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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOl^^ 
PUBLIC 
UBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

®l)e CommontDealtf) of iWasis^acfjusietts 



THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1938 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

Letter to Governor 7 

Introductory 7 

Boston Junior Police Corps 20 

Crime Prevention Bureau 24 

Obscene literature 25 

Narcotics 26 

The Department 28 

Police force 28 

Signal service 28 

Employees of the Department 28 

Recapitulation 29 

Distribution and changes 29 

Police officers injured while on duty 29 

Work of the Department 30 

Arrests 30 

Drunkenness 30 

Nativity of persons arrested . . 32 

Uniform crime record reporting . . . . . . .33 

Receipts 35 

Expenditures 35 

Organization 35 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 36 

Sex Crime Squad 37 

Automobile division 37 

Lost and stolen property division . . . . . . .39 

Homicide Squad . 40 

Biological chemist 41 

General 44 

Bureau of Records 44 

Establishment, purpose and equipment 44 

Multilith 46 

Output of daily manifolds, etc. . . . . . . . 46 

Circulars drafted containing photographs and fingerprints of 

fugitives 46 

Photographic division . . . 47 

Record files of assignments 47 

Identification division .48 

Main index file .48 

Criminal record file 48 

Cabinets of segregated photographs of criminals . . . .48 

Ultra-violet lamp, etc 49 

Pantoscopic camera . . .50 

Single-fingerprint files, etc . . . 51 

Civilian fingerprint file 52 

Displacement of Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classifica- 
tion 52 



4 CONTENTS. 

Page 

Bureau of Records — Concluded: 

Criminal identification 53 

Miscellaneous department photography 54 

Requests for information from Police Journals .... 55 

Services of a draftsman from the personnel 55 

Criminal records for the Department furnished by the Bureau, 55 

Identification made through fingerprints 56 

Missing persons 56 

Warrant file 58 

Summons file . . " 59 

Persons committed to bail 60 

Buildings found open and secured by police officers ... 60 

Defective public streets reported 61 

Police school 61 

Traffic 62 

Activities 62 

Tagging 64 

Safety educational automobile 65 

Supervisor of Cases Unit 67 

Its purpose 67 

Personnel 67 

Procedure after arrest 67 

Line-up 68 

Cases supervised 70 

Transcripts of statements and their disposition .... 70 

Commendation of justices 71 

Bureau of Operations 72 

Creation 72 

Accomplishments 72 

Transmission of primary and election returns .... 73 

Relief and assistance rendered at time of hurricane ... 73 

Change in radio frequencies 74 

Installation of equipment for recording of radio messages . . 74 

Installation of an auxiliary radio transmitter .... 75 

Ballistics Unit 75 

Formation and duties 75 

Accomplishments 76 

Special Service Squad 78 

Communications system 79 

Plant and equipment 80 

Special events 81 

Miscellaneous business 89 

Adjustment of claims 90 

House of Detention 90 

Police Signal Service 90 

Signal boxes 90 

Miscellaneous work 90 

Harbor service 91 

Horses 93 



CONTENTS. 5 

Page 

Vehicle service 93 

Automobiles 93 

Combination ambulances 93 

List of vehicles used by the Department 95 

Hackney Carriages 95 

Limitation of hackney carriages 97 

Special, public and private hackney stands 97 

Sight-seeing automobiles 99 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations . . . .100 

Wagon Licenses 101 

Listing Work in Boston 102 

Listing expenses 103 

Number of policemen employed in listing 103 

Police work on jury lists 103 

Special police 104 

Musicians' Licenses 104 

Itinerant 104 

Collective . 105 

Carrying dangerous weapons 106 

Public lodging houses 106 

Miscellaneous licenses 106 

Pensions and benefits 107 

Financial 107 

Statistical Tables: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the police force, 

signal service and employees 110 

Changes in authorized and actual strength 112 

List of police officers in active service who died . . . .113 

List of officers retired 115 

List of officers promoted 116 

Number of men in active service 118 

Men on the police force and year born 119 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness . 120 

Complaints against officers 121 

Number of arrests by police divisions 123 

Arrests and offenses 124 

Age and sex of persons arrested 143 

Comparative statement of police criminal work . . . .144 

Licenses of all classes issued 145 

Dog licenses 147 

Wagon licenses 147 

Financial statement 148 

Payments on account of signal service 149 

Accidents 150 

Male and female residents listed .152 



VLlft Commontuealti) of MuSiatffUitttfi. 



REPORT. 

Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1938. 

To His Excellency Charles F. Hurley, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — In accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the honor 
to submit, as PoHce Commissioner for the City of Boston, the 
following report for the year ending November 30, 1938. 
This is the third Annual Report I have submitted as Police 
Commissioner. 

Introductory. 

In my report this year, it is my intention to present to you 
my experience as Police Commissioner during this time and 
attempt to outline the present organization of the Department 
and present recommendations for its continued improvement. 

Annual reports submitted for many years have failed to 
give any history or background of the development of the 
Boston Pohce Department. I believe that prefacing this 
report with a brief history of the Department may be of aid 
in understanding its present state of development and the 
existing problems confronting the Boston Police. 

Almost contemporaneously with the first settlement of 
Boston, the town provided police protection to the settlers. 
The first provision in this regard vested police duties in oflficers 
given the title of Constables. These officers had the power to 
serve both civil and criminal process. Their work, however, 
related principally to the civil side of their power and their 
compensation consisted of fees received on the basis of indi- 
vidual services. After a short time, some of the Constables 
were specially selected to take charge of the town watch. 
Others were employed to maintain order on public days and 
on special occasions. A little later, some were detailed to 
regular patrol duty. Whenever the Constables were employed 
in such public capacity, carrying out duties taken care of at 
the present time by the police, they drew their compensation 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

from the town treasury. When, at a later date, the Con- 
stables carrying out public duties were made a part of a regular 
police department, the duties of the remaining Constables were 
confined principally to matters connected with civil, as differ- 
entiated from criminal, law enforcement. At the present 
time, the work of Constables is thus limited and they have 
little to do with the enforcement of the criminal law. 

A regular night watch was first established by the town 
officials in 1634 and Constables permanently assigned thereto. 
This night watch continued, under various revisions of the 
rules and regulations appertaining thereto, until 1854, when 
the first organized police department was established, with the 
exception of about a year during the Revolutionary War. All 
work in connection with the keeping of the watch was under 
the direction of an ordinary Constable until 1812 when provi- 
sion was made for the appointment of an officer designated as 
the Captain of the Watch. When this organization was dis- 
banded in 1854, it numbered about 300 men, most of whom 
received appointment as police officers in the newly created 
organization. 

In addition to the watch, there were, after 1788, officers 
known as police officers, whose duties were to maintain clean- 
liness and good order in the town. When first created, these 
officers were headed by an officer known as an Inspector of 
Police. In 1817, the head of these officers was given the title 
of Superintendent of Police and, at a later time, the title of 
City Marshal. In 1823, the City Marshal and all police 
officers were qualified as Constables and thus given all the 
powers possessed by Constables. In 1838, the Legislature 
passed a specific statute authorizing the Mayor and Board of 
Aldermen of the City of Boston to appoint, from time to time, 
such police officers for the city as they deemed necessary. 
These officers were granted all the powers of Constables except 
the service of civil process. The passage of this law marked 
the first time that the duties of carrying out police work were 
entrusted to officers whose sole functions related to the enforce- 
ment of the criminal law. 

In 1855, an ordinance was passed by the local government, 
under the authority of enabling legislation, uniting the watch 
and the police. This marked the beginning of an organized 
police department in the City of Boston. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

The control of this newly organized and united Police Force 
remained in the hands of local city officials until 1885. Be- 
ginning about 1860, however, there were repeated efforts made 
to transfer the control over the Boston Police Department 
from local officials to officials of the State government. The 
argument then advanced in support of this proposed change 
was that it would tend to keep the police out of politics. In 
passing, it is interesting to note that this slogan, "Keep the 
police out of politics," still frequently quoted, originated many 
years ago and is practically as old as the Depa^jtment itself. 
A committee was appointed by the General Court at that 
time to look into this problem but recommended that no 
action be taken. 

In 1878, the control over the Police Department was removed 
from the jurisdiction of a single head and the Mayor of the 
City of Boston was authorized by the Legislature to appoint 
three Police Commissioners with terms of office of three years. 
This arrangement did not last very long and was not successful. 
During the entire duration of this arrangement, and also with 
the next plan which preceded the present set-up, there was 
considerable dissatisfaction with the divided direction of the 
multiple head of the Department. 

In 1885, the Legislature transferred the appointive power 
over the Police Commission from the Mayor of Boston to the 
Governor of the Commonwealth, but retained the form of a 
three-man directive body. The law then passed provided that 
the Governor appoint a Board of Police consisting of three 
citizens of Boston, representative of both political parties. The 
Legislature apparently believed that State control, as differen- 
tiated from City control, would lessen political influence on 
the conduct of the Department. They also apparently be- 
lieved that the securing of representation to each political 
party on the directing board would have a like tendency. 
Unfortunately, experience proved some of these beliefs, at 
least, unfounded. Most of the same dissatisfactions which 
were caused by the multiple direction of the Police Depart- 
ment, under the previous set-up, continued to be present. 
The granting of representation to the political parties on this 
multiple directive board, instead of making the administration 
of the Police Department non-political, made it bi-political 
or doubly political. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The next change in the administrative control of the PoHce 
Department occurred in 1906. After a thorough study of the 
entire past history of the Department, the Legislature, still 
prompted by the aim of divorcing police administration from 
politics, in so far as possible, passed legislation abolishing the 
Police Board and substituting a single Police Commissioner as 
the administrative head of the Department. The power of 
appointment and removal was left in the hands of the Gover- 
nor, with the advice and consent of the Council, and the term 
of office was established at five years. At the same time, the 
jurisdiction and control over certain types of licenses was 
taken away from the Police Department. 

The administrative organization of the Boston Police De- 
partment, established under the 1906 act, has continued up 
until the present time with but few changes and is recognized 
by competent police experts as being fundamentally and 
basically the proper set-up for a police department in a city 
such as Boston. 

In 1938, the Legislature, in enacting Chapter 377 of the 
Acts of 1938, made perhaps the most material change since 
1906. This act is a decided step forward in the never-ending 
campaign of eradicating political influence from the police 
administration of Boston. This act increased the term of 
office from five to seven years and further provided that the 
Commissioner may only be removed "for just cause, after a 
public hearing to be held at least seven days after said Com- 
missioner shall have been given written notice of the time 
and place thereof and shall have been furnished with a state- 
ment of the specific charges preferred against him." The in- 
crease in the length of the term of the Police Commissioner 
necessarily increases his security and, at the same time, his 
independence of political control. The insertion of the re- 
quirement of just cause and a public hearing before removal 
likewise relieves the Commissioner from political pressure. 
He is no longer subject to removal for any reason which may 
appeal to the Executive Department of the Commonwealth, 
but is assured, within the limits of his term, that he will not 
be removed except for just cause. Conversely, this imposes 
upon the Commissioner an added responsibility. A Commis- 
sioner may no longer excuse his actions on the grounds that 
they were dictated by one having absolute power over his 
incumbency of office. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

The manifold nature of the duties of the Police Commis- 
sioner of the City of Boston is not generally known or appre- 
ciated by the public. It may therefore be well to recite a few 
of the specific duties imposed upon the Police Commissioner 
by specific statutes. He appoints special police ofiicers. He 
licenses dealers in many businesses and trades, such as dealers 
in second-hand articles, pawnbrokers, dealers in second-hand 
motor vehicles, sightseeing automobiles and operators, hackney 
carriages, taxicab operators, certain large lodging houses, and 
persons entitled to carry firearms. He establishes all taxi- 
stands in the city. In addition to those businesses and trades 
which he licenses directly, he is vested with the duty of in- 
vestigating applicants for licenses issued by other boards and 
officials. For example, he investigates all applications for 
licenses to be granted by the Boston Licensing Board and later 
enforces all licenses of that Board; he investigates and reports 
on all applications for licenses to be issued by the Mayor of 
Boston, and he investigates and reports on all applications to 
the Secretary of State for chartered clubs which may be located 
in Boston or where any of the proposed incorporators reside in 
Boston. He has the responsibility of listing all residents of 
the city, 20 years of age and over. 

In addition to these various duties, not necessarily related 
to police work, the Police Commissioner of the City of Boston 
is the administrative head and director of a department com- 
prising approximately 2,500 persons. As such head, he is 
charged with the responsibility of the carrying out of the 
general functions of a police department — the prevention of 
crime, the apprehension of criminals, and the enforcement of 
the criminal laws of the Commonwealth and ordinances of the 
city. 

Before recounting the detailed accomplishments of the 
Department during the past year, I should like to briefly dis- 
cuss a question which, in my opinion, is vital to the attain- 
ment of the maximum efficiency in the Department and which 
has been dealt with by many of my predecessors. I firmly 
believe that a Police Commissioner should have full responsi- 
bility for the administration of police service and should have 
greater authority in the naming of the officers, above the rank 
of patrolman, in the Department. I have always been a firm 
believer in the Civil Service laws and have always adhered to 
them strictly. However, in my opinion, the present system 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of promotion in this Department is not beneficial either to the 
Department or to the community. 

Having this in mind, on June 28, 1938, I requested the 
Department of Civil Service to create a promotional list to the 
grade of sergeant by non-competitive examination, this list to 
consist of patrolmen who have been special officers or members 
of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation for a period of not 
less than three months and who have performed especially 
meritorious service. This request was limited to a promo- 
tional examination. It did not affect original appointments 
to the Department. I am a firm advocate of original ap- 
pointments to the rank of patrolman by competitive examina- 
tion and do not believe that there should be any change in 
this particular part of the present system. Nor do I envisage 
the use of non-competitive examinations, as they have often 
been used in the past, merely to qualify a single man in a 
position to which he had already been previously appointed. 
My desire was to enable me to reward exceptional service by 
promotion. The examination, even though non-competitive, 
would insure the competency of the man whom I sought to 
reward. I did not intend that the present competitive, pro- 
motional system to the grade of sergeant be done away with. 
I did, however, desire that an alternative system be estab- 
lished, which could be used, as occasion arose, to supplement, 
but not entirely displace, the present competitive promotional 
system. If my request were granted, a patrolman would 
know that there were two means whereunder he might be 
eligible for promotion. First, the ordinary means of competi- 
tive examination and second, the rendering of exceptional 
service which would entitle him to an added avenue for pro- 
motion. The ordinary means of promotion should be pre- 
served for the ordinary man. There should be, in addition, 
an exceptional means to reward exceptional men. 

A police department has many duties. It must regulate 
traffic. It must prevent public disorders. It must control 
vice. But, in my opinion, its most important duty is the 
prevention of serious crime and the apprehension of dangerous 
and hardened criminals. The bulk of this work, naturally, 
must fall upon the shoulders of men in the department espe- 
cially trained and possessing detective ability. 

Since I assumed the office of Police Commissioner, I have 
been considerably disturbed on account of my inability to 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

properly reward police officers for meritorious work performed, 
particularly exceptional work in the solving of major crimes 
and the apprehension of the criminals involved. The only 
opportunity I have had in recognizing merit is in connection 
with the promotion of lieutenants to the grade of captain. 
Frankly speaking, I believe it far more important to be able 
to reward patrolmen who have performed meritorious work 
by promotion to the rank of sergeant, than to be able to reward 
lieutenants with promotion to the grade of captain. In the 
last analysis, the backbone of the service is the rank and file 
of the force and not the few high executive officers. The 
opportunity for exceptional reward for exceptional service 
should be available as an incentive to the rank and file as well 
as to the higher executive officers. 

Under our system today, promotions are governed entirely 
by the rules and regulations of the Civil Service Commission 
and by written civil service examination. When promotion 
of patrolmen to the grade of sergeant is contemplated, an 
eligible list is prepared and furnished to me by the Civil Service 
Commission. I am obliged to make the contemplated pro- 
motions from the top of this list with but little choice. In 
establishing this list, no credit is given by the Civil Service 
Commission to the patrolmen for meritorious work performed 
or exceptional talent or ability displayed. High ranking on 
this list is obtained by correct answers to questions. Ques- 
tions that are only too often trickily phrased. The ability to 
provide the correct answers to these questions is usually more 
satisfactorily obtained through book study and private tutor- 
ing than by faithful and diligent attention to actual and 
practical police work. 

This system is too inelastic and stereotyped to produce the 
best results. I am unable, under this system, to make a wise 
selection of men possessing qualities peculiarly fitting them for 
the task imposed upon them by promotion to the grade of 
sergeant. As to rewarding meritorious work, I am at present 
limited to verbal commendations or, at most, extra vacation 
periods. This latter is at best a lazy man's reward and not, 
in my opinion, the type of reward most attractive to a police 
officer anxious to prove his worth through outstanding service 
accomplishments and anxious to forge ahead in the service. 
The stimuli at present employed are not sufficient to encourage 
the accomplishment of superior police work. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Police heads in other jurisdictions in this country and in 
Europe have a better control over their departments, in so far 
as rewarding meritorious work, than I have. The police 
department of Chicago has long followed the practice of 
awarding bonuses to patrolmen who have performed some 
meritorious work. The amount of this extra compensation 
ranges from $180 to $300 a year. 

The Police Commissioner of New York may assign out- 
standing patrolmen to detective duty and designate them as 
first or second-grade detectives. A first-grade detective, 
while so assigned, receives $1,000 more salary than that of a 
patrolman and a second-grade detective receives $200 more 
salary than that of a patrolman. A patrolman remains on 
this duty as long as the Police Commissioner desires to keep 
him there. . 

In Detroit, the Police Commissioner has wide powers. The 
system employed in that city is as follows: Each patrolman is 
given a personnel card which contains pertinent information 
relating to the officer. This card contains full facts and 
ratings in connection with the officer's education, intelligence, 
adaptability, general capabilities, his merits, demerits, medical 
history, type of police work in which he has been engaged, 
command of languages, etc. From the information contained 
on this card, the Police Commissioner of Detroit has before 
him constantly an analysis of the ability of his men and he 
may, at any time he desires, promote a patrolman to the grade 
of sergeantcy without complying with any numerical or com- 
petitive Civil Service list. I have endeavored to duplicate 
this type of personnel card within the department, but am 
precluded from availing myself of this aid in making promotions. 

In the city of St. Louis, the Police Commissioner is not 
bound by competitive civil service examinations in promoting 
a patrolman to the grade of sergeantcy. He may promote a 
patrolman after considering his service record and his qualifica- 
tions to perform the duties of the next higher rank. He is 
always in a position to reward meritorious work by promotion. 

The system of selecting men for promotion in London, Eng- 
land, is as follows: The Commissioner has a board of police 
officials, appointed by him, whose duty is to make recommen- 
dations for promotion, and he makes his own choice from 
among the names submitted to him by this Board. In sup- 
port of this system, an Assistant Secretary of the Home Office 



■1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

in England has stated: "Selection on the basis of proved 
merit in practical work should be the foundation of any pro- 
motion system." 

The British Home Office Committee on Police Service of 
England, Wales and Scotland, have stated that: "Seniority 
may be taken into account but should not govern promotion, 
and promotion by competitive examination would be quite 
unsuited to the police system because of the importance of 
initiative, tact, judgment and other personal qualifications 
which cannot be gauged by means of an examination paper." 

In Boston, prior to 1919, the plan of non-competitive pro- 
motion examination was in effect for many years. If the 
Commissioner desired to promote a patrolman, who had per- 
formed meritorious work, he submitted his name to the Civil 
Service Commission which, in turn, subjected the patrolman 
to a qualifying, non-competitive examination. 

In this country, men who are recognized as experts on police 
administration, such as Bruce Smith, Leonard V. Harrison, 
and Raymond B. Fosdick, have unalterably been in favor of 
recognizing merit in promotion by non-competitive examination. 

In 1933, the Special Crime Commission in Massachusetts 
in its report to the Governor and General Court, made the 
following statement : 

"Police Promotions. — Under our present practice, 
police promotions must be made from among those officers 
who have passed the Civil Service promotional examina- 
tions. Police chiefs object to this set-up because it gives 
them too little leeway in the choice of their subordinate 
. officers. They argue that if a police chief is to be re- 
sponsible for the policing of a city or town, he should 
have some voice in the selection of his subordinate officers 
and should not be compelled to accept men merely because 
they have been able to satisfy the formal requirements of 
the Civil Service Commission. There is much to be said 
in favor of the attitude taken by the police chiefs. The 
police practice in England and on the Continent supports 
their contention. 

"It has been argued that to give police chiefs any in- 
fluence in promotions would open the door to the evil 
which our Civil Service laws were intended to eliminate, 
that with such an influence promotions might be dictated 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

largely by personal and political favoritism. It should be 
observed, however, that giving some weight to the opinion 
of superiors in the making of police promotions would not 
necessarily do away with the requirement of selection from 
a certified list. We must remember that the existing 
method of promotion has evidently not provided sufficient 
guarantee that promotion will be based upon merit alone, 
and that under the present system police officers com- 
monly feel that faithful performance of duty and meri- 
torious police work are not^ given due recognition in the 
making of promotions. 

"The scope of the present Civil Service promotional 
examinations is not adequate; too much emphasis is 
placed on length of service, and too little is placed upon 
the character of that service and the opinions of superior 
officers touching the manner in which an applicant for 
promotion has performed his duties. If the present 
system of promotions is to continue, greater value should 
be given to the past performance of those eligible for pro- 
motion and to the recommendations of their superior 
officers. Promotions should not depend, as they do now, 
upon the capacity of a candidate to acquire a book knowl- 
edge of matters relating to police activities or an acquaint- 
ance with novel methods of 'passing' promotional exam- 
inations, but should depend, also, upon the applicant's 
ability to preserve the public peace as demonstrated to 
his superiors in his actual police work." 

Before closing the discussion of Civil Service, I should like 
to make my position in this regard perfectly clear, even at the 
expense of repetition, and to re-emphasize two main points. 

First, the ability of the Commissioner to reward patrolmen 
by promotion to the rank of sergeant through the medium of 
a non-competitive examination is more important to the effi- 
ciency of the service than the like power of reward now pos- 
sessed by the Commissioner (having been approved by the 
Civil Service Commissioner) in regard to certain of the higher 
officers. 

Second, I do not favor entirely discarding the present com- 
petitive Civil Service system. I am in favor of competitive 
examinations for original appointment. I am not unmindful 
of the arguments in favor of the exclusive use of competitive 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

examinations for promotions within the Department. It is 
claimed and it is true, that a non-competitive system of exam- 
ination for promotion is capable of being abused by a Com- 
missioner. Any Police Commissioner who would disregard 
the primary qualifications of exceptional service or exceptional 
ability displayed atid attempt to prostitute such a system in 
the interest of favoritism, is not worthy of the trust he holds. 
Personally, I am not only willing but desirous, for the best 
interests of the Department, of accepting this additional 
responsibility and being held accountable for its proper exercise. 

The plan of non-competitive promotional examinations 
which I desire does not, however, necessitate the complete 
elimination of the present system. I believe a compromise is 
possible which will secure to the Department most of the 
advantages of a non-competitive system and retain for the 
Department most of the advantages of the competitive system. 
The compromise which I suggest is exceedingly simple. I 
suggest that the number of promotions to the rank of sergeant 
be divided; that part of these promotions be made from a list 
established from competitive examinations and that another 
part of these promotions be made by means of non-competitive 
examinations. Such a system would secure the advantages of 
incentive for exceptional services, in large part, and would also 
have far less tendency to affect the morale of the Department 
because of actual or supposed abuse which is pointed out as 
the danger of a non-competitive system and would insure, in 
large part, the continuance of the security of the present 
system. By this compromise, we would thus add the incentive 
of the new to the security of the old. I believe that the net 
result would bring about a material improvement in the work 
of the Department. 

With this compromise in operation, it will also be possible 
to procure comparative data on the men promoted under each 
system. This comparative data may be of inestimable aid in 
the future in determining whether the one or the other system 
should be used exclusively in connection w^ith promotions. 

At this time, I should like to acknowledge the excellent 
co-operation and advice I have obtained in connection with 
my consideration of this matter from the Massachusetts Civic 
League. I have had numerous conferences with the Civil 
Service Committee of this organization which has always taken 
a keen interest in preserving the integrity of the Civil Service, 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

retaining an open mind, however, on all proposals which seek 
an improvement in the present system. 

I am faced at the close of the year with a problem concerning 
the number of patrolmen in the Department. The Department 
has at present 1,932 patrolmen and there are 217 vacancies in 
this grade. It is my intention to request of the Mayor suffi- 
cient funds in the forthcoming budget to enable me to appoint 
100 new patrolmen to fill existing vacancies. The principal 
reason for this request is that the Department and the city 
need more patrolmen available for street duty. In congested 
districts where a large number of people are passing on the 
street, it is absolutely essential to have patrolmen doing duty 
on foot and covering comparatively small beats so that they 
can keep their posts constantly under surveillance. Cruising 
cars cannot take the place of this type of work. There is no 
doubt that the use of automobiles by the police has been of 
tremendous benefit, but the use of motor vehicles cannot do 
away entirely with the necessity of all foot patrol duty. 

The best argument for the necessity of foot patrolmen is a 
simple enumeration of the duties of a patrolman as prescribed 
in the Police Manual and other police documents. I believe 
that this necessity will be obvious to anyone who merely reads 
the following partial list of such duties. The patrolman 
must be ever present at exposed places throughout the city. 
He must watch over business, industrial, residential and 
amusement centers. He must patrol traffic arteries and 
sparsely settled areas. He must observe suspicious persons 
and suspicious conditions. He must inspect sidewalks and 
highways and report defects and dangerous conditions. He 
must, when requested, be able to direct the public to various 
streets and places, point out the best travel routes, and give 
information concerning hotels, theatres, restaurants, public 
buildings, etc. He must assist and advise the public relative 
to the proper procedure in case of wrongs done to the com- 
plainant. He must ascertain for the purpose of crime appre- 
hension and procedure, the habits and tendencies of the people 
in his district. He must observe all automobiles and sus- 
picious characters. He must conduct an "investigation at the 
scene of an accident or any crime occurring in his presence or 
brought to his attention. He must be present at all public 
gatherings to preserve order and prevent disorder. He must 
extinguish small fires and rescue persons when fire occurs sud- 



939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

denly before the arrival of the Fire Department. He must 
call ambulances for sick or injured persons. At the scene of 
an accident, he must take the names of witnesses and the 
statements of principals and arrange for the removal of vehicles 
to a safe place if the operators are injured. If a crime has 
been committed, on his beat, he must assist in the discovery 
and preservation of evidence at the scene of the crime. He 
must, in case of crime — if possible — arrest or give immediate 
pursuit to the criminal to bring about his arrest. He must 
secure descriptions of suspected criminals to assure rapid iden- 
tification. He must make arrests on warrants and serve sum- 
monses for appearance in Court. He must answer calls from 
members of the general public to rescue animals and give 
general aid and render minor services in various types of 
matters. Many times in this connection, he even acts as 
nurse or doctor until the arrival of the ambulance. He must 
keep under observation all places subject to license and regula- 
tion by any licensing authority. He must secure and remem- 
ber many things in regard to places and persons on his beat, 
such as the location of safes, cash registers, night lights, alarm 
systems, times of closing and opening of Boston establishments, 
habits of regular employees, the number and location of exits 
to buildings, the means of locking doors, windows, and gratings 
left open. He must keep under regular observation all resi- 
dences and places of business and must know the general 
habits and customs of residents. He must assist the Detective 
Bureau by observing and noting for future reference all per- 
sons in his district with regard to identity, characteristics, 
personal habits, peculiarities of physical expressions, manner 
of speech, posture, etc. 

In addition to an increase of men for patrol duty, there is 
also the necessity of an increase in the number of foot men 
necessary for traffic duty. The traffic problems in Boston are 
unusual, due to the narrowness of the streets in congested 
areas. This necessarily requires, in spite of the existence of 
traffic lights, a large number of foot patrolmen. Proper en- 
forcement of parking rules and regulations also requires a 
substantial number of foot patrolmen. 

In considering the increase in the number of patrolmen, 
particularly in regard to the traffic problem and the policing 
of the downtown business area, we must bear in mind that 
Boston is not merely a city of 800,000 inhabitants, but is the 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

business center of a metropolitan area of 2,000,000 population. 
Boston is the center of gravitation to the populace of the fol- 
lowing suburbs: Arlington, Belmont, Brookline, Cambridge, 
Chelsea, Dedham, Everett, Lexington, Lynn, Maiden, Med- 
ford, Melrose, Milton, Nahant, Needham, Newton, Quincy, 
Reading, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, Stoneham, Swampscott, 
Wakefield, Waltham, Watertown, Weston, Westwood, Wey- 
mouth, Winchester, Winthrop and Woburn. It must also be 
remembered that Boston is the capital city of the Common- 
wealth and acts as a magnet for thousands of persons from even 
outside this metropolitan area who are not residents of Boston. 
Unfortunately perhaps from a police standpoint, the Boston 
Department must police the vast number of persons who 
come into the city daily from this metropolitan area to work 
or shop or for some other reason of business or pleasure, and 
this must be done at the expense of the City of Boston. 

I am not unmindful that the chief obstacle to increasing the 
number of patrolmen is the amount of money that may be 
involved, bearing in mind the financial condition of the city. 
I firmly believe, however, that more patrolmen will mean an 
improvement in crime and traffic conditions and that the re- 
duction of crime and improvement in traffic conditions, which 
will be brought about through an increase in the number of 
patrolmen, will be well worth the additional money involved. 

Boston Junior Police Corps. 

Juvenile delinquency is today perhaps the greatest problem 
facing law-enforcement officers. The average age of criminals 
committed to our prisons and jails is far lower today than 
during any preceding generation. Too many boys in their 
teens or early twenties, are committing crimes which necessi- 
tate their commitment to penal institutions, often for long 
terms. These boys leave the institutions with blighted hopes 
for the future and often become habitual criminals. Court 
statistics show that a vast majority of persons convicted of 
serious crimes, first encountered arrest and prosecution early 
in fife. 

Aside from the efficient management in routine matters of 
the Boston Police Department, it has been my intention to 
make my contribution to the solution of this problem. Many 
social organizations in this city are doing admirable work in 
training the morals of our youth. As I viewed the situation, 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

however, there was one influence at work which these organiza- 
tions could not adequately meet and that was the feehng of 
distrust of, and often actual hostility toward, the police which 
appeared to actuate a large number of young boys. Too often 
they came to regard the police as a repressive rather than a 
protective force in a community. They too often regarded the 
existence of the police as a challenge to them to attempt to do 
something to outwit and outsmart those whom they regarded 
as repressing their natural desires. Unfortunately, the mecha- 
nization of the Department has lessened the number of police 
who come in contact with the youngsters of our community 
and this has tended to accentuate the lack of understanding 
between the young boys of our community and the Police 
Department. 

As my contribution, in an attempt to solve this problem, I 
have organized within the Department what is known as the 
Junior Police Corps. The duties of this organization were set 
forth in a general order promulgated on October 11, 1938, as 
follows: 

1. Instilling in boys a respect for law and appreciation 
of good citizenship. 

2. Assisting the police, through its activities in bring- 
ing about an increasing friendly relationship between the 
Police Department and the boys of the City of Boston, 
so that the police will be regarded as a protective rather 
than a repressive agency. 

Before assigning duties to the Junior Police Corps, I estab- 
lished a course of training for the men to be assigned to this 
organization. The Corps was placed under the direction and 
supervision of Lieutenant William J. Carey on September 3, 
1938. Lieutenant Carey was given charge of the instruction 
course and later the complete direction of the Corps. Fifteen 
patrolmen were assigned to this unit. 

The instruction course, which these men underwent, lasted 
about five weeks and was comprehensive in its nature. The 
purpose of the course was to so train these men that they 
would be qualified as instructors of boys in the subjects they 
were learning. These subjects included calisthenics, drill, 
first-aid instruction, juvenile psychology, and the ability to 
direct sports popularly indulged in. Officials of the Boston 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Chapter of the Red Cross furnished the instruction in first 
aid and, at the end of the course, granted to each officer an 
Instructor's Certificate issued by the National Red Cross. 
This certificate entitles the officers to teach first aid to others 
and to confer certificates of qualification upon their pupils. 
Many of the social agencies and organizations of the city 
co-operated in this training by furnishing instructors who gave 
a complete lecture course to the officers on juvenile psychology 
and the proper manner of handling and training boys. As 
there were over forty such instructors voluntarily furnished 
by these social organizations, I am unable to mention them 
all by name but I do wish to extend my deepest appreciation 
for their services. 

On October 11, 1938, the training period of Lieutenant 
Carey and his officers was completed and the general order 
promulgated establishing the Corps and enumerating its 
duties. Membership in the Corps was open to all boys resid- 
ing in the City of Boston, between the ages of 12 and 16. 
Fifteen separate units were established and a patrolman as- 
signed to superintend and direct each unit. In the short space 
of about two months since this Corps was established, about 
two thousand eligible boys have been enrolled as members 
and there are still pending, subject to investigation and the 
establishment of proper facilities, more than five thousand 
additional applicants who ultimately will become enrolled 
members. Each boy must procure the written approval of 
his parents before making application. 

In addition to the police officer in charge, each unit has a 
local advisory board. This board usually consists of some of 
the local school masters, teachers, judges, juvenile probation 
officers, clergymen of the various religious institutions in the 
district, and social workers affiliated with established social 
organizations interested in juvenile work. 

Each unit has a regular meeting, weekly. These meetings 
are held in city-owned gymnasiums or school halls. They are 
called to order at 4 p. m. on the meeting day. Each unit has 
a flag and a stand and the meeting is commenced with a pledge 
of allegiance to the flag. Athletic exercises are conducted at 
these meetings, regularly, by instructors from the Park De- 
partment. There is also, at each meeting, usually a lecture by 
an officer of rank from the Boston Police Department or some 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

individual of note who may have an interesting message to 
dehver. Organized sport activities, under the direction and 
supervision of the officer in charge, are also features of these 
meetings. In addition, there are also organized sport activi- 
ties held at times other than meeting times. The officer in 
charge of the individual units also arranges, on Saturdays and 
school holidays, to meet with such members of the unit as 
desire, and take them on trips to interesting places in the com- 
munity, such as historical places of interest, museums, public 
buildings, Navy Yard, Police Headquarters, Fire Headquarters, 
Police Boat, Fire Boat, etc. Hikes in park districts are also 
arranged for by the officer in charge. 

In addition to attendance at unit meetings and arranging 
for other activities, the officer in charge of each unit meets the 
members of the unit as often as possible, in the schools or in 
the homes, and endeavors in every way to become their friends. 

Each unit is organized with its own officers. Each unit is 
divided into four platoons. Each platoon has a lieutenant 
and two sergeants. At the head of the unit is a captain. 
Competition is encouraged, in various sport activities, between 
the units and also between the platoons within each unit. 
Prizes are offered, based upon inter-platoon competition. 
Credits for perfection in attendance at meetings is also an 
element considered in the inter-platoon competition. Mem- 
bership cards are issued to each member and it is contem- 
plated, sometime in the future, to issue badges. 

The entire purpose of the Boston Junior Police Corps is to 
assist in character formation of the youth of the city and to 
formulate a friendly spirit between our youngsters and the 
police. I firmly believe that this will result in saving many 
youngsters from lives of crime and will thus be of tremendous 
benefit to the community. The Junior Police Corps is not 
connected with the Police Department of the City of Boston 
other than being under its direction. By that, I mean that 
the boys who are members of the various units do no police 
work and are not used for police purposes such as obtaining 
information, etc. I hope to make these youngsters better 
citizens and better friends of the Police Department. I expect 
and ask from them nothing more than co-operation to accom- 
plish these two purposes. 

The Junior Police Corps has been in existence too short a 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

time to be able to properly evaluate its worth. Even in this 
short time, however, I have received many inquiries from 
other communities expressing an interest in this activity and 
requesting information. 

Crime Prevention Bureau. 

I have been giving serious consideration to the organization 
within the Department of a new unit to be known as the 
Crime Prevention Bureau. I have been obliged to delay the 
formation of the Bureau principally because of the lack of 
available personnel. 

A police department may be of inestimable social benefit 
to the community by striving to prevent juvenile delinquency. 
I believe that the organization of the Junior Police, already 
described in this report, has proved a worthy step in this direc- 
tion. The organization of a crime prevention bureau will be 
entirely separate and disassociated from the Junior Police. 
The functions of this Bureau will be purely departmental 
functions. 

The Bureau of Crime Prevention would consist of two units, 
— one dealing with juvenile delinquency amongst boys and 
the second amongst girls. I should like to briefly outline 
some of the proposed duties of this Bureau. It would receive 
reports from all divisions concerning juvenile delinquents and 
would either supervise or take over entirely the handling 
of all juvenile cases. It would establish contact with and 
deal personally with the parents of all juvenile delinquents 
and the complainants in all cases involving juveniles. It 
would formulate and seek to carry out adjustment programs 
for juvenile delinquents. It would establish and maintain 
contacts with all the social agencies in the city which are 
interested in this problem and work out a program of mutual 
assistance and co-operation. It would establish and maintain 
similar contact with the attendance division of the School 
Department. It would arrange for and promote a program 
of lectures on the subject of juvenile crime prevention in 
schools and in civic or church groups. It would establish a 
system of investigation and report on all juvenile cases which 
would furnish a statistical analysis which would be of great 
help in dealing with this problem. In this connection, it 
would prepare a standard form of case classification which 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

would aid accurate statistical analysis. It would investigate 
school and other environmental conditions of each juvenile 
delinquent so as to determine the social background of each 
case and assist the formulation of an adjustment program. 
It would secure consent of parents to voluntary probation 
without court action in most cases of petty theft thereby 
avoiding first appearance in court. It would maintain con- 
tact with the Probation Department and co-operate with them 
in all cases of juvenile delinquents on probation. It would in- 
vestigate and attempt to settle, without court action, disputes 
in neighborhood quarrels in which juveniles are involved. 
It would investigate and give attention to all cases of juveniles 
whose interests are affected because one or both of their parents 
may become involved in criminal prosecution or imprisonment. 

The unit of the Bureau in charge of female juveniles would 
consist of policewomen. Their duties would, in general, be 
the same as outlined above, except that in addition, they 
would take a special interest in sex offenses involving female 
juveniles. This unit could also handle complaints of a non- 
criminal nature relative to domestic relations and with the 
aid and assistance of social service agencies, formulate a plan 
of adjustment. 

In my study of this problem, I have received the fullest 
co-operation and excellent advice from many prominent per- 
sons and all the social agencies of this city that I have con- 
sulted, and I am sure that if this plan is put into operation, 
the new Bureau will have the hearty co-operation of these 
agencies in the carrying out of its duties. 

Obscene Literature. 

During the past year, the Department has waged a con- 
tinuous campaign to prevent and ban the circulation and dis- 
tribution of obscene and indecent books, magazines, pictures 
and other literature. 

This campaign was divided into two categories: First, 
against those who make a business of providing such obscene 
matter to the general public, usually trying to find a distribu- 
tion means amongst the younger members of the community, 
and second, against legitimate dealers in books and periodicals 
to whom there may be sent for circulation by the publishers, 
books or magazines which may contain objectionable parts. 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In regard to the first category of professional panders of 
filth, the Department vigorously and successfully enforced the 
law. There have been many successful prosecutions and I 
believe that the city at the present time is practically free 
from the vicious practices of such individuals. 

In regard to the second category of legitimate book sellers 
and periodical distributors, I have endeavored to follow a 
system which would prevent, in so far as possible, any prose- 
cutions in the courts and at the same time keep from public 
sale any obscene matter. I have received, during the past 
year, the hearty co-operation of all the leading dealers in the 
city. These dealers have agreed to remove from sale any 
books and periodicals which are called to their attention by the 
Department as being in violation of the law. Due to the fact 
that any request that literary material be withdrawn from 
circulation may prove of financial injury to the book sellers 
and periodical dealers, I have tried to exercise caution in 
making such requests. I have not relied solely on my own 
judgment but have always sought the advice of a group of 
persons, both in and out of the Department, before reaching 
any decisions to withdraw literary matter from circulation. I 
do not believe that any requests have been made during the 
past year where it was not perfectly clear that the material 
complained against was such as to tend to corrupt the morals 
of the youth and I am firmly convinced that if the Department 
had elected to prosecute such cases in the courts, instead of 
requesting and securing the co-operation of the dealers, such 
prosecutions would have resulted in convictions. 

Narcotics. 

The Department continued in the past year a special Nar- 
cotic Squad. This squad, as in past years, has performed 
most effective and efficient work in apprehending and success- 
fully prosecuting violators of the drug laws. As in the past, 
this squad has received the finest co-operation from, and in 
turn has co-operated with, the members of the Federal Narcotic 
Bureau. 

The work of this squad has been, during the past year, 
aided by the passage of legislation increasing the penalty 
which may be imposed upon violators of the drug laws of the 
Commonwealth and in other ways aiding and strengthening 
the enforcement of such laws. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

Conclusion. 

No report of mine could be complete without an expression 
of sincere gratitude and appreciation for the splendid co-opera- 
tion accorded the Department by Your Excellency and by the 
Mayor of the City of Boston, Honorable Maurice J. Tobin. 
To the members of the General Court, also, the Department 
expresses its appreciation for the many laws passed at their 
last session which enabled the Department to more efficiently 
carry out its duties. 

The Department also wishes to express its appreciation for 
the confidence and trust imposed in it by the general com- 
munity of the city. The Department will strive, in every 
way, to merit the continuance of this confidence and trust. 

In final closing, I should like to express my personal 
appreciation for the splendid co-operation of the Superin- 
tendent of Police and all the executive officers and members of 
the Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner. 
Secretary. Assistant Secretary. 

Chief Clerk. 



The Police Force. 

Superintendent ... 1 Sergeants 

Deputy Superintendents . 4 

Captains .... 30 

Lieutenants ... 66 
Lieutenant-Inspectors . 4 



Patrolmen 



Total 



187 
1,937 

2,229 



Director 

Foreman 

Chauffeur 

Laborer 

Linemen 



Signal Service. 



1 Mechanic 

1 Painter 

1 Signalmen 

1 

6 Total 



1 
1 
4 

16 



Employees of the Department. 



Chauffeurs 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Inventory 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks . 

Elevator Operators 

Engineer, Marine 

Firemen, Marine 

Firemen, Stationary 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Repairmen 



3 
1 
8 
1 
1 

28 
8 
1 
7 
5 
9 

29 
3 
5 

10 
3 



Signalmen .... 2 
Statisticians ... 3 
Steamfitter ... 1 
Stenographers ... 20 
Shorthand Reporters . 5 
Superintendent of Build- 
ings ..... 1 
Assistant Superintendent 

of Buildings ... 1 
Superintendent of Main- 
tenance Shop ... 1 

Tailor 1 

Telephone Operators . 6 

Total .... 163 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



29 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 1 

Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Chief Clerk .... 3 

Police Force 2,229 

Signal Service 16 

Employees 163 

Grand Total 2,412 

Distribution and Changes. 
The distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 
During the year 10 patrolmen were appointed; 2 patrolmen 
were reinstated; 6 patrolmen resigned (1 while charges were 
pending); 3 patrolmen were dismissed (1 reinstated after public 
hearing); 1 captain, 6 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant-inspector, 12 
sergeants and 20 patrolmen were promoted; 2 captains, 6 
lieutenants, 1 lieutenant-inspector, 6 sergeants and 3 patrolmen 
were retired on pensions; 1 deputy-superintendent, 1 captain, 
1 lieutenant, 2 sergeants and 14 patrolmen died. (See Tables 
III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1937: 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1938. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1937. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


94 
16 

94 
128 


1,371 
302 

2,099 
1,012 


1,024 
269 

1,146 
370 


Totals . 


332 


4,784 


2,809 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Work of the Department. 

Arrests. 
The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that 
of a separate person, was 97,187, as against 95,948 the pre- 
ceding year, being an increase of 1,239. The percentage of 
decrease and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

Decrease 3 . 46 
Decrease 3 . 94 



1. Offenses against the person .... 

2. Offenses against property committed with violence 

3. Offenses against property committed without vio 

lence 

4. Malicious offenses against property . 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency 

6. Offenses against the license laws 

7. Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. 

8. Offenses not included in the foregoing 



Increase 10.78 
Increase 12.62 
Increase 37.89 
Increase 19.40 
Decrease 10 . 10 
Increase 14.93 



There were 14,745 persons arrested on warrants and 52,490 
without warrants; 29,952 persons were summoned by the 
court; 64,190 persons were prosecuted; 31,684 released by 
probation officers or discharged at station houses, and 1,313 
were delivered to outside authorities. The number of males 
arrested was 88,702; of females, 8,485; of foreigners, 12,116, 
or approximately 12.46 per cent; of minors, 9,011. Of the 
total number arrested 27,441 or 28.23 per cent, were nonresi- 
dents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1934 to 1938, inclusive, was $163,600.30; in 
1938 it was $157,817, or $5,783.30 less than the average. 

The average number of days' attendance at court was 43,068; 
in 1938 it was 47,422, or 4,354 more than the average. 

The average amount of witness fees earned was $12,629.44; 
in 1938 it was $13,725.30, or $1,095.86 more than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 111. 
There were 4,919 less persons arrested than in 1937, a decrease 
of 10.75 per cent; 14.75 per cent of the arrested persons were 
nonresidents and 20.33 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table 
XL) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 97,187, 
being an increase of 1,239 over last year, and 10,514 more than 
the average for the past five years. There were 40,815 persons 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



31 



arrested for drunkenness, being 4,919 less than last year and 
1,368 less than the average for the past five years. Of the 
arrests for drunkenness this year, there was a decrease of 11.37 
per cent in males and a decrease of .07 per cent in females from 
last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (97,187), 269 were 
for violation of city ordinances; that is to say, that one arrest 
in 361 was for such offense or .27 per cent. 

Fifty-four and seventy-three one-hundredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty-one 
and forty. (See Table XII.) 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1938, as 
compared with the same period ending with November 30, 
1937, a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major 
offenses may be of interest and is submitted below. 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1937. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1938. 




Arrests. 


Arrests. 


Offenses Against the Person. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offences Against the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 

Drunkenness 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto, operating under the influence of liquor (first 
offense) . , 

Auto, operating so as to endanger .... 


13 
102 
155 
328 
171 

1,526 

236 

2,597 

189 
45,734 

619 
818 


12 

74 

111 

278 

185 

1,468 

364 
2,678 

137 
40,815 

526 
844 


Totals 


52,488 


47,492 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violation of city 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



ordinances, gaming and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 
the year totaled 97,187, of which 88,702 were males and 
8,485 were females. This total compares with 95,948 for the 
preceding year. 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 
Ireland 






85,071 
3,648 


Denmark . 
South America 






39 

16 


British Provinces 


) 




2,162 


Spain . 






33 


Italy . 






1,621 


Albania 






27 


Russia 








1,327 


Belgium 






16 


Lithuania 








596 


HoUand 






22 


Poland 








574 


West Indies 






20 


Sweden 








466 


Hungary 






9 


Greece 








198 


Mexico 






8 


Scotland 








268 


Porto Rico . 






6 


England 








201 


Rumania 






8 


Norway 








136 


Cuba . 






9 


Portugal 








134 


Switzerland 






4 


Finland 








117 


Wales . 






2 


Germany 








103 


Czecho-Slovakia 




2 


Armenia 








51 


Phihppine Islands 




1 


China . 








101 


Asia 




4 


Austria 








67 


Australia 




1 


Syria . 








45 


Unknown . 




2 


TTfQTIPA 








45 
27 




Turkey 








Total . 






. 97,187 



The number of persons punished by fine was 17,957, and 
the fines amounted to $157,817. (See Table XIII.) 

Two hundred and twenty-seven persons were committed to 
the State Prison; 3,390 to the House of Correction; 59 to the 
Women's Prison; 275 to the Reformatory Prison, and 3,066 
to other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were: 3,439 years (791 
sentences were indefinite) ; the total number of days' attendance 
at court by officers was 47,422 and the witness fees earned by 
them amounted to $13,725.30. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$87,748.80. 

Two witnesses were detained at station houses; 390 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 339 over last year. 

There was an increase of 1.38 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 5.37 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the city 
for the five years from 1934 to 1938, inclusive, was $476,174.50; 
in 1938 it was $483,524.21 or $7,349.71 more than the average. 
The amount of stolen property which was recovered by the 
Boston Police this year was $447,021.50 as against $512,559.10 
last year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to note 
that 27,441 persons, or 28.23 per cent of the total arrests 
during the past year, were persons residing outside the city 
limits of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which 
Boston is called on to perform police work for nonresidents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, either 
of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 28.23 per 
cent of the arrests in Boston are of nonresidents, whereas other 
cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests of non- 
residents. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 

This Department, during the past year, has continued its 
co-operation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses : 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — ■ breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

The following comparative tables show the number of certain 
offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 1937, 
to November 30, 1938, as against December 1, 1936, to 
November 30, 1937. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following: 

Cases 
Reported. Cleared. 

1938 8,949 7,461 

1937 8,643 7,589 

Per Cent 
Cleared. 

1938 83.37 

1937 87.80 

A comparison shows a decrease in clearance from 1937 of 
4.43 per cent. 

There was an increase in cases reported as compared with 
1937, of 306, or 3.54 per cent. 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1938, receipts 
totaled $81,667.75 as compared with $84,963.91 in the previous 
year. The decrease of $3,296.16 is principally due to the 
fact that less has been received for licenses. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1938, 
the total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted 
to $5,997,107.47. This included the pay of the police and 
employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($59,176.80 — 
the annual listing on January 1 of all persons twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 

In the corresponding period for 1937, expenditures totaled 
$6,013,598.44. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 

Organization. 
February 7, 1938. Captain Benjamin A. Wall, Division 
2, promoted to the grade of Deputy 
Superintendent; designated as Super- 
visor of Divisions and assigned to 
Office of the Superintendent of Police. 
Deputy Superintendent Wall, under 
direction of the Superintendent, to 
be in full charge of all Divisions 
and to be responsible for their effi- 
ciency. 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



August 29, 1938. 



April 24, 1938. Leonard M. Sjogren, Assistant-Director 

of Signal Service, appointed Acting- 
Director of Signal Service. 
July 26, 1938. Appointment as Assistant Harbor Master 

cancelled, — Lieutenant James ' J. 
Crowley, then of Division 7. 
Appointment of following named per- 
sons as Assistant Harbor Masters: 
Patrolman Thomas E. Currivan, 

Division 8. 
Patrolman Daniel T. Doyle, 

Division 8. 
Patrolman Francis W. Eldridge, 

Division 8. 
Patrolman William F. Healey, 
Division 8. 
Announcement to the Department that 
the Civil Service Commission in a 
communication to the Police Com- 
missioner states it has under con- 
sideration the framing of an examina- 
tion for promotion to Sergeant in 
the Boston Police Department which 
will give credit in the examination 
for meritorious service. 
Commissioner commends members of the 
Department for extra emergency duty 
performed in the saving of lives and 
of property, September 21, 1938, on 
occasion of unprecedented storm or 
hurricane, which visited the city. 
Leonard M. Sjogren, Acting-Director 
of Police Signal Service, appointed 
and designated as Director of said Unit. 
Junior Police Corps established within 
the Department, under direction of 
Lieutenant William J. Carey of the 
Superintendent's Office. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
Its Organization and Duties. 
This Bureau, a central detective agency of the Department, 
consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a large 
scale and in an efficient manner. 



September 29, 1938. 



October 4, 1938. 



October 11, 1938. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

In addition to its divisions for investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen, lost and stolen property and homicide 
investigation, — squads are assigned to cover the following 
phases of police work and investigation: Arson, banking, 
express thieves, fraudulent claims, general investigation, hotels, 
narcotic, pawnbrokers, pickpocket, radical, shopping and sex 
crime. 

Members of this Bureau investigate every felony committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of 
investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they co-operate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
prosecution of criminals. 

Sex Crime Squad. 
The Sex Crime Squad, organized for the purpose of preven- 
tion as well as the apprehension and prosecution of perverts, 
degenerates and homo-sexuals who prey upon juveniles, has 
been successful in the prosecution and conviction of a great 
many cases during the past year. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in 
co-operation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department and Immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile division index contains records of ajiproxi- 
mately 700,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons 
and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the Department and the 
Automobile Division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are inves- 
tigated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this division during the year identified a number of automo- 



38 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



biles which were recovered or found abandoned on poUce 
divisions, restoring them to their owners, and have assisted 
in solving many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Used Car Dealers^ Licenses Granted. 

During the year 219 applications for such licenses were 
received. Of these 214 were granted (five without fee), and 
7 rejected. Of the 7 rejected, 2 were subsequently recon- 
sidered and granted, and are included in the total number of 
214 on which favorable action was taken. 

One license was canceled for non-payment of the fee. 

Of the licenses granted, 7 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation, and 8 transferred to new locations. (See Table 
XIV.) 

Provision for Hearing Before Granting License as Used Car 
Dealer of the Third Class. 
Under provisions of Chapter 96, Acts of 1938, effective 
June 13, 1938, no license shall be issued to a person as a Used 
Car Dealer of the Third Class (Motor Vehicle Junk License) 
until after hearing, of which seven days' notice shall have 
been given to owners of property abutting on premises where 
such license is proposed to be exercised. 

Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1938. 



Month. 


Reported 

Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


December 

January 

February 

March 

April . 

May . 

June . 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 


1937. 
1938. 






316 

203 
216 
316 
329 
293 
285 
271 
247 
289 
339 
270 


301 

196 
211 
306 
322 
286 
271 
260 
231 
269 
330 
255 


12 

7 
5 
8 
6 
3 
10 
7 
9 
9 
6 
5 


3 



2 
1 
4 
4 
4 
7 

11 
3 

10 


Totals 


3,374 


3,238 


87 


49 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



39 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1938. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1937. 








December 


2,472 


1,907 


1,150 


1938. 








January .... 


2,900 


2,159 


1,022 


February 








2,277 


2,233 


657 


March . 








2,869 


2,722 


1,114 


April 








3,090 


3,040 


1,232 


May 








2,936 


3,088 


1,205 


June 








2,330 


2,851 


1,011 


July 








2,593 


2,346 


863 


August . 








3,065 


2,322 


816 


September 








2,468 


2,559 


708 


October . 








2,318 


2,179 


728 


November 








2,479 


2,256 


625 


Totals 








31,797 


29,662 


11,131 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All of the surrounding 
cities and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost 
or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased 
by dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' 
worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 
Approximately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property 
index during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased for the purpose of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Homicide Squad. 

It is the duty of officers of this unit to interrogate all persons 
involved or having knowledge of the commission of crimes of 
murder, manslaughter, abortion or other crimes of violence. 
The officers assigned to homicide work, with police stenog- 
raphers, are subject to call at any hour of the day or night, 
and have been very successful in obtaining confessions and 
valuable statements. They are also required to prepare cases 
when inquests are necessary. The homicide files contain com- 
plete reports of all deaths by violence in Boston, inquests and 
also a record of all serious accidents which are reported to the 
Police Department. 

The following is a report of the Homicide Unit of the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported to this unit 
for the period, December 1, 1937, to November 30, 1938, 
inclusive : 



Abortion 






1 


Fires .... 


3 


Airplane . 






1 


Homicides 


4 


Alcoholism 






55 


Infanticides . 


1 


Asphyxiation 






11 


Murders 


5 


Automobile 






88 


Natural causes 


466 


Bicycles . 






2 


Poison .... 


4 


Burns 






13 


Railway (steam) . 


8 


Coasting . 






3 


Railway (bus) 


1 


Drowning 






31 


Railway (street) . 


13 


Electricity 






1 


Shooting by officers 


1 


Elevator . 






9 


Stillborn .... 


6 


Explosion 






2 


Suicides .... 


64 


Exposure 






2 






Falls 






49 


Total 


849 


Falling objects 




5 






The following cases w 


ere prosecuted in the courts: 




Abortions 


7 


Robbery .... 


1 


Accessory to abortion . 


3 


Assault to murder 


4 


Advising abortion . 


1 


Assault with weapon 


23 


Manufacturing abortionists 




Manslaughter (automobile) 


82 


instruments 


1 


Manslaughter 


7 


Concealing death of issue . 


1 






Assault and battery * . 


10 


Total . . . . 


142 


Murder 


2 







* The assault and battery prosecutions referred to were the result of serious injuries 
inflicted and thought at the time might prove fatal. The victims subsequently recovered 
and appeared in court as witnesses in the prosecution of these cases. 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



41 



The following inquests were held during the year : 

Railroad (steam) . 
Total 



Elevator .... 


1 


Falls .... 


2 


Homicide 


1 


Natural causes 


1 



5 
10 



Two hundred and eight cases of violent death were investi- 
gated by the Homicide Unit. The facts in these cases were 
presented to the presiding justices who deemed it unnecessary 
to conduct inquests, acting under authority of Chapter 118 of 
the Acts of 1932. 

Biological Chemist. 

Summary oj the Yearns Work. 

Work at the Laboratory. 

The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department, 

located at the Southern Mortuary, was started on February 19, 

1934. 

During the intervening period it has worked on 1,131 cases, 
making more than 13,000 individual tests. 



Dec. 1, 1934, 

to 
Nov. 30, 1935. 



Dec. 1, 1935, 

to 
Nov. 30, 1936. 



Dec. 1, 1936, 

to 
Nov. 30, 1937. 



Dec. 1, 1937, 

to 
Nov. 30, 1938. 



Test 
Cases 



2,875 
173 



3,051 
276 



3,022 

311 



3,077 

288 



Examination of the preceding table shows that the laboratory 
has reached a relatively stable point in regard to the amount of 
work done. Simply explained, this means that an approxi- 
mate limit of work, which a single chemist can produce, has 
been reached; the slight variations in the recorded data being 
the result of variation in the character of the cases submitted. 

Attendance at Courts, Etc. 
During the past twelve months the Biological Chemist has 
been in attendance before courts and grand juries on 83 days. 
This is a slightly lower figure than that reported last year. 
Affecting it is the frequency with which several cases have 
been scheduled for a single day. As all work in the laboratory 
ceases with the chemist's attendance at court, the scheduling 
of_several cases for a single day is a definite economy. 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Toxicology. 

As in past years, toxicology takes up a major portion of 
the chemist's time. The primary questions are the identifica- 
tion of the poison taken and the determination of the amount 
present. As one is usually dealing with small amounts of the 
toxic agent, specialized methods are usually necessary. The 
amount present may be perhaps two to five grains of poison 
(one ounce equals 437.5 grains) or even less which is dis- 
tributed through the body in varying amounts. Thus 100 
grams of tissue may contain as little as 0.2 of a milligram of 
poison (0.0002 gram) or in more familiar terms, the poison 
may be present in a concentration of two ten-thousandths of 
one per cent. The problem is distinctly different from the 
analysis of the same agent when present in from one to ten per 
cent concentration. 

In this field the most common problem involves alcoholism, 
a factor in both accidents and homicides. For a rather lengthy 
period observations have been made on the inter-relationships 
of brain, blood, and urine alcohol content. These data were 
summarized and the more important points given as part of a 
paper at the Medico-Legal Conference, held in this city in 
October of 1938. The paper also included a summary of 
observations made upon various carbon monoxide cases to- 
gether with explanation of various apparent deviations from 
normal expectation and methods of compensating for them. 

General Chemistry. 
Other general problems in chemical analysis are encountered 
in cases involving a variety of materials: Beverages, patent 
medicines, tablets, powders, various manufactured products 
of unknown composition, etc. The paraffin-diphenylamine 
test of hands for the discharge of a firearm, the recording of 
powder patterns in close shots, and the spectrographic analysis 
of bullets, etc., are applications of chemistry to ballistics. 

Bloodstains. 
More directly related to police work as an obvious use are 
the several chemical tests for the identification of blood in 
which the pigment of the blood is identified by means of 
chemical reactions. In some cases it may be possible in 
decomposing material to go back by chemical reactions through 
the breakdown of this complex pigment and identify stages up 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

to the point where any semblance to blood is lost and the 
stain is merely an iron stain which could be acquired in any 
of a number of ways. To go further and identify the blood- 
stain as being of human or animal origin requires use of the 
field of immunology. Here an anti-human protein serum is 
developed in an experimental animal, collected, and stored 
so that a stock supply is always on hand. This immunologic 
reaction is applicable not only to blood stains, but also to 
tissues. 

Histology. 

In certain types of cases one encounters small fragments of 
tissue. By means of the reaction previously described it may 
be shown whether or not they are of human origin. The 
fragment is also given a standard treatment, and micro- 
sections mounted for microscopic examination. In this way 
one can determine the type of tissue, i. e., brain, muscle, fat, 
scalp, etc. For comparison there are the locations of lacera- 
tions upon the injured individual. 

Under histology comes the examination of hairs. This is 
sometimes a problem of showing likeness of a hair to that of a 
given individual. At other times it involves the identification 
of the animal from which it came. For this latter purpose the 
laboratory has a reference file of various animal hairs and 
common furs, with enlarged photomicrographs for ready com- 
parison, and lantern slides for demonstration. 

Closely related to hair is the identification of fibers. These 
have their own characteristics which may be seen under the 
microscope. As these are commonly made into manufactured 
fabrics, one often encounters problems involving the structure 
and character of small bits of cloth. Where imperfections of 
weaving, etc., and similar fine points of mill work are involved, 
the specimens are submitted to textile experts who can 
explain the cause and manner of the imperfections, etc. 

Besides these there is also generalized work involving dust 
or gravel, parts of plants, and miscellaneous debris which may 
show significant inclusions. 

Briefly, in the course of a year's work, the chemist encounters 
problems involving virtually all the branches of science and 
many phases of applied science. In those instances where the 
problems go beyond his ability to qualify as an expert in court, 
they are discussed with recognized experts in the city or 
vicinity. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Co-operation With Other Units. 

During the year occasion has frequently occurred for co- 
operation with various units in the Department, and various 
departments of the city and state. Past cordial relations and 
free exchange of information and case experiences have been 
maintained. 

Laboratory Costs. 

The cost of the laboratory's work on a case basis has remained 
low at approximately $10.00 per case. In view of the nature 
of the work, this represents a trivial sum in comparison to 
the fees of private analysts. The year's work brought a 
number of cases where extensive analysis was absolutely 
necessary. Applying to these the fee of a private analyst, 
the charge on eleven of these cases (or approximately four per 
cent of the total cases) would cover the cost of the laboratory 
during the past year. 

General. 

The number of cases reported at this Bureau investigated 
during the year, was 7,893. There were 68,045 cases reported 
on the assignment books kept for this purpose, and reports on 
these cases are filed away for future reference. Complaints 
are received from many sources, including cases referred to the 
Bureau by justices of courts and the district attorney, in 
addition to cases reported direct to the Police Department. 

The statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation are included in statements of general work of the Depart- 
ment, but as the duties of this Bureau are of special character, 
the following statement may be of interest. 

Number of persons arrested 1,742 

Fugitives from justice from other states, arrested and delivered 

to officers of these states 62 

Number of cases investigated 7,893 

Number of extra duties performed 10,276 

Number of cases of abortion 7 

Number of days spent in court by officers 2,148 

Number of years' imprisonment, 207 years, 4 months, 12 days and 

18 indefinite periods 
Amount of property recovered $144,601.90 

Bureau of Records. 
Establishment, Purpose and Equipment. 
The Bureau of Records was established October 17, 1931, 
having been merged with that part of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation known as the Criminal Identification Division. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

The unit is of great value and stands in favorable compari- 
son with identification units of the most advanced departments. 

Advancements and changes are constantly being made to 
maintain the efficiency and to increase its worth. To bring 
about this efficiency of service, equipment of the Bureau is 
continually being augmented by addition of modern identifica- 
tion apparatus. 

The following partial list of such machines, which have con- 
stantly proved their value, is included in the equipment of the 
Bureau. 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic-graflex, back fitted with Kalart Synchronized Range 
Finder 5J" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens, in Compus Shutter, No. 2049398 
(ground glass back). 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic fitted with Graphic back and Kalart Synchronized 
Range Finder 5\" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens. No. 1504117, in Compus 
Shutter. 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic fitted with Graflex back and Carl Zeiss Tessar lens 
in barrel. No. 797021, 6" focal lens, ground glass back. 

1 Dexigraph machine. 

1 4x5 revolving back Graflex with focusing ground glass panel on back 
with 8" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in barrel, No. 595980. 

1 4x5 revolving back auto Graflex fitted with a Bausch & Lomb con- 
vertible Prota lens 16xV" focus, front element, No. 3232563. 

1 5x7 Speed Graphic fitted with Graflex back and ground glass panel, 
Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in sunk mount 7" focal length, No. 1124860. 

3 Fingerprint cameras Folner and Schwing with 72 millimeter Kodak 
anastigmatic F 6.3 lens, numbers 2534, 585 and 1806. 

1 4x5 box camera Ilex paragon lens series A 6^" focus, No. 41619 in Uni- 
versal shutter. 

1 16 Millimeter Cine-Kodak special and fitted with 19-25 M.M. lens 
also with 3" telephoto 2.7 wide angle and 6" telephoto. 

1 Century view Camera 8x10 and lens as listed for the above, 1 12" 
Kodak anastigmatic lens. No. 36465, 1 Bausch & Lomb wide angle 
8x10 Prota, No. 3234300. 

1 Goertz-Gotar lens, No. 755175 for 11x14 half-tone camera. 

1 5x7 enlarging camera Kodak anastigmatic lens. No. 337770. 

1 8x10 enlarging-reducing and copying camera. 

1 Rectigraph camera with a 10" Woolensock lens and prism. 

1 8x10 Pantoscopic Camera with a Bausch & Lomb 50 M.M. Tessar lens, 
No. 2612072, and a 72 M.M. Micro Tessar Bausch & Lomb lens, 
No. 3234901. 

1 Campbell combination X-ray and Fluoroscope Serial, No. 7318. 

1 Spencer lantern slide projector. 

1 Mimeograph machine. 

1 19" cutting machine. 

1 Multilith machine, complete with equipment. 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Multilith. 

The installation of a Multilith machine on January 31, 
1934, under direct supervision of experienced operators enables 
this Department to prepare and complete printing of circu- 
lars containing photographs and fingerprints of persons either 
reported missing or wanted for criminal offenses. The original 
cost of this machine has been saved many times over in the 
efficient method of printing such circulars in the Bureau. It 
has proved a distinct advantage in the issuance of these cir- 
culars which play so important a part in the apprehension 
of fugitives from justice. 

The MultiHth machine is completely equipped with cameras 
for the preparation of half-tones which add to the varied output 
of the machine. This machine is capable of printing in approxi- 
mately two hours descriptive circulars of persons wanted, 
and in some cases it is possible to complete and mail such 
circulars to outside cities before the fugitive arrives at his 
destination. 

Output of Daily Manifolds, Warrant Manifolds, etc. 

There were 515,000 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machine, comprising daily manifolds for the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation and Special Service Squad, warrant 
manifolds, bulletins and circular letters. 

A change of 28 forms had to be set up on loose type and run 
off on a Junior Multigraph machine from which a copy was 
made and then photographed. There were 63 forms photo- 
graphed and 90 forms printed in on a zinc plate. There were 
approximately 100 Multilith plates used by this unit in the 
past year and 75 films used. There were 150,000 copies that 
were padded and blocked in 50 's and lOO's. . 

Circulars Drafted, Containing Photographs and Fingerprints 

of Fugitives. 
During the year 36,700 circulars, containing photographs and 
fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed from 
this office to every city and town in the United States with a 
population of 5,000 or more, State Bureaus of Identification, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, all Army and Navy recruiting 
stations. United States Immigration Offices and Customs 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

Stations, and a number of the larger cities in foreign countries. 
Circulars requesting co-operation in the return of four miss- 
ing persons were sent to all important cities in the East and 
practically to every city in Massachusetts. 

Multilith {Recapitulation). 

Impressions printed on the Multilith machine . . 702,055 
Included in this figure are the following: 

Department forms 76 

Letters 7 

Circulars 18 

Impressions 36,700 

Photographic Division. 

The Photographic Division of the Bureau of Records is one 
of the finest and most modern in the entire country. Its equip- 
ment has been continually added to and renewed with a view of 
maintaining a high standard of service. 

It forms an important adjunct of the Medical Examiners' 
Offices and co-operates with those offices in all homicide cases. 
The Medical Examiners' Offices are supplied with enlarged 
photographs of every homicide case. The efficiency of the 
Medical Examiners' Offices is improved by the co-operation 
of this unit. 

The enlarged photographs are filed in cabinets especially 
built to accommodate the size. The enlarged photographs are 
principally the scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and 
suspicious fires, and have proved invaluable for court purposes. 
Many communications have been received as a result of the 
value of these photographs, particularly in arson cases. Juries 
have been greatly assisted in determining the condition of the 
burnt premises by the introduction and exhibition of these 
photographs in court. This same excellent effect is obtained 
in homicide and hit-and-run cases. 

Record Files of Assignments. 
The files of this Bureau contain records of all assignments 
made in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records 
of arrests made throughout the Department. There are 
also on file reports of all felonies committed within the city 
and all reports of the investigation of these felonies. 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Identification Division. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, and Massachu- 
setts Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints and 
photographs, also records of all inmates of the Suffolk County 
House of Correction and their fingerprints. The keepers of 
the jails and houses of correction in the several counties of the 
Commonwealth have been requested to furnish this Bureau 
with a copy of the fingerprints of every inmate and they have 
responded favorably. In addition to the foregoing, the files 
contain many thousands of photographs and fingerprints, cor- 
respondence, records, clippings and histories of criminals 
arrested or wanted in various parts of the United States and 
foreign countries. 

Main Index File. 

The Main Index File forms the basis on which all other files 
are dependent. It is at all times being checked to maintain its 
accuracy. There are now recorded in the Main Index File 
650,756 persons. These include all persons arrested and 
fingerprinted in the Bureau; applicants for Hackney Carriage 
Licenses; applicants for Special Officers' Licenses, etc. 

Criminal Record File. 
The Criminal Record files contain a record of each person 
whose fingerprints are contained in the fingerprint files. At 
the present time there are in the Female Record Files 11,079 
records and in the Male Record Files there are 109,365 such 
records. These records are continually being brought up to 
date by co-operation with outside departments and the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation. 

Cahinets of Segregated Photographs of Criminals Arrested. 
Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 
cabinets. Photographs received from outside departments 
are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and those taken 
by this Department are in the ''Local Segregated" file. The 
photographs of all criminals are segregated into four distinct 
sections, namely: white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each of 
these groups is subdivided according to the sex and is also clas- 
sified under the head of the crime in which the subjects special- 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

ize. The local segregated file contains 29,494 photographs 
and the foreign segregated file contains 13,911 photographs. 

Exhibiting of Photographs of Criminals in Main and Segregated 

Files. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files 
to victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc., 
and in many instances, important identifications have been 
made which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valuable 
assistance has also been rendered to government officials of 
the following branches: Post Office Department, Treasury- 
Department, Secret Service Department, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation and other government agencies. Similar serv- 
ices have also been rendered to railroad and express companies. 

Members of Bureau Visited Scenes of Homicides, Burglaries, Etc. 
Members of this Bureau visited the scenes of homicides, 
burglaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and 
secured photographs of fingerprints, in many instances of the 
persons who committed these crimes, and, in many cases, took 
photographs of the scene where the crime was committed. The 
figures and other data in connection with the work are con- 
tained in a subsequent part of this report. 

Ultra-Violet Lamp {'^ Black Light"). 
This Bureau has successfully continued in the operation 
of an ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black light." 
This type of lamp is used for the detection of forgeries on 
checks and altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counter- 
feit money, fake antiques and also for the photographing of 
bloodstained fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not 
be photographed are now photographed with ease through the 
use of luminous powders such as anthracene or luminous zinc 
sulphide, due to the radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The '' Fluoroscope" and ''White DrilV 

There have been acquired by this Bureau two valuable 

pieces of scientific equipment. The first is known as the 

"Fluoroscope." When the rays of this instrument are trained 

on the subject before it, it reveals the presence of any foreign 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

substance concealed either on or in his person: for instance, 
jewelry, metal or glass. The finding of glass in clothing of 
a person suspected of striking and killing a pedestrian with 
an automobile is another example of what the instrument 
may accomplish in the detection of crime and criminals. The 
same is none the less true of inanimate objects, such as packages 
containing bombs, or concealed defects in the mechanism 
of an automobile or other object, which may be responsible 
for serious accidents or death of persons. The value of this 
device in thwarting criminals is very apparent and will make 
an important addition to the scientific equipment contained 
in this Bureau. 

The second piece of equipment before referred to is the 
"White Drill," purchased for the purpose of repairing photo- 
graphic equipment. This work had been done by commercial 
concerns but is now performed by the photographers attached 
to this Bureau to the greatest extent possible, resulting in a 
large saving. 

Pantoscopic Camera. 

One of the most valuable pieces of equipment in this Bureau 
is the Pantoscopic Camera which is used for the purpose of 
taking photographs of bullets used in homicide cases. By 
means of this camera the entire circumference of the bullet 
showing the cannelure impressions made as it passes through 
the barrel of the revolver can be photographed. The impres- 
sions shown by the photograph of this bullet are carefully 
compared with the impressions of a test bullet fired from a 
revolver which is believed to have been used in some homicide. 
If the test bullet and the real bullet disclose the same cannel- 
ure impressions, there is a strong presumption created that the 
revolver under examination is the one which was used in the 
homicide. 

Developing and Printing Room. 

The developing and printing of criminal photographs by 
members of this Bureau has, since its existence, saved thousands 
of dollars. The original practice of having this work done by 
private photographers necessarily led to great expense and 
delay. A staff of experienced photographers trained in every 
phase of police photography, on duty twenty-four hours a day, 
is prepared to accomplish any photographic need of the De- 
partment and to give that type of service which could be 
rendered only by the most modern and best equipped pho- 
tographer. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

In conjunction with the increased demands which have con- 
stantly been made on this staff of technicians and in order 
that their work might be maintained on an efficient basis, there 
has, in the past year, been installed in the Bureau a developing 
and printing room which compares favorably with that of any 
in this locality. 

The installation of this "Dark Room" has many favorable 
advantages. It is located on the same floor as the Bureau, 
where all photographs of prisoners are taken, thus ehminating 
the necessity formerly followed of developing and printing in 
a separate part of the building. The room is large, con- 
taining twice the floor space of the old room, large sinks for 
washing the films, a new Ferrotype dryer and other equip- 
ment for the production of work of a high standard. This 
has been one of the major changes in the Bureau during the 
past year and represents a definite forward step in the photo- 
graphic division. 

Filing System of Photographs and Fingerprints of Unidentified 

Dead. 

A modern development of the photographic division is the 
installation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photo- 
graphs of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are 
first sent to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Army, Navy 
and Marine Corps, in such cases where the persons are of the 
enlistment age, in an effort to identify these dead. Failing 
in this, they are filed in the Bureau of Records for future refer- 
ence. Through this method, a large proportion of the tenta- 
tively unidentified dead were later identified and their relatives 
notified. 

Single-Fingerprint Files. 

The single-fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crime. Here- 
tofore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might 
be, taken at the scene of a crime, were valuable only for com- 
parisons with the ten fingerprints of the person under suspicion, 
whether his prints were then in our files or taken later. There 
was no method of filing latent fingerprints taken at the scene 
of crime up to the comparatively recent origination of the single- 
fingerprint system of filing by Chief Inspector Battley of the 
Fingerprint Division of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley 
system of single fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of 
Records, and does not weaken in any way the standard system 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of filing fingerprints but is a very valuable addition thereto. 
There are, at present, on file in this Bureau 15,120 Battley 
single fingerprints and 945 latent fingerprints which are com- 
pared with all incoming single fingerprints. 

Fingerprint System Practically Eliminating Bertillon 
System. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the 
Bertillon system as a means of criminal identification. During 
the year the identity of hundreds of criminals was established 
for this and other departments through the fingerprint files of 
this Bureau. The identification of persons wanted for murder 
and robbery while armed was among the most important 
made. 

Civilian-Fingerprint File. 

Another important development of this Bureau was the 
institution of the civilian-fingerprint file wherein are kept the 
fingerprints of certain license applicants with a suitable index 
attached. 

Its Use In Connection With Applicants for Licenses. 
By means of the segregated file, it is impossible for a person 
with a criminal record, whose fingerprints are on file, to obtain 
a license under an assumed name, because by comparing his 
fingerprints with those in the civilian-fingerprint file, it is a 
matter of only a minute to determine whether the particular 
applicant has ever had, or applied for, a license before. There 
are now contained in the civilian files the fingerprints and 
criminal records, if any, of 9,119 hackney carriage operators, 
471 sight-seeing car operators and 3,247 Special Police Officers. 

Displacement of Conley-Flak System of Fingerprint 
Classification. 

The Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification and 
filing, in operation in the Boston Police Department since the 
installation of fingerprints in 1906, has been entirely dis- 
placed and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended 
System of Fingerprint Classification and Filing, as used in the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D. C. 

In order to effect the change, some 150,000 fingerprints 
were carefully checked by operatives, the formula on each was 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

revised, and a new type of filing card made out for each set 
of fingerprints together with complete criminal record of each 
subject typed thereon, showing the dealings of the individual 
with the various law enforcement agencies throughout the 
country. In such cases where a criminal subject uses one or 
more aliases, cross-reference cards were made and filed in 
addition to the main card. 

In effecting the transformation of systems from the Conley- 
Flak to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons, who are either 
now dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely 
at an end, were removed from the active file and placed in 
a separate file for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates 
were taken from the files and placed in other inactive files 
A final examination was then made to insure correct filing of 
every fingerprint and record card. At this writing, it can be 
truthfully said that the fingerprint system of the Boston 
Police Department, including the method of filing, quality and 
amount of fingerprint equipment and skilled operators, is 
comparable to the practically infallible files of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation at Washington, D. C, after which 
this Department's new system was fashioned. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Division of the 
Bureau of Records. 

This table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of copies prepared. 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . . . 369 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) . . . 130 

Scenes of crime photographed 1,180 

Circulars sent out by identification division 36,700 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1937 162,416 

Made and filed during the year 3,080 

Received from other authorities 1,512 

Number on file November 30, 1938 167,008 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1937 125,979 

Taken and filed during year 3,080 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 2,540 

Number on file November 30, 1938 131,599 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 6,437 

Other cities and states 376 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation ...... 2,986 

State Bureau of Identification 5,118' 

Other cities and states . . . . . . . . 108 

Prisoners' Record sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 3,905 

Supplementary: 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,180 

Number of exposures (small camera) 1,567 

Number of prints (small camera) 1,567 

Number of enlargements: 

16 by 20 inches 20 

11 by 14 inches 347 

8 by 10 inches 856 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 1,039 

Prints made from same 1,981 

Number of rectigraph photographs 3,491 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 10 

Number of civiUan employees photographed .... 11 

Number of negatives of criminals 3,094 

Number of prints from same 17,054 

Number of fingerprint investigations (negative) . . . 465 

Number of fingerprint investigations (positive) . . . 329 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed . 583 

Number of visitors photographed 201' 

Prints made from same 758 

Number of exposures on Pantoscopic camera .... 12 

Number of re-orders of criminal photographs .... 3,044 

Number of stand-up photographs made 24 

Prints made from same 68 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 10 

Special police officers 257 

Taxi drivers 524 

Civilian employees 11 

CivUian non-employees 144 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1937 . 12,823 

Total niunber of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1938 13,759 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

Request for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from police journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports services performed as follows: 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

poHce journal in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 12,670 
Days in coiu^t 21 

Services of a Draftsman from the Personnel. 
A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the serv- 
ice of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who drafts 
the scenes of crimes for presentation as evidence in court to aid 
the government in the prosecution of its cases by showing the 
jury the exact location and surroundings at the scene. During 
the course of the year, the draftsman visited scenes of various 
serious crimes where he took the measurements and later drew 
to scale forty-nine individual plans. Eighteen of these have 
been used as exhibits in the following courts within the juris- 
diction of Boston : 

Municipal Court 9 days. 

Grand Jury of Suffolk Coxmty ,....., 17 days. 

Superior Court 11 days. 

Many of these drawings have not as yet been exhibited in 
any court, but will be presented when the cases to which they 
relate come to trial. 

The drafting room is fully equipped with all necessary' 
instruments required for efficiently handling this work. 

Criminal Records for the Department Furnished hy the Bureau. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of convic- 
tions for presentation in courts, both here and in other cities. 

The following figures represent the requests received for 
these records from December 1, 1937, to November 30, 1938: 

Requests received by telephone 500 

Requests for correspondence 1,000 

Requests for certified records 1,903 

Requests for jury records 571 

Total 3,974 

Requests in connection with apphcants for hcenses . . . 15,839 

Grand Total 19,813 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Identification Made Through Fingerprints. 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions, when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also, where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. 

The photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally 
before courts of this city, but on occasions where connections 
are made with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photog- 
rapher who enlarges the prints for the purpose of charting them 
for presentation as evidence in court, is also summoned into 
court to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. 

There have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of 
police of outside cities and towns have asked for the services of 
fingerprint and photography experts in consequence of crime com- 
mitted in their jurisdiction and the Department co-operated by 
sending these men, properly equipped, to survey the scene of 
crime and reproduce any prints available for evidence. 

Missing Persons. 

The Missing Persons Division is a branch of the Bureau of 
Records and is performing a fine type of service to the citizens 
of Boston and surrounding cities and towns. Its chief function 
necessarily is to aid families in the location of their relatives 
reported lost or missing. It performs valuable service in the 
identification of unknown dead persons found in the various 
sections of the city whose relatives have been located. Without 
this service, such identified dead persons might have been 
interred with those unfortunates in potter's field. 

During the course of the year, the Missing Persons Bureau 
co-operated with the various State institutions in the location 
and return of many wards who have left these institutions with- 
out permission. 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston . . . 1,366 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,242 



Total number still missing 124 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



57 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston. 





MisaiNG. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


343 


94 


333 


94 


10 





Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 


246 


178 


221 


161 


25 


17 


Over 21 years, 


314 


191 


270 


163 


44 


28 


Totals . 


903 


463 


824 


418 


79 


45 



Submitted herewith, also, is Table No. 2 of persons reported 
missing from cities and towns outside of Boston: 

Total number of persons reported missing from cities and towns 

outside of Boston, as shown in Table No. 2 . . . . 1,456 
Total number found and restored to relatives . . . . 1,176 



Total number still missing 



280 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing from Cities and 
Towns Outside of Boston. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 




Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


254 


51 


223 


45 


31 


6 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


446 


283 


364 


236 


82 


47 


Over 21 years, 


290 


132 


212 


96 


78 


36 


Totals . 


990 


466 


799 


377 


191 


89 



The foregoing tables of figures do not include 140 persons 
reported missing from the Boys' Parole and Girls' Parole 
Branch Divisions, Child Guardianship, State Department of 
Public Welfare. Of these cases 87 have been found or have 
returned, leaving 53 cases still being investigated. In addi- 
tion, cases of children reported to the Department as missing 
and found or returned within a few hours are not included in 
the above figures. 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were 141 cases of identified dead persons recorded by 
the Bureau and investigated by the various units of the 
Department. 

In an effort to estabhsh the identification of unknown dead 
persons, fingerprints of 25 unidentified bodies were taken. Of 
these, 14 identifications were secured through either the finger- 
print files of the Bureau of Records, Boston Police Department, 
the State Bureau of Identification, the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, the United States Marine Corps, the United States 
War Department or the Bureau of Navigation of the United 
States Navy. 

There were approximately 3,200 pieces of correspondence 
relating to missing persons handled by this Bureau. There 
were approximately 3,500 tracers sent out on missing persons; 
approximately 500 persons were interviewed relative to lost 
persons. This does not include the number interviewed at 
the various units and divisions of the Department. There 
were sent out from the Bureau approximately 2,000 photo- 
static descriptive circulars on missing persons. The Depart- 
ment assisted in establishing the identity in the cases of six 
victims of amnesia. 

Warrant File. 
Procedure as to Warrants Issued to or Received hy this Department. 

The warrant file for the entire Police Department is now 
kept in the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued to 
or received by this Department is sent out each day on the 
manifold and every officer in the Department receives a copy 
of this Ust. Twenty-four hours after the issuance of a warrant, 
if the person named therein has not been arrested, a form card 
is forwarded to the Bureau of Records by the station house 
with all the data pertaining to the warrant and the case. 
These cards are alphabetically filed so that almost instan- 
taneously it can be ascertained whether a warrant exists in the 
Department for any person that may be named. On service 
of the warrant another card goes forward to the Bureau of 
Records with the necessary information of service. 

Warrants Received from Outside Departments, Etc. 
All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant files of the Bureau of Records. All cor- 
respondence pertaining to the movement of warrants outside 
of the city proper is handled in the Bureau of Records. Com- 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

manding Officers of this Department are required, under the 
rules and regulations, to notify the Warrant Division of an 
arrest on warrants issued to the Boston Police Department 
and all other poUce departments, also when arrests are made 
without a warrant involving serious crimes. The rule applies 
to this procedure every hour of the day and night. The 
warrant files are immediately searched. If it appears that 
there is a warrant for the arrested person in any other juris- 
diction, the officer in command of the arresting division or unit 
is immediately notified and given full particulars and the 
poUce division or unit in Boston or outside jurisdiction is 
immediately informed that the person is under arrest. 

Number of Warrants Received by Bureau of Records and their 

Disposition. 
The following table sets forth data relative to the receipt of 
warrants by this Bureau and their disposition : 

Warrants received by Bureau of Records 4,061 

Arrested on warrants ^ 2,217 

Warrants returned without service 2,916 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the Department 

and to other jurisdictions 2,315 

Active warrant cards on file issued to Boston Police . . . 11,089 
Active warrants issued to Boston Police for persons now out of 

State 84 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police, forwarded to other cities 

and towns in this State . . . . . . . . 745 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service (cards in our files) 412 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers , . . 179 

Summons File. 
Establishment and Purpose. 
On December 14, 1936, there was established in the Bureau 
of Records a summons file for the purpose of facilitating the 
service of summonses. All summonses for service outside the 
City of Boston obtained by the several divisions and units are 
forwarded to this Bureau where they are recorded and sent to 
the Chief of Police of the city or town where the defendant 
resides. Summonses received from other poUce departments 
for service in this city are in the same manner recorded and 
sent to the respective divisions and units for service, and after 
service has been made, are returned. 



60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The following figures represent summonses received from 
outside cities and towns for service in Boston from December 1, 
1937, to November 30, 1938: 



Total number received 

Total number served .... 

Total number returned without service 



2,786 

2,590 

196 



The following figures represent the number of summonses 
sent from the Bureau of Records for service in outside cities 
and towns : 

Received from local divisions and units and sent out . . . 16,838 

Total number served 13,941 

Total number not served 2,897 

Persons Committed to Bail. 
The following figures represent the number of persons com- 
mitted to bail in the various divisions from December 1, 1937, 
to November 30, 1938: 

December, 1937 90 



January, 1938 
February, 1938 
March, 1938 
April, 1938 . 
May, 1938 . 
June, 1938 . 
July, 1938 . 
August, 1938 
September, 1938 
October, 1938 
November, 1938 

Total . 



100 

141 

75 

89 

132 

126 

135 

100 

150 

100 

57 

1,295 



Buildings Found Open and Secured hy Police Officers. 
The following figures represent the number of buildings 
found open or unsecured and secured by police officers by 
divisions from December 1, 1937, to November 30, 1938: 

Division 1 152 

Division 2 306 

Division 3 59 

Division 4 166 

Carried forward 683 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



61 



Brought forward 












683 


Division 6 . 












174 


Division 7 . 












125 


Division 9 . 












285 


Division 10 












139 


Division 11 












183 


Division 13 












129 


Division 14 












192 


Division 15 












129 


Division 16 












275 


Division 17 












179 


Division 18 












85 


Division 19 












183 


Special Service Squad 








2 


Total . 












2,763 



Defective Public Streets Reported. 
The following figures represent the number of defective 
public streets reported by divisions from December 1, 1937, to 
November 30, 1938: 

Division 1 



Division 2 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 13 
Division 14 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Division 18 
Division 19 

Total 



7 

56 

108 

191 

153 

148 

184 

126 

130 

94 

84 

23 

396 

170 

37 

160 

2,067 



Police School. 
There were no sessions of the school held during the current 
police year. 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Traffic. 

The Trafl&c Division, established on May 22, 1936, is located 
in quarters on the fifth floor of Police Building, 229 Milk street. 

The Traffic Division includes territory within boundaries of 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 16, and the traffic post at Cottage- 
Farm Bridge. 

Activities. 

The Commanding Officer of the Traffic Division is responsible 
for proper regulation of traffic conditions and for safety of the 
public using the highways in the territory under jurisdiction 
of the Traffic Division, daily, from 8 a. m. to 12 midnight. 

This has been a trying year for officers of the Traffic Division 
for the reason that a number of thoroughfares, such as Beacon 
and Boylston streets, Huntington and Atlantic avenues, and 
other main arteries, have undergone reconstruction, including 
resurfacing of streets; a new subway extension; removal of 
water pipes; removal of electric cables of the Boston Elevated 
Railway on Atlantic avenue; repair and installation of under- 
ground telephone wires; and other work in connection with 
pubhc utilities, — all of which caused narrowing down of such 
streets, where, at times, but one lane could be used for traffic 
purposes. 

Beacon street (which, perhaps, handled more traffic in both 
directions than any artery in Boston) was made ''one way" 
from Charles street to Massachusetts avenue, throwing the 
bulk of traffic, formerly handled by this street, into Common- 
wealth avenue and Marlborough street. This caused a great 
delay to traffic at this section and brought about congested 
conditions through no fault of the Police Department. 

The Warren Bridge, over which passes traffic between the 
Charlestown district and the city proper, was closed practically 
the entire year. This threw a heavy flow of traffic into Keany 
square, to be cared for by the Charlestown Bridge. 

An additional difficulty with which the police were con- 
fronted was the fact that the Charlestown Bridge, when 
opened to allow passage of vessels through the channel, was in 
such a condition mechanically, that many times from twenty 
to twenty-five minutes elapsed before the draw closed and the 
bridge was open to vehicular traffic. This, of course, was a 
hindrance and one which backed up traffic from Keany 
square to the circle at Haymarket square and beyond. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

The foregoing conditions at the arteries described (except- 
ing that there is an opening of one lane of traffic on the Warren 
Bridge) still remain and will continue for some time from in- 
formation received from those working on various projects, 
most of which are under the Works Progress Administration. 

These conditions necessitated police officers on posts not 
heretofore required, thereby decreasing our police man-power 
in the city proper. 

With these various conditions as obstacles to ordinary free 
flow of traffic, it has also been the duty of the Traffic Division 
to care for ordinary downtown flow of heavy traffic, as well as 
in the Back Bay, and especially at such points as the North 
and South Stations, the Market district, Boston Garden, 
Sumner Tunnel, Boston Arena, Boston Opera House, Symphony 
Hall, Horticultural Hall, Mechanics Building, Fenway Park, 
the theatrical section and steamboat wharves. 

It is, in addition, the duty of the Traffic Division to work 
out with the Board of Street Commissioners proper arrange- 
ments for large parades, such as the Boston School Cadets, 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company, Central Labor 
Union, Labor Day; Columbus Day, on October 12th; American 
Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars on Armistice Day, and 
the Santason Parade, sponsored by the Jordan Marsh Com- 
pany, on Thanksgiving Day, all of which were handled with 
the co-operation of other police divisions and completed 
successfully. 

The Traffic Division has cared for the welfare of many 
tourists and members of organizations coming to this city to 
attend conventions with headquarters at the various large 
hotels, such as the Hotel Statler, Copley-Plaza Hotel, and 
others of like character; the Marathon Road Race, on April 
19, 1938; the Boston Traveler Soap Box Derby on July 30, 
held at Suffolk Downs, at which the Safety Educational Auto- 
mobile of the Boston Police Department was present, with its 
speakers; the so-called "Corrigan Day," sponsored by his 
Honor, Mayor Tobin, on August 8, 1938, which necessitated 
the handling of a tremendous crowd from time of arrival at 
the airport until the termination of the festivities at a banquet 
held at the Copley-Plaza Hotel, about 11.30 p. m.; and the 
Carol Singers on Christmas Eve; also the hurricane of Sep- 
tember 21, 1938, uprooting large trees in such arteries as 
Commonwealth avenue, and other main thoroughfares, ob- 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

structing free movement of traffic and causing its detouring 
which required additional men at various locations where these 
conditions obtained. 

On the latter date many of the officers remained on duty 
until 1 a. m. after doing a regular tour of duty from 7.45 a. m. 
of the same day, assisting in great measure in looking after the 
freedom of the streets, the safety of motorists and pedestrians, 
caring for wreckage of buildings, and in roping off streets to 
make them safe for travel and preventing injury to persons 
or damage to property. 

It is the duty of the Traffic Division to make inspection and 
study of traffic conditions throughout the city, for the purpose 
of learning where the so-called "sore" spots are, to make cor- 
rections, where needed, and also to make recommendations to 
the Boston Traffic Commission, for the placing of "No Park- 
ing" signs, where construction work is in operation, as well as 
at large parades or other activities, necessitating the restric- 
.tion of parking on streets over which these various parades 
pass, and, further, calling to the attention of the Traffic Com- 
mission when automatic control signal lights are out of order. 

Some of the duties successfully accomplished by the Traffic 
Division were the handling of approximately 1,000,000 persons 
who attended baseball games at Fenway Park, regulation of 
about 300,000 automobiles, with their passengers, at the 
entrance to the Sumner Traffic Tunnel, between the hours of 
11.30 a. m. and 2.45 p. m., from April 30 to July 9, during the 
racing season at Suffolk Downs, East Boston district; the 
policing of almost 1,000,000 people, many of them mothers 
and small children, who attended the Santason Parade along 
its route on Thanksgiving Day, without injury to any of those 
attending, and the efficient handling of the tremendous crowd 
of people on "Corrigan Day," estimated to be at least 1,000,000 
persons, who viewed this large parade along its extensive route. 

Tagging. 
Beginning January 1, 1938, and continuing during the 
months of January and February, the Traffic Division took 
over the duty of tagging automobiles illegally parked in our 
streets, which had been handled from November 12, 1937, 
to the end of the year, by the special tagging detail from the 
Superintendent's Office, and which again resumed that responsi- 
bihty March 1, 1938, to July 2, 1938, on which latter date it 
was again turned over to the Traffic Division. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

During the months of January and February, when it was 
difficult to obtain in collective groups at one time from the 
Registrar of Motor Vehicles the names and addresses of regis- 
trants of automobiles parked illegally in the streets of this 
city — for the reason that compilation in available book form 
had not then been made of such registrants — the Traffic 
Division did obtain the names and addresses of 5,737 auto- 
mobile owners, to whom notices were sent for violations of the 
parking rules. 

From July 2, 1938, up to and including November 30, 1938, 
and including the period of January and February, 1938, the 
Traffic Division has tagged approximately 53,908 automobiles 
for illegal parking, or approximately 15,372 more cars than 
were tagged by the Traffic Division during the year of 1937, 
which is exclusive of the period of time from March 1, 1938, 
to July 2, 1938, during which period this responsibility was, as 
stated, vested in the special tagging detail assigned to the 
Superintendent's Office. 

On July 11, 1938, legislation became effective whereby it 
was no longer necessary to send parking notices to owners of 
illegally parked automobiles by registered mail, which prior to 
the passage of this act had been mandatory by law. 

This saving of approximately eighteen cents on each notice 
resulted in reducing the cost of postage in forwarding notices 
to offending owners approximately S8,000 for the period of 
time from July 11 up to and including November 30, 1938. 

Safety Educational Automobile. 

A Safety Educational automobile has continued in operation 
on the highways of Boston during the past year, for the pur- 
pose of instructing the public as to the proper manner in which 
they should conduct themselves in the operation of their auto- 
mobiles, and to educate pedestrians as to the proper places 
and manner in which they should cross the street. 

The safety car, attached to the Traffic Division, has been 
in great demand during the past year, reporting daily in 
Governor square and giving its safety talk each morning 
between the hours of 8.45 and 9, over radio station WORL, 
resulting in the receipt of many letters of favorable comment 
on these excellent traffic talks. 

This car was manned by two high-type police officers, but 
sad to say, one of them (Patrolman John E. DeRoche) died 
during the past year, necessitating selection of another man 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of the same type to take his place, who has now become well 
versed in the duties required of officers giving these safety talks. 

During the past year the car was sent to all school districts 
throughout the city, in accordance with schedules received 
from the Chairman of the School Committee and a Super- 
visor of Parochial Schools. It has been estimated that ap- 
proximately 45,000 mothers were present during these talks. 

The car with its speakers has also been called on to appear 
at gatherings of employees of trucking concerns, telegraph 
offices, theatres, large business establishments, as well as civic 
and fraternal organizations, where safety talks have been 
given to persons assembled. 

During the summer school vacation the Safety Educational 
Car rendered excellent service to children visiting pubUc play- 
grounds, beaches and other recreational centers, giving safety 
talks to persons attending, as well as bringing to their atten- 
tion what it means to be a co-operative, willing person, with 
respect for property, resulting in the receipt by the Police 
Commissioner and Superintendent of many letters commending 
these officers in their splendid work. 

This educational car, also, as result of requests received 
by the PoHce Commissioner for its attendance at the National 
Convention of the Veterans of Foreign Wars held at Columbus, 
Ohio, during the week of August 21, visited this convention, 
where it won over the good will of all attending, and particu- 
larly his Honor, the Mayor of Boston, for its splendid work 
at the convention. Many believe in great measure it was a 
helpful factor in bringing to Boston the National Convention 
of this body for the year of 1939. 

During the past year officers operating the safety car visited 
823 public and parochial schools, including elementary, junior 
high and high schools, as well as the Teachers College, and 
spoke to approximately 1,300 teachers and 390,000 pupils. 

Since the opening of the 1938 school year and up to the 
present time through the medium of the loud speaker of the 
safety car, talks along safety lines, with practical demonstra- 
tions of hand signals and with the use of a portable miniature 
signal-control light, have been given by officers in the car to 
approximately 1,895 teachers and 5,000 parents of pupils in the 
different schools. 

As a result of these safety talks by officers in control of the 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

Safety Educational Car, the Police Commissioner and Super- 
intendent have received many commendatory letters from 
persons in various walks of life. 

It is attributed that reduction in fatalities in Boston through 
automobile accidents during the past year has been in great 
measure the result of safety talks given by officers in the Safety 
Educational Car. 

Supervisor of Cases Unit. 
Its Purpose. 
The Supervisor of Cases is directly charged with prepara- 
tion, presentation and supervision of all cases prosecuted in 
the criminal courts within jurisdiction of the City of Boston, 
the duty of interrogating all prisoners and witnesses in cases 
of serious felonies, excepting homicide cases, and conducting 
the daily line-up of prisoners arrested for serious offenses. 

Personnel. 
The personnel of the Unit is as follows : 

1 Captain, designated as the Super- 9 Sergeants, 
visor of Cases. 5 Patrolmen. 

1 Lieutenant-Inspector. 1 Stenographer. 



The foregoing are assigned for duty by the Supervisor as 
follows : 

Office of the District Attorney for Dorchester Municipal Court: 
Suffolk County: 1 Patrolman. 

1 Lieutenant-Inspector. East Boston Municipal Court: 

3 Sergeants. 1 Sergeant. 

1 Patrolman. Roxbury Municipal Court: 
Brighton Municipal Court: 1 Sergeant. 

1 Patrolman. West Roxbury Municipal Court: 
Central Municipal Coiu't: 1 Sergeant. 

2 Sergeants. Clerical Service: 
1 Patrolman. 1 Sergeant. 

Charlestown Municipal Court: 1 Stenographer. 

1 Patrolman. 

, Procedure After Arrest. 
In the event arrest is made by a member of the Department 
(other than for minor infraction of law), the arresting officer 
makes complete report of the arrest to the supervising officer 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

assigned to the court having jurisdiction of the case. This 
report is made on form provided for the purpose and bears the 
following facts : 

Name of court. Offense charged. 

Date of filing. Name of arresting officer. 

Name and age. Names and addresses of all wit- 
Address and description of prisoner. nesses in the case. 

The arresting officer then fills in on the form a concise but 
complete history of the case and also the evidence each witness 
will testify to in court. 

This form is given to the supervising officer upon the com- 
plaining officer's arrival at court. From this report, the 
supervising officer is able to determine whether or not the 
proper charge has been presented, and, further, that all wit- 
nesses are present to testify in court. The supervising officer 
may then recommend and ask for continuance of the case, 
where more time is needed for preparation. In instances 
where certified copies of previous convictions will materially 
aid, continuance is asked so that these records may be obtained. 

After disposition of cases in lower courts the supervising 
officer makes an index card, identifying the case by name and 
number. The officer's report is filed in the office of the Super- 
visor of Cases, in a manila folder bearing identifjdng number. 

In cases where appeal is taken or the prisoner is bound over 
for the grand jury, the case folder and index card are filed 
separately from completed cases. 

Upon notice from the District Attorney that an appealed or 
a grand jury case is to be heard, the folder containing officer's 
report and all other papers pertaining to the case are for- 
warded to the supervising officer in the District Attorney's 
office, Avhere they may be used by the District Attorney and 
his assistants. 

Upon completion of a case in the superior court, the dis- 
position is entered upon index card and the folder filed away 
in the completed-case file for future reference. 

Information contained in files of the Supervisor of Cases is 
advantageously used by attaches of the office of the State 
Department of Correction and investigators of the parole 
division of that department. 

Line-Up. 
At 8 a. m. each week day all prisoners arrested for serious 
offenses are brought by the several stations and units to Room 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

403, Police Headquarters, where facts of the case, together 
with any record furnished by the Bureau of Records pertain- 
ing to the prisoner, are given to the Supervisor of Cases by 
the arresting officer. 

The Supervisor of Cases then questions the prisoner and 
the stenographer records all questions and answers. Not in- 
frequently, prisoners arrested for serious offenses by police 
departments of metropolitan Boston are placed in the line-up 
and interrogated by the Supervisor. 

When persons are arrested for serious offenses, all divisions 
in the Department are notified to bring witnesses to the line-up. 
Police departments of metropolitan Boston are also notified 
by teletype, so that they may bring witnesses and victims of 
crimes to view the line-up for identification purposes. 

After prisoners have been interrogated individually, they are 
all placed in the line-up together, and witnesses and victims, 
one by one, view them. When identification is made, the 
stenographer, under the direction of the Supervisor, records all 
statements made by the prisoner and of identifying witnesses 
and victims. 

Special officers attached to divisions and members of the 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation attend the line-up each day, 
and record of their attendance is kept by the Supervisor. 

Statements recorded by the stenographer are transcribed 
and a copy of the transcript placed in the folder containing the 
arresting officer's report of the case. In cases pertaining to 
outside police agencies, a copy of the transcript is forwarded 
by the Supervisor to the police of the city involved. 

In a majority of cases tried in the courts, the "line-up state- 
ments" have been the means of obtaining convictions, as have 
identifications made by victims and witnesses in courts of this 
jurisdiction. 

This also is true in cases tried in the superior courts of other 
counties where our transcripts have been used. 

Figures on the '' Line-Up." 
The followiijig is the number of persons appearing before the 
line-up during the police year, December 1, 1937, to November 
30, 1938: 

2,215 prisoners appeared in the line-up. 

686 of this number confessed to crimes. 
1,240 were recorded as having previous records. 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



During the same period : 

984 witnesses attended the line-up. 
329 identifications were made. 

Cases Supervised. 
Following is the number of cases supervised in the courts 
during the police year, December 1, 1937, to November 30, 
1938: 



Month. 


Personal 
Supervision. 


General 
Supervision. 


Total 

Number Cases 

Supervised. 


Percentage of 

"Guilty" 

Cases. 


1937. 










December 


1,126 


2,351 


3,477 


88.6 


1938. 










January 


1,101 


2,239 


3,340 


87.8 


February 








1,149 


2,450 


3,599 


87.9 


March . 








1,008 


2,204 


3,212 


83.7 


April 








897 


998 


1,895 


84.1 


May 








956 


1,396 


2,352 


87.8 


June 








936 


1,622 


2,558 


83.5 


July 








758 


1,501 


2,259 


87.4 


August 








601 


1,354 


1,955 


93.1 


September 








994 


1,538 


2,532 


84.2 


October 








1,262 


1,248 


2,510 


83.3 


November 








1,168 


1,522 


2,690 


88.2 


Totals 








11,956 


20,423 


32,379 


86.63 



Transcripts of Statements and Their Disposition. 
The following is the number of transcripts made of state- 
ments of prisoners and witnesses under direction of the Super- 
visor of Cases by the stenographer: 

1,661 transcripts prepared. 

Transcripts were used and were material in bringing about 
convictions as follows: 

Suffolk County Superior Court . . 396 



Brighton Court 
Central Court 
Charlestown Court 
Dorchester Court 
East Boston Court 
Roxbury Court . 
South Boston Court 
West Roxbury Court 



12 
61 
42 
20 
29 
52 
33 
16 



Total 



661 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



71 



Superior Courts in outside counties : 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Total 



26 
3 
1 

30 



Federal authorities: 

United States Federal Court holden in Boston, 10 

Transcripts were forwarded to outside police departments as 
follows : 



Arlington .... 2 


Milton . 


Brookline .... 6 


New Bedford 


Belmont 1 


Newton . 


Cambridge .... 1.3 


Quincy . 


Canton 1 


Reading . 


Chelsea 2 


Revere 


Dedham 2 


SomerviUe 


Dighton 1 


Springfield 


Greenfield .... 1 


Stoneham 


Hull 1 


Stoughton 


Lynn 1 


Weymouth 


Metropolitan District Commission 6 


Worcester 


Maiden 2 




Medford 1 


Total 


Melrose 1 





3 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
10 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

68 



Transcripts were forwarded to police departments outside of 
the state as follows: 



Pawtucket, R. I. 
Providence, R. I. 
Portland, Me. . 
Dover, N. H. 
New York City . 

Total . 



Commendation of Justices. 
Presiding justices of the several courts and members of the 
District Attorney's office have many times commended the 
efficient service rendered by the Supervisor of Cases and his 
assistants, in that cases coming before the courts are properly 
prepared and uniformly presented. 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Bureau of Operations. 

Creation. 

This Bureau was created July 11, 1934. 

The Bureau was detached from the Superintendent's office 
and estabhshed at Police Headquarters as a separate unit, 
April 2, 1937. With a lieutenant in command, the Unit has 
control of all communications equipment, consisting of tele- 
phone, teletype, radio and telegraph, and through radio facili- 
ties controls movement of all radio cars patrolling the city 
and also the police boats on harbor duty. 

Accomplishments. 
During the poUce year from December 1, 1937, to November 
30, 1938, personnel of this Bureau managed the transmission, 
reception and handling of: 

Approximately 980,000 telephone messages and about 
6,028 toll calls made by the Department. 

111,776 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
the making and delivering of copies of such messages, as 
necessary to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

1,435 telegrams, including filing of same and the making 
and delivery of copies to the proper Bureau or Unit. 

2,822 teletype items for persons reported missing by 
Divisions and Units of this Department and other cities 
and towns delivered to the Bureau of Records and cards 
filled out for the files of the Bureau. 

134,834 radio messages, including keeping of log records- 
of same. 

Several thousand lost and stolen automobile forms filled 
out and delivered to the automobile unit, 3,374 of which 
were reported stolen in Boston, together with records 
made and delivered of all recovered cars, copies of both 
kept in the Bureau's file. 

A daily journal was kept in which all of the foregoing, to- 
gether with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents and other 
matter submitted by divisions and units of the Department, 
were recorded. 

A file was maintained of the entire police personnel of the 
Department, with name, rank and cap number, together with 
the address, telephone number and date of appointment. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 73 

The main radio transmitter, 78 car transmitters, 78 car 
receivers, 18 wired broadcast amplifiers and 8 pick-up receivers 
were maintained and kept in repair by the personnel of the 
Bureau. 

A car transmitter and receiver were installed in one patrol 
wagon attached to Division 4, by the personnel of the Bureau. 

Radio transmitters and receivers were installed on the four 
new police boats by the personnel of the Bureau. 

Transmission of Primary and Election Returns. 

At the State Primary on September 20, 1938, with informa- 
tion provided by the Election Commissioners, police officers 
detailed at the polling booths were able to telephone results 
of the primary direct to the turret operators in this Bureau. 
Such results were then tabulated and given to the press, and 
through amplifiers installed on Washington street, in the main 
part of the city, to the public within a few hours from the time 
the first returns were received. 

The personnel of the Bureau performed many extra hours of 
duty during this primary. 

At the State Election, November 8, 1938, results of the 
election were handled by the personnel of the Bureau in the 
same manner as in the State Primary, the results being tabu- 
lated and given to the press. The personnel of the Bureau 
were again called on to perform many extra hours of duty 
during this election. 

Relief and Assistance Rendered at Time of Hurricane. 
On September 21, 1938, the day following the State Primary, 
which already had required long extra hours of duty on the 
part of the personnel of the Bureau, the city and state suffered 
from a hurricane and flood, which resulted in great loss of life 
and property. Although transportation facilities were greatly 
impaired throughout the city by the storm, all of the "off 
duty" personnel of this Bureau that could be notified, and 
some without notification, reported for extra duty during this 
emergency. The personnel handled thousands of telephone, 
teletype and telegraph communications during the storm, 
without failing in a single instance to provide the public with 
the relief and assistance called for. During several succeeding 
days many messages were sent, received and delivered both 
within and without the state, for anxious citizens regarding 



74 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

the weKare and safety of relatives and friends. This was 
made possible by the fine spirit of co-operation of the police 
officers throughout this and the other states affected. During 
this storm the personnel of the Bureau worked without regard 
for their own welfare, remaining on duty until somewhat near 
normal conditions were restored. 

Change in Radio Frequencies. 
The Commanding Officer of the Bureau was notified late in 

1937, by the Federal Communications Commission, of its 
intention to re-allocate radio frequencies for emergency service, 
such re-allocations depriving this Department of the two fre- 
quencies used during the period the Department had been 
operating under an experimental license. 

As any radical change in frequencies would render our 
existing equipment useless and compel the purchase of new 
material, the Commanding Officer requested of and received 
from the Police Commissioner permission to confer with the 
Federal Communications Commission in Washington, D. C, 
in December of 1937. As a result of this conference, the 
Department was able to secure, in September of 1938, per- 
manent allocation of frequencies which our equipment was 
capable of being altered to meet. 

These alterations, which had to be completed by October 1, 

1938, would have cost the Department a considerable sum 
had the work been done by an outside concern. Officers of 
this Bureau, however, who had had previous mechanical and 
electrical experience, completed the work within allotted time, 
and without interruption of the radio service. 

During the hurricane of September 21, 1938, while this 
readjustment of radio equipment was being made, the effi- 
ciency of the radio was not impaired. The two-way radio 
facilities were particularly effective during the severity of this 
unprecedented storm. 

Installation of Equipment for Recording of Radio Messages. 

In October of 1938, a dictaphone, with automatic start and 
stop mechanism, was installed in the Bureau. This dictaphone 
is connected with the main radio transmitter, so that all radio 
messages sent over the air are automatically recorded, and 
permanent record made later in the radio-log book. The 
machine not only provides an exact record of every radio 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 75 

transmission but its use eliminates the necessity of keeping 
men in constant attendance on the transmitter twenty-four 
hours each day, as required by Federal law, for the purpose of 
keeping a log. The men formerly performing this duty are 
free to perform such repair and maintenance work as is necessary 
for the proper upkeep of the radio system. 

Installation of an Auxiliary Radio Transmitter. 

A small room has been provided on top of the new Court 
House building, Pemberton square, for installation of an 
auxiliary radio transmitter of 250 watts. 

This department is at present relying upon one radio trans- 
mitter for twenty-four hour service. During periods in the 
past when this transmitter had broken down, or it had been 
necessary to shut it down for periodical cleaning and adjust- 
ments, the entire city has been without radio contact with the 
cars upon the streets or the boats in the harbor. 

It is the intention of the Bureau to use this new 250-watt 
transmitter regularly, as by virtue of its superior height over 
that of our present 1,500-watt transmitter we expect it to 
surpass our present coverage at greatly less cost. 

The transmitter will be operated by remote control from 
the dispatcher's desk at Police Headquarters. The present 
1,500-watt transmitter will be used as an emergency unit. 
The saving in operation of this new unit will be a considerable 
sum per year and should more than pay for the new installation 
in two years. 

It is expected that installation of the foregoing auxiliary 
transmitter will be completed within a short time and then 
placed in operation immediately. 

Ballistics Unit. 
Formation and Duties. 

The activities of this Unit, with its personnel, were trans- 
ferred from the Property Clerk's office to the Superintendent's 
office on October 11, 1935. 

With a Sergeant-Ballistician in charge, the office consists of 
experts in ballistics, handwriting, typewriting, moulage and 
explosives, and also a gunsmith. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician, under the direction of the Super- 
intendent of Police, has charge of the care and custody of all 
firearms, explosives and substances of explosives coming into 
the possession of the police. 



76 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician prepares the cases where baUistic 
evidence is required, so far as bullets, shells, firearms or explo- 
sives are concerned, and appears before the court in such cases 
to give evidence. 

The Document Examiner prepares the cases where all hand- 
writing, typewriting, erasures in documents and questioned 
printing, water-marks, staplings, paper and ink are concerned, 
and appears before the court in such cases to give evidence. 

Accomplishments. 
During the year members of the Unit responded to 76 
emergency calls after regular working hours, and put in many 
extra hours of duty. Four hundred and sixty-three hours of 
duty were performed in this manner. Two hundred and 
fifty-eight days were spent in court by members of this Unit 
on ballistics, handwriting, and moulage cases. 

Of the total cases, ballistics numbered 251 (which included 
examination of firearms, explosives, bullets and shells and 
suspicious substances); handwriting and typewriting cases 
and questioned documents 148, and moulage cases 10. 

For identification purposes, additional specimens of tire 
threads, plate glass, gunpowders, shot, bullets and shells fired 
from various types of arms, pistols, revolvers, rifles and shot- 
guns, typewriter specimens, burglars' tools, foreign and domestic 
ammunition, firearms, arson setups, instruments of abortion, 
powder patterns, narcotics, gas munitions and moulage casts 
have been added to the Unit. 

For the efficiency of the Unit the following material was 
added to the equipment: a combined convertible microscope, 
universal binocular, consisting of a binocular body mounted 
in a jointed gooseneck arm to permit all movements for examin- 
ing large areas for powder burns, blood, chemical stains, 
erasures, etc., on cloth and documents; a delineascope for 
projecting photographs, handwriting specimens and slides in 
court and for lecture purposes. 

One hundred and twenty-five revolvers and 25 riot guns 
were serviced and repaired by the gunsmith, in addition to 
servicing the following equipment located at the various 
divisions and units: 2,500 revolvers, 210 shotguns, 20 gas 
guns, 10 machine guns, 60 .30 calibre rifles, 220 gas billies, 
60 gas masks, 60 bullet-proof vests, tear gas munitions and 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 77 

4 38-55 high powered rifles. By repairing and servicing our 
own equipment, substantial savings were made. 

Approximately 4,000 handwriting exemplars were classified 
and filed into the classification file at this office for use in 
questioned handwriting cases. To date between 25,000 and 
30,000 handwritings have been classified and filed for this 
purpose. 

Between 2,000 and 2,500 visitors were shown through the 
Unit. Also, members of this Unit lectured to business and 
social groups in various parts of Greater Boston. 

The members of the Junior Police Corps, accompanied by 
their instructors, have been taken through this Unit and its 
functions explained to them in detail. 

During the year members of this Unit attended lectures 
and demonstrations offered by the National Guard, and manu- 
facturers of munitions and ammunition for the purpose of 
combating civil disorders. Information thereby obtained was 
passed on to the members of the Department. 

The portable lighting plant which is part of the Ballistics 
Unit equipment was used during the year at scenes of crimes 
by searching parties. 

One hundred and thirty batteries were serviced and repaired, 
and 92 handlights were changed over from wet cell to dry- 
cell service during this period. 

Moulage. 
The substance known as moulage has been used to good 
advantage to establish the type of instrument used in a number 
"breaking and entering" cases and was presented in court to 
estabUsh proof. A number of specimens were made for the 
medical examiners in cases of violent deaths for use in court. 

Serial Numbers on Firearms. 
There were a number of cases during the year where serial 
numbers on firearms had been erased and had to be treated 
with chemicals to identify them. Identification resulted in 
tracing ownership of some of these firearms. 

Tear-Gas Munitions. 
In addition to the special tear-gas squad created some time 
ago, all members of the Department have been instructed 
and trained in the use of various types of tear-gas munitions 
of the newer types. 



78 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous. 

Effort is being made to collect all known makes of headlight 
lenses which are needed by the police for identification purposes 
in investigations where automobiles are concerned. 

An interchange of evidence is carried on by this Unit with 
all Federal agencies and police departments. Bullets and 
shells and handwriting exemplars are mailed to other enforce- 
ment agencies, to aid in the arrest of criminals. 

All evidence in homicide cases is kept for safe-keeping in 
the vault at this office. It is properly marked and stored 
away until needed in court. 

All divisions and units are now equipped with a sufficient 
supply of shotgTins, gas billies, gas guns, gas munitions, bullet- 
proof vests and gas masks for emergency purposes. 

Special Service Squad. 

The Special Service Squad, created in January of 1936, has 
become a separate permanent unit, working out of Police Head- 
quarters. 

The Squad was established for the purpose of performing 
night-patrol duty in motor vehicles throughout the city. 

It is the duty of the officers of the Squad, so far as possible, 
to prevent the commission of crime and if acts of violence or 
other serious crimes have been committed, to arrest and 
prosecute offenders. 

The office of the Special Service Squad, located at PoUce 
Headquarters, is open at all times for police purposes, with an 
officer on duty. 

At the present time its personnel consists of one captain, 
two lieutenants, three sergeants and forty patrolmen. 

The Squad is divided into two platoons, one platoon working 
from 6.15 p. m. to 1 a. m. and the other from 1 a. m. to 7.45 
a. m. 

Its officers cover every section of the city, dressed in civilian 
clothes and ride in two-way radio-equipped automobiles. 

During their tour of duty, they visit restaurants, taverns, 
dance halls, pool rooms, railroad and bus terminals, theatres 
and hotel lobbies and other places where the criminal element 
might resort, for the purpose of gaining information relative 
to the commission of crime or to arrest the perpetrator. 

Persons, acting suspiciously in the nighttime or who fail 
when questioned to give a good account of themselves, are 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 79 

taken into custody and held until the next sitting of the court, 
unless released before that time. 

Motor vehicles, observed under suspicious circumstances, 
are thoroughly investigated. 

Many important arrests have been made during the past 
year by members of this Unit. 

Figures of arrests of the Special Service Squad are included 
with those of the Department as shown in this report. 

Statistics show that the year 1938 has been one of the most 
successful in the life of the Squad. 

A resume of activities is as follows: 

Number of persons arrested 1,513 

Number of cases investigated 1,316 

Number of extra duties performed 1,835 

Number of days spent in court by officers . . . . 1,124 

Amount of property recovered (includes value of automobiles) $18,284 30 
Number of years' imprisonment, 169 years, 4 months, 1 day and 
79 indefinite terms. 

Fines $1,345 00 

Premises searched for property unlawfully possessed and wanted 



persons 



22 



Automobiles and pedestrians challenged and investigated in the 

nighttime 2,415 

Visits to licensed premises, railroad and bus terminals and other 

public places, in quest of suspicious persons .... 42,764 

Communications System. 

The Signal Service Unit is responsible for the maintenance 
of the signal system of the Department. 

During the year, 3 signal boxes w^re moved to new locations 
(1 each on Divisions 3, 4 and 16). 

Several miles of cable were placed underground in con- 
formance with law. Two police signal boxes were transferred 
from overhead to underground service. 

Officers' Recall and Citizens' Alarm features are now in- 
stalled in all police divisions and patrol boxes in the city. 
Individual line telephone service for each patrol box has been 
found advantageous and now all signal boxes are so equipped. 

Apparatus is provided in the radio dispatching room at 
Police Headquarters for centralized recording of citizens' 
and officers' code calls at all patrol boxes. 

New cable and cable joints were installed by the signal 
service at a great saving in cost to the Department. 

Two miles of new cable were installed, replacing some of the 
old cable retained in the new system. 



80 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Twenty signal boxes, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new equipment. 

Plant and Equipment. 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause. In its 
custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements 
which come into possession of the Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms and equipment are 
issued by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the 
cross-record system maintained for the purpose of comparing 
prices before such bills are prepared for payment. 

During the year, 129 motor vehicles came into custody of 
this office; 107 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants, 
and 33 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 
21 motor vehicles in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care and distribution 
of uniforms and equipment to members of the police force, 
and also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed garments 
and equipment. An individual record of items of uniform 
and equipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is 
operated on a twenty-four hour basis. During the year, 
6,600 Department cars were repaired at the repair shop in 
Division 4 and 1,440 cars were serviced. (Servicing includes 
greasing, changing of oil, checking of battery and electrical 
equipment, brakes, cooling systems, tires, steering systems, 
wear of clutch, etc.) Also, 150 department cars and 140 
privately-owned cars were towed by the department wrecker. 
A radio-repair shop is attached to the maintenance shop where 
a twenty-four hour daily service is maintained. The Depart- 
ment operates a motorcycle-repair shop, now located in the 
rear of Division 19, where 525 motorcycles were repaired and 
serviced during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving department vehicles. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 81 

The Lost and Found branch of the Property Clerk's Office 
has been active during the year as shown by the following 
schedule: 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1938 . . 1,483 
Disposed of: 

Worthless articles 450 

Sold at public auction 364 

To owners through efforts of the Property Clerk's Office, 154 

To owners on station-house orders 147 

Packages containing money paid to Chief Clerk . . 60 

Perishable articles decayed 6 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of Public 

Welfare 2 

To owners in response to advertisements ... 2 

Total number of articles disposed of 1,185 

Number of articles on hand, November 30, 1938 . . 298 

Special Events. 
The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year and gives the number of police detailed for duty 
at each: 

1937. Men. 

Dec. 6. Office of the Board of Election Commissioners, recount 

of ballots cast at Special State Primary, Eleventh 

Congressional District 10 

Dec. 7. Office of the Board of Election Commissioners, recount 

of ballots cast at Special State Primary, Eleventh 

Congressional District 10 

Dec. 9. Funeral of Patrolman Leo J. Phelan .... 81 

Dec. 10. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 

Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 

Dec. 12. Funeral of Sergeant Wayland H. Blanding ... 45 

Dec. 14. Special State Election, Eleventh Congressional District, 398 

Dec. 15. Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 20 

Dec. 22. Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 11 

Dec. 23. Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 11 

Dec. 24. Boston Post Santa Claus bundles 11 

Dec. 24. Christmas Eve, Carol Singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

and Boston Common 108 

Dec. 24. Christmas Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of the Holy 

Cross 11 

Dec. 31. Parkman Bandstand, Boston Common ... 12 

Dec. 31. New Year's Eve, celebration on Division Four . . 36 

Dec. 31. New Year's Eve, Midnight Mass, Cathedral of the 

Holy Cross 11 

1938. 

Jan. 3. Symphony Hall, inauguration exercises of the Hon. 

Maurice J. Tobin, Mayor-Elect of Boston . . 101 



Jan. 


28. 


Feb. 


11. 


Feb. 


16. 


Feb. 


21. 



82 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1938. Men. 

Jan. 14. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 

Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 
Jan. 17. Funeral of Lieutenant Edward J. Kelley ... 62 
Jan. 17. Funeral of Patrolman William F. Beckett ... 45 
Jan. 18. Mechanics Hall, ball of Boston Police Relief Associa- 
tion 332 

Jan. 23. Boston Garden, Boston Evening American Silver 

Skate Carnival 41 

Jan. 24. Mechanics Building, Community Federation Drive 

meeting 25 

Jan. 27. Funeral of Deputy Superintendent William W. 

Livingston 178 

Boston Garden, President Roosevelt's Birthday Ball, 147 

Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 
Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 

Funeral of Mr. James Tobin 32 

Boston Garden, ball of Boston Firemen's Relief Asso- 
ciation 58 

Feb. 22. State House, reception of His Excellency, Governor 

Charles F. Hurley 149 

Mar. 11. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston PoUce 

Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 

Mar. 12. Funeral of Patrolman John V. Jennings ... 48 

Mar. 13. Visit of three princesses from Albania .... 21 

Mar. 17. South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . . . 350 

Mar. 19. Massachusetts Civil Service examinations at various 

schools 10 

Mar. 22. Funeral of Mr. William McKenney .... 14 

Mar. 31. Funeral of Sergeant Peter J. Norton, retired . . 14 

Mar. 31. Funeral of Patrolman John E. Powers, retired . . 12 

April 2. Massachusetts Civil Service examinations at various 

schools 13 

April 2. Brighton, Presentation Literary and Social Organiza- 
tion, ten-mile road race 47 

April 3. Stephen Darius Post No. 317, American Legion 

parade 24 

April 7. Funeral of Captain William P. Gaffney ... 85 

April 9. Cathedral Club road race 48 

April 13. Funeral of Patrolman Alfred Walton .... 6 

April 16. Franklin Park, Boston Evening American Easter Egg 

Hunt 85 

April 16. Roxbury, Michael J. O'Connell Post, American Legion 

road race 34 

April 17, Boston Opera House, Boston Police Post No. 251, 
American Legion Band, participation in the benefit 
performance by Suffolk County Council Forty and 

Eight of The American Legion 35 

April 18. Funeral of Lieutenant-Inspector James A Dennessy, 

retired 22 

April 18. Funeral of Patrolman Joseph P. Clancy, retired . 12 

April 19. Marathon race 472 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 83 

1938. Men. 

April 19. City of Boston Patriots' Day Celebration ... 67 

April 21. Hyde Park, Dedication of George Wright Golf Course, 12 

April 22. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 

Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 

April 27. Students' Strike Against War Committee parade . 98 

April 30. Massachusetts Civil Service examinations at various 

schools 12 

April 30. Boston Common, Communist Party of Massachusetts, 

meeting 48 

May 1. Parade, Department of Massachusetts Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and May Day exercises on Boston 
Common under the auspices of the Ladies' Auxiliary, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 117 

May 1. North Station, arrival of Ringling Brothers and 

Barnum and Bailey Circus 15 

Funeral of Patrolman George J. Fallon, retired . . 10 

Irish-American A. A., road rac« 46 

Visit of His Excellency, Fulvio Survich, Italian Am- 
bassador to the United States 80 

North End, outdoor Mass by St. Leonard's Church . 21 

Visit of His Excellency, Fulvio Survich, Italian Am- 
bassador 168 

Visit of His Excellency, Fulvio Survich, Italian Am- 
bassador 66 

Mechanic Arts High School parade to East Newton 
Street Armory 25 

Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 
Post No. 251, The American Legion Band . . 37 

Massachusetts Civil Service examinations at various 
schools 20 

Avenue Louis Pasteur, Roxbury, Boston Evening 
American Roller Skate Derby 41 

East Boston Airport, National Air Mail Week . . 15 

Division Four, anticipated strike of employees of 

lumber companies 11 

Boston University Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 
parade and exercises on Boston Common . . 42 

Massachusetts Civil Service examinations at various 
schools 12 

101st Infantry parade and review on Boston Common, 81 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade and 
Field Mass at Fenway Park 96 

James F. Mahoney Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars 

parade 25 

Grand Clan of Massachusetts, Order of Scottish Clan, 
parade 31 

Charlestown, Fleet Reserve Branch, U. S. Navy parade, 22 

Commonwealth Pier, Boston Police Post No. 251, 
The American Legion Band, participating in Na- 
tional Maritime Day Celebration .... 37 



May 
May 
May 


5. 
7. 
7. 


May 
May 


8. 
8. 


May 


9. 


May 


13. 


May 


13. 


May 


14. 


May 


14. 


May 
May 


15. 
16. 


May 


17. 


May 


21. 


May 
May 


21. 
22. 


May 


22. 


May 


22. 


May 

May 


22. 
22. 



June 


3. 


June 


4. 


June 


5. 


June 


6. 


June 


7. 


June 


8. 



84 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1938. Men. 

May 22. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 22, 1938 . 150 

May 25. Funeral of Sergeant Alfred Boucher .... 42 

May 28. Boston Park Department cemeteries .... 28 

May 28. Roslindale Board of Trade, Children's Day . . 21 

May 29. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 29, 1938 . 150 

May 30. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 341 
May 30. Memorial Day Services at New Calvary Cemetery 
under the auspices of Boston Police Post No. 1018, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and Boston Police Post 

No. 251, The American Legion 126 

May 30. Kearsarge Association of Naval Veterans' parade and 

exercises on Boston Common 35 

Arrival of Honourable Artillery Company of London, 37 

Dorchester, Dorchester Day parade .... 249 
Mt. Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Sunday 

exercises 194 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade . 280 

Parade, Boston School Cadets 469 

State House, hearing conducted by Committee ap- 
pointed to investigate subversive organizations . 15 
June 8. 211th Coast Artillery (First Corps of Cadets) parade 

and review on Boston Common 48 

Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises .... 34 

Flag Day parade and exercises on Boston Common . 76 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day . 79 
Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 

concessions 31 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day 48 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day sports, celebrations, 

etc 43 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 384 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day band concerts . . 49 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day concessions ... 76 

Funeral of Patrolman William J. Doherty, retired . 12 

Funeral of Patrolman Wilder L. Dillon ... 56 
Boston Post Bulletin Board, Louis-Schmelling Boxing 

Contest 14 

June 25. Columbus Stadium, South Boston, "Farley Day" 

outdoor reception 45 

Symphony Hall, reception to Lieutenant-Governor 

Francis E. Kelly 16 

Funeral of Lieutenant Amasa E. Augusta, retired . 12 
Smith Playground, Allston, bonfire .... 23 
City of Boston Official Flag-Raising and parade . 63 
Franklin Field, N. E. A. A. U. meet .... 15 
Boston Common, band concert and fireworks display, 83 
Various band concerts and fireworks displays under 
the auspices of Boston Public Celebrations De- 
partment 152 

July 4. Smith Playground, Allston, band concert and fire- 
works display 15 



June 


12. 


June 14. 


June 


16. 


June 


16. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 22. 



June 26. 


June 27. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 



1938. 

July 
July 
July 


4. 
6. 

8. 


July 


9. 


July 


10. 


July 


25. 


July 
July 


27. 

28. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 85 

Men, 

Franklin Field, band concert and fireworks display . 3 1 

Funeral of Patrolman Almon L. Daniels, retired . 12 

Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police 

Post No. 251, American Legion Band ... 37 

Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, The Crown Prince 

and Crown Princess of Sweden 45 

Visit of Their Royal Highnesses, The Crown Prince 

and Crown Princess of Sweden 110 

Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Tris' Speaker's 

Baseball School 15 

Funeral of Patrolman WiUiam J. Trainor, retired . 11 
Boston Common, National "Joseph Lee" celebra- 
tion 16 

July 30. East Boston, Suffolk-Downs race track, Boston 

Traveler Soap Box Derby 52 

Aug. 1. Funeral of Patrolman Edward J. Eustace, retired . 12 

Aug. 1. Fenway Park, field day and entertainment for Mayor 

of Boston Special Welfare Fund . . . . 131 

Aug. 3. Boston Public Garden, visit of Shirley Temple . . 65 

Aug. 8. Reception and parade for Douglas Corrigan, Trans- 
Atlantic flyer 595 

Aug. 12. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 

Aug. 16. Boston Sanatorium, concert by Boston Police Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 

Aug. 16. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department, novice box- 
ing tournament 15 

Aug. 22. Roslindale, Fallon Field, Boston Park Department, 

novice boxing contest 15 

Aug. 24. Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Boston Park 

Department Playground circus 60 

Aug. 26. Funeral of Patrolman Edward M. Killion ... 38 

Aug. 31. Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Boston Park 

Department boxing championship contest . . 28 

Sept. 5. Parade, Boston Central Labor Union .... 332 

Sept. 6. Funeral of Patrolman William Hartigan ... 46 

Sept. 9. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 

Sept. 10. Funeral of Lieutenant Michael J. Trainor, retired . 15 

Sept. 11. Boston Common, "Commodore John Barry Day" 

celebration 16 

Sept. 11. Old Harbor Village, South Boston, dedication exer- 
cises 16 

Sept. 1 1 . Old Harbor Village, South Boston, concert by Boston 

Police Post No. 251, American Legion Band . . 37 

Sept. 13. Boston Common, Massachusetts Firemen's Associa- 
tion exhibition 21 

Sept. 17. Boston Common, National Guard Day e.xercises . 16 

Sept. 17. Boston Common, night demonstration by the Avia- 
tion and 211th C. A. C 12 



86 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1938. Men. 

Sept. 18. West Roxbury, vicinity of Jewish cemeteries . . 26 

Sept. 18. Boston Common, " National Dog Week " ... 10 

Sept. 18. Boston Garden, political rally in the interest of 
Hon. James M. Curley, candidate for the office of 

Governor 85 

Sept. 18. Symphony Hall, political rally in the interest of 
Hon. Francis E. Kelly, candidate for the office of 

Governor 16 

Funeral of Patrolman William J. Burke ... 72 
Boston Arena, political rally in the interest of Hon. 
Francis E. Kelly, candidate for the office of Gov- 
ernor 16 

State Primary Day 2,153 

Boston Post Bulletin Board, broadcast of State 

Primary returns 54 

Funeral of Hon. John A. Keliher, Sheriff of Suffolk 

County 73 

Boston Common, " National Dog Week " ... 16 

Funeral of Patrolman Paul J. Murnane ... 52 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company Fall 

parade 41 

Harvard-Brown football game 31 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 68 

Boston Post Bulletin Board, play-by-play description 
of the New York "Yankees"— Chicago "Cubs," 

World Series baseball game 20 

Harvard-Cornell football game 35 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 68 

Boston Fire Department fire prevention parade and 

demonstration on Boston Common .... 104 

City of Boston Columbus Day parade .... 48 

Boston Common, City of Boston Observance of 

Columbus Day 26 

North End Park, fireworks display .... 16 

Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 

Columbus Stadium, South Boston, Boston Fire 

Department exhibition drill and demonstration . 32 

Visit to Boston and parade of U. S. Corps of Cadets, 332 

Harvard-West Point football game .... 60 

Various Boston Park Department football games . . 54 

Ronan Park, Dorchester, Boston Fire Department 

exhibition drill and demonstration .... 32 

Oct. 19. Franklin Field, Boston Fire Department exhibition 

drill and demonstration 32 

Oct. 21. Smith Playground, Hyde Park, Boston Fire Depart- 
ment exhibition drill and demonstration ... 32 
Oct. 22. Harvard-Dartmouth football game .... 54 
Oct. 23. Various Boston Park Department football games , 64 
Oct. 23. Copley-Plaza Hotel, Democratic dinner ... 12 



Sept. 


19. 


Sept. 


19. 


Sept. 


20. 


Sept. 


20. 


Sept. 


24. 


Sept. 


24. 


Sept. 


26. 


Sept. 


28. 


Oct. 


1. 


Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


5. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


15. 


Oct. 


15. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


17. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 87 

1938. Men. 

Oct. 24. Boston Garden, Boston Evening American Christmas 

Basket Fund "Jitterbug" contest .... 105 
Oct. 25. Fallon Field, Roslindale, Boston Fire Department 

exhibition driU and demonstration .... 32 
Oct. 26. McKenney Playground, Brighton, Boston Fire De- 
partment exhibition drill and demonstration . . 32 
Oct. 27. U. S. Navy Day exercises at Charlestown Navy Yard 

and Boston Common 33 

Oct. 28. Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston PoUce Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 
Oct. 28. Fens Stadium, Boston Fire Department exhibition 

drill and demonstration ...... 32 

Harvard-Princeton football game 54 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 52 

Halloween Eve celebration 828 

Funeral of Patrolman Walter F. Dawson ... 14 

University of Indiana Band parade .... 80 

Harvard-University of Chicago football game . . 36 

Boston Garden, Democratic State Committee rally . 125 
East Boston, Mt. Carmel Church parade and open-air 

Mass 22 

Boston Garden, Republican State Committee rally . 125 

Back Bay, various political rallies .... 26 

Various Boston Park Department football games , 52 

State Election 2,156 

Boston Post Bulletin Board, broadcast of State Elec- 
tion returns 54 

Funeral of Patrolman John E. DeRoche ... 85 
Boston Garden, 163d Anniversary Birthday Ball of 

the United States Marine Corps 42 

Parade, Lieutenant Norman Prince Post, Veterans of 

Foreign Wars 295 

Parade, Suffolk County Council, The American Legion, 698 

Harvard-Virginia football game 32 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 52 
Boston State Hospital, concert by Boston Police Post 

No. 251, American Legion Band .... 37 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas J. Connelly ... 48 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 12 
Division 16, strike of employees of Sears Roebuck 

Company 18 

Jordan Marsh Company, Santason parade . . . 832 
Fenway Park, Boston College-Holy Cross football 

game 55 

Note. — December 1 to December 17, inclusive, 1937, 12 officers performed 
a total of 106 duties for that period at the District Attorney's 
Office of Suffolk County, on special investigation of a murder 
committed in Revere, Mass. 



Oct. 


29. 


Oct. 


30. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov, 


5. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


9. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


13. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


20. 


Nov. 


20. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


24. 


Nov. 


26. 



88 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Note. — February 2 to February 6, inclusive, 1938, 2,076 officers per- 
formed a total of 4,806 duties for that period patrolling the 
streets of the City of Boston for the prevention of crime. 

March 17 to March 23, inclusive, 1938, 13 officers performed a 
total of 91 duties for that period in connection with the Mas- 
sachusetts Horticultural Society Flower Show at Mechanics 
Building. 

March 23 to March 28, inclusive, 1938 (Sunday e.xcepted), 169 
officers performed a total of 169 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the so-called Meat Provisioners' Union Strike, 
in Division 1. 

April 30 to July 9, inclusive, 1938 (Sundays excepted), 16 officers 
performed a total of 976 duties for that period directing traffic 
during the horse races at Suffolk-Downs Race Track in East 
Boston. 

May 16 to May 19, inclusive, 1938, 8 officers performed a total 
of 32 duties for that period in connection with the so-called 
Lumber Companies' Union Strike, in Division 4. 

August 22 to August 31, inclusive, 1938 (Sunday excepted), 
40 officers performed a total of 40 duties for that period in 
connection with the so-called "union strike" at the Steadfast 
Rubber Company, Hyde Park, in Division 18. 

August 23 to August 31, inclusive, 1938, and October 5 to Octo- 
ber 19, inclusive, 1938 (Sundays excepted), 22 officers performed 
a total of 482 duties for that period at various registration 
places in connection with the registration of voters for the 
year 1938. 

August 24 to August 27, inclusive, 1938, 6 officers performed a 
total of 24 duties for that period in connection with the so- 
called Garment Workers' Union Strike, in Division 2. 

August 29 to September 20, inclusive, 1938 (Sundays excepted), 
235 officers performed a total of 235 duties for that period in 
connection with the so-called Garment Workers' Union Strike, 
in Division 4. 

September 21 to September 22, inclusive, 1938, 420 officers per- 
formed a total of 840 duties for that period protecting persons 
and property as a result of the hurricane. 

September 29 to October 3, inclusive, 1938 (Sunday excepted), 
1 1 officers performed a total of 33 duties for that period at the 
office of the Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall, 
during recount of ballots cast at the State Primary. 

October 13 to October 18, inclusive, 1938 (Sunday excepted), 
6 officers performed a total of 30 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the so-called Garment Workers' Union Strike, in 
Division 4. 

October 28 to November 1, inclusive, 1938 (Sunday excepted), 
10 officers performed a total of 30 duties for that period in the 
office of the Treasurer, City Hall, in connection with the collec- 
tion of taxes for the City of Boston. 

November 13 to November 20, inclusive, 1938, 18 officers per- 
formed a total of 144 duties for that period at the Boston Public 
Library, Copley Square, in connection with Boston Book Week. 

November 17 to November 25, inclusive, 1938 (Saturday and 
Sunday excepted), 4 officers performed a total of 32 duties for 
that period at the office of the Election Commissioners, City 
Hall, during recount of ballots cast at the State Election. 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



89 



Miscellaneous Business. 



1935-36. 1936-37. 1937-38 



Abandoned children cared for 

Accidents reported . 

Cases investigated . 

Dangerous buildings reported 

Dangerous chimneys reported 

Dead bodies recovered and cared for 

Defective cesspools reported . 

Defective drains and vaults reported 

Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 

Defective gas pipes reported . 

Defective hydrants reported . 

Defective lamps reported 

Defective sewers reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed . 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished . 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted . 

Lost children restored 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed . 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained . 



2 

9,065 

63,004 

42 

11 

446 

35 

2 

5 

18 

47 

5,447 

64 

22 

448 

44,496 

5,134 

805 

420 

220 

1,625 

20 

8,800 

11 

32 

487 

3 



12 

9,802 

69,956 

39 

22 

492 

50 

2 

3 

37 

61 

4,506 

89 

149 

401 

41,001 

5,308 

671 

488 

322 

1,620 

39 

9,281 

25 

24 

595 



16 

9,583 

69,506 

80 

206 

390 

44 

15 

1 

18 

17 

3,933 

124 

67 

937 

44,251 

5,213 

859 

494 

81 

1,533 

45 

9,410 

14 

186 

362 

2 



90 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Adjustment of Claims. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $1,340.69. 

House of Detention. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street.* All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They 
are then held in charge of the matron until the next session of 
the court before which they are to appear. If sentenced to 
imprisonment they are returned to the House of Detention 
and from there conveyed to the jail or institution to which 
they have been sentenced. 

During the year 3,788 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 2,874 

Larceny 79 

Night walking 37 

Fornication 119 

Idle and disorderly 171 

Assault and battery 15 

Adultery 70 

Keeping houses of ill fame 25 

Various other causes 398 

Total 3,788 

Recommitments. 

From municipal court 

From county jail . . . . ' 

Grand total . . . ' 3,788 

Police Signal Service. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 560. Of these 470 are 
connected with the underground system and 90 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,400 
trouble calls; inspected 560 signal boxes; 15 signal desks; 15 
motor generator sets; 500 new type batteries. Repairs have 
been made on 164 box movements; 15 registers; 150 locks; 

* From November 28, 1936, House of Detention temporarily located in police building, 
521 Commercial street, Boston, during construction of new Suffolk County Court House. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 91 

15 time stamps; 24 vibrator bells; 70 relays; 5 electric fans. 
This Unit has the installing and maintenance of all electric 
wiring and equipment at all stations and Headquarters build- 
ing. There have been made 150 plungers; 150 box fittings; 
150 line blocks and 90 automatic hooks. 

Connected with the police signal boxes there are 130 signal 
and 120 telephone circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
Department. All patrol box telephone and blinker light 
repairs are made by Signal Service members. 

The Unit also takes care of all poUce traffic booths, taxicab 
signs and street-obstruction signs. 

New signal desks are installed at all station houses in con- 
nection with the Hayes Signal System over department-owned 
lines. 

There are assigned to the Unit 1 GMC tnick, 2§-ton capacity; 
2 utiUty trucks, ^-ton capacity, each; and 1 four-door Ford 
sedan. 

The following list comprises the property in the Signal 
Service maintenance at the present time : 

16 open circuit blinker type sig- 750,300 feet underground cable 

nal desks 208,200 feet of overhead cable 

250 circuits 31,450 feet of duct 

50 test boxes 70 manholes 

400 cells of sulphuric acid storage 18 motor generator sets 

type battery 15 motor-driven flashers 

2,200 taxicab signs 1 GMC truck 

32 traffic booths 2 Ford trucks 

560 police signal boxes 1 Ford sedan 

Harbor Service. 
The special duties performed by the harbor poUce, styled 
Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein^ 
were as follows : 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 

stages, etc $80,950 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 1,560 

Niunber of vessels ordered from channel 115 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 35 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 24 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the waterfront ... 89 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 11 



92 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Number of boats challenged 216 

Number of boats searched for contraband 180 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 30 

Number of cases investigated 1,475 

Number of dead bodies recovered 21 

Number rescued from drowning 36 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 954 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 802 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 5,832 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 

in harbor 12 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 40 

Number of dead bodies cared for 36 

Number of hours grappling 312 

The number of vessels that arrived in this port was 7,009, 
of which 1,605 were from foreign ports, 726 from the British 
Provinces in Canada, and 4,678 domestic arrivals. Of the 
latter 3,102 were steamers, 810 motor vessels, 562 tugs, 152 
barges, 12 sailing and 40 miscellaneous. 

Patrol Service. 

A patrol service was maintained by the Patrol Boat ''Argus" 
in Dorchester Bay and harbor daily and nightly from Castle 
Island to the Neponset Bridge from May 30, 1938, to October 
15, 1938. There were 601 cases investigated, 71 boats chal- 
lenged for contraband, 502 cases where assistance was rendered 
to boats in distress by reason of disabled engines, stress of 
weather, etc.; 6 dead bodies recovered, 3 boats ordered to put 
out sailing lights, sixty hours spent in grappling, 12 persons 
rescued from drowning, 35 boats warned about speeding 
amongst boats, 368 obstructions removed from the channel, 
24 fire alarms attended and 89 arrests for various violations. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police 
patrol boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "William H. Pierce," 
''William H. McShane," in the upper and lower harbors, 
Mystic river, Chelsea creek, Fort-Point and the L-Street 
channels. 

July 2, 1938, a 19-foot speed boat was acquired by the 
Department. It has been used in investigation of cases, and 
special patrol duty in the Fort-Point and L-Street channels 
and the Chelsea creek, without opening the drawbridges at 
any tide. 



1939.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 93 



Horses. 

On November 30, 1937, there were 19 horses in the service. 

During the year, because of age, 2 were retired to a farm, 
and 1 was humanely killed because of an injury, and 3 were 
purchased. 

At the present time there are 19 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 

Vehicle Service. 
There are 163 automobiles in the service at the present time: 
47 attached to Headquarters; 4 attached to Traffic Division; 
23 in the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8; 
8 in the South Boston district, attached to Division 6; 7 in 
the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 14 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 9 in the Dor- 
chester district, attached to Division 11; 6 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 7 in the Brighton 
district, attached to Division 14 ; 5 in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; 7 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 6 in the West Roxbury district, 
attached to Division 17; 6 in the Hyde Park district, attached 
to Division 18; 7 in the Mattapan district, attached to Division 
19, and 7 unassigned. (See page 95 for distribution of auto- 
mobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs and replacement of parts .... $24,972 73 

Storage 2,529 17 

Gasoline 46,007 56 

Oil and grease 3,503 06 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, etc. . 1,044 65 

Registration fee 2 00 

Totals $78,059 17 



Combination Ambulances. 
The Department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 



94 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 4,775 

City Hospital (Relief Station, Haymarket Square) * . . , 326 

Calls where services were not required 267 

Psychopathic Hospital 251 

St. EHzabeth's Hospital 211 

Home 181 

Southern Mortuary 95 

Massachusetts General Hospital 77 

Carney Hospital 70 

City Hospital (Relief Station, East Boston District) * . . . 52 

Forest Hills Hospital 52 

Morgue 46 

Boston State Hospital 44 

Children's Hospital 41 

Beth Israel Hospital 40 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 28 

New England Women's Hospital 20 

United States Marine Hospital 18 

Faulkner Hospital 17 

Strong Hospital 10 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 8 

Deaconess Hospital 4 

Police Station Houses 4 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 3 

New England Hospital 3 

Winthrop Community Hospital 3 

Charlesgate Hospital 2 

Bay State Hospital 1 

Brooks Hospital 1 

Palmer Memorial Hospital 1 

Trumbull Hospital 1 

Total 6,652 

* Closed midnight, March 15, 1938. 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



95 



lAst of Vehicles Used by the Department. 



Divisions. 


Is 

IS 
o 


i 
J 

II 

PL, 


J3 


o 
o 




Headquarters 


- 


40 


7 


- 


47 


Division 1 


2 


3 


- 


- 


5 


Division 2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


4 


Division 3 


1 


3 


- 


- 


4 


Division 4 


4 


5 


- 


- 


9 


Division 6 


2 


6 


- 


3 


11 


Division 7 


2 


5 


- 


3 


10 


Division 8 . 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Division 9 


1 


5 


- 


- 


6 


Division 10 


2 


6 


- 


- 


8 


Division 11 


2 


7 


- 


3 


12 


Division 13 


1 


5 


- 


4 


10 




2 


5 


- 


5 


12 


Division 15 . . . 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 




2 


5 


- 


2 


9 


Division 17 


1 


5 


- 


- 


6 




1 


5 


- 


1 


7 


Division 19 . . . 


2 


5 


- 


1 


8 


Traffic Division 


- 


4 


- 


5 


9 


Unassigned 


3 


4 


- 


8 


15 


Totals 


30 


126 


7 


35 


198 



Hackney Carriages. 
During the year there were 1,819* Ucenses to set up and use 
hackney carriages granted, being a decrease of 286 as compared 
with last year. 



* 247 re-grants. 



96 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were no horse-drawn carriages Ucensed during the 
year. 

There were 37 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the Office of Inspector of Carriages, 23 of these 
were restored to the owners and the balance of 14 placed in 
the custody of the lost property division of the Property 
Clerk's Office. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1938, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as 
has been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in 
the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 



Hackney Carriage "Set-Ups.^' 

Number of applications for carriage licenses received . . . 1,820 

Number of carriages licensed t 1,572 

Number of carriage licenses (re-grants) J 247 

Number of carriage applications rejected § 1 

Number of licenses transferred 1 

Number of licenses canceled 387 

Number of carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1938 . . 1,433 

Number of carriages inspected . 1,693 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Number of applications for drivers' licenses reported on . . 2,856 
Number of applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after 

investigation 19 

Number of drivers' applications for licenses rejected . . . || 32 

Number of di-ivers' licenses granted 2,823 

Number of drivers' licenses revoked 27 

Number of revocations rescinded and licenses restored ... 11 

Number of drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1938 . . 2,807 
Number of drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of 

credentials 2,125 

Number of replaced windshield plates and badges .... 36 

t 139 changed ownership. 

t 1 "re-grant" license granted "No fee." 

§ Subsequently reconsidered and granted, and included in number of carriages licensed. 

II 18 subsequently reconsidered and granted, and included in number of drivers licensed. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 97 

Miscellaneous. 

Number of complaints against owners, drivers and "set-ups" 

investigated 2,458 

Number of days spent in court 73 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by citizens . . 103 

Number of articles found in carriages reported by drivers . . 37 

Limitation of Hackney Carriages. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, effective 
June 12, 1934, the Police Commissioner was required to fix 
a limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be issued, 
which limit shall be based upon the number of licenses then 
issued and outstanding but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and 
he may from time to time, after reasonable notice and a hearing, 
decrease the number so fixed, but in no event to a number 
less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner on July 
20, 1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number 
of hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses 
limited under the Act referred to has been issued, the Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities, on petition of such applicant, may 
after a hearing determine that public convenience and necessity 
require a higher limit than that fixed by the Police Commis- 
sioner or previously established by said Department, and 
shall establish the limit so required, in which case the limit 
set by said Department shall be considered final until changed 
as herein provided. 

Special, Public and Private Hackney Stands. 

(Provided for in Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930.) 

Special Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of the Act above mentioned, the Police 

Commissioner was empowered to assign to a hackney carriage 

licensee or licensees a designated portion of a public way 

abutting a hotel, railroad station, steamboat pier, public or 

semi-public building, as a special hackney stand. 

During the year 170 applications for such stands (with a 
total capacity of 516 hackney carriages) were received; 167 
locations for 512 carriages were granted; 3 locations for 4 



98 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

carriages were rejected; 1 location for 1 carriage was subse- 
quently reconsidered and granted. 

Of these special hackney carriage stand licenses, 14 locations 
(capacity, 38 carriages) were subsequently canceled; 154 
locations (capacity, 475 carriages) are now in force. 

Public Hackney Stands. 

Under the provisions of Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, 
referred to, the Police Commissioner was directed to designate 
certain portions other than sidewalks, of public ways in Boston, 
to be used and known as public hackney stands. Such stands 
shall be equally free and open of access to all vehicles whose 
owners are licensed in this city to set up and use hackney 
carriages, and which vehicles have not been assigned to special 
hackney stands. 

During the year 821 applications to set up and use hackney 
carriages for such public stands were granted. 

Of these public stand licenses 5 were revoked; 3 revocations 
subsequently rescinded and former licenses restored to their 
full force and effect; 10 holders of public stand licenses were 
stripped of credentials and 9 were suspended for periods varying 
from five to thirty days each. 

Hackney Carriages and Special and Public Stands. 

For the eight years operating under the provisions of Chapter 
392 of the Acts of 1930, which became effective February 1, 
1931, the rules and regulations relative to hackney carriages 
and stands established on February 1, 1931, by the Police 
Commissioner have worked out very well. 

As shown in foregoing figures, at the present time there are 
154 locations for special stands, with a capacity of 475 carriages, 
as compared with 150 locations, with a capacity of 466 carriages, 
during the previous year. 

There are 300 locations for public stands, with a capacity of 
733 cabs, as compared with 298 locations, with a capacity of 
732 cabs, during the preceding year. 

The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present 
is 1,433 as compared with 1,477 in the previous year; this 
number being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts 
of 1934. 

During the year there were approximately 35 taxi stands, 
both special and public, that were established, removed or 
relocated in the interest of public necessity and convenience. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 99 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon prop- 
erty) by hcensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 16 appHcations (capacity, 305 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Section 1 of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 
1931, which went into eflfect June 9, 1931, the term "sight- 
seeing automobile " was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this 
act, shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one 
of chapter ninety of the General Laws, used for the carrying 
for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes in 
or from the city of Boston and in or on which automobile 
guide service by the driver or other person is offered or 
furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the transpor- 
tation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department 
of Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public con- 
venience and necessity require such operation; and further, 
it is provided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate 
said automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is 
licensed so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1938, 25 apphcations 
for designated stands for sight-seeing automobiles were re- 
ceived; 22 were granted; 3 were rejected; and 1 subsequently 
was reconsidered and granted. 

During the year, 30 applications for licenses for sight-seeing 
automobiles were received; 29 were granted; 1 was rejected 
and subsequently reconsidered and granted. 



100 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Continuing with our practice, "new" sight-seeing auto- 
mobile drivers for the year commencing as of March 1, 1938, 
were fingerprinted as in the case of "new" hackney carriage 
drivers, and their records, if any, searched for in the Bureau 
of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were 34 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violations of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year 
57 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Two thousand one hundred and twenty-five penalties were 
imposed (including 7 suspensions), and 27 revocations were 
made, the remainder being reprimanded and warned and a 
record filed for future reference. This system of discipline has 
continued to result in relieving the courts of many minor cases 
which would tend to congest their dockets. Any driver, in 
accordance with the hackney rules, who is dissatisfied with the 
findings of the Office of Inspector of Carriages may appeal to 
the Commissioner. During the past year no such appeals 
have been made. There still continues to be a minimum of 
crime among the 2,823 drivers who have been licensed by the 
Police Commissioner. 

During the past year the Supervisory Force of the Office of 
Inspector of Carriages has been very busy in the Blue Hill 
avenue section of Boston suppressing the activities of taxicab 
operators who engage in the illegal practice of bringing the 
so-called "loads" to the intown section of the city, in violation 
of Section 1, Chapter 408, Acts of 1931, which reads as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any public way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for hire 
in such a manner as to afford a means of transportation 
similar to that afforded by a railway company, by indis- 
criminately receiving and discharging passengers along 
the route on which the vehicle is operated or may be 
running . . ." 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum and this procedure will be followed continuously 
until such illegal practices have ceased. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 101 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 76 applications for such licenses were re- 
ceived and granted. Of these 1 license was subsequently can- 
celed for nonpayment of license fee. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was "Not at 
a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representa- 
tives of abutting property. 

Of the 76 granted, 33 were for licenses from offices, garages, 
stables or order boxes, and 43 were for designated stands in 
the highway. 

Note. 

Legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 
for hire : 

Chapter 122, Acts of 1937; effective June 21, 1937. 

"No person holding a certificate (common carrier) or a 
permit (contract carrier) issued under the provisions of 
(Chapter 264, Acts of 1934, by the Department of Public 
Utilities) and authorizing the transportation of property 
for hire by motor vehicle within the City of Boston shall 
be required to obtain a license from the Police Commis- 
sioner for said city on account of such transportation or 
the use of motor vehicles therein." 

The legislation referred to did not affect customary pro- 
cedure of this Department in issuing a "wagon" license for a 
horse-drawn vehicle or for a hand-cart to convey merchandise 
for hire. 

A motor vehicle for which there has been issued a certificate 
or permit by the Department of Public Utilities, authorizing 



102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



transportation for hire, shall not be required to be also licensed 
by the Police Commissioner on account of such transportation 
for hire in this city. 

However, should it be intended to locate such motor vehicle 
at a designated stand in the highway in the business of trans- 
portation for hire, the owner thereof, to lawfully occupy such 
designated stand, has no alternative but to take out a "wagon" 
license to be granted by the Police Commissioner. 



Listing Work in Boston. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903* .... 


181,045 


1921 § . . . . 


480,783 


1904 








193,195 


1922 . 








480,106 


1905 . 








194,547 


1923 . 








477,547 


1906 . 








195,446 


1924 . 








485,677 


1907 . 








195,900 


1925 . 








489,478 


1908 . 








201,552 


1926 








493,415 


1909 








201,391 


1927 








495,767 


1910 t 








203,603 


1928 








491,277 


1911 








206,825 


1929 








493,250 


1912 








214,178 


1930 








502,101 


1913 








215,388 


1931 








500,986 


1914 








219,364 


1932 








499,758 


1915 








220,883 


1933 








501,175 


1916 1 








- 


1934 








502,936 


1917 








221,207 


1935 II 








509,703 


1918 








224,012 


1936 








514,312 


1919 








227,466 


1937 








520,838 


1920 








235,248 







* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

i 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

II 1935 first year of listing as of January 1 instead of April 1. 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



103 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year: 



Male 251,259 

Female 278,646 

Total 529,905 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, not including the services 
rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $43,288 30 

Clerical services and material used in preparing list . 13,740 00 

Newspaper notices 1,126 14 

Circulars and pamphlets 478 50 

Stationery 137 24 

Directories 31 00 

Telephone rental 15 62 

Examination of questioned documents 360 00 

Total $59,176 80 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

January 3 ^. . 380 

January 4 382 

January 5 369 

January 6 ' . . . . 365 

January 7 378 

January 8 374 

January 9 155 

January 10 358 

January 11 358 

January 12 311 

January 13 247 

January 14 232 

January 15 201 

January 16 35 

January 17 116 

January 18 87 

January 19 23 

January 20 3 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 

Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 



104 . POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The police findings in 1938 may be summarized as follows : 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,894 

Physically incapacitated 142 

Convicted of crime 86 

Unfit for various reasons 633 

Apparently fit 7,669 

Total 10.424 

In addition to the above, the Election Commissioners sent 
to the Police Department for delivery 7,669 summonses to 
persons for jury service. 

Special Police. 

Special pohce are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1938, were fingerprinted 
by the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

During the year ending November 30, 1938, there were 
1,203 special police officers appointed; 10 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause, and 106 appointments 
were canceled. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 

From United States Government 54 

From State Departments 5 

From City Departments 46 

From County of Suffolk 1 

From railroad corporations 33 

From other corporations and associations 779 

From theatres and other places of amusement . . . . 231 

From private institutions 22 

From churches 32 

Total 1,203 

Musicians' Licenses. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 22 applications for itinerant 

musicians' licenses received, 1 of which was disapproved; 2 

licenses were subsequently canceled on account of nonpayment 

of license fee. 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



105 



All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians 
are inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged 
with a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, 
that such instruments shall be inspected in April and September 
of each year. 

During the year 33 instruments were inspected with the 
following results: 



Kind or Instrument. 



Number 
Inspected. 



Number 
Passed. 



Street pianos 
Accordions . 
Hand organs 
Banjos 
Flutes . 
Clarinet 

Orchestrion organ 
Violin . 

Totals . 



11 



11 



7 


7 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 



33 



33 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1934 


184 


181 


3 


1935 


194 


192 


2 


1936 


204 


204 


- 


1937 


175 


175 


- 


1938 


227 


227 


- 



106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Carrying Dangerous Weapons. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers in the Commonwealth during the past five years, 
the number of such applications granted, the number refused 
and the number revoked : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1934 .... 


3,173 


3,063 


110 


2 


1935 .... 


3,140 


2,954 


186 


7 


1936 .... 


2,139 


2,054 


85 


4 


1937 .... 


2,597 


2,453 


144 


5 


1938 .... 


2,629 


* 2,446 


183 


2 



* 15 canceled for nonpayment. 

Public Lodging Houses. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Chapter 121 of the 
General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) and Sections 33 and 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Tercen- 
tenary Edition), and the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis Street . 
8 Pine Street 
79 Shawmut Avenue 
1202 Washington Street 
Total . 



35,679 
63,241 
12,994 
38,303 



150,217 



Miscellaneous Licenses. 
The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 21,650. Of these 238 were rejected (of the 
rejections, 18 were subsequently reconsidered and granted), 
1 was filed on which no action was taken, and 23 were with- 
drawn, leaving a balance of 21,406 which were granted. 



1939.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 107 

Of the granted applications, 50 were canceled for non- 
payment, leaving in force a net of 21,356. 

During the year 125 licenses were transferred, 523 canceled 
for various reasons, 39 revoked and 238 applications rejected. 

The ofl&cers investigated 2,922 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $67,159.50. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 

Pensions and Benefits. 

On December 1, 1937, there were 302 persons on the roll. 
During the year 31 died; viz., 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 2 lieu- 
tenant-inspectors, 4 sergeants, 23 patrolmen; and one pensioned 
patrolman was reinstated to active service. Twenty-one 
were added, viz.: 2 captains, 6 lieutenants, 1 inspector, 6 
sergeants, 3 patrolmen, 1 chief-engineer, 1 foreman of linemen, 
1 janitor, and the widows of Lieutenant Edward J. Kelley, 
Patrolmen John H. Manning and Walter Baxter, who died 
from injuries received in the performance of duty, leaving 
294 on the roll at date, 254 pensioners and 40 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $338,120.01, and it is estimated that 
$356,500 will be required for pensions and annuities in 1939. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 54 beneficiaries at the present time 
and there has been paid to them the sum of $7,899.87 during 
the past year. 

Financial. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and annuities, listing persons twenty 
years of age or more, and the maintenance of the police signal 
service were $5,997,107.47. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $53,835.15. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
from licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., 
was $81,667.75. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(109) 



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2,000 

1,700 

1,600 

1,600 

1,600 
2,000-2,400 
1,500-1,800 
1,600-2,100 

1,900 

3,600 
1,800-2,100 

2,100 
1,950-2,160 

1,700 
1.000-3,800 

3,000 

2.500 

2,200 

2,000 
1,600-1,800 
1,800-2,500 




. . . _ 




Firemen (marine) . 

Firemen (stationary) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Linemen and Foreman . 

Matrons 

Mechanics .... 

Painter 

Property Clerk 

Repairmen .... 

Signalmen .... 

Statisticians .... 

Steamfitter .... 

Stenographers .... 

Superintendent of Buildings . 

Assistant Superintendent of Build 
ings 

Superintendent of Repair Shop 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators 

Shorthand Reporters 


"3 
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112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 







Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1938. 


Nov. 30, 
1938. 


Jan. 1, 
1938. 


Nov. 30, 
1938. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary . 

Superintendent . 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants 

Lieutenant-Inspectors 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen . 

Patrolwomen 




1 

1 
1 
1 

4 

28 

67 

6 

187 

1,969 

8 


1 

1 
1 
1 

4 

30 

66 

4 

187 

1,969 

8 


1 
1 
1 
1 

4 

27 

67 

6 

185 

1,972 

5 


1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

30 

66 

4 

187 

1,932 

5 


Plus 3 
Minus 1 
Minus 2 
Plus 2 
Minus 40 


Totals . 




2,273 


2,272 


2,270 


2,232 


Minus 38 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between 
the actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



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114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







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1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



115 



Table IV. 
List of Officers Retired during the Year ending November SO, 
1938, giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Brennan, Cornelius 


Age 


65 Vu years 


34 Vi2 years 


Campbell, Archibald F. 






Age 


65 Vu " 


37 Vi2 " 


Cashman, John J. 






Age ■ 


65 '/i2 " 


34 Vu " 


Connolly, William R. . 






Age 


66 


34 "/i2 « 


Cook, Harry H. , 






Incapacitated 


43 Vi2 " 


17 Vu " 


DriscoU, Maurice 






Age 


65 Vi! " 


37 Vu " 


Flaherty, Patrick F. . 






Age 


63 »Aj ■■ 


32 iVi2 • 


Florentine, Charles T. 






Age 


62 it/i5 • 


35 Vi2 " 


Killen, Mathew . 






Age 


65 ViJ " 


39 Vi2 " 


Marks, Arthur J. 






Incapacitated 


50 


20 Vi2 " 


Marston, Hugh F. 






Age 


65 Vi2 " 


37 'Vi2 " 


O'Donnell, Thomas W. 






Age 


67 Vi2 • 


34 Vu " 


Ryan, Edward A. 






Age 


68 Vi2 • 


40 Vu " 


Rymes, William H. . 






Age 


65 Vu " 


37 Vu ' 


Spinney, Granville B. 






Age 


65 Vu " 


34 Vu " 


Thompson, Frank H. . 






Age 


66 1/12 " 


37 »/u • 


Welsh, Edward J. 






Age 


66 Vu " 


35 Vu " 


Whitehead, Joseph S. . 






Age 


66 •■o/a ' 


34 



116 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1938. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1938. 



Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


25 


July 


6 


July 


6 


July 


6 


July 


6 


July 


6 


July 


6 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 



Captain Benjamin A. Wall to the rank of Deputy Super- 
intendent. 
Lieutenant Bernard J. Graham to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Lawrence H. Dunn to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant-Inspector James H. Egan to the rank of 

Captain. 
Lieutenant Edward J. Keating to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Frank McNabb to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant John J. McArdle to the rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Justin McCarthy to the rank of Captain. 

Sergeant James V. Crowley to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Nicholas E. Kenney to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant William M. Donahue to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Frank H. Sliney to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John J. Walkins to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Arthur H. Vickerson to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant William Belle to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Cornelius F. O'Brien to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Leo E. Ho ban to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Patrick J. O'Donnell to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Benjamin R. Beers to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Harrington B. Wyand to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman Frank E. Shaw to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Robert E. Bowes to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Chester A. Henchey to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Daniel L. Donahue to the rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman George V. Stevens to the rank of Sergeant. 



1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



117 



Table V. — Concluded. 

List of Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending 
November 30, 1938. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1938. 



Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 


Aug. 


31 



Patrolman John H. Cloran to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas P. Gavin to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph W. McCleary to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Francis J. Hennessey to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles J. Deignan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John M. White to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edwin P. Murphy to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael H. Blute to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Thomas E. Currivan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Andrew E. Connelly to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman George W. O'Donnell to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael M. Heffernan to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Patrick J. Murphy (2d) to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James F. Flaherty to the rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Andrew C. Hagerty to the rank of Sergeant. 



118 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 

who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 





c 
















Date Appointed. 


T3 

C 

c 

i 

3 

m 


it 

Q 


a 


c 

3 


il 

<^ ?-. 

II 

3 e 

0)1-1 

2 


CO 


J 
"3 


Totals. 


1898 .... 














1 


1 


1900 . 








- 


- 


4 


1 


1 


3 


1 


10 


1901 . 








- 


- 




- 


- 


2 


2 


5 


1903 . 








- 


1 




- 


- 


4 


4 


10 


1904 . 








- 


1 




5 


_ 


1 


2 


10 


1905 . 








- 


- 




1 


1 


2 


3 


8 


1906 . 








- 


- 




1 


- 


3 


- 


5 


1907 . 








- 


- 




3 


- 


2 


4 


10 


1908 . 








- 


- 




4 


- 


5 


3 


15 


1909 . 








- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 . 








- 


1 




1 


- 


_ 


1 


4 


1911 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1912 . 








- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


2 


7 


1913 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1914 . 








- 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


2 


2 


1915 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1916 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1919 . 








1 


1 


9 


26 


- 


66 


458 


561 


1920 . 








- 


- 


3 


4 


- 


20 


147 


174 


1921 . 








- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


15 


97 


117 


1922 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


10 


55 


68 


1923 . 








- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


10 


88 


101 


1924 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


67 


71 


1925 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


83 


89 


1926 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


18 


275 


295 


1927 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


109 


116 


1928 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


82 


84 


1929 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


195 


197 


1930 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


38 


38 


1931 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


16 


1937 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


194 


194 


1938 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals 


1 


4 


30 


66 


4 


187 


1,937 


2,229 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 



Table VII. 

Men on the Police Force on November SO, 19S8, who were Born 
in the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 







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Date of Birth. 


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1 


4 


6 


1873 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


1 


8 


1874 . 








- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


2 


3 


10 


1875 . 








- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


4 


- 


8 


1876 . 








- 


1 


2 


2 


- 


1 


2 


8 


1877 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


6 


11 


1878 . 








- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


4 


2 


9 


1879 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


4 


8 


1880 . 








- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1881 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


3 


1 


8 


1882 . 








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1 


3 


3 


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1 


- 


8 


1883 . 








- 


- 


1 




- 


2 


- 


3 


1884 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


7 


1885 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 




- 


16 


17 


1886 . 








- 


- 


1 


2 




2 


25 


30 


1887 . 








- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


39 


43 


1888 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


49 


54 


1889 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


6 


67 


76 


1890 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


51 


54 


1891 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


88 


94 


1892 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


13 


111 


128 


1893 . 








■ - 


- 


2 


8 


- 


17 


124 


151 


1894 . 








- 


- 


1 


6 


- 


19 


142 


168 


1895 . 








- 


1 


1 


4 


- 


13 


145 


164 


1896 . 








- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


19 


157 


182 


1897 . 








1 


- 


5 


3 


- 


24 


150 


183 


1898 . 








- 


- 


_ 


5 


- 


12 


136 


153 


1899 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


9 


88 


98 


1900 . 








- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


7 


134 


141 


1901 . 








_ 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


4 


104 


109 


1902 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


52 


54 


1903 . 








' - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


56 


57 


1904 . 








- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


34 


34 


1905 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


24 


1906 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


25 


1907 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


30 


1908 . 








' - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


29 


29 


1909 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


22 


1910 . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


13 


Totals 


1 


4 


30 


66 


4 


187 


1,937 


2,229 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1938, 
was 42.61 years. 



120 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



121 





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1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



123 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions during the Year ending 
November 30, 1938. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation 


1,591 


151 


1,742 


Division 1 


4,208 


206 


4,414 


Division 2 












3,227 


150 


3,377 


Division 3 












6,694 


331 


7,025 


Division 4 












13,995 


1,736 


15,731 


Division 6 












7,521 


397 


7,918 


Division 7 












4,052 


219 


4,271 


Division 8 












97 


2 


99 


Division 9 












5,956 


522 


6,478 


Division 10 












5,412 


596 


6,008 


Division 11 












3,695 


180 


3,875 


Division 13 












1,640 


79 


1,719 


Division 14 












2,114 


153 


2,267 


Division 15 












4,616 


217 


4,833 


Division 16 












4,824 


619 


5,443 


Division 17 












2,526 


204 


2,730 


Division 18 












846 


30 


876 


Division 19 












3,734 


213 


3,947 


Special Service Squad 








1,435 


78 


1,513 


Superintendent's Office 








3,884 


913 


4,797 


Traffic . 








6,635 


1,489* 


8,124 


Totals . 








88,702 


8,485 


97,187 



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O 


o 




tt— ( 


o 




<: 


o 


>o 


^ 

"o 


if) 

s 






> 




S 




c3 


o 


o 

i 






i-l 


CO 




o 


o 

a 


S 


03 


S 






m 


CO 


oi 




c 


P 


U 


;::j 


^ 


^ 



-^ 



'W 




?s 


!? 


o 


o 


^ 




o 


H 


;^ 


< 




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1 


P 




H 


1— 1 

X 


1— 1 

< 




u 


w 


w 


>4 


« 


<; 




H 









r-i 


(N 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


_i 


'^ 


9} 








1 — 1 








CO 


<M 


i> 


z 


•sajBuiaj 






















GO 


■:© 


Oi 


CD 


l> 





-* 


CD 


CD 




i-H 


(M 


ICI 


'i* 




»o 


C5 








•S3IBJ\[ 


^ 


t^ 


GO 










CO 


CO 


Q 




















C^" 




1 


1 


1 


• 1 


1 


1 


00 


CO 


^H 


•pasBapjj 














(N 


?^ 


CO 

05 


JO paSjBqosiQ 
















cd" 


CO" 




CO 


Ttl 


lO 





(M 





t^ 


Cl 


CD 




(N 


00 


o 


rt< 


CO 





GO 


■* 


to 


■jBux JOj ppH 


•* 


^^ 


CO 


TjH 


(N 


c^ 








(M 




CO 


^ 


'*" 






'"' 


^ 


co" 
CO 


0" 

05 




t^ 


o 


(M 


CO 


CD 


(M 


,_, 





,_, 




(M 


3; 


t^ 


CO 


1— 1 


IC 


10 


(M 


r-H 


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(TO 


o 


t-_^ 


C^] 




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CD 


1> 







lO 


o 


CO 


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00 


00 


Oi 


t^ 


^^ 




(M 


CO 


lO 


Tt< 


t^ 







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^. 


•sjagpisaj-uojsT 


•<*< 




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10 


Tf^ 
















co" 


a^ 






CO 


CO 


CO 


05 


10 


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t^ 


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05 


IM 


00 




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00" 


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of 




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o 


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^ 


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<M 


C^l 




o 


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CO 


CO 










»o 


lO 


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Tt< 


c^ 


TJH 






TtH 






05 


jtq paaouiuing 
















00" 






o 


CO 


r^ 


c\ 





GO 


t^ 


t^ 







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r— ( 


Oi 


10 




'^t^ 




cq 


05 


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CO 


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00 











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im" 




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j-H 


,_i 





10 


CO 


,_! 


CO 


iCi 




02 


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Tt< 


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Tt< 


00 


00 


•* 


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05 


05 


(M 


(M 


(M 





CO 
cd" 






CO 


■* 


IQ 


CO 


(M 





U5 


(N 


l^ 




(M 


00 


O 


Tf< 


CD 








CO 


00 


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'^^ 


'^ 


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Tt< 


(N 


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t^ 






CO 


^"^ 


rf 






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CO 




05 






,—4 


o 


(M 


CO 


■* 


tH 


"3 


CO 


10 






o 




O 


i-H 


(M 





Oi 


CO 


00 


Tj a 


•saiBuia^ 


(M 




Tfi 








10 




^^ 


z w 
















CO 


■^" 


CO 


























(M 


Tji 


CO 





00 


CO 





Ci 


<N 






(M 


t^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


OS 


T— H 


(M 





•saiBJV 


(M_ 


^_ 


o 


TtH 


cs 


o_ 


1> 


CO 


t^ 






co" 


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co" 






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CO 


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CO 


00" 

00 






^ 


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3 


















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o 

■*3 



















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■5 




s 




C 










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g 




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4> 


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3 














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H 




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^ 




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to 
to 


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S 


0) 




o 


o 

CO 


2 


a. 


to 
bC 


CO 

C 


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'-3 

CO 






o 


<u 


m 





03 


a> 


<u 


03 


0) 




-1-3 

-1-3 

cc 




to 


to 

1 


CO 


CJ 

-k3 
CO 


'0 




Pi 


C 




g 


a; 





c 


C 


^^ 




t3 


'3 


be 


■3 


StI 


-73 


■3 


'3 


-1-3 




H 


M 


e3 


^; iiC 


. 


c 


bC 


b£ 







<; 


o3 




g ^ 


g » 


03 


o3 


03 


c 




•z 


to 


cc 


C to 


C 5 


h 


to 


to 


to 






OJ 


O 


aj 0) 


a; .0 


0) 


(U 









M 


to . 


— CO . 






to 


to 


M 






C 


C 


2 « 


o.H 





C 


C 


C 






5C 


5c 




>'o3 




0) 

5C 


jS 


to 




o 


o 





fe 











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-^ 

























>-! 


CQ 


CO 


Tii 


10 


CO 


t^ 


00 


H 




6 


c 


d 


c 


d 


d 


d 


d 








^ 


^ 


Z 


15 


^ 


Z 


Z 


Z 





1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



143 



'ts 





i: 




^ 




so 


1— 1 


S 


h-i 


O 


X 


so 


w 


(i. 


hj 


V-^ 


m 


o* 


< 


§ 



CO 



5a. 









■0 


1 


IN 


1 


1 





00 


_ 






« 


P^ 






^ 






^ 


CJi 


■>*( 


CO 
CM 






























^ 





CD 


00 


•* 


on 


CO 













-> 










CO 


CM 

co" 




1-0 


oo_ 

co" 




OJ 


P^ 


■* 


1 


IC 


" 


1 





c 


CO 

10 


s 




-o 


















1 '^ 




"5 go 


























10 


n 


•<)< 


O) 


t^ 


Of) 


C5 








XI 














(N 





CM 






^ 






*"• 








10 


CO 


CO 




a 




















CO 











1 


C2 


^ 


CM 


CO 











— 

<~Ui 


(i* 












<N 


CD 
CM 


Ol 












<N 


§ 


00 





0: 
CD 


CM 


CO 


00 




■§ 


^ 


'^ 












Tj" 


CO 






oj 


















"^ 


10 




t^ 


&; 


CO 


1 




CO 


" 





CO 

CD 


t^ 


0: 




-a 
in go 
















" 


LO 






I— t 


O 


t- 


CO 


CO 





t^ 


i> 
































s 






"■^ 











«o 







cS 














■* 


CM 


00 








•-^ 


1 


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1 


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Of) 


CM 






















r-i 


t^ 


c^ 


CD 


, 



T3 


pq 














•* 


"O 





^ 


Sic 






















.^ 










1^ 


a> 


r- 










te 






3; 








CO 











6 


cf 


^ 














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CO 


00 


_3 






















—1 






01 





C-. 


CO 




'O 








_C 


^ 
















CD 


00 


iO 




-0 


p<:( 


















05 


■3 
S 


Ifl go 



























Oi 


.— 1 


en 


t^ 


CM 
















CO 


!N 


■* 





■>*• 










s 














00 

co" 


1^ 


»o" 


r 






















^ 


ls< 








1 


CO 


Ol 


■* 





CO 


00 

05 


CM 


' 


-a 


p^' 














•o 


to 


CO 


fs 


Bin 



























CD 


t^ 


a> 


CO 




00 




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.^ 












CO 


(M 


tN 


00 




_, 


^ 


0) 


C3 


s 






CO 








10 





iq 
























— 








■* 


1 


CO 


■* 


t~ 


CO 





,_, 




^ 
















CO 


•0 


t^ 






pt^ 
















10 


1. 


"a 
























U5 So 
























.-H 


(N 


.— 1 


<— « 








^^ 




p^, 










00 


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CD 


t^ 


on 









C3 


s 
















LO 


CD 


<, 








, 














*-• 


u 




r~ 


c<t 


■* 


r^ 


<N 


•* 


CM 








pt, 


•— * 












CD 





t^ 


1 
















CO 


CO 


t^ 


u 






CD 



C5 
CO 


to 
10 


lO 


CD 


CO 




00 

CM 


■* 




















•<*< 







5^ 


















O) 


10 



































00 


1 


r~ 


.— 1 


,~i 


CO 


CO 


CM 








&H 














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t^ 


CM 




tN g- 
















'"' 


CO 









CO 


•— 1 


CO 


00 


■o 

























CO 
























































(S 
























, 




1—1 


Oi 


t^ 


1 


1 


1 


CO 








T3 


P^ 






iH 








CO 


CO 


00 

C-l 




2^:: 


























t^ 


!N 


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CO 


r^ 





CO 


















CO 






















00 








































ej 




























1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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P^ 
















■* 


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2 — 


























t— 1 


■* 


t^ 











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D 


s 






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t^ 


C) 
























































'^ 


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00 
































d 


Ch 








■^ 


^ 


•/^ 


z 


:^: 


/Z 


2 


Z 


1 



144 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[J an. 









1— 1 

X 




w 


•<s> 


Hi 


J- 


m 


o 


<i 


■^ 


H 


5J 




o 




as 




^ 




5S 



^ 



o 





eo 


o 


lO 


»o 


o 


^ 




05 


»o 


00 


CD 


CO 


^ 




00 


CO 


o 


lO 


»o 


05 


•paujBg S33J 


lO 




(M 


IM 


(M 


IM 


ssatu;^ JO ■junoxuy 


t^ 


lO 


o 




r-;^ 


co__ 




o 


>-<" 


co" 


tJh" 


co" 


cT 




s 










s 




oo 


CO 


o 


r^ 


<M 


00 


•}ano3 


o 


as 


CD 


CR 


(M 


CD 


IB aou^pua^JV 


■* 


00_ 


Cft 


"\ 


"^ 


O 


.sjCbq jo jaqmnjf^ 


CD 


CO 

CO 


of 






co' 




CO 


t^ 


C5 


o 


03 


^^ 


•;jnoo Xq 




Oi 


lO 


ITS 


CO 


lO 


pssodiuj ;uaui 


1> 


co_ 


00 


CO 


■* 


t-^ 


-uosudmj JO sj'Ba^ 


c^" 


c^" 


co" 


co" 


CO 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 




o 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 




05 


t>- 


I> 


^ 


t^ 


o 


•^jnoQ Xq p3soduii 


o 




o 


§ 


^ 


o 
CO 


sauij[ JO ^unouiy 


^ 


T)H~ 


o" 


•* 


r-T 


CO 




t^ 


lO 


"0 


00 


IC 


CO 




^ 










m 




^^ 


1— 1 


t^ 


o 


o 


^ 




'^ 


o 


o 




»o 


CO 




^ 


05 


o 


o 


,_! 


00 


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o 


00 


CD 


lO 


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00 


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c^ 


(N 


00 


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O^ 


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§8 


g 


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oT 




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CO 


CO 


s 


TtH 


^ 




m 










s© 




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o 


t- 


■* 


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o 




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■* 


o 


CD 


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00 


00 


CO 


■* 


■* 


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OS 


00 


t^ 




(M 


t^ 


uajo^g pa^joday 


(N 


»o 


CO 


"^ 


O 


'-I, 


A)J8doj(j JO ■junoiuy 






co" 


05 


CO 
00 


CD 




»o 


»o 


CO 


rt< 


^ 


Tt< 




m 










m 




^ 


00 


CO 


1 


^_l 


CO 




o 




l> 


CO 


■* 


CO 


"Sjsajjy 














JO aSBCfuaojaj 


oi 


00 


00 


d 


d 


d 




<o 


-* 


00 


00 


t^ 


(N 




lO 


(M 


■* 


■* 


00 


l> 


•ps^sajjy 




t>;^ 


CO 


05 




CD 


suosjaj JO jaqnin^ 


CO 


»o 


1— 1 


"f 


nT 


CO 




GO 


t^ 


00 


C5 


05 


00 




O 


Oi 


iM 


05 


o 


CD 




lO 


00 


00 


Tt< 




"3 


•uopBindoj 


CO 


(M 




o 


(m" 




pajBuinsji 


(M 


(M 


(M 


CO 


CO 


(M 




05 


05 


02 


05 


OJ 


cn 




























bO 














OS 














t« 














0) 














> 




■* 


»o 


CO 


l> 


00 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






05 


03 


o 


05 


05 





1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



145 



'« 



?3i 



00 



-J? 


a 




o 


-^ 


5^ 


<3 


1^ 





O 


-j:^ 




O 






o 


?; 


> 


•■J^ 


5.- 


h- H 


o 


s 


X 


Uh 


-^ 



CO ."^ 



'^ 


-.s; 


s 


**** 


K"t 


o 


>^ 


'V 






r-->A 


« 


^ 


as 


-^ 


1 


CO 


« 


•4) 




CO 


CO 


cj 


•45 


^ 


^ 


^1 


i- 


•^ 


JS 


K-1 


o 




*/j 






c 

3 
O 

S 
< 


oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 

C<JOOCOCDU50a>iOO 
-*COGOM^O-*100050 
CO CO CO r-H_C^CO T-( (N 


1,215 50 

3,420 00 

10,100 00 

23 00 


OOOOiOO 
OOOOCOO 

iO00O»CiTf*CD 

gcocot^-co 


Com- 
plaints 
Investi- 
gated. 


^ 1 locxi fo Tt*r^ 1 1 i> 
coo_co 


1 \ cct^io 


^CO ■<* 1 1 1 




CO I 1 1 1 0(M 1 1 Tfi 


1 1 1 ooco 

05 


1 1 to 1 1 1 


T3 


1 1 1 t^lOC^) 1 1 1 1 


1 COr-H CO 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 


■6 

o 


CO 1 1 1 l>CO00 1 (M(M 
00 ^ 
CO 


1 ^cococo 

CO.-H Tt< 


1 1 CO.-H 1 1 




■-Hrt l(M.-ICD,-H |r-lT-H 

CO 


1 CO lOiO 1 

00 


^ 1 1 1 1 1 


Licenses 

Issued 

Without 

Fee. 


1 1 r-H 1 ^ 1 C<l Ol 1 --I 


1 1 CO»C 1 


1 1 CO 1 1 1 




^■^OCOQOOlCOCOOS-^rJHrtCqoOlM 
t^ C^ (M ^ ■* CO i-H ^ GO CO ■* O 02 
rt CD G0_00 (M (M ■* CO <M 


as-* cD»o 1 1 
coco-* t^ 




C0C0rtC0O^^t^(M00->tiC50>05C^ 
l^ (M lO (M t^ t^ (M (M CO (MOt-iO 
"H CO CO 00 (M (N CD CO CO 

co~co~r-r of 


0-*05CD 1 1 
COCOt}<I> 


o 

»J 

ex 

o 

OS 

m 
O 




. . . . d 

« s 

. . .^ o 

c3 o 


1 
O) 

"a 

o o -^2 5? 

•lis l"§1 

t: CI c ^ . tH ^ -^ 
111.2 '^S? 

tZi CZ2 H ;^ CQ P3 




-2 co 

CJ s- 


• • • ^_ .^ -t^ 

2 2 ^ ^^ 2SSg-2S-?-?S 



146 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 







, 










Ti 


c 








O 


_2 


> 


C3 




, 


■6 














eS 








H 







(M CO ■* CD lOOt^^ ■* CO lO OO (M »0 

■* o C5 o r^ CD CO t^ c<i (N ^^ coco coco 



II I I I I 



I II I 



I I I 



I III II II 






> 

I— I 

X 
&a 

pq 

< 



I III II II 



III III II II 



hJ";£ 



I I II I I I I III I 



I I I I I III I 



II I I I I III II 



S eg 

■" Hi 

.ii So 

t„ CO CI, 

g bC '* — 

o " aj'^ 



s 
o 

02 S l-i 

33 o 






QJ 






• •■^'§ 

^ 03 
. cu ^'^^ 

.Si C S 
> 0-2- 

o3 OJ cj -H 

•5 -ti a fi 

S o ^ S 
. bID-C +i to 
>> - - .-Si 

*- S 3 3 S 



J2 >,c3 

t- <i> i; 

o o 03 

I "^ &« 



'5 i= 



fi cc ■ ■ 

>.o3.^ >>03 

m 03 o3 '-I e 

^ Q 



G O 






a3 
o oj 

&« 3 
S.2 C 



' OJ <U QJ 0) 

PiP^pHp:5 



^ o 



^ to O C 
^ Oh £i^ a § 

o o o -^ o g 
mm PIS 






-tJ o 

■3 bC 

O P 
• >. S 

coOg 
o~ aj 

41 S 



C 

o3 

o 



u 



1939.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



147 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued during the Year ending 

November 30, 1938. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Kennels. 


Total. 


1 


45 


4 


1 




50 


2 


3 


1 


1 


- 


5 


3 


205 


43 


40 


2 


290 


4 


t400 


103 


55 


*1 


559 


6 


780 


105 


93 


- 


978 


7 


785 


174 


69 


- 


1,028 


8 


3 


- 


1 


- 


4 


9 


707 


104 


88 




900 


10 


499 


67 


66 




633 


11 


1,230 


99 


238 




1,567 


13 


626 


55 


167 




849 


14 


764 


71 


194 


- 


1,029 


15 


314 


52 


25 




392 


16 


t532 


128 


140 




801 


17 


1,345 


173 


424 


- 


1,942 


18 


690 


56 


141 


- 


887 


19 


t563 


52 


92 


- 


707 


Totals 


9,491 


1,287 


1,835 


8 


12,621 



t 4 removals at $0.25 each. 



* No fee, kennel license. 
Division 4, 1; Division 16, 2; and Division 19, 1. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 

Police Divisions. 



Division 1 


2 


Division 10 


Division 2 


30 


Division 16 


Division 3 


1 


Division 19 


Division 4 


25 




Division 7 


10 


Total 



3 
4 
1 

76 



* 1 canceled for nonpayment. 



148 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year ending November 30, 1938. 





Expenditures. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Permanent employees . 


$5,045,968 69 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


5,155 58 


$5,051,124 27 






B. Contractual Services: 






1. 


Printing and binding . 


$6,999 56 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


999 66 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


21,679 48 




5. 


Express charges 


65 60 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


40,734 70 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


635 67 




12. 


Bond and insurance premi 








urns .... 


295 00 




13. 


Communication 


42,948 81 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs anc 








care .... 


18,780 00 




16. 


Care of animals 


3,263 75 




18. 


Cleaning .... 


2,274 25 




22. 


Medical .... 


14,745 53 




28. 


Expert .... 


831 91 




29. 


Stenographic, copying, etc. 


856 00 




30. 


Listing .... 


59,176 80 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc. 


1,216 28 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint 








ing .... 


1 09 




39. 


General repairs 


35,739 85 


251,243 94 


C. Equipment: 






3. 


Electrical 


$4,850 76 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


14,404 79 




6. 


Stable .... 


281 17 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings 


2,135 91 




9. 


Office .... 


5,307 73 




10. 


Library .... 


721 53 




11. 


Marine .... 


69 95 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


244 50 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


6,156 13 




14. 


Live stock 


1,100 00 




15. 


Tires, tubes, accessories 


7,049 47 




16. 


Wearing apparel . 


85,547 52 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


2,335 40 


130,204 86 






D. Supplies: 






1. 


Office .... 


$43,101 57 




2. 


Food and ice . 


12,928 65 




3. 


Fuel 


24,252 93 




4. 


Forage and animal 


3,164 74 




5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


421 68 




8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


5,957 86 




11. 


Gasoline, oil and grease 


- 53,628 02 




13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants 


1,536 70 




16. 


General plant . 


11,630 34 


156,622 49 




Carried forward . 




$5,589,195 56 



1939.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Brought forward 



E. Materials: 

1. Building . . . . 
10. Electrical 
13. Miscellaneous materials 

F. Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities . 



$3,804 38 

18,813 70 

8,604 28 



H. 



Emergency Relief Project Materials 
Total 



Receipts. 

For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner 

For dog licenses (credited to School Department) 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 

For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phone, report blanks, use of police property . 

Sale of two Police Department owned telephone switch- 
boards 

Refunds and reimbursements 

Miscellaneous refunds 

Total 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 
to police property 

Grand total 



149 

,589,195 56 



31,222 36 
338,120 01 

38,569 54 
,997,107 47 



$37,879 50 

29,280 00 

2,038 69 

1,937 35 

1,480 00 

7,645 70 

65 82 

$80,327 06 



1,340 69 
$81,667 75 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
ending November 30, 1938. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 



Pay rolls 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 
Pavement and sidewalk surface restoration 

Traffic box posters, posting, etc 

Stationery 

Total 



$33,297 


91 


18,591 


20 


1,548 65 


369 


70 


27 69 


$53,835 


15 



150 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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152 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1939. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



153 



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INDEX. 



A. 



Accidents 

caused by automobile 

number of, reported . 

persons killed or injured by, in streets. 
Adjustment of claims 
Ambulance service . 
Arrests 

age and sex of . 

comparative statement of 

for drunkenness 

foreigners .... 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. 

increase in number of 

minors .... 

nativity of . 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions . 

number of, punished by fine 

on warrants 

procedure after . 

summoned by court . 

total number of 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants 
Articles lost and found 
Auctioneers .... 
Automobiles .... 

accidents due to 

deaths caused by 

operating under influence of liquor 

police 

public 

safety educational 

sight-seeing 

stolen and recovered 

used, dealers in . 
Auxiliary radio transmitter installed 



31, 37 



PAGE 

40, 89, 150, 151 

. 150, 151 

89 

parks and squares, 150, 151 

90 

94 

44, 123, 124, 144 

143 



30, 31 



40, 



80, 



32, 



30, 



144 

30, 31, 90, 132 

30, 124, 142 

30, 131, 142 

30 

30, 124, 142 

32 

33, 124, 142 

123 

32 

30, 124, 142 

67 

30, 124, 142 

32, 142 

31,137 

30, 124, 142 

81 

145 

93, 128, 135, 150, 151 
150, 151 
40, 150, 151 
31, 135 
80, 93, 95 
95, 145 
65 
99, 145 
31, 38, 128 
37, 39, 145 
75 



Bail, persons committed to 

Ballistics unit 

formation and duties 
accomplishments 



B. 



(155) 



60 

75-78 
75 
76 



156 



P. D. 49. 



Benefits and pensions 
Biological chemist 
Boston Junior Police Corps 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported . 

found open and made secure 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation 

automobile division . 

biological chemist 

homicide squad . 

lost and stolen property division 

sex crime squad 
Bureau of Operations 

creation, accomplishments 

auxiliary radio transmitter 

change in frequencies 

recording of radio messages 
Bureau of Records . 

criminal identification 

missing persons . 

multilith .... 

photography, fingerprinting 

summons file 

warrant file 



PAGE 

107 

41-44 
20, 36 
60 
89 
60 
36^4 
37 
41 
40 
39 
37 

72-75, 79 
72 
75 
74 
74 
44-60 
48, 53 
56 
46 
45-56 
59 
58 



c. 

Carriages, public 95, 145 

articles left in 97 

number licensed 96, 145 

stands for 97 

Cases investigated 44, 89 

Children 32, 57, 89 

abandoned, cared for 89 

lost, restored 57, 89 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 31,137 

Claims, adjustment of . 90 

Collective musicians 105, 145 

Commitments 32, 90 

Communications system 72, 79 

Complaints 106, 121, 145 

against miscellaneous licenses 106, 145 

against police officers 121 

Courts 30, 32, 40, 124, 142 

fines imposed by 30, 32, 144 

number of days' attendance at, by officers . 30, 32, 41, 44, 144 

number of persons summoned by 30, 124, 142 

prosecutions in 30, 40 

Crime Prevention Bureau 24 



p. D. 49. 157 

PAGE 

Criminal identification 48, 53 

Criminal work 144 

comparative statement of 144 

D. 

Dangerous weapons 106 

Dead bodies 89, 92 

recovered 89, 92 

Deaths 29, 40, 113, 150, 151 

by accident, suicide, etc 40, 150, 151 

of police officers 29, 113 

Dictaphone, installation of, for recording radio messages ... 74 

Distribution of force 29, 110 

Disturbances suppressed 89 

Dogs 145, 147, 149 

amount received for licenses for 145, 149 

number licensed 147 

Draftsman, services of 55 

Drivers 96, 100, 145 

hackney carriage . ' 96, 145 

sight-seeing automobile 100, 145 

Drowning, persons rescued from 89, 92 

Drunkenness 30, 31, 90, 132 

arrests for, per day 30 

decrease in number of arrests for 30 

foreigners arrested for 30, 132 

nonresidents arrested for 30, 132 

total number of arrests for 30, 31, 132 

women committed for 90 

Duties of Police Commissioner 11 

E. 

Election and primary returns, transmission of 73 

Employees of the Department 28, 110 

Events, special 81 

Expenditures 35, 107, 148 

Extra duties performed by officers 44, 89 

F. 

Financial 35, 107, 145, 148 

expenditures 35, 107, 148 

miscellaneous license fees 107, 145, 149 

pensions 107, 149 

receipts 35, 106, 107, 146, 149 

signal service 107, 149 

Fines 30, 32, 144 

amount of 30, 32, 144 

average amount of 30, 144 

number punished by 32 



158 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Fingerprint 46-58 

Fire alarms 89, 91 

defective, reported 89 

number given 89 

Fires 89, 91 

extinguished 89, 91 

on waterfront attended 91 

Foreigners, number arrested 30, 124, 142 

Fugitives from justice . . 44, 137 

Q. 

Gaming, illegal 137 

H. 

Hackney carriage drivers 96, 145 

Hackney carriages 95, 100, 145 

Hand carts 101, 145 

Harbor service 35, 36, 91 

History of department 7 

Homicide squad ' 40 

Horses 93 

House of Detention 90 

Houses of ill fame, keeping 90, 133 

Hurricane 36, 73 

I. 

Imprisonment 32, 44, 144 

persons sentenced to 32 

total years of 32, 144 

Income 35, 107, 146, 149 

Information from police journals, requests for 55 

Inquests held 40 

Insane persons taken in charge 89 

Intoxicated persons assisted . 89 

Itinerant musicians 104, 145 

J. 

Junior Police Corps, established within department . . . . 20, 36 

Junk collectors 145 

Jimk shop keepers 145 

Jury lists, police work on 103 

L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 89 

Licenses, miscellaneous 106, 145 

Line-up of prisoners 68, 69 

Listing, pohce 35, 102, 148, 152, 153 

expenses of 35, 103, 148 

number listed 103, 152, 153 

number of policemen employed in 103 

Lodgers at station houses 32 



p. D. 49. 159 

PAGE 

Lodging houses, public 106, 145 

applications for licenses 106, 145 

authority to license 106 

location of 106 

number of persons lodged in 106 

Lost and found articles 81 

Lost and stolen property division 39 

Lost children 32, 57, 89 

M. 

Maintenance shop 80 

Minors, number arrested 30, 124, 142 

Miscellaneous business ■ . 89 

Miscellaneous licenses 106, 145 

amount of fees collected for 106, 145 

complaints investigated 106, 145 

number canceled and revoked 106, 145 

number issued . 106, 145 

number transferred 106, 145 

Missing persons 56-58 

age and sex of 57 

number found 57 

number reported 67 

Musicians 104, 145 

collective 105, 145 

itinerant 104, 145 

Narcotics 26 

Nativity of persons arrested 32 

Nonresident offenders 30, 33, 124, 142 

o. 

Obscene literature 25 

Offenses . .' 30,31,33,124,142 

against chastity, morality, etc 30, 131, 142 

against license laws 30, 129, 142 

against liquor law 31, 130 

against the person 30, 31, 124, 142 

against property, malicious 30, 129, 142 

against property, with violence .... 30, 31, 126, 142 

against property, without violence . . . 30, 31, 127, 142 

forgery and against currency 30, 129, 142 

miscellaneous 30, 31, 33, 135, 142 

recapitulation 142 

Organization 35 

P. 

Parks, public 150, 151 

accidents reported in 150, 151 



160 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Pawnbrokers 39, 145 

Pensions and benefits 107, 149 

estimates for pensions 107 

number of persons on rolls 107 

payments on account of 107, 149 

Personnel 28, 110 

Photographic, etc 45-54 

Plant and equipment 80 

Police, special 104 

Police charitable fund 107 

Police Commissioner, duties of 11 

term of office, change in Act 10 

Pohce Department . . 26, 28, 29, 79, 107, 110, 112, 118, 121, 144 

authorized and actual strength of 112 

commendation of officers 27, 36 

distribution of personnel 29, 110 

history of 7 

horses in use in 93 

how constituted 28 

officers absent sick 120 

active service, number of officers in 118 

appointed 29 

arrests by 30, 123, 124, 144 

average age of 119 

complaints against 121 

date appointed 118 

detailed, special events 81-88 

died 29, 113 

dismissed 29, 121 

injured 29 

meritorious service, request for promotion on account of . 12 

nativity of 119 

pensioned 29, 115 

promoted 29, 116 

reinstated 29, 121 

resigned 29, 122 

retired 29, 115 

suspended 121 

school 61 

vehicles in use in 93 

work of 30 

Police listing 35, 102, 148, 152, 153 

Pohce signal service 28, 36, 70, 90, 107, 149 

miscellaneous work 90 

payments on account of 107, 149 

property assigned to 91 

signal boxes 90 

Primary and election returns, trahsmission of 73 

Prisoners, nativity of 32 

Promotion of police 29, 36, 116 



p. D. 49. • 161 

PAGE 

Property 32, 33, 38, 39, 44, 146, 149 

lost, abandoned and stolen 38, 39, 146, 149 

recovered 33, 44, 144 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 146, 149 

stolen 33, 144 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 32 

Prosecution of homicide cases 40 

Public carriages 95, 145 

Public lodging houses 106, 145 

R. 

Radio, two-way 36, 72, 73, 74, 75, 79 

auxiHary transmitter installed 75 

change in frequencies 74 

hurricane, relief and assistance at time of 36, 73 

installation of dictaphone for recording messages ... 74 

Receipts, financial 35, 107, 146, 149 

Requests for information from police journals 55 

Revolvers 106, 145 

licenses to carry 106, 145 

s. 

Safety educational automobile 65 

Salaries 110 

School, police 61 

Second-hand articles . 145 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 37, 145 

Sergeant ballistician 75 

Sex crime squad established 37 

Sick and injured persons assisted 32, 89, 92 

Sickness, absence on account of 120 

Sight-seeing automobiles 99, 145 

Signal service, police .28, 36, 79, 90, 107, 149 

Special events 81 

Special police 104 

Special service squad 78 

State wards 57 

Station houses 32 

lodgers at 32 

persons discharged at 30 

witnesses detained at 32 

Stolen property 33, 39, 144 

recovered 33, 44, 144 

value of 33, 44, 144 

Street railways, conductors, motormen and starters .... 145 

Streets . . . . '. 61, 89, 150, 151 

accidents reported in 150, 151 

defective, reported 61 

obstructions removed 89 

Summons file 59 



162 P. D. 49. 

PAGE 

Supervisor of Cases unit •. . . 67-71 

personnel 67 

71 

70 



commendation of justices 
court supervision 
line-up of prisoners . 
transcript of cases 



70 



T. 

Tagging 64, 100 

Theatrical — booking agencies 145 

Traffic Division 62-65 

activities 62 

safety educational automobile ....... 65 

tagging 64 

territory 62 

u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 33 

Used cars 37, 39, 145 

licensed dealers 38, 145 

provisions for hearing before granting third class license . . 38 
purchases and sales reported 39 

V. 

Vehicles 93, 95 

ambulances, combination 93 

automobiles 93 

in use in police department 93-95 

public carriages 95 

wagons and hand carts 101, 145, 147 

Vessels 92 

w. 

Wagons ... 5 101, 145, 147 

new legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 

for hire 101 

number licensed by divisions 147 

total number licensed 101,145,147 

Warrant file 58 

Water pipes, defective, reported 89 

Water running to waste, reported 89 

Weapons, dangerous 106 

Witnesses 30, 32, 89, 144 

fees earned by officers as 30, 32, 144 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . 30, 32, 144 

number of, detained at station houses : 32, 89 

Women committed to House of Detention 90 

Work of the Department 30 

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