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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.1 

^i)t Commontoealtt) of iflasisiacbusiEtts 



THJRTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 

FOR THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1943 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



D 









CONTENTS. 



Page 

Letter to Governor 7 

The war and the police 7 

Civilian defense 8 

Personnel 8 

Juvenile delinquency 11 

Conclusion 12 

The Department 13 

Police force 13 

Signal service 13 

Employees of the Department 13 

Recapitulation 14 

Distribution and changes 14 

Police officers injured while on duty 14 

Work of the Department 15 

Arrests 15 

Drunkenness 16 

Nativity of persons arrested 16 

Uniform crime record reporting 18 

Volunteer, unpaid, auxiliary police 21 

Receipts 21 

Expenditures 22 

Personnel 22 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 22 

Department Medals of Honor 23 

Time lost by officers on account of injuries 24 

Punishments impo-sed for violation of rules and regulations ... 24 

Organization 24 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation . - 31 

Automobile division 31 

Used car dealers' licenses granted 31 

Lost and stolen property division 33 

Homicide squad 33 

General 35 

Biological chemist 36 

Bureau of Records 40 

Establishment, purpose and equipment 40 

Multilith 41 

Output of daily manifolds, etc. 41 

C'irculars drafted, containing photographs and fingerprints of 

fugitives 42 

Photographic division 42 

Record files of assignments 43 

Identification division 43 

Main index file 43 

Criminal record files 43 

Cabinets of segregated photographs of criminals arrested . . 43 



4 CONTENTS. 

Bureau of Records — Concluded: Page 

Exhibiting of photographs of criminals in main and segregated 

files 44 

Members of Bureau visited scenes of homicides, burglaries, etc., 44 

Ultra-violet lamp 44 

Fluoroscope and White drill 45 

Pantoscopic camera 45 

Developing and printing room 45 

Fihng system of photographs and fingerprints of unidentified 

dead 46 

Single fingerprint files . _ 46 

Fingerprint system practically eliminating Bertillon system . 47 

Civilian fingerprint file 47 

Displacement of Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification, 47 

Criminal identification 48 

Miscellaneous department photography 49 

Requests for information from police journals .... 50 

Services of a draftsman from the personnel 50 

Criminal records for the Department furnished by the Bureau . 50 

Identification made through fingerprints 51 

Missing persons 51 

Warrant file 54 

Summons file 55 

Traffic 56 

Activities 56 

Traffic conditions 58 

Safety-educational automobile 59 

Tagging 60 

Conclusion 61 

Bureau of Operations 62 

Creation 62 

Duties 62 

Accomplishments 62 

Ballistics Unit 64 

Formation and duties 64 

Accomplishments 64 

Crime Prevention Bureau 68 

Plant and equipment 70 

Special events 72 

Miscellaneous business 78 

City Prison 79 

House of Detention 80 

Adjustment of claims 80 

Police Signal Box Service 81 

Signal boxes . 81 

Miscellaneous work 81 

Communications system 82 

Harbor service 82 

Patrol service 84 

Horses 84 



CONTENTS. 



ehicles 
carriage 



violations 



Vehicle service 

Cost of running automobiles 

Combination ambulances 

List of vehicles used by the department 
Hackney Carriages 

Limitation of hackney carriage licenses .... 

Abolishing special and public hacknej' carriage stands 

Establishing public taxicab stands .... 

Hackney carriage licenses granted 

Private hackney stands 

Sight-seeing automobiles 

Sight-seeing horse-drawn v( 

Lssuing of tags for hacknej' 

Appeal board 

Supervisor}- force 
Wagon licenses 
Listing work in Boston 

Listing expenses . 

Number of policemen emploj'ed in listing 

Police work on jury lists 
Special police 
Musicians' licenses 

Itinerant 

Collective 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
Public lodging hou.ses 
Miscellaneous licenses 
Pensions and benefits 
Financial .... 
Statistical Tables 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the police 
signal service and employees 

Changes in authorized and actual strength of police department 

List of police officers in active service who died . 

List of officers retired 

Officers promoted 

Number of men in active service 

Men on the police force and year born .... 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of sickness 

Complaints against officers 

Number of arrests by police divisions .... 

Arrests and offenses 

Age and sex of persons arrested 

Comparative statement of police criminal work . 

Licenses of all classes issued 

Dog licenses 

Wagon licenses 

Financial statement 

Payment on account of signal service .... 

Accidents 

Male and female residents listed . . . 



force 



Page 

85 

85 
85 
87 



90 

90 

91 

91 

91 

93 

93 

93 

94 

95 

97 

98 

98 

98 

100 

101 

101 

101 

102 

102 

103 

103 

104 

105 

106 
109 
110 
111 
114 
116 
117 
118 
119 
121 
122 
139 
140 
141 
143 
143 
144 
146 
147 
149 



®fte Commontuealti) of jWaggacfjusfetts. 



REPORT . 

Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

' Boston, December 31, 1943. 

To His Excellency Leverett Saltonstall, Governor. 

Your ExcELLENcf , — As Police Commissioner for the City 
of Boston, I have the honor to present in comphance with the 
provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, a 
report of the work of the Boston PoHce Department for the 
year ending November 30, 1943. 

I was appointed PoHce Commissioner for the City of Boston 
on November 26, 1943, succeeding Mr. Joseph F. Timilty 
upon the expiration of his term of office. 

The War and the Police. 

The war has placed a great additional burden upon the 
police department. The police have performed a great number 
of extra hours of duty for exclusively war purposes without 
taking into account the innumerable daily activities created 
or increased by war conditions. Thousands of cases involving 
enemy aliens, draft dodgers, saboteurs and deserters were 
referred to this department for investigation by the various 
Federal agencies and military authorities. In addition thereto 
the department was called upon to furnish police details at 
various defense plants and factories producing war materials. 
From time to time protection was furnished by the department 
for the transportation of convoys of war materials from one 
location to another. 

The Harbor Police in addition to their regular duties of 
patrolling the waterfront were called upon to protect the many 
new government buildings and piers that have been erected 
along the upper harbor and to guard as well the many wharves 
and storehouses w^here war materials are stored, or where 
vessels are being loaded or unloaded, in order to prevent any 
acts of sabotage or other unlawful acts by enemy agents. 
Frequently assistance was rendered to the United States Navy 
and the United States Coast Guard by the Harbor Police in the 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

transportation of officers from various points in the upper 
harbor. In addition to these activities, the Harbor Police were 
instrumental in enforcing the dimout regulations respecting all 
lights located on wharves, docks and piers, in that they be of a 
particular design and focus and be operated correctly during 
all blackout tests. 

Civilian Defense. 

The Volunteer Auxiliary Police was established in the 
department in accordance with the Acts ©f 1941, Chapter 719, 
Section 5. The members volunteer their services as a patriotic 
duty, without compeiLsation. Men classified in 1-A under the 
Selective Service Act are not eligible for membership because 
they are subject to early call in the Armed Forces. The 
members are equipped with a badge, helmet, night stick and a 
flash light. They are photographed and fingerprinted and 
given the oath of office. Their duties are restricted to pre- 
vention of crime, protection of life and property and such 
other duties as may be assigned to them in an emergency. 
There are 3,075 men enrolled as Auxihary Policemen. 

The Air Raid Wardens carried out the duties assigned to 
them in periodic drills and exercises, including blackouts, 
during the second year of the war, in a highly successful manner. 
Approximately 17,000 men are enrolled as Air Raid Wardens. 

New members of these protective forces are constantly being 
trained to replace those who have found it necessary to resign. 

The members of these units are deserving of the highest 
praise for their patriotism and unselfish devotion of their time 
to the important war-time responsibiUties that have been 
entrusted to them, and their efficiency has elicited warm 
praise from Civilian Defense Officials. 

Personnel. 

The morale of any large body of men is inspired and main- 
tained at a high level if they are happy in their work and aware 
that indi\ddual ability and ambition will be rewarded. So far 
in my term as Police Commissioner I have come in contact 
with officers who have distinguished themselves in the perform- 
ance of duty through intelligence, initiative and courage. 
Each year such officers are awarded the Walter Scott Medal 
for Valor, Department Medals of Honor, or are cited in General 
Orders for outstanding achievement. In my opinion, many of 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

these officers because of such proven ability are quaUfied to 
fulfill assignments of greater responsibility, and in matters of 
promotion are worthy of particular consideration in so far as 
Civil Service Rules and Regulations permit. In this manner, 
officers can be reassured that the department is not unaware 
of those who perform their duties in keeping with the highest 
traditions of the service. 

Since the inception of the war, the department has lost the 
services of many of its able and experienced officers who have 
entered the Armed Forces. A total of two hundred and eighty- 
seven (287) officers and twenty-three (23) civilian employees 
answered the call to the colors. A further depletion of the 
personnel would seriously affect the efficient functioning of 
poHce service. 

During the past year, deferments had been claimed by the 
department but met with scant approval from the local draft 
boards. Recently, however, these boards have been satisfied 
that the claims for such deferments were based upon well- 
founded and important reasons and many of these claims 
have been granted in the interest of the service. It is also 
encouraging to report that the draft boards have shown a 
greater spirit of cooperation by granting the reopening of 
certain cases for the purpose of reclassification. 

In spite of the inroads made upon the membership of the 
department by the war, the personnel has been able to carry 
out all its duties as well as the many extra calls made upon them 
in connection with the war in a highly satisfactory manner. 

In the absence of a Civil Service eligible list for military 
substitute patrolmen to replace permanent patrolmen who 
entered the Armed Forces, permission was requested of and 
granted by the Civil Service Commission to appoint properly 
qualified men from civilian lif^ as provisional temporary 
patrolmen. On October 11, 1943, one hundred and twelve 
(112) men were appointed provisional temporary patrolmen. 
On June 2, 1943, with Civil Service authorization, ten (10) 
properly qualified women were appointed provisional temporary 
policewomen. 

The emergency battalion of the department was reorganized 
on July 7, 1943, and composed of five hundred (500) officers 
for services in time of unusual stress. These officers were 
given an intensive course of training in riot formations and 
defense tactics with special training given in the use of firearms. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

A Red Cross course in First Aid training was started in the 
Spring of 1943 for all sergeants and patrolmen. This course 
was taken in relays so that at the present writing two-thirds of 
the officers have completed their training and the remainder 
of the men are now in the process of training, so that all of 
these officers will be enabled, whenever the occasion arises, to 
handle efficiently those cases requiring first aid attention. 

Governor Leverett Saltonstall directed John F. Stokes, 
Commissioner of Public Safety, on October 19, 1943, to con- 
duct an investigation of assaults, insults, and cases of property 
damage allegedly resulting from anti-Semitism in the Metro- 
politan and Boston areas. Commissioner John F. Stokes 
submitted a report to the Governor in which he stated that 
thirty-four of the forty alleged incidents occurred in Police 
Di\dsions 9 and 19 (Roxbury and Mattapan districts) and 
showed evidence of neglect of duty on the part of sergeants 
and route officers to make a proper investigation. The for- 
tieth case was found to be purely fictitious. He also reported 
that he had found a widespread dissemination of anti-Semitic 
hterature. He further reported that he could find no evidence 
of any organization of an anti-Semitic nature. The indi\dduals 
reported as being responsible for these anti-Semitic incidents 
were found to be boys sixteen years of age and under. 

Upon direction of Governor Saltonstall, Commissioner 
Stokes forwarded a copy of his report to the then Police Com- 
missioner who, on November 22, 1943, instituted an investi- 
gation. Of the forty (40) cases mentioned in the report of 
Commissioner Stokes, he stated that sixteen could be elimi- 
nated because the police were never called upon to take 
any action and there was further evidence to show that the 
police were never given any information whatever about them. 
Three cases were found to he outside the jurischction of the 
Boston police and one proved to be purely fictitious. Two 
cases involved no assaults or other offenses upon which the 
pofice could take action. In fifteen cases the police took 
action upon complaint. In one of these, the complainant 
disappeared and no trace whatever could be found of him. 
One case involving no complaint consisted of derogatory 
remarks that had been overheard. One case was a duplication. 
As far as could be discovered, there was no evidence of any 
organized anti-Semitism in this city. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

Juvenile Delinquency. 

Delinquency among juveniles is a problem that has always 
been with the American people. It is only natural 'that it 
should assume greater proportions under the impact of a world- 
wide war. Some of the causes for this growth are the lack of 
proper parental supervision, the employment of both parents 
in defense industries to the neglect of the children at home, 
the ease with which young people can earn high wages, thus 
affording them a larger amount of spending money, and lack of 
sufficient recreational facilities in the average large city. 

Police departments are usually blamed for the recent in- 
crease in juvenile delinquency as they were blamed in the 
first world war. However, the truth is that lack of proper 
parental supervision is the primary cause of any increase in 
juvenile dehnquency in the majority of cases. In addition to 
this lack of proper parental supervision may be added the 
avariciousness of some parents to work in defense plants and 
leave their children to their own devices for eight or ten hours 
a day. Under these circumstances, a great many children fall 
in with bad companions who are instrumental in leading them 
upon wrong paths and ultimately into the hands of the police. 

In an effort to cope with this problem at the present time, 
and in the years to come, the department established on 
August 9, 1943, what is known as the Crime Prevention 
Bureau, under the command Qf a Deputy Superintendent, 
and which is staffed as follows: two lieutenants, two acting- 
sergeants (policewomen), nineteen patrolmen and twelve 
policewomen. 

The functions of this Bureau are: 

1. To develop a program of crime prevention intended 
to eliminate those factors that induce criminal tendencies, 
especially among children. 

2. To enlist in this program the aid of the public and 
all interested agencies and other divisions and units of the 
police department. 

3. To teach good citizenship and to develop the proper 
mental attitude of all citizens toward law enforcement 
agencies. 

4. To ascertain persons and places which in any way 
contribute to delinquency of children and to take necessary 
steps to correct such conditions. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

5. To super\dse the inspection of all places of public 
amusement. 

6. To promote the welfare of children and take special 
care to locate missmg children. 

7. To investigate all complaints concerning boys and 
girls and to investigate individuals concerned in such 
cases. 

From its inception up to November 30, 1943, officers of the 
Bureau arrested 55 juveniles for various violations of the law. 
In addition to these arrests there were 3,077 inspections and 
1,530 cases investigated. In every case the Bureau makes an 
effort to deal with the child without resorting to court action 
in so far as possible and to enlist the sincere cooperation of the 
parents to the end that the child may be spared a court record. 

Conclusion. 

Durmg my official capacity as Chief Blackout Officer in 
Metropolitan Boston, I had frequent occasion to work with 
officials and members of the Boston Police Department in the 
enforcement of blackout regulations. I am pleased to say that 
I have always found the rank and file of its membership ready 
and willing at all time to cooperate to the fullest degree in the 
public interest. As Police Commissioner, I am happy to be 
associated with such a fine body of men and I look forward to 
many years of fruitful and pleasant relations. I also wish to 
express my appreciation to the members of the department 
for the fine spirit they have extended to me. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank Your Excellency, the pubUc, 
and the press for the splendid cooperation that has been 
accorded me upon my assumption of this responsible position. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1944.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



13 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows; 



Police Commissioner. 
Secretary. Assistant Secretary. 

Chief Clerk. 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Lieutenant-Inspector 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen . 

Patrolmen (Military Sub 
stitutes) ... 



1 

5 

31 

66 

1 

*187 

1 1,968 

45 



Patrolmen (Provisional 

Ternporary) . 
Patrolwomen 
Patrolwomen (Provisional 

Temporary) . 

Total .... 



Signal Service. 



Director . . . . 
Foreman . . . . 
Chauffeur . . . . 
Chauffeur (Military Sub- 
stitute) . . . . 
Laborer . . . . 

Employ 

Chauffeurs . 

Chemist 

Cleaners 

Clerk, Inventory 

Clerk, Property 

Clerks 

Clerks (Military Substi 

tutes) ... 
Clerks (Provisional Tem 

porary) ... 
Diesel Engine Operator 
Elevator Operators . 
Firemen, Marine 
Firemen, Stationarj' 
Hostlers 
Janitors 
Laborers 
Matrons 
Mechanics 
Repairmen 



Linemen 
Mechanic 
Painter 
Signalmen 

Total 



EES 



OF THE Department. 

2 Signalman .... 
1 Statisticians 

6 Steamfitter 
1 Stenographers . 
1 Stenographers (Military 
36 Substitutes) . 

Stenographer (Provisional 

3 Temporary) . 
Shorthand Reporters 
Superintendent of Build- 
ings 

Assistant Superintendent 
of Buildings . 

Superintendent of Mainte- 
nance Shop . . .^ 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators 



2 
1 
9 
5 
4 
9 

29 
2 
9 

13 
3 



108 
5 



2,426 



* As of November 30, 1943, 1 Sergeant in the armed service. 

t As of November 30, 1943, 280 Patrolmen in the armed service. 



Total 



6 
1 
1 
6 

19 



1 
3 

1 
24 



1 
4 

1 

1 

1 
1 

7 

183 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Assistant Secretary and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 

Grand Total 



1 
3 

2,426 

19 

183 

2,632 



Distribution and Changes. 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 

During the year 99 Patrolmen, 60 Military Substitute 
Patrolmen, 112 Provisional Temporary Patrolmen, and 11 
Provisional Temporary Patrolwomen were appointed; 1 Patrol- 
man reinstated; 9 Patrolmen, 22 Military Substitute Patrol- 
men, 6 Provisional Temporary Patrolmen, and 2 Provisional 
Temporary Patrolwomen resigned (1 Patrolman while charges 
were pending); 3 Patrolmen were dismissed; 2 Captains, 8 
Lieutenants, 15 Sergeants, and 20 Patrolmen were promoted; 
2 Deputy Superintendents, 2 Captains, 3 Lieutenants, 1 Ser- 
geant, and 64 Patrolmen retired on pensions ; 1 Sergeant and 
20 Patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While On Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties 
lost by them and the number of duties lost by police officers 
during the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 
1942. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1943. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1942. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various ©ther causes . 


115 

24 

62 
187 


1,870 
303 

741 
2,900 


768 

486 

1,888 
1,712 


Totals . . 


388 


5,814 


4,854 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

WORK OF THE DEPARTIVIENT. 

Arrests. 
The total niiinbor of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a 
separate person, was 62,681, as against 85,956 the preceding 
year, being a decrease of 23,275. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows : 

Per Cent 

1. Offenses against the person Increase 9.53 

2. Offenses against property committed with violence, Decrease 7.02 

3. Offenses against property committed without vio- 

lence Decrease 5.97 

4. Malicious offenses against property .... Increase 29 . 75 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency . . Increase 15 . 23 

6. Offenses against the license laws .... Increase 12.54 

7. Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. . . Decrease 32.09 

8. Offenses not included in the fon'going . . Decrease 28 . 25 

There were 11,909 persons arrested on warrants and 32,248 
without warrants; 18,524 persons were summoned by the 
court. The number of males arrested w^as 56,344; of females, 
6,337; of foreigners, 6,751 or approximately 10.77 per cent; 
of minors, 7,748. Of the total number arrested, 20,053, or 
31.99 per cent, were non-residents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for 
the five years from 1939 to 1943, inclusive, was $173,656.20; 
in 1943 it was $164,888, or $8,768.20 less than the average. 
(See Table XIII.) 

The average number of days' attendance at court for 
the five years from 1939 to 1943, inclusive, was 41,311; in 
1943 it was 34,681, or 6,630 less than the average. (See Table 
XIII.) 

The average amount of witness fees earned for the five 
years from 1939 to 1943, inclusive, was $10,134.20; in 1943 it 
was $8,637, or $1,497.20 less than the average. (See Table 
XIII.) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 
62,681, being a decrease of 23,275 from last year and 22,945 
less than the average for the past five years. (See Table XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (62,681) 98 were 
for violation of city ordinances, that is to .say, that one arrest 
in 639 was for such offense, or 15 per cent. (See Table XI.) 



16 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Forty-eight and twenty-one one-hundredths per cent of 
the persons taken into custody were between the ages of 
twenty-one and forty. (See Table XII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 64. 
There were 12,101 less persons arrested than in 1942, a de- 
crease of 33.86 per cent; 20.37 per cent of the arrested persons 
were non-residents and 18.46 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XL) 

There were 23,627 persons arrested for drunkenness, being 
12,101 less than last year and 11,154 less than the average for 
the past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness this year, 
there was a decrease of 35.71 per cent in males and a decrease 
of 8 per cent in females over last year. (See Tables XI, XIII.) 

Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 




55,930 


France 


22 


Ireland 




1,835 


Turkey 


22 


British Provinces 




1,438 


South America . 


17 


Italy . 




853 


Syria . 


17 


Russia 






527 


Spain . 


16 


Lithuania 






300 


Belgium 


13 


England 






293 


Switzerland 


10 


Poland 






288 


Africa . 


7 


Norway 






152 


Cuba . 


6 


Scotland 


• 




138 


Philippine Islands 


5 


Greece 






134 


Puerto Rico 


5 


Portugal 






134 


Rumania 


4 


Sweden 






133 


Australia 


3 


China 






, 84 


Hawaii 


3 


Finland 






43 


Japan . 


3 


Armenia 






41 


Iran 


2 


Germany 






40 


Wales . 


2 


Denmark 






30 


Czechoslovakia . 


1 


Austria 






27 


Hungary 


1 


West Indies 






27 


Mexico 


1 


Latvia 






26 








Albania 






25 


Total 


. 62,681 


Holland 






23 







The number of persons punished by fine was 16,217, and the 
fines amounted to $164,888. (See Table XIII.) 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 17 

One hundred and sixty-five persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 2,282 to tlie House of Correction; 153 to the 
Women's Prison; 261 to the Reformatory Prison, and 2,107 to 
other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were: 2,892 years (814 
sentences were indefinite); the total number of days' attend- 
ance at coiu't by officers was 34,681 and the witness fees earned 
by them amounted to $8,637. (See Table XIII.) 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$160,612. 

Eight witnesses were detained at station houses; 22,575 were 
accommodated with lodgings, an increase of 12,839 over last 
year. 

There was an increase of 12.86 per cent in the number of sick 
and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about .34 per 
cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the city 
for the five years from 1939 to 1943, inclusive, was $382,532.74; 
in 1943 it was $396,881 or $14,348.26 more than the average. 
The amount of stolen property which was recovered by the 
Boston police this year was $296,792 as against $219,655 last 
year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to note 
that 20,053 persons, or 31.99 per cent of the total arrests during 
the past year, were persons residing outside the city limits of 
Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which Boston is 
called on to perform police work for non-residents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of non-residents. This per- 
centage is so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of 
this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in 
making comparisons of Boston with other cities, either of the 
cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 31.99 per cent of 
the arrests in Boston is of non-residents, whereas other cities 
have but a negligible percentage of arrests of non-residents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1943, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1942, 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below : 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1942. 



Arrests. 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1943. 



Arrests. 



Offenses Against the Person. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Against Propertt Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto' thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offenses Against the Liquor L.^w. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 

Drunkenness 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto', operating under the influence of liquor . 

Auto', operating so as to endanger .... 

Totals 



14 


8 


71 


59 


112 


116 


180 


338 


149 


182 



1,091 



186 
1,830 



96 
35,728 



385 
915 



40,757 



1,011 



153 
2,035 



186 
23,627 



285 
607 



28,607 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called minor 
offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city ordinances, 
gaming and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for the year 
totaled 62,681, of which 56,344 were males and 6,337 were 
females. This total compares with 85,956 for the preceding 
year. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 

This Department, during the past year, has continued its 
cooperation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses : 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by liegUgence. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under S50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. 

The following comparati\'e tables show the number of 
certain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 
1, 1942, to November 30, 1943, as against December 1, 1941, 
to November 30, 1942. 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

A recapitulation of tlu^ foregoing shows the following: 

Cases Per Cent 

Reported. Cleared. Cleared. 

1942 ^ 6,471 5,140 79.43 

1943 6,057 4,937 81.50 

A comparison shows an increase in clearance over 1942 of 
2.07 per cent. 

There was a decrease in cases reported as compared with 
1942 of 414 or 6.39 per cent. 

Volunteer, Unpaid, Auxiliary Police. 

As previously stated, there has been established in the 
Department, in accordance with the Acts of 1941, Chapter 719, 
Section 5, an organization known as the Volunteer AuxiHary 
Police. The members are not to be paid for their services. 
Applicants, classified ''1-A" under the Selective Service Act, 
are not accepted for this duty on account of being subject to 
immediate call for United States military service. 

These men are equipped with a badge, helmet, night stick 
and a flash light. They are also photographed and finger- 
printed, and given the oath of office. 

Duties of the members are restricted to prevention of crime, 
protection of life and property, and such other duties as may 
be assigned to them during an emergency. 

At the present time there are 3,075 men enrolled as Auxiliary 
Policemen. They have undergone an intensive course of 
training to fit them for their duties. 

Volunteer, Unpaid, Auxiliary Police. 
December 13, 1941 (first day of enrollment), to November 
30, 1943, inclusive. 

Appointed and sworn 4,732 

Enrollments cancelled 1,750 

2,982 

Cancellations rescinded 93 

Total number of members in good standing .... 3,075 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1943, receipts 
totaled $86,609.31, as compared with $86,374.67 in the previous 
year. The increase of $234.64 was due to the fact that more 
had been received for licenses. 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1943, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted 
to $6,189,521.84. This included the pay of the police and 
employees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($63,639.21, — 
the annual listing on January 1 of all residents twenty years 
of age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal 
Service. 

During the same period, $1,091.09 was expended for Work 
Relief Materials for Police Department W. P. A. Projects. 
This amount was not included in Pohce Department appro- 
priation. 

In the corresponding period of 1942, expenditures totalled 
$5,969,528.12. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 

Personnel. 

The police personnel of the Department on November 30, 
1943, consisted of 1 Superintendent, 5 Deputy Superintendents, 
31 Captains, 66 Lieutenants, 1 Lieutenant-Inspector, 187 
Sergeants, 1,973 Patrolmen, 45 Military-Substitute Patrolmen, 
108 Provisional Temporary Patrolmen, and 9 Provisional 
Temporary Patrolwomen; total, 2,426. 

On November 30, 1943, there was a total of 2,627 persons, 
including civilian employees, on the rolls of the Department. 

During the year in General Orders, officers were commended 
as follows : 

Captains, 3; Sergeants, 9; Patrolmen, 61; and the De- 
partment in general, 1. 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1943 and Department 
Medals of Honor were awarded, as recommended by the 
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendents, serving as a 
Board of Merit, at the annual ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 1, 1943, as 
follows : 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1943 and a De- 
partment Medal of Honor to Patrolman James A. 
Powers, Formerly of the Traffic Division, Now 
OF the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 
Patrolman James A. Powers, formerly of the Traffic Division, 

is hereby awarded the Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1943^ 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

and a Department Medal of Honor for courageous duty per- 
formed on February 5, 1943, in the capture of a notorious 
bandit, who a short time before had shot point-blank at a 
woman in an automobile at a stop-light intersection in the 
Back Bay. Patrolman Powers was informed that the bandit 
had entered another automobile, whereupon the officer pro- 
ceeded to the car with drawn revolver, ordered the bandit 
to drop the gun and was immediately shot at by the gunman, 
the bullet ripping off the officer's badge. 

The Commissioner recognizes and commends the courageous 
and fearless action of Patrolman Powers who imperiled his 
life in the capture of this dangerous criminal. 

Department Medals or Honor. 

Sergeant Charles C. Flaherty and Patrolmen Daniel F. 
Hooley, Jr., and Leo H. Neville, all attached to Division 13, 
are each awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meri- 
torious service rendered in the early morning of October 21, 
1943, wherein several children were rescued from the third 
floor of a burning dwelling. 

Patrolman John T. Finnerty, attached to Division 15, is 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor for heroic conduct 
displayed on July 3, 1943, in diving from the Alford street 
bridge to rescue a woman from drowning. 

Patrolmen Joseph W. Allen and Richard H. Hickey, both 
attached to Di\'ision 4, are each awarded a Department Medal 
of Honor for meritious duty performed on the night of Febru- 
ary 23, 1943, in effecting the capture of three men who were 
participating in an armed hold-up in the South End. 

Patrolman Edmond J. Farrell, Jr., of Division 4, is awarded 
a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious service per- 
formed in effecting the rescue of a woman from drowning on 
June 9, 1943, by diving into the waters of Fort Point Channel. 

Patrolmen Lawrence P. Daly and John F. Abraham, both 
attached to Di^^sion 9, are each awarded a Department Medal 
of Honor for meritorious duty performed on the night of 
October 28, 1943, in the capture of an armed bandit, who 
attempted to shoot Patrolman Daly, and who was one of a 
group who had committed a series of armed hold-ups. 

The presentations of the Walter Scott Medal for Valor 
and the Department Medals of Honor to the officers mentioned 
herein were made by the Commissioner at the Concert and 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Ball of the Boston Police Relief Association at the Boston 
Garden on the evening of December 1, 1943. 

In 1943, 5,814 days were lost by officers by reason of injuries 
received while on duty. 



1942. 
December 



During the year, 3 patrolmen were dismissed from the 
Department for violation of Pohce Rules and Regulations; 9 
patrolmen were punished by suspension with loss of pay or 
extra duty, or both. Complaints against 2 patrolmen were 
dismissed after hearing. Complaint against one patrolman 
w'as dismissed without hearing after he w'as found not guilty 
in the Suffolk Superior Court. One patrolman resigned while 
charges were pending. 

Organization. 

General 
Order No. 
14, 866 Plan of the City of Boston Committee on 
Pubhc Safety for "State Wide Black- 
out," to be held between Sunday mid- 
night, December 13, and Saturday 
midnight, December 19, 1942. 
December 24, 875 Subject of "Protective Lighting" as 

presented by the Massachusetts Com- 
mittee on Public Safety. 
Communication from the War Produc- 
tion Board, Lessing J. Rosenwald, 
Director, concerning survey to be 
made in this city regarding certain 
items made of copper, brass and 
bronze metals. 



December 29, 876 



1943. 
January 



5, 880 Executive Order No. 45 of the Governor, 
regarding provision to be made to re- 
lieve and assist persons unable to pro- 
vide adequate shelter and care for 
themselves by reason of shortage of 
fuel oil. 
January 5, 881 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of movement of military per- 
sonnel during "blackouts." 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



25 



January 5, 882 



Announcement of tlie Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of "Blackout Regulations." 



January 5, 



January 



883 Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of "Dimout Enforcement." 



January 14, 885 



884 Department instructed to proceed with 
registration of bicycles in accordance 
with provisions of chapter 710, Acts 
of 1941, providing for such registra- 
tion. 

Executive Order of the Governor re- 
garding the subject of fuel oil, avail- 
able for heating of dwellings, being 
diverted to other uses. 

January 14, 886 Executive Order No. 48 of the Governor 

regarding use of privately owned 
motor vehicles for carriage of addi- 
tional persons. 

January 19, 887 Executive Order No. 47 of the Governor 

regarding adequate care and custody 
at centers of children of mothers and 
other women charged with the health 
and welfare of such children. 

January 28, 893 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety, on the 
subject of Lighting of Vehicles from 
one-half hour after sunset to one-half 
hour before sunrise, except during 
"blackouts." 

January 30, 894 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety regarding 
movement of the State Guard during 
"blackout." 

February 2, 895 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety regarding 
movement of the Civil Air Patrol when 
on duty on foot. 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



February 3, 899 



February 16. 904 



February 16. 905 



February 26, 910 



March 22, 921 



March 27, 924 



April 2, 929 



Communication, dated February 1, 
1943, from the Massachusetts State 
Office of Price Administration by 
John M. Deely, State Rationing 
Officer, concerning a "rescue plan," 
to cover hardship emergencies arising 
through inability of citizens to obtain 
kerosene oil through regular channels. 

Executive Order No. 52 of the Governor, 
regarding compliance with rules and 
regulations governing "blackout," 
control of lighting and radio, move- 
ment of A'Chicles and other convey- 
ances and activities of persons during 
periods of blackout and air raid. 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety con- 
cerning a test of new audible air-raid 
signals. 

Announcement of the City of Boston 
Committee on Public Safety, regard- 
ing a test blackout for the entire City 
of Boston. 

Announcement of increase in basic rates 
of pay for grades of police officers 
below that of Captain, effective as of 
January 1, 1943. 

During absence of Police Commissioner 
Joseph F. Timilty, commencing as of 
Saturday, March 27, 1943, and during 
period of time Edward W. Fallon is 
relieved of his duties as Superin- 
tendent of Police, commencing also, 
as of March 27, 1943,— Captain 
Thomas S. J. Kavanagh, of the Super- 
intendent's Office, designated to serve 
as Acting-Police Commissioner and 
Acting-Superintendent of Police. 

Deputy Superintendent Wilham J. Carey 
designated to serve as Acting-Inspec- 
tor of Divisions. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

April 26, 945 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on PubUc Safety on the 
subject of Extinguishing Street Lights 
During Blackout. 

May 3, 956 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of re-lighting of street lights 
on "All Clear" signal. 

May 10, 959 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety regarding 
a Surprise Test Mobilization. 

May 19, 970 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety regarding 
sounding a new "All Clear Signal." 

May 21, 971 Announcement of the Office of Price 

Administration, Washington, D. C, 
on the subject of a ban on non- 
essential automobile driving. 

May 22, 975 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of Guards for Report Centers. 

May 25, 977 Attention of all members of the depart- 

ment directed to the observance of 
Policemen's Memorial Day, Sunday, 
June 6, 1943. 

June 2, 984 Appointment of ten Provisional Tem- 

porary Policewomen. 

June 4, 988 Joseph F. Timilty, PoUce Commis- 

sioner, resumed duties of his office, 
and Captain Thomas S. J. Kavanagh 
was relieved as Acting-Police Com- 
missioner. 

June 9, 993 Executive Order No. 55 of the Governor 

regarding revision and modification of 
the rules and regulations promulgated 
November 27, 1942, in Executive 
Order on control, elimination or re- 
duction of fights. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

June 10, 994 Announcement of the Fifth Annual 

Police Memorial Mass, to be cele- 
brated Sunday, June 20, 1943, in the 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, and fol- 
lowed by a Communion Breakfast. 

June 18, 1003 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of "Trial Testing of Air-raid 
Warning Signals." 

July 7, 1023 Deputy Superintendent William J. Carey 

relieved of duties as Acting-Inspector 
of Divisions. 

July 7, 1024 Attention of the Department called to 

importance of affording proper police 
protection to Victory Gardens located 
throughout the city upon private and 
public property. 

July 13, 1033 Announcement of reorganization of 

Emergency Battalion of the Depart- 
ment, settmg out names of officers 
selected to comprise the new Bat- 
talion. 

July 20, 1039 Announcement of the City of Boston 

Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of "Duties and Responsibilities of 
A. R. P. Personnel Under New Air- 
raid Warning System." 

July 20, 1040 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on the 
subject of "Industrial Plants, Facil- 
ities and Utilities During Blackout 
and Air Raid." 

August 5, 1049 GeneralOrder No. 370of July 21, 1939, 

calling for daily reports of offenses and 
arrests in sectors of Divisions, re- 
scinded. 

August 6, 1050 Establishment of a Crime Prevention 

Bureau within the Department, to be 
located at Police Headquarters. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



2& 



August 25, 1062 
September 1, 1064 



September 13, 1069 



September 22, 1073 



October 9, 1092 



October 16. 1102 



October 20, 1105 



October 25, 1107 
October 26, 1108 

October 29, 1113 



Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on PubUc Safety, regard- 
ing "Dimout" and "Skyglow." 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety regarding 
subject of "How Civihans May Aid 
Themselves if War Gas is Used 
Against Them." 

Announcement of the City of Bo.ston 
Committee on Public Safety regarding 
Surprise Test Mobilization for entire 
City of Boston, to take place sometime 
between midnight, Sunday, Septem- 
ber 12, 1943, and midnight, Saturday, 
September 25, 1943. 

Announcing appointment of 106 Pro- 
visional Temporary Patrolmen. 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety regarding 
subject, "The Time has not come for 
Demobilization of Civilian Defense." 
(President Roosevelt.) 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of "Manning of Report Centers." 

Announcement of the City of Boston 
Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of "Blackout with Field Test 
Exercises" on evening of October 21, 
1943. 

Request for pledges of members of the 
Department to the Greater Boston 
United War Fund Drive. 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of "Participation of Industry in 
Practice Air Raid Drills." 

Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of "Butterfly Bombs." 



30 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



No vembe r 4 , 11 20 



November 8, 1122 



November 24, 1132 



November 24, 1133 



Announcement of the Massachusetts 
Committee on PubUc Safety on sub- 
ject of suspension of ''dimout," as of 
November 1, 1943. 

Communication from the Governor of 
the Commonwealth, Leverett Salton- 
stall, to the PoUce Commissioner on 
subject of maintaining our CiviUan 
Defense and Warning System. 

Executive Order No. 63 of the Massa- 
chusetts Committee on Public Safety 
regarding suspension of "dimout" re- 
quirements. 

Executive Order No. 64 of the Governor 
on subject of scrap materials and junk 
for use in prosecution of existing war. 



November 26, 1 Colonel Thomas F. Sullivan appointed 

Police Commissioner to succeed Hon. 
Joseph F. Timilty, whose term of ofl&ce 
had expired. 

November 26, 3 Deputy Superintendent James F. Daley 

relieved of duties as Commanding 
Officer of the Bureau of Records and 
designated to serve as Acting-Super- 
intendent of Police in place of Edward 
W. Fallon, Superintendent of Police, 
who had been relieved of his duties. 

November 26, 4 Captain James T. Sheehan detailed to 

the Superintendent's Office and desig- 
nated to serve as Acting-Inspector of 
Divisions. 

November 30, 7 Announcement of the Massachusetts 

Committee on Public Safety on sub- 
ject of a Massachusetts Test Air-Raid 
Demonstration Drill, December 12, 
1943. 



1944.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 
Its Organization and Duties. 

This Bureau, a central detective agency of the Department, 
consists of several subdivisions, and is operated on a large 
scale and in an efficient manner. 

In addition to its divisions for investigation of reports of 
automobiles stolen, lost and stolen property, and homicides, 
(as well as supervision of the line-up), — squads are assigned 
to cover the following phases of police work and investigation: 
arson, banking, express thieves, general investigation, hotels, 
narcotics, pawnbrokers, including junk shopkeepers and 
dealers in second-hand articles, pickpocket, radical, shopping 
and a night piotor-patrol squad. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds 
of investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
prosecution of criminals. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made 
in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department and immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile division index contains records of approxi- 
mately 700,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing per- 
sons and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the Department and the 
Automobile Division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for U.sed Car Dealers' Licenses are inves- 
tigated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations 
are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this 
division during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Used Car Dealers^ Licenses Granted. 

During the year 144 applications for such licenses were 
received. Of these 144 were granted (1 without fee). 

Of, the licenses granted, 4 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation, and 5 transferred to new locations. (See Table 
XIV.) 

Provision for Hearing Before Granting License as Used Car 
Dealer of the Third Class. 
Under provisions of Chapter 96, Acts of 1938, effective 
June 13, 1938, no license shall be issued to a person as a Used 
Car Dealer of the Third Class (Motor Vehicle Junk License) 
until after hearing, of which seven days' notice shall have been 
given to owners of property abutting on premises where such, 
license is proposed to be exercised. 

Hearings to the number of 25 were held under this provision 
of law. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1943. 





Bought by 


Sold by 


Sold by 




Dealers. 


Dealers. 


Individuals. 


1942. 








December 


1,120 


745 


1,416 


1943. 








January 


965 


639 


1,200 


Febioiary 








874 


659 


764 


March . 








1,501 


1,078 


1,501 


April 








1,408 


1,152 


1,623 


May 








1,546 


1,282 


1,756 


June 








1,534 


1,155 


1,465 


July 








1,377 


1,304 


1,659 


August . 








1,259 


1,223 


1,476 


September 








1,642 


1,199 


1,397 


October . 








1,519 


1,160 


1,351 


November 








1,204 


932 


1,280 


Totals . 


15,949 


12,528 


16,888 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Record of A II A utomobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year 
Ending November 30, 1943. 



Month. 


heported 
Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


December 

January 

February 

March 

April . 

May . 

June . 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 


1942. 
1943. 






212 

149 
145 
225 
241 
253 
215 
147 
193 
341 
299 
275 


211 

146 
142 
219 
238 
250 
208 
138 
189 
331 
292 
268 


3 

2 
4 
3 
3 

4 
9 
2 

4 
4 


1 

1 
2 

3 

2 
6 
3 

7 


Totals 


2,695 


2,632 


38 


25 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found in 
this city is filed in this division. All the surrounding cities 
and towns and many other cities forward lists of property 
stolen in such places to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or 
purchased. A comparison of the description of articles lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth 
of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
secondhand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased, for the purpose of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 

Homicide Squad. 
It is the duty of officers of this unit to investigate and 
prosecute all homicide cases. They are required to interrogate 
all persons involved in or who have knowledge of the commis- 
sion of crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion or other 
crimes of \aolence. Cases assigned to inquest are prepared 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan 



and presented by officers of this unit. The officers assigned 
to homicide work, with poHce stenographers, are subject to 
call throughout the day and night. The confessions and 
statements obtained by members of this unit have proven of 
inestimable value in the successful prosecution of capital 
cases. 

The homicide files contain complete reports of all inquests 
and deaths by violence in Boston and also a record of all 
accidents reported to the Police Department. 

The following is a report of the Homicide Unit of the Bureau 
of Criminal Investiga-tion of all deaths reported to this unit 
for the period of December 1, 1942, to November 30, 1943, 
inclusive : 



Alcoholism . 




45 


Horse and wagon 


1 


Asphyxiation 




18 


Machinery . 


4 


Automobile 




73 


Natural causes . 


663 


Burns . 




10 


Poison 


2 


Coasting 




1 


Railway (steam) 


10 


Drowning 




29 


Railway (street) 


18 


Elevator 




13 


Stillborn 


12 


Falls . 




61 


Suicides 


48 


Falhng objects 




2 






Fires . 




17 


Total . 


1,041 


Homicides . 




14 






The following c 


ases were pre 


>secuted in the courts: 




Abortions . 


2 


Conspiracy to c o m m i 




Accessory to abortion 


2 


abortion . 


2 


Assault and battery . 


2 


Manslaughter . 


4 


Assault with intent to 


rape, 1 


Manslaughter (auto' ) 


65 


Assault to murder 


4 


Murder . . . . 


4 


Assault with wea 


pon 


8 




— 



Total .... 
The following inquests were held during the year: 

by police 



Assault and battery . 
Auto' fatality 
Fall . . . . 
Falling objects . 



Felon killed 

officer 
Railway (street) 

Total . 



94 



Three hundred and thirteen cases of violent deaths were 
investigated by the Homicide Unit. The presiding justices 
of the courts deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in 
these cases, acting under authority of Section 8, Chapter 38, 
General Laws (Ter. Edit.), as amended. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 

Recapitulation of Homicides. 

Murders 4 

4 murderers prosecuted. 

No unsolved murders. 
Manslaughters (homicidal) 8 

4 prosecutions. 

4 unsolved manslaughters; of these, one was an infanticide 
case and three were fatalities resulting from simple 
assaults. 
Killed by police officers 2 

(in hue of duty.) 

Total 14 

General. 

Members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation during 
the year made investigations on 4,865 cases. Our files and 
assignment books now contain records and reports on 72,636 
cases. Complaints are received from many sources, includmg 
cases referred to the Bureau by justices of courts, the District 
Attorney, Attorney-General, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and hundreds of outside police agencies. 

Statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation are included in the general work of the Department, 
but as the duties of the Bureau are of a special character, the 
following statement will be found to be of interest: 

Number of persons arrested 1,645 

Fugitives from justice from other states arrested and delivered 

to officers of these states 69 

Number of cases investigated 4,865 

Number of extra duties performed 6,934 

Number of cases of abortion investigated 2 

Number of days spent in court by officers 2,014 

Number of years' imprisonment: 169 years, 5 months, 2 days 

and 41 indefinite periods. 
Amount of property recovered . . . . . . . $76,801 . 34 



36 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST. 

Summary of the Year's Work. 

Work at the Laboratory. 

The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department 

is located at the Southern Mortuary, and since its opening in 

1934 has worked on 2,760 cases. The average annual number 

of cases for the last five years was 326. During the past year 

330 cases were submitted to the laboratory. 

The number of individual tests per case varies widely 
according to the type of case, but during the course of the 
year the total number of tests will range from 3,000 to 3,500. 
A partial breakdown of the cases into types of work shows 
more clearlv the nature of the chemist's work. 





No. of 




No. of 


Material Sought. 


Cases. 


Material Sought. 


Cases. 


Alcohol, ethyl 


215 


General toxicology exam 


2 


Chloral 


10 


Misc. clinical analyses 


9 


Cyanides 


5 


Bloodstains 


38 


Phenols 


4 


Photographs 


20 


Phosphorus 


3 


Powder residue, hands 


11 


Other volatile poisons 


4 


Spermatozoa 


6 


Barbiturates 


16 


Tissue .... 


5 


Sahcylates . 


4 


Spectrographic analyses 


4 


Other synthetics 


6 


Glass .... 


3 


Alkaloids 


5 


X-ray .... 


3 


Arsenic 


4 


Hair and fiber . 


3 


Mercury 


4 


Powder residue, cloth 


2 


Lead .... 


2 


Dirt .... 


2 


Other metals 


2 


Paint .... 


2 


Carbon monoxide 


33 


Tire prints . 


2 


Fluorides . 


19 


Inflammables 


1 


Chlorides (drowning) 

A Ai 7 /- ti n 


4 

7 ■ - 7 /n 


Miscellaneous 

7 'A Ti .f T 7- •_? 


11 

71 - _7 • _ 



Attendance of the Biological Chemist Before Judicial Bodies. 

In addition to work in the laboratory on case material, 
the chemist has been in attendance on courts and grand juries 
on 98 days during the past twelve months. 

Toxicological Problems. 
The bulk of the routine analytical work in the laboratory 
is toxicological in nature. Outstanding is the number of cases 
examined for presence of alcohol, analyses being made in 65 per 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

cent of the cases. That this is not unusual may be seen from 
the average vahie for the five years, 1939-1943, where analyses 
for alcohol were made in 64 per cent of the cases. Alcohol is 
found present in a high percentage of cases involving accidental 
death from various causes, as well as in homicidal cases. 

Carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as barbiturates, have 
continued their usual frequency. The slightly higher number 
of monoxide cases this year has arisen from several fires in 
which there were multiple deaths. 

In more recent years fluoride has been commonly used as 
an insect poison with frequent accidental deaths as well as 
some suicides. An experimental check of quantitative analyti- 
cal methods during the past year has produced an abnormally 
high percentage of fluoride cases, although some of the investi- 
gation was an outgrowth of the "Cocoanut Grove" disaster. 

The fact that most of the cases involving toxicological work 
do not enter the criminal courts tends to obscure the essential 
nature of the work. Sudden deaths must be investigated, and 
in such deaths by poison (accidental or suicidal) knowledge 
of the poison taken and of its amount is necessary for an 
opinion as to the cause of death, as well as to circumstances 
surrounding that death. Such knowledge may forestall or be 
an integral part of a civil suit or of a claim for compensation. 

Technical Work on Criminal Cases. 

The laboratory serves as a clearing house of technical work 
on highly-varied aspects of criminal cases. While this work 
has developed chiefly from investigation of homicides, many 
phases of it are applicable to other types of cases. The func- 
tion of the laboratory is to examine the scene, weapon, defend- 
ant, clothing, etc., selecting concrete physical evidence which 
is examined, analyzed, etc., in the laboratory for such informa- 
tion as may have bearing on the crime, the defendant's partici- 
pation in it, etc. 

In some instances the case is purely circumstantial and 
based solely on technical evidence. In many others, the 
laboratory's work serves to check or modify statements made 
by witnesses, to clear points of confusion, or to fill a minor gap 
in recollection. In others, the case is the product of close 
cooperation between the laboratory and investigating ofl&cers, 
each using the other's information as it is developed. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

There have been a number of interesting cases in the past 
year, of which two are excellent examples of this cooperation. 

In one, a hit-and-run car, after striking the deceased, was 
involved in a subsequent accident causing property damage. 
Officers found at the scene of the fatal accident a fragment of 
headlamp lens which matched exactly a fragment found at the 
scene of property damage. This clearly established the re- 
sponsibility of one car for both accidents. Witnesses provided 
little information, but investigation by the officers produced 
a damaged car which also showed a new headlamp bulb and 
lens. The new bulb and lens were traced. The old lens was 
like the fragments and the dimout paint appeared similar. At 
the laboratory the lens was examined, also the dimout paint, 
and compared to that on the fragments from the two scenes. 
Examination of the underparts of the car revealed scratch- 
marks in the adherent dirt, and fragments of plant material. 
These fragments were taken to the laboratory and compared 
to parts of a hedge which the hit-and-run car passed over after 
jumping a curb and knocking down an iron fence. From these 
laboratory data a circumstantial case was prepared for prosecu- 
tion. However, the investigating officers continued theirwork 
and located a passenger in that car who admitted remembrance 
of jumping the curb. This corroboration of the laboratory 
evidence made the case complete. 

Similarly, in a homicide by kicking, investigation produced 
a suspect whose trousers showed blood spatters on the legs; 
whose shoes showed a tiny bit of epidermis (outer layer of the 
skin), a minute fragment of bone, and extensive bloodstains; 
and whose hat showed some dirt, blood spots, and a small 
fragment of bone adherent in a blood spot. From this evi- 
dence a circumstantial case was prepared. Further investiga- 
tion by the officers located a witness who saw the deceased 
kicked. 

These cases illustrate the variety of material examined at the 
laboratory, and the manner in which physical evidence is used 
to develop a case, fill gaps between witnesses' statements, etc., 
to produce a complete case for trial. 

Cooperation with Other Agencies. 
During the past year few lectures were given. The chemist 
cooperated in the Medico-Legal Conference sponsored by the 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 49. 39 

Massachusetts Medico-Legal Society and the Department 
of Legal Medicine of Harvard University with a discussion of 
hit-and-run automobile cases, and at the seminar with a 
discussion of barbiturates and narcotics. 

There has also been occasion to cooperate with law enforce- 
ment agencies in other New England states with suggestions 
or work on evidence. 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF RECORDS. 
Establishment, Purpose and Equipment. 

The Bureau of Records was established October 17, 1931, as 
a central correspondence and filing unit in the Department. 
It consists of several separate divisions, namely: criminal 
identification, fingerprints and photographs, missing persons, 
warrants and summonses. 

It is one of the outstanding units of the organization and its 
value to the Department is indispensable. It stands in favor- 
able comparison with identification units of the most advanced 
departments. 

Advancements and changes are constantly bemg made to 
maintain efficiency and to increase the worth of the unit to the 
Department as a whole. 

To bring about this efficiency of service, equipment of the 
Bureau is continually being augmented by addition of modern 
identification apparatus. 

The followmg is a partial list of such machines which have 
constantly proved their value to the Department and which 
are numbered among the equipment of the modern police 
department : 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic — Graflex back, fitted with Kalart Synchronized 
Range Finder 5j" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in Compus Shutter, 
No. 2049398 (ground glass back). 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic, fitted with Graphic back and Kalart Synchronized 
Range Finder 5i" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens, No. 1504117 in Compus 
Shutter. 

1 4x5 Speed Graphic, fitted with Graflex back and Carl Zeiss Tessar lens 
in barrel. No. 797021, 6" focal lens, ground glass back. 

1 Dexigraph machine. 

1 4x5 revolving back Graflex with focusing ground glass panel on back 
with 8" Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in barrel. No. 595980. 

1 4x5 revolving back auto Graflex, fitted with a Bausch and Lomb con- 
vertible Frota lens 16 3/16" focus, front element. No. 3232563. 

1 5x7 Speed Graphic fitted with Graflex back and ground glass panel, 
Carl Zeiss Tessar lens in sunk mount 7" focal- length. No. 1124860. 

4 Fingerprint cameras, Folner and Schwing, with 72 millimeter Kodak 
anastigmatic F 6.3 lens, Nos. 2534, 585, 1806 and 14188. 

1 4x5 box camera Ilex paragon lens, series A 6^" focus. No. 41619 in Uni- 
versal shutter. 

1 Lens for 4x5 box camera, Ilex Paragon, series A88608. 

1 16 Millimeter Cine-Kodak special and fitted with 19-25 M.M. lens, also 
with 3" telephoto 2.7 wide angle and 6" telephoto. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

1 Century view camera 8x10 and lens, 1 12" Kodak anastigmatic lens, 
No. 36465, 1 Bau.sch and Lomb wide-angle 8x10 Prota, No. 3234300. 
1 Goertz-Gotar lens, No. 755175 for 11x14 half-tone camera. 
1 5x7 enlarging camera Kodak, anastigmatic lens, No. 337770. 

1 SxlOenlarging-reducing and copying camera. 

2 Hugo-Meyer range finders 4x5 Speed Graphic Carl Zeiss 51" lens with 

13.5 focal length. 
1 Rectigraph camera with a 10" Woolensock lens and prism. 
1 8x10 Pantoscopic Camera with a Bausch and Lomb 50 M.M. Tessar 

lens, No. 2612072, and a 72 M.M. Micro Tessar Bausch and Lomb 

lens, No. 3234901. 
1 Campbell combination X-llay and Fluoroscope, Serial No. 7318. 

1 Spencer lantern-slide projector. 

2 Mimeograph machines. 
1 19" cutting machine. 

1 Multilith machine, complete with equipment. 
1 High-Speed electric addressograph. 

Multilith. 

Installation of a Multilith machine, January 31, 1934, under 
direct supervision of experienced operators, enables this De- 
partment to prepare and complete printing of circulars con- 
taining photographs and fingerprints of persons either reported 
missing or wanted for criminal offenses. The original cost 
of this machine has been saved many times over in the efficient 
method of printing such circulars in the Bureau. It has 
proved a distinct advantage in issuance of these circulars 
which play so important a part in apprehension of fugitives 
from justice. 

The Multilith machine is completely equipped with cameras 
for preparation of half-tones which add to the varied output 
of the machine. This machine is capable of printing in approx- 
imately two hours descriptive circulars of persons wanted, and 
in some cases it is possible to complete and mail such circulars 
to outside cities before the fugitive arrives at his destination. 

• 
Output of Daily Manifolds, Wan-ajit Manifolds, etc. 

There were 499,275 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machines, comprising daily manifolds for the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation and other units, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins and circular letters. 

There were 12 forms and circulars photographed and 12 
forms printed in upon a zinc plate. There were approximately 
12 Multihth plates used by this unit in the past year and 6 
films used. 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Circulars Drafted, Containing Photographs and Fingerprints of 

Fugitives. 
During the year 15,000 circulars, containing photographs 
and fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed 
from this office to every city and town in the United States 
with a population of 5,000 or more, State bureaus of identi- 
fication, all Army and Navy recruiting stations, and a number 
of the larger cities in foreign countries. Circulars requesting 
cooperation in the return of seven missing persons were sent 
to all important cities in the East and practically to every city 
in Massachusetts. 

Multilith Recapitulation. 
Impressions printed on the Multilith machine . . 171,250 
Included in this figure are the following: 

Department forms 34 

Letters 9 

Circulars 3 



Photographic Division. 

The Photographic Division of the Bureau of Records is one 
of the finest and most modern in the entire country. Its 
equipment has been continually added to and renewed with a 
view of maintaining a high standard of service. 

It forms an important adjunct of the Medical Examiners' 
offices and cooperates with those offices in all homicide cases. 
The Medical Examiners' offices are supplied with enlarged 
photographs of every homicide case. The efficient operation 
of the Medical Examiners' offices is improved by the coopera- 
tion of this Unit. 

Enlarged photographs are filed in cabinets especially built 
to accommodate the size. The enlarged photographs are 
principally scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and 
suspicious fires, and have proved invaluable for court purposes. 
Many communications have been received as a result of the 
value of these photographs, particularly in arson cases. Juries 
have been greatly assisted in determining the condition of 
burnt premises by introduction and exhibition of these photo- 
graphs in court. This same excellent effect is obtained in 
homicide and hit-and-run cases. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

Record Files of Assignments. 
Files of this Bureau contain records of all assignments made 
in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, also all records of 
arrests made throughout the Department. There are also on 
file reports of all felonies committed within the city and all 
reports of the investigation of these felonies. 

Identification Division. 
In the Identification Division records are kept of all persons 
committed to the Massachusetts State Prison, Massachusetts 
Reformatory for Women, including their fingerprints and 
photographs; also records of all inmates of the Suffolk County 
House of Correction and their fingerprints. The keepers of 
jails and houses of correction in the several counties of the 
Commonwealth have been requested to furnish this Bureau 
with a copy of the fingerprints of every inmate and they have 
responded favorably. In addition to the foregoing, the files 
contain many thousands of photographs and fingerprints, 
correspondence, records, clippings and histories of criminals 
arrested or wanted in various parts of the United States 
and foreign countries. 

Main Index File. 
The Main Index File forms the basis on which all other 
files are dependent. It is at all times being checked to main- 
tain accuracy. There are now recorded in the Main Index 
File 796,700 persons. These include all persons arrested and 
fingerprinted in the Bureau, applicants for Hackney Carriage 
Licenses and applicants for Special Officers' Licenses, etc. 

Criminal Record Files. 
The Criminal Record Files contain a record of each person 
whose fingerprints are contained in the fingerprint files. At 
the present time there are in the Female Record Files 13,350 
records and in the Male Record Files there are 155,718 such 
records. These records are continually being brought up to 
date by cooperation with outside departments and the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation. 

Cabinets of Segregated Photographs of Criminals Arrested. 
Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston police and 
photographs received from other sources are filed in segregated 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

cabinets. Photographs received from outside departments 
are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file and those taken by 
this Department are in the "Local Segregated" file. Photo- 
graphs of all criminals are segregated into four distinct sections, 
namely, white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each of these groups 
is subdivided according to sex and also classified under head of 
the crime in which the subjects specialize. The "Local 
Segregated" file contains 41,092 photographs and the "For- 
eign Segregated" file, 17,988 photographs. 

Exhibiting of Photographs of Criminals in Main and 
Segregated Files. 

The Identification Division has rendered efficient and 
beneficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, pickpockets, etc. 

In many instances, important identifications have been 
made which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valu- 
able assistance has also been rendered to government officials 
of the following branches: Post Office, Treasury and Secret 
Service Departments, Federal Bureau of Investigation and 
other government agencies. Similar services have also been 
rendered to railroad and express companies. 

Members of Bureau Visited Scenes of Homicides, 
Burglaries, etc. 
Members of this Bureau visited scenes of homicides, bur- 
glaries, robberies, suspicious fires and other crimes and secured 
photographs of fingerprints, in many instances of the persons 
who committed these crimes. In many cases photographs 
were taken of the scene where the crime was committed. The 
figures and other data in connection with the work are con- 
tained in a subsequent part of this report. 

Ultra-Violet Lamp {"Black Light"). 
This Bureau has successfully continued in the operation of 
an ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black hght." 
This type of lamp is used for detection of forgeries on checks 
and altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counterfeit money, 
fake antiques and also for photographing of bloodstained 
fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not be photographed 
are now photographed with ease through the use of luminous 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

powders such as anthracene or luminous zinc sulphide, due to 
radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The " Fluoroscope" and "White Drill." 
There have been acquired by this Bureau two valuable pieces 
of scientific equipment. The first is known as the "Fluoro- 
scope." When the rays of this instrument are trained on the 
subject before it, it reveals presence of any foreign substance 
concealed cither on or in his person, for instance, jewelry, 
metal or glass. The finding of glass in clothing on a person 
suspected of striking and killing a pedestrian with an auto- 
mobile is another example of what the instrument may accom- 
plish in detection of crime and criminals. The same is none 
the less true of inanimate objects, such as packages contain- 
ing bombs, or concealed defects in the mechanism of an auto- 
mobile or other object, which may be responsible for serious 
accidents or death of persons. The value of this device in 
thwarting criminals is very apparent and makes an important 
addition to the scientific equipment contained in this Bureau. 
The second piece of equipment before referred to is the 
"White Drill," purchased for the purpose of repairing photo- 
graphic equipment. This work had been done by commercial 
concerns, but is now performed, to the greatest possible extent, 
by photographers attached to this Bureau, resulting in a large 
saving. 

Pantoscopic Camera. 
One of the most valuable pieces of equipment in the Bureau 
is the Pantoscopic camera, used for the purpose of taking 
photographs of bullets connected with homicide cases. By 
means of this camera the entire circumference of the bullet 
showing cannelure impressions made as it passes through the 
barrel of the revolver can be photographed. Impressions 
shown by the photograph of this bullet are carefully compared 
with impressions of a test bullet fired from a revolver believed 
to have been used in the homicide. If the test bullet and the 
real bullet disclose the same cannelure impressions, there is 
strong presumption created that the revolver under examina- 
tion was the one used in the homicide. 

Developing and Printing Room. 
Developing and printing of criminal photographs by mem- 
bers of this Bureau has, since its existence, saved thousands 
of dollars. The original practice of having this work done by 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

private photographers necessarily led to great expense and 
delay. A staff of experienced photographers trained in every 
phase of police photography and on duty twenty-four hours a 
day, is prepared to accomplish any photographic need of the 
Department, and to give that type of service which could be 
rendered only by the most modern and best equipped 
photographer. 

In conjunction with increased demands constantly made 
on this staff of technicians, and in order that their work might 
be maintained on an efficient basis, there has been installed 
in the Bureau a developing and printing room which compares 
favorably with that of any in this locality. 

Installation of this "dark room" has many favorable advan- 
tages. It is located on the same floor as the Bureau where 
all photographs of prisoners are taken, thus eliminating necessity 
formerly followed of developing and printing in a separate part 
of the building. The room is large, containing twice the floor 
space of the old room, has large sinks for washing films, a 
Ferrotype dryer and other equipment for production of work of 
high standard. This has been one of the major changes in 
recent years in the Bureau and represents a definite forward 
step in the photographic division. 

Filing System of Photographs and Fingerprints of Unidentified 

Dead. 
A modern development of the photographic division was the 
installation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and photo- 
graphs of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints are 
first sent to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and to the 
Army, Navy and Marine Corps, in such cases where the persons 
are of enlistment age, in an effort to identify these dead. Fail- 
ing in this, they are filed in the Bureau of Records for future 
reference. Through this method, a large proportion of the 
tentatively unidentified dead were later identified and their 
relatives notified. 

Single-F^inger print Files. 
The single-fingerprint files have great potential value in 
making identifications of persons committing crime. Hereto- 
fore, single fingerprints, or two or three, as the case might be, 
taken at the scene of the crime, were valuable only for com- 
parison with the ten fingerprints of the person under suspicion. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

whether his prints were then in our files or taken later. There 
was no method of filing latent fingerprints taken at the scene of 
crime up to comparatively recent origination of the single- 
fingerprint system of filing by Chief Inspector Battley of the 
Fingerprint Di^'ision of Scotland Yard, England. The Battley 
system of single-fingerprints is installed in the Bureau of 
Records, and does not weaken in any way the standard system 
of filing fingerprints, but is a very valuable addition thereto. 
There are, at present, on file in this Bureau, 20,100 Battley 
smgle fingerprints and 2,050 latent fingerprints which are 
compared with all in-coming single fingerprints. 

Fingerprint System Practically Eliminating Bertillon System. 
The fingerprint system has practically eliminated the Ber- 
tillon system as means of criminal identification. During the 
year identity of hundreds of criminals was established for this 
and other departments through the fingerprint files of this 
Bureau. Identification of persons wanted for murder and 
robbery while armed was among the most important made. 

Civilia n-Fingerprint File. 
Another important development of this Bureau was institu- 
tion of the civilian-fingerprint file, wherein are kept finger- 
prints of certain license applicants w'ith suitable index attached. 

Its Use in Connection With Applicants for Licenses. 
By means of the segregated file, it is impossible for a person 
with a criminal record, whose fingerprints are on file, to obtain 
a license under an assumed name, because by comparing his 
fingerprints with those in the civilian-fingerprint file, it is a 
matter of only a minute to determine whether the particular 
applicant has ever had, or applied for, a license before. There 
are now contained in the civilian files fingerprints and criminal 
records, if any, of 13,883 hackney carriage drivers, 641 sight- 
seeing automobile drivers and 4,586 special police officers. 

Displacement of Conley-Flak System of Fingerprint 
Classificafion. 
The Conley-Flak system of fingerprint classification and 
filing, in operation in the Boston Police Department since in- 
stallation of fingerprints in 1906, has been entirely displaced 
and supplanted by the Henry Modified and Extended System 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

of Fingerprint Classification and Filing, as used in the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D. C. 

In order to effect the change, some 150,000 fingerprints were 
carefully checked by operatives, the formula on each was re- 
vised, and a new type of filing card made out for each set of 
fingerprints, together with complete criminal record of each 
subject typed thereon, showing dealings of the individual with 
various law enforcement agencies throughout the country. In 
such cases where a criminal subject used one or more aliases^ 
cross-reference cards were made and filed in addition to the 
main card. 

In effecting transformation of systems from the Conley- 
Flak to the Henry, all fingerprints of persons, who are either 
now dead or so old that their criminal career is definitely at an 
end, were removed from the active file and placed in a separate 
file for future reference. Hundreds of duplicates were taken 
from the files and placed in other inactive files. A final 
examination was then made to insure correct filing of every 
fingerprint and record card. At this writing, it can be truth- 
fully said that the fingerprint system of the Boston Police 
Department, including method of filing, quality and amount 
of fingerprint equipment and skilled operators, is comparable 
to the practically infallible files of the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation at Washington, D. C, after which this Depart- 
ment's new system was fashioned. 

Criminal Identification. 

This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Division of 
the Bureau of Records. 

The table refers to the number of individuals photographed 
and fingerprinted, also the number of Copies prepared. 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . . . 1,440 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) . . 140 

Scenes of crime photographed 374 

Circulars sent out by identification division 15,000 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30; 1942 180,048 

Made and filed during the year 1,945 

Received from other authorities 759 

Number on file November 30, 1943 182,762 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



Fingerprint File: 

Number on file XovembcM- 30. 1942 145,126 

Taken and filed dining the year 1,951 

Received from other authorities 1,317 

Number on file November 30, 1943 148,394 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 5,742 

Other cities and states 324 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 1,669 

State Bureau of Identification 4,190 

Other cities and states 85 

Supplementary: 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,230 

Number of exposures (small camera) 861 

Number of prints (small camera) 422 

Number of enlargements: 

11 by 14 inches 235 

8 by 10 inches 3,280 

M iscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films -380 

Prints made from same 1,140 

Number of rectigraph photographs 2,875 

Number of civilians photographed 66 

Number of negatives of criminals 1,945 

Number of prints from same 9,725 

Number of fingerprint investigations (negative) . . . 420 

Number of fingerprint investigations (positive) . . . 535 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 535 

Number of visitors photographed 275 

Prints made from same 825 

Number of exposures of Pantoscopic camera ... 4 

Number of re-orders of criminal photographs . . . 3,820 

Number of stand-up photographs made .... 2 

Prints made from same 10 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 234 

Number of auxiliary police officers photographed . . 107 
Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police Officers 234 

Special Police Officers 380 

Hackney carriage drivers 2,490 

Civilian employees 66 

Civilians cooperating in defense work 3,600 

Auxiliary police officers 107 

Civilians fingerprinted and prints filed .... 2,000 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civihan file), November 30, 

1942 37,243 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file), November 30, 

1943 42,413 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau of Records, detailed to 
impart information from police journals on file at Head- 
quarters, reports services performed as follows : 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

police journal in regard to accidents and thefts . . . 1,670 
Days in court 10 

Services of a Draftsman from the Personnel. 
A modern development of the Bureau of Records is the 
service of an expert draftsman, one of the personnel, who drafts 
scenes of crimes for presentation as evidence in court, to aid 
the government in prosecution of its case by showing the jury 
the exact location and surroundings at the scene. During the 
course of the year, the draftsman visited scenes of various 
serious crimes where he took measurements and later drew to 
scale twenty-seven individual plans. Twenty of these have 
been used as exhibits in the following courts within jurisdiction 
of Boston: 

Municipal Court 4 days. 

Grand Jury of Suffolk County 7 days. 

Superior Court 30 days. 

In addition, ten special drawings or paintings (miscellaneous) 
were also made for the use of the Police Department. 

Some of these drawings have not as yet been exhibited in 
any court, but will be presented when the cases to which they 
relate come to trial. 

The drafting room is fully equipped with all necessary instru- 
ments required for efficiently handling this work. 

Criminal Records for the Department Furnished by the Bureau. 

All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau of Records, as well as certified copies of con- 
victions for presentation in courts, both here and in other cities : 

The following figures represent requests received for these 
records from December 1, 1942, to November 30, 1943: 



Requests received by telephone 
Requests received by correspondence 
Requests for certified records 
Requests for jury records . 



Total : . . . 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 

Grand Total 



2,080 

5,870 
1,560 
2,500 

12,010 
16,060 

28,070 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

The following figures represent requests received from 
various public agencies for records required due to the war 
activity: 

U. S. Coast Guard 4,600 

U. S. Marine Corps 900 

U. S. Naval Procurement (Air Corps Cadets) .... 600 

U. S. Merchant Marine 1,800 

U. S. Army 500 

U. S. Navy 700 

Auxiliary Police 107 

U. S. Civil Service applicants 600 

Selective Service delinquents 780 

Guards and special officers for defense purposes .... 350 

Massachusetts Women's Defense Corps 1,860 

Stragglers and deserters (Army and Navy) 7,300 

Total .... 20,097 

Identification Made Through Fingerprints. 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions, when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also, where 
identifications have been made through latent prints. 

Photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally 
before courts of this city, but on occasions where connections 
are made with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photog- 
rapher, who enlarges the prints for purpose of charting them 
for presentation as evidence in court, is also summoned into 
court to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. 

There have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of 
police of outside cites and towns have asked for services of 
fingerprint and photography experts, in consequence of crime 
committed in their jurisdiction. The Department cooperated 
by sending these men, properly equipped, to survey the scene 
of crime and reproduce any prints available for evidence. 

Missing Persons. 
The Missing Persons Division, a branch of the Bvu'eau of 
Records, is performing a fine type of service to citizens of 
Boston and surrounding cities and towns. Its chief function 
necessarily is to aid families in the location of their relatives 
reported lost or missing. It performs valuable service in 
identification of luiknown dead persons found in various 
sections of the city whose relatives had been located. With- 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



out this service, such dead persons might have been interred 
with those unfortunates in potter's field. 

During the course of the year, the Missing Persons Division 
cooperated with various State institutions in the location and 
return of many wards who had left these institutions without 
permission. 



Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. 



Total number still missing 

Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston. 



2,390 
2,217 

173 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


720 


231 


693 


214 


27 


17 


Over 15 years, 
tinder 21 years, 


323 


341 


294 


316 


29 


25 


Over 21 years, 


472 


303 


406 


294 


66 


9 


Totals . 


1,515 


875 


1,393 


824 


122 


51 



Not included in the foregoing are 405 persons reported 
missing by both the Division of Child Guardianship of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Girls' 
and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools. 

Not included, also, in the foregoing figures are numerous 
cases of children reported missing to this Department, who 
were found or returned within a few hours after report was 
made. 

There was reported to this Department from outside depart- 
ments a total of 4,730 missing persons. 

Grand total of number of persons reported 

missing 7,525 

Persons Reported Missing, by Police Divisions, for a Twelve- 
Month Period, Commencing December 1, 19J^2, and Ending 
November 30, 1943. 

Division 1 (North End section) 63 

Division 3 (West End section) 103 

Division 4 (South End section) 210 



1944.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



53 



Division 6 (South Boston district) 

Division 7 (East Boston district) . 

Division 9 (Dudley street section of Roxbury 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

Division 11 (Adams street section of Dorchester) 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) 

Division 18 (Hyde Park district) . 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) 

Total 



182 

88 

350 

340 

257 

91 

116 

113 

62 

59 

70 

*286 

2,390 



* (Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital, a mental institution.) 

During the past j^ear there was an increase in the total 
number of persons reported missing of 353 cases over the 
previous year. This was due in the main to the number of 
persons reported missing to this Department from outside 
departments. 

In connection with the "teen-age" girl problem, a record of 
individual ages was kept for the past seven months of girls 
reported missing in the City of Boston. Other than those 
cases where the girl was 21 years of age or over, it clearly shows 
that females of 15 and 16 years of age were the most frequent 
offenders, and those between 13 and 17 years, inclusive, to be 
the "problem" group. See the following table. 











City 


of Boston Ca 


ses. 










Ages. 


13. 


14. 


15. 


16. 


17. 


18. 


19. 


20. 


21 and 
Over. 


May .... 


5 


4 


13 


6 


7 


3 


2 


2 


27 


June 








3 


5 


15 


11 


7 


1 


2 


3 


28 


July 








1 


9 


14 


4 


7 


3 


1 


1 


26 


August . 








8 


2 


9 


13 


6 


6 


2 




38 


September 








4 


2 


10 


9 


6 


1 


2 


2 


30 


October . 








6 


3 


6 


7 


2 


6 


3 


1 


26 


November 








8 


6 


10 


10 


3 


2 


4 


1 


14 


Totals . 


35 


31 


77 


60 


38 


22 


16 


10 


189 



Persons Interviewed. — At the "Missing Persoas" office 
there were interviewed about 700 persons relative to cases 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

handled. This does not inchide the number interviewed at 
other units and divisions of the Department. 

Correspondence. — There were handled by the unit approx- 
imately 5,000 pieces of correspondence relating to location of 
friends and relatives. 

Circulars. — About 2,500 descriptive circulars on missing 
persons were sent out from the unit. 

Tracers. — There were sent out approximately 1,100 tracers 
on persons reported missing. 

Identification of Dead Bodies.— In 43 cases on unknown 
white men, 29 were identified through fingerprints. 

Amnesia. — Four individuals afflicted with amnesia were 
identified. 

Warrant File. 
Procedure as to Warrants Issued to or Received by this Department^ 

The warrant file for the entire Police Department is kept in 
the Bureau of Records. A hst of all warrants issued to or 
received by this Department is sent out each day on the 
manifold and every officer in the Department receives a copy 
of this fist. Twenty-four hours after issuance of a warrant, if 
the person named therein has not been arrested, a form card is 
forwarded to the Bureau of Records by the station house with 
all data pertaining to the warrant and the case. These cards 
are alphabetically filed so that almost instantaneously it may 
be ascertained whether a warrant exists in the Department 
for any person named. On service of the warrant another 
card goes forward to the Bureau of Records with necessary 
information of service. 

Warrants Received from Outside Departments, Etc. 
All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant files of the Bureau of Records. All 
correspondence pertaining to movement of warrants outside 
of the city proper is handled in that Bureau. Commanding 
Officers of this Department are required, under the rules and 
regulations, to notify the Warrant Division of arrests on war- 
rants issued to the Boston Police Department and on warrants 
of all other poHce departments; also when arrests are made 
without a warrant involving serious crimes. The rule applies 
to this procedure every hour of the day and night. The 
warrant files are immediately searched. If it appears that 
there is a warrant for the arrested person in any other jurisdic- 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

tion, the officer in command of the arresting division or unit 
is immediately notified and given full particulars, and such 
other police division or unit in Boston or outside jurisdiction 
is immediately notified that the person is under arrest. 

Number of Warrants Received by Bureau of Records and Their 

Disposition. 

Warrants received by Bureau of Records 2,852 

Arrested on warrants 1,666 

Warrants returned without service 1,065 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the Depart- 
ment and to other jurisdictions 2,057 

Active warrant cards on file issued to Boston Police . . . 5,700 
Active warrants issued to Boston Police for persons now out of 

state 36 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police, forwarded to other 

cities and towns in this State 95 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service (cards in our files) 166 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers .... 45 

Summons File. 
Establishment and Purpose. 

On December 14, 1936, there was estabUshed in the Bureau 
of Records a summons file for the purpose of facilitatmg service 
of summonses. All summonses for service outside the City of 
Boston obtained by the several divisions and units are for- 
warded to this Bureau where they are recorded and sent to the 
Chief of Police of the city or town where a defendant resides- 
Summonses received from other police departments for service 
in this city are in the same manner recorded and sent to the 
respective divisions and units for service and, after service has 
been made, are returned. 

The following figures represent summonses received from 
outside cities and towns for service in Boston from December 1, 
1942, to November 30, 1943: 

Total number received 2,081 

Total number served 1,915 

Total number returned (without service) 166 

The following figures represent the number of summonses 
sent from the Bureau of Records for service in outside cities 
and towns: 

Received from local divisions and units and sent out . . . 9,096 

Total number served 8,453 

Total number not served 643 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

TRAFFIC. 

The Traffic Division consists of territory within boundaries 
of Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 16, and the traffic post at Cottage 
Farm Bridge, Division 14. Primarily, it is the duty of the 
Traffic Division to enforce rules and regulations established 
by the Boston Traffic Commission and to provide for safety of 
the public using our highways within this territory. Traffic 
officers are assigned to vital traffic control points as well as to 
special duty of tagging automobiles parked on our streets in 
violation of law. 

The Traffic Di^'ision is responsible for proper control of 
licensed hackney carriages and the duty of carrying on a pro- 
gram of Safety Educational work. 

Activities. 

During the past year the usual traffic problems were pre- 
sented to the Traffic Division. There has been a tremendous 
increase in pedestrian traffic arriving each day by the Boston 
Elevated System, bus lines and railroad trains in addition to 
thousands of employees working in defense plants, who go to 
and from work by automobiles passing through some part of 
the city. There has been in the vicinity of the North and 
South Stations such a marked increase in vehicular traffic, 
such as buses, trucks and convoys of soldiers, that additional 
traffic officers have been placed at vital intersections at unusual 
hours for the purpose of facilitating traffic. The opening of 
retail stores on Monday and Wednesday evenings has also 
necessitated a redistribution of traffic officers. 

Tractor-trailers and other large commercial vehicles, many 
of which come from other states, have been the cause of con- 
gestion in the market district as well as in other sections of the 
city. Such conditions have necessitated placing of officers in 
the market area as early as 6 a. m. to control traffic conditions 
and make streets passable, so that serious congestion will not 
result. It is believed this business has attained such pro- 
portions that terminals should be required. Trucks almost as 
long and as wide as the average freight car now drive through 
the city streets. No doubt, they have been made for economic 
handling of goods, but congestion caused by them has become 
almost intolerable. Their economic value could be con- 
siderably increased and traffic congestion greatly alleviated by 
use of terminals. Freight and express coming into Boston 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

could be unloaded at conveniently-placed terniinaLs and goods 
could be sorted for smaller trucks to deliver to various stores 
and warehouses. It is believed that the long-haul cost from 
terminal-to-terminal would thereby be reduced and a good 
deal of useless mileage and congestion within the city limits 
eliminated. 

Arrangements were made for the control of traffic in connec- 
tion witli the following events: 

1942. 

Dec. 7. Coast Guard parade. 

Dec. 11. Naval Recruit parade. 

Dec. 18. Coast Guard parade. 

1943. 

Australian Cadet parade. 

Naval Recruit parade. 

WAC parade. 

WAC Caravan parade. 

Naval Construction Battalion "Seabees" parade. 

"Waves" and "Spars" parade. 

Patriots' Day parade. 

"I am an American Day" parade. 

Maritime Recruit parade. 

Display of the captured Japanese "suicide" submarine. 

Schoolboys' parade. 

Flag Day parade. 

Memorial Mass and Communion Breakfast. 

Naval Construction Battalion parade. 

Naval Construction Battalion parade. 

' ' Waves ' ' parade. 

Coast Guard parade. 

Visit of Prime Minister Winston Churchill. 

Naval parade. 

Hollywood "Caravan" parade. 

State Guard parade. 

Red Mass. 

Columbus Day parade. 

Movie Star parade. 

"Winged Victory" cast parade. 

Rodeo parade. 

Armistice Daj' parade. 

The Traffic Division has also worked in conjunction with the 
Boston Street Commissioners in mapping out programs of various 
streets through which i)arades are to pass, so that the automo- 
bile public would be inconvenienced as little as possible. 
Recommendations have been made through the Superintendent 
of Police to the Boston Traffic Commission for procurement of 



Feb. 


9. 


Mar. 


31. 


Apr. 


6. 


Apr. 


13. 


Apr. 


14. 


Apr. 


17. 


Apr. 


19. 


May 


16. 


May 


19. 


May 


21. 


June 


6. 


June 


14. 


June 20. 


July 


9. 


July 


23. 


July 


30. 


Aug. 


1. 


Sept. 


6. 


Sept. 


9. 


Sept. 


10. 


Sept. 


25. 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


28. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


11. 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

traffic-detour signs to be placed in streets during parades, while 
streets are under repair and* during emergencies. 

The Traffic Division has always exerted every effort to en- 
courage visitors to come to our city and to assist them in every 
way possible. These visitors patronize our hotels, places of 
entertainment and business establishments. Every courtesy 
is extended to them by officers of the Traffic Division in rela- 
tion to the parking of their automobiles whenever this can be 
done without hindering free movement of traffic. Thus, the 
Police Department gains new friends, and it is pleasing to know 
that many visitors take back to localities from which they came 
a pleasant thought of the treatment accorded them while stop- 
ping in Boston. 

Arrangements were made for the most advantageous routes 
to destinations and escorts were furnished for many distin- 
guished visitors and organizations, some of which are enum- 
erated as follows: Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox; Austra- 
lian Cadets; Madame Chiang Kai-shek; Mexican Ambassador 
and party ; group of distinguished Russian women ; Lieutenant- 
General Ben Lear; Women's Defense Corps; Guadalcanal hero 
"Barney" Ross; heroes of the "Memphis Bell"; Major General 
Ralph Royce and party; American Federation of Labor group; 
Archbishop Karekin Hovsepian, and Prime Minister Churchill. 

Traffic Conditions. 

In essence the Traffic Division is making e^Try effort to 
have the city become so attractive for residence and business 
that the tendency to move beyond its limits will be stopped. 
Studies in automobile traffic have uncovered many facts bearing 
on the problem. So many passenger cars are coming into the 
"Inner Cordon," the portion of the city bounded by the Basin, 
the Charles River, the Harbor, and Charles, Stuart and Ejiee- 
land streets, that occasionally a little congestion results. 

Parking has always been a most troublesome problem for the 
traffic police. Traffic rules and regulations are established by 
authorities other than the police; nevertheless, it is the duty of 
the police department to enforce these regulations, and this we 
try to do in an intelligent manner, governed by our years of 
practical experience. The police know the difficulties of their 
task and have knowledge of legal and other limitations affecting 
action that can be taken or even attempted, which are unknown 
to critics and advisors. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 

Situated as Boston is, especially in the crowded section, with 
its narrow and crooked streets and tlie variety and extent of 
uses to which they must be put, tlie business section of Boston 
bears not the remotest resemblance to anything that can be 
found on the American continent, or, perhaps, in the whole 
world. The police cannot widen or straighten the streets and 
neither have they the power to reduce the number of vehicles 
or persons using them. Their task is to enforce the rules and 
regulations which have been made for the common good. 
Everyone recognizes and has recognized for years the increasing 
difficulties of the street situation. The police, who have created 
none of these difficulties, are constantly doing all that their 
numbers and authority permit for relief of the public. In the 
midst of conflicting interests, our police officers have been 
soundly instructed to exercise courtesy and act patiently upon 
all occasions. 

New problems have come about as a natural consequence of 
war. A boom era, such as we are now experiencing, affects all 
in some way or other, expecially the police. During the past 
year or longer, the Traffic Division has been confronted with 
the serious responsibility of assisting and escorting convoys and 
other vehicles of the United States Government through streets 
of our city as rapidly as possible, consistent with safety, in order 
that they might arrive at their destinations promptly and 
without difficulty. Escorts, in all instances, have been pro- 
vided to meet at various parts of our city line, such convoys of 
trucks, containing soldiers and equipment from the different 
army camps, and at times under most trying conditions; but 
there was never an occasion where such duties failed to come to 
a most successful close. 

Safety Educational Automobile. 

Our Safety Educational automobile has been in continuous 
operation on the highways of Boston during the past several 
years, educating motorists as to the proper manner in which 
they should operate their automobiles and instructing pedes- 
trians as to the proper place and manner in which they should 
cross the street. Through constant and persistent short 
safety talks by officers assigned to this automobile, the general 
pubhc is rapidly becoming more accident conscious. 

Each Saturday, between the hours of 9 and 9.30 a. m., broad- 
casts are given over a local radio network by members of the 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

M-1 Safety Squad. It has a membership consisting of children 
of school age, 16 years and under. 

During the past year many requests have been received for 
the Safety Educational car to visit other cities and towns to 
give talks along safety lines to various groups of children and 
adults, and in particular, to auxiliary police officers and air- 
raid wardens. 

At the Park Department playgrounds, during the summer 
months, many "Safety Shows" were provided for children. 
The Safety car may be seen at all important parades and at 
Park Department baseball and football championsliip games 
in Fenway Park. The car has also been used in cooperation 
with the Massachusetts Public Safety Committee on Boston 
Common and at various other locations during demonstration 
of air-raid precautions, assisting greatly by use of its loud 
speaker in preventing injury to spectators and impressing on 
their minds need for greater safety. 

The car, with its officers, has also been called on many times 
to appear at gatherings of employees of large trucking concerns, 
telegraph offices, theatres, civic and fraternal organizations, 
and other business establishments, where safety talks have 
been given to employees of these various concerns or to persons 
in attendance at the meetings. Many schools and organizations 
outside the city have been accommodated in like manner, upon 
request. 

As a result of this program conducted by the Safety Edu- 
cational car, many complimentary letters have been received 
from persons in various walks of life. 

Tagging. 

During the period from December 1, 1942, up to and in- 
cluding November 30, 1943, the Traffic Division issued ap- 
proximately 52,000 notices for violations of the "parking" 
rules established by the Boston Traffic Commission. Such 
notices were forwarded through the United States mail to 
owners of offending automobiles, or by service in hand to the 
operators. 

The decrease in the number of violation notices issued during 
1943, in comparison with last year, shows a better spirit of 
cooperation on the part of automobile owners. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 61 

Conclusion. 

It is pleasing to know that during these perilous times, when 
there is so much talk about invasion to our shores, that officers 
of the Traffic Division, by reason of training, organization, and 
intimacy with traffic problems, are best suited to direct and 
control traffic in an emergency. Their competence in this 
respect is demonstrated by expertness with which they handle 
large groups, particularly at times of parades, large gatherings 
at recreation parks and other groups of a like character. Then, 
too, they are familiar with the highways. Not only are they 
aware of the volume of traffic in evidence on any particular 
roadway, but they likewise know the characteristics of such 
traffic. With these gifted qualities, the presence of the uni- 
formed traffic police officer in the street brings about a feeling 
of security to the general public. These same officers have 
especially proven their worth during recent "blackout" and 
"alert" tests in our city and their conduct under these con- 
ditions brought favorable comment from the press and radio. 

The value of the uniformed traffic policeman in the street 
was never more graphically emphasized than on the afternoon 
of Friday, February 5, 1943, when Patrolman James A. Powers, 
then of the Traffic Division, on duty at the intersection of 
Massachusetts avenue and Boylston street, performed what is 
believed to be the most outstanding act of valor during the 
current police year. This officer fearlessly intercepted a 
dangerous gunman in the commission of a serious crime. He 
was fired upon by the gunman, but through timely preparation, 
the officer having taken his revolver from his pocket, exercised 
the good judgment that comes only from experience, and was 
instrumental in removing from society a very dangerous 
criminal. 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS. 
Creation. 
This Bureau was created on July 11, 1934. 
The Bureau was detached from the Superintendent's Office 
and estabhshed at PoUce Headquarters as a separate unit, 
April 2, 1937. 

Duties. 

This Bureau has control of all communications equipment, 
consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and telegraph and 
through its facilities has directed movement of radio cars, 
police boats, and ambulances. 

The vast majority of all telephoned complaints, reports and 
requests for information from the general public and other 
police departments, military organizations and organizations 
connected with the Civilian Defense program was handled by 
officers of this unit. 

Accomplishments. 
During this period, from December 1, 1942, to November 30, 
1943, personnel of the Bureau managed transmission, reception 
and handling of : 

247,310 outgoing telephone messages and 5,071 toll calls 
made by the Department through our switchboard. 

Approximately 320,000 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the turret through either "Devon- 
shire 1212" or the Department inter-communicating 
system. 

Approximately 475,000 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of which were transferred 
■ to the turret for handling. 

Due to the war and other emergencies the number of 
telephone calls has increased. This has necessitated 
installation of another panel or unit on the switchboard, 
including additional lines, and has also required additional 
operators, four on day duty and two on each night tour of 
duty. 

Direct lines have also been installed connecting this 
unit with report centers, telephone exchanges, utility 
companies, etc. 

107,112 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
making and delivering of copies of such messages, as 
necessary to the proper bureau or unit. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 63 

1,053 telegrams, including the filing of same and making 
and delivering of copies to the proper bureau or unit. 

7,525 teletype items for persons re])orted missing by 
divisions and units of the Department, and other states, 
cities and towns. Copies of these were delivered to the 
Bureau of Records, and cards filled out for our files. 

271,644 radio messages sent, including dictaphone 
recording of same and transcription from records to the 
radio log. 

9,310 lost or stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the automoble division of the Bureau of Crimi- 
nal Investigation, 2,695 of which were reported stolen 
in Boston, together with records made and delivered of all 
recovered cars, copies of both kept in the files of this 
Bureau. 

A daily journal has been kept in which all of the foregoing, 
together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents and other 
matters submitted by divisions and units of the Department, 
were recorded. 

Files are kept in the unit of: 

(1) The police personnel of the Department, with 
name, rank, cap and badge numbers, together with the 
address, telephone, date of appointment and promotion, 
etc., as well as a file of former officers. 

(2) The Police Department civilian personnel, includ- 
ing home address and telephone number. 

(3) The Fire Department, which includes the name, 
rank and address of its members, and the radio sector in 
which they live. 

Two main radio transmitters (Station "WQIP," Police 
Headquarters, and "WRAS," Suffolk Comity Court House), 
78 car and four boat transmitters and receivers, 26 wired- 
broadcast amplifiers and eight pickup receivers were maintained 
and kept in repair by members of this unit. Two-way radio 
installation has l)een installed in 15 combination patrol wagon 
and ambulances. 

An emergency unit has been created in Roxbury where a 
170-watt transmitter has been prepared. This emergency 
unit is equipped with most of the facilities now in use in the 
quarters of the main unit, including files, telephone and teletype 
service. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BALLISTICS UNIT. 
Formation and Duties. 

The activities of this Unit, with its personnel, are under 
the supervision of the Superintendent of PoHce. 

With a Sergeant-Balhstician in charge, the office consists 
of experts in balhstics, moulage, explosives and munitions, 
also a gunsmith. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician, under the direction of the Super- 
intendent of Police, has charge of the care and custody of 
all firearms, explosives and substances of explosives coming 
into possession of the police. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician examines all evidence found at 
the scene of a crime where firearms or explosives are used 
and sends a written report to the Superintendent of his findings. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician prepares cases where ballistic 
evidence is required insofar as bullets, shells, firearms or explo- 
sives are concerned and appears before the courts in such cases 
to give evidence. 

The Sergeant-Ballistician has custody of emergency equip- 
ment such as rifles, shot-guns, machine-guns, gas guns, 
revolvers, pistols, bullet-proof vests and tear-gas equipment 
and maintenance of same. 

Accomplishments. 

During the year members of this Unit responded to 40 
emergency calls after regular working hours and performed 
1,053 hours of extra duty in this manner. Members of this 
Unit spent 82 daj^s in court on ballistic and moulage cases. 

For efficiency of the L^nit the following material was added 
to the equipment: 100 Official Police Commando type .38- 
calibre special revolvers, 100 gas ma.sks, equipped with new type 
canisters for all military gases, 200 hand-lights and 2 large 
gun baths for cleaning rifles, shotguns, revolvers, pistols, 
machine-guns and gas guns. 

The follo\ving equipment was serviced and repaired: 500 
revolvers, 110 riot guns, 20 gas guns, 4 gas masks, 110 gas 
billies and 2 gas projectors. In addition to the foregoing, 
the following equipment located at the various police divisions 
and units was serviced : 200 riot guns, 20 gas guns, 10 Thompson 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

sub-machine guns, 110 gas billies, 145 gas masks, 60 bullet- 
proof vests, tear-gas munitions and 4 high-powered rifles. 
Substantial savings were made by repairing our own equipment. 
All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the 
courts, and those held for ballistic purposes, are kept clean and 
recorded. 

Stolen firearms received at this office are traced and returned 
to the rightful owners and a file maintained of same. Any 
United States property recovered is returned to the Spring- 
field Armory, United States Ordnance Department. 

Fifteen groups, consisting of members of the Army, Navy, 
Coast Guard and Marine Corps, have visited the Unit during 
the year. Between three and five hundred servicemen were 
shown through the Unit. Also, members lectured to military 
groups in metropolitan Boston. 

During formation of the Auxiliary Police Force this office 
issued 5,000 riot clubs, 5,000 flash fights and 20,000 batteries 
to the various divisions for their use, and 5,000 white helmets 
were also issued. The riot clubs were numbered at this Unit. 
Through courtesy of the Police Commissioner, the Adjutant- 
General of the Massachusetts State Guard sent the following 
firearms to this Unit from the State Guard Supply Depot: 
15,000 shotguns, 750 Thompson sub-machine guns, 300 Reising 
machine guns and 25 gas guns. These weapons were stamped 
with the State serial number, cleaned, inspected and serviced. 
A number of groups of State Guard officers have received 
instructions in assembling and disassembling the Thompson 
and Reising sub-machine guns and nomenclature of same and 
in the proper means of handling explosive bombs and suspicious 
packages. 

During the year members of this Unit attended lectures and 
demonstrations given by the Boston Fire Department and 
various military groups on the subjects of bombs, firearms, and 
civil cooperation with Army regulations. A course in Bomb 
Disposal Reconnaissance given at Fort Devens was attended 
by a member of this Unit and information obtained passed on 
to members of the Department. 

This office has worked in cooperation with the Army, Navy 
and Coast Guard Intelligence during the year. 

Members of the Military Police were instructed in the 
science of Ballistics at this Unit. 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The portable -lighting equipment, department property- 
assigned to this office, was used at various times throughout the 
year. 

MOULAGE. 

Substance known as moulage was utilized to good advan- 
tage on several occasions. Specimens were used in court to 
establish proof in breaking and entering cases. 

Serial Numbers on Firearms. 
There were a number of cases where serial numbers on fire- 
arms, locks, instruments and other objects were erased and 
had to be treated with chemicals to reveal the numbers for 
identification, resulting in tracing ownership of most of these 
articles. 

Tear-Gas Munitions. 

Members of the Department were instructed in the use of 
tear-gas munitions during drills held at the First Corps Cadets' 
armory, and at the West Roxbury revolver range during the 
summer months. 

Several groups of State Guard officers and enlisted men were 
instructed in the use of tear-gas munitions at the Camp Curtis 
Guild rifle range, Wakefield, Mass. 

Disposition of Confiscated Explosives. 
During the past year a number of grenades, projectiles. 
Mills bombs, fixed ammunition, dynamite and caps, railroad 
torpedoes, powders and war souvenirs, which had come into 
possession of the police from various sections of metropolitan 
Boston, were delivered to the Bomb Disposal Officer, First 
Service Command. 

Examination of Suspected Bombs. 
The portable X-ray equipment assigned to this office was 
used frequently to examine suspected bombs, various types of 
explosives and all packages of suspicious nature. The danger 
of injury or possible death in removing these materials was 
thereby eliminated. 

Miscellaneous. 
An interchange of evidence is carried on by this Unit with 
all Federal agencies and police departments. Bullets and 
shells are mailed to other enforcement agencies to aid in the 
arrest of criminals. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

All evidence in homicide cases is properly marked and 
stored in the vault of this office until needed by the courts. 

The police divisions and units are now equipped with a 
sufficient supply of emergency equipment to handle any situa- 
tion. Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced 
whenever necessary. 

The motor truck attached to this Unit has been equipped 
with all necessary material for emergency purposes. 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU. 
Creation. 
This Bureau, created August 9, 1943, is established as a 
separate unit of the Department, with quarters upon the fourth 
floor of Police Headquarters building. 

Formation. 

The Bureau is under command of a Deputy Superintendent 
(designated as Director), who is assisted by the following 
police personnel: 2 Lieutenants, 2 Acting-Sergeants (Patrol- 
women), 19 Patrolmen, and 12 other Patrolwomen. 

The personnel is divided into two divisions: male juveniles 
being handled by Patrolmen, and female juveniles by Patrol- 
women. 

Purpose. 

To meet the pressing problem of juvenile delinquency which 
faces law-enforcement agencies today, the Bureau was formed. 

Law enforcement having direct contact with crime, the 
police are obligated to take an aggressive and corrective role in 
aiding and establishing programs of crime prevention. 

Juvenile delinquency, if left unchecked, tends to result in a 
national calamity. 

Sworn officers of the law, pledged to prevent crime, have a 
grave responsibility, and must do their part to carry out their 
obligations intelligently and effectively. 

The Department, recognizing the need of such action, 
established the Bureau. 

Duties in General. 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended 
to eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies among 
children. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies and divisions and units of this Department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental 
attitude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and 
especially to educate the public and the police in the 
problem of crime prevention and suppression. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way 
contribute to delinquency of children; investigating and 
taking necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged and 
the needy; taking pains to locate missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls, and 
assist in investigation of cases where women are involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished. 

(Period covered: August 9 to November 30, — both dates, 

inclusive, — 1943) 

Arrests. 



Assault and battery 


1 


Suspicious person . 


1 


Begetting with child 


5 


Stubborn child 


5 


Drunkenness .... 


4 


Vagrancy 


3 


Disturbing public assembly, 


1 


Violation of probation . 


4 


Fugitive from justice . 


1 


Violation of parole 


1 


Idle and disorderly persons. 


6 


Violation of city ordinance 


2 


Lewd and lascivious cohabi- 




Wayward child 


2 


tation 


2 






Lewd person .... 


1 


Total arrests . 


55 


Runaway .... 


15 




"— 


Safekeeping .... 


1 







Inspections and Investigations. 
During the period covered, there were 3,077 inspections and 
1,530 cases investigated (total, 4,607) by personnel of the 
Bureau in connection with the following places: 

Bus and railroad terminals. Public highways and property. 

Dance halls. Restaurants. 

Bowling alleys. Taverns. 

Hotels. Theatres. 
Pool rooms. 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause. In its 
custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements 
which come into possession of the Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms and equipment are 
issued by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the cross- 
record system maintained for the purpose of comparing prices 
before such bills are prepared for payment. 

During the year 46 motor vehicles came into custody of this 
office; 29 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants, and 15 
vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 17 motor 
vehicles in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care and distribution 
of uniforms and equipment to members of the police force, and 
also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed garments and 
equipment. An individual record of items of uniform and 
equipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is 
operated on a twenty-four-hour basis. During the year, 5,636 
Department cars were repaired at the repair shop in Division 4, 
and 1,135 cars were serviced. (Servicing includes greasing, 
changing of oil, checking of battery and electrical equipment, 
brakes, cooling systems, tires, steering systems, wear of clutch, 
etc.) Also 92 Department cars and 49 privately-owned cars 
were towed by the Department wrecker. A radio-repair shop 
is attached to the maintenance shop where a twenty-four-hour 
daily .service is maintained. The Department operates a motor- 
cycle repair shop, now located in the rear of Station 19, where 
297 motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all Department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions and is required to investigate and report on all 
accidents involving Department vehicles. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

The Lost and Found branch of the Department has been 
active during the past year, as shown by the following schedule : 

Articles on hand December 1, 1942 3,661 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1943, 2,253 

Total 5,914 

Disposed of: 
To owners through efforts of the Property Clerk's 

Office 979 

Dehvered on orders from divisions .... 81 

Worthless 1,780 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of Public 

Welfare 14 

Perishable articles decayed 3 

Sold at public auction 618 

Total number of articles disposed of 3,475 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1943 . 2,439 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



SPECIAL EVENTS. 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the number of police detailed for duty 
at each : 

1942. Men. 

Dec. 10. Boston Garden, Boston and Maine Railroad U. S. 

War Bond Victory Ball and Entertainment . . 101 
Dec. 12. Boston Garden, hockey game for benefit of The 

American Red Cross 22 

Dec. 15. City of Boston "blackout" test . . . . . 975 

Dec. 24. Boston Common, City of Boston Christmas exercises, 21 

Dec. 28. Funeral of Patrolman David A. McCarthy, retired . 10 
Dec. 30. Boston Garden, U. S. War Bond Drive under auspices 

of radio station "WBZ" 32 

Dec. 31. New Year's Eve celebration 825 

1943. 

Jan. 12. Boston Garden, hockey game for benefit of The 

American Red Cross 30 

Jan. 21. Boston Garden, Greater Boston United War Fund 

Drive, meeting and entertainment .... 132 

Funeral of Patrolman John J. Flynn, 1st . . . 48 

Boston Garden, Boston Evening American Silver 

Skate Carnival 38 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank Sacco .... 48 
Boston Garden, President Roosevelt's Birthday Ball, 150 
Boston Garden, ball of Boston Police Relief Associa- 
tion 395 

Feb. 9. Boston Garden, hockey game for benefit of The 

American Red Cross 30 

Feb. 17. Boston Garden, "Ice Follies" U. S. War Bond Drive 

under auspices of radio station " WBZ " ... 32 

Feb. 20. Funeral of Patrolman Joseph S. Desmond ... 78 

Feb. 23. Funeral of Patrolman John V. Wedder, retired . . 12 

Feb. 26. Symphony Hall, American Red Cross opening event 

of the 1943 War Fund Drive 22 

Feb. 28. City of Boston practice, "blackout" and "air-raid" 

test 925 

Mar. 1. Boston Garden, ball of Boston Firemen's Relief Asso- 
ciation 147 

Mar. 5. Boston Garden, induction ceremonies for 1,500 

WAGS, SPARS, WAVES and MARINES . . 95 

Mar. 6. South Station arrival of Madame Chiang Kai-shek . 145 

Mar. 8. Funeral of Patrolman Frank L. McNamara . . 76 

Mar. 8. Symphony Hall, address delivered by Madame Chiang 

Kai-shek 247 

Mar. 8. South Station, departure of Madame Chiang Kai-shek, 58 



Jan. 


23. 


Jan. 


24. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


3. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



73 



1945. 




Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


14. 


Mar. 


16 


Mar. 


30. 


April 


4. 


April 


10. 


April 


18. 


April 


18. 


April 


19. 


April 


19. 


April 


21. 


April 


23. 


April 


25. 


April 29. 


April 30. 


May 


1. 


May 


2. 


May 


2. 



May 7. 

May 9. 

May 12. 

May 12. 

May 12. 

May 16. 

May 17. 



May 18. 
May 20. 
May 21. 

May 21. 



May 23. 

May 23. 
May 30. 
May 30. 



War 



Funeral of Patrolman Herman C. Blake 
Funeral of Patrolman Henry F. Hogan, retired 
South Boston High School, historical exercises 
Boston Garden, hockey game for benefit of The 

American Red Cross .... 
Funeral of Patrolman Alphonse Blondin 
Ro-xburj-, William F. Reddish Athletic Association 

ten-mile road race 

Cathedral Club road race 

Marathon race 

Symphony Hall, "Minute Man" celebration sponsore 

by Massachusetts U. S. War Savings Staflf 
Funeral of Sergeant Leslie B. Bickford, retired . 
City of Boston Patriots' Day Celebration . 
Funeral of Patrolman David A. Roche, Jr. . 
Funeral of Captain Bradley C. Mason, retired . 
Easter parade on Commonweath avenue 
Boston Common, Treasury Department U. S 

Bond Victory Rally 

Boston Common, United Labor rally . 
Boston Common, various May Day events 
Charlestown, dedication of John Harvard Mall 
Boston Garden, Mass demonstration and Memorial 
meeting under auspices of American Jewish Com- 
mittee 

Esquire Theatre, show conducted for members of the 

Women's .\rmy Corps 

Roslindale, parade and dedication exercises at Adams 

Park 

Funeral of Patrolman Herbert E. Stockman 

Boston Trade School parade to East Newton street 

Armory 

Boston Common, National "Hospital Day" exercises, 

"I Am An American Day" parade .... 

Boston Garden, U. S. War Bond Drive under auspices 

of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey 

Circus 

City of Boston, "Surprise Test Mobilization" 
City of Boston, "Surprise Test Mobilization" . 
Mechanic Arts High School, parade to East Newton 

Street Armory 

Boston Common, display of captured Japanese sub- 
marine under auspices of U. S. Treasury Depart- 
ment War Bond Drive 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade and 

field Mass at Fenway Park 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 23, 1943 
Boston Common, Memorial exercises .... 
Boston Park Department cemeteries on Sunday, 
May 30, 1943 " . 



Men. 

48 
12 
15 

36 
75 

52 
121 
443 

19 
42 
125 
48 
18 
35 

15 
20 
45 
30 



89 
20 

25 

48 

26 
15 

992 



35 
750 

995 

17 



45 

34 

115 

35 

31 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1943. 

May 30. 

May 31. 

May 31. 

May 31. 



June 6. 

June 6. 

June 7. 

June 11. 

June 13. 

June 14. 

June 16. 

June 17. 

June 17. 

June 17. 



June 21. 

June 26. 

June 27. 

June 30. 

June 30. 



July 

July 

July 

July 
July 

July 



July 8. 

July 9. 

July 10. 

July 11. 



July 12. 



Men. 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 30, 1943 . 177 

Boston Park Department cemeteries on Memorial 

Day 31 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 24Q 

Memorial Day Services at St. Joseph's Cemetery, 
under auspices of Boston Police Post, No. 251, 
American Legion, and Boston Police Post No. 1018, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 148 

Parade, Boston School Cadets 620 

Dorchester, John B. Kelly Associates ten-mile road 

race 45 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company pai'ade . 265 

Funeral of Patrolman Charles L. O'Connell . . 12 

Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises . . 28 

Flag Day parade and exercises on Boston Common, 174 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day cele- 
bration, concessions, street patrol and traffic duty, 139 
Funeral of Sergeant Charles S. Gordon ... 12 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 425 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, conces- 
sions, street patrol, traffic duty, sports and band 

concerts 380 

Funeral of Patrolman John M. Cole .... 48 

West Roxburj^ Holy Name Athletic Association road 

race 32 

Roxbury, dedication of service flag at Mission Church, 38 

Funeral of Patrolman John J. Babb .... 12 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay 

Nineties" variety show 32 

City of Boston parade in observance of the 2nd 

Division Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars . . 56 

South Boston, South Boston Citizen's Association 

parade and dedication of war service flag . . 82 

City of Boston official flag-raising and Independence 

Day Parade 70 

Franklin Field, N. E. A. A. U. meet .... 18 

Independence Day celebration, various band concerts, 

and Community Festival on Boston Common . 120 

Boston Common, United States Coast Guard Reserve 

review 15 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties " variety show 32 

United States Navy recruit parade .... 35 

Boston Common, Boston Traveler "Punch and Judy" 

show 20 

Boston Arena, mass meeting under auspices of the 
Boston Branch of the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People .... 47 

Fenway Park, field day and entertainment of the 

Mayor of Boston Special Welfare Fund ... 52 



1943. 




July 


14. 


July 


17. 


July 


19. 


July 


21. 


July 


21. 


July 


23. 


July 


24. 


July 


24. 


July 


24. 


July 


28. 


July 


30. 


July 


31. 


Aug. 


1. 


Aug. 


2. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 75 

Men. 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties" variety show 32 

Boston Common, Boston Traveler "Punch and Judy" 

show 20 

Funeral of Patrolman John W. Thoms ... 78 
Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties " variety show 32 

City of Boston "blackout" test 985 

South Boston, presentation of Navy "E ' pennant to 

the Gillette Safety Razor Company .... 15 

Funeral of Lieutenant James F. Blaney, retired . 12 

Boston Common, Boston Traveler "Punch and Judy" 

show 20 

Harvard Stadium, track meet 18 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties" variety show 32 

Funeral of Patrolman Martin F. Ford .... 74 

Boston Common, Boston Traveler "Punch and Judy" 

show 20 

United States Coast Guard parade .... 35 

Boston Garden, "Smokes for Buddies ' show under 

auspices of the Boston Daily Record ... 75 
Aug. 4. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties" variety show 32 

Aug. 5. United States Marine Corps parade .... 35 
Aug. 11. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties " variety show 32 

Aug. 12. Funeral of Patrolman Thomas W. Noble ... 74 

Aug. 17. Dartmouth street, block party 15 

Aug. 18. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department "Gay Nine- 
ties " variety show 32 

Aug. 20. Boston Garden, presentation of Navy "E" pennant 

to the Boston Navy Yard 76 

Aug. 25. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department playground 

circus 32 

Aug. 30. North End, block party 18 

Sept. 1. Funeral of Sergeant Athanasius MacGillivray, retired, 12 

Sept. 1. Boston Common, induction ceremonies for members 

of the Women's Army Corps 20 

Sept. 10. South Station, arrival of Hollywood screen stars par- 
ticipating in Third U. S. War Bond Drive . . 125 
Sept. 10. Parade of Hollywood screen stars in connection with 

the Third U. S. War Bond Drive .... 590 

Sept. 10. Boston Garden, entertainment by Hollywood Screen 
stars in connection with Third U. S. War Bond 

Drive 289 

Sept. 14. City of Boston "Surprise Test Mobihzation" . . 965 

Sept. 23. Boston Common, Massachusetts State Guard Motor 

Squadron exercises 22 

Sept. 25. Funeral of Patrolman William R. Sutliff ... 48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1943. 




Sept. 


27 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


17 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


24 


Oct. 


26 


Oct. 


28 


Oct. 


31. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


7. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


13. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


14. 


Nov. 


16. 


Nov. 


17. 


Nov. 


19. 


Nov. 


20. 


Nov. 


23. 


Nov. 


24. 


Note 


,_ 



Men. 

Funeral of Patrolman Andrew R. Smith ... 48 
Funeral of Sergeant Thomas F. Ryan, retired . . 12 
Boston Common, Boston Fire Department fire pre- 
vention exercised 55 

Various Boston Park Department football games 16 
Harvard-Worcester Polytechnic Institute football 

game 12 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 16 

Funeral of Patrolman Peter P. Cloherty ... 48 
City of Boston Columbus Day parade and exercises 

on Boston Common 535 

Symphony Hall, City of Boston AU-American Colum- 
bian festival 20 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 16 
City of Boston "blackout" test and Regional Field 

exerci.ses 990 

Roxbury, Norfolk House Centre road race . . 45 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 14 

Funeral of Patrolman Patrick A. MacKinnon, retired, 12 
City of Boston parade in connection with the U. S. 

Arm}'' Air Force premiere of play, ' ' Winged Victory " 35 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 12 

Halloween celebration 898 

City Election 1,958 

Rodeo parade 52 

Funeral of Patrolman Ernest Broadbent ... 76 

Harvard-Camp Edwards football game ... 25 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 12 

Parade, Suffolk County Council, American Legion . 640 

Harvard-Tufts football game 18 

Funeral of Patrolman Henry Meyers, retired . . 12 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 12 
Fenway Park, Boston Park Department final football 

game 35 

Boston Garden, Bruins-Canadiens hockey game for 

the benefit of the Greater Boston United War Fund, 37 
Boston Garden, Metropolitan Police Relief As.soci- 

ation ball 55 

Funeral of Captain Thomas F. Gleavy, retired . . 22 

Harvard-Boston College football game ... 45 
Boston Common, United States Coast Guard review 

and parade 50 

Funeral of Sergeant Frank M. Magee, retired . . 12 
December 1, 1942, to February 12, 1943, inclusive, 869 officers 
performed a total of 869 duties for that period in connection 
with the "Cocoanut Grove Restaurant" fire disaster. 
February 21 to February 26, inclusive, 1943, 44 officers per- 
formed a total of 264 duties for that period at various schools 
selected as local protected depositories in connection with the 
"War Ration Book Two" registration. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 77 

March 13 to March 20, inclusive, 1943, 6 officers performed a 
total of 48 duties for that period in connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society Flower Show at Horticultural 
Hall. 

May 10 to August 7, inchisive, 1943 (Sundays excepted), 8 
officers performed a total of 624 duties for that period, directing 
traffic; during the horse races at Suffolk Downs race track in 
East Boston. 

May 24 to May 28, inclusive, 1943, 18 officers performed a total 
of 90 duties for that period at various schools selected as local 
protected depositories in connection with the "War Ration 
Book Three" registration. 

September 29 to October 13, inclusive, 1943 (Sundays excepted), 
22 officers performed a total of 286 duties for that period at 
various registration places in connection with the registration 
of voters for the year 1943. 

October 24 to October 29, inclusive, 1943, 44 officers performed 
a total of 264 duties for that period at various schools selected 
as local protected depositories in connection with the "War 
Ration Book Four" registration. 

October 26 to November 5, inclusive, 1943, 8 officers performed 
a total of 80 duties for that period at the office of the City 
Collector, City Hall Annex, in connection with collection of 
taxes. 

November 15 to November 19, inclusive, 1943, 12 officers per- 
formed a total of 60 duties for that period at the office of the 
Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during 
recount of ballots cast at the City Election. 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 



[Jan. 





1940-41. 


1941=42. 


1942-43. 


Abandoned children cared for . 


12 


50 


23 


Accidents reported 


8,062 


6,724 


4,344 


Buildings found open and made secure . 


2,957 


2,534 


2,399 


Cases investigated 


66,497 


67,795 


76,563 


Dangerous buildings reported . 


69 


91 


105 


Dangerous chimneys reported 


27 


39 


47 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 


574 


807 


691 


Defective cesspools reported . 


19 


56 


71 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


16 


29 


36 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported, 


12 


21 


34 


Defective gas pipes reported . 


28 


30 


37 


Defective hydrants reported . 


30 


51 


41 


Defective lamps reported 


3,834 


2,782 


3,098 


Defective sewers reported 


88 


120 


194 


Defective streets and walks reported 


3,247 


2,405 


2>707 


Defective water pipes reported 


168 


56 


96 


Disturbances suppressed .... 


1,088 


1,077 


1,286 


Extra duties performed .... 


45,520 


31,172 


37,105 


Fire alarms given 


6,480 


4,989 


6,763 


Fires extinguished 


840 


741 


589 


Insane persons taken in charge 


562 


580 


637 


Intoxicated persons assisted . 


377 


452 


395 


Lodgers at station houses 


231 


9,736 


22,575 


Lost children restored .... 


1,662 


1,764 


1,770 


Number of persons committed to bail . 


3,291 


2,714 


3,823 


Persons rescued from drowning 


42 


37 


28 


Sick and injured persons assisted . 


10,590 


11,255 


12,703 


Stray teams reported and put up . 


19 


28 


26 


Street obstructions removed . 


83 


100 


117 


Water running to waste reported . 


515 


572 


395 


Witnesses detained 


2 


6 


8 



1944.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 79 



CITY PRISON. 

The City Pri.son is located in the new Court House building, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses, the prosecution of 
which is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court 
(criminal session), new Court House building, are conveyed, if 
in fit condition, to the City Prison and, unless otherwise re- 
leased, are held in charge of the keeper until the next session of 
the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1942, to November 30, 1943, 
10,340 were committed to the City Prison for the following: 

Drunkenness 9,430 

Suspicious persons 278 

For safe keeping 100 

Violation of Rules and Regulations of the Park Commission . . 98 

Assault and battery 55 

Larceny . .' 47 

Fornication 43 

Violation of probation 31 

Non-support 30 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 28 

Default 24 

Adultery 23 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law 16 

Vagrancy 8 

Violation of drug law 6 

Illegal gaming 3 

Lewdness 2 

Soliciting alms 2 

Miscellaneous 116 

Total 10,340 

Lodgers received at the City Prison for period December 1, 
1942, to November 30, 1943, numbered to 306. 



80 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They are 
then held in charge of the matron until the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 3,222 were committed for the following: 

Drunkenness 2,249 

Idle and disorderly 208 

Fornication 102 

Adultery 66 

Larceny 59 

Assault and battery 18 

Night walking 1 

Keeping house of ill fame 12 

Violation of liquor law 1 

Various other causes ' . . . 506 

Total 3,222 

Recommitments. 
From municipal court 55 

Grand Total 3,277 



ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS, ETC. 
For damage to police property, for telephone commissions 
and for dog fines, there was received by the City Collector and 
credited to this Department, $3,143.62. 



1944.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 81 



POLICE SIGNAL BOX SERVICE. 
Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 565. Of these 479 are 
connected with the underground system and 86 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 
In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,700 
trouble calls; inspected 565 signal boxes; 16 signal desks; 18 
motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs have 
been made on 104 box movements; 18 registers; 82 locks; 18 
time stamps; 16 vibrator bells; 30 relays; 14 electric fans. 
This Unit has the installing and maintenance of all electric 
wiring and equipment at all stations and Headquarters building. 
There have been made 112 plungers; 112 box fittings; 80 line 
blocks; 6 automatic hooks; and 350 street-obstruction horses. 

Connected with the pohce signal boxes are 64 signal, 584 
telephone, and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Box Service Unit supervises all telephone and 
teletjrpe installations and minor teletype repairs throughout 
the Department. It also maintains 44 Headquarters-to- 
station-house telephone circuits, 18 teletype-writer circuits, 
18 radio- wired broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits, 
a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank station of the 
MetropoHtan District Police; also a circuit, with equipment, in 
booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel, and the 
inter-communications units throughout the Department. 

All patrol-box telephone, signal and blinker-light repairs 
are made by Signal Box Service members. 

The Unit also installs and maintains all police traffic booths, 
taxicab signs and street-obstruction signs. 

Signal desks and P.B.X. switchboards, installed at all 
station houses in connection with the Police Signal System 
over Department-owned lines, are maintained by this Unit. 

Fluorescent lighting fixtures have been installed in the 
main offices at all the division station houses which are serviced 
by alternating current. 

There are assigned to the Unit 1 GMC truck, 2^ ton capacity; 
2 utility trucks, ^ ton capacity, each; 1 four-door Ford sedan; 
and 1 GMC service truck, | ton capacity. 



82 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The following list comprises the property of the Signal 
Service maintenance at the present time: 

16 open circuit blinker type sig- 17 battery-charging units 

nal P.B.X. desks 777,500 feet of underground cable 

716 circuits 182,000 feet of overhead cable 

48 test boxes 34,200 feet of duct 

400 cells of sulphuric acid storage 79 manholes 

type battery 22 motor generator sets 

2,110 taxicab signs 18 motor-driven flashers 

50 traffic booths 3 GMC trucks 

565 poUce signal boxes 1 Ford truck 

1 Ford sedan 

Communications System. 

The Signal Box Service Unit is responsible for the main- 
tenance of the signal system of the Department. 

During the year, one signal box was moved to a new location, 
several miles of cable w^ere placed underground in conformance 
with law. 

Officers' Recall and Citizen's Alarm features are now installed 
in all police divisions and patrol boxes in the city. Individual 
line telephone service for each patrol box has been found 
advantageous and now all signal boxes are so equipped. 

New cable and cable joints were installed by the signal 
service at a great saving in cost to the Department. 

Two thousand six hundred and ninety feet of cable were 
installed, replacing some of the old cable retained in the new- 
system. 

Fourteen signal boxes, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new equipment. 

Nine taxicab signs, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new signs. 

HARBOR SERVICE. 
The special duties performed by the harbor police, styled 
Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows: 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 

stages, etc $65,025 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 325 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 45 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 19 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 10 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



Number of alarms of fire attended on the water front 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 

Number of boats challenged 

Number of boats searched for contraband 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of dead bodies recovered 

Number rescued from drowning 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and deliver oi 

in harbor 

Number of coal permits granted' to bunker or discharge 
Number of dead bodies cared for 
Number of hours grapphng 



ights 



263 

4 

78 

71 

15 

3,576 

24 

11 

5 

697 

1,394 

954 

6 

10 

24 

210 



Information as to the number of vessels arriving in this port, 
usually inserted in this part of the annual report, is not to be 
included this year, for reasons deemed advisable. 



84 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PATROL SERVICE. 

A patrol service was maintained by the patrol boat "Argus" 
in Dorchester Bay and harbor, daily and nightly, from Castle 
Island to Neponset Bridge, from May 30, 1943, to October 31, 
1943. In connection with this service, there were 512 cases 
investigated, 17 boats challenged for contraband, 350 cases 
where assistance was rendered to boats in distress by reason of 
disabled engines, stress of weather, etc., 7 dead bodies were 
recovered, 3 boats were ordered to put out sailing Ughts, 52 
hours were spent in grappling, 3 persons were rescued from 
drowning, 19 boats were warned about speeding amongst boats, 
375 obstructions removed from channel, 21 fire alarms attended, 
and 3 arrests for various violations. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the 
police patrol boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "William H. 
Pierce," and the "William H. McShane," in the upper and 
lower harbors. Mystic river, Chelsea creek, Fort Point channel, 
and the L Street channel. 

A 19-foot speed boat acquired by the Department in 1938 
has been used in the investigation of cases and in special 
patrol duty in the Fort Point channel, L Street channel, and 
Chelsea creek, without opening the drawbridges at any tide. 

A Dodge Marine Utility speed boat, equipped with an 
inhalator, stretcher and grappling irons, patrolled the Charles 
river in the vicinity of the Spring street bridge. West Roxbury, 
from May 9, 1943, to October 14, 1943. 



HORSES. 

On November 30, 1943, there were 22 saddle horses in 
the service, all attached to Division 16. 

During the year no horses were purchased nor were any 
retired to farms, or disposed of otherwise. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



VEHICLE SERVICE. 
There are 132 automobiles in the service at the present time: 
42 attached to Headquarters; 5 attached to the Traffic Divi- 
sion ; 15 in the city proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3 and 
4; 6 in the South Boston district, attached to Division 6; 
6 in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 11 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 5 in the 
Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 4 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 6 in the Brighton dis- 
trict, attached to Division 14; 4 in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; 5 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 5 in the West Roxbury district, 
attached to Division 17; 5 in the Hyde Park district, attached 
to Division 18 ; 6 in the Mattapan district, attached to Divi- 
sion 19, and 7 unassigned. (See page 87 for distribution of 
automobiles.) 



Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs and replacement of parts 

Storage 

Gasoline 

Oil and grease 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses 

etc 

Registration fees 

Total 



$40,153 07 

154 00 

37,958 62 

1,939 06 

1,837 67 
66 00 

$82,108 42 



Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automo- 
biles (patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 
10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 



City Hospital 

Calls where services were not required 
Southern Mortuary 
Psychopathic Hospital 
Massachusetts General Hospital 

Morgue 

Home 

Carried forward 



9,034 
1,211 
532 
345 
281 
261 
259 



11,923 



86 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Brought forward 11,923 

Boston State Hospital 224 

Carney Hospital 132 

Children's Hospital 99 

Police Station Houses 97 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 92 

City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) 81 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 53 

United States Marine Hospital 53 

Beth Israel Hospital 50 

Forest Hills Hospital 42 

United States Naval Hospital 36 

New England Hospital for Women 32 

Faulkner Hospital 22 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 16 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 11 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 8 

Fort Banks Hospital 6 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 5 

Physicians' offices 5 

Revere General Hospital 3 

St. Margaret's Hospital 3 

Whidden Memorial Hospital 3 

Winthrop Community Hospital 3 

Brooks Hospital 2 

Deaconess Hospital 2 

Evangeline Booth Hospital ........ 2 

Industrial Building Clinic 2 

Milton Hospital 2 

Sullivan Square Emergency Hospital 2 

Cambridge Rehef Hospital 

Glenside Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Kenmore Hospital 

Lahey Chnic 

Maiden Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Navy Yard Dispensary 

Osteopathic Hospital 

Palmer Memorial Hospital 

Robert B. Brigham Hospital 

Salem Hospital 

Strong Hospital 

Washingtonian Home 



Total 13,025 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 



LIST OF VEHICLES USED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 



Divisions. 


Is 

.11 

6 ^ 

O 


« a 
a) 3 

(5 


o 

3 

H 


1 
o 

o 


OS 


Headquarters 










- 


33 


9 


1 


43 


Division 1 . 










2 


2 


- 


- 


4 


Division 2 . 










1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Division 3 . 










1 


2 


- 


- 


3 


Division 4 . 










2 


3 


- 


- 


5 


Division 6 . 










2 


4 


- 


3 


9 


Division 7 . 










2 


4 


- 


4 


10 


Division 9 . 










1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 10 . 










.2 


4 


- 


- 


6 


Divisiort 11 . 










1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 13 . 










1 


3 


- 


4 


8 


Division 14 . 










2 


4 


- 


4 


10 


Division 15 . 










1 


3 


- 


- 


4 


Division 16 . 










1 


4 


- 


- 


5 


Division 17 . 










1 


4 


- 


1 


6 


Division 18 . 










1 


4 


- 


1 


6 


Division 19 . 










1 


5 


- 


- 


6 


Traffic Division . 










- 


5 


- 


6 


11 


Unassigned . 










4 


3 


- 


3 


10 


Totals . 










26 


97 


9 


27 


159 



88 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES. 

During the police year, December 1, 1942, to November 30, 
1943, there were 1,723 * licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages granted, being a decrease of 136 as compared with 
last year. 

During the year ending November 30, 1943, there were 
7 horse-drawn vehicles granted; 5 of these were subsequently 
regranted to motor-driven hackney carriages; leaving a total 
of 2 horse-drawn vehicles licensed. (These jjgures are in- 
cluded in the table of "Hackney Carriage Licenses" shown 
below.) 

There were 249 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. One 
hundred fifty-three of these were restored to the owners and 
the balance of 96 placed in the custody of the Lost Property 
Division of the Property Clerk's Office. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1943, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as 
has been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in 
the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. (To Set Up and Use the Vehicle.) 
Applications for carriage licenses received 1,723 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and 

"changes of ownership") 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 




Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 356 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") . . . . 171 

Carriage licenses revoked 5 

Carriage license revocations rescinded 5 

Carriage owners stripped of credentials 6 

* 185 "regrants." 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 89 

Carriage licenses in effect at end of police year, November 30, 
1943, licensed since February 1, 1943 (beginning of hackney 
carriage license year) — (excludes number canceled in favor 
of "changes of ownership") 1,367 

Carriages inspected 1,293 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 4,419 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after inves- 
tigation 44 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected ... 70 

114 



Drivers' licenses granted 4,305 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 79; of which revocations, 42 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored, — leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 37 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1943 (at end of police 
year), — (licensed since February 1, 1943; beginning of 

hackney carriage driver license year) *3,951 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials . 353 

Complaints against owners, drivers and "set ups" investigated . 2,552 

Days spent in court 15 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 249 

* Includes 72 Female Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Limitation of Hackney Carriage Licenses. 

Under provisions of Section 4, Chapter 392, Acts of 1930, 
as amended by Section 1, Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, the Police 
Commissioner was required to fix a limit for the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be issued, which limit shall be 
based upon the number of licenses then issued and outstanding 
but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and he may from time to 
time, after reasonable notice and hearing, decrease the number 
so fixed, but in no event to number less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner, July 20, 
1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525, 

Subsequently, the Police Commis.sioner, after publication 
of reasonable notice in the Boston daily newspapers and after 
public hearing, November 28, 1939, by General Order to the 
Department, announced (effective as of January 6, 1940) that 
the limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be 
issued under the reference in law herein set out was decreased 
to 1,200; provided, however, that the announcement shall not 



90 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

affect, in any way, the rights of any existing licensee to renewal 
of his license under provisions of said amending section. 

The Police Commissioner further announced in said sub- 
sequent General Order, effectiye as of January 6, 1940, that 
hackney carriage licenses may be granted to the number 
heretofore established (1,525), except that no further original 
licenses shall be granted until the number of hackney carriage 
licenses outstanding shall have been reduced to less than 1,200 
by cancellation or revocation or the failure of holders of licenses 
to apply for renewals, and thereafter hackney licenses may 
be granted only up to a total not exceeding 1,200. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses 
limited under the Act, with amendment, referred to, has been 
issued, the Department of Public Utilities, on petition of such 
applicant, may after a hearing determine that public con- 
venience and necessity require a higher limit than that fixed 
by the Police Commissioner or previously established by said 
Department, and shall establish the limit so required, in which 
case the limit set by said Department shall be considered final 
until change as herein provided. 

Abolishing Special and Public Hackney Carriage 

Stands. 
In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, — 

"An Act with Relation to Pubhc Stands for the 
Use of Taxicabs and Motor Vehicles for Hire in 
Cities . . . ," 

accepted by the City of Boston, the Police Commissioner as of 
February 11, 1939, at 7.45 o'clock, a. m., abolished all special 
and public hackney carriage stands, granted in accordance with 
Chapter 392, Acts of 1930. 

Establishing Public Taxicab Stands. 

In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, referred to, 
the PoUce Commissioner as of February 11, 1939, at 7.45 
o'clock, a. m., established public taxicab stands in the City of 
Boston, which stands are free and accessible to all taxicabs 
whose owners are licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

(See list of public taxicab stands on file in the office of 
Inspector of Carriages.) 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 91 

During the police year, December 1, 1942, to November 30, 
1943, there were 2 piibhc taxicab stands, with capacity for 6 
cabs, abolished. 

There are 487 established public taxicab stands, with 
capacity for 1,254 cabs, at the present time. 

There are, also, 8 established public stands for horse-drawn 
vehicles, with capacity for 10 vehicles, at the present time. 

Hackney Carriage Licenses Granted. 
The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present 
is 1,367 as compared with 1,369 in the previous year; this 
number being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts of 
1934. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon private 
property) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 20 applications (capacity 355 carriages) for 
such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
By the provisions of Section 1 of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 
1931, which went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight- 
seeing automobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this 
act, shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one 
of chapter ninety of the General Laws, used for the carry- 
ing for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 
in or from the city of Boston and in or on which auto- 
mobile guide service by the driver or other person is offered 
or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the transpor- 
tation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 



92 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department 
of Pubhc Utihties a certificate, declaring that public con- 
venience and necessity require such operation; and further, 
it is provided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate 
said automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is 
licensed so to do. 



Suspension of Certificate of Convenience and Necessity for 
Operation of Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 

As of June 3, 1942, the Department of Public Utilities, in 
accordance with an Executive Order and, also, a General 
Order of the Office of Defense Transportation, voted suspen- 
sion of all certificates of public convenience and necessity 
issued by that department for operation of sight-seeing auto- 
mobiles carrying persons in or from the City of Boston in 
accordance mth Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as amended, — 
such suspension to remain in full force and effect until removed 
by the said Department of Public Utilities or unless it may 
become null and void by operation of law. 

Providing for Licensing of Sight-Seeing Horse-Drawn Vehicles^ 
On June 3, 1942, the Pohce Commissioner directed that in 
accordance with vote referred to, of the Department of Public 
Utilities, in the paragraph immediately precedmg, it shall be 
lawful for the owner of a licensed sight-seemg automobile to 
transfer such sight-seeing automobile license to the class of a 
Sight-Seeing Horse-Drawn vehicle, — the fee to be paid therefor 
to the Police Department for such transfer to be the sum of 
one dollar. 

The Police Commissioner further stated that this permission 
of transfer, from the type of a motor vehicle sight-seemg auto- 
mobile to the type of a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle, is 
permissible, notwithstanding suspension referred to of June 3, 
1942, of sight-seeing automobiles, as contained in the notice of 
the Department of Public Utilities. 

Accordingly, insertion was made in the Rules and Regula- 
tions of this Department to the effect that Rule 66 of said Rules 
and Regulations, relating to Sight-Seeing Automobiles, shall be 
inclusive of Sight-Seeing Horse-Drawn Vehicles and Drivers 
thereof, insofar as they are applicable to meet the then present 
conditions of the sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle business. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 93 

Fees Therefor. 
The fees for such sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles, com- 
parable to those for sight-seeing automobiles of similar seating 
capacities, were established as follows: 

For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to carry 
not more than twelve persons, $10. 

For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to carry 
more than twelve but not more than eighteen persons, $15. 
For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to carry 
more than twenty-four persons, $50. 
The following statement gives details concerning horse- 
drawn sight-seeing vehicles and stands: 

Sight-Seeing Horse-Drawn Vehicles and Stands. 

Horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles granted 7 

Sight-seeing stands for horse-drawn vehicles granted ... 6 

Continuing with .our practice, "new" sight-seeing drivers 
for the year commencing as of March 1, 1943, were fingerprinted 
as in the case of "new" hackney carriage drivers, and their 
records, if any, searched for in the Bureau of Records. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were seven sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violation of rules has 
continued to show good results. During the past year, 6,391 
tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Twelve hundred thirty-one penalties were imposed, and 79 
revocations were made, the remainder being reprimanded and 
warned and a record filed for future reference. This system of 
discipline has continued to result in relieving courts of many 
minor cases which would tend to congest their dockets. 

There still continues to be a minimum of crime among the 
3,951 drivers licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

Appeal Board. 
In accordance with Hackney Carriage Rules and Regula- 
tions, hackney carriage drivers and owners dissatisfied with 
findings of the Inspector of Carriages, have the right of appeal 



94 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

to the Commissioner, provided appeal is made in writing within 
forty-eight hours of date of finding. 

Such appeals are heard by an Appeal Board, consisting of 
a Deputy Superintendent of Police and two Captains, desig- 
nated by the Commissioner. 

Hearings on such appeals shall be public; the appellant shall 
have the right to be represented by counsel, to introduce evi- 
dence and to cross-examine witnesses. 

The Board shall file its report and recommendations with 
the Commissioner who takes such action thereon as he deems 
advisable. 

In accordance with such provision, many matters of appeal 
from imposition of penalties (as well as fitness of applicants for 
hackney carriage drivers' licenses whose applications had been 
rejected) were referred by the Commissioner to the Board. 

Supervisory Force. 

Since February 11, 1939, when public taxicab stands were 
established in accordance with the law," and then existing 
special and public hackney carriage stands abolished, the super- 
visory force of the office of Inspector of Carriages (now con- 
solidated with the Traffic Division) enforced rules and regula- 
tions of this Department relating to conduct at and occupancy 
of public taxicab stands by licensed hackney carriage drivers. 

In addition, during the past year, such supervisory force 
has been very busy in the Blue Hill avenue section of Boston, 
suppressing activities of taxicab operators who engage in 
illegal practice of bringing so-called "loads" to the intown 
section of the city, in violation of Section 1, Chapter 408, Acts 
of 1931, which reads as follows: 

"No person shall, except as otherwise provided in this 
chapter, operate any motor vehicle upon any pubHc way 
in any city or town for the carriage of passengers for hire 
in such a manner as to afford a means of transportation 
similar to that afforded by a railway company, by indis- 
criminately receiving and discharging passengers along 
the route on which the vehicle is operated or may be 
running. . . ." 

This policy has resulted in reducing these activities to a 
minimum, and the procedure will be followed continuously until 
such illegal practice has ceased. 



1944.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 95 

WAGON LICENSES. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up and 
use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year, 59 applications for such licenses were re- 
ceived, 57 were granted, one was cancelled for non-payment and 
one was disapproved. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was "Not at a 
designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the higliAvay." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 57 granted, 38 were for licenses from offices, garages, 
stables or order boxes, and 19 were for designated stands in the 
highway. 

Note. 
Legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 
for hire : 

Chapter 122, Acts of 1937; effective June 21, 1937. 

"No person holding a certificate (common carrier) or a 
permit (contract carrier) issued under the provisions of 
(Chapter 264, Acts of 1934, by the Department of Public 
Utilities) and authorizing the transportation of property 
for hire by motor vehicle within the City of Boston shall 
be required to obtain a license from the Police Commissioner 
for said city on account of such transportation or the use of 
motor vehicles therein." 

The legislation referred to did not affect customary procedure 
of this Department in issuing a "wagon" license for a horse- 
drawn vehicle or for a handcart to convey merchandise for hire. 



96 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

A motor vehicle for which there has been issued a certificate 
or permit by the Department of Pubhc Utihties, authorizing 
transportation for hire, shall not be required to be also licensed 
by the Police Commissioner on account of such transportation 
for hire in this city. 

However, should it be intended to locate such motor vehicle 
at a designated stand in the highway in the business of trans- 
portation for hire, the owner thereof, to lawfully occupy such 
designated stand, has no alternative but to take out a "wagon" 
license to be granted by the Police Commissioner. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON. 



Ye;ar. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903* .... 


181,045 


1923 .... 


477,547 


1904 










193,195 


1924 










485,677 


1905 










194,547 


1925 










489,478 


1906 










195,446 


1926 










493,415 


1907 










195,900 


1927 










495,767 


1908 










201,552 


1928 










491,277 


1909 










201,391 


1929 










493,250 


1910 t 










203,603 


1930 










502,101 


1911 










206,825 


1931 










500,986 


1912 










214,178 


1932 










499,758 


1913 










215,388 


1933 










501,175 


1914 










219,364 


1934 










502,936 


1915 










220,883 


1935 i 










509,703 


1916 t 










- 


1936 










514,312 


1917 










221,207 


1937 










520,838 


1918 










224,012 


1938 










529,905 


1919 










227,466 


1939 










534,230 


1920 










235,248 


1940 










531,010 


1921 § 










480,783 


1941 










541,335 


1922 










480,106 


1942 










539,408 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to .\pril 1. 

j 1916 listing done by Board of .\ssessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

n 193.5 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of .\pril 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year : 

Male 252,256 

Female 288,261 



Total 



540,517 



98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Listing Expenses. 

The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 20 

years of age or more, not including the services rendered by 
members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $44,087.75 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list . 17,970.00 

Newspaper notices 1,240.15 

Circulars and pamphlets 210.00 

Telephone rental . . 52.16 

Cartage 79.15 

Total ' . . $63,639.21 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

January 2 353 

January 3 144 

January 4 338 

January 5 334 

January 6 335 

January 7 317 

January 8 320 

January 9 307 

January 10 113 

January 11 283 

January 12 269 

January 13 251 

January 14 235 

January 15 196 

January 16 141 

January 17 39 

January 18 76 

January 19 52 

January 20 53 

January 21 42 

January 22 5 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for Jury service. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



99 



The police findiiijj;s in 1943 may be summarized 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Convicted of crime .... 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit 



Total 



IS follows: 



2,158 

205 

370 

2,326 

9,862 

14,921 



In addition to the above, the Election Commissioners sent to 
the Police Department for delivery 9,862 summonses to persons 
for jury service. 



100 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



SPECIAL POLICE. 

Special police are appointed to serve Avithout pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official miscondnct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1943, were fingerprinted by 
the Department, as has been the custom, and their records, if 
any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

During the year ending November 30, 1943, there were 1,880 
special police officers appointed; 10 applications for appoint- 
ment were refused for cause; 7 appointments were canceled for 
nonpayment of license fee; 225 appointments Avere canceled for 
other reasons; and there were 23 applications either withdrawn 
or on which no action was taken. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 



From corporations and associations . 

From theatres and other places of amusement 

From City Departments 

From United States Government 

From State Departments . 

From churches .... 

From private institutions . 

Total 



1,196 

289 

220 

107 

19 

28 

21 

1,880 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



101 



MUSICIANS' LICENSES. 
Itinerant. 

During the year there were 15 applicatioMs for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, one of which was subsequently 
canceled on account of nonpayment of license fee. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a qualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April of each year. 

During the year 15 instruments were inspected with the 
following results: 



Kind of Instrument. 


Xumber 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Hand organs 

Street pianos 

Accordions 

Clarinet 

Guitar 


5 

4 
4 
1 
1 


5 

4 
4 

1 
1 


Totals 


15 


15 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1939 


161 


161 




1940 


137 


136 


1 


1941 


98 


98 


- 


1942 


65 


65 


- 


1943 


31 


31 


~ 



102 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS. 
The following return shows the number of applications 
made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols 
or revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Common- 
wealth during the past &ye years, the number of such applica- 
tions granted, the number refused and the number revoked. 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


1939 .... 


2,618 


2,520 


98 


4 


1940 .... 


2,611 


2,467 


144 


3 


1941 .... 


2,775 


2,632 


143 


5 


1942 .... 


4,030 


3,863 


167 


5 


1943 .... 


3,714 


* 3,615t 


99 


5 



* 1 10 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 23 licenses to possess machine guns. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Sections 33 to 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Tercen- 
tenary Edition), and the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated: 



Location. 



Number 
Lodged. 



17 Davis Street . 

8 Pine Street 

79 Shawmut Avenue 



36,920 

66,750 

418 



Total 



104,088 



For Accommodation of Service Men. 

48 Boylston street (Boston Young Men's Christian Union) . 1,969 

36 Commonwealth avenue (Columbus Home Corporation) . 13,239 

287 Hanover street (Boston Seamen's Friend Society, Inc.) . 4,336 

Sleeping facilities in fifteen police stations .... 41,745 

Grand Total 165,377 



1944.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 103 



MISCELLANEOUS LICENSES. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 44,291. Of these 188 were rejected; 80 were 
withdrawn or no action taken, leaving a balance of 44,023 
which Avere granted. 

Of the granted applications, 162 w^ere canceled for non- 
payment, leaving in force a net of 43,861, granted "with" and 
"without" fee. 

During the year 127 licenses were transferred, 1,074 canceled 
for various reasons and 90 revoked or suspended. 

The officers investigated 3,105 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $73,612.25. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1942, there were 341 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 22 died, viz. : 2 captains, 3 lieutenants, 
6 sergeants, 11 patrolmen. One annuitant remarried and the 
annuity thereby canceled. Fifty were added, viz. : 2 deputy 
superintendents, 2 captains, 3 lieutenants, 1 sergeant, 41 patrol- 
men, and the widow of Patrolman Felix F. Sharkey, who died 
from disability received in the performance of duty, leaving. 
368 on the roll at date, 323 pensioners and 45 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $402,521.15, and it is estimated that 
$458,835.83 will be required for pensions and annuities in 
1944. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 49 beneficiaries of the Fund at the 
present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$7,634.00 during the past year. 



104 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



FINANCIAL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and annuities, listing residents, twenty 
years of age or more, and the maintenance of the police signal 
.service were $6,189,521.84. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $51,233.33. (See Table XVIII.) 

In addition to the above amount there was expended 
$1,091.09 for Work Relief Materials for Police Department 
W. P. A. Projects. 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, 
etc., was $86,609.31. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(105) 





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$8,000 
5,000 
3,000 
3,800 
7,000 
4,. 500 
4,000 
2,900 
2,900 
2,700 
2,500 
2,500 
1,800-2,300 
1,800 
1,800 
2,300 

1,800 




Z 

O 

as 

O 

c 


Commissioner 

Secretary 

Assistant Secretary .... 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents . 
Captains 

Lieutenant-Inspector .... 

Sergeants 

Patrolman (Aide) .... 
Patrolman and Supervisor of Stable . 
Patrolmen 

Patrolmen (Provisional Temporary), 

Patrolwomen (Provisional Tempo- 
, rary) 



_ .-; _ — -.T o c-i — — rj '■■: ■«< r. o rc r^ c r^ — — ' ec ■* f~ ^5 — 
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II 1 1 1 1 1 i - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 .; 1 1 1 1 1 =-' 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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II 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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II 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 


II ; 1 — 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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II 11 1 I ! 1 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


: 1 1 ! 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 <M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


II :> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


l(N 1 — ICC|||||l||r^|ICM|-H-H|«| — 


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II 1 1 (N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


'1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


II 1 .'! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 , 1 1 , 


II 1 1 1 O 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CO : 


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II 111— "llllllllllllllrHll. 


3.150 

1,600-1,800 

1,600 

3,600 

1,200 
1,000-3,600 
1,000-1,100 

2,600 

3,350 
1,200-1,600 

2,000 

1,700 

1,600 

1,600 

1,000 
2,000-2,400 
1,500-1,800 
1,600 2,100 

1,900 

3,600 
1,800-2,100 
1,800-2,500 

2,100 
2,160-2,300 

1,700 


...... 


Biological Chemist 
Chauffeurs 

Chauffeur-Laborer (Military Subst 

Chief Inventory Clerk 
Cleaners 

Clerks (Military Substitutes) . 
Diesel Engine Operator 
Director, Signal Box Service 

Firemen (Marine) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Laborers 

Linemen and Foreman 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Painter 

Property Clerk .... 

Repairmen 

Shorthand Reporters . 

Signalmen 

Statisticians .... 
Steamfitter 



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2 

o 
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Stenographer.s 

Superintendent of Buildings 

Assistant Superintendent of Build- 
ings 

Superintendent of Repair Shop 

Tailor 

Telephone Operators .... 


1 
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1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength oj Police Department. 





.4lDTHORIZED 

Strength. 


.Actual Strength. 


Kanks and Grades. 


Jan. 1, 
1943. 


Nov. 30. 
1943. 


Jan. 1, 
1943. 


Nov. 30, 
1943. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Assistant Secretary . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendent 


5 


5 


5 


5 


- 


Captains .... 


30 


30 


27 


31 


Plus 4 


Lieutenants 


69 


69 


62 


66 


Plus 4 


Lieutenant-Inspectoi- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Sergeants .... 


187 


187 


184 


187 


Plus 3 


Patrolmen .... 


1,977 


1,977 


1,974 


1,968 


Minus 6 


Patrolwomen 


5 


5 


5 


5 


- 


Military Substitute Patrol- 
men 


- 


- 


91 


45 


Minus 46 


Provisional Temporary 
Patrolmen 


- 


_ 


_ 


108 


Plus 108 


Provisional Temporary 
Patrolwomen . 


- 


- 


- 


9 


Plus 9 


Totals .... 


2,278 


2,278 


2,353 


2,429 


Plus 76 



The la.st column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



no 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



HI 



Table IV. 
List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November SO, 
IQJfS, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time 
of Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



Barrett, John G., Jr. . 


Incapacitated 


48 


3-12 years 


23 


7-12 years 


Bickford, Leslie B. . . . 


Incapacitated 


46 


7-12 " 


22 


10-12 " 


Bird, George H 


Incapacitated 


49 


10-12 " 


24 


« 


Blue, James L 


Incapacitated 


46 


8-12 " 


20 


5-12 " 


Bradbury, Joshua J. . 


Incapacitated 


49 


" 


23 


8-12 " 


Brauneis, Fred C. . . . 


Incapacitated 


48 


9-12 " 


23 


8-12 " 


Broderick, James W. . 


Incapacitated 


49 


9-12 " 


23 


9-12 " 


Carey, William J. ... 


Age 


67 


7-12 " 


37 


2-12 " 


Carney, Bernard 


Incapacitated 


54 


11-12 " 


22 


7-12 " 


Chambers, Harold L.* 


Incapacitated 


39 


10-12 " 


12 


7-12 " 


Chatfield, William B. 


Incapacitated 


56 


10-12 " 


23 


11-12 " 


Cote, Joseph A 


Incapacitated 


45 


9-12 " 


22 


8-12 " 


Cowan. Walter J.* . . . 


Incapacitated 


50 


5-12 " 


14 


4-12 " 


Crehan, .\ugustine F.* 


Incapacitated 


44 


10-12 " 


17 


8-12 " 


Creighton, Patrick J. . 


Incapacitated 


50 


11-12 " 


22 


7-12 " 


Crossen, Nicholas C. . 


Incapacitated 


48 


5-12 " 


23 


11-12 " 


Davenport, Michael J. 


Incapacitated 


53 


7-12 " 


23 


4-12 " 


Dooley, James L. . . . 


Incapacitated 


48 


11-12 " 


23 


10-12 " 


Evans, Charles W.* . 


Incapacitated 


45 


" 


18 


11-12 " 


Fahey, Francis J.* 


Incapacitated 


43 


9-12 " 


13 


6-12 " 


Goodwin, Francis V. . 


Incapacitated 


50 


4-12 " 


23 


4-12 " 


Grace, Herbert A.* 


Incapacitated 


42 


8-12 " 


12 


11-12 " 


Hanley, Joseph A. . . . 


Incapacitated 


54 


8-12 ■■ 


23 


4-12 " 


Hanlon, Thomas J.* . 


Incapacitated 


46 


8-12 " 


19 


5-12 " 


Harvey, Seward T. . . . 


Incapacitated 


47 


11-12 " 


21 


6-12 " 


Haskins, Herbert H. . 


Incapacitated 


54 


5-12 " 


23 


8-12 " 


Hassey, Thomas J.* . 


Incapacitated 


40 


" 


13 


9-12 " 


Hodgkinson, William J. 


Incapacitated 


53 


" 


22 


6-12 " 


HoUstein, Gustav F. . 


Age 


65 


8-12 " 


39 


5-12 " 


Hoy, Frederick C* . 


Incapacitated 


45 


10-12 " 


17 


" 



* Retired under Boston Retirement Sj-stera. 



112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan, 



Table 1Y. — Continued. 
List of Officers Retired During the Year Eliding November 30, 
1943, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years^ Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Hurley, Andrew J. 




Age 


65 


6-12 years. 


35 


6-12 years. 


Hurley, James W'.' 






Incapacitated 


41 


7-12 ■■ 


14 


1-12 " 


Jackson, Edward S. 






Incapacitated 


52 


4-12 " 


23 


7-12 " 


Johnson, Henry W. 






Incapacitated 


54 


" 


22 


7-12 " 


Johnston, Thomas F.'* 






Incapacitated 


43 


" 


16 


9-12 " 


Kearns, John J. . 






Incapacitated 


47 


2-12 " 


22 


9-12 " 


Keeney, Francis A.* . 






Incapacitated 


40 


1-12 " 


12 


7-12 " 


Kelley, John J. . 






Incapacitated 


51 


7-12 " 


22 


11-12 " 


LaCroix, Henr>- J. 






Incapacitated 


45 


.5-12 " 


21 


« 


Lawson, Samuel A. 






Incapacitated 


57 


6-12 " 


23 


11-12 " 


Lee, William B. F. 






Incapacitated 


51 


5-12 •' 


23 


7-12 " 


Londergan, Thomas F.-* 






Incapacitated 


40 


11-12 " 


14 


10-12 " 


Lowney, John 






Incapacitated 


53 


4-12 " 


22 


11-12 " 


Lucy, Frank D.* . 






Incapacitated 


51 


7-12 " 


17 


3-12 " 


MacKinnon, Patrick A. 






Incapacitated 


54 


9-12 " 


29 


4-12 " 


Malcolm, William F.* 






Incapacitated 


52 


4-12 " 


18 


1-12 " 


Millett, Reginald C* . 






Incapacitated 


45 


8-12 " 


19 


2-12 " 


Miner, Carl L. 






Incapacitated 


54 


11-12 " 


24 


" 


Mooney, James J.* 






Incapacitated 


43 


2-12 " 


15 


11-12 " 


Mulrey, Thomas F. 






Age 


.66 


10-12 " 


36 


8-12 " 


Murphy, Patrick J. 






Incapacitated 


51 


6-12 " 


21 


" 


McCarthy, Patrick J.* 






Incapacitated 


40 


7-12 " 


14 


7-12 " 


McKinnon, Joseph 






Age 


67 


4-12 " 


40 


4-12 " 


McLaughlin, Patrick H.* 






Incapacitated 


43 


6-12 " 


19 


3-12 " 


O'Dea, John T. . 






Age 


65 


3-12 " 


39 


9-12 " 


Parker, Joseph A. 






Incapacitated 


48 


8-12 " 


20 


9-12 " 


Richmond, Harold R.* 






Incapacitated 


45 


3-12 " 


19 


9-12 " 


Salvador, John S. 






Incapacitated 


53 


8-12 " 


23 


6-12 " 


Sawyer, Arthur H. 






Incapacitated 


47 


8-12 " 


23 


8-12 " 


Schicks, Chester A; 






Incapacitated 


47 


9-12 " 


23 


6-12 " 


Slack, Hersey D. 






Incapacitated 


50 


7-12 " 


23 


4-12 " 


Smith, John J.* . 






Incapacitated 


47 


11-12 " 


18 


10-12 " 


Stone, Thomas F. " . 






Incapacitated 


42 


9-12 " 


17 


2-12 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



1944.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



113 



Table IV. — Concluded. 
List of Officers Retired Durifig the Year Ending November 30, 
1943, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Strange, Clarence C. . 


Incapacitated 


50 9-12 years. 


23 


8-12 years. 


Sullivan, Thomas J.* . 






Incapacitated 


44 


14 


10-12 " 


Sweeney, John C, Jr.* 






Incapacitated 


42 7-12 " 


16 


3-12 " 


Tracy, John . 






Incapacitated 


56 5-12 " 


23 


9-12 " 


Tutela, Felix 






Incapacitated 


47 2-12 " 


21 


8-12 " 


Wall, Arthur F. . 






Incapacitated 


45 2-12 " 


21 


9-12 " 


Werner, Harold . 






Incapacitated 


45 


22 


8-12 " 


Williston, Samuel I. . 






Incapacitated 


50 6-12 " 


23 


2-12 " 


Winn, Edward J. 






Incapacitated 


53 6-12 " 


22 


1-12 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



114 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending November 

30, 1943. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1943. 



June 


24 


October 


4 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


October 


4 


October 


4 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 


June 


24 



Captain Thomas S. J. Kavanagh to rank of Deputy Superintendent. 

Captain James J. Hinchey to rank of Deputy Superintendent. 

Lieutenant Carleton B. Perry to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Edward B. Cain to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Leo C. J. Masuret to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Frank H. Sliney to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Thomas E. McMurray to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Louis DiSessa to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant Maurice F. Murphy to rank of Captain. 

Lieutenant James F. O'Neil to rank of Captain. 

Sergeant Donald F. MacKinnon to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Edward T. Leary to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John J. Danehy to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Daniel F. Burns to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Francis W. Russell to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John F. McElhinney to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant John F. Petitti to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Joseph B. Fallon to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Thomas F. Friel to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Joseph B- Dawson to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Frank E. Shaw to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Chester A. Henchey to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Walter J. Wilson to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant Edwin P. Murphy to rank of Lieutenant. 

Sergeant George F. Weckbacher to rank of Lieutenant. 

Patrolman John J. Moynihan to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Charles J. Masuret to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Martin P. Kelly to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Arthur V. Fraher to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman Arthur F. McDermott to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrolman William J. Creedon to rank of Sergeant. 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



115 



Table V. — Concluded. 
Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending November 

30, 1943. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1943. 



June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


Jiine 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 


June 


24 


Patrolman 



Patrick J. Gaflfey to rank of Sergeant. 

Frederick G. Kahler to rank of Sergeant. 
. James W. McAllister to rank of Sergeant. 
. John J. Cunniffe to rank of Sergeant. 

Douglas McLeod to rank of Sergeant. 

James F. McGrath to rank of Sergeant. 
. John B. Glawson, Jr., to rank of Sergeant. 

William H. Costin to rank of Sergeant. 

Thomas F. Flaherty to rank of Sergeant. 

William F. Fullerton to rank of Sergeant. 

John J. Byrne to rank of Sergeant. 

Patrick J. Mulvey to rank of Sergeant. 

John J. Foley to rank of Sergeant. 

Bartholomew J. Adiey to rank of Sergeant. 



116 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 
Who Were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date Appointed. 


T3 

c 
a 

3 


a 
o 
■a 
d 
S 
a 

II 

D 


i 

a 
O 


a 

03 

<a 

3 
a) 

3 


ii 

ajM 
3 


i 

a 

03 
a 

1 


d 
£ 

1 


Totals. 


1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 

1906 . 

1907 . 

1908 . 

1909 . 

1910 . 

1911 . 

1912 . 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 

1925 . 

1926 . 

1927 . 

1928 . 

1929 . 

1930 . 

1931 . 

1937 . 

1938 . 

1940 . 

1941 . 

1942 . 

1943 . 








1 


1 

_ 

1 
1 

2 


1 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

1 

17 
3 

2 

1 


2 

2 
3 

3 

1 

1 
1 
16 
5 
6 
5 
3 
2 
1 
7 
5 
1 
2 


1 


1 
1 

2 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

66 

27 

16 

12 

11 

5 

9 

13 

5 

4 

6 

1 


1 

3 
3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

350 

106 

75 

40 

77 
48 
72 

232 
94 
70 

165 
34 
14 

183 
2 

133 
58 

100 

105 


2 

2 

3 

2 

7 

12 

5 

2 

2 

6 

2 

1 

4 

2 

452 

141 

97 

57 

93 

55 

82 

253 

104 

75 

173 

35 

14 

183 

2 

133 

58 

100 

105 


Totals 


1 


5 


31 


66 


1 


187 


1,973 


2,264 



■ Note. — 45 Military Substitute Patrolmen, not included. 108 Provisional Temporary 
Patrolmen and 9 Provisional Temporary Patrolwomen, not included. 



Table VII. 

Men on Police Force on November 30, 1943, Who Were Born in 
the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 





a 


a 

q 














Date of Birth. 


1 


01 
C 

II 

Q 


i 

o 




OS o 
OJI-l 


a 


s 

a 
1 


Totals. 


1873 .... 












1 




1 


1876 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1877 . 








- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


1878 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


2 


8 


1879 . 








- 


- 




2 


- 


- 


3 


6 


1880 . 








- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


2 


3 


1881 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


3 


- 


6 


1882 . 








- 


2 


2 


3 


- 


- 


- 


7 


1883 . 








- 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


1884 . 








- 


- 




1 


- 


2 


1 


5 


1885 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


12 


13 


1886 . 








- 


- 




2 


- 


2 


21 


26 


1887 . 








- 


1 




- 


- 


3 


28 


33 


1888 . 








- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


1 


36 


41 


1889 . 








- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


5 


51 


59 


1890 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


36 


40 


1891 . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


7 


70 


79 


1892 . 








- 


- 


2 


3 


- 


11 


85 


101 


1893 . 








- 


- 


4 


6 


- 


19 


104 


133 


1894 . 








- 


- 


2 


5 


- 


20 


112 


139 


1895 . 








- 


- 


1 


6 


- 


16 


116 


139 


1896 . 








- 


1 


3 


3 


- 


24 


128 


159 


1897 . 








1 


- 


5 


6 


- 


24 


120 


156 


1898 . 








- 


- 


2 


4 


- 


17 


HI 


134 


1899 . 








- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


6 


76 


87 


1900 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


11 


109 


124 


1901 . 








- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


2 


95 


101 


1902 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


47 


51 


1903 . 








- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


45 


47 


1904 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


32 


32 


1905 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


30 


1906 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


33 


1907 . 








- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


48 


48 


1908 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


39 


39 


1909 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51 


51 


1910 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


56 


56 


1911 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


33 


1912 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


44 


44 


1913 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


38 


38 


1914 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


29 


29 


1915 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


40 


40 


1916 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


36 


36 


1917 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


22 


22 


1918 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


16 


1919 . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


13 


13 


Totals 


1 


5 


31 


66 


1 


187 


1,973 


2,264 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1943, 

was 44.04 years. 

N'oTE. — 45 Military Substitute Patrolmen, not included. 108 Provisional Temporary 
Patrolmen and 9 Provisional Temporary Patrolwomen, not included. 

(117) 



118 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 









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1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 



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120 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Jan . 




1944.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



121 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1943. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation 


1,341 


306 


1,647 


Division 1 . . . . 




2,573 


104 


2,677 


Division 2 








2,081 


141 


2,222 


Division 3 








4,386 


717 


5,103 


Division 4 








7,927 


1,234 


9,161 


Division 6 








6,468 


357 


6,825 


Division 7 








3,218 


219 


3,437 


Division 8 








20 


- 


20 


Division 9 








3,475 


462 


3,937 


Division 10 








3,911 


546 


4,457 


Division 11 . 








2,201 


138 


2,339 


Division 13 . 








1,047 


75 


1,122 


Division 14 








1,478 


93 


1,571 


Division 15 








3,722 


254 


3,976 


Division 16 . 








■ 3,866 


320 


4,186 


Division 17 . 








867 


66 


933 


Division 18 . 








624 


30 


654 


Division 19 








1,683 


83 


1,766 


Traffic . 








5,456 


1,192 


6,648 


Totals . 








56,344 


6,337 


62,681 





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1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



139 



"CS la 



M Si 



X! 



[■f] 


!to 


ill 


tJ 


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■73 


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140 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



(20 






rii 





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05 


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1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



141 



c 

3 
O 

B 
< 


OOOOOOOOOOOO lOOQOOOiO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO iOOOOOOI> 

00(NiOiCOiCOOOiC030iO (MO'OCTj^TfiO 

N ri C^ «0 00 00 CO i-H^ t^'^.OO r-i O^-* 

CO 


oo 

oo 

oo 

CO CO 

CO 




IM 
(M 

CO 

co" 


siuit;]cluioQ 


coco 03 (N 
Tf in 


"^ ' 


3,105 


•pajjajsuBJX 


IC01001IIIIIIC<»l|iOiOII|iO II 


t^ 1 


•papuadsng 
JO pajjoAay 


1 1 1 1 0510 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lO^ 1 1 1 1 1 11 

r^ * 


O 1 

03 


•suos'sajj snouBjY 

joj papouBj 


rtlOl 10r^'-<C01.-HlCia)THTtll |C<|r-l 1 1 

CO lO «D'-i CO lO 
CO --1 (N(M 


1,074 


•pa^oafay 


l--i| lOI l-il 1 1 |(M05-*| 1 lOI 


1 rH 


00 1 

00 


uoiiov ox 
JO UMBjpq^i^ 
suoi;Boi'|ddy 


COIII'*llllll|(M|.-i|||OI 11 

Tfi CO 


O 1 

00 


•aaj inoqijAV 
panssj sasuaoi^ 


1 1 1 TtH 1 1 1 1 esi(N 1 (M-H 1 eo^ 1 1 o 1 11 

CO 


5 ' 

CO 


panssj sasuaoi'j 


Tt< CO o ^ lo CO 00 ■* lo o Tt^ Tf 1 lo CO CO i> t^ t^ CO 

O 00 lO O (M r-i ^ lO (M 1-1 00 O '* -* (N ^ 
rti.O^COt>'-H >OCO^ lOO 

QO~co'~'*'r-r co" -Trt" 


C0 05 

coco 


43,480 


•paAiaoay 
suoi^TJoiiddy 


OOTjicOiOOSCOOiCDt^r-iiOCDiCTtHCOTtHr^OOCO 

O ^ lO -H (N ^ CO lO CO r-i 00 (N rH IC Tjl CO '^ 

■-I ^""i.^^^:, '"' t> CO -I o CO 

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coo 
co^ 


44,291 


Class of License. 




>1 

go 
bti'f. 

§1 
^ s 

— o 

X 03 


J2 

c3 
O 


t 


Auctioneer (class 1) 

Auctioneer (special) ' . . . 

Bicycle registration .... 

Dog . 

Driver (hackney carriage) 
Hackney carriage (and regrants) " 
Handcart (common carrier) . 

Junk collector 

Junk shopkeeper .... 
Musician (collective) 
Musician (itinerant) 

Pawnbroker ^ 

Public lodging house 
Revolver (including machine gun) 
Second-hand articles 
Second-hand motor vehicle dealer ■* 

Sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle driver 
Special police officer 
Street railway conductor, motormai 
and starter. 



142 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





LOOO 


tH OCO 


^OC^iOCOO 05iC 


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lice 

oners 

discount, 

damaged 

ned prop- 


73 
CI 








3 


• • 3 
O 

5 o 


C! 
O 


noney 
prope 
dog fi 




u 




O r- 


soline tax 
spital service to po 
scellaneous 
insportation of pris 
tomobile fleet trade 
ment for lost and 

and equipment, 
demned property . 

stolen and abando 


03 

to 


ll-l 




z 

o 

■«: 
O 


it forward 
nerant musician 
icenses and repl 


police property 

tomobiles abanc 

l)olice officers o 


nbroker and 
report blanks, 
ce property 


City Collector f 
r damage to pol 
e commissions a 


"3 
o 




Cft'-D'"' 


O 3 >> 


bCjS C *i rf S S o 9S 


c3 "3 O 




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03 - - 


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ej 




?; 03 ,^ 


• bc-a-3 


pay. 
efund 
efund 
efund 
efund 
efund 
eimbi 
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1944.1 



PUBLIC document — No. 49. 



14:^ 



Table XV. 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued During Year Ending 

November SO, 1943. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Kennels. 


Transfers. 


Total. 


1 . . 


39 


6 


2 






47 


2 








3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


4 


3 








210 


57 


41 


1 


2 


311 


4 








420 


102 


67 


*2 


- 


591 


6 








846 


114 


94 


- 


1 


1,055 


7 








700 


105 


78 


- 


- 


883 


8 








4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


9 








742 


95 


112 


- 


- 


949 


10 








ol5 


81 


78 


- 


- 


674 


11 








1,655 


201 


407 


- 


1 


2,264 


13 








596 


75 


184 


2 


2 


859 


14 








631 


54 


213 


1 


2 


901 


15 








274 


38 


27 


- 


- 


339 


16 








560 


126 


161 




- 


847 


17 








1,351 


1.50 


t489 


- 


- 


1,990 


18 








t808 


62 


240 


- 


- 


1,110 


19 








261 


18 


48 


- 


- 


327 




Tot 


als 




9,615 


1,285 


2,241 


6 


8 


13,155 



* 2 kennels, no fee. 

t 2 seeing-eye dogs, no fee. 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City, 
by Police Divisions. 



Division 1 * 
Division 2 
Division 4 



18 
12 
18 



Division 6 
Division 7 

Total 



57 



* Includes 18 handcart common carriers. 



144 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1943. 





Expenditures 








A. Personal Service: 








1. 


Permanent employees 


$5,204,254 39 




2. 


Temporary employees 


29,416 43 












$5,233,670 82 








B. Contractual Services: 








1. 


Printing and binding 


$875 20 




3. 


Advertising and posting . 


487 


05 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


18,552 


47 




5. 


Express charges 


83 


82 




8. 


Light, heat and power 


34,208 


68 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water 


727 


55 




12. 


Bond and insurance premiums 


295 


00 




13. 


Communication 


35,105 


87 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and care 


27,231 


44 




16. 


Care of animals . 


2,508 


50 




18. 


Cleaning .... 


2,375 


60 




22. 


Medical .... 


13,759 


52 




28. 


Expert .... 


60 


00 




29. 


Stenographic, copying, etc. 




— 




30. 


Listing .... 


63,639 


21 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc. 


884 


77 




37. 


Photographic and blueprinting 




— 




39. 


General repairs . 


61,214 


62 


262,009 30 








C. Eqtji 


PMENT : 








3. 


Electrical .... 


$424 


64 




4. 


Motor vehicles . 


28,566 


11 




6. 


Stable 


226 


45 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings 


1,202 


73 




9. 


Office ..... 


3,004 


85 




10. 


Library .... 


267 


00 




11. 


Marine .... 


231 


63 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


72 


00 




13. 


Tools and instruments 


3,476 


58 




14. 


Live stock .... 




— 




15. 


Tires, tubes, accessories . 


10,367 


04 




16. 


Wearing apparel 


72,620 


76 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 
Brought forward 


3,395 


88 


123,855 67 










$5,619,535 79 



1944.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



145 







Carried forward 




$5,619,535 79 


D. 


Supplies: 








1. 


Office 


$35,955 72 






2. 


Food and ice . . . 


8,387 07 






3. 


Fuel 


26,961 10 






4. 


Forage and animal . 


5,545 73 






5. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


520 41 






8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet . 


5,855 77 






11. 


Gasoline, oil and grease . 


43,857 96 






13. 


Chemicals and disinfectants 


3,120 65 






16. 


Miscellaneous 


16,156 84 


146,361 25 






E. 


Materials: 








1. 


Building .... 


$1,479 72 






10. 


Electrical .... 


13.019 59 






13. 


Miscellaneous 


6,028 68 


20,527 99 






F. 


Spec 


ial Items: 








7. 


Pensions and annuities 


$402,521 15 






11. 


Workmen's compensation 


187 14 


402,708 29 






H. 


Emergency Relief Project Materials 

Total . . . .- 


388 52 




$6,189,521 84 



Special Items: (Not included in Police Department appropriation)' 
Work Relief materials for Police W. P. A. Project, $1,091 09 

Civilian Precautionary Assistance .... $1,374 72 

Emergency Compensation Allotment . . . $90,092 68 



Receipts. 
For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . 
For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 
Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property, 
For licen.se badges, replacement dog tags, copies of license.s, 

sale of report blanks, use of police property 
For damage to police property (received at Headquarters) 

Refund, automobile trade discount 

Refunds and reimbursements 

Refunds, miscellaneous 

Total ... 



$43,377 25 


30,235 


00 


2,303 


44 


1,406 


60 


160 54 


1,593 


42 


4.227 


12 


162 


32 



Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 
to police propert}', commis.sions on telephones and for 
dog fines . 

Grand Total 



J,465 69 



3,143 62 

$86,609 31 



146 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



Table XVIII. 
Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year 
Ending November 30, 1943. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 

Pay rolls ........... $33,360 77 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . 17,872 56 

Total $51,233 33 



1944. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



147 







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INDEX 



A. 



Page 



Accidents . 34, 78, 147, 148 

caused by automobiles 147, 148 

number of, reported 78 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares, 147, 148 

Acting Police Commissioner, Acting Superintendent, Acting In- 
spector of Divisions 26, 27, 28, 30 



Adjustment of claims 

Air-raid test 

Air-raid wardens 

Ambulance service 

Anti-semitism, investigation of assaults, etc., 

from 

Arrests 

age and sex of 

comparative statement of 

decrease in number .... 

for drunkenness .... 

foreigners 

for offenses against chastity, morality, 

minors 

nativity of 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions . 

number of, punished by fine . 

on warrants 

summoned by court .... 

total number of .... 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants .... 



etc 



Articles lost and found .... 

Auctioneers 

Automobiles . . . 18,20,31-34,71, 

accidents due to .... 

cost of running police 

deaths caused by ... . 

non-e.ssential driving of . 

operating while under influence of liquor 

police 

public 

safety-educational .... 

sight-seeing 

stolen and recovered 

used, dealers in 



26. 



80 
27, 28, 29, 30 



. . 85 
allegedly resulting 

10 

12, 15-19, 35, 79, 121-140 

139 

140 

15, 16 

16, 18, 79, 80, 130 

16, 122-138 

15, 129, 138 

12, 15, 122-138 

16 

15, 16, 17, 122-138 

121 

. 15, 16 

15, 122-138 

15, 122-138 

15, 18, 122-138 

15, 133 

15, 122-138 

71 

141 

85, 125, 126, 132, 133, 147, 148 

147, 148 

85 

34, 147, 148 

26 

18, 132 

. 70, 85-87 

88, 141 

59 

91, 141 

. 18, 31, 126 

. 31-33, 141 



B. 

Ballistics unit 

accomplishments 

bombs, suspected, examination of 

formation and duties 
Benefits and pensions 

(151) 



64-66 

64 

66 

64 

103 



152 



P. D. 49. 



Bicycles, registration of . 
Biological chemist 
"Blackout" tests 
Buildings 

dangerous, reported . 
Bureau of Crime Prevention . 

creation .... 

formation 

purpose .... 

duties in general 

summary of work accomplished 

inspections and investigations 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation . 

automobile division . 

biological chemist 

homicide squad 

lost and stolen property division 

used cars dealers' licenses granted 
Bureau of Operations 

creation, accomplishments 

recording of radio messages 
Bureau of Records 

criminal identification 

missing persons 

multihth .... 

photography, fingerprinting 

summons file 

warrant file 
"Butterfly" bombs . 



24, 25, 



Page 

25 

. 36-38 

26, 27, 29 

78, 125 

78 

11, 28, 68 

68 

68 

68 

68 

69 

69 

31-38 

31 

36 

33 

33 

32, 141 

62-63 

62 

63 

40-55 

43,48 

51-54 

41 

42-47, 49 
55 
54 
29 



c. 

Carriages, public 

articles left in 

number licensed 

public and special hackney carriage stands abolished 

public stands for taxicabs established 
Cases investigated .... 
Children 17 

abandoned, cared for 

lost, restored .... 
City ordinances, arrests for violation of 

City Prison 

Civil Air Patrol .... 

Civilian Defense .... 
Claims, adjustment of . . . 
Cocoanut Grove disaster 
Collective musicians 

Commitments 

Communications system . 
Complaints 

against miscellaneous licenses 

against pohce officers 
Confiscated explosives, disposition of 
Courts 15, 16, 17, 34, 

fines imposed by . . . 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 

number of persons summoned by 

prosecutions in . 
Criminal identification 
Criminal work 

comparative statement of 



52, 



15, 



88, 141 

89 

88, 141 

90 

90 

35, 78 

78, 122, 123 

78 

52, 78 

18, 133 

79 

25 

8,29 

80 

37 

101, 141 

17, 80 

82 

103, 119, 141 

103, 141 

24, 119, 120 

66 

36, 122-138, 140 

15, 16, 140 

15, 17, 36, 140 

15, 122-138 

34 

. 42-48 

140 

140 



p. D. 49. 



153 



D. 



Page 



Dangerous weapons . 










102, 122 


Dead bodies 






. 54, 83, 84 


recovered 






. 83. 84 


Deaths 1 


4, 34', 37, 


54, 110, 147. 148 


by accident, suicide, etc. 

of police officers 






34, 147, 148 






14, 110 


Defense preparations 






24 


Department medals of honor .... 






. 8, 23 


Dictaphone for recording radio messages 






63 


"Dimout, " ehmination of .... 






. 27, 29, 30 


"Dimout" enforcement 






. 8, 25 


Distribution of force 






14, 106-108 


Disturbances suppressed .... 






78 


Dogs 






141, 143, 145 


amount received for licenses for . 






141,145 


number h censed 






145 


Draftsman, services of 






50 


Drivers 






89, 92, 93, 141 


hackne}' carriage 






89, 141 


sight-seeing automobile and sight-seeing 


horse-drawn 


vehicle 






92, 93, 141 


Drowning, persons rescued from . 






. 78,83 


Drunkenness 


1 


6, 


18, 78, 80, 130 


arrests for, per day 






16 


decrease in number of arrrests for 






16 


foreigners arrested for .... 






16, 130 


men committed to City Prison 






78 


nonresidents arrested for 






16, 130 


total number of arrests for 






16, 18, 130 


women committed to the House of Detention 




80 


E. 

Emergency Battalion reorganized 


. 9, 28 


Employees of the Department 






13, 106-108 


Events, special .... 






72 


Executive orders of the Governor 




• 24, 


25, 26, 27, 30 


Expenditures .... 






22, 104, 144 


Extra duties performed by officers 




. 35, 78 


F. 

Financial 21, 22, 103 


104. 141, 144 


expenditures 






22, 104, 144 


miscellaneous license fees 










104, 141, 145 


pensions 










103, 145 


receipts 








21 


103, 141, 145 


signal service 










104. 146 


Fines .... 










15, 16, 140 


amount of . - . 










15, 16, 140 


average amount of . 










15, 140 


number punished by 










16 


Fingerprint 










. 41-51 


Fire alarms 










78, 83 


defective, reported 










78 


number given . 










- 78 


Fires .... 










. 78,83 


extinguished 










. 78,83 


on waterfront, attended 










83 


First aid course, Red Cross 










10 


Foreigneis, number arrested . 










15, 122-138 


Fuel oil shortage 










. 24,25 


Fugitives from justice 










35, 135 



154 



P. D. 49. 



Q. 

Gaming, illegal 

General conditions of the Department 

General orders 

Guards for Report Centers 



Page 
135 

7 

8, 24 

27 



H. 



Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Halloween parties 
Handcarts . 
Harbor service . 
Homicide squad 
Horses 

House of Detention . 
Houses of ill fame, keeping 



89, 141 

;8-94,141 

76 

95, 141 

7, 82, 84 

33 

84 

80 

80, 130 



I. 

Imprisonment .... 

persons sentenced to 

total years of 

Income 

Information from police journals, requests for 
Inquests held .... 
Insane persons taken in charge 
Intoxicated persons assisted. . 
Itinerant musicians 



21, 103, 



17, 35, 140 

17 

17, 35, 140 

104, 141, 145 

50 

34 

78 

78 

101, 141 



J. 

Junk collectors 141 

Junk shopkeepers 141 

Juvenile delinquency 11 

Jury lists, pohce work on 98 



K. 

Kerosene oil, Executive Order pertaining to 



26 



L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 
Licenses, miscellaneous 
Line-up of prisoners 
Listing, police . 

expenses of 

number Usted 

number of policemen employed 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lodging houses, pubhc . 

applications for licenses 

authority to license . 

for accommodation of Service Men 

location of . 

number of persons lodged in 
Lost and found articles . 
Lost and stolen property division 
Lost children .... 



23, 



78 

103, 141 

31 

97, 144, 149, 150 

23, 98, 144 

97, 149, 150 

98 

17, 102 

102, 141 

102, 141 

102 

102 

102 

102 

17,71 

33, 71 

17, 52, 78 



p. D. 49. 



155 



M. 



Maintenance shop . 
Men committed to City Prison 
Military substitute patrolmen 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued . 

number transferred . 
Missing persons 

age and sex of . 

number found ... 

number reported 

reported by Police Divisions 
Musicians 

collective .... 

itinerant .... 



Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 



N. 



Page 

70 

79 

106 

15, 122-138 

78 

103, 141 

103, 141 

103, 141 

103, 141 

103, 141 

103, 141 

. 51-54 

52 

52 

. 52, 53 

. 52,53 

101, 141 

101, 141 

101, 141 



16 



15, 16, 19, 122-138 



o. 

Offenses 

against chastity, morality, etc 

against license laws . 

against liquor law 

against the person 

against property, malicious 

against property*, with violence 

against property, without violence 

daily reports of in division sectors, rescinded 

forgery and against currency 

miscellaneous 

recapitulation . 
Organization .... 



15, 18, 28, 122-138 

15, 129, 138 

15, 128, 138 

18, 128 

15, 18, 122, 138 

15. 127. 138 

15, 18. 125, 138 

15, 18, 125, 138 

28 

15, 127, 138 

15, 18, 132, 138 

138 

24 



P. 

Parks, public .... 
accidents reported in 

Pawnbrokers .... 

Pensions and benefits 

estimates for pensions 
number of persons on rolls 
payments on account of . 

Personnel . 

Photographic, etc. 

Plant and equipment 

Police, special . 

Police buildings, use of 

Police charitable fund 

Police Commissioner, appointment of 

Police Department .... 

authorized and actual strength of 
commendation of officers 
distribution of personnel 
horses in use in ... 

how constituted 



147, 148 

147, 148 

33, 141 

103, 145 

103 

103 

103, 145 

13, 22, 106 

42-46, 48 

70 

100 

102 

103 

30 

13, 14, 103, 106, 109, 110 
111, 114, 116, 119, 140 
109 
. 8, 22 
14, 106 
84 
13 



156 












P. D. 49. 


Police Department (concluded) Page 


Memorial Day observance 27 


Memorial Mass 








28 


officers: 










absent, sick 








118 


active service, number of officers in 








116 


allowances for pay, Department rule or 


I 






108 


appointed 








14 


arrests by 






15, 1 


21, 122-140 


average age of 








117 


complaints against .... 








24, 119 


date appointed 








116 


deferred 








9 


detailed, special events . 








. 72-77 


died 








14, 110 


dismissed 








14, 119 


in armed service .... 








9 


injured 








. 14, 24 


medals of honor .... 








. 8,22 


military substitute patrolmen appointe 


d 






106 


nativity of 








117 


pay allowances, Department rule on 








. 108 


pay, increase of .... 








26 


pensioned 








14, 111-113 


promoted 








14, 114 


provisional temporary policewomen 








. 27, 29 


punishments imposed 








24 


reinstated after public hearing 








14 


resigned 








14, 119 


retired 








14, 111-113 


suspended . . •.-..• 








119 


time lost on account of injuries 








. 14, 24 


Walter Scott Medal for Valor 








22 


vehicles in use in 








. 85, 87 


work of . . . 












15 


Police li.sting 








22, 97, 144, 149, 150 


Police signal box service . 








. 13, 81, 82, 104, 146 


miscellaneous work . 








81 


payments on account of 












104, 146 


property assigned to 












82 


signal boxes 












81 


Prisoners, nativity of 












16 


Promotion of police . 












14, 114 


Property .... 








'. 17 


, 32-33, 142, 145 


lost, abandoned and stolen 








32-33, 142, 145 


recovered 








. 17, 32, 140 


sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 










142, 145 


stolen 










17, 140 


taken from prisoners and lodgers 










17 


Prosecution of homicide cases 










33 


Protective lighting .... 










24 


Provisional temporary patrolmen . 










9 


Provisional temporary patrolwomen 










9, 27, 29 


Public carriages .... 










88, 141 


Public lodging houses 












102, 141 



R. 



Radio, two-way 

dictaphone for recording messages 
Receipts, financial 



63 

63 

21, 104, 141, 145 



p. D. 49. 



157 



Report Centers, manning of . 

Requests for information from police journals 

Revolvers 

licenses to carrv 



Page 

29 

50 

102, 141 

102, 141 



s. 

Safety-educational automobile 

Salaries 

Scrap materials and junk, executive order on 
Second-hand articles 
Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 
Sergeant Ballistician 

Servicemen 

Sick and injured persons assisted . 
Sickness, absence on account of 
Sight-seeing automobiles 
Sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles 
Signal service, police 

Special events 

Special police 

State wards 

Station houses 

lodgers at 

w'itnesses detained at 
Stolen property .... 

recovered 

value of 

Street railway conductors, motormen and starter 
Streets 

accidents reported in 

defective, reported . 

obstructions removed 
Summons file 



13 



81- 



17 



59 

106 

30 

141 

31, 141 

64 

102 

17, 78, 83 

118 

91, 141 

93, 141 

82, 104, 146 

72 

100 

52 

17 

17, 102 

17 

, 31-33, 140 

17, 31, 140 

17, 33, 140 

141 

78, 147, 148 

147, 148 

147, 148 

78 

55 



T. 



Tagging . . 
"Teen-age"' girl problem 
Theatrical — booking agencies 
Traffic Divi.sion ... 
activities .... 
safety-educational automobile 
tagging 



60. 93 

53 

141 

56-61 
56 
59 
60 



u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 18 

United War Fund Drive for Greater Boston 29 

Used cars 31-33, 141 

licensed dealers 31, 141 

provisions for hearing before granting third-class license . . 32 

purchases and sales reported 33 



V. 



Vehicles 

ambulances, combination 

automobiles 

in use in Police Department 

l)ublic carriages 

wagons and handcarts 



85-87, 88. 141, 143 
85 
. 85-87 
. 85-87 
88 
95, 141, 143 



158 



P. D. 49. 



Page 

Vessels 7, 82 

Victory Gardens, protection of 28 

Volunteer, unpaid, Auxiliary Police 8, 21 



w. 

Wagons 95, 141, 143 

legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property for 



hire 

number licensed bj' divisions 

total number licensed 
Walter Scott iNIedal for Valor 

War 

Warrant file .... 
Water pipes, defective, reported 
Water running to waste, reported 
Weapons, dangerous 
Witnesses 

fees earned by officers as 

number of days' attendance at court by 

number of, detained at station houses 
Women committed to House of Deten ion 
Work of the Department 



officers 



15 



95 

143 

95, 141, 143 

. 8, 22 

7, 24, 51 

54 

78 

78 

102 

17, 78, 140 

15, 17, 140 

15, 17, 140 

. 17,78 

80 

15 



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