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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOIM 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

QT^e Commontuealtf) of ilHafi>siacf)us;ettg 



THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 

FOB THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

FOB THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1942 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



D^"- 



1 r\ 



ol-tiA-^otU i'04l/4^-|?4v/45' 



S^. 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

Letter to Governor 7 

War 7 

General . . _ 7 

Personnel 8 

Extra duties 9 

Traffic 10 

Servicemen II 

Juvenile delinquency 11 

Bureau of Operations 13 

Cocoanut Grove disaster 13 

The Department 15 

Police force 15 

Signal service 15 

Employees of the Department 15 

Recapitulation 15 

Distribution and changes 16 

Police officers injured while on duty 16 

Work of the Department 16 

Arrests 16 

Drunkenness 17 

Nativity of persons arrested 18 

Uniform crime record reporting 20 

Volunteer, unpaid, auxiliary police 22 

Receipts 22 

Expenditures 23 

Personnel 23 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 23 

Department Medals of Honor 24 

Time lost by officers on account of injuries 24 

Pimishments imposed for violation of rules and regulations ... 24 

Organization 25 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation . . . . .29 

Automobile division 29 

Used car dealers' licenses granted 30 

Lost and stolen property division 31 

Homicide Squad 31 

General 33 

Biological chemist 33 

Bureau of Records 36 

Establishment, purpose and equipment 36 

Multilith 37 

Output of daily manifolds, etc. 37 

Circulars drafted, containing photographs and fingerprints of 

fugitives 38 

Photographic division 38 

Record files of assignments 39 

Identification division 39 



4 CONTENTS. 

Bureau of Records — Concluded: Page 

Main index file 39 

Criminal record file 39 

Cabinets of segregated photographs of criminals arrested . 40 
Exhibiting of photographs of criminals in main and segre- 
gated files 40 

Members of Bureau visited scenes of homicides, burglaries, 

etc 40 

Ultra-violet lamp 41 

Fluoroscope and White drill 41 

Pantoscopic camera 41 

Developing and printing room 42 

Filing system of photographs and fingerprints of unidentified 

dead 42 

Single fingerprint files 43 

Fingerprint system practically eliminating Bertillon system 43 

Civilian fingerprint file 43 

Displacement of Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classifi- 
cation 44 

Criminal identification 44 

Miscellaneous department photography 45 

Requests for information from police journals .... 46 

Services of a draftsman from the personnel .... 46 

Criminal records for the Department furnished by the Bureau 47 

Identification made through fingerprints 47 

Missing persons 48 

Warrant file 50 

Summons file 51 

Traffic Division 52 

Activities 52 

Safety-educational automoliile 56 

Tagging 57 

Two-hour parking 58 

Bureau of Operations 60 

Creation 60 

Duties 60 

Accomplishments .60 

Ballistics Unit 63 

Formation and duties 63 

Accomplishments . . . . , 63 

Plant and equipment 67 

Special events 69 

Miscellaneous business 76 

City Prison 77 

House of Detention .... 78 

Adjustment of claims 78 

Police signal box service 79 

Signal boxes 79 

Miscellaneous work 79 

Commimications system . . 80 

Harbor service 81 

Patrol service 82 



CONTENTS. 5 

Page 

Horses 82 

Vehicle service 83 

Cost of running automobiles . 83 

Combination ambulances 83 

List of vehicles used by the Department 85 

Hackney Carriages 86 

Limitation of hackney carriage licenses 87 

Abolishing special and public hackney carriage stands . 88 

Establishing public taxicab stands 88 

Hackney carriage licenses granted 89 

Private hackney stands 89 

Sight-seeing automobiles 89 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations .... 90 

Appeal Board 90 

Supervisory force 91 

Wagon licenses 91 

Listing Work in Boston 93 

Listing expenses 94 

Number of policemen employed in listing 94 

Police work on jury lists 94 

Special police 96 

Musicians' licenses 97 

Itinerant 97 

Collective 97 

Carrying dangerous weapons 98 

Public lodging houses 98 

Miscellaneous licenses 99 

Pensions and benefits 99 

Financial /. 100 

Statistical Tables 101 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the police force, 

signal service and employees 102 

Changes in authorized and actual strength of police department, 104 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 105 

List of officers retired 106 

Officers promoted 108 

Number of men in active service 109 

Men on the police force and year born 110 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness . Ill 

Complaints against officers 112 

Number of arrests by police divisions 114 

Arrests and offenses 115 

Age and sex of persons arrested 135 

Comparative statement of police criminal work .... 136 

Licenses of all classes issued 137 

Dog licenses 139 

Wagon licenses 139 

Financial statement 140 

Payments on account of signal service 142 

Accidents 143 

Male and female residents listed 145 



Wtit Commontoealtt) of jflassacbustetts;. 



REPORT . 

Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 31, 1942. 

To His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — As Police Commissioner for the City 
of Boston, I have the honor to present, in compUance with pro- 
visions of Chapter 291, Acts of 1906, as amended, my seventh 
Annual Report of work of the Police Department. 

War. 
On Sunday morning, December 7, 1941, shortly after the 
official police year got under way the United States possession 
at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was attacked by Japan. On De- 
cember 8, the United States of America declared war against 
Japan and on December 11, war was proclaimed against Ger- 
many and Italy. This sudden blow by the Japanese not only 
involved this country in World War II, but started every 
appropriate agency into full time production within its respec- 
tive sphere of usefulness. 

General. 

The protection of life and property being the primary func- 
tion of the police, in time of war, as well as in time of peace, 
all efforts of the Boston Police Department were directed 
toward that end. For one thing it proved highly profitable 
to have started a school for air raid wardens some six months 
previous to the entrance of our country into war. Over 16,000 
volunteers were already trained when Japan struck. It did 
not take long for a second school to be initiated and today over 
25,000 civilian air raid wardens have received courses of in- 
struction in air raid precaution work under the supervision of 
the Boston Police Department. 

Following in the wake of organizing this huge army of home 
defense workers, the formation of an auxiliary police unit was 
begun. By appeals through the press and over the radio, 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

5,000 men were enrolled within the space of two weeks. Each 
applicant was investigated, photographed and fingerprinted. 
This force of auxiliary police was instructed in the fundamentals 
of police procedure and conduct and were grounded in their 
responsibilities by means of tours of duty with uniformed police 
officers. 

The Department as a whole quickly adjusted itself to war 
conditions. Our riot battalion of 500 men was reorganized 
and given intensive training in riot formations and defense 
tactics along with special training in the use of firearms. 

I called together all the police chiefs of the state on two 
occasions to discuss the manner in which the police through- 
out the commonwealth might coordinate their responsibilities 
when called upon to act in a crisis. Police cooperation on 
such a; state-wide scale was a matter that had to be planned 
and established for the protection of our citizens. 

Another phase of police work that was pursued with renewed 
vigor after our entry into war concerned the investigation of 
Selective Service Delinquents. The majority of cases were in 
reference to those who either had not registered, or if registered, 
had failed to leave a reliable forwarding address. In close 
association with this type of investigation was the check made 
by the police on aliens living in the several divisions who were 
employed in vital war industries. Other investigations in the 
form of important "spot raids" were conducted by our de- 
partment radical squad, whose efforts were directed against 
enemy aliens and other suspects. As a result of such raids 
our officers were rewarded with large seizures of contraband. 
All the foregoing forms of wartime probes and inquiries were in 
some manner executed either at the request of, or in conjunc- 
tion with, government agencies. 

Personnel. 

A serious depletion in the ranks has come about through 
the draft and enhstments. This condition is appreciated 
when one considers the vital role of the police as the first line 
of home defense in wartime. The shortage of experienced men 
is further compUcated by the scarcity of eligible applicants for 
the police force. When the necessity for the appointment of 
new members arises it has been found in many cases that those 
eligible for appointment are within the scope of immediate call 
into the armed forces, or have already made commitments in 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

some branch of tho military service thereby rendering their 
services unobtainable as policemen. 

In order to offset this situation I claimed deferred classifi- 
cation for those members of the force who had the benefit of 
three or more years of police experience and who on their own 
request desired reclassification. This claim of deferment was 
based on a policy adopted by the chiefs of police in assemblage 
at the International Association of Chiefs of Police War Con- 
ference in New York City from September 21 to 23, 1942, and 
at which I was present. Boston has experienced little success 
in obtaining deferments and reclassifications from local draft 
boards. 

Those who were eligible for appointment to the force but 
were not able to accept such appointment because of entrance 
into the armed forces may still become members of the Depart- 
ment upon their release from the armed forces, provided they 
meet certain requirements of law. ' 

Extra Duties. 

The total number of hours of extra duty performed by 
the members of the Department during the past year was tre- 
mendous. War conditions obviously were responsible for 
much of this extra work. During the several successful black- 
out tests and daylight air raid tests the whole force was detailed 
to duty. Police officers have been assigned to duty at civic 
and miUtary parades, bond rallies and at the many entertain- 
ments held in the interests of servicemen. Many hours of 
their time have been contributed in giving police protection 
to rationing boards, report centers and vital war plants. 

The training of air raid wardens and auxiliary police has 
been in force over a period of many months. These police- 
instructed units are doing very commendable work aiding the 
police in the enforcement of the dimout and other wartime 
regulations. The work of the police and these civilian vol- 
unteers is of a continuous nature and not merely restricted to 
air raid tests. 

Additional burdens have also been placed upon our Bureau 
of Records at Police Headquarters to which thousands of 
names have been submitted for a check on possible criminal 
records in the expedition of wartime investigations. Following 
is a list of agencies from which 37,000 names were received and 
which were checked in the criminal record files of this Depart- 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

ment with the results reported on in each individual case: 
United States Coast Guard, United States Marine Corps, 
United States Naval Procurement (Air Corps Cadets), United 
States Merchant ]Marine, United States Army, United States 
Navy, United States Defense Plants, Auxiliary Police, Air Raid 
Wardens, United States Civil Service Applicants, Selective 
Service Delinquents, Guards and Special Officers for Defense 
Purposes, and Massachusetts Women's Defense Corps. Of 
this total 30,000 were fingerprinted and classified. 

The war has brought into prominence the work of our harbor 
police. The speedy craft assigned to this unit gave protection 
to- the bridges and docks in and about Boston Harbor and its 
tributaries. The upper harbor with its many new government 
buildings and piers is also the object of close surveillance by 
the harbor police. We are as vigilant as we can be in main- 
taining a lookout over wharves and storehouses where war 
materials are kept, as well as over vessels that are being loaded 
and unloaded. 

The harbor police frequently have such duties to perform as 
transporting officers of the Navy and Coast Guard, towing 
federal boats if they should become disabled, transportation of 
the injured from ship to shore, carrying medical aid from shore 
to the islands in the harbor, removing obstructions and debris 
floating in the harbor that are a menace to operating craft, and 
the handling of any other police duties of a maritime nature. 

Since the government has required that all lights located on 
the wharves, docks and piers be of a particular design and 
focus, the harbor police are depended upon to see that all 
waterfront establishments comply with these regulations. 
Mention should also be made of the efficient work performed 
by the officers attached to the harbor station in training and 
instructing the air raid wardens and auxiliary police residing 
on the islands in the harbor. 

Included in the multitude of assignments directed to the 
police has been the stamping and countersigning of all passes 
issued by the Massachusetts Committee on Public Safety for 
the Boston area. This work is of a continuous nature and so 
far some 9,000 passes have been stamped and approved and a 
record kept of each. 

Traffic. 
An over-all view of traffic conditions in general no doubt 
admits to a decrease in motor vehicle traffic, but looking at that 



1943] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

part of Boston under the jurisdiction of this Unit, muisual 
travel along certain streets is still evident. One cause comes 
from the almost continuous flow of defense workers going to 
and from their work in war industries. Allowing for a per- 
centage of decrease in road traffic, that condition is more than 
offset by the heavy increase in pedestrian traffic by way of bus 
lines and railroad trains. It is important that traffic officers 
be assigned in sufficient numbers to guarantee the safety of so 
many now traveling on foot. 

Convoying army trucks and supplies through the city and 
to points within the city has been a regular wartime service 
rendered the military by this Department. The loud-speaking 
device which is a feature of our Ml Safety Car has also been 
of great help on many occasions of this nature. 

Servicemen. 

For the many thousands of servicemen enjoying their leaves 
in Boston, it is gratifying to state that they have caused but a 
minimum of trouble. I have continually impressed upon the 
officers of the Department to treat servicemen with the utmost 
consideration. Accommodations were provided for men in 
uniform whereby they might sleep at any police station in 
Boston free of charge. Suitable lodging was made available, 
consisting of a comfortable cot and clean sheets, and the use 
of towels, soap, shaving cream and razor. Over 25,000 uni- 
formed men took advantage of this service during the year. 

With the assistance of public-spirited citizens, I arranged for 
many special performances of popular stage plays, boxing 
bouts, variety shows, monster hotel dances and parties, free of 
charge to servicemen in uniform. Over 200,000 boys have 
thus far been guests of the police at these many different 
functions. 

The Boston Police Department fully cooperated with the 
Military Police and the Shore Patrol. Whenever arrests 
among servicemen were made it was usually for the purpose 
of placing them in protective custody, until such time as the 
military or naval authorities took charge of the case. 

Juvenile Delinquency. 
It is a well known fact that war breeds crime. London was 
the first to make public that fact when she became aware of 
the rapid rise in juvenile delinquency during the first year of 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

war. The reason might be psychological or it might be the 
free spending of money earned in booming defense industries. 
However, this much is certain: many families have both 
parents out working, or else the father is in the service and 
the mother is in war work, and in such homes the children are 
left unsupervised, especially after school hours, until one or 
both parents return home. 

Despite the fact that young boys who formerly loitered 
around street corners are either now in the service or in defense 
workt delinquency figures among juveniles show a disturbing 
increase in London and many large cities in this country. 
However, Boston boasts a better record in crime prevention 
among juveniles than practically any other city of its size in 
the country. The following table shows the number of delin- 
quency arrests in Boston for the years stated: 

1938 2,437 

1939 2,231 

1940 2,360 

1941 1,955 

1942 1,712 

In respect to juveniles, the achievements of our Boston 
Junior Police Corps have been most noteworthy. Twenty-one 
thousand boys, between the ages of 10 and 16, are now enrolled 
as members of the Corps. Approximately one thousand boys 
have received a total of 18,000 hours of instruction in first aid 
alone. Another eight hundred and fifty have taken 20,000 
hours of instruction in courier messenger duties in preparation 
for possible air raids. Over eight thousand members partici- 
pated in the various salvage drives for metal, rubber and scrap 
iron which were essential to the war industry. 

This summer over 1,500 members of the Junior Police were 
provided a summer vacation. Due to the fact our own camp 
in the Blue Hills was occupied during part of the summer by 
Army authorities, we were forced to depend upon outside 
camps for the weeks that the site in the Blue Hills was not 
available. 

At the Halloween parties held this year, the Department 
played host to 125,000 boys and girls in the greatest celebra- 
tion of that evening yet observed. There was a marked 
decrease in vandalism by virtue of our efforts. Every one of 
the 70 halls, theatres and gymnasiums was equipped with 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

blackout curtains in compliance with dimout regulations. 
These annual Halloween parties are a function of the Junior 
Police Corps. 

Bureau of Operations. 

During the past year the Bureau of Operations has trans- 
mitted approximately 1,500,000 messages by telephone, tele- 
type and telegram, including 286,411 messages over the two- 
way radio system. Two-way radio was installed in 15 patrol 
wagons and ambulances. The radio has proven to be of great 
value on many occasions during the past year. It has been 
especially helpful in assisting in convoying military units across 
the city and to different points within the city. 

At the different multiple alarm fires that have seriously 
affected Boston recently, especially in respect to the loss of 
life and property, our radio bureau was depended upon to 
mobiUze police, fire and medical units. It was instrumental in 
bringing all needed help quickly to scenes of disaster. 

CocoANUT Grove Disaster. 

The Cocoanut Grove, a popular dine and dance place in 
Boston, was gutted by fire on Saturday evening, November 28, 
1942, about 10:20 p. m., with accompanying loss of life of some 
four hundred and eighty-seven persons. Of those who man- 
aged to escape from this conflagration some 165 were reported 
injured. (Official report as of December 31, 1942.) 

All available members of the Department were summoned 
to the scene to take charge of rescue operations and to lend 
every assistance possible. Air raid wardens, auxiliary police, 
Coast Guardsmen, Army and Navy, and even men and women 
who happened to be nearby, willingly did their utmost to help 
the police in their activities. Splendid cooperation was also 
given by outside police departments, the clergy. Women's 
Defense Corps, the American Red Cross and affiliated Chap- 
ters, taxi agencies, and both public and private organizations. 

Conclusion. 
May I express to you my sincere appreciation for the splendid 
cooperation you have extended to the Boston Police Depart- 
ment at all times. I wish to thank all those who assisted the 
Department in any way whatsoever during the past year. 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Superintendent, the execu- 
tive officers, and the members of the Department for their 
earnest cooperation during the year. 

Further activities and statistics of the Department are in- 
chided in the following part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



15 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner. 1 

Secretary. Assistant Secretary. 2 

Chief Clerk. 1 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-Inspector 



Director 

Foreman 

Chauffeur 

Laborer 

linemen 

Employ 

Chauffeurs . 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Inventory 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks . . \ 

Diesel Engine Operator 

Elevator Operators . 

Firemen, Marine 

Firemen, Stationary 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Repairmen 

Signalman 



1 

5 

27 

62 

1 



Sergeants 
Patrolmen . 
Military Substitutes 
(Patrolmen) 

Total . 



Signal Service. 
1 Mechanic 
1 Painter 
I Signalmen 
I 
6 Total 



EES 



OF THE Department. 
2 Statisticians 
1 Steamfitter 

6 Stenographers . 

1 Shorthand Reporters 

1 Superintendent of Build- 

30 ings 

1 Assistant Superintendent 
9 of BuUdings . 

7 Superintendent of Main- 
5 tenance Shop 

9 Tailor 

Telephone Operators 
Military Substitute Clerks 
Military Substitute Chauf- 
feur .... 



28 
2 
7 

11 
3 
1 



Total 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 

Grand Total 



184 
1,97.5 

29 



2,284 

1 
1 
6 

18 

a 

1 

26 
5 



1 
1 

6 
4 

1 

174 



2,480 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Distribution and Changes. 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 

During the year 99 patrolmen were appointed; 2 patrolmen 
reinstated; 1 sergeant and 11 patrolmen resigned (1 while 
charges were pending) ; 2 patrolmen were dismissed ; 7 sergeants 
and 17 patrolmen were promoted; 2 lieutenants, 8 sergeants and 
47 patrolmen retired on pensions ; 1 lieutenant and 1 lieutenant- 
inspector, 3 sergeants and 25 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, 
IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1941 : 



How Injured. 


NumVjer of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1942. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. L 1941. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pur.sixing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


110 
12 

67 
168 


1,552 
170 

2,074 

2,378 


649 
30 

670 
745 


Totals 


357 


6,174 


2,094 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Arrests. 
The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 85,956, as against 95,372 the preceding 
year, being a decrea.se of 9,416. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

1 . Offenses against the person Decrease 4 . 39 

2. Offenses against property committed with violence, Increase 

3. Offenses against property committed without vio- 

lence 

4. Malicious offenses against property ... 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency . 

6. Offenses against the license laws ... 

7. Offenses against cha.stity, morality, etc. . 

8. Offenses not included in the foregoing 



9.35 



Decrease 15.03 

Decrease 8.16 

Decrease 38.86 

Decrease 22.25 

Decrease 6 . 54 

Decrease 12.93 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

There were 13,349 persons arrested on warrants and 46,358 
without warrants; 26,249 persons were summoned by the court. 
The number of males arrested was 78,226; of females, 7,730; 
of foreigners, 8,869, or approximately 10.31 per cent; of minors, 
8,396. Of the total number arrested, 27,779, or 32.31 per cent 
were non-residents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1938 to 1942, inclusive, was $172,242; in 1942 
it was $175,992, or $3,750 more than the average. (See Table 
XIII.) 

The average number of days' attendance at court for the 
five years from 1938 to 1942, inclusive, was 43,859; in 1942 it 
was 38,632, or 5,227 less than the average. (See Table XIII.) 

The average amount of witness fees earned for the five years 
from 1938 to 1942, inclusive, was $11,151.86; in 1942 it was 
$9,775, or $1,376.86 less than the average. (See Table XIII.) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 85,956, 
being a decrease of 9,416 from last year and 6,572 less than the 
a-verage for the past five years. (See Table XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (85,956) 97 were 
for violation of city ordinances, that is to say, that one arrest 
in 880 was for such offense, or .11 per cent. (See Table XI.) 

Fifty-one and seventy one-hundredths per cent of the per- 
sons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty-one- 
and forty. (See Table XII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 97. 
There were 2,905 less persons arrested than in 1941, a decrease 
of 7.51 per cent; 17.92 per cent of the arrested persons w^ere 
non-residents and 18.36 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table 
XI.) 

There were 35,728 persons arrested for drunkenness, being 
2,905 less than last year and 2,490 less than the average for the 
past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness this year, there 
was a decrease of 8.15 per cent in males and an increase of 2.41 
per cent in females over last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 

Ireland 

British Provinces 

Italy . 

Russia 



77,087 Poland 

2,768 England 

2,999 Lithuania 

802 Scotland 

605 Sweden 



444 
395 
360 
251 
211 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Norway 






172 


Portugal 






143 


China . 






113 


Greece 






106 


Germany . 






66 


Finland 






65 


Austria 






59 


Denmark . 






45 


France 






26 


Albania 






23 


Armenia 






23 


Syria . 






23 


Turkey 






20 


Holland 






19 


West Indies 






18 


South America 






14 


Rumania . 






11 


Belgium 






9 


Spain . 






9 



lrrested. — Conchidea 


(. 


Cuba 8 


Philippine Islands 




8 


Africa . 




7 


Asia 






7 


Latvia 






7 


Puerto Rico 






6 


Estonia 






4 


Switzerland 






4 


Australia 






3 


Bulgaria 






3 


Cz'echoslovakia 






3 


Wales . 






3 


Arabia 






2 


Hungary 






2 


Mexico 






1 


Japan . 






1 


New Zealand 






1 


Total . 


85,956 



The number of persons punished by fine was 22,925, and the 
fines amounted to $175,992. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred and fifty-two persons were com.mitted to the 
State Prison; 3,369 to the House of Correction; 167 to the 
Women's Prison; 212 to the Reformatory Prison, and 3,234 
to other institutions. 

One person was sentenced to death. 

The total years of imprisonment were: 3,287 years (602 sen- 
tences were indefinite) ; the total number of days' attendance 
at court by ofiicers was 38,632 and the witness fees earned by 
them amounted to $9,775. (See Table XIII.) 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$142,616. 

Six witnesses were detained at station houses; 9,736 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 9,505 over last 
year. 

There was an increase of 6.27 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 6.13 
per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the city 
for the five years from 1938 to 1942, inclusive, was $399,861.38; 
in 1942 it was $278,653 or $121,208.38 less than the average. 
The amount of stolen property which was recovered by the 
Boston police this year was $219,655 as against $280,388 last 
year. (See Table XIII.) 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to note 
that 27,779 persons, or 32.31 per cent of the total arrests during 
the past year, were persons residing outside the city Hmits of 
Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called on to perform police work for non-residents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of non-residents. This per- 
centage is so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of 
this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in 
making comparisons of Boston with other cities, either of the 
cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 32.31 per cent of 
the arrests in Boston is of non-residents, whereas other cities 
have but a negligible percentage of arrests of non-residents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1942, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1941, 
a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below: 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1941. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1942. 




Arrests. 


Arrests. 


Offenses Against the Person. 






Murder 


15 


14 


Manslaughter 


63 


71 


Rape (including attempts) 


1.51 


112 


Robbery (including attempts) 


228 


180 


Aggravated assault 


167 


149 


Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 






Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 


1,015 


1,091 


Offenses Against Property Committed 






W ithoxjt Violence. 






Auto' thefts (including attempts) .... 


285 


186 


Larceny (including attempts) 


2,287 


1,830 


Offenses Against the Liquor Law. 






Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 


115 


96 


Drunkenness 


38,633 


35,728 


Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 






Auto', operating under the influence of liquor' 


564 


385 


Auto', operating so as to endanger .... 


1,211 


915 


Totals 


44,734 


40,757 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called minor 
offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city ordinances, 
gaming and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for the year totaled 
85,956, of which 78,226 were males and 7,730 were females. 
This total compares with 95,372 for the preceding year. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department, during the past year, ha§ continued its 
cooperation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses: 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny : 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto' theft. 

The following comparative tables show the number of certain 
offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 1941, 
to November 30, 1942, as against December 1, 1940, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1941. 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [J'an. 

A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following : 

Cases Per Cent 

Reported. Cleared. Cleared; 

1941 7,177 5,696 79.36 

1942 6,471 5,140 79.43 

A comparison shows an increase in clearance over 1941 of 
.07 per cent. 

There was a decrease in cases reported as compared with 1941 
of 706 or 9.83 per cent. 

Volunteer, Unpaid, Auxiliary Police. 
There has been established in the Department, in accord- 
ance with the Acts of 1941, Chapter 719, Section 5, an organ- 
ization known as the Volunteer Auxiliary Police. The 
members are not to be paid for their services. Applicants, 
classified **1-A" under the Selective Service Act, are not 
accepted for this duty on account of being subject to imme- 
diate call for United States military service. 

These men are equipped with a badge, helmet, night stick 
and a flash light. They are also photographed and finger- 
printed, and given the oath of ofiice. 

Duties of the members are restricted to prevention of crime, 
protection of life and property, and such other duties as may 
be assigned to them during an emergency. 

At the present time there are 3,365 men enrolled as Aux- 
iliary Policemen. They have undergone an intensive course of 
training to fit them for their duties. 

Volunteer, Unpaid, Auxiliary Police. 

December 13, 1941 (first day of enrollment), to November 30, 

1942, inclusive. 

Appointed and sworn 4,625 

Enrollments cancelled 1,338 

3,287 

Cancellations rescinded 78 

Total number of members in good standing .... 3,365 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1942, 
receipts totaled $86,374.67, as compared with $81,709.53 in 
the previous year. The increase of $4,665.14 was due to the 
fact that more had been received for licenses and from other 
sources. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

Expenditures. 
During the twelve months ending November 30, 1942, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$5,969,528.12. This included the pay of the police and 
employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($58,181.65, — 
the annual listing on January 1 of all residents twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 

During the same period, $6,289.01 was expended for Work 
Relief Materials for Police Department W. P. A. Projects. 
This amount was not included in Police Department appropri- 
ation. 

In the corresponding period of 1941, expenditures totalled 
$5,973,715.46. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 

Personnel. 
The poHce personnel of the Department on November 30, 

1942, consisted of 1 Superintendent, 5 Deputy Superintendents, 
27 Captains, 62 Lieutenants, 1 Lieutenant-Inspector, 184 
Sergeants, 1,975 Patrolmen and 29 Military-Substitute Patrol- 
men; total, 2,284. 

On November 30, 1942, there was a total of 2,480 persons, 
including civiUan employees, on the rolls of the Department. 

During the year in General Orders, officers were commended 
as follows: 

Captain, 1; Sergeants, 15; Patrolmen, 58; Patrolwomen, 4; 
and the Department in general, 2. 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1942 and Department 
Medals of Honor will be awarded, as recommended by the 
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendents, serving as a 
Board of Merit, at the annual ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, to be held at the Boston Garden, February 3^ 

1943, as follows: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1942 and a 
Department Medal of Honor to Patrolman Martin 
J. Kelley of Division 6. 
Patrolman Martin J. Kelley of Division 6 is hereby awarded 

the Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1942 and a Department 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Medal of Honor for courageous duty performed on October 13, 
1942, in entering a house in South Boston with Patrolman 
Robert H. Ennis,'and arresting a man armed with a loaded 
revolver who had threatened to shoot his wife and also to 
shoot the officers if they entered. 

Department Medals of Honor. 

Patrolman Robert H. Ennis of Division 6 is hereby awarded 
a Department Medal of Honor for courage displayed on 
October 13, 1942, in entering a house with Patrolman Martin 
J. Kelley to arrest a man whom the officers knew to be armed 
with a loaded revolver and who had threatened to shoot his 
wife and the officers if they entered. 

Patrolman David M. A. Meaney of Division 13 is hereby 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor for his courageous and 
resourceful action on March 3, 1942, when his prompt response 
to cries of children in the vicinity of Scarboro Pond undoubtedly 
saved a drowning boy's life. 

Patrolmen Joseph H. Ziniti, George E. Smith and Fred H. 
Shulenburg, all attached to Division 15, are each awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor for courage and fortitude, shown 
on July 15, 1942, when being lowered into a pit, 80 feet deep, 
they placed their own lives in jeopardy in a futile attempt to 
rescue three men who were buried under tons of falling gypsum. 

Sergeant Joseph F. Condon and Patrolmen Perfer P. Fortin 
and Albert A. Hurst, all attached to the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation, are each awarded a Department Medal of 
Honor for meritorious police duty performed on November 12, 
1941, in the pursuit and capture of a dangerous criminal who 
had committed a number of vicious assaults and robberies in 
the South End District. 

In 1942, 6,174 days were lost by officers by reason of injuries 
received while on duty. 

During the year 2 patrolmen were dismissed from the 
Department for violation of Police Rules and Regulations 
(1 reinstated after public hearing, for purpose of retirement, 
only) ; 13 patrolmen were punished by suspension with loss of 
pay or extra duty, or both. Complaint against 1 patrolman 
was dismissed after hearing. 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



25 



Organization. 

General 
1941. Order No. 

December 7 675 Members of the Department notified that 
the day's events in the Far East have 
automatically made them auxiUaries of 
the Nation's armed forces for the dura- 
tion, and that they are to be on the 
alert at all times. 



December 8 676 



December 13 679 



December 23 686 



December 29 689 



1942 
February 



12 707 



February 17 708 



Rules promulgated applying to the use 
of all police buildings by employees and 
visitors. 

An organization known as the "Volunteer 
Auxihary Police" established in the 
Department, in accordance with Chap- 
ter 719, Section 5, Acts of 1941. 

Announcement of plans made whereby 
men in the uniform of the military 
forces of the United States were to be 
furnished gratuitously tickets for din- 
ners and theatres on Christmas Day. 

Announcement that His Excellency the 
Governor on December 29, 1941, pro- 
claimed a state of emergency to exist 
in Massachusetts, in accordance with 
Chapter 719 of the Acts of 1941. A 
copy of the Act submitted to the De- 
partment for its information and guid- 
ance. 

Announcement that on Tuesday, Febru- 
ary 17, 1942, between 10 P. M. and 
10:20 P. M., the entire city of Boston 
would be "blacked out." 

Instructions submitted for the informa- 
tion of the Department and the mem- 
bers of the Auxiliary Police Force in 
connection with "black out," Febru- 
ary 17, 1942. 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



February 18 



712 
713 



February 21 714 



February 18 710 Announcement made of establishment of 
a "rumor clinic," under auspices of the 
Massachusetts Committee on Public 
Safety, where all rumors of war activ- 
ities will be investigated and those 
proven false, publicized. 

February 18 711 Air-Raid Patrol commended by the Police 
Commissioner for their excellent public 
spirit and devotion to duty on occasion 
of "black out" on evening of February 
17, 1942. 

Members of the force of the Department 
and of the Volunteer Auxiliary Police 
commended by the Police Commis- 
sioner for their efforts in connection 
with "black out," February 17, 1942. 

Arrangements made at all station houses 
to provide, without charge, lodgings 
with a towel, whenever requested, to 
members of the armed forces of the 
United States who visit this city. 

Written opinion submitted to the De- 
partment of Robert H. Hopkins, Esq., 
then Acting-Corporation Counsel for 
the City of Boston, as rendered to the 
Licensing Division, Office of the Mayor, 
on the subject of so-called "pin ball" 
machines. 

Information submitted to the Depart- 
ment in connection with a "black out" 
scheduled for the evening of March 31, 
1942. 

Announcement that the Third Annual 
Jubilee of the Boston Junior Police 
Corps would be held at the Boston 
Garden, May 18, 1942. 

Announcement of Fourth Annual Police 
Memorial Mass, to be celebrated Sun- 
day, May 3, 1942, in the Cathedral of 
the Holy Cross, to be followed by a 
communion breakfast. 



March 25 723 



March 28 726 



April 9 729 



April 16 733 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



27 



May 



May 



May 



June 



10 769 



June 18 775 



June 23 

July 11 



September 15 820 



September 30 827 



5 743 Attention of commanding officers and 
members called to the necessity of 
exercising the strictest observation and 
care of the many articles of equipment 
and materials vitally necessary for the 
proper functioning of the Department. 

11 748 Attention of all members of the Depart- 
ment directed to observance of Police- 
men's Memorial Day, Sunday, June 7, 
1942. 

28 762 The Commissioner informs the Depart- 
ment it is a source of great pleasure to 
state that the Junior Police Corps 
Jubilee at the Boston Garden, May 18, 
1942, was the most successful ever held. 

Announcement of vote of the Commis- 
sion of the Department of Public 
Utilities of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts regarding suspension, 
as of June 3, 1942, of all certificates of 
public convenience and necessity issued 
by the Department for operation of 
sight-seeing automobiles. 

Announcement to members of the De- 
partment relative to purchase by them 
of United States War Bonds through 
a pay-deduction plan. 

Announcement of Army Test "black 
out," Tuesday evening, June 23, 1942. 

Announcement of Army Test "black 
out," to be held on Tuesday morning, 
July 14, 1942. 

Announcement of the Annual Ball of the 
Boston Police Relief Association, sched- 
uled for Wednesday evening, December 
9, 1942, at the Boston Garden. (The 
affair later postponed to Wednesday 
evening, February 3, 1943.) 

Announcement that fuel oil rationing 
begins on October 1, 1942. 



780 



793 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



October 13 833 



November 20 857 



Announcement that members of the Force 
of various pohce departments through- 
out the country who have had at least 
three years' experience in police work, 
are now being deferred as necessary 
men because of their occupational 
status (training and service). 

Announcement that the City of Boston 
Committee on Public Safety shall hold 
a Daylight Air Raid Test for the entire 
City of Boston on Sunday, November 
22, 1942. 



1943.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 
Its Organization and Duties. 

This Bureau, a central detective agency of the Department, 
consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a large 
scale and in an efficient manner. 

In addition to its divisions for investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen, lost and stolen property, and homicides, 
(as well as supervision of the line-up), — squads are assigned 
to cover the following phases of police work and investigation : 
arson, banking, general investigation, hotels, narcotic, pawn- 
brokers, including junk shopkeepers and dealers in second-hand 
articles, pickpocket, radical, shopping, sex crimes and a night 
motor-patrol squad. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of 
investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
prosecution of criminals. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in 
cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department, and immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile division index contains records of approxi- 
mately 700,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons 
and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the Department and the 
Automobile Division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this 
division during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Used Car Dealers' Licenses Granted. 

During the year 179 applications for such licenses were 
received. Of these 178 were granted (five without fee), and 
1 rejected. 

Of the licenses granted, 19 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation, and 10 transferred to new locations. (See Table 
XIV.) 

Cancellation of one license, voluntarily surrendered, was 
rescinded and the license restored to its full force and effect. 

Provision for Hearing Before Granting License as Used Car 
Dealer of the Third Class. 

Under provisions of Chapter 96, Acts of 1938, effective 
June 13, 1938, no license shall be issued to a person as a Used 
Car Dealer of the Third Class (Motor Vehicle Junk License) 
until after hearing, of which seven days' notice shall have been 
given to owners of property abutting on premises where such 
license is proposed to be exercised. 

Hearings to the number of 34 were held under this provision 
of law. " 

Record of all Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November SO, 19If2. 



Month. 



Reported 
Stolen. 



Recovered 
During 
Month. 



Recovered 
Later 



Not 
Recovered. 





941 
















December 


268 


254 


13 


1 


1942. 










January 




277 


264 


13 





February 










235 


227 


7 


1 


March 










305 


297 


8 





April 










280 


276 


3 


1 


May . 










238 


229 


8 


1 


June . 










222 


212 


10 





July . 










186 


178 


6 


2 


August 










173 


169 


3 


1 


September 








201 


196 


5 





October 








188 


183 


1 


4 


November 








194 


188 





6 


Totals 


2,767 


2,673 


77 


17 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



31 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 194^. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1941. 








December 


3,096 


2,033 


1,265 


1942. 








January 


2,335 


1,923 


1,381 


February 








1,861 


1,299 


792 


March . 








1,505 


1,322 


1,305 


April 








1,437 


1,521 


1,427 


May 








1,383 


1,274 


1,278 


June 








1,358 


1,182 


1,068 


July . 








1,285 


1,136 


1,085 


August . 








1,510 


1,079 


1,004 


September 








1,732 


1,061 


1,080 


October . 








1,701 


1,211 


1,255 


November 








1,288 


929 


1,133 


Totals 








20,491 


15,970 


14,073 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found in 
this city is filed in this division. All the surrounding cities and 
towns and many other cities forward lists of property stolen in 
such places to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second-hand 
dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or pur- 
chased. A comparison of the description of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth 
of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased, for the purpose of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 

Homicide Squad. 
It is the duty of ofiicers of this unit to investigate and prose- 
cute all homicide cases. They are required to interrogate all 
persons involved in or who have knowledge of the commission 
of crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion or other crimes of 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



violence. Cases assigned to inquest are prepared and pre- 
sented by officers of this unit. The officers assigned to homi- 
cide work, with police stenographers, are subject to call 
throughout the day and night. The confessions and state- 
ments obtained by members of this unit have proven of inesti- 
mable value in the successful prosecution of capital cases. 

The homicide files contain complete reports of all inquests 
and deaths by violence in Boston and also a record of all acci- 
dents reported to the Police Department. 

The following is a report of the Homicide Unit of the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported to this unit for 
the period of December 1, 1941, to November 30, 1942, 
inclusive : 



Alcoholism . 






55 


Homicides . 


20 


Asphyxiation 






13 


Machinery . 


4 


Automobile 






80 


Natural causes . 


691 


Burns . 






17 


Poison 


1 


Drowning . 






25 


Railway (steam) 


& 


Electricity . 






1 


Railway (street) 


10 


Elevator 






9 


StiUborn 


8 


Exposure . 






1 
52 


Suicides 


69 


r alls 




Falling objects 
Fires . 






3 
496 


Total . 


1,560 



The following cases were prosecuted in the courts : 



Abortions . 


3 


Manslaughter . 


Accessory to abortion 


4 


Manslaughter (auto') 


Assault and battery . 


2 


Assault to murder 


Miu-der 


11 




Assault with weapon 


10 


Total . 



4 

72 

5 

111 



The following inquests were held during the year: 



Auto' fatality 
Abortion 
Electricity . 
Drowning 



1 Machinery . 

1 Railway (steam) 

1 

1 Total . 



Four hundred and sixty-five cases of violent deaths were 
investigated by the Homicide Unit. Presiding justices of 
courts deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in these 
cases, acting under authority of Chapter 118, Acts of 1932. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

Recapitulation of Homicides. 

Murders " . . . . 16 

(13 murderers prosecuted) 

( 1 committed suicide after the commission of two murders) 

( 2 unsolved murders) 
Manslaughters (homicidal) 4 

( 4 prosecutions) 

Total . 20 

General. 

Members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation during 
the year made investigations on 5,794 eases. Our files and 
assignment books now contain records and reports on 71,663 
cases. Complaints are received from many sources, including 
cases referred to the Bureau by justices of courts, the District 
Attorney, Attorney-General, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and hundreds of outside police agencies. 

Statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion are included in the general work of the Department, but 
as the duties of the Bureau are of a special character, the fol- 
lowing statement will be found to be of interest: 

Number of persons arrested 2,487 

Fugitives from justice from other states arrested and delivered 

to officers of these states 73 

Number of cases investigated 5,794 

Number of extra duties performed 7,352 

Number of cases of abortion investigated 3 

Number of days spent in court by officers 2,182 

Number of years of imprisonment, 288 years, 6 months, 8 days 

and 18 indefinite periods. 
Amount of property recovered $126,655.25 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST. 
Summary of the Year's Work. 

Work at the Laboratory. 
The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department is 
located at the Southern Mortuary, and since its opening in 
1934 has worked on more than 2,400 cases of all types. The 
average annual number of cases for the last five years was 317. 
During the past year 380 cases were submitted to the 
laboratory. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The number of individual tests run during the course of the 
year is approximately 3,000. A partial breakdown of the cases 
into types of work shows more clearly the nature of the chemist's 
work : 





No. of 




No of 


Material Sought 


Cases. 


Material Sought. 


Cases, 


Alcohol, ethyl 


261 


Chlorides (drowning) 


6 


Phenols, etc. 


2 


Acids and alkahs 


3 


Other volatile poison 


3 . 5 


General toxicologic exam., 


5 


Barbiturates 


19 


Bloodstains 


34 


SaHcylates . 


3 


Photographs 


35 


Other synthetic hypE 


lotics, 1 


Hair, fibers, etc. 


7 


Strychnine . 


3 


Powder residue, hands 


4 


Morphine . 


3 


Powder pattern, cloth 


2 


Other alkaloids 


3 


Cloth .... 


7 


Arsenic 


6 


Tissues 


3 


Antimony . 


4 


Spermatozoa 


1 


Mercury 


2 


Nitro compounds 


2 


Lead 


1 


Inflammables 


2 


Carbon monoxide 


30 


Miscellaneous 


19 


Fluoride 


7 







Attendance of Biological Chemist Before Judicial Bodies. 

In addition to work in the laboratory on case material, the 
chemist has been in attendance on courts and grand juries on 
63 days during the past twelve months. 



Toxicological Problems. 
Examination of the preceding table shows that the bulk of 
the work is toxicological in nature, and that four subjects sum 
up the major items, the others occurring rather infrequently as 
a few cases per year. The following table shows the incidence 
of these four during the past five years: 



Number of Cases 
Alcohol, ethyl 
Bloodstains . 
Carbon monoxide 
Barbiturates 



1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 

288 278 308 332 380 

145 155 204 217 261 

37 31 32 37 34 

11 20 23 21 30 

10 10 24 29 19 



Of the 261 cases examined for alcohol during the past year^ 
49 per cent could be classed as showing no influence from 
alcohol; 27 per cent could be classed as being "under the in- 
fluence"; and 24 per cent could be classed as "drunk." Con- 
sidering the relation of alcoholism to criminal acts, accidents, 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

etc., the importance of this problem is clearly shown in these 
figures. The distribution for the past year is essentially the 
same as that for the 612 cases reviewed in last year's report. 

Carbon monoxide poisoning continues as a problem. This 
gas arises in instances of incomplete combustion, being found 
in smoke from fires, automobile exhaust gases, poorly-vented 
heaters, stoves, etc. It is also present in illuminating gas. 
The relation of alcoholism to fatal carbon monoxide poisoning 
is often overlooked despite its prominence. In a review of 76 
cases in which both carbon monoxide and alcohol were de- 
termined it was found that 33 per cent could be classified as 
showing no influence from alcohol; 21 per cent could be classi- 
fied as being "under the influence"; and 46 per cent could be 
classified as "drunk." These general figures suggest that with 
the accumulation of more cases and data, a further breakdown 
into classes of origin of the gas and study of individual cir- 
cumstances would provide useful knowledge on this hazard. 

The laboratory has increased its use of photography during 
the past year. This work comes under three general headings: 
(1) a record of significant points or observations of evidence 
which may be destroyed or obliterated during analysis; (2) a 
record of microscopic detail not readily visible to the eye, or 
of material which could not readily be taken to court; and (3) 
a record of unusual items of evidence for reference or lecture 
purposes. 

Miscellaneous. 

Lectures during the past year have been primarily technical 
in character, that is, given to specialized groups upon a par- 
ticular subject as contrasted to the more customary general 
lecture to a lay audience. 

The close of the Department year brought the Cocoanut 
Grove fire. The chemist reported in to the Southern Mortuary 
and worked under the direction of the medical examiner. In 
connection with this fire various chemical and toxicological 
questions have arisen which require extensive investigation and 
analysis. This work is still highly incomplete and it is not 
possible to make any comment on the Grove cases in this year's 
report. 

Cooperation With Other Agencies. 

During the course of the year the chemist has had occasion 
to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other New 
England states with suggestions or work on evidence. 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF RECORDS. 

Establishment, Purpose and Equipment. 

The Bureau of Records was established October 17, 1931, 
as a central correspondence and filing unit in the Department. 
It consists of several separate divisions, namely, criminal 
identification, fingerprints and photographs, missing persons 
and warrants and summonses. 

It is one of the outstanding units of the organization and 
its value to the Department is indispensable. It stands in 
favorable comparison with identification units of the most 
advanced departments. 

Advancements and changes are constantly being made to 
maintain efficiency and to increase the worth of the unit to the 
Department as a whole. 

To bring about this efficiency of service, equipment of the 
Bureau is continually being augmented by addition of modern 
identification apparatus. 

The following is a partial list of such machines which have 
constantly proved their value to the Department and which 
are numbered among the equipment of the modern police 
department : 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic-Graflex back, fitted with Kalart Synchi-onized Range 

Finder 5\" Carl Zeiss Tessar in Compus Shutter No. 2049398 (ground 

glass back). 
1 4x5 Speed Graphic, fitted with Graphic back and Kalart Synchronized 

Range Finder 5j" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens No. 1504117 in Compus 

Shutter. 
1 4x5 Speed Graphic, fitted with Graflex back and Carl Zeiss Tessar lens 

in barrel No. 797021, 6" focal lens, ground glass back. 
1 Dexigraph machine. 
1 4x5 revolving back Graflex with focusing ground glass panel on back 

with 8" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in barrel, No. 595980. 
1 4x5 revolving back auto Graflex, fitted with a Bausch and Lomb con- 
vertible Prota lens 16 j%" focus, front element. No. 3232563. 
1 5x7 Speed Graphic, fitted with Graflex back and ground glass panel, 

Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in sunk mount 7" focal length. No. 1124860. 
4 Fingerprint cameras, Folner and Schwing, with 72 millimeter Kodak 

anastigmatic F 6.3 lens, Nos. 2534, 585, 1806 and 14188. 
1 4x5 box camera Ilex paragon lens series A 6^" focus No. 41619 in 

Universal shutter. 
1 Lens for 4x5 box camera, Ilex Paragon series A88608. 
1 16 millimeter Cine-Kodak special and fitted with 19-25 M.M. lens, 

also with 3" telephoto 2.7 wide angle and 6" telephoto. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

1 Century view camera 8x10 and lens, 1 12" Kodak anastigmatic lens, 
No. 36465, 1 Bausch and Lomb wide-angle, 8x10 Prota No. 3234300. 
1 Goertz-Gotar lens. No. 755175 for 11x14 half-tone camera. 
1 5x7 enlarging camera Kodak anastigmatic lens. No. 337770. 

1 8x10 enlarging-reducing and copying camera. 

2 Hugo-Meyer range finders 4x5 Speed Graphic Carl Zeiss 5j" lens with 

13.5 focal length. 
1 Rectigraph camera with a 10" Woolensock lens and prism. 
1 8x10 Pantoscopic camera with a Bausch and Lomb 50 M.M. Tessar 

lens, No. 2612072 and a 72 M.M. Micro Tessar Bausch and Lomb 

lens. No. 3234901. 
1 Campbell combination X-ray and Fluoroscope Serial No. 7318. 

1 Spencer lantern-slide projector. 

2 Mimeograph machines. 
1 19" cutting machine. 

1 Multilith machine, complete with equipment. 
1 High-Speed electric addressograph. 



Multilith. • 

Installation of a Multilith machine, January 31, 1934, under 
direct supervision of experienced operators, enables this Depart- 
ment to prepare and complete printing of circulars containing 
photographs and fingerprints of persons either reported missing 
or wanted for criminal offenses. The original cost of this 
machine has been saved many times over in the efficient method 
of printing such circulars in the Bureau. It has proved a 
distinct advantage in issuance of these circulars which play so 
important a part in apprehension of fugitives from justice. 

The Multilith machine is completely equipped with cameras 
for preparation of half-tones which add to the varied output of 
the machine. This machine is capable of printing in approx- 
imately two hours descriptive circulars of persons wanted, and 
in some cases it is possible to complete and mail such circulars 
to outside cities before the fugitive arrives at his destination. 



Output of Daily Manifolds, Warrant Manifolds, Etc. 
There were 1,061,833 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machines, comprising daily manifolds for the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation and other units,, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins and circular letters. Also, forms and lectures for the 
Junior PoHce, Air- Raid Defense and related subjects of 
National Emergency. This necessitated cutting of 1,066 
stencils. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There were 66 forms and circulars photographed and 66 
forms printed in upon a zinc plate. There were approximately 
78 Multilith plates used by this unit in the past year and 47 
films used. There were 46,000 copies padded and blocked in 
50's and lOO's. 

Because of increased production of work handled by the 
printing unit of this Bureau, it was found necessary to add a 
new high-speed electric addressograph machine to the printing 
equipment. 

Circulars Drafted, Containing Photographs and Finger-prints of 

Fugitives. 

During the year 24,200 circulars, containing photographs 
and fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed 
from this office to every city and town in the United States 
with a population of 5,000 or more. State bureaus of identifi- 
cation, all Army and Navy recruiting stations, United States 
immigration offices and customs stations, and a number of the 
larger cities in foreign countries. Circulars requesting cooper- 
ation in the return of two missing persons were sent to all 
important cities in the East and practically to every city in 
Massachusetts. 

Multilith Recapitulation. 

Impressions printed on the Multilith machine . . 340,900 
Included in this figure are the following : 

Department forms 60 

Letters 6 

Circulars ...... 4 

Photographic Division. 

The Photographic Division of the Bureau of Records is one 
of the finest and most modern in the entire country. Its 
equipment has been continually added to and renewed with a 
view of maintaining a high standard of service. 

It forms an important adjunct of the Medical Examiners' 
offices and cooperates with those offices in all homicide cases. 
The Medical Examiners' offices are supplied with enlarged 
photographs of every homicide case. The efficient operation 
of the Medical Examiners' offices is improved by the co- 
operation of this Unit. 

Enlarged photographs are filed in cabinets especially built 
to accommodate the size. The enlarged photographs are 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

principally scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and sus- 
picious fires, and have proved invaluable for court purposes. 
Many communications have been received as a result of the 
value of these photographs, particularly in arson cases. Juries 
have been greatly assisted in determining the condition of 
burnt premises by introduction and exhibition of these photo- 
graphs in court. This same excellent effect is obtained in 
homicide and hit-and-run cases. 

Record Files of Assignments. 
Files of this Bureau contain records of all assignments made 
in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records of 
arrests made throughout the Department. There are also on 
file reports of all felonies committed within the city and all 
reports of the investigation of these felonies. 

Identification Division. 

In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints and 
photographs; also records of all inmates of the Suffolk County 
House of Correction and their fingerprints. The keepers of 
jails and houses of correction in the several counties of the 
Commonwealth have been requested to furnish this Bureau 
with a copy of the fingerprints of every inmate and they have 
responded favorably. In addition to the foregoing, the files 
contain many thousands of photographs and fingerprints, cor- 
respondence, records, clippings and histories of criminals 
arrested or wanted in various parts of the United States and 
foreign couTitries. 

Main Index File. 

The Main Index File forms the basis on which all other files 
are dependent. It is at all times being checked to maintain 
accuracy. There are now recorded in the Main Index File 
766,725 persons. These include all persons arrested and fin- 
gerprinted in the Bureau, applicants for Hackney Carriage 
Licenses and applicants for Special Officers' Licenses, etc. 

Criminal Record Files. 
The Criminal Record files contain a record of each person 
whose fingerprints are contained in the fingerprint files. At 
the present time there are in the Female Record Files 13,200 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

records and in the Male Record Files there are 152,450 such 
records. These records are continually being brought up to 
date by cooperation with outside departments and the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation. 

Cabinets of Segregated Photographs of Criminals Arrested. 

Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston police and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 
cabinets. Photographs received from outside departments are 
placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and those taken by 
this Department are in the "Local Segregated" file. Photo- 
graphs of all criminals are segregated into four distinct sec- 
tions, namely, white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each of these 
groups is subdivided according to sex and also classified under 
head of the crime in which the subjects specialize. The "Local 
Segregated" file contains 39,147 photographs and the "Foreign 
Segregated" file, 17,229 photographs. 

Exhibiting of Photographs of Criminals in Main and Segregated 

Files. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc. 

In many instances, important identifications have been made 
which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valuable 
assistance has also been rendered to govermnent officials of the 
following branches: Post Office, Treasury and Secret Service 
Departments, Federal Bureau of Investigation and other gov- 
ernment agencies. Similar services have also l^een rendered to 
railroad and express companies. 

Members of Bureau Visited Scenes of Homicides, Burglaries, Etc. 
Members of this Bureau visited scenes of homicides, burg- 
laries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and secured 
photographs of fingerprints, in many instances of the persons 
who committed these crimes. In many cases photographs were 
taken of the scene where the crime was committed. The figures 
and other data in connection with the work are contained in a 
subsequent part of this report. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

Ultra-Violet Lamp {"Black Light"). 
This Bureau has successfully continued in the operation of 
an ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black light." This 
type of lamp is used for detection of forgeries on checks and 
altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counterfeit money, 
fake antiques and also for photographing of bloodstained 
fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not be photo- 
graphed are now photographed with ease through the use of 
luminous powders such as anthracene or luminous zinc sul- 
phide, due to radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The " Fluoroscope" and "White Drill" 
There have been acquired by this Bureau two valuable 
pieces of scientific equipment. The first is known as the 
"Fluoroscope. " When the rays of this instrument are trained 
on the subject before it, it reveals presence of any foreign sub- 
stance concealed either on or in his person, for instance, jewelry, 
metal or glass. The finding of glass in clothing of a person 
suspected of striking and killing a pedestrian with an auto- 
mobile is another example of what the instrument may accom- 
plish in detection of crime and criminals. The same is none 
the less true of inanimate objects, such as packages containing 
bombs, or concealed defects in the mechanism of an auto- 
mobile or other object, which may be responsible for serious 
accidents or death of persons. The value of this device in 
thwarting criminals is very apparent and makes an important 
addition to the scientific equipment contained in this Bureau. 
The second piece of equipment before referred to is the 
"White Drill," purchased for the purpose of repairing photo- 
graphic equipment. This work had been done by commercial 
concerns, but is now performed, to the greatest po'ssible extent, 
by photographers attached to this Bureau, resulting in a large 
saving. 

Pantoscopic Camera. 
One of the most valuable pieces of equipment in the Bureau 
is the Pantoscopic camera, used for the purpose of taking 
photographs of bullets connected with homicide cases. By 
means of this camera the entire circumference of the bullet 
showing cannelure impressions made as it passes through the 
barrel of the revolver can be photographed. Impressions 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

shown by the photograph of this bullet are carefully compared 
with impressions of a test bullet fired from a revolver believed 
to have been used in the homicide. If the test bullet and the 
real bullet disclose the same cannelure impressions, there is 
strong presumption created that the revolver under examination 
was the one used in the homicide. 

Developing and Printing Room. 

Developing and printing of criminal photographs by mem- 
bers of this Bureau has, since its existence, saved thousands 
of dollars. The original practice of having this work done by 
private photographers necessarily led to great expense and 
delay. A staff of experienced photographers trained in every 
phase of police photography and on duty twenty-four hours a 
day, is prepared to accomplish any photographic need of the 
Department, and to give that type of service which could be 
rendered only by the most modern and best equipped photog- 
rapher. 

In conjunction with increased demands constantly made on 
this staff of technicians, and in order that their work might 
be maintained on an eflficient basis, there has been installed in 
the Bureau a developing and printing room which compares 
favorably with that of any in this locality. 

Installation of this "dark room" has many favorable ad- 
vantages. It is located on the same floor as the Bureau where 
all photographs of prisoners are taken, thus eliminating ne- 
cessity formerly followed of developing and printing in a 
separate part of the building. The room is large, containing 
twice the floor space of the old room, has large sinks for wash- 
ing films, a Ferrotype dryer and other equipment for produc- 
tion of work of high standard. This has been one of the major 
changes in recent years in the Bureau and represents a definite 
forward step in the photographic division. 

Filing System of Photographs and Fingerprints of Unidentified 

Dead. 
A modern development of the photographic division was 
installation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photo- 
graphs of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are 
first sent to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and to the 
Army, Navy and Marine Corps, in such cases where the 
persons are of enlistment age, in an effort to identify these dead. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

Failing in this, they arc filed in the Bureau of Records for 
future reference. Through this method, a large proportion of 
the tentatively unidentified dead were later identified and their 
relatives notified. 

Single-Fingerprint Files. 
The single-fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crime. Hereto- 
fore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might be, 
taken at the scene of the crime, were valuable only for com- 
parison with the ten fingerprints of the person under suspicion, 
whether his prints were then in our files or taken later. There 
was no method of filing latent- fingerprints taken at the scene 
of crime up to comparatively recent origination of the single- 
fingerprint system of filing by Chief Inspector Battley of the 
Fingerprint Division of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley 
system of single fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of 
Records, and does not weaken in any way the standard system 
of filing fingerprints, but is a very valuable addition thereto. 
There are, at present, on file in this Bureau, 19,500 Battley 
single fingerprints and 1,975 latent fingerprints which are com- 
pared with all in-coming single fingerprints. 

Fingerprint System Practically Eliminating Bertillon System. 

The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the Bertil- 
lon system as means of criminal identification. During the 
year identity of hundreds of criminals was established for this 
and other departments through the fingerprint files of this 
Bureau. Identification of persons wanted for murder and rob- 
bery while armed was among the most important made. 

Civilian-Fingerprint File . 
Another important development of this Bureau was insti- 
tution of the civilian-fingerprint file, wherein are kept finger- 
prints of certain license apphcants with suitable index attached. 

Its Use in Connection with Applicants for Licenses. 
By means of the segregated file, it is impossible for a person 
with a criminal record, whose fingerprints are on file, to obtain 
a license under an assumed name, because by comparing his 
fingerprints with those in the civilian-fingerprint file, it is a 
matter of only a minute to determine whether the particular 
applicant has ever had, or applied for, a license before. There 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

are now contained in the civilian files fingerprints and criminal 
records, if any, of 11,393 hackney carriage drivers, 641 sight- 
seeing automobile drivers and 4,206 special police officers. 

Displacement of Conley-Flak System of Fingerprint Classification. 

The Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification and 
filing, in operation in the Boston Police Department since 
installation of fingerprints in 1906, has been entirely displaced 
and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended System 
of Fingerprint Classification and Filing, as used in the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D. C. 

In order to effect the change, some 150,000 fingerprints were 
carefully checked by operatives, the formula on each was re- 
vised, and a new type of filing card made out for each set of 
fingerprints, together with complete criminal record of each 
subject typed thereon, showing dealings of the individual with 
various law enforcement agencies throughout the country. In 
such cases where a criminal subject used one or more aHases, 
cross-reference cards were made and filed in addition to the 
main card. 

In effecting transformation of systems from the Conley-Flak 
to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons, who are either now 
dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely at an end, 
were removed from the active file and placed in a separate file 
for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates were taken from 
the files and placed in other inactive files. A final examination 
was then made to insure correct filing of every fingerprint and 
record card. At this writing, it can be truthfully said that the 
fingerprint system of the Boston Police Department, including 
method of filing, quality and amount of fingerprint equipment 
and skilled operators, is comparable to the practically infallible 
files of the Federal Bureau of Investigation at Washington, 
D. C, after which this Department's new system was fashioned. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Division of the 
Bureau of Records. 

The table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of copies prepared. 
Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . . . 106 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) . . 61 

Scenes of crime photographed 330 

Circulars sent out by identification division 24,200 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1941 176,964 

Made and filed during the year 2,278 

Received from other authorities 806 

Number on file November 30, 1942 180,048 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1941 142,374 

Taken and filed during the year 2,358 

Received from other authorities and filed .... 394 

Number on file November 30, 1942 145,126 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 4,622 

Other cities and states 266 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 2,271 

State Bureau of Identification 3,402 

Other cities and states 78 

Prisoners' Records sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 1,583 

Supplementary: 

Number of scenes of crime visited .../... 1,016 

Number of exposures (small camera) 758 

Number of prints (small camera) 399 

Number of enlargements: 

11 by 14 inches 144 

8 by 10 inches 3,888 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 417 

Prints made from same 1,251 

Number of rectigraph photographs 3,240 

Number of civilian employees photographed ... 34 

Number of negatives of criminals 2,278 

Number of prints from same 11,390 

Number of fingerprint investigations (negative) . . . 381 

Number of fingerprint investigations (positive) . . . 399 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 399 

Number of visitors photographed 189 

Prints made from same 557 

Number of exposures of Pantoscopic camera ... 8 

Number of re-orders of criminal photographs . . 2,985 

Number of stand-up photographs made .... 6 

Prints made from same 18 

Niunber of photographs of police officers .... 114 

Number of auxiliary police officers photographed . . 4,796 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 114 

Special police officers 472 

Hackney carriage drivers 383 

Civilian employees 34 

Civilians cooperating in defense work 7,892 

Auxiliary police officers 4,796 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1941 23,552 

Tota} number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1942 37,243 



Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from poHce journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports services performed as follows: 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

police journal in regard to accidents and thefts . 1,788 

Days in court 14 

Services of a Draftsman from the Personnel. 
A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the 
service of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who drafts 
scenes of crimes for presentation as evidence in court, to aid 
the government in prosecution of its case by showing the jury 
the exact location and surroundings at the scene. During the 
course of the year, the draftsman visited scenes of various 
serious crimes where he took measurements and later drew to 
scale thirty-five individual plans. Twenty-nine of these have 
been used as exhibits in the following courts within jurisdiction 
of Boston : 

Municipal Court 5 days. 

Grand Jury of Suffolk County 5 days. 

Superior Court 25 days. 

■ In addition, twenty-five special drawings or paintings (miscel- 
laneous) were also made for the use of the Police Department. 

Some of these drawings have not as yet been exhibited in 
any court, but will be presented when the cases to which they 
relate come to trial. 

The drafting room is fully equipped with all necessary in- 
struments required for efficiently handling this work. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

Criminal Records for the Department Furnished by the Bureau. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of con- 
victions for presentation in courts, both here and in other cities. 

The following figures represent requests received for these 
records from December 1, 1941, to November 30, 1942: 



Requests received by telephone 
Requests received by correspondence 
Requests for certified records 
Requests for jury records . 

Total 

Requests in connection with appHcants for Hcenses 

Grand total 



1,800 
4,825 
1,650 
2,400 

10,675 
13,880 

24,555 



The following figures represent requests received from various 
public agencies for records required due to the war activity: 

U. S. Coast Guard 4,500 

U. S. Marine Corps 4,300 

U. S. Naval Procurement (Air Corps Cadets) .... 2,600 

U. S. Merchant Marine 600 

U. S. .\rmy 2,900 

U. S. Navy 2,100 

U. S. Defense Plants 3,650 

Auxiliary police 4,795 

Air Raid Wardens 2,000 

U. S. Civil Service applicants 400 

Selective Service delinquents 200 

Guards and special officers for defense purposes .... 1,200 

Mass. Women's Defense Corps 7,900 

Total 37,145 

Identification Made Through Fingerprints. 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions, when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also, where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. 

Photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally before 
courts of this city, but on occasions where connections are made 
with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photographer, 
who enlarges the prints for purpose of charting them for 
presentation as evidence in court, is also summoned into court 
to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



There have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of 
pohce of outside cities and towns have asked for services of 
fingerprint and photography experts, in consequence of crime 
committed in their jurisdiction. The Department cooperated 
by sending these men, properly equipped, to survey the scene 
of crime and reproduce any prints available for evidence. 

Missing Persons. 

The Missing Persons Division, a branch of the Bureau of 
Records, is performing a fine type of service to citizens of 
Boston and surrounding cities and towns. Its chief function 
necessarily is to aid families in the location of their relatives 
reported lost or missing. It performs valuable service in identi- 
fication of unknown dead persons found in various sections 
of the city whose relatives had been located. Without this 
service, such dead persons might have been interred with 
those unfortunates in potter's field. 

During the course of the year, the Missing Persons Division 
cooperated with various State institutions in the location and 
return of many wards who had left these institutions without 
permission. 



Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total nimiber foimd, restored to relatives, etc. 



Total number still missing « . 

Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing In Boston. 



2,170 
1,954 

216 



Age. 


Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


585 


211 


581 


201 


4 


10 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 


335 


313 


295 


274 


40 


39 


Over 21 years. 


449 


277 


366 


237 


83 


40 


Totals . 


1,369 


801 


1,242 


712 


127 


89 



Not included in the foregoing are 432 persons reported 
missing by both the Division of Child Guardianship of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Girls' 
and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools. 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



Not included, also, in the foregoing figures are numerous 
cases of children reported missing to this Department, who were 
found or returned within a few hours after report was made. 

There was reported to this Department from outside depart- 
ments a total of 4,570 missing persons. 

Grand total of number of persons reported 

missing 7,172 



Persons Reported Missing, by Police Divisions, for 
Month Period, Commencing December 1, 194^, and 
November SO, 1942. 

Division 1 (North End section) 

Division 3 (West End section) 

Division 4 (South End section) 

Division 6 (South Boston district) 

Division 7 (East Boston district) . 

Division 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) . 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

Division 1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) 

Division 18 (Hyde Park district) . 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) 

Total 



a Twelve- 
Ending 

67 

95 

178 

192 

96 

316 

303 

188 

83 

96 

110 

57 

51 

57 

281 



2,170 



During the past year there was an increase in the total 
number of persons reported missing of 1,258 cases over the 
previous year. This was due in the main to the number of 
persons reported missing to this department from outside 
departments. 

Persons Interviewed. — At the "Missing Persons" office there 
were interviewed about 750 persons relative to cases handled. 
This does not include the number interviewed at other units 
and divisions of the Department. 

Correspondence. — There were handled by the unit approxi- 
mately 5,000 pieces of correspondence relating to location of 
friends and relatives. 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Circulars. — About 3,500 descriptive circulars on missing 
persons were sent out from the unit. 

Tracers. — There were sent out approximately 1,500 tracers 
on persons reported missing. 

Identification of Dead Bodies. — In 45 cases of unknown white 
men, 27 were identified through fingerprints. 

Warrant File 
Procedure as to Warrants Issued to or Received hy this Department. 
The warrant file for the entire Police Department is kept in 
the Bureau of Records. A list of all warrants issued to or 
received by this Department is sent out each day on the mani- 
fold and every officer in the Department receives a copy of this 
list. Twenty-four hours after issuance of a warrant, if the 
person named therein has not been arrested, a form card is 
forwarded to the Bureau of Records by the station house with 
all data pertaining to the warrant and the case. These cards 
are alphabetically filed so that almost instantaneously it may 
be ascertained whether a warrant exists in the Department for 
any person named. On service of the warrant another card 
goes forward to the Bureau of Records with necessary informa- 
tion of service. 

Warrants Received from Outside Departments, Etc. 
All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant files of the Bureau of Records. All corre- 
spondence pertaining to movement of warrants outside of the 
city proper is handled in that Bureau. Commanding Officers 
of this Department are required, under the rules and regula- 
tions, to notify the Warrant Division of arrests on warrants 
issued to the Boston Police Department and on warrants of all 
other police departments; also when arrests are made without 
a warrant involving serious crimes. The rule applies to this 
procedure every hour of the day and night. The warrant files 
are immediately searched. If it appears that there is a warrant 
for the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the officer in 
command of the arresting division or unit is immediately noti- 
fied and given full particulars, and such other police division 
or unit in Boston or outside jurisdiction is immediately notified 
that the person is under arrest. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Number of Warrants Received by Bureau of Records and Their 

Disposition. 

Warrants received by Bureau of Records 3,316 

Arrested on warrants 1,969 

Warrants returned without service 1,620 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the Department 

and to other jurisdictions 1,819 

Active warrant cards on file issued to Boston PoHce . . . 5,175 
Active warrants issued to Boston Pohce for persons now out of 

state 62 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police, forwarded to other 

cities and towns in this State 181 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service (cards in our files) 263 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers ... 62 

Summons File. 
Establishment and Purpose. 

On December 14, 1936, there was established in the Bureau 
of Records a summons file for the purpose of facilitating service 
of summonses. All summonses for service outside the City of 
Boston obtained by the several divisions and units are for- 
warded to this Bureau where they are recorded and sent to 
the Chief of Police of the city or town where a defendant 
resides. Summonses received from other police departments 
for service in this city are in the same manner recorded and 
sent to the respective divisions and units for service, and after 
service has been made, are returned. 

The following figures represent summonses received from 
outside cities and towns for service in Boston from December 1, 
1941, to November 30, 1942: 

Total number received 3,273 

Total number served 3,019 

Total number returned (without service) .... 254 

The following figures represent the number of summonses 
sent from the Bureau of Records for service in outside cities 
and towns: 

Received from local divisions and units and sent out . . 12,600 
Total number served 11,578 

Total number not served 1,022 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



TRAFFIC. 

The Traffic Division, re-established May 22, 1936, is located 
in quarters on the fifth floor of Police Building, 229 Milk street. 
The Traffic Division includes territory within boundaries of 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 16, and the traffic post at Cottage Farm 
Bridge, Division 14. 

The Commanding Officer of the Traffic Division is responsible 
for proper regulation of traffic conditions and for safety of the 
public using highways in territory under jurisdiction of the 
Traffic Division, week days and Sundays, from 8 a. m. to 
12 midnight. On Saturdays such duty is extended to one 
o'clock Sunday morning. 

The traffic post at Cottage Farm Bridge is pohced from 
8 a. m. to 6 p. m. week days, as well as on Sundays and 
holidays. 

Activities. 

This has been a busy year for officers connected with the 
Traffic Division on account of problems in connection with war 
conditions: first, necessitating placing of officers on various 
posts in remote parts of the city to meet convoys going through 
our municipality to reach points north and northeasterly of 
Boston as well as south and west; and, second, with change of 
hours in the mercantile district of the large stores (thus estab- 
lishing a so-called "stagger system,") the Traffic Division has 
been obhged to furnish officers to meet with this new situation. 
Many of such stores are now open on Mondays from 9.45 
a. m. to 9 p. m. and a like condition prevails in these stores 
on Wednesday of the same week during the same hours. 

The Traffic Division was confronted with a delicate problem 
in the dismantling of the Boston Elevated Railway structure in 
Commercial street, Atlantic avenue. Beach street, Harrison 
avenue and Motte street, which began on March 16, 1942, and 
was completed about the middle of June of the same year. 

In other parts of the city, such as locations of the South 
Station, Boston Arena, Mechanics Building, Symphony and 
Horticultural Halls, Boston Opera House, Fenway Park, 
Sumner Tunnel, the market and theatrical districts, as well as 
at the North Station (in which building the Boston Garden is 
situated), there are points where congestion is apt to appear 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 53 

most any time. It is the duty of this Division to so regulate 
traffic that it will be moving at all times in these localities. 

In the market district there has been about the usual flow of 
traffic with its tractor-trailers. Large commercial vehicles and 
trucks, many of which come from other states, are additional 
burdens imposed upon the police in this small area, where so 
much business is conducted in the handling of food-stuffs. As 
a result, the practice has continued of sending police officers 
into this district as early as 6 a. m. to regulate the heavy flow of 
traffic. 

The Traffic Division throughout the year made necessary 
arrangements for large parades, such as: 

Royal Air Force parade from Hotel Lenox to the Boston Garden. 

"March of Dimes" parade. 

Patriots' Day parade. 

"Hollywood Cavalcade." 

Memorial Mass and Communion Breakfast. 

"I am an American Day" parade. 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery parade. 

Schoolboys' parade 

"War Heroes" parade. 

Flag Day parade. 

Army parade. 

Chinese parade. 

Coast Guard parade. 

Navy parade. 

Canadian Legion parade. 

Fire prevention parade. 

Columbus Day parade. 

Rodeo parade. 

Marine Corps parade. 

Armistice Day parade. 

Community Fund parade. 

Parade of Naval Recruits. 

A traffic problem confronting the Division was regulation 
of thousands of automobiles passing through our streets with 
employees engaged in war work in plants such as the Bethle- 
hem Steel Company at Fore River, Quincy Point, the S. A. 
Woods Machine Company (now the Murray Company), the 
Charlestown Navy Yard and the extension at the Army Base, 
South Boston. 

Workers at these places use the thoroughfares of Dorchester 
avenue. Congress street, Atlantic avenue. Commercial street. 



1941. 


Dec. 


1. 


1942. 


Jan. 


22. 


Apr. 


20. 


May 


1. 


May 


3. 


May 


17. 


June 


1. 


June 


7. 


June 


10. 


June 


14. 


July 


4. 


July 


5. 


Aug. 


2. 


Aug. 


25. 


Sept. 


20. 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


10. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


19. 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Causeway and Beverly streets, where additional policemen 
have had to be sent to cope with the situation of keeping traffic 
moving. All of these streets in normal times are busy, but 
with this additional flow of traffic there have been required 
extra officers. 

It is the duty of the Traffic Division to make recommenda- 
tions, through the Superintendent of Police, to the Boston Traffic 
Commission, for procurement of traffic signs to be placed in 
streets to direct automobile operators temporarily and some- 
times permanently. Also, to work in conjunction with the 
Boston Street Commissioners to map out programs of various 
streets through which parades are to pass, so that the auto- 
mobile public will be inconvenienced as little as possible. 
These recommendations are made after study by the Com- 
manding Officer of this Division as the result sometimes of 
observation and other times by suggestion. 

Another problem of the Traffic Division is to satisfy tourists 
coming to our city, and members of organizations, also, who 
stop at hotels such as the Statler, Bradford, Copley Plaza, or 
others of like character. To such persons are provided parking 
spaces as much as possible without hindering free movement 
of traffic. Friendship of such people to the Police Department 
is gained. Further, it is hoped, such visitors take back to the 
localities from which they came a high feeling of the thoughtful 
treatment accorded them while stopping in Boston. 

Another important duty was the providing of escorts and 
making arrangements for the most advantageous routes to 
destinations for distinguished visitors and organizations, some 
of which are enumerated as follows : The Royal Air Force, War 
Department officials, officials of Evacuation Day parade, His 
Excellency Manuel Prado, President of Peru; His Excellency 
Manuel Quezon, President of the Philippines; Honorable Frank 
Knox, Secretary of the Navy; Her Royal Highness Queen 
Wilhelmina of the Netherlands; Honorable Frank C. Walker, 
Postmaster-General; Honorable Angus L. MacDonald, Cana- 
dian Minister of National Defense for Naval Service; His 
Excellency Sumner Sewall, Governor of Maine, and Major- 
General Francis B. Wilby of the United States Army. 

This Division is constantly in receipt of questionnaires from 
cities throughout the United States, requiring information as to 
how they might best establish rules and regulations pertinent 
to traffic conditions. In many communications it has been 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

stated that they call upon the Boston PoHce Department for 
the reason they have been informed favorably of our Traffic 
Division. 

Among outstanding accomplishments of the Traffic Division 
during the year was not only handling tremendous crowds at 
Fenway Park, at Sumner Tunnel during the racing season, and 
at various recreational grounds, but, also, throughout dis- 
mantling for war purposes of the Boston Elevated Railway 
structure, without a single accident to either automobile or 
pedestrians on this trying job, through excellent police work of 
the traffic officers. 

Traffic Conditions. 

It is the aim of the Police Department and particularly the 
Boston Traffic Division to assist in every way possible not only 
the stranger and tourist coming to our city from other localities 
for the purpose of patronizing our stores, hotels, restaurants, 
theatres, etc., but the merchants as well. 

It is realized many are not aware of our Traffic Rules and 
Regulations, especially those from other cities and towns, 
and use our streets at times in violation of such Rules and 
Regulations. 

Communications are received complaining of what is termed 
"illegal parking," which may be true, but if the police were to 
fully enforce all the rules and regulations pertinent to traffic, 
there would soon be much criticism from persons conducting 
business as described. Therefore, discretion is used in the 
exercise of authority imposed upon the police, so that we will 
win the good will of merchants, as well as automobile operators 
who come to our city to buy merchandise and spend money. 

Our street traffic conditions are constantly under survey by 
the Police Commissioner, the Superintendent of Police and the 
Deputy Superintendent in charge of traffic, who have had years 
of practical experience in police work. 

At the direction of the Police Commissioner, the Command- 
ing Officer of the Traffic Division, on September 23, 1942, 
made an address over the radio on Station "WHDH," calling 
attention of listeners to the work of the Division, its numerous 
activities, the increased demands made upon police personnel 
through war conditions, — all to the end to encourage fullest 
cooperation on the part of the pedestrian and vehicular public. 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Safety Educational Automobile. 

Our Safety Educational Automobile has been in continuous 
operation on the highways of Boston during the past several 
years, educating motorists as to the proper manner in which 
they should operate their automobiles and instructing pe- 
destrians as to the proper place and manner in which they 
should cross the street. Through constant and persistent 
short safety talks by ofl&cers assigned to this automobile, the 
general public is rapidly becoming more accident conscious. 

Each Saturday, between the hours of 9 and 9.30 a. m., 
broadcasts are given over a local radio network by members 
of the M-1 Safety Squad. It has a membership consisting of 
children of school age, 16 years and under. 

During the year, officers in the Safety Car visited and gave 
safety talks and demonstrations at a total of some 750 schools 
in the city, public, parochial and private, at which approxi- 
mately 315,000 pupils, 1,700 teachers and 20,000 parents 
were present. 

During the past year many requests have been received for 
the Safety Educational Car to visit other cities and towns to 
give talks along safety lines to various groups of children and 
adults, and in particular, to Auxiliary Police Officers. 

At the Park Department playgrounds during the summer 
months are staged "Safety Shows" for nearly 200,000 adults 
and 300,000 children. The Safety Car may be seen at all 
important parades and at the Park Department baseball and 
football championship games in Fenway Park. The car has 
also been used in cooperation with the Massachusetts Public 
Safety Committee on Boston Common, during demonstration 
of air-raid precautions, assisting greatly by the use of its loud 
speaker in preventing injury to spectators and impressing on 
their minds the need for greater safety. 

The car, with its officers, has also been called on many times 
to appear at gatherings of employees of large trucking concerns, 
telegraph offices, theatres, civic and fraternal organizations, 
Burroughs Newsboys' Foundation, policy holders of large 
insurance companies and other business establishments, where 
safety lectures have been given to employees of these various 
concerns or to persons in attendance at the meetings. Many 
schools and organizations outside the city have been accom- 
modated in like manner, upon request. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

As a result of this splendid program conducted by the Safety 
Educational Car, under direction of the Police Commissioner, 
many complimentary letters have been received from persons 
in various walks of life. 

Reduction in personal injuries caused by automobiles has 
been continued, and during the last school year not a single 
school child was killed while going to or from school. 

In connection with our war effort, the Safety Educational 
Car and its officers have assisted in great measure, especially 
with reference to the many Naval, Marine and Coast Guard 
Recruit parades. 

A letter of commendation received on this phase of activities 
of the Traffic Division is set out: 

"U. S. Navy Recruiting Station, 

Post Office Square, 

Boston, Mass. 

21 November 1942. 
Hon. Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner, 
Boston, Mass. 
My dear Commissioner Timilty, — I feel sure that I have neglected 
on former occasions to advise you that the services of the mounted police 
which have always been offered to us to lead our parades is greatly 
appreciated. These officers have always conducted themselves in a most 
efficient manner and I feel that no parade sponsored by the Navy Re- 
cruiting Service would be complete without them. 

Also, I feel that I have previously neglected to advise you that it would 
be just about impossible to plan a parade without requesting the services 
of the Police Safety Car. We have been fortunate in having this car to 
lead all of our parades, and in having the use of the public address sj^stem 
that is part of the equipment in the Safety Car has made it possible to 
properly handle several addresses that were delivered in Post Office square 
prior to the starting of the parade. I would like to compliment both of 
the officers assigned to this car for the excellent manner in which they 
have assisted us in all our parades. 

Again thanking you for your interest in the Navy Recruiting Service 
of Boston. Kindest personal regards. 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) George M. Powders, Jr., 
Lieutenant, U.S.N.R., 

Officer in Charge." 

Tagging. 
During the period from December 1, 1941, up to and in- 
cluding November 30, 1942, the Traffic Division issued approxi- 
mately 68,000 notices for violations of the "parking" rules. 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Such notices were forwarded through the United States mail 
to owners of offending automobiles, or by service in hand to 
the operators. 

Decrease in the number of violation notices issued this year 
in comparison with last year shows a better spirit of cooperation 
on the part of automobile owners. 

There were for a period in the past year forty-one patrolmen 
devoting their whole time to tagging automobiles. The special 
services of these officers in this respect were dispensed with on 
July 2, 1942, necessitating all of this tagging to be done by 
officers on traffic posts from that date. 

Furthermore, the Traffic Division has decreased from 237 
patrolmen of one year ago, to 168 patrolmen at the present 
time. This decrease was brought about by return of officers 
of the tagging unit, detailed to this Division, to their respective 
divisions, along with the fact that a number of police officers 
have entered the armed service of the United States, as well 
as by resignations and deaths of other members. 

Two-Hour Parking. 

This is the first entire year that the regulation recommended 
by the Police Commissioner pertaining to two-hour parking 
has been effective. It has met with the ready appreciation 
of the merchants of our city, shoppers coming to our stores, 
and the medical profession of the Back Bay section, as well as 
patients visiting their offices for treatment upon specified hours 
throughout the dsiy. This rule has proven its worth for the 
following reasons: 

Before its inception the Police Commissioner, the Superin- 
tendent of Police, and the Commanding Officer of the Traffic 
Division were in receipt of many complaints from persons, 
alleging that they were sent notices for violation of parking 
regulations which seemed unfair and unjust. No such con- 
dition now exists, as rarely is a complaint received of unfair- 
ness on the part of the police tagging cars wrongfully. 

Officers of the Traffic Division have been instructed to 
exercise their authority with proper discretion, particularly in 
areas where government units are functioning, such as the 
Rationing Boards in Devonshire street and at 10 Post Office 
square, the Coast Guard at 40 Central street, 70 State street 
and at the former Hotel Brunswick, the Finance Department 
of the United States Navy at the Paine Furniture Company, 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

Arlington street building, as well as the Federal Building in 
Post Office square, the Army and Navy units at 150 Causeway 
street, and the Intelligence Department of the United States 
Army at 6 Bowdoin square. 

Conclusion. 

It is really quite remarkable how little complaint there is, 
in view of the extraordinary conditions that the police en- 
counter on every business day. Doubtless, there are countless 
but technical and unintentional violations of the traffic rules 
every day. It would be folly for the police to put persons in- 
to court for such violations. However, the obligations as to 
enforcement of traffic rules and regulations will be pushed 
steadily forward. 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS. 

Creation. 

This Bureau was created on July 11, 1934. 

The Bureau was detached from the Superintendent's office 
and estabhshed at Police Headquarters as a separate unit, 
April 2, 1937. 

Duties. 

This Bureau has control of all communications equipment 
consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and telegraph and 
through its facilities has directed movement of radio cars, 
police boats and ambulances. 

The vast majority of all telephoned complaints, reports and 
requests for information from the general public and other 
police departments, military organizations and organizations 
connected with the Civilian Defense program was handled 
by officers of this unit. 

Accomplishments. 
During this period, from December 1, 1941, to November 30, 
1942, personnel of this Bureau managed transmission, reception 
and handling of: 

243,468 outgoing telephone messages and 4,960 toll calls 
made by the Department through our switchboard. 

Approximately 320,000 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the turret through either "Devon- 
shire 1212" or the Department inter-communicating 
system. 

Approximately 475,000 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of which were transferred 
to the turret for handhng. 

Due to the war and other emergencies the number of 
telephone calls has increased. This has necessitated 
installation of another panel or unit on the switchboard, 
including additional lines, and has also required additional 
operators, four on day duty and two on each night tour 
of duty. 

Direct lines have also been installed connecting this unit 
with report centers, telephone exchanges, utility com- 
panies, etc. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 61 

161,802 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
making and delivering of copies of such messages, as 
necessary, to the proper bureau or unit. 

1,386 telegrams, including the filing of same and making 
and delivering of copies to the proper bureau or unit. 

7,172 teletype items for persons reported missing by 
divisions and units of the Department, and other states, 
cities and towns. Copies of these were delivered to the 
Bureau of Records, and cards filled out for our files. 

286,411 radio messages sent, including dictaphone 
recording of same and transcription from records to the 
radio log. 

9,700 lost or stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the automobile division of the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation, 3,214 of which were reported 
stolen in Boston, together with records made and delivered 
of all recovered cars, copies of both kept in the files of this 
Bureau. 

A daily journal has been kept in which all of the foregoing, 
together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents and other 
matters submitted by divisions and units of the Department 
were recorded. 

Files are kept in the unit of: 

(1) The police personnel of the Department, with 
name, rank, cap and badge numbers, together with the 
address, telephone, date of appointment and promotion, 
etc., as well as a file of former officers. 

(2) The Police Department civilian personnel, includ- 
ing home address and telephone number. 

(3) The Fire Department, which includes the name, 
rank and address of its members, and the radio sector on 
which they live. 

Two main radio transmitters, 78 car and four boat trans- 
"mitters and receivers, 26 wired-broadcast amplifiers and eight 
pickup receivers were maintained and kept in repair by mem- 
bers of this unit. Two-way radio installation has been installed 
in 15 combination patrol wagon and ambulances. 

An emergency unit has been created in Roxbury where a 
170-watt transmitter has been prepared. This emergency unit 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

is equipped with most of the faciUties now in use in the quarters 
of the main unit, including files, telephone and teletype service. 
During the past year this unit has been called upon to 
mobilize police, fire and medical units in such cases as five- 
alarm fires in East Boston and the South End district of Bos- 
ton. To the East Boston fire of November 15, 1942, hospital 
and medical aid, and also cranes, were obtained through the 
efforts of this unit. 



1943.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 



BALLISTICS UNIT. 
Formation and Duties. 

The activities of this Unit, with its personnel, are under 
supervision of the Superintendent of Pohce. 

With a Sergeant-BaUistician in charge, the office consists of 
experts in balhstics, handwriting, typewriting, moulage, explo- 
sives and munitions. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician, under direction of the Superin- 
tendent of Police, has charge of the care and custody of all 
firearms, explosives and substances of explosives coming into 
possession of the police. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician examines all evidence found at the 
scene of a crime where firearms or explosives are used and sends 
a written report to the Superintendent of his findings. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician prepares cases where ballistics 
evidence is required insofar as bullets, shells, firearms or explo- 
sives are concerned and appears before the court in such cases 
to give evidence. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician has custody of emergency equip- 
ment, such as rifles, shotguns, machine guns, gas guns, revolvers, 
pistols, bullet-proof vests and tear-gas equipment and main- 
tenance of same. 

The Document Examiner prepares cases where handwriting, 
typewriting, erasures in documents, questioned printing, water- 
marks, staplings, paper and ink are concerned and appears 
before the court to give evidence in such cases. 

Accomplishments. 

During the year members of this Unit responded to 21 
emergency calls after regular working hours and performed 313 
hours of extra duty in this manner. Members of this Unit 
spent 225 days in court on ballistic, handwriting and moulage 
cases. 

For efficiency of the Unit the following material was added 
to the equipment : 90 official police .38-caliber special revolvers, 
100 gas masks, equipped with the new type canisters for all 
military gases; 106 handlights, and two large gun baths for 
cleaning rifles, shotguns, revolvers, pistols, machine guns and 
gas guns. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following equipment was serviced and repaired: 200 
revolvers, 45 riot guns, 6 gas guns, 10 gas masks, 15 gas billies 
and 7 gas projectors. In addition to the foregoing, the follow- 
ing equipment located at the various police divisions and 
units was serviced: 200 riot guns, 20 gas guns, 10 Thompson 
sub-machine guns, 110 gas billies, 145 gas masks, 60 bullet- 
proof vests, tear-gas munitions and four high-powered rifles. 
Substantial savings were made by servicing and repairing our 
own equipment. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the 
courts, and those held for ballistic purposes, are kept clean 
and recorded. 

Stolen firearms received at this office are traced, and returned 
to the rightful owners and a file maintained of same. Any 
United States property recovered is returned to the Springfield 
Armory, United States Ordnance Department. 

Approximately 600 handwriting specimens or exemplars were 
classified and filed at this office for use in questioned hand- 
writing cases. To date, nearly 31,000 specimens have been 
filed for this purpose. 

Twenty-one groups, consisting of clubs, fraternal organiza- 
tions, social service and members of the Army, Navy and 
Coast Guard, have visited the Unit during the year. Between 
750 and 1,000 visitors were shown through the Unit. Also, 
members lectured to military groups in metropolitan Boston. 

During formation of the Auxiliary Police Force this office 
issued 3,800 riot clubs, 3,920 flashlights and 10,000 batteries 
to the divisions for their use. The riot clubs were numbered 
at this Unit. 

Through courtesy of the Police Commissioner, the Adjutant 
General of the Massachusetts State Guard sent the following 
firearms to this Unit from the State Guard Supply Depot: 
7,434 shotguns, 336 Thompson sub-machine guns and 25 gas 
guns. These w^ capons were stamped with the State serial 
number, cleaned, inspected and serviced. 

A number of groups of State Guard officers have received 
instructions in assembling and disassembling the Thompson 
and Reising sub-machine guns and nomenclature of same and 
in the proper means of handling explosives, bombs and suspi- 
cious packages. 

During the year members of this Unit attended lectures and 
demonstrations given by the Boston Fire Department and 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

various military groups on the subjects of bombs, firearms and 
civil cooperation with Army regulations. A course in Bomb 
Disposal Reconnaissance given at Fort Devens was attended 
by a member of this Unit and information obtained passed on 
to members of the Department. 

This office has worked in cooperation with the Army, Navy 
and Coast Guard Intelligence during the year. 

The portable-lighting equipment, department property as- 
signed to this office, was used at various times throughout the 
year. 

MOULAGE. 

Substance known as moulage was utilized to good advantage 
on several occasions. Specimens were used in court to establish 
proof in breaking and entering cases. 

Serial Numbers on Firearms. 

There were a number of cases where serial numbers on fire- 
arms, locks, instruments and other objects were erased and had 
to be treated with chemicals to reveal the numbers for identi- 
fication. Identification resulted in tracing ownership of most 
of these articles. 

Tear-Gas Munitions. 

Members of the Department were instructed in the use of 
tear-gas munitions during drills held at the First Corps Cadets' 
Armory and at the West Roxbury revolver range during the 
summer months. 

Several groups of State Guard officers were instructed in the 
use of tear-gas munitions at the Camp Curtis Guild rifle range, 
Wakefield. 

Disposition of Confiscated Explosives. 
During the past year a number of grenades, projectiles. 
Mills bombs, fixed ammunition, dynamite and caps, railroad 
torpedoes, powders and war souvenirs, which had come into 
possession of the police from various sections of metropolitan 
Boston, were disposed of by this Unit. 

Examination of Suspected Bombs. 
The portable X-ray equipment assigned to this office was 
used frequently to examine suspected bombs, various types of 
explosives and all packages of suspicious nature. The danger 
of injury or possible death in removing these materials was 
thereby eliminated. 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous. 

An interchange of evidence is carried on by this Unit with 
all Federal agencies and police departments. Bullets, shells 
and handwriting exemplars are mailed to other enforcement 
agencies to aid in the arrest of criminals. 

All evidence in homicide cases is properly marked and stored 
in the vault of this office until needed by the court. 

The police divisions and units are now equipped with a 
sufficient supply of emergency equipment to handle any situ- 
ation. Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced 
whenever necessary. 

The motor truck attached to this Unit has been equipped 
with all necessary material for emergency purposes. 



1943.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 



PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause. In its 
custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming imple- 
ments which come into possession of the Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms and equipment are issued 
by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the cross-record 
system maintained for the purpose of comparing prices before 
such bills are prepared for payment. 

During the year 70 motor vehicles came into custody of this 
office; 56 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants, and 
24 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 12 
motor vehicles in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care and distribution 
of uniforms and equipment to members of the police force, and 
also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed garments and 
equipment. An individual record of items of uniform and ' 
equipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is 
operated on a twenty-four hour basis. During the year, 5,216 
Department cars were repaired at the repair shop in Division 
4, and 1,412 cars were serviced. (Servicing includes greasing, 
changing of oil, checking of battery and electrical equipment, 
brakes, cooling systems, tires, steering systems, wear of clutch, 
etc.) Also 71 Department cars and 75 privately-owned cars 
w^ere towed by the Department wrecker. A radio-repair shop 
is attached to the maintenance shop where a twenty-four hour 
daily service is maintained. The Department operates a motor- 
cycle repair shop, now located in the rear of Station 19, where 
257 motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all Department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving Department vehicles. 



68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The Lost and Found branch of the Department has been 
active during the past year, as shown by the following schedule: 



Articles on hand December 1, 1941 4,470 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1942 1,652 

Total 



Disposed of: 

To owTiers through efforts of the Property Clerk's 

Office 108 

Delivered on orders from divisions ... 156 

Worthless 1,692 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of Public 

Welfare 9 

Perishable articles decayed 7 

Sold at public auction 489 

Total number of articles disposed of 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1942 



6,122 



2,461 
3,661 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



SPECIAL EVENTS. 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the number of police detailed for duty 
at each: 



1941. 




Dec. 


3. 


Deo. 


7. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


14. 


Dee. 


15. 


Dec. 


16. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


20. 


Dec. 


21. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


28. 


Dec. 


30. 


1942. 




Jan. 


5. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


7. 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


9. 


Feb. 


17. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mar. 


15. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


17. 



Boston Garden, ball of Boston Police Relief Associ- 
ation 

Funeral of Patrolman Ephraim W. Pitman 

Funeral of Patrolman John M. Sullivan 

Boston Arena, Russian Relief Committee concert 

Boston Post, Santa Claus bundles .... 

Funeral of Sergeant Andrew W. Ryan, retired . 

Funeral of Captain John McGrath, retired . 

Funeral of Patrolman Luke A. Farley .... 

Copley Square, Christmas services under auspices of 
the Back Bay Association 

Copley Square, Christmas Eve, exercises under 
auspices of the Back Bay Association 

Christmas Eve, Carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 
and Boston Common 

Boston Common, City of Boston Christmas exercises, 

Funeral of Sergeant Jeremiah O'Neil .... 



Symphony Hall, inauguration exercises of the Hon 

Maurice J. Tobin, Mayor of Boston 
Funeral of Patrolman Daniel P. Duggan 
Boston Garden, Boston Evening American Silver 

Skate Carnival 

Funeral of Patrolman Timothy M. McGillicuddy 
Boston Garden, Greater Boston United War Fund 

Drive, meeting and entertainment 



Boy 



Asso 



Boston Garden, President Roosevelt's Birthday 

Funeral of Patrolman Leo J. Gushing . 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, anniversary of 
Scout Sunday" 

Funeral of Patrolman Albert J. Nott 

Boston Garden, ball of Boston Firemen's Relief 
ciation 

City of Boston "blackout" test 

Copley-Plaza Hotel, ball sponsored by Police Com- 
missioner Joseph F. Timilty for service men 

Funeral of Patrolman Lawrence A. Boyle 

South Boston High School, historical exercises 

Funeral of Sergeant .James L. Culleton 

South Boston, Evacuaticni Day road race and parade, 



Ball 



Men. 

398 
48 
48 
33 
25 
12 
20 
48 

74 

43 

138 
20 

48 



78 
80 

38 

48 

149 
148 
106 

16 
10 

149 
1,083 

65 
48 
15 
78 
391 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1942. Men. 

Mar. 22. Boston Common, American Legion auction of war 

souvenirs for national defense 19 

Mar. 25. Funeral of Patrolman John J. O'Connor ... 78 
Mar. 28. Roxbury, William F. Reddish Athletic Association, 

ten-mile road race 53 

Mar. 31. City of Boston "blackout" test 1,107 

April 4. Brighton, Presentation Literary and Social Organiza- 
tion, ten-mile road race 52 

April 5. Easter parade on Commonwealth avenue ... 35 

April 6. Boston Common, Army Day exercises .... 52 

April 6. Boston Garden, "Buddies' Club" jamboree . . 107 
April 10. Boston Garden, "All Star" boxing show for service 

men 98 

April 11. Cathedral Club road race 124 

April 12. Majestic Theatre, show for service men ... 16 

April 19. Marathon race 448 

April 19. Statler Hotel, ball sponsored by Police Commissioner 

Joseph F. Timilty for service men .... 106 

April 20. City of Boston Patriots' Day celebration . . . 132 
April 23. Funeral of Mrs. Katherine F. Webb, Chief Matron 

of the House of Detention 12 

April 26. Various schools. Fourth Registration for Selective 

Service 127 

April 26. Wilbur Theatre, show for service men .... 16 
April 27. Various schools. Fourth Registration for Selective 

Service 127 

May 1. Cathedral of the Holy Cross, ordination ... 12 
May 1. Hollywood "Victory Caravan" for Army and Navy 

Relief 603 

May 2. Boston Common, Boston Park Department May 

festival 25 

May 4. Boston Opera House, United Rally for Democratic 

Victory 19 

May 8. Boston Garden, boxing bouts for Navy Relief . 45 
May 9. Hyde Park, Wood Avenue Playground, Hyde Park 
"Sport's Day" sponsored by Hyde Park Air Raid 

Wardens and Volunteer Auxiliary Police . . 35 
May 10. Boston Elevated Railway employees' parade and 

memorial Mass at Cathedral of the Holy Cross 32 

May 10. Boston Common, "Buddies' Club" opening . 20 
May 13. Boston Trade School parade to East Newton Street 

Armory 24 

May 14. Visit of His Excellency, Manuel Prado, President of 

Peru 22 

May 16. Funeral of Patrolman Michael J. Sullivan, retired . 10 
May 17. Suffolk County Council, American T^egion, parade 

and field Mass at Fenway Park .... 36 

May 17. "I Am An American Day" parade .... 1,032 

May 18. Boston Garden, Boston Junior Police Corps' Jubilee, 227 



1943. 

May 


22. 


May 
May 


23. 
24. 


May 


24. 


May 


24. 


May 
May 


24. 
30. 


May 
May 
May 


30. 
30. 
30. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

Men. 

Mechanic Arts High School, parade to East Newton 

Street Armory 15 

Funeral of Patrolman Robert Fennell . _ . . 108 
Grand Clan of Massachusetts, Order of Scottish Clans, 

parade 20 

Boston Post Office employees' parade and memorial 

Mass at Cathedral of the Holy Cross ... 21 
Boston Common, dedication of General Douglas 

MacArthur Mall 26 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 24, 1942 162 
Kearsarge Association of Naval Veterans, parade and 

exercises on Boston Common 30 

Boston Park Department cemeteries on Memorial Day, 31 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 260 
Memorial Day Services at St. Joseph's Cemetery, 
under auspices of Boston Police Post, No. 1018, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and Boston Police Post, 

No. 251, American Legion 158 

Funeral of Patrolman Max Augustin .... 48 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade 278 

Funeral of Patrolman Felix F. Sharkey ... 48 

Boston Arena, "Junior Victory Army" jamboree 40 

Parade, Boston School Cadets . 628 

" War Heroes' Day " parade 911 

"War Heroes" reception on Boston Common . . 310 

Flag Day parade and exercises on Boston Common . 197 

Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises . . 33 

Dorchester, Dorchester Day parade . . . . 361 
Statler Hotel, ball sponsored by Police Commissioner 

Joseph F. Timilty for service men .... 65 
June 16. Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day cele- 
brations, concessions, street patrol and traffic duty, 134 
June 17. Funeral of Patrolman Horace J. Thibault . . 103 
June 17. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade . . 420 
June 17. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, conces- 
sions, street patrol, traffic duty, sports and band 

concerts 389 

June 20. West Roxbury, Holy Name Athletic Association road 

race 33 

City of Boston Army "blackout" test .... 982 

Funeral of Patrolman Henry F. Suprenard ... 48 
Braves' Field, Army and Navy Relief Fund baseball 

game 25 

Boston Common, U. S. .^rmy display of equipment 

and drill 18 

"Night Before," Independence Day, various band 

concerts 32 

Boston Common, U. S. Army display of equipment 

and drill 18 



June 


1. 


June 


1. 


June 


6. 


June 


6. 


June 


7. 


June 


10. 


June 


10. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 


June 


14. 



June 


23. 


June 


25. 


June 


25. 


July 


3. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 



72 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1942. 




July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


5. 


July 


10. 


July 


11. 


July 


12. 


July 


13. 


July 


14. 


July 


17. 


July 


17. 


July 


20. 



Men. 



July 21. 

July 23. 
July 24. 
July 31. 

Aug. 2. 
Aug. 5. 

Aug. 10. 
Aug. 12. 

Aug. 16. 

Aug. 19. 

Aug. 20. 
Aug. 20. 

Aug. 22. 
Aug. 24. 
Aug. 25. 
Aug. 26. 

Aug. 26. 
Aug. 28. 
Aug. 29. 
Aug. 31. 
Sept. 1. 
Sept. 2. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



City of Boston official flag-raising and Independence 

Day parade 

Franklin Field, N. E. A. A. U. meet 

Independence Day celebration, various band concerts 

and Community Festival on Boston Common 
Chinese Patriotic Association parade . 
North End, Snowhill playground, block dance 
Suffolk Downs race track, East Boston, Army and 

Navy Relief Fund horse races .... 
Roxbury, John J. Connolly playground, track meet 
Funeral of Patrolman William J. Dooley 
City of Boston Army "blackout" test . 
Funeral of Patrolman Robert J. Remmes 
Boston Common, U. S. War Bond Drive 
Visit of Her Royal Highness, Queen Wilhelmina of the 

Netherlands 

Visit of Her Royal Highness, Queen Wilhelmina of the 

Netherlands 

Funeral of Patrolman Gerard M. Stone, retired 
Funeral of Patrolman Henry C. Elliott, retired 
Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

U. S. Coast Guard parade 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties " variety show 

Funeral of Lieutenant John C. Blake 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

James P. Welch Post, American Legion, parade anc 

exercises 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

Funeral of Patrolman Warren C. Perkins . 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department playgrounc 

circus 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Hughes, retired . 
Fens Stadiun, Boston Park Department boxing show. 
Symphony Hall, induction of U. S. Navy recruits 
Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

North End, Snowhill playground, block dance 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department boxing show 

Boston Arena, boxing show for service men 

Funeral of Patrolman Maurice B. MiUett 

Boston Common, U. S. War Bond drive 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. O'Leary 

Berkeley street, block party sponsored by Boston 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Committee . . . . 



18 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



73 



1942. 

Sept. 6. 
Sept. 7. 
Sept. 8. 
Sept. 10. 

Sept. 10. 

Sept. 12. 

Sept. 13. 

Sept. 14. 



Sept. 


15. 


Sept. 


18. 


Sept. 


19. 


Sept. 


20. 


Sept. 


23. 


Sept. 


26. 


Sept. 


27. 


Sept. 


27. 


Sept. 


28. 


Sept. 


29. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


16 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


25 


Oct. 


25 


Oct. 


27 


Oct. 


30 


Oct. 


31 



West Roxbury, vicinity of Jewish cemeteries 
Boston Common, Labor Day exercises 

City of Boston "blackout'' test 

Fenway Park, Boston Park Department final baseball 

game 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine 

ties" variety show 

Visit of Dorothy Lamour, screen star, in connection 

with U. S. War Bond Drive 
Visit of Dorothy Lamour, screen star, and U. S. War 

Bond Drive on Boston Common 
Visit of Dorothy Lamour, screen star, and personal 

appearance at the Metropolitan Theatre 

State Primary 

Funeral of Patrolman James E. Halligan, retired 
Funeral of Patrolman Thomas A. Gibbs, retired 
Canadian Legion of the British Empire Service League 

parade 

Air-raid Alert 

Harvard- Navy football game 
Boston Garden, "Wings for Norway," under aus- 
pices of the Swedish-American Drive, Ihc. 
Various Boston Park Department football games 
Braves' Field, .Air-raid precaution demonstration 
Braves' Field, Air-raid precaution demonstration 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company Fall 

parade 

Harvard-Pennsylvania football game . 

Boston Fire Department fire prevention parade 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Special City Election in Ward 14 . 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Hanlon 

Boston Common, Boston Committee on Public Safety 

demonstration 

Harvard-William and Mary football game . 
City of Boston Columbus Day parade . 
Various Boston Park Department football games 
Improved Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of 

the World parade 

Funeral of Patrolman James W. Schroeder . 

Harvard-Dartmouth football game 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Funeral of Patrolman William J. O'Connell 

Harvard- West Point football game 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Statler Hotel, ball sponsored by Police Commissione 

Joseph F. Timilty for servicemen 
Boston Common, Navy Day exercises . 

Rodoo parade 

Harvard-Princeton football game 



Men. 
20 
15 

1,042 

20 

32 

25 

105 

50 

2,122 

10 

10 

53 

886 
32 

48 
26 
45 
45 

38 

32 
306 

26 
104 

48 

20 

32 

459 

26 

42 
77 
32 
26 
77 
32 
26 

115 
12 
50 
32 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1942. 




Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


18. 


Nov. 


19. 


Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


24. 


Nov. 


28. 


Nov. 


28. 


Nov. 


29. 



Halloween celebration 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Boston Opera House and Symphony Hall, political 
rallies 

State election 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Parade, Suffolk County Council, American Legion 

Boston Common, Cit}'^ of Boston Armistice Day exer- 
cises and U. S. Army exhibition and display of army 
equipment 

Harvard-Brown football game 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Fordham football game 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph T. Kowalik . 

Community Fund opening parade 

Symphony Hall, address delivered by Price Adminis 
trator Leon Henderson 

Funeral of Patrolman Percj' F. Manton 

Various Boston Park Department football games 

Cit}' of Boston "daylight air-raid" test 

Funeral of Patrolman John M. Conroy 

Funeral of Sergeant Daniel L. Donahue 

Boston Garden, "Boston Traveler Junior Commando 
rally" 

Fenway Park, Boston College-Holy Cross footba 
game 

Fenway Park, Boston Park Department final footba 
game 



11 



Men. 

968 
26 

30 

2,083 

22 

732 



35 
32 
16 
10 

48 
39 

24 

48 

10 

503 

48 
48 

49 

32 

37 



Note. — February 20 to March 4, inclusive, 1942 (Sundays excepted) ^ 
132 officers performed a total of 132 duties for that period in 
connection with the so-called garment workers' strike, in 
Division 4. 

March 16 to March 21, inclusive, 1942, 12 officers performed a 
total of 72 duties for that period in connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society Flower Show at Mechanics 
Building. 

May 4 to May 7, inclusive, 128 officers performed a total of 
128 duties for that period at various schools selected as local 
protected depositories in connection with the "Sugar Card" 
registration. 

May 11 to July 18, inclusive, 1942 (Sundays excepted), 9 officers 
performed a total of 540 duties for that period directing traffic 
during the horse races at Suffolk Downs race track in East 
Boston. 

September 24 to September 25, inclusive, 1942, 10 officers per- 
formed a total of 20 duties for that period at the office of the 
Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during 
recount of ballots cast at the State Primary. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 75 

October 26 to November 4, inclusive, 1942, 8 officers performed 
a total of 72 duties for that period at the office of the City 
Collector, City Hall Annex, in connection with collection of 
taxes. 

November 12 to November 13, inclusive, 12 officers performed a 
total of 24 duties for that period at the office of the Board of 
Election Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during recount of 
ballots cast at the State Election. 

November 18 to November 20, inclu-sive, 1942, 46 officers per- 
formed a total of 138 duties for that period at various schools 
in connection with the distribution of fuel oil ration coupons. 

November 28 to November 30, inclusive, 1942, 930 officers per- 
formed a total of 930 duties for that period in connection with 
the "Cocoanut Grove Restaurant" fire disaster. 



76 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 



[Jan. 



1939-40. 



1940-41. 



1941-42. 



Abandoned children cared for 

Accidents reported 

Buildings found open and made secure 

Cases investigated 

Dangerous buildings reported 
Dangerous chimneys reported 
Dead bodies recovered and cared for . 
Defective cesspools reported .... 
Defective drains and vaults reported . 
Defective fire alarms and clocks reported . 
Defective gas pipes reported .... 
Defective hydrants reported .... 
Defective lamps reported .... 
Defective sewers reported .... 
Defective streets and walks reported . 
Defective water pipes reported 
Disturbances suppressed .... 

Extra duties performed 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished 

Insane persons taken in charge 
Intoxicated persons assisted . . . . 
Lodgers at station houses .... 

Lost children restored 

Number of persons committed to bail 
Persons rescued from drowning 
Sick and injured persons assisted . 
Stray teams reported and put up . 
Street obstructions removed . . . . 
Water running to waste reported . 
Witnesses detained 



9 


12 


8,663 


8,062 


2,831 


2,957 


69,549 


66,497 


96 


69 


23 


27 


613 


574 


16 


19 


28 


16 


7 


12 


23 


28 


46 


30 


7,955 


3,834 


178 


88 


2,173 


3,247 


167 


168 


1,227 


1,088 


47,544 


45,520 


5,617 


6,480 


707 


840 


561 


562 


371 


377 


270 


231 


1,769 


1,662 


709 


3,291 


28 


42 


10,965 


10,590 


29 


19 


54 


83 


854 


515 


2 


2 



50 

6,724 

2,534 

67,795 

91 

39 

807 

56 

29 

21 

30 

51 

2,782 

120 

2,405 

56 

1,077 

31,172 

4,989 

741 

580 

452 

9,736 

1,764 

2,714 

37 

11,255 

28 

100 

572 

6 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



77 



CITY PRISON. 

The City Prison is located in the new Court-House building, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses, the prosecution of 
which is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court 
(criminal session), new Court-House building, are conveyed, if 
in fit condition, to the City Prison and, unless otherwise 
released, are held in charge of the keeper until the next session 
of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1941, to November 30, 1942, 
17,966 were committed to the City Prison for the following: 



Drunkenness . 

Suspicious persons 

Violation of Rules and Regulations of the Park Commission 

For safe keeping 

Ijarceny 

Assault and battery . . 

Non-support 

Violation of probation .... 

Default 

Adultery 

Fornication 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law 

Lewdness 

Illegal gaming 

Vagrancy 

Violation of drug law 

Soliciting alms 

Miscellaneous 



Total 



16,771 

366 

221 

116 

80 

48 

34 

32 

31 

29 

21 

20 

19 

16 

14 

9 

9 

4 

126 

17,966 



Lodgers received at the City Prison for period, December 1, 
1941, to November 30, 1942, numbered to 538. 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court-House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They are 
then held in charge of the matron until the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 3,444 were committed for the following: 



Drunkenness . 

Idle and disorderly 

Fornication . 

Adultery 

Larceny 

Assault and battery 

Night walking 

Keeping house of ill fame 

Violation of liquor law 

Various other causes . 

Total 



2,495 

259 

77 

58 

35 

16 

12 

9 

1 

482 

3,444 



From municipal court 
From county jail . 

Grand Total . 



Recommitments. 



40 
11 

3,495 



ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS. 
For damage to police property there was collected by the 
City Collector and credited to this Department, $2,831.58. 



1943.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 79 



POLICE SIGNAL BOX SERVICE. 
Signal Boxes. 

The total number of boxes in use is 566. Of these 480 are 
connected with the underground system and 86 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
1,400 trouble calls; inspected 566 signal boxes; 16 signal desks; 
18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs have 
been made on 96 box movements; 16 registers; 75 locks; 15 
time stamps; 20 vibrator bells; 45 relays; 8 electric fans. This 
Unit has the installing and maintenance of all electric wiring and 
equipment at all stations and Headquarters building. There 
have been made 120 plungers; 120 box fittings; 120 line blocks; 
8 automatic hooks; and 348 street-obstruction horses. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 584 
telephone, and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Box Service Unit supervises all telephone and 
teletype installations and minor teletype repairs throughout 
the Department. It also maintains 44 Headquarters-to- 
station-house telephone circuits, 18 teletype-writer circuits, 
18 radio-wired broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits, 
a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank station of the 
Metropolitan District Police; also a circuit, with equipment, in 
booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel, and the 
inter-communications units throughout the Department. 

All patrol-box telephone, signal and blinker-light repairs are 
made by Signal Box Service members. 

The Unit also takes care of all police-traffic booths, taxi- 
cab signs and street-obstruction signs, and 25 new traffic 
booths purchased during the year. 

New signal desks and P. B. X. switchboards are installed at 
all station houses in connection with the Police Signal System 
over Department-owned lines. 

There are assigned to the Unit 1 GMC truck, 2|-ton capacity; 
2 utility trucks, |-ton capacity, each; 1 four-door Ford sedan; 
and 1 GMC service truck, |-ton capacity. 



80 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following list comprises the property of the Signal 
Service maintenance at the present time: 

16 open-circuit, blinker-type sig- 17 batterj^-charging units 

nal P.B.X desks 777,500 feet of underground cable 

716 circuits 182,000 feet of overhead cable 

48 test boxes 33,400 feet of duct 

400 cells of sulphuric acid storage- 77 manholes 

type battery 22 motor-generator sets 

2,312 taxicab signs 18 motor-driven flashers 

50 traffic booths 3 GMC trucks 

566 police signal boxes 1 Ford truck 

1 Ford sedan 

Communications System. 

The Signal Box Service Unit is responsible for the main- 
tenance of the signal system of the Department. 

During the year, one signal box was moved to a new location, 
several miles of cable were placed underground in conformance 
with law, two overhead signal boxes were transferred to under- 
ground construction, and two signal boxes established on 
Division 14, Brighton district. 

Officers' Recall and Citizens' Alarm features are now installed 
in all police divisions and patrol boxes in the city. Individual 
line telephone service for each patrol box has been found 
advantageous and now all signal boxes are so equipped. 

New cable and cable joints were installed by the signal 
service at a great saving in cost to the Department. 

Seven thousand four hundred and eighteen feet of cable were 
installed, replacing some of the old cable retained in the new 
system. 

Six signal boxes, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new equipment. 

Twelve taxicab signs, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new signs. 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



HARBOR SERVICE. 

The special duties performed by the harbor police, styled 
Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were 
as follows: 



Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 
stages, etc 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 

Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 
stream 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the water front 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 

Number of boats challenged 

Number of boats searched for contraband 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted . 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of dead bodies recovered 

Number rescued from drowning .... 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oil 
in harbor 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge 

Number of dead bodies cared for .... 

Number of hours grappling 



.S74,050 

500 

70 

21 

17 

140 

6 

103 

91 

18 

2,202 

10 

20 

7 

960 

1,082 

1,142 

7 

15 

10 

255 



Information as to the number of vessels arriving in this port, 
usually inserted in this part of the annual report, is not to be 
included this year, for reasons deemed advisable. 



82 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PATROL SERVICE. 

A patrol service was maintained by the patrol boat "Argus" 
in Dorchester Bay and harbor, daily and nightly, from Castle 
Island to Neponset Bridge, from May 30, 1942, to October 
31, 1942. In connection with this service, there were 520 
cases investigated, 21 boats challenged for contraband, 425 
cases where assistance was rendered to boats in distress by 
reason of disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., 4 dead bodies 
were recovered, 4 boats were Qrdered to put out sailing lights, 
60 hours w^ere spent in grappling, 6 persons were rescued from 
drowning, 25 boats were warned about speeding amongst boats, 
350 obstructions removed from channel, 18 fire alarms attended, 
and 9 arrests for various violations. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police 
patrol boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "William H. Pierce," 
and the "William H. McShane," in the upper and lower har- 
bors. Mystic river, Chelsea creek, Fort Point channel, and 
the L street channel. 

A 19-foot speed boat acquired by the Department in 1938 
has been used in the investigation of cases and in special patrol 
duty in the Fort Point channel, L street channel, and Chelsea 
creek, without opening the drawbridges at any tide. 

A Dodge Marine LTtility speed boat, equipped with an in- 
halator, stretcher and grappling irons, patrolled the Charles 
river in the vicinity of the Spring street bridge. West Roxbury, 
from May 9 to October 14, 1942. 



HORSES. 

On November 30, 1942, there were 22 saddle horses in the 
service, all attached to Division 16. 

During the year no horses were purchased nor were any 
retired to farms, or disposed of otherwise. 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



VEHICLE SERVICE. 
There are 134 automobiles in the service at the present time : 
42 attached to Headquarters; 5 attached to the Traffic Divi- 
sion; 16 in the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3 
and 4; 6 in the South Boston district, attached to Division 6; 
6 in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7 ; 1 1 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 6 in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 4 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 6 in the Brighton 
district, attached to Division 14; 4 in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; 5 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 5 in the West Roxbury district, 
attached to Division 17; 5 in the Hyde Park district, attached 
to Division 18; 6 in the Mattapan district, attached to Division 
19, and 7 unassigned. (See page 85 for distribution of auto- 
mobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 
General repairs and replacement of parts .... 

Storage 

Gasoline 

Oil and grease 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses, etc. 
Registration fees 

Total 

Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 



$32,131 


26 


188 00 


44,614 


68 


2,332 


41 


460 


31 


15 


00 


.$79,741 


66 



City Hospital 










7,431 


Calls where services were not required 










1,306 


Southern Mortuary .... 










610 


Psychopathic Hospital 










305 


Massachusetts General Hospital 










249 


Morgue 










233 


Home 










221 


Boston State Hospital 










210 


Carried forward 










10,565 



84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Brought forward 
Carney Hospital 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
Children's Hospital 
Police Station Houses . 
City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) 
United States Naval Hospital 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 
United States Marine Hospital . 
Forest Hills Hospital 
Beth Israel Hospital 
Faulkner Hospital 
Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 
New England Hospital for Women 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital 
VVinthrop Community Hospital 
Washingtonian Home . 
St. Margaret's Hospital 
Boston Lying-in Hospital . 
Brooks Hospital 
Deaconess Hospital 
Audubon Hospital 
Kenmore Hospital 
Palmer Memorial Hospital 
Physicians' offices 
Somerville Hospital 
Cambridge Relief Hospital 
Deer Island Hospital . 
Fort Banks Hospital . 
Harley Hospital . 
New England Baptist Hospital 
Newton City Hospital 
Strong Hospital 

Total .... 



10,565 

111 

108 

102 

73 

64 

63 

62 

47 

45 

42 

24 

19 

17 

11 

8 

7 

4 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 



11,398 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



LIST OF VEHICLES USED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 



Divisions. 











o m 










. 














C 3 








ox: 


^ 












1 


x^-a 


^ 


f-1 

s 


l§ 


H 






u* 




O 


cu 


H 


^ 



Headquarters 


- 


33 


9 


1 


43 


Division 1 


2 


2 


- 


- 


4 


Division 2 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Division 3 


1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Division 4 


3 


3 


- 


- 


6 


Division 6 


2 


4 


- 


3 


9 


Division 7 


2 


4 


- 


4 


10 


Division 9 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 10 ..... 


2 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Division 11 


2 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Division 13 


1 


3 


- 


4 


8 


Division 14 


2 


4 


- 


4 


10 


Division 15 


1 


3 


- 


- 


4 


Division 16 


1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 17 


1 


4 


- 


2 


7 


Division 18 


1 


4 


- 


1 


6 


Division 19 


1 


5 


- 


- 


6 


Traffic Division 


- 


5 


- 


6 


11 


Unassigned 


4 


3 


- 


2 


9 


Totals 


28 


97 


9 


27 


161 



86 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

HACKNEY CARRIAGES. 

During the police year, December 1, 1941, to November 30, 
1942, there were 1,859* Hcenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages granted, being an increase of 142 as compared with 
last year. 

During the year ending November 30, 1942, there were 31 
horse-drawn vehicles granted; 14 of these were subsequently 
regranted to motor-driven hackney carriages; leaving a total 
of 17 horse-drawn vehicles licensed. (These figures are included 
in the table of "Hackney Carriage Licenses" shown below.) 

There were 92 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, hand- 
bags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Seventy- 
one of these were restored to the owners and the balance of 21 
placed in the custody of the Lost Property Division of the 
Property Clerk's Office. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1942, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. {To Set Up and Use the Vehicle.) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 1,859 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" and "new" applications 

and "changes of ownership") 1,582 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 277 

1,859 



Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 417 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 177 

Carriage licenses revoked 7 

Carriage license revocations rescinded 7 

Carriage owners stripped of credentials 1 

Carriage licenses transferred to new garage locations ... 3 
Carriage licenses in effect at end of police year, November 30, 
1942, licensed since February 1, 1942 (beginning of hackney 
carriage license year) — (excludes number canceled in favor 

of "changes of ownership") 1,369 

Carriages inspected 1,277 

* 277 "regrants." 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 87 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 3,686 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after inves- 
tigation 21 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected ... 27 

— 48 



Drivers' licenses granted 3,638 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 50; of which revocations, 28 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored, — leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 22 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1942 (at end of police 
year), — (licensed since February 1, 1942, beginning of 

hackney carriage driver license year) *3,519 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials . 475 

Replacement of drivers' badges 61 

Complaints against owners, drivers and "set ups" investigated . 2,536 

Days spent in court 63 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 47 

Limitation of Hackney Carriage Licenses. 

Under provisions of Section 4, Chapter 392, Acts of 1930, as 
amended by Section 1, Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, the PoUce 
Commissioner was required to fix a Hmit for the number of 
hackney carriage hcenses to be issued, which limit shall be 
based upon the number of licenses then issued and outstanding 
but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and he may from time to 
time, after reasonable notice and hearing, decrease the number 
so fixed, but in no event to number less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner, July 20, 
1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

Subsequently, the Police Commissioner, after publication of 
reasonable notice in the Boston daily newspapers and after 
public hearing, November 28, 1939, by General Order to the 
Department, announced (effective as of January 6, 1940), that 
the limit for the number of hackney carriages to be issued under 
the reference in law herein set out was decreased to 1,200; 
provided, however, that the announcement shall not affect, in 
any way, the rights of any existing licensee to renewal of his 
license under provisions of said amending section. 

The Police Commissioner further announced in said subse- 
quent General Order, effective as of January 6, 1940, that 
hackney carriage licenses may be granted to the number here- 

* Includes 25 Female Hackney Carriage Drivers. 



88 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

tofore established (1,525), except that no further original licenses 
shall be granted until the number of hackney carriage licenses 
outstanding shall have been reduced to less than 1,200 by can- 
celation or revocation or the failure of holders of licenses to 
apply for renewals, and thereafter hackney licenses may be 
granted only up to a total not exceeding 1,200. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license by 
reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses limited 
under the Act, with amendment, referred to, has been issued, 
the Department of Public Utilities, on petition of such appli- 
cant, may after a hearing determine that public convenience 
and necessity require a higher limit than that jQxed by the 
Police Commissioner or previously established by said Depart- 
ment, and shall establish the limit so required, in W'hich case 
the limit set by said Department shall be considered final until 
changed as herein provided. 

Abolishing Special and Public Hackney Carriage Stands. 

In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938,— 

"An Act with Relation to Public Stands for the 
Use of Taxicabs and Motor Vehicles for Hire in 
Cities ....," 

accepted by the City of Boston, the Police Commissioner as of 
February 11, 1939, at 7.45 o'clock, a. m., abolished all special 
and public hackney carriage stands, granted in accordance with 
Chapter 392, Acts of 1930. 

Establishing Public Taxicab Stands. 

In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, referred to, 
the Police Commissioner as of February 11, 1939, at 7.45 
o'clock, a. m., established public taxicab stands in the City of 
Boston, which stands are free and accessible to all taxicabs 
whose owners are licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

(See list of public taxicab stands on file in the office of In- 
spector of Carriages.) 

During the police year, December 1, 1941, to November 30, 
1942, there were 10 public taxicab stands, with capacity for 
38 cabs, established, and 13 public taxicab stands, with ca- 
pacity for 53 cabs, abolished, and 1 public taxicab stand for 
2 cabs increased to 4-cab capacity. 

There are 489 established public taxicab stands, with 
capacity for 1,260 cabs, at the present time. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 89 

During the police year, December 1, 1941, to November 30, 
1942, there were 10 public stands for horse-drawn vehicles, 
with capacity for 10 vehicles established. 

Hackney Carriage Licenses Granted. 
The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present 
is 1,369 as compared with 1,332 in the previous year; this 
number being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts 
of 1934. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon private 
property) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 22 applications (capacity 357 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Section 1 of Chapter 399 of the Acts 
of 1931, which went into, effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight- 
seeing automobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this 
act, shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one 
of chapter ninety of the General Laws, used for the carry- 
ing for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 
in or from the City of Boston and in or on which auto- 
mobile guide service by the driver or other person is 
offered or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a sight- 
seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless said 
automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, and 
unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department of 
Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public convenience 
and necessity require such operation; and further, it is provided 
that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate said automobile 
as a driver in or from said city unless he is licensed so to do. 



90 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following statement gives details concerning motor- 
driven and horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles and stands: 

Sight-Seeing Vehicles and Stands. 

Motor-driven sight-seeing vehicles granted 5 

Motor-driven sight-seeing vehicles suspended 5 

Change from motor-driven to horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles 5 

Horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles granted 5 

Sight-seeing stands for motor-driven vehicles granted ... 5 

Sight-seeing stands for motor-driven vehicles revoked ... 5 

Sight-seeing stands for horse-drawn vehicles granted ... 2 

Continuing with our practice, "new" sight-seeing automo- 
bile drivers for the year commencing as of March 1, 1942, were 
fingerprinted as in the case of "new" hackney carriage drivers, 
and their records, if any, searched for in the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were two sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violation of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year, 
4,291 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Four hundred seventy-five penalties were imposed, and 50 
revocations were made, the remainder being reprimanded and 
warned and a record filed for future reference. This system of 
discipline has continued to result in relieving courts of many 
minor cases which would tend to congest their dockets. 

There still continues to be a minimum of crime among the 
3,519 drivers licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

Appeal Board. 

In accordance with Hackney Carriage Rules and Regula- 
tions, hackney carriage drivers and owners dissatisfied with 
findings of the Inspector of Carriages, have the right of appeal 
to the Commissioner, provided appeal is made in writing within 
forty-eight hours of date of finding. 

Such appeals are heard by an Appeal Board, consisting of a 
Deputy Superintendent of Police and two Captains, designated 
by the Commissioner. 

Hearings on such appeals shall be public; the appellant shall 
have the right to be represented by counsel, to introdvice 
evidence and to cross-examine witnesses. 



1943.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 91 

The Board shall file its report and recommendations with 
the Commissioner who takes such action thereon as he deems 
advisable. 

In accordance with such provision, many matters of appeal 
from imposition of penalties (as well as fitness of applicants 
for hackney carriage drivers' licenses whose applications had 
been rejected) were referred by the Commissioner to the Board. 

Supervisory Force. 

Since February 11, 1939, when public taxicab stands were 
established in accordance with the law, and then existing 
special and public hackney carriage stands abolished, the super- 
visory force of the office of Inspector of Carriages (now con- 
solidated W'ith the Traffic Division) enforced rules and regula- 
tions of this Department relating to conduct at and occupancy 
of public taxicab stands by licensed hackney carriage drivers. 

In addition, during the past year such supervisory force has 
been very busy in the Blue Hill avenue section of Boston, 
suppressing activities of taxicab operators who engage in illegal 
practice of bringing so-called "loads" to the intown section of 
the city, in violation of Section 1, Chapter 408, Acts of 1931, 
which reads as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any public way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for hire 
in such a manner as to afford a means of transportation 
similar to that afforded by a railway company, by in- 
discriminately receiving and discharging passengers along 
the route on which the vehicle is operated or may be 
running ..." 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum, and the procedure will be followed continuously 
until such illegal practice has ceased. 

Wagon Licenses. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year, 70 applications for such licenses were 
received and granted. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 



92 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued : 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was "Not at 
a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 70 granted, 40 were for licenses from offices, garages, 
stables or order boxes, and 30 were for designated stands in the 
highway. 

Note. 

Legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 
for hire: 

Chapter 122, Acts of 1937; effective June 21, 1937. 

"No person holding a certificate (common carrier) or a 
permit (contract carrier) issued under the provisions of 
(Chapter 264, Acts of 1934, by the Department of Pubhc 
Utilities) and authorizing the transportation of property 
for hire by motor vehicle within the City of Boston shall 
be required to obtain a license from the Police Commis- 
sioner for said city on account of such transportation or 
the use of motor vehicles therein." 

The legislation referred to did not affect customary pro- 
cedure of this Department in issuing a "wagon" license for a 
horse-drawn vehicle or for a handcart to convey merchandise 
for hire. 

A motor vehicle for which there has been issued a certificate 
or permit by the Department of Public Utilities, authorizing 
transportation for hire, shall not be required to be also licensed 
by the Police Commissioner on account of such transportation 
for hire in this city. 

However, should it be intended to locate such motor vehicle 
at a designated stand in the highway in the business of trans- 
portation for hire, the owner thereof, to lawfully occupy such 
designated stand, has no alternative but to take out a "wagon" 
license to be granted by the Police Commissioner. 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Ye.\r. 


Canvass. 


1903* 


181,045 


1923 ... 


477,547 


1904 .... 


193,195 


1924 .... 


485,677 


1905 .... 


194,547 


1925 .... 


489,478 


1906 .... 


195,446 


1926 .... 


493,415 


1907 .... 


195,900 


1927 .... 


495,767 


1908 .... 


201,552 


1928 ..... 


491,277 


1909 ... 


201,391 


1929 .... 


493,250 


1910 t 


203,603 


1930 .... 


502,101 


1911 .... 


206,825 


1931 .... 


500,986 


1912 .... 


214,178 


1932 .... 


499,758 


1913 .... 


215,388 


1933 .... 


.501,175 


1914 .... 


219,364 


1934 .... 


502,936 


1915 


220,883 


1935 II . . . 


509,703 


1916 1 




1936 .... 


514,312 


1917 .... 


221,207 


1937 .... 


520,838 


1918 .... 


224,012 


1938 .... 


529,905 


1919 .... 


227,466 


1939 .... 


534,230 


1920 .... 


235,248 


1940 .... 


531,010 


1921 § . . . 


480,783 


1941 .... 


541,335 


1922 .... 


480,106 







* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

t 1916 listing done hy Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

II 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of .\pril 1. 

The following shows the total iiuml)er of persons listed in 
January of the present year: 



Male 
Female 



263,905 
285,503 



Total 



539,408 



94 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
20 years of age or more, not including the services rendered by 
members of the poHce force, were as follows : 

Printing police list $44,090.70 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list . . 12,428.00 

Newspaper notices 1,278.67 

Circulars and pamphlets 210.00 

Stationery 42.50 

Telephone rental 59.28 

Directory 15.00 

Cartage 57.50 

Total . . . . ■ $58,181.65 



Number of Policemen Employed In Listing. 



January 2 
January 3 
January 4 
January 5 
January 6 
January 7 
January 8 
January 9 
January 10 
January 11 
January 12 
January 13 
January 14 
January 15 
January 16 
January 17 
January 18 
January 19 
January 20 
January 21 
January 22 
January 23 



329 

326 

95 

308 

306 

317 

308 

293 

284 

81 

243 

235 

220 

183 

167 

111 

8 

78 

71 

17 

4 

4 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascertain- 
ing the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



95 



The police findings in 1942 may be summarized as follows: 



Dead or could not be found in Boston .... 


2,268 


Physically incapacitated 


209 


Convicted of crime 


279 


Unfit for various reasons 


1,182 


Apparently fit 


8,613 


Total 


12,551 



In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent to 
the Police Department for delivery 8,613 summonses to persons 
for jury .service. 



96 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



SPECIAL POLICE. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of 
any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1942, were fingerprinted by 
the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, if 
any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

During the year ending November 30, 1942, there were 
2,290 special police officers appointed; 7 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause; 16 appointments were 
canceled for non-payment of license fee; 263 appointments 
were canceled for other reasons; 3 appointments revoked for 
cause; and there were 11 applications either withdrawn or on 
which no action was taken. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 



From corporations and associations . 

From theatres and other places of amusement 

From City Departments 

From United States Government 

From State Departments 

From churches . . . . ■> 

From private institutions . 

Total 



1,514 

301 

234 

143 

48 

27 

23 

2,290 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



MUSICIANS' LICENSES. 
Itinerant, 

During the year there were 18 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, one of which was subsequently 
canceled on account of nonpayment of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April of each year. 

During the year 18 instruments w^ere inspected with the 
following: results: 



Kind of Instrument. 



Number 
Inspected. 



Number 



Hand organs 
Street pianos 
Accordions 
Clarinet 
Guitar 

Totals . 




18 



18 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Yeak. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1938 


227 


227 




1939 


161 


161 


- 


1940 


137 


136 


1 


1941 


98 


98 


- 


1942 


65 


65 


- 



98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS. 
The following return shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused and the number revoked: 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1938 .... 


2,629 


2,446 


183 


2 


1939 .... 


2,618 


2,520 


98 


4 


1940 .... 


2,611 


2,467 


144 


3 


1941 .... 


2,775 


2,632 


143 


5 


1942 .... 


4,030 


* t 3,863 


167 


5 



* 89 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 25 licenses to possess machine guns. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Sections 33 to 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Tercen- 
tenary Edition), and the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated: 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis Street 


34,782 


8 Pine Street 


67,091 


79 Shawmut Avenue 


9,757 


Total 


111,630 



1943.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 99 



MISCELLANEOUS LICENSES. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 27,804. Of these 212 were rejected; 36 were 
withdrawn or no action taken, leaving a balance of 27,556 
which were granted. 

Of the granted applications, 121 were canceled for non- 
payment, leaving in force a net of 27,435, granted "with" 
and "without" fee. 

During the year 85 licenses were transferred, 1,072 canceled 
for various reasons and 74 revoked or suspended. 

The officers investigated 3,091 complaints arising under these 
licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the. city treasury amounted 
to $72,565.75. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1941, there were 311 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 18 died, viz.: 2 captains, 2 sergeants, 
12 patrolmen, 1 civilian (formerly Director of Signal Service) 
and 1 annuitant. Forty-eight were added, viz. : 2 lieutenants, 
7 sergeants, 37 patrolmen, the widow of Patrolman Luke A. 
Farley, who died from disability received in the performance of 
duty, and the widow of Patrolman James G. McCann, who 
also died from disability received in the performance of duty, 
leaving 341 on the roll at date, 296 pensioners and 45 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $378,146.90, and it is estimated that 
$407,335.83 will be required for pensions and annuities in 1943. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 53 beneficiaries of the Fund at the 
present time and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$7,604.50 during the past year. 



100 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



FINANCIAL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and annuities, listing residents, twenty 
years of age or more, and the maintenance of the police signal 
service were $5,969,528.12. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $57,545.00. (See Table XVIII.) 

In addition to the above amount there was expended 
$6,289.01 for Work Rehef Materials for Pohce Department 
W. P. A. Projects. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the pohce have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., was 

),374.67. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(101) 






fc5 



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lillll-HCOiSII-HTOlllllll 

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llllll-H!N|C0iiOIIIIIIII 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 -H TO 1 O 1 1 O 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 l"l — 1 lOI 1 |(N|r^llN 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^H 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '-I t-( 1 1 1 


■uojiua^aQ 
' JO asnoH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 TO 1 


1 -nosiJj A%iQ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 — i — 1 1 O 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 -spjooaH JO nBaJng 


lllll«lllNil03|||||ll«3 


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IBUTunJQ jb nBaJng 


1 1 1 1 l-HTOOIOI lOjiOrtl 1 1 I'"*! 


•enot^BJadQ Jo nBaang 


llllilr^^iroiiMiiililll 


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llll'HNoqiMIOIIOOIIIIIIII 


•sjajJBnbpBajj 


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$8,000 

5,000 

3,000 

3,800 

7,000 

4,500 

4,000 

2,700 

2,700 

2,500 

2,300 

2,300 
1,600-2,100 

1,600 

2,100 

3,150 
1,600-1,800 

1,600 

3,600 

1,200 
1,000-3,600 


o 

H 
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Si 
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« 


^^ 


3 


Commissioner 

Assistant Secretary 

Superintendent .... 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 

Lieutenant-Inspector 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Aide 
Patrolmen and Aides 
Patrolman (Supervisor of Stable) 
Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen 

Chauffeurs 

Chauffeur and Laborer (Military Subst 
Chief Inventory Clerk . , , , 

Cleaners 

Clerks 



r-iOt»"50500Mt-t~C^— i-HC<3>Ot-.C0'-H<O-<-H-H-H 






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104 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1942. 


Nov. 30, 
1942. 


Jan. 1, 
1942. 


Nov. 30, 
1942. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Assistant Secretary . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendents . 


5 


5 


5 


5 


- 


Captains .... 


30 


30 


27 


27 


- 


Lieutenants 


68 


68 


58 


62 


Plus 4 


Lieutenant-Inspectors 


2 


2 


2 


1 


Minus 1 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


185 


184 


Minus 1 


Patrolmen .... 


1,977 


1,977 


1,972 


1,970 


Minus 2 


Patrolwomen 


5 


5 


5 


5 


- 


Military Substitute Patrol- 
men 


- 


- 


5 


29 


Plus 24 


Totals .... 


2,278 


2,278 


2,263 


2,287 


Plus 24 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



105 



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106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. 
List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1942, gining Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years^ Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time of 
Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



Amelotte, Napoleon R 
Barthel, August H. 
Blaney, James F. 
Breed, Ferdinand E. 
Breen, Maurice A. 
Brogan, James E. * 
Brooks, Joseph, Jr. * 
Brown, Walter . 
Buckley, John J. . 
Burke, George W. * 
Burkinshaw, Walter J 
Callahan, Richard B. 
Conlan, Joseph E. * 
Crawford, Elmer R. 
Eldridge, Arthur E. 
Ellis, Albert E. . 
Fish, George M. . 
Fisher, Henry H. 
Flynn, Thomas J. 
Geary, Joseph T . 
Gonnella, John J. * 
Hennessey, Richard L. 
Higgins, Thomas S. * 
Jenkinson, William J. * 
Jensen, Rudolph E. 
Joyce, Thomas F. 
Kelly, Lester A. * 
Lawless, Edward C. 
Lynch, John 
Lyons, Martin J. 
MacRury, Chester A 



Incapacitated 

Age 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 



48 V; 

66 V 

65 V 
59 V: 

48 V: 
34 V! 

45 V: 

67 V: 

49 V 
45 V: 
52 V: 
47 Vi 
44 

45 V: 

50 V: 
44 »V: 
54 V: 
47 V: 
52 V: 
65 V: 

46 V: 

49 V: 

52 10/; 

40 V 

50 V 
44 V: 

41 "V 

51 V: 
54 'V: 

53 V 
52 



22 Vw years 

40 "/n " 

33 V12 " 

30 V12 " 

21 V12 " 
5 V12 " 

I8V12 " 

38 >Vi2 " 

22 V12 " 
15 1V12 " 

21 V12 " 

22 V12 " 

19 V12 " 
22 

22 Vi! " 

20 V12 " 
23 

21 " 
23 

32 V12 " 

15 V12 ■ 

21 V12 " 

18 V12 " 

16Vi2 " 

22 1V12 " 

21 V12 " 
13 V12 " 

22 2/,2 " 

21 V12 " 

22 V12 " 
22 iVi2 " 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



lor 



Table IV. — Concluded. 
List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
19Jt2y Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and ike Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time of 
Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Manning, Thomas J. . 


Incapacitated 


44 '/i2 years 


22 Vi2 years 


McCormick, Francis P. 






Incapacitated 


47 Vi2 " 


22 Vi2 " 


McCue, Joseph W. 






Incapacitated 


45 «/i2 " 


23 i/i2 " 


McEvOy, Murtagh T. 






Incapacitated 


49 "/i2 " 


23 


McGowan, Coleman F. 






Incapacitated 


55 «/i2 " 


23 


McGrath, Patrick M. 






Incapacitated 


48 Vi2 " 


22 Vi2 " 


McNeill, Charles M. . 






Incapacitated 


57 Vk " 


22 Vi2 " 


Moore, Charles E. 






Incapacitated 


54 Vi2 " 


20 Vi2 " 


Murphy, Stephen J. . 






Incapacitated 


60 Vi2 " 


30 i»/i2 " 


Nesky, Aleck 






Incapacitated 


50 Vi2 " 


21 Vl2 " 


O'Brien, Daniel J. 






Incapacitated 


49 Vi2 " 


21 


O'Reilly, Frank E. . 






Incapacitated 


47 >Vi2 " 


23 


Packard, Charles E. . 






Incapacitated 


47 10/12 " 


20 11/12 " 


Patterson, Herbert J. . 






Age 


60 


29 iVi2 " 


Pelletier, Arthur L. J. 






Incapacitated 


47 Vi2 " 


23 


Perelli, Charles A. 






Incapacitated 


45 Vi2 " 


22 3/l2 " 


Reagan, William R. * . 






Incapacitated 


45 Vi2 " 


16 Vl2 " 


Ridlon, Charles C. 






Age 


67 i/i2 " 


37 Vi2 " 


Roberts, Thomas C. * 






Incapacitated 


43 11/12 " 


14 Vl2 " 


Schumann, Philip E. . 






Incapacitated 


54 Vi2 " 


26 Vi2 " 


South worth, Richard . 






Incapacitated 


56 Vi2 " 


22 Vi2 " 


Stancar, John A. . 






Incapacitated 


48 


22 Vi2 " 


Sullivan, Francis W. . 






Incapacitated 


46 Vi2 " 


22 


Tighe, Charles H. * . 






Incapacitated 


40 Vi2 " 


14 2/l2 « 


Troy, Thomas A. 






Incapacitated 


44 Vi2 " 


20 Vi2 " 


Waugh, Orrington 






Age 


65 Vi2 " 


38 Vi2 " 


Wermers, Bernard F. . 






Incapacitated 


43 iVi2 " 


21 Vl2 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



108 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 
Officers who were Promoted during the Year ending November 

30, 19Jt2. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1942 




August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


August 


12 


September 16 



Sergeant Patrick J. O'Reilly to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Francis G. Wilson to rank of Lieutenant. • 
Sergeant John D. Ahern to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant John H. Cloran to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Dennis F. Dalton to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Charles J. Deignan to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Francis J. Hennessey to rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman Joseph W. Kiley to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Bernard W. Fay to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph J. Cunningham to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Robert A. Hayhurst to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Lancelot J. Mills to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William J. Condon to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward J. Fitzpatrick to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Walter J. Lutz to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Jacob M. Christensen to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William J. Killeen to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles H. Hoar to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward J. CurtLn to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Todd to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Leslie B. Bickford to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward L. Fenerty to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph E. Green to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward J. Galvin to rank of Sergeant. 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the end of the Present Year 
who were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 







c 
-0 














Date Appointed. 


C 
0) 

m 


1 

p 


'3 
a 

03 
U 


e 

0) 
3 

3 


II 

DM 

3 


C 

o 
M 

03 


53 


Totals. 


1903 .... 




1 


1 




_ 


1 


1 


4 


1904 . 






- 


1 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


4 


1905 . 






- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1906 . 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


1907 . 






- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


3 


8 


1908 . 






- 


- 


3 


3 


- 


3 


3 


12 


1909 . 






- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


2 


6 


1910 . 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1911 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


1912 . 






- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


1 


1 


6 


1913 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1914 . 






- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1916 . 






— 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


4 


1917 . 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1919 . 






1 


1 


12 


22 


— 


64 


383 


483 


1920 . 






- 


- 


3 


4 


- 


27 


120 


154 


1921 . 






- 


- 


_ 


6 


- 


13 


83 


102 


1922 . 






- 


— 


- 


3 


- 


12 


46 


61 


1923 . 






- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


12 


80 


95 


1924 . 






- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5 


54 


61 


1925 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


77 


86 


1926 . 






- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


14 


246 


264 


1927 . 






- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


7 


96 


106 


1928 . 






_ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


74 


77 


1929 . 






— 


_ 


— 


1 


- 


4 


176 


181 


1930 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


35 


36 


1931 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


15 


1937 . 






- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


185 


185 


1938 . 






- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1940 . 






— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


135 


135 


1941 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


58 


58 


1942 . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


93 


93 


Totals 


1 


5 


27 


62 


1 


184 


1,975 


2,255 


Note:— 2 


J Military 


Sub 


)stitute 


Patroln 


len, not 


includf 


3d. 









Table VII. 

Men on Police Force on November 30, 1942, who were Born in 

the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 



Date of Birth. 


0) 

■a 
c 








"i = 






Totals. 




0. 


II 


a 

O 


3 
s 

i 


S a 
3 


c3 

m 


J 

Eh 

|3h 




1873 .... 




_ 








1 


_ 


1 


1875 . 








- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1876 . 








- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


1877 . 








- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


3 


6 


1878 . 








- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


4 


2 


9 


1879 . 








_ 


- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


3 


7 


1880 . 








- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


1881 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


- 


6 


1882 . 








- 


1 


3 


3 


- 


- 


- 


7 


1883 . 








- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1884 . 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


2 


1 


5 


1885 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


12 


13 


1886 . 








- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


2 


23 


28 


1887 . 








- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


31 


35 


1888 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


40 


45 


1889 . 








- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


5 


56 


64 


1890 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


43 


46 


1891 , 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


6 


76 


84 


1892 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


11 


94 


109 


1893 . 








- 


- 


4 


6 


- 


19 


111 


140 


1894 . 








— 


_ 


1 


7 


- 


18 


120 


146 


1895 . 








- 


- 


1 


4 


- 


14 


127 


146 


1896 . 








- 


- 


4 


2 


- 


26 


133 


165 


1897 . 








1 


_ 


5 


3 


- 


26 


128 


163 


1898 . 








- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


16 


119 


141 


1899 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


9 


83 


93 


1900 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


8 


120 


130 


1901 . 








- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


2 


97 


102 


1902 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


49 


52 


1903 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


51 


53 


1904 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


32 


1905 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


30 


1906 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


33 


1907 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1908 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


37 


37 


1909 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


47 


47 


1910 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


52 


52 


1911 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


26 


1912 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


33 


1913 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25 


25 


1914 . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


20 


1915 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


27 


1916 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22 


22 


1917 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


10 


1918 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


1919 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Totals 


1 


5 


27 


62 


1 


184 


1,975 


2,255 



The average age of the members of the Force on November 30, 1942, 
was 44 . 10 years. 
Note: — 29 Military Substitute Patrolmen, not included. 

aio) 



1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Ill 



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112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 














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114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year Ending 

November 30, 1942. 



Di^asiONs. 



Males. 



Females. 



Total. 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Division 1 



Division 2 
Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 6 
Division 7 
Division 8 
Division 9 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 13 
Division 14 
Division 15 
Division 16 
Division 17 
Division 18 
Division 19 
Traffic . 



Totals 



2,139 

3,229 

1,796 

7,771 

13,482 

6,861 

3,191 

31 

4,160 

5,612 

2,749 

1,217 

2,106 

3,875 

5,832 

1,366 

546 

2,254 

10,009 

78,226 



348 
130 
87 
586 
1,383 
306 
147 

399 

690 

119 

72 

169 

286 

440 

108 

43 

133 

2,284 

7,730 



2,487 

3,359 

1,883 

8,357 

14,865 

7,167 

3,338 

31 

4,559 

6,302 

2,868 

1,289 

2,275 

4,161 

6,272 

1,474 

589 

2,387 

12,293 

85,956 









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a 

c 




tn 

C 

>> 


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CO 

C 
O 

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c 

S 
>> 

a 

s 
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c 

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o 

3 


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1 

> 




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bC 
rt 
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3 


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3 
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to 

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CO 

ID 
3 


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1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



135 






1— ( 


S fe 


1— 1 


O : 


X 




w 


Oh ^ 




^^ 


< 


^ 1 




OQ -S 




'^ ^ 




s £ 




e 2 




<» - . 




Oi S 




^ --' 







.- 


1 


00 


1 


1 


t^ 


CO 


00 


CO 




Ph' 














CM 




CO 


WO 
























CO 


_^ 


t^ 


CO 


1 


CM 


•* 


00 


Tff 


>« 




05 




•* 






CM 


00 


o 


CD 


O 


§ 














o 
co" 


•o 


;;- 




" 


tM 


1 


TT 


,— t 


1 


Tfl 


t^ 


CM 


o 


tH 
















>o 


"5 


CO 


■a 
U5 Eo 
in 3« 


(^' 


















CM 




o 


"^ 


03 


o 


CM 


03 


t^ 


t- 


« 




h- 












o 


t^ 


CO 


T) 


s 














Tf 


CO 


CO 


g 














cm" 




co" 






Ci 


1 


,_, 


,_1 


,_, 


Tr 


o 


"T^: 


CO 


(h 
















lO 


•o 


CO 




fsj 














CM 




■* 




IN 


CO 


o 


CC 


05 


o 


■* 


<-H 


•<»l 




t-.. 




o 






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I^ 


ira 


h- 


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CO_ 


CM 


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id 






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1 


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o 


o 


CO 


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00 


05 


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t~ 


CD 


o 


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§ 


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o 


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lO 


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oo" 






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i 


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CO 


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o 


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00 




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CM 


o 


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CO 


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^ 


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o 


CO 


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1 


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1 


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C'l 








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13 


fe 














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m Eo 

1-5 ^•f 
























o 


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CO 


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o 


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IM 


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00 


o 


C 


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CO 












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CD 


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CU 


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id' 


;:5 






CO 


i 


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CO 


CO 


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CO 


"f; 


C33 






^ 




CM 








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r^ 


o 


0) 


li*' 














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1^ -^r<5 
























03 


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M 


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C 




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CO 


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a 


s 


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CM 








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1 


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o 


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CM 








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o 




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^ 


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00 


00 


CO 


OS 


o 


CO 


o 


CD 


1 




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CM 


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CO 








03_ 


10 




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1 


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03 


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73 














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00 


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1 




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CM 


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CO 


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10 ; 




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lO 




^ 


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o 


CD 1 


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CD 


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10 




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co" 


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1 


1 


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1 

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00 


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00 


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CO 






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ox 


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00 


o 


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CD 










CD 






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1 


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1 


1 


1 


1 


00 


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fa 


















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1 


1 


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Ci 


t> 


s 
















'~* 


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— ' 


M 


CO 


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lO 


CO 


t^ 


00 


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d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


H 






Z 


z; 


Z 


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Z 


sn 


z; 


iz: 





136 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



<3i 



C5i 



ft. 



e 
^ 



o 





o 


LQ 


m 


o 


o 


CO 




CO 


^ 


00 


o 


o 


00 




lo 


00 


o 


o 


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I— 1 


•pauJBg saaj 


(M 


o 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


m 


ssaujijYV JO innoiuy 


1> 


00 


^ 


c» 


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d~ 


oT 


oT 


f— 1 




f—t 


,—1 








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m 










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^ 


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o 


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lO 


'i'B aou'epuany 


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00 


,s^BQ JO jaquin^ 






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co" 




05 


CO 


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t^ 


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fC 


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00 


00 


00 


00 


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't- 


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CO 


co" 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 


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t^ 


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o 


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•jjnoo ^^q pasoduii 


53 




o 


A 


05 


(N 


sautj JO '^unomY* 


!> 


lO" 


lO" 


co" 


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c<r 




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no 


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m 


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<M 


05 


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o. 


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^ 


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CD 


t^ 


U3[0jg JO c(unomy 


!>.' 

't 




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§ 


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CO 


CO 


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c^ 


CO 




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m 




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s§ 


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02 




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00 


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t^ 


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joj sc)sajjy 


o" 


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CO 


00 


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^ 


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CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




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CO 


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t^ 




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CO 






00 


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JO sagB^uaoJaj 


d 


d 


d 


o 


d 


d 




t^ 


CO 


Oi 


(N 


CD 


00 




00 


00 


CO 


tv 


lO 


<M 


■paisajjy 




CO 


l> 


eo^ 


CR 


o 


suosjaj JO jgqinn^ 


i>r 


CO 


1> 


»o" 


lO 


c^" 




05 


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00 


o> 


00 


a> 




o 


(N 


Q 


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CO 


o 






00 


00 




1—1 


(N 


•notciBindoj 


l> 


t> 


CO 


■* 


o_ 


»o 


■paiBini^sg 


CO 


CO 


CO" 

CO 


00 

CO 


<£ 

^ 


CO 
CO 




05 


o 


Oi 


o> 


05 


Cft 












tn 














(U 














bO 














oj 














L.I 














a> 














> 














<t^ 




00 


05 


o 


r-H 


o 






CO 


CO 


-* 


Tfl 


'* 






05 


Oi 


o 


OS 


Oi 





1943. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



137 





OiOOOOOOOOO ooooooo 


00 




m 




0(NOOOCOOOO OOOOOO'O 


00 




tr^ 


^J 


O'-ioo — oo— '"oo r^ooO'j-coiM 


Oi 




>o 


c 


t^'^t^OOiM'^COOGOlM ococooo OlO 


00^ 




CD 


3 


(M Oi (M — ^ lO 00 QO >C O T^ O (M 


"* 




»o 


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138 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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eceived, New England Telephone 
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automatic paj' stations), 
efund, automobiles abandoned 
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pay. 

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efund, hospital service to police . 
efimd, miscellaneous 
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eimbursement for lost and dama 
uniforms and equipment, 
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badges. 

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lie of lost, stolen and abandoned p 


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se of police property 


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1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



139 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued During Year Ending 

November 30, 194S. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Kennels. 


Transfers. 


Total. 


1 . . . 


51 


7 


5 




_ 


63 


2 . 






2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


3 


3 . 






205 


51 


41 


2 


- 


299 


4 . 






416 


96 


61 


*2 


- 


575 


6 . 






878 


97 


97 


- 


- 


1,072 


7 . 






736 


113 


67 


- 


— 


916 


8 . 






3 


- 


1 


- 


- 


4 


9 . 






829 


89 


103 


- 


- 


1,021 


10 . 






499 


76 


76 


- 


1 


652 


11 . 






1,703 


186 


393 


- 


- 


2,282 


13 . 






572 


63 


171 


1 


2 


809 


14 . 






692 


69 


189 


1 


1 


952 


15 . 






263 


41 


22 


- 


- 


326 


16 . 






552 


111 


159 


- 


4 


826 


17 . 






1,344 


t 142 


512 


- 


1 


1,999 


18 . 






840 


68 


228 


- 


- 


1,136 


19 . 






503 


37 


93 


- 


- 


633 


Tot 


lis 




10,088 


1,246 


2,219 


6 


9 


13,568 



* 2 kennels, no fee. 

t 1 seeing-eye dog, no fee. 



TABLE XVL 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City, 
by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 * . 


23 


Division 7 


Division 2 


16 


Division 16 


Division 3 


1 




Division 4 


17 


Total 


Division 6 


3 





8 
2 

70 



* Includes 21 handcart common carriers. 



140 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 19Jf2. 



Expenditures. 

A. Personal Service: 

1. Permanent employees . . i 

2. Temporary employees 

B. Contractual Services: 

1. Printing and binding 

3. Advertising and posting . 

4. Transportation of persons 

5. Express charges . 
8. Light, heat and power 

10. Rent, taxes and water 

12. Bond and insurance premiums 

13. Communication . 

14. Motor vehicle repairs and care 
16. Care of animals . 
18. Cleaning .... 
22. Medical .... 

28. Expert .... 

29. Stenographic, copying, etc. 

30. Listing .... 
35. Fees, service of venires, etc. 
37. Photographic and blueprintin 
39. General repairs . 



c. 



Equipment: 

3. Electrical .... 

4. Motor vehicles . 

6. Stable 

7. Furniture and furnishings 
9. Office 

10. Library .... 

11. Marine .... 

12. Medical, surgical, laboratory 

13. Tools and instruments 

14. Live stock .... 

15. Tires, tubes, accessories . 

16. Wearing apparel 

17. Miscellaneous equipment 



Brought forward t $5,404,298 23 



5,001,293 68 


10,798 67 




$3,564 45 


1,147 83 


16,098 46 


110 11 


37,949 66 


1,088 90 


606 84 


33,769 48 


21,852 25 


2,651 75 


1,845 03 


15,945 73 


285 00 


1 50 


58,181 65 


1,250 82 


52,551 07 


^A9. onn '\'K 




$1,698 89 


34,424 59 


154 05 


3,945 39 


3,268 18 


707 52 


479 44 


372 30 


4,391 61 


300 00 


7,114 00 


80,677 68 


5,771 70 


143,305 35 



D. 



E. 



F. 



3.] 


PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 




Carried forward . 




Supplies: 




1. 


Office 


$42,701 60 


2. 


Food and ice . . . 


9,285 88 


3. 


Fuel 


26,303 80 


4. 


Forage and animal . 


5,064 00 


5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


640 39 


8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet . 


8,333 62 


11. 


Gasoline, oil and grease . 


51,296 99 


13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants 


3,440 93 


16. 


Miscellaneous 


9,197 44 


Mat 
1. 


ERIALS: 

Building .... 


$1,382 20 


10. 


Electrical .... 


19,718 09 


13. 


Miscellaneous 


8,740 61 



141 



$5,404,298 23 



Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities 
11. Workmen's compensation 



$378,146 90 
49 75 



H. Emergency Relief Project Materials 

Total 



156,264 65 



29,840 90 



378,196 65 
. 927 69 

),969,528 12 



Special Items: (Not included in Police Department appropriation). 
Work Relief materials for Police W. P. A. Project $6,289 01 

Civilian Precautionary Assistance, (eleven months) $29,974 73 

Emergency Compensation Allotment, (nine months) $157,484 22 



Receipts. 
For all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . 
For dog licenses (credited to School Department) 
Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 
For license badges, copies of licenses, commissions on tele- 
phones, report blanks, use of police property . 

Refunds and reimbursements 

Miscellaneous refunds 

Total 

Credit by the City Collector for mone}' received for damage 
to police property 

Grand Total 



$41,624 50 
30,941 25 

2,498 48 

1,868 84 

6,587 52 

22 50 

$83,543 09 



2,831 58 
?6,374 67 



142 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on account of the Signal Service during the Year 

Ending November 30, 19^2. 

(Included in Table XVII.) 

Pay rolls $33,968 66 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . 23,524 79 

Pavement and sidewalk surface restoration ... 51 55 

Total $57,545 00 



1943.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



143 







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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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146 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 1943. 






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INDEX 



A. 

Accidents 

caused by automobiles 

number of, reported 

persons killed or injured by, in streets. 
Adjustment of claims .... 
Air-raid test, daylight .... 
Air-raid wardens' school ... 

Ambulance service 

Arrests 

age and sex of 

comparative statement of 

decrease in number .... 

for drunkenness .... 

foreigners 

for offenses against chastity, morality, 

minors 

nativity of 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions . 

number of, punished by fine . 

on warrants 

summoned by court .... 

total number of .... 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants .... 
Articles lost and found .... 

Auctioneers 

Automobiles . . . 19, 21, 27-32, 

accidents due to .... 

cost of running police 

deaths caused by ... . 

operating while imder influence of li 

police 

public 

safety-educational 

sight-seeing .... 

stolen and recovered 

two-hour parking 

used, dealers in ... 



park; 



etc. 



quor 



s and squares 



16-20, 33, 



67,83 



Page 

32, 76, 143, 144 

143, 144 

76 

143, 144 

78 

28 

7 

83 

77, 114-136 

135 

136 

16, 17 

17, 19, 77, 78, 125 

17,115-134 

16, 124, 134 

17, 115-134 
. 17, 18 

. 17, 19, 115-134 

114 

. 17, 18 

17, 115-134 

17, 115-134 

16, 17, 20, 115-134 

17, 129 

17, 115-134 

68 

137 

?, 119, 120, 127, 143, 144 

143, 144 

83 

'. 32, 143, 144 

19, 127 

. 67, 83-85 

86, 137 

56 

89, 137 

. 19, 29, 120 

58 

. 29, 30,31, 137 



B. 

Ballistics unit 

accomplishments 

bombs, suspected, examination of 

formation and duties 
Benefits and pensions 
Biological chemist .... 
"Blackout" tests .... 
Boston Junior Police Corps 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported . 

(147) 



63-66 

63 

65 

63 

99 

33-35 

25, 26, 27 

12, 26, 27 

76, 118 

76 



148 






P. D. 49. 




Page 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation . 


. 29-35 


automobile division 




. . 29 


biological chemist 




33 


homicide squad 




31 


lost and stolen property division 




31 


used car dealers' licenses granted . 




30, 137 


Bureau of Operations 




. 13, 60-62 


creation, accomplishments 




60 


recording of radio messages 




61 


Bureau of Records 




. 36-51 


criminal identification .... 




39, 44 


missing persons 




. 48-50 


multilith 




37 


photography, fingerprinting . 




. 38-42, 45 


summons file 




51 


warrant file 




50 


c. 




Carriages, public 


86, 137 


articles left in 




87 


number licensed 




86, 137 


public and special hackney carriage stands ; 


ibolished 


88 


public stands for taxicabs established . 




88 


Cases investigated 




. 33, 76 


Children 


■. 18 


48, 76, 115, 116 


abandoned, cared for .... 




76 


lost, restored 




. 49, 76 


City ordinances, arrests for violation of 




. 17, 20, 129 


City Prison 




77 


Claims, adjustment of 




78 


Cocoanut Grove disaster 




13 


Collective musicians 




97, 137 


Commitments 




. 18, 78 


Communications system 




80 


Complaints 




99, 112, 137 


against miscellaneous Hcenses 




99, 137 


against police officers .... 




24, 112, 113 


Confiscated explosives, disposition of . 




65 


Courts 


17", 18, 


32, 115-134, 136 


fines imposed by 




. 17, 18, 136 


number of days' attendance at, by officers 




17, 18, 34, 136 


number of persons summoned bj^ . 




17, 115-134 


prosecutions in 




32 


Criminal identification 




. 39,44 


Criminal work 




136 


comparative statement of . . . 




136 


D. 

Dangerous weapons 


98, 115 


Dead bodies .... 






. 50,81,82 


recovered .... 






. 81, 82 


Death, sentenced to 






18 


Deaths , 




16,' 32, 


50, 105, 143, 144 


bj'^ accident, suicide, etc. 






32, 143, 144 


of police officers 






16, 105 


Defense jjreparations 






7 


Department medals of honor . 






24 


Dictaphone for recording radio messages 




61 


Distribution of force 


• / 




16, 102-103 



p. D. 49. 



149 



Disturbances suppressed . 

Dogs 

amount received for licenses for 

number licensed 
Draftsman, services of . , . 
Drivers 

hackney carriage 

sight-seeing automobile 
Drowning, persons rescued from 
Drunkenness 

arrests for, per day . 

decrease in number of arrests for 

foreigners arrested for 

men committed to City Prison 

nonresidents arrested for 

total number of arrests for 

women committed to the House of Detention 



Page 

76 
137, 139, 141 
137, 141 
139 
46 
87, 90, 137- 
87, 137 
90, 137 
. 76,81 
7, 19, 76, 78, 125 
17 
17 
17,125 
77 
17,125 
17, 20, 125 
78 



E. 



22, 



Emergency Battalion reorganized . 
Emploj^ees of the Department 

Events, special 

Expend itui'es . . . . . 
Extra duties performed by officers 



Financial 

expenditures 

miscellaneous license fees 

pensions 

receipts 

signal service 
Fines .... 

amount of . 

average amount of 

number punished by 
Fingerprint 
Fire alarms 

defective, reported 

number given 
Fires .... 

extinguished 

on waterfront, attended 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 



Q. 

Gaming, illegal 

General conditions of the Department 

General orders 

Governor proclaimed a state of emergency in Massachusetts 



H. 



Hackney carriage driver; 
Hackney carriages . 
Halloween parties 
Handcarts . 
Harbor service . 





15, 


102, 103 


69 


22, 100, 140 


9, 33, 76 


23, 100, 137, 140 


23, 100, 140 


100, 137, 141 


99, 141 


22, 99, 137, 141 


100, 142 




17, 18, 136 




17,18,136 




17, 136 




18 






37-47 






76,81 






76 






76 






76,81 






76,81 






81 


17,115-134 


33, 130 


130 


7 


25 


tts . 25 


. 86-91,137 




86-91,137 




74 




92, 137 




IC 


),81,82 



150 



P. D. 49. 



Homicide squad 
Horses .... 
House of Detention . 
Houses of ill fame, keeping 



P.VGE 

31 

82 

78 

78, 125 



I. 

Imprisonment .... 

persons sentenced to 

total years of . . . 

Income 

Information from police journals, requests for 
Inquests held .... 
Insane persons taken in charge 
Intoxicated persons assisted . 
Itinerant musicians . 



22, 



99, 



18,33,136 

18 

. 18, 136 

100, 137, 141 

46 

32 

76 

76 

97, 137 



Junior Police Corps . 
Junk collectors . 
Junk shopkeepers 
Juvenile welfare 
Jury lists, police work on 



12,26,27 

137 

137 

11 

94 



L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Line-up of prisoners 
Listing, police . 

expenses of 

number listed 

number of policemen employed in 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, public 

applications for licenses . 

authority to license . 

location of 

number of persons lodged in . 
Lost and found articles . 
Lost and stolen property division . 
Lost children 



23, 



76 

99, 137 

29 

93, 140, i45, 146 

. 23, 94, 140 

93, 145, 146 

94 

18 

98, 137 

98, 137 

98 

98 

98 

68 

31 

. 18, 48, 76 



M. 



Maintenance shop 
Men committed to City Prison 
Military substitute patrolmen 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued . 

number transferred 
Missing persons . 

age and sex of . 

number found 

number reported 

reported by Police Divisions 



67 

77 

102 

17,115-134 

76 

99, 137 

99, 137 

99, 137 

99, 137 

99, 137 

99, 137 

. 48-49 

48 

. 48,49 

. 48,49 

49 



p. D. 49. 



151 



Musicians . 
collective 
itinerant 



Page 
97, 137 
97, 137 
97, 137 



N. 



Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident oflfenders 



17 
17,18,19,115-134 



o. 

Offenses 

against chastity, morality, etc. 
against license laws . 
against liquor law 
against the person 
against property, malicious 
against property, with violence 
against property, without violence 
forgery and against currency . 
miscellaneous .... 
recapitulation .... 

Organization 



Parking time, extension of 

Parks, public 

accidents reported in 

Pawnbrokers 

Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 
number of persons on rolls 
payments on account of 

Personnel 

Photographic, etc. 

Pin ball machine 

Plant and equipment 

Police, special . 

Police buildings, use of 

Police charitable fund 

Police Department . 



authorized and actual strength of 
commendation of officers 
distribution of personnel 
general conditions 
horses in use in 
how constituted 
Memorial Ma-ss 
officers : 

absent, sick 

active service, number of officers in 

allowances for pay. Department rule on 

appointed . 

arrests by . 

average age of . 

complaints against 

date appointed . 

deferred 

detailed, special events 

died .... 





. 16,19, 115-134 




16, 124, 134 




16, 122, 134 




19, 122 




. 16,19,115,134 




16, 121, 134 




16, 19, 118, 134 




16, 19, 119, 134 




16, 121, 134 




16, 19, 130, 134 




134 




25 




58 




143, 144 




143, 144 




31, 137 




99, 141 




99 




99 




99, 140 




. 8, 15, 23, 102 




38-42, 45 




26 




67 




96 




25 




99 


' 15, 


16, 99, 102, 104, 105 


1( 


)6, 108, 109, 112, 136 




104 




23 




16, 102 




7 




82 




15 




26 




111 




109 




103 




16 




16, 114, 115-136 




110 




24, 112 




109 




9, 28 




. 69-75 




16, 105 



152 



P. D. 49. 



Police Department: 

officers (concluded) 

dismissed 

injured 

made auxiliaries of the nation's armed 
medals of honor . . . 
militarj' substitute patrolmen appointed 

nativity of 

pay allowances, Department rule on 

pensioned 

promoted 

punishments imposed 
reinstated after public hearing 

resigned 

retired 

suspended 

time lost on account of injuries 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor 
vehicles in use in 
work of 
Police listing 
Police signal box service 
miscellaneous work 
payments on account of 
property assigned to 
signal boxes 
Prisoners, nativity of 
Promotion of police . 
Property .... 

lost, abandoned and stolen 
recovered .... 
sale of condemned, unclaimed 

stolen 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Prosecution of homicide cases 
Public carriages 
Public lodging houses 



forces 



etc. 



Page 

16, 112 

16, 24 

25 

23 

102 

110 

103 

16, 106, 107 

16, 108 

24 

16 

16, 112 

16, 106, 107 

112 

16, 24 

23 

83, 85 

16 

23, 93, 140, 145, 146 
15, 79, 80, 100, 142 
79 
100, 142 
80 
79 
17 
16, 108 
30-31, 138, 141 
30-31, 138, 141 
18, 30, 136 
138, 141 
18, 136 
18 
31 
86, 137 
98, 137 



18, 



R. 

Radio, two-way 

dictaphone for recording messages 

Ration of oil 

Receipts, financial . . 
Requests for information from police journals 
Revolvers 

licenses to carry 

Rumor clinic 



61 
61 

27 
22, 100, 137, 141 

46 
98, 137 
98, 137 

26 



Safety-educational automobile 

Salaries 

Second-hand articles 
Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 
Sergeant Ballistician 
Servicemen .... 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Signal service, police 
Special events . 
Special police . 
State wards 



15 



11, 56 
102 
137 
29, 137 
63 
1 1 , 25, 26 
18, 76, 81 
111 
27, 89, 137 
, 79-80, 100, 142 
69 
96 
48 



p. D. 49. 



153 



Station houses 

lodgers at 

witnesses detained at 

Stolen property 

recovered 

value of 

Street railway conductors, motormen and starters 
Streets 

accidents reported in 

defective, reported 

obstructions removed 

Summons file • 



Page 

. II, 18 

18 

18 

18, 30, 31, 136 

18, 31, 136 

18, 31, 136 

137 

76, 143, 144 

143, 144 

143 

76 

51 



T. 



Tagging 

Theatrical — booking agencies 
Traffic Division . . . . 

activities 

safety-educational automobile 

tagging 

two-hour parking 



57, 90 
137 
10, 52-59 
52 
56 
57 
58 



u. 

Uniform crime record reporting .... 

U. S. War bonds 

Used cars 

licensed dealers 

provisions for hearing before granting third-class license 
purchases and sales reported 



20 
27 
29-31, 137 
29, 137 
30 
31 



V. 



Vehicles 

ambulances, combination 

automobiles 

in use in Police Department 

public carriages 

wagons and handcarts 

Vessels 

Volunteer, unpaid. Auxiliary Police 



83-85, 86, 137, 139 
83 
. 83-85 
. 83-85 
86 
91, 137, 139 
81 
. 22, 25, 26 



w. 

Wagons 91, 137, 139 

legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property for 

hire 92 

number licensed by divisions 
total number licensed 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 

War 

Warrant file .... 

Water pipes, defective, reported 

Water running to waste, reported 

Weapons, dangerous 

Witnesses 17, 

fees eained by officers as 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as 
number of, detained at station houses .... 

Women committed to House of Detention .... 

Work of the Department 







139 


91, 


137, 


139 
23 




. 7 


,47 
50 
76 
76 
98 


18. 


76, 


136 


. 17 


18, 


136 


. 17 


18, 


136 




. 18 


,76 
78 
16 



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