboratory has 
collected quantitative data on some 50-odd cases (26 during 
the past year). Those cases in which respiratory adjuvants 
(inhalators) have been used are particularly interesting as they 
may show appreciable modification of the quantitative pic- 
ture after post-mortem. For convenience we have adopted a 
special long needle for withdrawing blood and a gasproof cap 
for the syringe which will preserve the blood with only negligible 
gaseous change within 24 hours. 

Synthetic Hypnotics. 
Synthetic hypnotics are often used with suicidal intent. 
During the past year the laboratory has devised a modifica- 
tion of the standard method for isolation of these agents from 
tissue which gives improved results with the acid group. It 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

is believed that this modification can be extended to include 
the alkaline group and alkaloids (within which group come 
narcotics). This phase will be studied during the coming 
year. 

Miscellaneous Tests. 

Tests have been made of methods advocated for showing 
powder residue on hands after the firing of a gun. For the 
most part the reactions are not wholly satisfactory because of 
their general character. The laboratory has co-operated with 
the laboratory of the Department of Public Safety in trying to 
develop better methods. At present we have a satisfactory 
reaction, but lack a suitable medium for carrying the reagent. 

Tests have likewise been made of various solutions for the 
restoration of obliterated serial numbers on different metals. 
Our degree of success has been about the equivalent of that 
commonly reported. 

We have also examined explosive residues. In the case of 
powder residue in small arms, it is difficult to go further than 
differentiation between black and smokeless powders, on a 
chemical basis. With rifle powders one can sometimes go a 
little further. Within the small group of nitrated organic 
materials, it is a little difficult to differentiate, but it is usually 
fairly easy to differentiate between that small group and the 
other types of explosive materials used for bombs. We have 
had considerable success in the recording of the pattern of 
unburned powder grains on clothing in near-contact shots, 
using a specially sensitized paper, and have found the same 
test useful in confirming visual observation that such unburned 
grains are absent. 

Among the less usual cases of the year was a death due to 
accidental use of a rat poison, a fluoride. On treatment with 
strong acid and heat, the stomach contents etched glass, due to 
the formation of hydrofluoric acid. The case is also interest- 
ing due to the presence of a measurable (but non-fatal) amount 
of arsenic presumably ingested at the same time, and possibly 
present as an impurity in the fluoride rat poison. 

During the past year there have been several occasions for 
the analysis of industrial products purchased by various units 
of the Department with recommendation for Department 
compounding or for a substitute at less cost. 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Co-operation with Other Departments. 
There have also been a number of occasions for co-operation 
with other departments in various types of cases where the 
laboratory has definitely been of assistance in securing con- 
viction. We have continued a close contact with the chemist 
of the Department of Public Safety, exchanging technical 
information, and co-operating in a number of cases. 

Relative Costs of Laboratory Cases. 

The chemical laboratory has continued to carry out its work 

on a rather wide variety of cases. The cost of this is worthy 

of mention, being shghtly less than SIO per case. This may 

be compared with the usual professional charges of commercial 

analyses which range from fifty to several hundred dollars per 

case according to the nature of the case and the time involved. 

The comparison leaves a creditable balance in the favor of the 

laboratory. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this Bureau, investigated 
during the year, was 8,327. There were 64,782 cases reported 
on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports on 
these cases are filed away for future reference. Complaints 
are received from many sources, including cases referred to 
the Bureau by justices of courts and the district attorney, in 
addition to cases reported direct to the Police Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal In- 
vestigation are included in statements of general work of the 
Department, but as the duties of this Bureau are of special 
character, the following statement may be of interest : 

Number of persons arrested 1,970 

Fugitives from justice from other states, arrested and 

delivered to officers from these states .... 74 

Number of cases investigated 8,327 

Number of extra duties performed 11,764 

Number of cases of abortion 6 

Number of days spent in court by officers .... 2,264 
Number of years' imprisonment, 379 years, 10 months, 

5 days and 17 indefinite periods. 
Amount of property recovered $117,925 78 

Bureau of Records. 
The Bureau of Records was estabhshed October 17, 1931, 
and that part of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation known 
as the Criminal Identification Division was merged with the 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

Bureau of Records. Additional changes have been made to 
simplify the maintenance of police records, as well as to make 
the records of the Department uniform in all its branches. 
The efficiency of this Bureau has been greatly increased by the 
installation of complete and thoroughly modern identification 
equipment, consisting of the following machines and photo- 
graphic apparatus: 

3 4x5 Graflex cameras. 

1 5x7 camera. 

1 8x10 camera. 

1 4x5 "photo" record camera. 

1 enlarging, reducing and copying camera, size 8x10, 

3 fingerprint cameras, used at scenes of crime. 

1 Rectigraph. 

1 Dexigraph. 

1 complete set of fluorescent screens. 

Lenses for magnification photography. 
1 Multilith machine, with complete equipment. 
1 Violet ray machine. 
1 Fluoroscope. 

1 16 millimeter movie camera. 
1 White drill. 

A Multilith machine which had been purchased, in order to 
enable this Department to prepare and complete the printing 
of circulars containing photographs and fingerprints of persons 
who were either missing or wanted for criminal offenses, has 
been placed in charge of an operator and under his super- 
vision, approximately 1,024,000 impressions were run off. 
This includes 72 Department forms, 10 circular letters and 
3 fugitive circulars containing photographs and fingerprints of 
persons wanted by this Department. 

Cameras for the preparation of half-tones are a part of the 
Multilith equipment, which, incidentally, add to the modern 
equipment of the photographic unit. This machine is ca- 
pable of printing in approximately two hours descriptive cir- 
culars of persons wanted, and in some cases it is possible to 
complete and mail such circulars to outside cities before the 
fugitive arrives at his destination. 

There were 531,153 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machine comprising daily manifolds, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins, and circular letters. 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan, 

During the year 13,500 circulars, containing photographs 
and fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed 
from this office to every city and town in the United States 
with a population of 5,000 or more. State Bureaus of Identifi- 
cation, all Army and Navy recruiting stations. United States 
Immigration offices, and Customs Stations, and a number of 
the larger cities in foreign countries. In addition, there were 
8,500 photographic circulars containing photographs and 
descriptions of persons wanted for crime, also missing persons, 
sent to departments within a radius of 100 miles of Boston. 

The photographic unit of this Department supplies the 
Medical Examiners with complete sets of enlarged photo- 
graphs in homicide cases. The photographic unit of the 
Bureau of Records is one of the finest and most modern in 
the entire country. Photographic films in various sizes are 
filed in proper order in steel files equipped with locks. The 
enlarged photographs are filed in cabinets especially built to 
accommodate the size. The enlarged photographs are princi- 
pally the scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and sus- 
picious fires, and have proved invaluable for court purposes. 
Many communications have been received as a result of the 
value of these photographs, particularly in arson cases. Juries 
have been greatly assisted in determining the condition of the 
burned premises by the introduction and exhibition of these 
photographs in court. This same excellent effect obtains in 
homicide and hit-and-run cases. 

The files in this Bureau contain records of all assignments 
made in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records 
of arrests made throughout the Department. On file also are 
reports of all felonies committed within the city and all reports 
of the investigation of those felonies. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all per- 
sons committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints 
and photographs, also records of all inmates of the Suffolk 
County House of Correction and their fingerprints. The 
keepers of the jails and houses of correction in the several 
counties of the Commonwealth have been requested to furnish 
this Bureau with a copy of the fingerprints of every inmate and 
they have responded favorably. In addition to the foregoing, 
the files contain many thousands of photographs and finger- 
prints, correspondence, records, clippings and histories of 



1 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

criminals arrested or wanted in various parts of the United 
States and foreign countries. 

The Main Index File has been thoroughly modernized by 
alphabetical arrangement. Obsolete wooden filing cabinets 
have been replaced by new metal uniform files, equipped with 
locks. Practically all of the obsolete index matter has been 
removed so that, with the additions to this file made in the 
course of the past year, there are now approximately 775,000 
persons recorded in the files of this Bureau. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston PoHce and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 
cabinets. Photographs received from outside departments are 
placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and those taken by 
this Department are placed in the ''Local Segregated" file. 
The photographs of all criminals are segregated into four 
distinct sections, namely, white, yellow, negro and gypsy. 
Each of these groups is subdivided according to sex and is 
also classified under the head of the crime in which the sub- 
jects speciahze. The local segregated file contains 20,878 
photographs and the foreign segregated file contains 10,743 
photographs. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., and 
in many instances, important identifications have been made 
which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valuable 
assistance has also been rendered to government officials of 
the following branches: Post Office Department, Treasury 
Department, Secret Service Department, Department of Justice 
and other government agencies. Similar services have also 
been rendered to railroad and express companies. 

Members of this Bureau visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and 
secured photographs of fingerprints, in many instances, of the 
persons who committed these crimes, and, in many cases, 
took photographs of the scene where the crime was committed. 
The figures and other data in connection with this work are 
contained in a subsequent part of this report. 

This Bureau has successfully continued in the operation of 
an ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black hght." 
This type of lamp is used for the detection of forgeries on 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

checks and altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counter- 
feit moneys, fake antiques, and also for the photographing 
of blood-stained fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could 
not be photographed are now photographed with ease through 
the use of luminous powders such as anthracene, or luminous 
zinc sulphide, due to the radiations emitted by this lamp. 

There have been acquired by this Bureau two valuable 
pieces of scientific equipment. The first is known as the 
fluoroscope. When the rays of this instrument are trained 
on the subject before it, it reveals the presence of any 
foreign substance concealed either on or in his person: for 
instance, jewelry, metal or glass. The finding of glass in 
clothing of a person suspected of striking and killing a pedes- 
trian with an automobile is another example of what the 
instrument may accomplish in the detection of crime and 
criminals. The same is none the less true of inanimate objects, 
such as packages containing bombs or concealed defects in the 
mechanism of an automobile or other object, which may be 
responsible for serious accidents or death of persons. The 
value of this device in thwarting criminals is very apparent 
and will make an important addition to the scientific equipment 
contained in this Bureau. 

The second piece of equipment above referred to is the 
"White Drill," purchased for the purpose of repairing photo- 
graphic equipment. This work had been done by commercial 
concerns but will now be performed by the photographers 
attached to this Bureau to the greatest extent possible, resulting 
in a large saving. 

A modern development of the photographic unit is the instal- 
lation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photographs 
of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are first sent 
to the Federal Bureau of Identification (United States Depart- 
ment of Justice), Army, Navy, and Marine Corps in such 
cases where the persons are of the enlistment age, in an effort 
to identify these dead. Failing in this, they are filed in the 
Bureau of Records for future reference. Through this method, 
a large proportion of the tentatively unidentified dead were 
later identified and their relatives, if any, notified. 

The single fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crime. Hereto- 
fore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might be, 
taken at the scene of a crime, were valuable only for comparison 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

with the tell fingerprints of the person under suspicion, whether 
his prints were then in our files or taken later. There was no 
method of filing latent fingerprints taken at the scene of crime 
up to the comparatively recent origination of the single finger- 
print system of filing by Chief Inspector Battley of the Finger- 
print Division of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley sys- 
tem of single fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of Records, 
and does not weaken in any way the standard system of filing 
fingerprints, but is a very valuable addition thereto. There 
are at present on file in this Bureau 16,500 Battley single 
fingerprints and 1,600 latent fingerprints which are compared 
with all incoming single fingerprints. In the current police 
year 12 latent fingerprints were positively identified with 
the fingerprints of persons suspected of crime at the scenes of 
which the latent fingerprints were developed. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the Ber- 
tillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 
the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
for this and other departments through the fingerprint files 
of this Bureau. The identification of persons wanted for 
murder and robbery while armed was among the most important 
made. 

Another important development of this Bureau was the 
institution of the civilian fingerprint file wherein are kept the 
fingerprints of certain license applicants with a suitable index 
attached to it. 

By means of the segregated file, it is impossible for a person 
with a criminal record whose fingerprints are on file to obtain 
a license under an assumed name, because by comparing his 
fingerprints with those in the civilian fingerprint file, it is a 
matter of only a minute to determine whether or not the 
particular appHcant has ever had, or apphed, for a license 
before. There are now contained in the civilian files the 
fingerprints and criminal record, if any, of 8,032 hackney 
carriage operators, 350 sight-seeing car operators, and 2,759 
Special Police Officers. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Unit of the 
Bureau of Records. 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

This table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of copies prepared. 

Identification of criminals arrested locally 602 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere . . ' . . 459 

Scenes of crime photographed 1,006 

Circulars sent out by identification unit 13,500 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1935 150,481 

Made and filed during year 4,418 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 1,981 

Number on file November 30, 1936 156,880 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1935 110,055 

Taken and filed during year 4,418 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 4,306 

Number on file November 30, 1936 118,779 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 8,618 

Other cities and states 982 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Identification (United States Department 

of Justice) 4,418 

State Bureau of Identification 5,225 

Other cities and states 763 

Supplementary. 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,006 

Number of exposures (small camera) 2,379 

Number of prints (small camera) 2,379 

Number of enlargements: 

16 by 20 inches 30 

11 by 14 inches 749 

8 by 10 inches 283 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 2,971 

Prints made from same 2,936 

Number of rectigraph photographs 6,147 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 2 

Number of civilian employees photographed .... 18 

Number of negatives of criminals 4,348 

Number of prints from same 24,533 

Number of fingerprint investigations (negative) . . . 326 

Number of fingerprint investigations (positive) . . 721 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 991 

Number of visitors photographed 124 

Prints made from same 544 

Number of exposures on pantoscopic camera .... 61 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

Number of re-orders of criminal photographs .... 7,599 

Number of stand-up photographs made 21 

Prints made from the same 52 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 

Police officers 2 

Special police officers 209 

Taxi drivers 597 

Civilian employees 18 

The Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification and 
filing, in operation in the Boston Police Department since the 
installation of fingerprints in 1908, has been entirely displaced 
and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended System 
of Fingerprint Classification and Filing, as used in the United 
States Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

In order to effect the change, some 150,000 fingerprints 
were carefully checked by operatives, the formula on each was 
revised, and a new type of filing card made out for each set of 
fingerprints, together with complete criminal record of each 
subject typed thereon, showing the dealings of the individual 
with the various law enforcement agencies throughout the 
country. In such cases where a criminal subject uses one or 
more aliases, cross reference cards were made and filed in 
addition to the main card. There are now on file in this 
Bureau the 8" by 8" record cards of approximately 85,000 
males and 9,400 females. Those figures represent actual 
record cards, there being no cross reference cards necessary 
in the 8" by 8" record card system. 

In effecting the transformation of systems from the Conley- 
Flak to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons who are either 
now dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely at 
an end, were removed from the active file and placed in a 
separate file for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates 
were taken from the files and placed in other inactive files. 
A final examination was then made to insure correct filing of 
every fingerprint and record card. At this writing, it can be 
truthfully said that the fingerprint system of the Boston 
Police Department, including the method of fifing, quality 
and amount of fingerprint equipment and skilled operators, is 
comparable to the practically infallible files of the Federal 
Bureau of Identification (Department of Justice) at Wash- 
ington, D. C, after which this Department's new system was 
fashioned. 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan- 



Missing Persons. 
The Missing Persons Unit is a branch of the Bureau of 
Records. The following Table No. 1 shows the number of 
persons lost or runaway during the pohce year of 1936 in 
Boston, Mass.: 



Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. 



Total number still missing 



1,390 
1,203 

187 



Age and Sex of Persons Missing in Boston. 



Table No. 1. 


Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


329 


81 


298 


75 


31 


6 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 


286 


187 


248 


166 


38 


21 


Over 21 years. 


325 


182 


268 


148 


57 


34 


Totals 


940 


450 


814 


389 


126 


61 



I am submitting herewith also Table No. 2 of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston. 

Total number of persons reported missing from cities and towns 

outside of Boston, as shown by Table No. 2. . . 1,861 
Total number restored to relatives, etc 1,515 



Total number still missing 



346 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing from Cities 
AND Towns Outside of Boston. 



Table No. 2. 


Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years. 


358 


116 


313 


108 


45 


8 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


494 


353 


415 


270 


79 


83 


Over 21 years, 


360 


180 


272 


137 


88 


43 


Totals . 


1,212 


649 


1,000 


515 


212 


134 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

Table No. 2 shows a clearance of approximately 81 per cent. 

By careful checking with recording agencies Table No. 2 
shows the number found is 1,515. The total still missing is 346. 

Of the 1,515 reported found, the Missing Persons Unit was 
active in assisting to locate them. 

The total number of state wards reported as runaways is 
165. The total number apprehended and returned, male and 
female, is 143, leaving 22 still at large. Of the 143 state ward 
runaways located, this Department assisted in apprehending 
and locating 83 of them. 

There were recorded 145 identified dead cases, all of which 
were investigated by the various units of the Boston Police 
Department. 

Recorded and investigated: 33 unidentified dead cases. 

One thousand nine hundred and seventy-two lost children 
were restored to their parents by officers of the different divi- 
sions of this Department. This record does not appear in 
Table No. 1 because they were found a few hours after reported 
lost. 

The Missing Persons Unit handled approximately 1,553 
pieces of correspondence, sent out 4,618 tracers, and inter- 
viewed 2,580 persons relative to missing persons. It also sent 
out 4,720 photostatic descriptive circulars of missing persons 
and succeeded in establishing the identity of two persons 
suffering from amnesia. 

Requests for Information from. Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from police journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports services performed as follows: 
Number of requests complied with for information from the 

police journal in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 14,411 
Days in court . 16 

Warrant File. 
The warrant file for the entire Police Department is now 
kept in the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued 
to or received by this Department is sent out each day on the 
manifold and every officer in the Department receives a copy 
of this list. Twenty-four hours after the issuance of a warrant, 
if the person named therein has not been arrested, a form 
card is forwarded to the Bureau of Records by the station 
house with all the data pertaining to the warrant and the 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

case. These cards are alphabetically filed so that almost 
instantaneously it can be ascertained whether a warrant exists 
in the Department for any person that may be named. On 
the service of the warrant another card goes forward to the 
Bureau of Records with the necessary information of service. 

All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant files of the Bureau of Records. All 
correspondence pertaining to the movements of warrants 
outside of the city proper is carried on in the Bureau of Records. 
Commanding officers of stations are required, under the rules 
and regulations, to notify the warrant unit of an arrest on 
warrants issued to the Boston Police Department and all 
other police departments, also when arrests are made without 
a warrant involving serious crimes. This rule applies to this 
procedure every hour of the day and night. The warrant 
files are immediately searched and if it appears that there 
is a warrant for the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, 
the officer in command of the arresting division shall be imme- 
diately notified and given full particulars and the police divi- 
sion in Boston or outside jurisdiction is immediately notified 
that the person is under arrest. 

The following table sets forth data relative to the receipt of 
warrants by this Bureau and their disposition : 

Warrants received by Bureau of Records 3,880 

Arrested on warrants 2,175 

Warrants returned without service 1,966 

Warrants sent out to divisions within the Department and to 

other jurisdictions ' . . . 2,249 

Active warrant cards on file issued to Boston PoHce . . 3,872 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police, now out of State . . 87 
Active warrants issued to Boston Police forwarded to other cities 

and towns in this State ' . 468 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service, cards in our files 616 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers ... 42 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in our 
courts and in courts of other jurisdictions when identifications 
are made in our files through fingerprints; also where identifi- 
cations have been made through latent prints. The photog- 
raphers of the Bureau are summoned principally before the 
courts of this city, but on occasions where connections are 
made with latent fingerprints for outside cities the photog- 
rapher who enlarges the prints for the purpose of charting 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

them for presentation as evidence in court is also summoned 
into court to enable the photographs to be properly intro- 
duced. There have been many occasions in the past when 
chiefs of police of outside cities and towns have asked for the 
services of fingerprint and photography experts in consequence 
of crime committed in their jurisdiction, and the Department 
co-operated by sending fingerprint men and photography 
experts, properly equipped, to survey the scene of crime and 
reproduce any prints that may be available for evidence. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of con- 
viction for presentation in courts, both here and in other 
cities. 

A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the 
service of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who 
drafts the scenes of crime for presentation as evidence in 
court to aid the prosecution in showing the jury the exact 
location and surroundings at the scene. During the course 
of the year, the draftsman visited the scenes of various serious 
crimes where he took the measurements of same and later 
drew to scale 45 individual plans which were used as exhibits 
in the following courts within the jurisdiction of Boston: 

Municipal Court 21 days. 

Grand Jury of Suffolk Superior Court, 41 days. 
Superior Court 47 days. 

Police School. 

There were no sessions of the school held during the current 
police year. 

The unprecedented shortage of personnel in the Depart- 
ment, coupled with the consequent necessity of having officers 
perform extra police duties, made it advisable for the Admin- 
istrative Board of the Police School, under the direction of 
the Superintendent, to discontinue school sessions temporarily. 

Traffic. 
The Bureau of Traffic, which consisted of an Application 
Office of the Hackney Carriage Unit, as well as being the 
responsible agency for uniform handling of traffic throughout 
the city, was abolished on May 22, 1936, on which date the 
Police Commissioner established a Traffic Division, with 
headquarters on the fifth floor of 229 Milk street. 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The Traffic Division includes territory within boundaries of 
Divisions 1, 2, 4 and 16, and the traffic post at Cottage Farm 
Bridge. 

The Commanding Officer of the Traffic Division is respon- 
sible for proper regulation of traffic conditions and for safety 
of the public using the highways in the territory under juris- 
diction of the Traffic Division, daily, from 8 a. m. to 12 
midnight. 

With this responsibihty, the Traffic Division looks after 
the free flow of traffic in the down-town section of the city, as 
well as in the Back Bay section and especially in the vicinity of 
the North and South Stations, Boston Garden, Boston Arena, 
Mechanics Building, Symphony Hall, Boston Opera House, 
Fenway Park and Sumner Tunnel, as well as the theatrical 
section and steamboat wharves. 

The Traffic Division has worked in conjunction with the 
Board of Street Commissioners in making arrangements for 
large parades, particularly on such occasions as the Boston 
School Cadets Parade, Parade of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company, Central Labor Union Parade on Labor 
Day, Republican Torchlight Parade, October 31, 1936, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars and American Legion Parades on Armistice 
Day, and the Santason Parade, Thanksgiving Day, all of 
which parades were handled by the Traffic Division, with 
co-operation of other divisions, concerning which pohce work 
many letters of commendation were received by the Police 
Commissioner and Superintendent. 

The Traffic Division makes an inspection and study of 
traffic conditions in these various divisions; recommends to 
the Boston Traffic Commission where action for improvement 
is needed; causes arrangements to be made with that body for 
placing of signs at various locations (where needed) for the 
direction of the automobile public, as well as the detouring of 
traffic in cases of emergency, and notifies said Commission 
when automatic signal lights fail to function properly. 

Some of the duties successfully accomplished since creation 
of the Traffic Division were the handling, without a single 
mishap of approximately 500,000 persons who attended base- 
ball games at Fenway Park, the handling of about 183,000 
automobiles, with their passengers, at the entrance to the 
Sumner Traffic Tunnel, between the hours of 11 a. m. and 
3 p. m. from June 15th to August 14th, inclusive (during the 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 4a 

racing season at Suffolk Downs); as well as about 800,000 
persons who attended the Santason parade along its route, 
an event held by the Jordan Marsh Company. 

Tagging. 

One of the duties of the Traffic Division is to see that the 
streets are kept free and clear of illegal parking of automobiles, 
in conjunction with Divisions 1, 2, 4 and 16. While the public 
could be more co-operative in this respect, this Division has 
continued in its duty to enforce the rules and regulations of 
the Boston Traffic Commission. 

From inauguration of the Traffic Division in May of 1936 
up to and including November 30, 1936, the Division has 
caused to issue a total of approximately 23,300 notices for 
violations of the parking rules. 

Safety Educational Automobile. 

A Safety Educational Automobile was placed in operation 
on the highways of Boston, March 14, 1936, for the purpose of 
instructing the public as to the proper manner in which they 
should conduct themselves in the operation of their automo- 
biles, and to educate pedestrians as to the proper places and 
manner in which they should cross the street. This automo- 
bile is operated by officers of the Department, selected specially 
for this type of work. 

The public was asked to co-operate with the Department in 
its desire to minimize accidents and reduce the large number 
of persons injured and killed. The car is also sent to various 
school districts, where talks are given along safety lines to the 
pupils attending the different schools. 

The car has also been called upon to appear at gatherings 
of employees of trucking concerns, telegraph offices and other 
large places of business where safety talks have been given to 
persons assembled. In this connection, the officer in charge of 
the Safety Educational Automobile has also been called on by 
the Boston Park Department to speak at many of its out-door 
activities, such as at the South Boston Stadium where the 
officers spoke to about 100,000 persons during the circus and 
boxing bouts; also at ball games held at this playground, where 
talks were given to approximately 46,000 persons. These talks 
met with favorable comment from persons in attendance at 
these activities. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

During the months of May and June, officers operating the 
Safety Car spoke to approximately 115,000 pupils and their 
teachers. Since the opening of the 1936 school year, and up 
to the present time, through the medium of the loud speaker 
of the Safety Car, talks along safety lines, with demonstrations 
of hand signals, etc., have been given by officers in the car to 
approximately 67,700 pupils, and these assemblies were at- 
tended by approximately 1,800 teachers and 4,000 parents of 
pupils in the different schools. 

As a result of these safety talks by officers in control of the 
Safety Educational Car, the Police Commissioner and Super- 
intendent have received many letters of commendation from 
persons in various walks of life. 

Supervisor of Cases Unit, 

This Unit is the central agency of the Department for the 
supervision, preparation and presentation of all criminal cases 
brought by members of the force in the criminal courts within 
our jurisdiction; the interrogation of all prisoners and wit- 
nesses in cases of serious felonies, excepting homicide cases, 
and the supervision of the daily line-up of all prisoners arrested 
for serious offenses. The officers attached to this Unit work 
under the direction of the Supervisor of Cases and are assigned 
to duty in the several courts and at the office of the District 
Attorney of Suffolk County. The Unit, since its inception, 
lias proved its great value not only to the members of the 
Department but also to the District Attorney, his assistants 
and the various courts. The presiding justices of the various 
courts have praised the efficiency of this Unit in presenting 
cases to the courts, commending the dispatch and orderly 
manner in which the evidence is presented, and the prompt 
attendance of members of the Department when appearing 
as witnesses. 

Brief outhne of the activities of this Unit : 

Line-Up. 

The line-up for the entire Police Department of all prisoners 
arrested for serious offenses, held every week day at 8 a. m. 
in Room 403 at Police Headquarters, is conducted under the 
personal direction of the Commanding Officer of this Unit. 

Frequently, prisoners arrested for serious offenses by Police 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

Departments of Metropolitan Boston are brought to Police 
Headquarters, placed in the line-up and interrogated by the 
officer in charge. 

When persons are arrested for serious offenses, all Divisions 
in the Department are notified to bring forward witnesses, and 
the various Police Departments of Metropolitan Boston noti- 
fied by teletype to bring all witnesses and victims of crimes to 
view the line-up for the purpose of identification. Each morn- 
ing, prior to the appearance of the prisoners held for the line-up^ 
the officer supervising same is furnished with records giving 
the prisoner's history and details of his offense. All criminal 
records of prisoners are furnished by the Bureau of Records. 
When prisoners or witnesses are being interrogated at the 
line-up, a competent police stenographer is present to take 
down verbatim all questions and answers. A daily transcript 
of the stenographer's notes is made and filed in this office for 
future reference. 

When a prisoner in the line-up confesses to a crime com- 
mitted in another city, or if a witness identifies a prisoner in 
the line-up as having committed a crime in another city, a 
copy of the transcript of the stenographer's notes is forwarded 
to the Police Department of said city. 

Line-up statements have been the cause of convicting accused 
prisoners in a majority of cases tried before the Superior Court. 
Through identifications by victims and witnesses, the line-up 
during the past year was also greatly responsible for convic- 
tions of prisoners of Suffolk County, and in many cases in the 
Superior Court of other counties. 

From December 1, 1935, to November 30, 1936, 2,235 
prisoners appeared in the line-up. Of this number, 555 con- 
fessed to crimes, and 1,321 were recorded as having previous 
criminal records. During the same period, 714 witnesses 
attended the line-up and made 200 identifications. 

Court Supervision. 
A supervising officer, under the direction of the Supervisor 
of Cases, is assigned to each municipal or district court in 
Boston for the supervision and prosecution of criminal cases. 
They receive from the complaining officers having criminal 
cases before the courts a report giving a concise statement of 
facts, evidence obtained, names of witnesses, name and de- 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



script ion of defendant. The supervising officer then assists in 
preparing and presenting the case before the court. At the 
end of each day the supervising officer submits a report on a 
form provided for this purpose, giving a complete history of 
the case, with the findings and disposition by the court. When 
an appeal is taken in a lower court for trial in the Superior 
Court, the folder containing the history of the case is for- 
warded to the supervising officer in the District Attorney's 
office for the information of the District Attorney and his 
assistants. 

A filing system installed in this office contains a card index 
of all major cases supervised, a record of each case under its 
proper classification and a folder which contains the original 
report of every officer on each case. Each month a report is 
compiled showing the number of cases supervised, name of the 
court, name of the presiding justice, classification of the offense 
and disposition of same. 

Following is the number of cases supervised during the 
months named therein: 



Month. 


Personal 
Supervision. 


General 
Supervision. 


Total 

Number Cases 

Supervised. 


Percentage of 

"Guilty" 

Cases. 


1935. 










December 


632 


1,236 


1,868 


87.34 


1936. 










January 


773 


1,842 


2,615 


88.63 


February 








788 


1,463 


2,251 


84.32 


March . 








1,062 


1,954 


3,016 


92.08 


April 








840 


2,370 


3,210 


90.76 


May 








886 


2,234 


3,120 


88.22 


June 








586 


3,450 


4,036 


89.79 


July . 








776 


2,001 


2,777 


87.37 


August . 








542 


1,397 


1,939 


84.19 


September 








664 


1,758 


2,422 


86.70 


October 








614 


2,030 


2,644 


89.02 


November 








683 


1,908 


2,591 


81.57 


Totals 








8,846 


23,643 


32,489 


87.50 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

Bureau of Operations. 

This Bureau was created July 11, 1934. 

During the poHce year from December 1, 1935, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1936, the personnel of this Bureau has managed the 
transmission, reception and handling of: 

Approximately 1,713,450 telephone messages, and about 
5,500 toll calls made by the Department. 

81,640 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
the making and delivering of copies of such messages, as 
necessary, to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

92,866 radio messages, including keeping of log record 
of same. 

1,441 telegrams, including filing of same and the making 
and delivery of copies to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

1,861 forms for persons reported missing by other cities 
and towns filled out and delivered to the Bureau of Records, 
together with copies for the files of the Bureau. 

12,078 lost and stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the Automobile Unit, 2,931 of which were 
reported stolen in Boston, together with records made and 
delivered of all recovered cars, copies of both kept in the 
Bureau's files. 

A daily journal was kept in which all of the above, including 
such of the telephone messages as were toll calls, were recorded, 
together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents, and other 
matter submitted by divisions and units of the Depart- 
ment. 

Press bulletins were typed in every matter of importance, 
copies of which were delivered to the Police Commissioner, 
the Superintendent and the Press. 

A file was maintained of the entire police personnel of the 
Department, cross indexed bj'" division, name, rank and cap 
number, together with the address, telephone number and 
date of appointment. 

The main radio transmitter, 77 car transmitters, 77 car 
receivers, 18 wired broadcast amplifiers and 8 pick-up receivers 
were maintained and kept in repair by the personnel of the 
Bureau. 

The number of telephone calls handled by the Bureau of 
Operations have more than doubled since the telephone turret 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

system for receiving emergency calls was installed and the 
listing of telephones of division station houses was discontinued 
from the telephone company's directory. Many thousands of 
these telephone calls from the general public are received over 
the emergency lines by officers at the turret desk, namely: 
complaints, reports of crimes, questions of every conceivable 
kind and appeals for assistance. Prior to the nonlisting of 
division house telephone numbers, most of these calls were 
handled by the divisions, and the manner of handling was 
necessarily not uniform. At the present time, one particular 
group of trained men handle such calls and it is thus possible 
to more easily maintain a proper standard of courtesy and 
efficiency in this work. 

The installation of new telephone, teletype and other equip- 
ment in the Bureau of Operations found the quarters allotted 
to the Bureau inadequate for the proper arrangement of this 
new equipment. 

Early in the year it was recommended to the Police Com- 
missioner that the communications equipment, with the excep- 
tion of the radio transmitter, be moved to a new location on the 
same floor of Headquarters Buildings, in order to provide 
proper working space and permit the equipment to be arranged 
in improved order. The Police Commissioner approved the 
recommendation for making this change and the work was 
begun immediately. 

In addition to their regular routine duties, members of the 
Bureau have devoted much time and consideration to the 
general layout and furnishing of the new quarters for this unit. 
Much of the furniture and equipment to be used in the new 
quarters was designed or built and arranged by members of 
the Bureau. 

Illuminated Car Control and Radio Panel. 
One of the outstanding accomplishments was the designing 
and building of an illuminated car control and radio panel. 
This panel, by means of small electric lights, shows the exact 
number of radio cars on duty in each division and indicates 
by means of flashing lights when any particular car has been 
sent on an assignment, to a fire or to cover a fixed post. When 
a radio car is absent from its patrol sector for any cause, it 
shows the particular car assigned to cover that sector during 
the absence of the car regularly assigned. The number of 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

patrol wagons and ambulances assigned for duty in each divi- 
sion are shown and when wagons or ambulances are sent on 
call, it is indicated by flashing lights. A remote radio control 
unit and microphone is connected into the panel through 
which the dispatcher maintains two-way communication with 
radio cars on patrol duty throughout the city and the police 
boats on harbor patrol. There is also a device connected 
into the panel which, through shadowgraphs, indicates to the 
dispatcher the location from which he is receiving a car signal 
the best, and by closing a key switch the dispatcher establishes 
communication with the car through the pick-up point, where 
the signal from the car is the strongest. Key switches are 
also provided on the panel for control of the wired broadcast 
system which is connected with the radio transmitter, whereby 
the dispatcher may cause his messages to be heard in only 
one, any number, or all of the Headquarters units and the 
station houses as he so desires, and further, it is possible for 
Division Commanders to talk direct with their patrol cars 
from the station houses through this wired broadcast system. 

Illuminated Map. 
An illuminated map has also been designed and built by 
members of this Bureau. This consists of a large map of the 
city of Boston on which the police division boundaries and the 
radio car patrol sectors in each division have been outlined. 
Small electric lights are used to show the exact number of 
radio cars on duty in each division. The station houses and 
the location of fixed posts that are covered by the cars in 
emergencies are also shown, and it is indicated by means of 
flashing lights when one, any number, or all fixed posts are 
being covered by the cars. The map is controlled from the 
illuminated panel located on the dispatcher's desk. This 
map enables the telephone turret operators, who receive all 
emergency calls, to determine at all times just what cars are 
available for service in any section of the city. 

Other Equipment. 
Other equipment which has been designed by members of 
this Bureau consists of a new dispatcher's desk, a telephone 
turret table to accommodate four operators and bench tables 
for holding the teletype and telegraph equipment. 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

About the first of November two-way radio equipment was 
installed on the police boats which patrol Boston Harbor. 
Much of this work was done by members of this Bureau. 

The value of an efficient system of communications has been 
demonstrated in many ways during the past year, and the 
two-way radio facilities were particularly effective in the 
following instances: 

About 9.30 a. m., on December 3, 1935, there was received 
a telephone call at the Bureau from the Commanding Officer 
of the Charlestown Police Division stating that there was 
trouble of some nature at the State Prison in Charlestown, 
and that he believed a number of prisoners had escaped. As is 
customary in time of serious difficulty at the State Prison, 
their telephone operators answer no incoming telephone calls, 
and the personnel of the Bureau of Operations had no com- 
munication with the prison and no quick means of finding 
out the exact nature of the trouble there. Immediately after 
receiving word of this emergency, twenty-seven radio cars 
were dispatched to the prison with orders to report on arrival, 
and at the same time about 100 foot patrolmen were sent to 
the scene. 

The Superintendent of Police, who had also been notified, 
on his arrival at the prison, established a mobile headquarters 
in one of the two-way radio cars and from a radiophone hand 
set in the car directed over the air the activities of other cars 
during the search for the escaped prisoners, who had murdered 
one guard and seriously wounded another in attempting their 
escape. 

This made possible quick and proper concentration and dis- 
posal of radio cars and foot patrolmen that were at the scene, 
and also the dispatching of men equipped with tear-gas bombs 
and gas guns to proper places, so that in a matter of minutes 
the entire area around the prison was under guard. Our 
ability to get quick information direct from the scene through 
the two-way radio cars resulted in the capture within an hour 
and a quarter of five desperate long-term prisoners, two of 
whom were shot in their capture and later died. 

On Saturday, March 21, 1936, Mayor Dalrymple, of the 
city of Haverhill, appealed to the Police Commissioner for 
assistance, the city being in serious difficulties due to the flood 
conditions in the Merrimac valley. The Police Commissioner 
immediately issued orders that the Commanding Officer of this 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Bureau with four patrolmen and two two-way radio cars pro- 
ceed to Haverhill to render such assistance as could be offered. 
Upon arrival, it was found that the city of Haverhill was in 
absolute darkness, all electric power being off. It was also 
found that the police and fire signal systems had been rendered 
useless for operation. With the assistance of civihan radio 
help a transmitter and receiver were set up in the tower of the 
Haverhill City Hall, which building housed the Police Head- 
quarters. The receivers in the two Boston cars were tuned 
to the same frequency as their transmitters and a transceiver 
on the same frequency as that in City Hall was installed in 
one of the two-way cars. With this equipment, both cars 
were in constant touch with each other and with Haverhill 
Police Headquarters while patrolling the city. By working in 
two shifts and accompanied by Haverhill police officers, the 
city was constantly patrolled twenty-four hours a day for 
seven days. 

During this period, the radio was the only means of com- 
munication the police and fireman had with their respective 
headquarters. Not one case of looting or of larceny was 
reported during this time and these officers evacuated over 
fifty families from the worst part of the flood area, removing 
them to places of safety. 

Two-Way Radio. 

The installation of the two-way radio system was completed 
about October 1, 1936. 

With the completion of the unified poUce telephone system 
and the new teletype equipment now in process of installation, 
the Bureau of Operations will be established in its new quarters. 

The Boston PoHce Department will have, it is believed, the 
best equipped and most modern communications system of 
any city in the world. 

Ballistic Unit. 

Formation and Duties. 

The activities of this Unit, with its personnel, were trans- 
ferred from the Property Clerk's Office to the Superintendent's 
Oflftce on October 11, 1935. 

With a Sergeant-Ballistician in charge, the office consists of 
experts in baUistics, handwriting and explosives, and also a 
gunsmith. 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician, under direction of the Super- 
intendent of Police, has charge of the care and custody of all 
firearms, explosives and substances of explosives coming into 
the possession of members of the Department. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician prepares the cases where ballistic 
evidence is required, so far as bullets, shells, firearms or ex- 
plosives are concerned, and appears before the court in such 
cases to give evidence. 

Acco7nplishments. 

During the year members of the Unit responded to 102 
emergency calls after regular office hours, and put in many 
extra hours of duty. Three hundred and thirty-five days 
were spent in court by members of the Unit on ballistic, 
handwriting and moulage cases. 

Of the total cases, ballistics numbered to 327 (which in- 
cluded examination of firearms, explosives, bullets and shells, 
and suspicious substances) ; handwriting and typewriting cases, 
117, and moulage cases, 10. 

For identification purposes, a large collection, consisting of 
tire threads, gun powders, shot, bullets, types, typewriter 
specimens, and moulage casts, has been added to the Unit 
during this period. 

For efficiency of the Unit the following material was added 
to the equipment: one 16-foot gunsmith's table with equip- 
ment; a transmitted light table for document examining; and 
an ultra violet light for the same purpose. 

One hundred and ninety-one revolvers and 27 riot guns were 
serviced and repaired by the gunsmith, in addition to servicing 
all equipment carried in the vault at this office and in the 
radio cruising cars attached to the various Units and Divisions. 
By repairing and servicing our own equipment substantial 
savings were made. 

Inspections were made twice a month by members of this 
Unit of all equipment carried in the various Divisions and 
Units and in radio cruising cars. Replacements were made 
when found necessary and equipment kept in good working 
order and condition. 

Between 1,500 and 2,000 visitors, consisting of large groups 
and individuals, were shown through the Unit. In addition, 
members of the Unit gave lectures to business and social groups 
in various parts of greater Boston. 



i 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

During the early months of 1936, sergeants and special 
officers of the Department attended sessions in this office 
where they were instructed on firearm laws, law of questioned 
documents and various types of tear-gas munitions and their 
use. 

During the year, members of this Unit attended lectures and 
demonstrations offered by the National Guard and manufac- 
turers of munitions on riot formations and use of newer types 
of tear gas. 

A large exhibit, prepared for the Texas Centennial Exposi- 
tion, was placed in the Warden Lawes Building at Dallas, 
where were shown articles of display from major police depart- 
ments of the world. This exhibit, covering an area of 90 
square feet, was comprised of forgeries and moulage. Letters 
of commendation were received in reference to this exhibit. 
Another exhibit, prepared for the New York Hotel Association 
Annual Convention, was of a nationally known forger's method 
of operation with actual checks and other appurtenances used 
by him. 

Moulage. 

Substance known as moulage, apparently new in identifica- 
tion of certain types of evidence, was introduced into the 
courts of this Commonwealth by this office, where it was 
accepted as evidence over objection by counsel. 

This material was used to very good advantage in recent 
investigation of a murder case. All necessary casts required 
by the Medical Examiner of certain parts of a body were made 
under his direction and to his satisfaction. These casts were 
accepted by the court as true reproductions of the subjects 
they represented. 

In addition to the casts, specimens of woodpulp paper used 
by newspapers were treated and photographed and placed in 
juxtaposition to the paper of which they were alleged to have 
been a part. These specimens, treated with chemicals to 
remove body fat and blood before being photographed, belonged 
to two missing sections of a newspaper found in the home of the 
victim. Members of this Unit co-operated with the Medical 
Examiner in establishing identity of the murder victim, by 
assisting him in his inquiries. 

Serial Numbers on Firearms. 
There were a number of cases during the year where serial 
numbers on firearms had been erased and had to be treated 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

with chemicals to identify them. By request of the City 
Marshal of Lawrence, a member of this Unit reported to 
Lawrence Police Headquarters where he received firearms, 
cartridges, discharged cartridges and other ballistic evidence 
concerned in an attempted holdup of a bank truck. 

Serial numbers on one of the firearms had been filed off. 
After treatment with chemicals all identifying marks and 
numbers appeared. This firearm was traced from the manu- 
facturer to the last owner and ultimately to a person, one of 
three defendants. As a result of this investigation, two of the 
defendants were found guilty, and the firearms used in the 
crime connected with a holdup of a Brockton bank earlier in 
the year. 

The Federal Government, interested in the arrest of these 
two men, was given assistance in their case. 

Tear Gas Squad. 

A Special Tear Gas Squad has been created, including 
members of this office and office of the Assistant Drillmaster, 
to cope with any disorder which may arise in the city where 
tear gas would be necessary. 

In the past year a considerable supply of tear gas has been 
added to the stock in this office. This stock is sufficient to 
handle any size disturbance, and a sufficient supply has been 
dehvered to each Division and Unit for this purpose. 

Miscellaneous. 

It is our intent to make a collection of watermarks used by 
the various manufacturers in the manufacture of paper, laundry 
marks used by the laundries in greater Boston, which also 
includes the cleaning and dyeing establishments, and other 
identifying collections needed by the police from time to time 
in investigations. 

Handwriting exemplars of certain persons arrested by this 
Department are sent to this office where they are classified 
and filed away in an orderly arrangement. These specimens 
are used for court purposes and for searching when questioned 
writings are received in this office. About 5,000 such speci- 
mens were classified during the past year. 

Twenty Colt Bankers' Special Type revolvers were pur- 
chased during the year. These revolvers were turned over to 
members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. .55 

To each member of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation was 
issued the latest type Baby Giant Tear Gas Projector, which 
may be carried in the pocket of a coat for use in emergency. 

Radio cruising cars attached to all Divisions and Units were 
equipped with Federal Tear Gas billies, a combination tear-gas 
gun and billy combined. 

Special Service Squad. 

On January 22, 1936, the Special Service Squad was formed 
and operated out of the office of the Superintendent of Police. 

Effective as of April 16, 1936, the Squad was detached from 
the Superintendent's office and estabhshed at Police Head- 
quarters as a separate unit. 

The Squad was established for the purpose of performing 
night patrol duty in motor vehicles throughout the city. 

It is the duty of officers of the Squad, so far as possible, 
to prevent the commission of crime, and, if acts of violence or 
other serious crimes have been committed, to arrest and 
prosecute offenders. 

The Commanding Officer of the Special Service Squad is 
responsible for proper keeping of all records and accounts in 
accordance with department rules and regulations. 

The office of the Special Service Squad is open at all times 
for police purposes, with an officer on duty. 

The personnel of the Special Servdce Squad consists of 
approximately 50 members, divided into watches, who patrol 
the city in two-way radio cars, both day and night, challenging 
and investigating all suspicious persons, questionable pleasure 
vehicles, motor trucks and taxicabs. 

In addition, members of the Squad, in search of suspicious 
persons and persons wanted for the commission of crime, visit 
licensed premises, including cafes, taverns, restaurants, clubs, 
pool rooms, dance halls, skating rinks, theater lobbies, parking 
spaces, railroad and elevated stations, and places known which 
might be frequented by criminal element. 

The work of the Squad has progressed in a very satisfactory 
manner. Its personnel, by efficiency and alertness, while on 
and off duty, have been successful in reducing to a minimum 
''holdups" and other serious crimes. 

Figures of arrest of the Special Service Squad are included 
within those of the Department as shown in this report. 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following statement, however, relative to activities of 
the Squad, is herewith presented : 

Number of persons arrested 2,510 

Number of cases investigated 1,775 

Number of extra duties performed 1,915 

Number of days spent in court by officers .... 1,667 

Amount of property recovered. (Includes value of automo- 
biles recovered from April 16, 1936.) .... $18,948 58 
Number of years' imprisonment, 317 years, 1 month, 18 days 
and 21 indefinite terms. 

Fines S2,062 00 

Premises searched for property unlawfully possessed and 

wanted persons 83 

Automobiles and pedestrians challenged and investigated 

in the night-time 3,438 

Visits to licensed premises, raihoad stations, bus terminals 

and other pubHc places, in quest of suspicious persons, 28,082 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of the special events transpiring during 
the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty at 
each: 



1935. 

Dec. 3. 
Dec. 4. 
Dec. 8. 
Dec. 11. 
Dec. 14. 
Dec. 16. 
Dec. 22. 
Dec. 23. 
Dec. 24. 
Dec. 24. 

Dec. 24. 



Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


Dec. 


31 


1936. 




Jan. 


11 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


14 


Jan. 


16 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


26 



State Prison, escape of convicts 

State Prison, escape of convicts 

St. Clement's Church, dedication exercises . 

Funeral of Sergeant Walter G. Horton, retired 

Funeral of Patrohnan Charles E. Guittarr 

Funeral of Patrolman Michael S. Merrigan . 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Boston Post Santa Claus bundles . 

Christmas Eve, Carol Singers, etc., on Beacon 

and Boston Common 

Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of 

Cross 

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common 

New Year's Eve, celebration on Division Four 

New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of 

Cross 



Hill 
Holy 



Holy 



Funeral of Mr. Herbert J. Hickey . 

Funeral of Patrolman WiUiam V. Chisholm, retired 

Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Associa 

tion 

Funeral of Dr. Francis X. Mahoney 
Funeral of Representative Leo M. Birmingham . 
Franklin Field, Boston American Silver Skate Car- 
nival 



Men. 

24 
48 
18 
16 
52 
86 
10 
10 
10 

109 

12 
13 
36 

10 

18 
12 

375 
32 

16 

102 



1937.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 



1936. 




Jan. 


26. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


10. 


Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


22. 



Feb. 


24. 


Feb. 


24. 


Feb. 


25. 


Feb. 


29. 


Mar. 


10. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


23. 


Mar. 


28. 


April 


4. 



May 


2. 


May 


9. 


May 


9. 


May 


10. 


May 


10. 


May 


15. 



Men. 

77 

32 

119 

60 



76 



Symphony Hall, Lenin Memorial meeting . 

East Newton Street Armory, Tammany Club ball 

Boston Garden, President Roosevelt's Birthday ball 

Funeral of Sergeant John L. Hunt 

Funeral of Joseph A. Tomasello, Jr. . . . 

State House, Reception of His Excellency, Governor 

James M. Curley 52 

Feb. 22. Beacon Park Railroad yard and vicinity, visit of 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Harvard College, 334 

Funeral of Joseph A. Tomasello, Sr 76 

Bunker Hill Armory, banquet tendered to Honorable 

Thomas H. Green, Civil Service Commissioner . 32 

Special Primary in Ward 22, Brighton district . . 62 

Funeral of Patrolman Paul T. Ford .... 56 

Special Election in Ward 22, Brighton district . . 62 

South Boston, Evacuation Day Parade . 368 

76 Atherton street, Jamaica Plain, proposed strike at 

Fisher Shoe Company 41 

Funeral of Patrolman James B. Roche .... 54 
Funeral of Patrolman Edwin H. Gallagher ... 62 
Brighton, Presentation Literary and Social Organiza- 
tion ten-mile road race 40 

April 4. Boston Arena, Army Day exercises under the auspices 

of Militarj^ Order of the World War 
April 9. Funeral of Mrs. Curtis Guild . 
April 11. Cathedral Club road race 
April 12. Division 16, Easter parade 
April 16. Funeral of Patrolman William Cahoon 
April 16. Funeral of Barbara M. Ward . 
April 17. East Armory, Annual Boston School Cadets competi- 
tive di-ill 69 

April 18. Fallon Field, Roslindale, Easter egg rolling contest 41 

April 18. Roxbury, Michael J. O'Connell Post, American Legion 

road race 35 

April 18. Franklin Park, Easter egg hunt 83 

April 19. Jefferson Club and Boston American bicycle road 

race 

April 20. Marathon. race 473 

April 28. Party Primary 2,037 

May 1. Boston Common, Charles Street Mall, May Day 
exercises under auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 56 

Fenway Park, Boston Herald Baseball School . 12 

Funeral of Patrolman James F. Hennessey ... 84 

National League Park, Boston Herald Baseball 

School 12 

Association of Boston Italian Clubs' parade . 47 

East Boston, Italian World War Veterans' Parade 54 

Amalgamated Hall, debate on " Youth Fights War, " 16 

May 16. National League Park, Boston Herald Baseball School, 12 



108 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1936. Men. 

May 17. Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade and 

Field Mass at Fenway Park 92 

May 22. East Newton Street Armory, Mechanic Arts High 

School parade 29 

May 22. Funeral of Dr. Simon F. Curran 14 

May 23. Franklin Park, Junior Birdmen Outdoor Air Races . 15 

May 24. Knights Templar, Boston Commandery parade . . 32 

May 24. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Sunday . . 142 

May 30. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 327 
May 30. Memorial Day Services at New Calvary Cemetery 
under the auspices of Boston Police Post, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars, and Boston Police Post, American 

Legion 72 

May 31. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday after Memorial 

Day 142 

182d Infantry parade 68 

Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company . 257 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank W. Murphy ... 58 

Funeral of Sergeant Denis J. Casey, retired . 16 
East Boston, dedication exercises, Michael J. Brody 

Park 18 

Parade, Boston School Cadets . . ' . . . 281 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises .... 31 

Flag Day celebration on Boston Common ... 26 
101st Infantry and Old Ninth Regiment Anniversary 

parade and exercises 162 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 35 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 48 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day . . 83 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day 46 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 360 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 67 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day band concerts . 48 
Washington Park, pageant under auspices of W. P. A. 

and Business Men of Roxbury 43 

Boston Post bulletin board, Louis-Schmelling Boxing 

Contest 19 

Washington Park, pageant under auspices of W. P. A. 

and Business Men of Roxbury 48 

Various band concerts under auspices of Boston Public 

Celebrations Committee 73 

Smith Playground, AUston, bonfire .... 23 
Franklin Field, Park Department road race . . 24 
City of Boston Official Flag-Raising and parade . 54 
Various band concerts and fireworks under the aus- 
pices of Boston Public Celebrations Committee . 152 
Boston Common, band concert and fireworks . . 87 
Castle Island, South Boston, dedication of walk in 

memory of Reverend Timothy J. O'Connor . . 18 

July 6. Franklin Field, Junior Birdmen Outdoor Air Races . 24 



May 


31. 


June 


1. 


June 


3. 


June 


4, 


June 


7. 


June 


8. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


15. 


June 


16. 


June 


16. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 


19. 


July 


1. 


July 


3. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

1936. Men. 

July 10. Funeral of Lieutenant Stephen J. Gillis ... 63 

July 12. Franklin Field, Theodore Herzl Field and Track 

Meet 21 

July 18. Columbus Circle, South Boston, Boston Traveler 

Soap-Box Derby 37 

July 27. Boston Common, Meeting under auspices of the 

^National Tom Mooney Provisional Committee . 49 
Aug. 1. Charlesbank Park, Entertainment under auspices of 
W. P. A. and West End Joint Planning Com- 
mittee 18 

Aug. 3. Town Field, Dorchester, Dramatic Play and Twilight 
baseball game under auspices of Adult Recreation 

Committee of the W. P. A 18 

Aug. 4. Franklin Field, Junior Birdmen Outdoor Air Races, 25 

Aug. 6. Fens Stadium, Theatrical Drama under auspices 

W. P. A 16 

Aug. 14. Dedication exercises of the New Parcel Post Build- 
ing 26 

Aug. 17. Noyes Playground, East Boston, Dramatic Play 
under auspices of the W. P. A. Adult Recreation 

Committee 26 

Aug. 18. Parade, Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order Nobles of 

Mystic Shrine 183 

Aug. 18. Boston Post Bulletin Board, Sharkey-Louis Boxing 

Contest 14 

Aug. 18. Columbus Park, South Boston, Boston Park Depart- 
ment Amateur Boxing Bouts 29 

Aug. 24. Funeral of Patrolman Chester D. Barron ... 48 

Aug. 26. Funeral of Patrolman Patrick J. Lahey, retired . . 14 

Aug. 26. Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Annual Park 

Department Playground Circus 69 

Aug. 28. Funeral of Patrolman Richard H. Leary, retired . 14 

Sept. 1. Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Boston Park 

Department Amateur Boxing Bouts .... 29 

Sept. 2. Funeral of Sergeant Anthony J. Ferrulle ... 83 

Sept. 4. Funeral of Mrs. Louisa Langone 21 

Sept. 6. L-Street Baths, South Boston, Boston Park Depart- 
ment Final Swimming Meet 14 

Sept. 7. Parade, Boston Central Labor Union .... 336 

Sept. 9. Columbus Park, South Boston, Boston Park Depart- 
ment Final Amateur Boxing Bouts .... 32 
Sept. 12. Details for wedding of John T. O'Dea, Jr., and Miss 

Rita Curley 36 

Sept. 12. Funeral of Reverend Jones I. J. Corrigan, S. J. . . 24 

Sept. 13. Columbus Park, South Boston, Annual Polish Field 

Day 29 

Sept. 14. Funeral of Patrolman John J. Murray .... 85 

Sept. 15. State Primary 2,025 

Sept. 18. Beacon Park Railroad Yard and vicinity, visit of 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Harvard College, 233 



60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1936. 

Sept. 26. 
Sept. 27. 
Oct. 3. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



Oct. 11. 
Oct. 12. 
Oct. 14. 

Oct. 17. 

Oct. 17. 

Oct. 18. 

Oct. 21. 

Oct. 24. 

Oct. 25. 

Oct. 29. 
Oct. 31. 

Nov. 1. 
Nov. 3. 

Nov. 7. 
Nov. 8. 
Nov. 11. 

Nov. 11. 
Nov. 11. 

Nov. 11. 
Nov. 12. 
Nov. 14. 
Nov. 20. 
Nov. 21. 
Nov. 21. 
Nov. 26. 
Nov. 30. 



Parade, Omar Grotto 

Various Boston Park Department football games 
Parade, Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 

Field Day 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Boston Arena, Communist Party meeting . 

Labor Non-Partisan League parade and meeting on 

Boston Common 

Various Boston Park Department football games 
Parade, North End Post, American Legion . 
Columbus Park, South Boston, pageant under aus 

pices of Adult Recreation Committee of W. P. A 
Visit to Boston and parade of U. S. Corps of Cadets 
Harvard- West Point football game 
Various Boston Park Department football games 
Visit of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Boston 
Harvard-Dartmouth football game 
Mechanics Building, banquet tendered to State 

Treasurer Charles F. Hurley .... 
Various Republican City Committee rallies . 
Republican Service League Torch-Light parade and 

meeting in Boston Garden 

Boston Garden, Democratic State Committee rally 
Presidential and State Election .... 
Harvard-Virginia football game .... 
Various Boston Park Department football games 
Parade, Lieutenant Norman E. Prince Post, Veterans 

of Foreign Wars 

Veterans of Foreign Wars, Armistice Day parade 
American Legion, Suffolk County Council, Armistice 

Day parade 

Various Boston Park Department football games 
Funeral of Patrolman William Hazlett, retired . 

Harvard-Navy football game 

Parade, Boston University Student Council 
Parade, Boston University R. O. T. C. Unit 
Funeral of Patrolman George L. Klages 
Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade . 
Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall, Recount 

of ballots cast at Presidential and State Election 



Men. 

141 

50 

36 
50 
38 

149 
50 

68 
31 

296 
57 
50 

529 
56 

26 

27 

527 

108 

2,021 

29 

28 

36 

298 

479 
24 
16 
64 
72 
31 
52 

640 

10 



Note. — January 21 to January 31, 1936, inclusive, a total of 110 officers 
was on duty for that period at the Superior Criminal Court, 
during the trial of four convicts from State Prison. 

February 27 to April 6, 1936, inclusive, a total of 2,018 officers 
was on duty for that period of the so-called Garment Workers' 
Strike, in Division 4. 

March 23 to March 29, 1936, inclusive, a total of 92 officers was 
on duty for that period in connection with the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society Flower Show at Mechanics Building. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 61 

May 18 to May 21, 1936, inclusive, a total of 40 officers was on 
duty for that period at the office of the Board of Election 
Commissioners, City Hall, during the recount of ballots cast 
at the Party Primary. 

June 15 to August 14, 1936, inclusive, a total of 795 officers was 
on duty for that period directing traffic during the Horse Races 
at Suffolk Downs Race Track in East Boston. 

June 16 to June 21, 1936, inclusive, a total of 100 officers was on 
duty for that period at various schools and armories, in con- 
nection with the certification of Veterans' Adjusted Service 
Bonds. 

September 11 to November 2, 1936, inclusive, a total of 504 
officers was on duty for that period at 211 Washington street, 
in connection with political rallies. 

September 24 to October 1, 1936, inclusive, a total of 35 officers 
was on duty for that period at the office of the Board of Elec- 
tion Commissioners, City Hall, during the recount of ballots 
cast at the State Primary. 

September 30 to October 9, 1936, inclusive, a total of 168 officers 
was on duty for that period at the Boston Post Bulletin Board 
and the Iver Johnson Bulletin Board, in connection with the 
play-by-play description of the New York Yankees-New York 
Giant's World's Series Baseball Games. 

November 27 to November 30, 1936, inclusive, a total of 40 
officers was on duty for that period of the so-called Meat 
Provisioners' Union Strike, in Division 1. 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Miscellaneous Business. 



[Jan. 





1933-34. 


1934-35. 


1935-36. 


Abandoned children cared for ... 


13 


23 


2 


Accidents reported 




10,440 


9,830 


9,065 


Buildings found open and made secure 




2,968 


2,838 


2,857 


Cases investigated . . . ; . 






43,753 


52,354 


63,004 


Dangerous buildings reported 






40 


47 


42 


Dangerous chimneys reported 






24 


15 


11 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 






382 


411 


446 


Defective cesspools reported . 






19 


35 


35 


Defective drains and vaults reported 






11 


22 


2 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 




5 


5 


5 


Defective gas pipes reported . 




18 


31 


18 


Defective hydrants reported . 




34 


65 


47 


Defective lamps reported 




4,883 


4,705 


5,447 


Defective sewers reported 




99 


61 


64 


Defective sidewalks and streets reported 




2,442 


1,950 


2,837 


Defective water pipes reported 






45 


44 


22 


Disturbances suppressed 






1,682 


827 


448 


Extra duties performed . 






25,678 


28,956 


44,496 


Fire alarms given .... 






5,546 


5,702 


5,134 


Fires extinguished .... 






994 


865 


805 


Insane persons taken in charge 






387 


403 


420 


Intoxicated persons assisted . 






549 


162 


220 


Lost children restored 






1,503 


1,800 


1,625 


Persons rescued from drowning 






150 


168 


20 


Sick and injured persons assisted 






7,973 


7,969 


8,800 


Stray teams reported and put up . 






30 


14 


11 


Street obstructions removed . 






612 


1,023 


32 


Water running to waste reported 






745 


412 


487 


Witnesses detained .... 






313 


2 


3 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

Adjustment of Claims. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $1,165.71; 
turned in and receipted for at the Chief Clerk's office, S66.26; 
making a grand total of $1,231.97 either received by or credited 
to this Department for such police property damage. 

House of Detention. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the court 
house building, Somerset street.* All women arrested in the 
city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They are then 
held in charge of the matron until the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. If sentenced to im- 
prisonment they are returned to the House of Detention and 
from there conveyed to the jail or institution to which they 
have been sentenced. 

During the year 3,515 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 2,435 

Larceny Ill 

Night walking 55 

Fornication 160 

Idle and disorderly 160 

Assault and batterj' 20 

Adultery 59 

Violation of liquor law 3 

Keeping house of ill fame 26 

Various other causes 486 

Total 3,515 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 126 

From county jail 485 

Grand total 4,126 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 577. Of these 459 are 
connected with the underground system and 118 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
4,132 trouble calls; inspected 559 signal boxes; 15 signal desks; 

* From November 28, 1936, House of Detention temporarily located in police building, 
521 Commercial street, Boston, during construction of new Suffolk County Court House. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

9 motor generator sets; 150 old type and 500 new type batteries. 
Repairs have been made on 150 box movements; 65 registers; 
190 locks; 15 time stamps; 2 garage motors; 3 garage registers; 
35 vibrator bells; 60 relays; 15 electric fans. This unit has 
the installing and maintenance of all electric wiring and equip- 
ment at all stations and Headquarters building. There have 
been made 150 plungers; 150 box fittings; 50 line blocks and 75 
automatic hooks. 

Connected with the police signal boxes there are 130 signal 
and 120 telephone circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
Department. All patrol box telephone and blinker light 
repairs are made by Signal Service members. 

Contract has been signed to complete signal box wiring and 
station house wiring for the Hayes Signal System. Paper 
insulated underground cable has been installed on all divisions. 
New signal desks are to be installed at all station houses in 
connection with the Hayes Signal System over Department 
owned lines. 

There are assigned to the unit one White truck, 2| tons 
capacity; three utility trucks, | ton capacity each, and one 
four-door Plymouth sedan. 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal 
Service maintenance at the present time: 

7 close circuit desks 730,600 feet underground cable 

8 open circuit blinker type 233,400 feet of overhead cable 

signal desks 31,143 feet of duct 

240 circuits 68 manholes 

12 garage annunciators 18 motor generator sets 
52 test boxes 6 motor-driven flashes 

400 cells of sulphuric acid storage 1 White truck 

type battery 3 Ford trucks 

2,100 taxicab signs 1 Plymouth sedan 

45 traffic booths 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the harbor police, formerly 
styled Division 8,* comprising the harbor and the islands 
therein, were as follows: 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 

stages, etc $55,720 

>i umber of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 562 

♦Division 8 consolidated with Division 1 May 8, 1933. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 94 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 8 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 5 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the waterfront . . 29 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm .... 4 

Number of boats challenged 42 

Number of boats searched for contraband 31 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted .... 19 

Number of cases investigated 408 

Number of dead bodies recovered 38 

Number rescued from drowning 11 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 7 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered ... 137 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 240 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 1,814 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 

in harbor 12 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 8 

Number of dead bodies cared for 

Number of hours grappling 



7 
412 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 8,107, 
5,712 of which were from domestic ports, 644 from the British 
Province in Canada, 1,751 from foreign ports. Of the latter, 
1,282 were steamers, 308 werS motor ves.sels and 161 were 
schooners. 

A patrol service was maintained in the harbor and Dor- 
chester Bay daily and nightly from Castle Island to Neponset 
Bridge, with Launch "E. U. Curtis," from August 9th to 
November 30th. There were 125 cases investigated, 12 boats 
challenged for contraband, 74 cases where assistance was 
rendered to boats in distress by reason of disabled engines, 
stress of weather, .etc.; 14 dead bodies, 1 dismembered head 
and 2 dismembered legs were cared for, 6 boats ordered to 
put up sailing lights, 110 hours spent in grappling, 12 persons 
rescued from drowning, 27 boats warned about speeding 
amongst boats, 90 obstructions removed from the channel, 
15 alarms of fire attended, 19 arrests for various violations. 

Horses. 

On the 30th of November, 1935, there were 20 horses in 
the service. 

During the year, on account of age, 1 was delivered to the 
Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
and 2 to farms; 1 died, 1 was humanely killed and 5 were 
purchased. 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

At the present time there are 20 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 163 automobiles in the service at the present 
time: 52 attached to Headquarters; 3 attached to Traffic 
Division; 21 in the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 
2 and 4; 9 in the South Boston district, attached to Division 6; 
7 in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 15 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 8 in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 6 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 7 in the Brighton dis- 
trict, attached to Division 14; 5 in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; 7 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 6 in the West Roxbury district, 
attached to Division 17; 6 in the Hyde Park district, attached 
to Division 18; 8 in the Mattapan district, attached to Divi- 
sion 19, and 3 unassigned. (See page 68 for distribution of 
automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs ....%..... $12,258 19 

Storage 1,375 50 

Gasoline 45,196 62 

Oil and grease 6,076 80 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, etc. . 427 41 

Registration fees 28 00 

Total $64,362 52 



Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automobiles 

(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 4,261 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) . . 1,405 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 554 

Calls where services were not required 264 

Southern Mortuary 236 

Psychopathic Hospital 234 

Home 163 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston district) ... 115 

Carried forward 7,232 



1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



67 



Brought forward 

Morgue 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Carney Hospital . 

Boston State Hospital 

Forest Hills Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Police Station Houses . 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 

United States Marine Hospital 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals 

New England Hospital 

Strong Hospital 

Boston Floating Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 

Bosworth Hospital 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 

Children's Hospital 

Commonwealth Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Massachusetts Women's Hospital 

Needham Hospital 

Palmer Memorial Hospital . 

Roxbury Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

Total 



7,232 

77 

64 

56 

45 

28 

22 

18 

18 

8 

6 

5 

5 

4 

3 

2 



7,606 



68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



List of Vehicles Used hy the Department. 



Divisions. 


Is 

II 


IS 

a c 

s => 


o 
H 


>> 
O 


3 
^ 


Headquarters 


3 


42 


7 


- 


52 


Division 1 


2 


4 


- 




6 


Division 2 


2 


4 


- 


1 


7 


Division 4 


4 


5 


- 


1 


10 


Division 6 


3 


6 


- 


3 


12 


Division 7 


2 


5 


- 


4 


11 


Division 9 


1 


6 


- 


- 


7 


Division 10 


2 


6 


- 


1 


9 


Division 11 


1 


7 


- 


- 


8 


Division 13 


1 


5 


- 


4 


10 


Division 14 


2 


5 


- 


4 


11 


Division 15 . . . 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 16 


1 


6 


- 


4 


11 


Division 17 


1 


5 


- 


4 


10 


Division 18 


1 


5 


- 


- 


6 


Division 19 


1 


7 


- 


3 


11 


Traffic Division 


- 


3 


- 


5 


8 


Unassigned 


3 


- 


- 


3 


6 


Totals 


31 


125 


7 


37 


200 



Hackney Carriages. 

During the year there were 2,222* Ucenses to set-up and use 
hackney carriages granted, being an increase of 363 as com- 
pared with last year. 

There were no horse-drawn carriages Hcensed during the 
year. 

* 607 regrants. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

There were 68 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the Office of Inspector of Carriages, 33 of these 
were restored to the owners and the balance of 35 placed in 
the custody of the Lost Property Bureau. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1936, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as 
has been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for 
in the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as hcenses to drive the same: 



Hackney Carriage "Set-Ups." 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received 

Number of carriages licensed . 

Number of carriage licenses (regrants) . 

Number of carriage applications rejected 

Number of licenses transferred 

Number of licenses canceled . 

Number of carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1936 

Number of carriages inspected 



2,223 

1,615 

607 

1 

6 

744 

1,478 

2,095 



Hackney Carriage Drivers. 
Number of applications for drivers' licenses reported upon . f 3,057 

Number of drivers' licenses granted 2,987 

Number of drivers' applications for licenses rejected . . 7 

Number of drivers' licenses revoked 6 

Number of drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of 

credentials 346 

Miscellaneous. 

Number of complaints against owners, drivers and "set-ups" 

investigated 1,903 

Number of days spent in court 102 

Number of articles left in carriages reported by citizens . . 33 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by drivers . 68 

Limitation of Hackney Carriages. 
Under the provisions of Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, effective 
June 12, 1934, the Police Commissioner was required to fix a 
limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be issued, 

* 137 changed ownership. 

t 63 withdrawn after investigation. 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

which Hmit shall be based upon the number of licenses then 
issued and outstanding but shall not be in excess of 1,525, 
and he may from time to time, after reasonable notice and a hear- 
ing, decrease the number so fixed, but in no event to a number 
less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner on July 20, 
1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses 
limited under the Act referred to, has been issued, the Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities, on petition of such applicant, may 
after a hearing determine that public convenience and neces- 
sity require a higher limit than that fixed by the Police Com- 
missioner or previously established by said Department, and 
shall establish the limit so required, in which case the limit 
set by said Department shall be considered final until changed 
as herein provided. 

Special, Public and P*rivate Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 
Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 
licensee or licensees a designated portion of a public way 
abutting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, or public or 
semi-public building as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 148 applications for such stands ("with a 
total capacity of 419 hackney carriages) were received; 142 
locations for 413 carriages were granted and 6 locations for 
6 carriages were rejected; 1 location for 1 carriage was recon- 
sidered and granted. 

Of these special hackney carriage stand licenses 3 locations 
(capacity, 4 carriages) were subsequently canceled; 139 loca- 
tions (capacity, 409 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 
Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions other than sidewalks, of public ways in Bos- 
ton, to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such 
stands shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles 



i 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

whose owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 872 applications to set up and use hackney 
carriages for such public stands were granted. 

Of these public stand licenses, none was suspended, stripped 
of credentials or revoked. 

Hackney Carriages and Special and Public Stands. 

For the six years operating under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the new rules and regulations relative to hackney car- 
riages and stands estabhshed on February 1, 1931, by the 
Police Commissioner have worked out very well. 

As shown in foregoing figures, at the present time there are 
139 locations for special stands, with a capacity of 409 car- 
riages, as compared with 139 locations, with a capacity of 462 
carriages, during the previous year. 

There are 290 locations for public stands, with a capacity of 
721 cabs, as compared with 285 locations, with a capacity of 
717 cabs, during the preceding year. 

The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present is 
1,478 as compared with 1,441 in the previous year; this number 
being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts of 1934. 

During the year there were approximately 34 taxi stands, 
both special and public, that were established, removed or 
relocated in the interest of public necessity and convenience. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon prop- 
erty) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 13 applications (capacity, 150 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 1931, which 
went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight-seeing automo- 
bile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing Automobile' as used in this act, 
shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one of 
chapter ninety of the General Laws used for the carrying 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 
in or from the city of Boston and in or on which automo- 
bile guide service by the driver or other person is offered 
or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating eight 
or more persons and was used or offered for the transportation 
of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department 
of Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public con- 
venience and necessity require such operation; and further, 
it is provided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate 
said automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is 
licensed so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1936, there have 
been issued licenses for 31 sight-seeing automobiles and 23 
designated stands for the same. 

Continuing with our practice, ''new" sight-seeing automo- 
bile drivers for the year commencing as of March 1, 1936, 
were fingerprinted as in the case of "new" hackney carriage 
drivers, and their records, if any, searched for in the Bureau of 
Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were 25 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year 613 
tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Three hundred and forty-six suspensions ranging from one to 
thirty days, according to the seriousness of the offense, and 
six revocations were made, the remainder being reprimanded 
and warned and a record filed for future reference. This 
system of discipline has continued to result in relieving the 
courts of many minor cases which would tend to congest their 
dockets. Any driver, in accordance with the hackney rules, 
who is dissatisfied with the findings of the Office of Inspector 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 73 

of Carriages may appeal to the Commissioner, and during the 
past year no such appeals have been made. There still con- 
tinues to be a minimum of crime among the 2,987 drivers who 
have been licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

During the past year the Supervisory Force of the Office of 
Inspector of Carriages has been very busy in the Blue Hill 
avenue section of Boston, suppressing the activities of taxicab 
operators who engage in the illegal practice of bringing the 
so-called "loads" to the intown section of the city and many 
prosecutions have been made in the municipal courts of Dor- 
chester and Roxbury, as well as in the Central Municipal 
Court, under Section 1, Chapter 408, Acts of 1931, which reads 
as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any public way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for hire 
in such a manner as to afford a means of transportation 
similar to that afforded by a railway company, by indis- 
criminately receiving and discharging passengers along the 
route on which the vehicle is operated or may be run- 
ning ..." 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum and this procedure will be followed unceasingly 
until such illegal practices have ceased. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 1,694 applications for such licenses were 
received and granted. Of these licenses 6 were subsequently 
canceled for nonpayment of license fee. (See Tables XIV, 
XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was ^^Not at 
a designated stand in the highway.'^ 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was '^For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 1,694 granted, 1,629 were for licenses from offices, 
garages, stables or order boxes, and 65 were for designated 
stands in the highway. 

L16TING Work in Boston. 



Yeah. 



Canvass. 



Year. 



1903* 






181,045 


1920 








235,248 


1904 






193,195 


1921 § 








480,783 


1905 






194,547 


1922 








480,106 


1906 






195,446 


1923 








477,547 


1907 






195,900 


1924 








485,677 


1908 






201,552 


1925 








489,478 


1909 






201,391 


1926 








493,415 


1910 t 






203,603 


1927 








495,767 


1911 






206,825 


1928 








491,277 


1912 






214,178 


1929 








493,250 


1913 






215,388 


1930 








502,101 


1914 






219,364 


1931 








500,986 


1915 






220,883 


1932 








499,758 


1916 t 






- 


1933 








501,175 


1917 






221,207 


1934 








602,936 


1918 






224,012 


1935 11 . 








509,703 


1919 






227,466 







* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

J 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

II 1935 First year of listing as of January 1 instead of April 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year : 

Male 245,804 

Female 268,508 



Total 



514,312 



1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



75 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows : 

Printing police list $40,438 60 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list . . 16,690 00 

Newspaper notices 1,038 50 

Circulars and pamphlets 352 15 

Stationery 118 55 

Interpreters 96 75 

Binders 64 35 

Directories 31 00 

Telephone rental 13 81 

Total $58,843 71 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

January 2 1,200 

January 3 , 1,150 

January 4 885 

January 5 179 

January 6 621 

January 7 191 

January 8 24 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 

The police findings in 1936 may be summarized as follows : 



D ead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Convicted of crime .... 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit . . 



Total 



1,730 

87 

79 

549 

6,564 

9,009 



In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent 
to the Police Department for delivery 6,564 summonses to 
persons for jury service. 



Special Police. 
Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a Department of the City of Boston, or on the application 



76 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen 
for the year commencing as of April 1, 1936, were fingerprinted 
by the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
part of and considered with the application for appointment. 

During the year ending November 30, 1936, there were 
1,202 special police officers appointed; 7 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause, and 82 appointments 
were canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 

From United States Government 49 

From State Departments 4 

From City Departments ' . . . . 50 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations ........ 38 

From other corporations and associations 780 

From theatres and other places of amusement .... 217 

From private institutions 20 

From churches . 43 

Total 1,202 

Railroad Police. 

One person was appointed as a railroad policeman dur- 
ing the year, he being employed by the Boston Terminal 
Company. Four appointments were canceled, all of whom 
were employees of the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 363, Acts of 1936, effective 
September 14, 1936, the Department of Pubhc Utilities took 
over the appointment of Railroad Police Officers. 

Musicians' Licenses. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 22 applications for itinerant 

musicians' licenses received, all of which were granted; 3 

licenses were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment 

of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



77 



with a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, 
that such instruments shall be inspected in April and Sep- 
tember of each year. 

During the year 38 instruments were inspected with the 
following results: 



Kind of Instrument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street piano 

Hand organ 

Accordions 

Clarinets 

Violins 

Banjo . 

Mandolin 


s 

3 


















17 

8 
6 
3 
2 

1 
1 


17 
8 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 


Totals 




















38 


38 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of per- 
sons over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments 
in company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1932 


270 


269 


1 


1933 


226 


226 


- 


1934 


184 


181 


3 


1935 


194 


192 


2 


1936 


204 


204 


- 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



or revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked: 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1932 


3,190 


3,115 


75 


12 


1933 .... 


3,130 


3,010 


120 


2 


1934 .... 


3,173 


3,063 


110 


2 


1935 .... 


3,140 


2,954 


186 


7 


1936 .... 


2,139 


* 2,054 


85 


4 



* 20 "fee" licenses and 4 "no fee" licenses canceled. 

Public LodcxIng Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Pohce Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) and Sections 33 and 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Ter- 
centenary Edition), and the location of each house and the 
number of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

8 Pine Street 




33,986 
62,816 


79 Shawmut Avenue 

1202 Washington Street 


15,704 
29,849 


Total 




142,355 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 22,617. Of these 109 were rejected, 3 filed on 
which no action was taken and 66 withdrawn, leaving a balance 
of 22,439 which were granted. 

Of the granted applications, 41 were canceled for non- 
payment (plus 4 "no fee"), leaving in force a net of 22,394. 

During the year 230 licenses were transferred, 1,004 can- 
celed for various reasons, 14 revoked and 109 applications 
rejected. 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 79 

The officers investigated 2,001 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted to 
),014.75. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1935, there were 321 persons on the roll. 
During the year 23 died; viz., 1 lieutenant, 1 lieutenant- 
inspector, 3 inspectors, 2 sergeants, 14 patrolmen, 1 foreman 
of linemen, and 1 signal man. Twenty-one were added, viz.: 
1 superintendent, 1 deputy-superintendent, 2 captains, 3 lieu- 
tenants, 3 sergeants, 10 patrolmen, and the widow of Patrolman 
James B. Roche, who died from injuries received in the per- 
formance of duty; leaving 319 on the roll at date, 283 pen- 
sioners and 36 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions during the past year 
amounted to $346,079.18 and it is estimated that $358,760 
will be required for pensions in 1937. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 60 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $8,754 during the 
past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions, listing persons twenty years of age 
or more, and the maintenance of the police signal service were 
$5,832,104.15. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during 
the year was $53,035.62. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the 
fees from licenses over which the police have supervision, 
for the sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report 
blanks, etc., was $80,640.57. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(81) 





"3 
o 


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m 
Z 

m 
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Illllli-ITOIOOCDIIIIIIII 


ifi 


1 1 1 1 1 ii-HiNii^'*: 1 irt| 1 1 1 


■V 


1 1 1 1 1 I'-iiNICOOOl 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


i~5 


llllllfHcoit^ioiiiiiiii 




1 1 1 1 1 I'^INIt^OI 1 1^1 1 1 1 


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9- 


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■V 


1 1 1 1 1 l!NC<3l(Nt^l 1 l-^l 1 1 1 

rH CO 


r< 


llllll-^-H-^OOlNllllilll 


- 


lllllll-ICOI-^Tflllrtllll 

^^ CO 


•^M\0 X^jadojj 


IIIIIIIIIINt^ll-^l-*!!! 


•sauipimg 
JO ^uapaaiuuadng 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 00 


•aoiAJag iBuSig 


lllllllllllll-'ll'HrtI 


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JO 3Bnojj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -1 IN 1 1 1 1 


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aoiAJag jBioadg 


IIIII-H|CC|T1HCMIIIIII|| 


•UOBUJ Av.O 


illllli^-ioroiiiillli 


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Illlll-^cat-iiNCMIlilllll 

f-t o 
IN 


•epjooa^j 
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iiiiii"llMoiiiiu:iiii 

(N 


•uoi^BSpsaAuj 
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JO jOBtAjadng 


lllllll-^iNOSCOIillllll 


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s^^uapuaiuuadng 


1 1 1 |.-I-H(MIOIOO«I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•BJeiJBnbp'Bajj 


IN 


1 

"ca 



a 
c 


$8,000 

5,000 

3,000 

3.500 

7,000 

4,500 

4,000 

2,700 

2,700 

2,500 
2,000 to 2,100 

2,100 

2,400 
1,600 to 1,800 
1,000 to 1,200 
1,000 to 3,600 

3,350 

2,100 
1,000 to 1,600 


!5 

o 

H 

o 

P5 
O 

M 






. . . . . . . 1 . 


Commissioner 

Secretary 

Assistant secretary 

Chief clerk 

Superintendent 

Deputy superintendents 

Captains .... 

Lieutenants . 

Lieutenant-inspectors . 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen . 

Biological chemist 

Chauffeurs 

Cleaners .... 

Clerks .... 

Director, signal service 

Assistant director, signal ser 

Elevator operators 



— ooica:toiot^t^-^--^c^t~o)-Hio----'<'-H'j< 


00 
00 
IN 


1 1 1 1 -' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3> 


1 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ra 

1 "= 


1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t^ 

1 * 


1 1 1 C-. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 >o 


1 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 00 

1 ^ 


1 1 1 1 ^4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 00 

1 * 


1 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


2 


1 1 1 1 -< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


S 


1 1 1 1 '^1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•* 


1 1 1 I 'M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 o> 


1 1 1 1 '" 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


M 
■* 


1 1 1 1 M CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


U5 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




^OOIICOIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 


2 




1 I'Oic;— 1 1 1 1 I'-i |rti«rt| 1 1 


1^ 

CO 


iiiii— 't^ii — ii-^iiiliiii 


2 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


o 


1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


g 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


to 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


2 

CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 1 >0 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 


00 
05 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


00 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


§ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 00 1 1 1 1 T)< 


00 


2,700 

2,000 

1,700 

1,600 
1,600 to 1,800 

1,600 

1,900 to 2,000 

400 to 1,800 

1,.500 to 2,100 

1,900 

3,600 

2,100 
1,900 to 2,100 

2,160 

1,700 
1,000 to 3,500 

3,000 

2,500 

2,200 

2,000 
1,600 to 1,800 


' 


Engineers 

Firemen (marine) 

Firemen (stationary) .... 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Linemen 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Painter 

Property clerk 

Repairmen 

Signalmen 

Statisticians 

Steamfitter 

Stenographers 

Superintendent of buildings 
Assistant superintendent of buildings . 
Superintendent of repair shop 

Tailor 

Telephone operators .... 


1 
o 



:s o «3 « 

S S-3S 



» :S = 



S = 



H < 



a 

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r; = " c 

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S O) fc- OQ 

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Q 



84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1936. 


Nov. 30, 
1936. 


Jan. 1, 
1936. 


Nov. 30, 
1936. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Assistant Secretary . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendents . 


4 


4 


4 


3 


Minus 1 


Captains .... 


28 


28 


19 


25 


Plus 6 


Lieutenants 


64 


64 


60 


49 


Minus 11 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


9 


9 


9 


7 


Minus 2 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


183 


179 


Minus 4 


Patrolmen .... 


2,149 


2,149 


1,868 


1,841 


Minus 27 


Patrolwomen 


8 


8 


5 


5 


- 


Totals .... 


2,453 


2,453 


2,152 


2,113 


Minus 39 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



i 



1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



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86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 
List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November 30, 
1936, giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Caswell, David F. 






Incapacitated 


38 Vi2 years 


16 years 


Coughlin, John J. 






Age 


66 V 12 " 


40 Vk 


" 


Garrison, Roland W. . 






Incapacitated 


42 "/i2 " 


7Vi2 


" 


Hazlett, William . 






Age 


66 Vi2 ■' 


35 


" 


Hutchins, Samuel C. . 






Age 


66 8/12 " 


40 »/i2 


« 


Jones, Lewis F.* . 






Incapacitated 


36 Vi2 " 


IOV12 


" 


Kenny, John F. . 






Age 


66 Vi2 " 


40 11/12 


" 


King, Martin H. . 






Age 


60 Vi2 " 


34 V12 


" 


Lyons, John F. 






Age 


67 Vi2 " 


34 V12 


" 


Maguire, Joseph J. 






Age 


66 3/i2 " 


33 V12 


" 


Mason, William J. 






Incapacitated 


43i»/i2 " 


I6V12 


" 


McDevitt, James 






Age 


66 Vi2 " 


40 6/12 


" 


Merchant, Bartholomew 






Age 


65 V 12 " 


37 V12 


" 


Murphy, Dennis L. 






Age 


65 Vi2 " 


39 9/12 


" 


O'Halloran, Richard P.* 






Incapacitated 


42 'A2 " 


12 9/,2 


« 


O'Hara, Robert P.* . 






Incapacitated 


37 3/12 " 


9 »/l2 


" 


Sheehan, Jeremiah B. 






Age 


65 1/12 " 


33Vi2 


" 


Skillings, Perley S. 






Age 


66 Vi2 " 


41 


« 


Sweeney, John J. 






Age 


65 


32 i'/i2 


" 


Towle, Thomas M. 






Age 


66 Vi2 " 


38 V 12 


" 


Trainor, WiUiam J. 






Age 


64 Vi2 " 


32 9/,2 


" 


Wheeler, Frederick N. 






Age 


67 9/12 " 


41 11/13 


■' 


Winn, Edward J. 






Incapacitated 


46 Vi2 " 


16 9/12 


■' 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 

November 30, 1936. 



Date. 


Rank and Name. 


1936. 




April 1 1 


Lieutenant John T. O'Dea to the rank of Captain. 


April 11 


Lieutenant Charles F. Eldridge to the rank of Captain. 


April 1 1 
April 1 1 
April 1 1 


Lieutenant-Inspector Francis P. Haggerty to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant-Inspector John F. McCarthy to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant Thomas G. Duggan to the rank of Captain. 


April 1 1 


Lieutenant Benjamin A. Wall to the rank of Captain. 


April 1 1 


Lieutenant Francis M. Tieman to the rank of Captain. 


April 1 1 


Lieutenant WilUam D. Donovan to the rank of Captain. 


April 1 1 


Lieutenant Francis J. Murphy to the rank of Captain. 


Sept. 18 


Captain Edward W. FaUon to the rank of Superintendent. 



ft 



k 



88 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 





c 

0) 


a 

0) 

13 














Date Appointed. 


T3 

C 

a 

3 


II 

Q 


g 
'3 

o 


03 

a 

V 

3 

3 


3 a 

3 


g 


c 

0) 

s 

"o 

1 


Totals. 


1895 .... 
















1 


1898 . 






- 


- 




1 


- 


1 


2 


5 


1900 . 






- 


1 


4 


5 


1 


4 


2 


17 


1901 . 






— 


- 




1 


- 


3 


2 


7 


1903 . 






- 


1 




1 


1 


7 


4 


15 


1904 . 






- 


- 




6 


1 


3 


3 


14 


1905 . 






- 


- 




1 


1 


3 


3 


9 


1906 . 






- 


- 




1 


- 


3 


- 


5 


1907 . 






- 


- 




2 


- 


3 


4 


10 


1908 . 






- 


- 


3 


2 


1 


8 


3 


17 


1909 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 . 






- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


1 


5 


1911 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1912 . 






- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


1 


3 


9 


1913 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1914 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1915 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1916 . 






- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1919 . 






1 


- 


6 


15 


- 


74 


476 


572 


1920 . 






- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


19 


156 


179 


1921 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


19 


102 


121 


1922 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


60 


69 


1923 . 






- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


10 


91 


102 


1924 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


71 


73 


1925 . 






- 


- 


— 


— 


- 


1 


90 


91 


1926 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


299 


302 


1927 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


118 


118 


1928 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


86 


86 


1929 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


201 


201 


1930 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


42 


42 


1931 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


Totals 


1 


3 


25 


49 


7 


179 


1,846 


2,110 



1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



89 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November 30, 1936, who were Born 

in the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 







^ 
















^ 


S 


















TS 














Date of Birth. 




O 




2 








Totals. 




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m 


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s 


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a 


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3 


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1870 .... 












1 


_ 


1 


1871 . 






— 


- 


1 


2 


— 


- 


1 


4 


1872 . 






- 


- 


1 


4 


1 


2 


6 


14 


1873 . 






- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


10 


1 


16 


1874 . 






- 


1 


2 


1 


3 


4 


3 


14 


1875 . . 






- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


5 


- 


9 


1876 . 






- 


1 


2 


2 


_ 


1 


2 


8 


1877 . 






- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


1 


7 


13 


1878 . 






- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


5 


2 


9 


1879 . 






- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


3 


4 


9 


1880 . 






- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1881 . 






- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


1 


8 


1882 . 






- 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


- 


9 


1883 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


3 


1884 . 






- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


2 


2 


7 


1885 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


17 


18 


1886 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


4 


26 


31 


1887 . 






- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


40 


44 


1888 . 






- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


1 


50 


54 


1889 . 






- 


_ 


- 


2 


- 


6 


70 


78 


1890 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


53 


56 


1891 . 






_ 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


4 


91 


96 


1892 . 






— 


- 


- 


2 


- 


9 


120 


131 


1893 . 






_ 


_ 


1 


4 


— 


20 


127 


152 


1894 . 






— 


_ 


— 


2 


- 


19 


149 


170 


1895 . 






_ 


- 


2 


1 


_ 


15 


147 


165 


1896 . 






- 


- 


1 


3 


_ 


15 


170 


189 


1897 . 






1 


- 


4 


1 


- 


22 


158 


186 


1898 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


147 


157 


1899 . 






_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


4 


100 


104 


1900 . 






_ 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


141 


142 


1901 . 






— 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


100 


101 


1902 . 






_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


47 


47 


1903 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


43 


1904 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


1905 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals 


1 


3 


25 


49 


7 


179 


1,846 


2,110 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1936, 
was 41.90 years. 



90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1937.1 



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1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 

November 30, 1936. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Headquarters 


1,724 


243 


1,967 


Division 1 










7,090 


469 


7,559 


Division 2 












3,481 


208 


3,689 


Division 4 












14,594 


1,700 


16,294 


Division 6 












8,352 


407 


8,759 


Division 7 












4,783 


141 


4,924 


Division 9 












4,454 


355 


4,809 


Division 10 












7,478 


788 


8,266 


Division 11 












3,415 


146 


3,561 


Division 13 












1,681 


67 


1,748 


Division 14 












2,614 


138 


2,752 


Division 15 












4,311 


219 


4,530 


Division 16 












4,136 


495 


4,631 


Division 17 












1,261 


84 


1,345 


Division 18 












815 


36 


851 


Division 19 












1,136 


80 


1,216 


Special Service Squad * 






2,438 


72 


2,510 


Traffic! 






1,584 


353 


1,937 


Totals . 






75,347 


6,001 


81,348 



* Established January 22, 1936. 
t Established May 22, 1936. 



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O O Q 



CO 


1 


1 


^^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CD 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


(M 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1-H 
1 


1 


CO 


(M 


(M 


lO 




CO 


00 


(M 


<M 


CD 






C5 


CO 


IM 


t^ 


1> 






CO 




CD 


■* 




LO 






s 


<M 


CO 






CD 






•<** 




(N 








CO 










■—1 




o 
































■* 
































^^ 


»— 1 


1 


o 


1 


•* 


1 


1 


O 


CO 


1 


•* 


1 


t* 


^_^ 


1 


o 






so 




<N 


















(M 




Tt< 
































CO 


1 


, 


1 


1 


l^ 


1 


1 


•«*< 


CO 


1 


Tf< 


1 


iCi 


^ 


^_^ 


cc 






(N 




(N 








>— 1 










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»o 
































o 


^^ 


^^ 


CO 


1 


O 


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C5 


CO 


1 


1 


00 


to 


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(M 


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■* 












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00 
































lO 


1 


1 


,_l 


,_! 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


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1 


1 


1 


IM 


CO 


1 


(M 
































CO 


1 


1 


W5 


1 


CO 


CD 


1 


(M 


05 


1 


o 


Tt< 


CD 


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(M 


1—4 






05 




00 


<N 




CO 


CO 




IC> 


f— ( 




»o 




»o 






CO 












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o 
































■* 
































o 


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IM 


o 


1 


Q 


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t^ 


CD 


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IM 


lO 


»c 


•<*< 


lO 


CO 






CO 




qo 


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t^ 








IM 


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CO 


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C^ 


"5 


^^ 


CO 


00 


IM 


(M 


CD 


1—1 


^ 


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CO 


C<1 


r-- 


tr 






CO 




CD 


•«*< 




»o 






CD 


IM 


eo 






<© 






Tf 




(M 








CO 










1—1 




o 
































-* 
































t^ 


1 


1 


(N 


1 


eo 


05 


1 


1 


00 


1 


^^ 


, 


^_i 


t^ 


•— < 


05 






CO 




o 


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to 




CD 


y—t 








CO 






IM 




PT 






















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CD 


IM 


<M 


CO 


^ 


o 


O 


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IM 


00 


,_, 


1 


00 


C<1 


»c 


CO 


t^ 






O 




CD 






lO 


»o 








eo 


05 




(N 






(M 












•-H 














oo" 
































CO 




















































1 

a 
































"-< 
























• 








O 




^ 


























a 


.a 

O 




a. 












o 




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o 

1 




















IS 

3 

.2 




a; 

ID 






2 

o 
u 


03 

o 




<v 

03 

3 
O 




a; 

3 

2 




^ 

QJ 


c 


3 
J 

o 


C 


c 
o 

2 

S 

a 

(Z4 


>> 


S 
o 

s 




03 
O 

X 


OQ 

3 

o 
]> 
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03 


« 
EQ 

3 
o 

60 

C2 


a 
12 


i 


a 

to 

o 




c 


a 
o 

CO 

> 


bC 

_s 

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C 
W 


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c 

83 

1— 1 


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a 

03 
1 

l-H 


to 

o 

C 


0) 

c 

C 
1— 1 


T3 

c 

03 

-a 

►-5 


Maintainii 

beciles. 

Night wall 


c 

03 

O 
12; 


Si 
<o 

a 

o 


-a 

3 
c3 

3 

O 


a 

03 



o 






Eh 
W 

Eh 

13 
< 

O 



X 



Eh 

HH 
b^ 

02 

< 

02 

o 



o 



.«■? 


^ I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


(M 


e-e-w 2 
























CO 


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quer 

(Inclu 
in 

Mino 


























.-S "i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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Die- 
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or 
leae 


























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o . 


t^ 


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^^ 




fC 


C) 








CO 






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C<I 


p-^ t- 


























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^ 


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^^ 


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1 


1 


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05 


CO 


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o 


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CO 


is 


























on 


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1 


CO 


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CC 


I> 


11 














cs 








CO 


CO 
























1-H 

co- 


01 


























u 


























C 


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>o 


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1 


CO 


1 


Ci 


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1 


^ 


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co 


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rH 


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<^- 


S* 
























oT 


f^ 




























1 


CO 


1 


1 


T*< 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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O 




















































id 


l>. 


__^ 


<^ 


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t^ 


1 


OO 


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CO 


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^^ 


^ 


II 




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CO 


05 
























"^ 




























S| 
























■<n 


ai 


o 


00 


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^_i 


o 


^_l 


CO 


•^ 


■* 


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CO 


CO 


C 














CO 






CM 


CO 


o 


C OS 
























00 


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03 


























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t^ 


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o 


IM 


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CO 


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TJH 


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o 


p£ 




CO 


c^ 








CO 






C<l 


Ol 


CO 


OS 




















































o 
























(M 


Eh 
























-* 




1 


05 


■* 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


(M 


c^ 


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CO 






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c^ 


0! Q 


a 
























co' 


is 


^ 




















































OS g 

Qj 05 




00 


00 


l> 


(N 


1> 


T— i 


'^ 


CO 


05 


^ 


1— ( 


CO 


00 




(N 










CO 






(M 


05 


o 


« 
























CO 




c3 
























co 




__ 


























c3 


























s- 


























O 












xn 


























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£ 


M 










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c 


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CO 


s 








u 














t^ 


3 








s 












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o 


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p 






• 


s. 












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bC 


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o 
a, 

3 




bC 


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3 


OJ 


"o 








o 


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c 
^ 


s 


1 


c3 


s 


3 


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o 






-fj 


'-+3 








o 


s 


(D 


m 

bC 


be 


72 


a 


3 


cc 


"o 








w 




S 


_C 


|S 


^ 




02 


p 


■> 




m 




K 


02 


'> 


a 


w 


Ifl 




S, 






(X 




t3 


? 




'C 




^ 


+3 

o 


c3 


sT 




g 






^ 


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o 
TJ 


c" 




-o 


o 


_c5 




o3 




2: 




O <U 






02 

s 




S 
>> 


bC 


a 

o3 


O 


-*-5 
m 


CO 

-►J 
o 
H 




"a 


^2 


'■♦3 
O 

S-t 


'-5 

OJ 

2 


3 


o 


a 

o 
o 


'■+3 

!§ 

o 


02 

3 






fl^ 


Ph 


^1 


PL, 


PL( 


Ph 


m 


CQ 


H 


> 


> 







■^ 








o 




a 




H 




« 




o 




\^ 




H 




w 


• 


H 


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« 
s 


;2; 


s 




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Q 


c 


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o 


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P 




hJ 




o 




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l-H 


X 


H 


» 
^ 


O 


n 




< 


02 


IH 






z 




W 




t^ 




Ix 




O 



00 

d 



J 


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^ 


1 


1 


1 1 ^ ^ 1 


1 1 


■* 


00 


1 


i^TS E 






t-H 






1-H 




Deli 
quer 

(Inclu 
in 

Minoi 






























,"2 1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 I 1 


1 1 


1 


1 




i M t^ 2 
















ja 4) 
















" tf 
















o . 


^ 


^ 


CC Cl Tt< 05 CO 


W -H 


Tf 


■* 




il 






«> »o ■* 


^ t^ 


40 


^ 








»o r>. --^ 


c^ 


o 


■* 






























in" 






oi 


1 


1 


05 1 CO IC 1 


00 ■<*< 


(N 


00 




O 

c 






-< (M (M 


(M ^ 


IC 


05 








■— ' 




IM 






§ 
















m 


1 


,_, 


t^ CO -^ o ^ 


O CO 


r^ 


CJ> 




gl 






CO 00 ■* 


o c^ 


-* 


o 








(N (N 










ll 










^ 






V 
















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s 


^ 


1 


O -^ — 00 1 


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to 




t« . 






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g« 
















P^ 
















im- 
ned 
the 
urt. 


^_i 


1 


iCl 1 ^ C<) 1 


o o 


Q 


05 








^ t^ ^ 


r-l IM 


Q 


a> 












f^ 






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1 


^^ 


00 1 00 o ^ 


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I— 1 


CO 




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ja 2 






C<3 ■* 


■* 




00 














■—I 




ti ^ 
















^1 
















o 


1 


1 


CO OS »o r>- (N 


rt 05 


CO 


<M 




c 






(M t^ 05 


CD -^ 


»o 


CO 




a <s 






lO o 






)-H 




O t 
















d 
















^ 


















1 


, 


CO O^ ^ 05 CO 


lO -H 


•* 


Tt< 




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t>. »o •* 


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»o 


■* 




5 






lO t^ ,-H 


(N 


o 


■<* 




e2 










(m" 








s 


1 


1 


lO 1 IC 1 1 


CO 1 


(M 


t^ 






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S 






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CO 






ao Q 










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6^ 


































r-l 


,—1 


■— 1 03 Oi 05 CO 


<N rH 


(M 


t^ 




OO 






CO (M -* 


^ t^ 


IM 


CO 




4> 






»C t^ rt 


(M 


°l 


^^ 














^^ 












<— e*- 1 fc< <*« 


Lh 


13 


o 










o c c o o 


O 


m 










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0) 


O 
X 

O 


0) 










o o no 


CO 


M 






b£ 

-3 
a 


o 


influen 
influen 
igently, 
evocatii 
•evocatii 


ut licen 

istered 


a; 
3 




CO 




ating under 
ense). 

ating under 
offense), 
rating negl 
ic safety, 
ating after r 
icense. 
ating after i 


g bo 


o3 

O 
tc 

60 

a 

'■♦3 


O 




O 

o 


0) 




ating wi 
person, 
ating un 


a 

'■+3 
c3 




tl-i 


-2 


ajSe oj-rt D.-^ 5 OJ 


S fl S 


O 






t3 


.*J* 




e- ° e< fi o 3 a's !=- 

O+jOo 0,00 
_C0 ^cj ^.. ^fi ., 

^ iC -S S -3J fl -S 2 -S 


. a o &, 


. a 






C 

s 


tion, 
le, 
tion 
le, o 


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0) 

72 




3"";s^:s'c3 c^ 


g:3 g3 


3 


■^IS 








o^o'iiOS^^oSo 


+i o +3 o 


O 


ipeed 
tomo 
o do. 






^ 


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a§s§s^aas 


•egis 
torn 
■egis 
torn 


s 






> 


1 


3'- 3— ' 3^ s '^ ;3 


O 






T! 


M 3 -, ^ 


3 


3 








<J 


-5 


< «< <tj <!5 <3 


^ <: 


<: 


<: 1 



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O 



X 



O 



o 
•z 

o 
w 
o 

X 



Q 

Q 

o 

H 
O 

w 

o 



00 

d 



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a 


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fe 


m 


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o 



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rt C^ IC -H 



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S3 ir; ca p ^ra tH 



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c g w o c o 

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1 


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1 


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1 


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1 


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1 


1 


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1 


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1 


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CO 


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CO 


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o 
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c^ 






CO 


1— 1 




<M 






CO 


1 


(N 




■"^ 


00 


'"' 


1 


o 


1 


1 


ca 
1—1 


1— 1 


CO 


CO 


1 


(M 


g 


Tt< 


o 


t- 

•* 
N 


1 


CD 


1 


1 


<M 


•* 


(N 


o 


■* 


c^ 


00 


^^ 


-* 




t^ 


00 


O 


1 


IM 

00 


1 


1 


CO 

CO 


■"^ 


(M 


^ 


'"* 


1 


(M 


1 


»o 


00 


CO 


o 


lO 


1 


t^ 


1 


1 


(M 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


^_l 


<N 




^H 


00 






























1 


1 


^ 


1 


V^ 


1 


1 


IC 


,_! 


CO 


o 


1 


CO 


05 


1 


00 


lO 










t- 






kO 




























^ 


























lO 


CO 


o 


IM 


o 


^ 


^ 


(N 


00 


1 


^ 


o 


(M 


^_l 


^^ 


•^ 


o 






•* 










t^ 










t-H 






CD 


































CO 


00 


Ol 


CD 


(N 


(M 


^ 


^ 


o 


o 


Tt< 


(N 


o 


00 


o 


^_l 


CO 


t^ 






CD 
CO 




CO 






(M 






CO 






(N 






CO 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


»o 


UO 


1 


■* 


1 


CO 


§ 


00 


Oi 


o 


(M 


CD 


,^ 


,_, 


00 


05 


TfH 


r^ 


lO 


00 


CD 


^_l 


o 


t^ 






CO 
CO 




00 






1-H 






»r3 






1— 1 






CO 

CO 








'o 


• 


g 














X! 






a> 




" 






W) 




a 














-»^ 






3 










c 




« 














^ 






o 


































03 








-c 
























?^ 


fi 




. 


o 


u 

o 


03 

J 


-4-3 

3 
o 




o 






33 

CI 

o 
■-13 


'o 


bC 

a 

s 

a 






o 

•4-3 

a 


.2 
'-3 

C! 


t»- 




o 


a 


pr 


-o 


03 






-o 


fi 


d 




a 


f= 


^ 


o 

a 
_o 
'■»3 


o 
o 




bC 




bO 
c3 


xn 


o 


Si 

o 


^ 


o 
« 

O 


o 
■-S 

03 


B 




03 

03 
O 


03 


o 

ill 
o 


0! 






a 




;^ 


<u 


a 

CO 




o 


-kJ 


"B 




O 




O 

i 


3 
■> 


-a 

-1-3 


3 
o 


c 


o 
1 


s 

JO 


bC 

s 


o 


'-G 


3 

CO 

03 


03 

>> 

03 

"cS 

c 


a 

03 

« 

xn 


.1 


0) 

3 
o 

03 


'o 
"> 

a 
o 




o 

J2 


o 






o 
O 

o 


o 

o 


o 




fcT 




_3 
*i7 


<0 


C 
o 

03 




o 

03 


-i-3 
03 

a 



. ~ CO ra u u i_i h^ ,'•" ^*-i ^-i 



pL, Ph 



Oh P^ 



Si 

O 






o 



o 

o 

o 

w 

X 



X 



o 



00 

d 






3 « °^ 



3 '2 



:^^ 






1-H (N ^ 



00 CO 



--^ ^ I 



(N »0 C5 lO 






a; Q 

is 

f^_5 



rt CO 



I o 



rt (M ,-H 



T-H 05 »0 ^ 



^ r- ^ CO 



;S I I I 



.- 5 c 



H S 



o fi 



PQ 



. Si 






c 
o 
O 



o 
O 



o *^ . a ^ = 



rt 



u W ^ 



3 « 3 



2 o 

o e 



Pi 



Ph 



■"'.2 .2 .2'*-' >> 

O *-+2 ^ *^ fi '-^ O c3 

o "3 '-^ 3 '-3 3 c =2 

^ |C^ M^ M-^ c 
p:? Ph Pi P5 



3 



I 



OS 


1 


f-H 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


■n< 




1 


9S 


<N 






















l-H 






00 

(N 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


00 














QO 
















■* 














CO 
















1^ 














M3 


• 














10 


»CI 


1-4 


CO 


CO 


10 


,_, 


1 


-* 


CD 


I— ( 


IN 


rfH 




CO 


-* 


CO 






























t 


»c 


1 


^^ 


CO 


CC 


;o 


CD 


1 


CD 


1 


1 


TfH 




^ 


^ 


CO 




























CO 


1> 


1 


" 


1 


(M 


(N 


CD 

co_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




' 


(N 
(N 

CD 

0' 


1 


1 


'"' 


1 


t^ 


CO 


CO 

5 


1 


1 


^^ 


<M 


1 




1 





05 


^ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 





1 


■<1< 





1 


(M 


Tf 




1 


^ 


<N 








00 


10 


















CD 


CD 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


CO 
00 
CD 
"3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




(N 


CD 
00" 


1 


1 


1 


1 


00 


(N 


1 


1 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 




" 


CO 


Id 


^ 


fO 


CO 


10 


1 


CO 


■"ti 


CD 


^ 


(N 


rt< 




CO 


(M 


CO 











CD 


00 
CD__ 
















10 
CD 
00' 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


CO 





I— 1 


'"' 


i> 


'"' 


1 


' 




(M 


CO 

(N~ 


lO 


^^ 


CO 


1 


(N 


10 





CO 





1 


IM 


^ 




, 


Oi 


CO 








O! 


U3 


05 
«0 


















CD 

co" 

(N 








^ 
















1 












































o 

















c! 














o 














3 


l-< 








;-< 






3 

CO 












°o 


+3 


3 
C 








o 


>, 




a 



CO 

3 










3 



"o 


CO 








^ 


c 


Ml 

a 


oT 










03 


> 


bD 












3 




CO 












^ 



to 

CO 








Si 


M 




















03 










£3 


02 

o 


I2 


CO 




C 







C 








CO 










CO 


CI 


>J 


0, 


C 


-►J 




+= 




fen 


to 
















c3 






03 












1— ( 




o 


2 


3 


a 


-k-i 


c 


C 




fe 


« 

?= 




2 




cc 


O 


& 


>> 

03 


c3 


> 

03 




CO 

3 

_o 
'3 


> 

o3 




CO 

03 


-3 
3 
o3 


o3 
3 




o3 

s 


JO 


a 


o3 


03 


s 


o3 
Si 


o3 


-ki 




'S 


CO 

-3 




■3 






H 
I 


03 


1 






02 


-0 
C 
3 


CO 

3 




o3 

3 




p 


3 



'ts 



s 


^ 


^ 


o 


?^ 




o 


H 


O 




1 


U 


1 


H 




<1 




U 


M 


M 




tf 


< 




H 





1 (O 0) 


^ 


r^ 


O IM CO 


r>. 


»o 


IM 


00 


■* 


c-e-TS E 


t^ 


lo 00 >o 




o 


CO 


00 


00 


Deli 
quen 

(Inclu 
in 

Mino: 




lO t^ ^ 








IM 


05_ 


"S "B 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


o 


00 


00 


1 ^ Si 










•Tl 


TtH 


00 












t^ 


00_ 




. 








id" 


id" 


" tf 
















U 
















*H_: 


CO 


OS t^ r^ 


00 


<M 


o 


"* 


O 


.^"^ 


rH 


i^ »o ^ 


to 


00 


IM 


o 


CO 


n 


^_ 


— 1 r^ T}H 




00 


t^ 


05 


Tt^ 


S^ 
















CO 


.-H CO 






IM 


(M 


lO 










TfH 


(M 


r^ 


»• 


o 


lO (N 00 


t^ 


o 


CD 


^ 


lO 


o 


o 


-H 00 Oi 




00 




CO 


CO 


c 


CO 


00 CO '-I 




T-H 


o 


Tt< 


05 


















§ 




'^ 








Mh" 


r-T 


o 


a> 


(M (N »0 


'^^ 


^ 


t^ 


IM 


lO 


11 




r^ CO ■* 


l> 




CO 


(M 


1— 1 


lO 


t>. 




'"' 




CO 


CO 

00- 


S 














1— 1 


;- 
















C 


o 


(M CD 00 


.^ 


o 


CO 


Oi 


lO 


.5faD 


05 


(N C5 ■<»< 


(M 


TJH 


IM 


o 


lO 




to 


CO 




(M 


(M 




t^ 


^ 










oi" 


(M" 


(M" 


, 13 c ^ 


o 


lO ^ C5 


CO 


C<« 


CD 


CO 


00 


s s^s 


05 


^ o -^ 




CO 


CO 


CD 


CO 


3§tg 


Tj< 


IM -* rt 




IM 






CO*" 


1 

o S 


lO 


(N r^ o 


o 


1 


, 


IM 


00 


o 


m Oi lO 




lO 


Oi 


05 


Oi 


^ 2 


CO 


r-l 00 




CO 


05_ 


CD 


■>*< 


















l| 










1-H 


oo" 


(M* 










'Tt^ 




IC 


i 


(M 


(M O 00 


»o 


o 


CO 


•<*< 


(M 


^ 


05 


rt lO — ( 


CO 


Oi 


^ 


05 


<— 1 


C 03 


lO 


00 Tfi^ IM 




IM 


GO 


co_ 


I> 


O S 


(n" 


IM 








lO 


IM*" 


^ 














'"^ 


(0 


CO 


05 t^ t^ 


00 


(N 


o 


(N 


00 


"cfi 


-^ 


r- kO »-< 


lO 


00 


CD 


»c 


■* 


■*^ 


-*__ 


^_ r- •># 




00 


00 


CD 


CO 


o 
















H 


CO 


i-T CO 






(N 


00 


^H 










■* 


IM 


00 




1 


C<l 


»o --H »o 


, 


r^ 


I^ 


CO 


1 






TfH 


lO (M 


(M 


lO 


lO 


Tfl 


o 




g 


c^ 


CO 






c^ 


o 


o 


















0} fi 













CO 


<M 


CO 


















K IS 


















a K 




T-H 


Ttl O Ol 


t^ 


UO 


CO 


OS 


l> 


(S « 


i 


o 


t^ O 05 


CO 


(M 


o 




Tt< 


<; 




<M 


^ •* CO 




00 


CD 


cO 


CO 




03 


















§ 


CO 


"h" C0~ 






oT 


CO 


id" 












CO 


(M 


t^ 






a s » 






i 


k 








o o c 


-♦^ 


J 




.2 








o o ." 


-ti 




CO 


tt-H 






c 


>> >>« ?r 




CO 


g 


o 




H 


^ . g G C3 


"3 

Ml 


S 


13 


'*^ 




:2; 






1/3 


_0 




-o 




O 

O 

w 
Pi 




^ 


o 


CO 


ID 
73 




CO 

c 

c3 


, 2 , -k^ c 

CC > M SsS- 

=3 & C3 ^ ^ 


o 


CO 








M 


r/5 "^ rn "O 3 




Si CO 


CO 
CO 


li^ 






5C 


|s|s| 
o o S 




sg 






03 


o 


fe 


o 


o 


O 


Is 
















-U 
















o 




'-H* 


(M' CO -"^ 


id 


to 


l> 


00 


H 




d 


d d d 


d 


d 


d 


d 








Z 


:^ z ^ 


Z 


^ 


;z; 


;z; 





1937.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



X 











■* 


1 


h. 


_< 


.^ 


lO 


•* 


..H 


CO 








E^ 














t^ 


CO 


N 






























Ho 


























C 




^H 






.— < 


Q 




00 










t^ 




lO 






CO 






lO 






O 


s 














IN 


CO 


co_ 
eo 








■* 


1 


lO 


1 


1 


■"J" 


00 


o 


rH 








Ex 














— 


•* 


o 






us =o 


























TO 


rx 


>o 


to 






.M 


(N 


•ra 










00 




■* 






CO 






in 






•o 


S 














■* 


CO 


05 






§ 














N 




IN 








f-H 


1 


r^ 


.~( 


<N 


r^ 


C^ 


o 


O 






0) 

•T3 

e Em 


^ 






(N 








CO 


t>. 


in 

eo 






05 


CO 


on 


to 




IN 


O! 


.^ 


in 










t^ 




(O 






in 


CO 


N 


r- 






•O 


§ 














■o< 


X 


m 






§ 














CO 




■<i< 








CO 


1 


o 


1—1 


on 


C5 


t- 


t— 1 


(N 






V 


b:< 






CO 








to 




•>»• 




















-^ 








in §e 


























^H 


o 


o 


CO 


t~ 


1^ 


lO 


« 


-M 










(O 






IN 


o) 


to 


r~ 


00 








■o 


S 


IN 












00 


IN 


t^ 




















Tjl 


-H 


to 




ffi 






























CO 


1 


n 


■* 


•* 


.— « 


OJ 


":> 


00 




kl 


o 

2 §2 


li. 


« 




n 








o 


o 


o 




in) 














■* 


(N 


to 






o 


c^ 


on 


•<»< 


■<>| 


N 


a> 


<» 


^H 




-a 
s 








c^ 


CO 






to 


o 


O 


in 


-v" 




s 


C«5 




Ol 








00 


IN 


oo" 


■w 


c 
























1 






t- 


1— t 


on 


to 


to 


to 


1— 1 


on 


CSl 


B 


01 

-0 


1^ 


M 




•* 








"5 


<N 


§ 






^H 


o 




O 


_( 








in 


"=lj 


<K 




t^ 


■* 


C) 


M 


CO 


r^ 


re 


O! 


in 


iK 


•v 


^_ 


■* 




CO 








00 




in 


CO 




c 

c3 


r^ 














to 


CO 


.^ 


K 


P^ 




















■^ 


o 






■* 


r~i 


t^ 


(N 


1 


t^ 


.^ 


03 


^H 






©gm 


f^ 














to 




in 




1 














■»J< 


CO 


o 


^A. 




o 


(D 


C5 


h- 


to 




00 


1^ 


t^ 








«o 


CO 


t^ 






on 


on 


00 


to 


^ 
J 


1 




s 


•* 




CO 








"5 


00 

co" 


o 






t^ 


1 


CO 


<N 


^H 


■* 


r^ 


00 


Ol 












to 














^J 




u 


^ 














■>»| 


CO 


o 






us 5© 
























^H 


^H 


to 






^H 




J-t 


to 


rs 


T5 




» 




o 


lO 




C-1 


to 


c<> 


■»< 






s 


o 












lO 


o 




<» 


t 


ej 
















"5 


o 




§ 




























X 


.—1 


on 


CO 


1 


•* 


.n 


•* 


CO 






o 

-Eus 


fe 


M 




CO 








>.o 




in 




1 














CO 


CI 


to 






N 


CO 


,-H 


CO 


o 


o 


on 


t^ 


CO 








■* 


CO 


o 


T»l 






to 


■<J< 


CD 




O 


c 

03 


§ 


■<»< 




tC 








to_ 

IN 


to 


oo" 








CO 


,—1 


,-4 


CO 


1 




S 


to 


00 






o 
•a 


fe 






C^ 








•<(< 


to 
































to 


■»• 


OS 


C) 


o 


lO 


O 


OS 


in 










CO 


t^ 


•>1< 






to 




OJ 








§ 


(N 


C-) 


LO 








■0< 


■* 


o 






c 

03 
















CO 


in 








lO 


1 




a 




1 


CO 


o 








© StN 


(>• 






IN 










N 


to 






05 


t» 


•* 


to 


t^ 


CO 


lO 


to 


t^ 










to 


IN 


IN 


CO 




to 


■>»< 


to 


CO 






T3 

C 
08 


s 




lO 


r- 










to 


IN 

of 








1 


,_l 


c^ 


1 




1 


1 


,.H 


T)t 






SI 


Pc< 
















CO 


CO 






s© 

55 — 


























M 


IM 


o) 


uO 


1 


c^ 


^H 


a 


■<)' 






t3 


§ 




O 


CO 


" 










CO 


























"3 










-^ 


IN 


CO 


•>1< 


o 


to 


t^ 


00 


o 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


H 










Z. 


Z 


•z 


;z; 


Z 


•z 


z 


z 





114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



X 

pq 
< 



Co" 






e 
^ 



o 





»0 


J3 


CO 


o 


lO 


CO 




TJH 


CO 


05 


IC 


00 


^ 




•* 


,_, 


00 


CO 


o 


(N 


•paiuBg saaj 


lO 


T— 1 


to 




Ol 


05 


sssu^'AV JO lunouiy 


C^ 


'^^ 


t^ 


»o_ 


o 


t> 




i>r 


■—1 


o" 


"—I 


eo" 


im' 




s^ 










m 




^_l 


o 


00 


CO 


Q 


05 




IC 


r- 


CO 


O) 


CO 


o 


r-^ 


05_ 


•* 


oo_ 


c» 


T)H_ 


.sjCbq jo jaqran^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 

CO 




^ 




2 


CO 


CO 


r^ 


05 


*; 




^-v.^ 


00 




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1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



117 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 
November 30, 1936. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Kennels. 


Total. 


1 


104 


24 


8 


1 


137 


2 


139 


23 


30 


1 


193 


4 


1370 


96 


44 


* 1 


511 


6 


667 


99 


68 


- 


834 


7 


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40 


- 


1,119 


9 


603 


89 


84 


2 


778 


10 


488 


73 


59 


- 


620 


11 


1,250 


99 


217 


- 


1,566 


13 


t617 


61 


120 




799 


14 


815 


106 


156 




1,078 


15 


268 


39 


13 




321 


16 


t550 


122 


137 




810 


17 


1,121 


108 


331 




1,561 


18 


630 


56 


119 




806 


19 


1468 


46 


71 




586 


Totals 


8,971 


1,239 


1,497 


12 


11,719 



t 9 removals at S 
and Division 19, 3. 



1.25 each. 



* No fee. 
Division 4, 2; Division 7, 1; Division 13, 2; Division 16, 1; 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 

Police Divisions. 



Division 1 . . . . 293 


Divi.sion 14 


30 


Division 2 . 






552 


Division 15 


8 


Division 4 . 






312 


Division 16 


34 


Division 6 . 






181 


Division 17 


39 


Division 7 . 






20 


Division 18 


31 


Division 9 . 






65 


Division 19 


37 


Division 10 






16 








Division 11 






25 


Total . 


. * 1,694 


Division 13 






51 







* 6 canceled for nonpayment. 



118 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1936. 





Expenditures. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


$4,842,021 90 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


8,511 39 


$4,850,533 29 






B. Contractual Services: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$1,816 60 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


2,042 68 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


16,520 72 




5. 


Express charges 


250 96 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


44,598 24 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


853 77 




12. 


Bond and insurance premi 


_ 






ums .... 


331 43 




13. 


Communication 


33,098 91 




14. 


Motor vehicles, repair anc 


i 






care .... 


18,674 52 




16. 


Care of animals 


3,085 50 




18. 


Cleaning .... 


1,745 56 




22. 


Medical .... 


12,005 31 




28. 


Expert .... 


854 00 




29. 


Stenographic and copying 


12 50 




30. 


Listing .... 


58,843 71 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc. 


1,346 21 




39. 


General repairs 


44,287 76 


240,368 38 


C. Equipment: 






3. 


Electrical 


$3,426 50 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


80,685 37 




6. 


Stable .... 


1,684 50 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings 


5,321 42 




9. 


Office .... 


13,293 51 




10. 


Library .... 


679 05 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


128 50 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


5,477 18 




14. 


Live stock 


1,325 00 




15. 


Tires, tubes and accessories 


7,497 23 




16. 


Wearing apparel 


68,026 40 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


14,673 83 


202,217 49 


D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office .... 


$39,794 34 




2. 


Food and ice . 


9,440 94 




3. 


Fuel 


21,849 66 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,912 97 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


575 19 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


6,643 95 




11. 


Gasoline, oil and grease 


48,309 29 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants 


1,533 53 




16. 


Miscellaneous supplies . 


17,733 50 


149,793 37 


E. Materials: 






1. 


Building .... 


$2,148 98 




10. 


Electrical 


16,793 66 




13. 


Miscellaneous materials 


7,998 85 






Carried forward 




26,941 49 




$5,469,854 02 



1937.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 119 

Brought forward $5,469,854 02 

r. Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities 346,079 18 

H. Emergency Relief Project materials .... 16,170 95 

Total $5,832,104 15 

Receipts. 
Por all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . $42,599 50 
For dog licenses (credited to school department) . . 27,415 25 
Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,126 57 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, report blanks, use of police property, etc. . . 2,136 00 

Refunds and reimbursements 5,972 54 

Miscellaneous refunds 158 74 

For damage to police property 66 26 

Total $79,474 86 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 

to police property 1,165 71 

Grand total $80,640 57 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1936. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 
Pavement and sidewalk surface restoration 

Underground construction 

Chair cushions, hose, etc. 

Total 



$38,110 98 

13,048 01 

1,811 49 

52 58 


12 


56 


$53,035 62 



120 



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1937.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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r^ 


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IN 




CD 














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1937. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



123 





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>> 


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k. 


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03 


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^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 





INDEX. 



A. PAGE 

Accidents 62, 120, 121 

caused by automobile 120, 121 

number of, reported 62 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares, 120,121 

Adjustment of claims 63 

Ambulance service 66 

Arrests 14, 15, 16, 20, 30, 93, 94-113, 114 

age and sex of 113 

comparative statement of 114 

for drunkenness 14, 21, 63, 103 

foreigners 21, 94-112 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. . . .21, 102, 112 

increase in number of 21 

minors 21, 94-112 

nativity of 15 

nonresidents 16, 21, 94-112 

number of, by divisions 93 

number of, punished by fine 15 

on warrants 21, 94-112 

summoned by court 21, 94-113 

total number of 20,112 

violation of city ordinances 21, 107 

without warrants . . 21, 94-112 

Auctioneers 115 

Automobiles 9, 13, 22, 25, 66, 68, 120, 121 

accidents due to 120, 121 

deaths caused by- 25,120,121 

operating under influence of liquor 14, 105 

police 9, 66 

pubUc . 68, 115 

safety educational 43 

sight-seeing 71, 115 

stolen 14, 23, 98 

used 22, 24, 115 

B. 

Ballistic unit 51 

formation and duties 51 

accomplishments 52 

Benefits -and pensions . 79 

Biological chemist 26 

(125) 



126 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Buildings 62 

dangerous, reported 62 

found open and made secure 62 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 22-26 

automobile division 22 

biological chemist 26 

homicide squad • 25 

lost and stolen property division 24 

Bureau of Operations 47-51 

illuminated car control and radio panel 48 

illuminated map, etc 49 

two-way radio 51 

Bureau of Records 9, 30-39 

criminal indentification 30, 32, 35 

missing persons 38 

warrant file 39 

Bureau of Traffic abolished 41 

c. 

Carriages, public 68, 115 

articles left in 69 

number licensed . 69, 115 

stands for 70 

Cases investigated 30, 62 

Children 15, 62 

abandoned, cared for 62 

lost, restored 15, 62 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 21, 107 

Civil Service Rule amendments 8 

Claims, adjustment of 63 

Collective musicians 76, 115 

Commitments 15, 63 

Communications system 12, 47 

Complaints 11, 78, 91, 116 

against miscellaneous licenses 78, 116 

against police officers 11, 91 

Courts 21, 30, 44, 94-112, 114 

fines imposed by 21, 114 

number of days' attendance at, by officers . . . 21, 30, 114 

number of persons summoned by 21, 94-112 

Criminal identification 35 

Criminal work 114 

comparative statement of 114 

D. 

Dangerous weapons 77 

Dead bodies 62, 65 

recovered 62, 65 



p. D. 49. 127 

PAGE 

Deaths 20, 25, 26, 85, 120, 121 

by accident, suicide, etc 25, 120, 121 

of police officers 20, 85 

Distribution of force 20, 82 

Disturbances suppressed 62 

Dogs 116, 117, 119 

amount received for licenses for 115,119 

number licensed 117 

Drivers 69, 71, 115 

hackney carriage 69, 115 

sight-seeing automobile 71, 115 

Drowning, persons rescued from 62, 65 

Drunkenness 14, 21, 63, 103 

arrests for, per day 21 

foreigners arrested for 21, 103 

increase in number of arrests for 21 

nonresidents arrested for 21, 103 

total number of arrests for 14, 21, 103 

women committed for 63 

E. 

Employees of the Department ' . . 19, 82 

Events, special 56 

Expenditures 18, 79, 118 

Extra duties performed by officers 30, 62 

F. • 

Financial 18, 79, 115, 118, 119 

expenditures 18, 79, 118 

pensions 79, 118 

receipts . 18,79,115,119 

miscellaneous license fees 79, 116, 119 

signal service 79, 119 

Fines 15, 21, 114 

amount of 15, 21, 114 

average amount of 15, 21, 114 

number punished by 15 

Finger print 34, 36 

Fire alarms 62, 65 

defective, reported 62 

number given 62 

Fires 62, 65 

extinguished 62, 65 

on waterfront attended 65 

Floods in March, 1936 9 

Foreigners, number arrested 21, 94r-112 

Fugitives from justice 30, 108 

G. 

Gaming, illegal . 108 



128 P. D. 49. 

■tl' PAGE 

Hackney carriage drivers 69, 115 

Hackney carriages 68, 115 

Hand carts 115 

Harbor Master appointed 11 

Harbor service 8, 64 

Homicide squad 25 

Horses 65 

House of detention 63 

House of ill fame, keeping 63, 103 

Hydrants, defective reported 62 

I. 

Imprisonment 15, 30, 114 

persons sentenced to 15 

total years of 15, 114 

Income 18, 79, 116, 119 

Information from Police Journals, requests for .... 39 

Inquests held 25 

Insane persons taken in charge 62 

Intoxicated persons assisted 62 

Itinerant musicians 76, 115 

J. 

Junk collectors 115 

Junk shop keepers 115 

Jury lists, police work on » 75 

L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 62 

Licenses, miscellaneous 78, 115 

Line-up of prisoners 44 

Listing, police 18,74,118,122,123 

expenses of 18, 75, 118 

number listed 74, 122, 123 

number of policemen employed in 75 

Lodgers at station houses 15 

Lodging houses, public 78, 115 

applications for licenses ......... 78 

authority to license 78 

location of 78 

number of persons lodged in 78 

Lost and stolen property division 24 

Lost children 15, 62 

M. 

Maintenance shop 9, 13 

Medals 10 

Department 10 

Walter Scott 10 



p. D. 49. 



129 



PAGE 

Minors, number arrested . .• 21,94-113 

Miscellaneous business 62 

Miscellaneous licenses 78, 115 

amount of fees collected for 78,116 

complaints investigated 78, 116 

number canceled and revoked 78, 116 

number issued 78, 116 

number transferred 78, 116 

Missing persons 38 

age and sex of 38 

number found 38 

number reported 38 

Musicians . 76, 115 

collective 77, 115 

itinerant . 76, 115 

N. 

Nativity of persons arrested . . ^ 15 

Nonresident offenders 16, 21, 94-112 



0. 

Offenses 

against chastity, morality, etc. 
against license laws 
against liquor law . 
against the person . 
against property, malicious 
against property, with violence 
against property, without violence 
forgery and against currency 
miscellaneous .... 
recapitulation .... 

Organization and administration 



14, 16, 17, 20, 94^112 
. 21, 102, 112 
. 20, 100, 112 
. 14, 101 
14, 20, 94, 112 
. 20, 99, 112 
14, 20, 96, 112 
14, 20, 97, 112 
. 20, 99, 112 
14, 21, 105, 112 
112 
11 



P. 

Parks, public 120, 121 

accidents reported in 120, 121 

Pawnbrokers 24, 115 

Pensions and benefits 79, 119 

estimates for pensions 79 

number of persons on rolls 79 

payments on account of 79, 119 

Personnel 10, 82 

Photographic, etc. 31, 33, 36 

Plant and equipment 13 

Police, special 75 

Police charitable fund 79 



130 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Police department .... 10, 19, 20, 41, 56, 65, 82, 84-91, 114 

authorized and actual strength of 84 

commended 10 

distribution of 20, 82 

horses in use in 65 

how constituted 19 

officers absent sick 90 

arrests by 20, 93, 114 

average age of 89 

complaints against 11, 91 

date appointed 88 

detailed, special events 56 

died 20, 85 

injured 11, 20 

nativity of 89 

pensioned 20 

promoted 10, 20, 87 

replacements omitted for six years 7 

resigned 20 

reinstated 20 

retired 10, 20, 86 

school 41 

vehicles in use in 68 

work of 20 

Police listing 18, 74, 118, 122, 123 

Police signal service 12,19,63,79,119 

miscellaneous work 63 

payments on account of 79, 119 

property of 64 

signal boxes . ■. 63 

Prisoners, nativitj'' of 15 

Promotion of police 87 

Property 13,15,24,30,114,116,119 

lost, abandoned and stolen 13, 24, 116, 119 

recovered 30, 114 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc. . . . . . 116, 119 

stolen 15, 114 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 15 

Public carriages 68, 115 

Public lodging houses 78, 115 

R. 

Radio installation . . . - . . . . . . • • 51 

Railroad police 76 

Receipts 18, 79, 115, 119 

Requests for information from Police Journals 39 

Revolvers 77, 115 

licenses to carry 77, 115 



p. D. 49. 



131 



s. 

Safety educational automobile 

Salaries 

School, police 

Second-hand articles 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 

Sergeant Ballistician 

Sergeant-Supervisor of Automotive Equipment 

Sewers, defective, reported . 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Sickness, absence on account of 

Sight-seeing automobiles 

Signal service, police 

Special events . 

Special police . 

Special service squad 

Station houses 

condition of 

lodgers at 

witnesses detained at 
Stolen property 

recovered . 

value of . . . 
Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters 
Streets .... 

accidents, reported in 

defective, reported. 

obstructions removed 
Supervisor of Cases unit 

line-up of prisoners 

court supervision 



12, 19, 63 



PAGE 

43 

82 

41 

115 

22, 115 

52 

12, 13 

62 

15, 62, 65 

90 

71, 115 

, 79, 119 

56 

75 

11, 55 

9 

9 

15 

15 

15, 24, 114 

15, 30, 114 

15, 30, 114 

115 

62, 120, 121 

120, 121 

62 

62 

44 

44 

45 



T. 

Teams 62 

stray, put up 62 

Theatrical agency 115 

Traffic Division 11, 41-44 

established 11, 41 

work of 42 

safety educational automobile 43 

tagging 43 

u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 16 

Used cars 22, 115 

licensed dealers 22, 115 

purchases and sales reported 24 



132 P. D. 49. 



V . PAGE ' 

Vehicles 66, 68 

ambulances, combination 66 

automobiles 66, 68 

in use in police department 68 

public carriages 68 

wagons 73, 116, 117 

Vessels 65 

w. 

Wagons 73, 116, 117 

number licensed by divisions 117 

total number licensed 73, 116, 117 

Warrant file 39 

Water pipes, defective, reported 62 

Water running to waste, reported 62 

Weapons, dangerous 77 

Witnesses 15, 21, 62, 114 

fees earned by officers as 15, 21, 114 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 15, 114 

number of, detained at station houses 15, 62 

Women committed to House of Detention 63 



CITY OP BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT