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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
tlBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

i:f)e Commonluealtt of Jlasfsiacfjusietts 



FORTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1945 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

lA'tter to Governor 7 

Personnel 7 

Police Academy 9 

Crime ^ 10 

Juvenile (leliiuiueiicy 11 

Traflle . . , ' 12 

Hackney Cariiage Licenses 13 

Decennial Census of 1945 14 

The Department 17 

Police force 17 

Signal service 17 

Employees of the DepaitnuMit 17 

Recapitulation 18 

Distribution and changes 18 

Police officers injured while on duty 18 

Work of Department ..." 19 

Arrests 19 

Drunkenness .... 20 

Xativit}' of persons arrested 20 

Uniform crime record reporting 22 

Volunteer unpaid auxiliary polic(> 24 

Receipts 24 

Expenditiu'es 24 

Persoruiel 25 

Walter Scott :\Iedal of Valor 25 

Department Medals of Honor 25 

Time lost by officers on account of disability 26 

Punishment imposed for violation of rules and regulations . 26 

Organization 26 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 30 

Its organization and duties 30 

Automobile division 30 

Used car dealers' licenses granted 31 

Lost and stolen property division 32 

Homicide squad 32 

General 34 

Identification section 35 

Multilith 35 

Output of daily manifolds, etc. 35 

Circulars drafted, containing pliotographs and finger[)rints of 

fugitives 35 

Photographic division 36 

Main-index file 36 

Criminal-record files 37 

Cabinets of segregated photograplis of criminals arrested 37 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation — Concluded 

Exhibiting of photographs of criminals in main and segregated 
files 

Members of Bureau visited scenes of homicides, burglaries, etc. 

Ultra-violet lamp 

Fluoroscope .... 

Pantoscopic camera 

Developing and printing room 

Filing system of photographs and fingerprints of uniden 
dead 

Criminal identification 

Requests for information from police journal 

Criminal records for tlie Department furnished by the Burc; 

Identification made through, fingerprints 

Missing persons .... 

Warrant file .... 

Summons file .... 

Ballistic Division 

Biological Chemist 
Traffic Division 

Activities 

Traffic conditions 

Safety-educational automobile 

Tagging 

Conclusion 

Bureau of Operations 

Creation 

Duties 

Accomplishments 
Crime Prevention Bvweau 

Creation 

Formation 

Duties in general 

Summary of work accomplished 
Plant and equipment 

Special events 

Miscellaneous business 

City Prison 

House of Detention .... 
Adjustment of claims, etc. 
Police Signal Box Service . 

Signal boxes .... 

Miscellaneous work 

Communications system 
Harbor service 

Patrol service .... 

Horses 

Vehicle service 

('ost of running automobiles 

Combination ambulances . 

List of vehicles used by the department 



Page 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Hackney Carriages 

Limitation of hackney carriage licenses . 

Abolishing special and pubhc hackney carriage stands 

Flstahlishing public taxicab stands .... 

Hackney cari-iage licenses granted 

Private hackney stands 

Sight-seeing automobiles 

Susi)ension of certificate of convenience and necessity for opera- 
tion of sight-seeing automobiles 

Sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations 

Appeal board 

Wagon licenses 

Listing work in Boston 

Listing expenses 

Number of poUcemen employed in listing 

Police work on jiuy lists 

Special Police 

Musicians' licenses . 

Itinerant 

Collective 

Carrying dangerous weapons 

Public lodging houses 

Miscellaneous licenses ........ 

Pensions and benefits 

Financial 

Statistical : 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the poli( 

signal box service and employees 

Changes in authorized and actual strength of police department 
List of police officers in active service who died . 

List of officers retired 

Officers promoted 

Number of men in active service, by year appointed . 
Men on the police force and year born .... 
Number of days' absence from duty by reason of disabilitv 

Complaints against officers 

Number of arrests by police divisions .... 

Arrests and offenses 

Age and sex of persons arrested 

Comparative .statement of police criminal work 

Licenses of all clas.ses issued 

Dog licenses 

Wagon licen.ses 

Financial statement 

Payments on account of signal .service 

Accidents 

Male and female residents listetl 



P.\GE 

83 
84 
85 
85 
86 
86 
86 

87 
87 
89 
89 
93 
92 
93 
93 
93 
95 
96 
98 
96 
97 
98 
99 
99 
100 



102 

105 

106 

107 

111 

112 

113 

11-4 

115 

116 

117 

134 

135 

136 

138 

138 

139 

141 

142 

144 



Cfje CommonUiealtlj of JWaSSacfjiiScttS. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1945. 

To His Excellency Maurice J. Tobin, 
Governor of the Commonwealth. 
State House, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Your Excellency, — As Police Commissioner for the City 
of Boston, I have the honor to present, in compHance with 
provisions of Chapter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, a 
report of the work of the Boston Pohce Dei)artment for the 
year ending November 30, 1945. 

Personnel. 

It is with deep regret that I report the death of the following 
patrolmen who gave their lives in the service of their country 
during World War I I.- 
John J. Babb 
John P. Citrano 
John J. Kenney 
James E. McLaughlin 
Paul J. Saunders 
John F. Wolfe 

and of Patrolman Frank B. Callahan of Station 4, ^'eteran of 
World War I, who was killed in line <»f duty while attempting 
to apprehend a murderer. 

As of this date 394 police officers of tliis De])artment served 
in the Armed Forces during World War II. Of this number 
176 luiA'e been honorably discharged and leinstated to their 
former positions. There were 212 officers still sei-\ing in the 
Armed Forces at the end of the fiscal yeai'. 

The enactment of more liberal pension legislation has 
resulted in the retirement of membeis of tlie Force to a gi-eater 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

degree than ever l^efore. During the year from December 1, 
1944. to Novem])er 30, 1945, a total of 127 officers were retired 
on pensions. 

For the poHce year, on which this report is based, the 
average number of officers in the department was 2,213, 
inchiding the 212 in the Armed Forces. The daily average of 
men on sick leave was 63, and to this must be added the daily 
loss of manpower caused by those officers who were on their 
regular day off or ^•acation. 

The Department was handicapped because of the fact that 
there was no Civil Service list available to fill existing vacancies. 

By reason of the reduced personnel that has existed thi-ough- 
out the war period and the months immediately following, 
officers were called upon to perform innumerable extra hours 
of duty. The police officer is one of the few individuals called 
upon for extra work without compensation. Wherever pos- 
sible, it has been my policy to grant officers time off in con- 
sideration of the extra hours of duty performed. 

It is unfair, however, to expect these men to perform extra 
hours of duty without giving them greater compensation than 
time off, in view of the fact that officers in cities of comparable 
size to Boston, and also in some cities in the metropolitan area, 
receive higher salaries for regular police work. The salaries 
of officers of the Boston Police Department are decidedly 
below the standard justified by the type of work and responsi- 
bility they are required to assume. The citizens of this city 
have a solemn obligation to insist that their police officers be 
given a substantial increase in pay and that they receive at 
least the remuneration paid to police officers not only in the 
larger cities of this State but in many instances to officers in 
smaller cities and towns. 

The following additional pension legislation affecting Boston 
police officei's was enacted dining the past year: 

Section 57, Chapter S2, General Laws. — A veteran who 
has been in the service of the Commonwealth, or of any 
county, city, town or district thereof, for a total period of 
ten years, may, upon petition to the retiring authority 
be retired, in the discietion of said authority, from active 
service, at one-half of the highest regular rate of com- 
pensation, including any allowance for maintenance, 
payable to him while he was holding the grade held by 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

him at his rotirenient. and i)ayal)le from tlic same .source, 
if he is fouiul h}' said authority to have become incapac- 
itated for a('ti\'e service; j)rovided, tliat lie has a total 
income, from all sources, exclusi^'e of such i-ctirement 
allowance and of any sum received from the government 
of (he United States as a pension for war service, not 
exceeding five hundred dollars. 

Chapter W'^ of the Acts of WJ^o. — Section ]. Chapter 
three hundred and fifty-three of the acts of eighteen 
hundred and ninety-two is hereby amended by striking 
out section two, as amended by .section one of chapter 
fifty-one of the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-three, 
and inserting in place thereof the following section: — 
Section 2. The amoimt of the annual pension of members 
of the Police Department retired under the provisions of 
this act and certified to be permanently incapacitated by 
injiny sustained in the actual performance of duty shall 
be two-thirds of the annual compensation allowed to men 
of the grade in which such member served, and the amount 
of the annual pension of other per.sons retired under the 
provisions of this act .shall be one-half of the annual 
compensation allowed to men of the grade in which such 
member served. Said pensions shall be })aid by the City 
of Boston. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take full effect upon its 
acceptance by vote of the City Council of the City of 
Bo.ston, .subject to the provisions of its charter, but not 
otherwise. Approved June 21, 1945. 

Acceptance by the City of Boston: 
Pas.sed in City Council, June 25, 1945. 
Approved l)y the Mayor, June 26, 1945. 

Police Ac.\demy. 

It is my conviction that a modern police force should include 
in its organization a school wherein the members of the force 
might be trained and instructed in the latest methods and 
scientific developments brought forth in combatting crime. 
With this end in view, I made arrangements with the Honor- 
able J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation, for enrollment in the National Police Academy at 
Washington of carefully chosen superior officers of this De- 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

partment who would undergo rigorou.s training for a period of 
fourteen weeks. Two superior officers have already completed 
this course and received certificates of graduation, and a third 
is now enrolled. It is my intention to establish a Boston 
Police Academy early next year for instruction and training of 
all officers of the Department, utilizing the services of the 
graduates of the National Police Academy as part of the 
teaching staff. 

The basic salary of captains was increased from $4,000 to 
$4,200 per annum and that of Deputy Superintendents from 
$4,500 to $4,700 per annum, effective June 20, 1945. These are 
the only salary changes effective this year in the uniformed 
force. 

Crime. 

One of the inevital^le results of war is an increase in the 
commission of serious crime, and this recent Avar has been no 
exception. It is not restricted to one city or one country, but 
seems to be a condition prevalent throughout the world, and 
even smaller cities and towns of this country have been so 
affected. Recently, there were groups of criminals A\'ho com- 
mitted a series of armed robberies in and about Boston, and 
their conduct Avas given wide publicity. Shortly after the com- 
mission of these crimes, identification of the criminals was 
established through efficient police investigation. None of the 
men involved, contrary to popular belief, Avas a member of the 
Armed Forces. As a matter of fact, they AA^ere members of 
well-organized gangs Avho had equipped themselves Avith CA'ery 
device to carry on criminal activities. Practically all of them 
had long criminal records and had been pai'oled repeatedly. 
Relentless police Avork ultimately resulted in their apprehen- 
sion and arrest. They Avere found guilty in the Superior 
Criminal Court on several counts of armed robbery and sen- 
tenced to substantial terms in State Prison. Many of the 
armed robberies committed in Boston were chargeable to these 
gangs. 

Boston enjoys an enviable position in the solution of murder 
and manslaughter cases in comparison Avith cities of equal or 
greater population. As an illustration of this statement, it 
can be stated that the total number of homicides committed 
during the past two years was 47. Of these 47 cases, 44 have 



1946.J I'UBLIC DOCTMEXT — No. 40. 11 

been solved. The three lemainiiig uie still under in^•estigation. 
In short, over 90 per cent of homicide cases haA'e been 
successfully concluded. 

Every member of the Ai-metl Forces is permitted, under 
Federal regulations, to bring one gun into the country as a 
somenii'. Eventuall}^ this i)ractice will create a sei-ious prob- 
lem for the police. Although the Federal orders prescribe 
that such a gun must be registered with customs authorities, 
there is no positive check that this is being complied witli. It is 
apparent that if these guns fall into the hands of ciiminals it 
will he difficult to trace them, since they are of foreign make 
anfl no record of them is available. The Boston police had a 
recent experience that aptly illustrates this possil)ility. A 
soldier was taken into custody on suspicion of being in\'olved 
in robberies of taxicab drivers and had on his person at the time 
a .45 caliber revoh^er. This was brought into the country in 
accordance with regulations, but he stated that upon his return 
from overseas he had been given permission to bring in tweh-e 
guns of any description without recording the numbei's. This, 
of course, was untrue. The soldier also stated that he had 
giA'en away or sold most of them, and at the time he was taken 
into custody ^^•as endea\'oring to sell the gun found in his 
possession. Undoubtedly, many guns will be brought into the 
countiy in like mannei- and, if they are used in crimes, it will 
be almost impossible for the police to trace them. I have called 
this situation to the attention of the Federal authorities. 

Juvenile Delinquency. 

The war, with its varied demands and stresses, affected youth 
far more than during the years immediately preceding. It was 
only natural that there would be disclocations when so many 
homes were intimately touched by the worries and the demands 
of the martial needs of the country. The several reasons that 
have been advanced as influencing the unrest of many young 
jieople have been so often enumerated by interested agencies 
that they require no repetition here. Outstanding among 
them, however, and requiring uigent and jjersistent treatment 
because of the far reaching effects it is evidencing, is the spirit 
of disrespect for parental and civil authority so boldly and 
ojoenly manifested by those of juvenile years. Though all the 
blame for this attitude is usually placed upon i)arents, there is 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

much truth in the statement of one authority that young people 
themselves are partially responsible for the actions and atti- 
tudes that arouse so much concern among law enforcement 
agencies. The primary responsibility for inculcating proper 
attitudes toward authority, regardless of its source, neverthe- 
less lies with parents. Unfortunately, many parents are either 
foolishly ignoring this or are taking the easy course of condoning 
wrong. Until the home exercises a vigilant Supervision over 
the children, especially teen-agers, and makes itself acquainted 
with their type of companion and places of congregation, there 
can be no appreciable progress made toward correcting a par- 
ticularly serious problem. 

The damage done to public and private property, especially 
to school buildings, is appalling. The destruction of window 
glass in school buildings merits and should receive serious 
consideration by parents. This damage indicates a deploral^le 
failure on the part of parents to instill respect for public prop- 
erty, which, if done, would have transferred itself to a respect 
for all property. Window breakage is shameful enough, but 
the past year has witnessed the breaking into school buildings 
and destruction of school property and the wanton setting of a 
fire within a school building. Police investigations have suc- 
ceeded in apprehending those responsible for serious school 
damage, and they have been brought before the coiu'ts. 

The Department maintains a Crime Prevention Bureau, 
which is chiefly concerned with the prevention of crime among 
adolescents. The Biu'eau seeks to cooperate with social 
agencies, juvenile probation officers and school attendance 
officers in dealing with youth. A fine relationship has devel- 
oped between these agencies and the Bureau, one which I 
believe is and will continue to be instrumental in accomplishing 
much to combat and correct delinquency among young people. 

Traffic. 

The i)roblem of traffic regulation in the City of Boston is 
not a new one. Difficult as it was duiing the years (jf the war, 
when motor vehicular traffic had been considei-ably reduced 
through gas rationing, it threatens to become much more of a 
problem now that cars are returning to the road in gi'eater 
numbers. Engineers of the Boston Traffic Commission in a 
recent survey foimd in our downtown area that approximately 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 13 

2,500 cars could be legally parked. If downtown Boston is to 
continue to be the shopping center of New England, provision 
must be made for neai-by off-street parking at reasonable rates. 

During the i)eriod from December 1, 1944, to November 30, 
1945, the Traffic Division alone issued approximately 85,000 
notices for violation of the parking regulations established by 
the Boston Traffic Commission. 

The present penalties dealing with violation of parking 
regulations are as follows: 

First Offense — Warning 
Second Offense — $1 Fine 
Third Offen.se — $2 Fine 
Fourth Offense — Summons Issued 

These penalties are too lightly treated by repeated violators 
who have no compunction, evidently, in paying the small fine 
that is levied against them. I am asking the incoming Legis- 
lature to increase these penalties. 

Despite the fact that there was a constant increase in traffic 
death records in this State and throughout the country during 
the past year, I am happy to report that the number of fatal- 
ities in Boston dui-ing 1945 was a reduction of approximately 
50 per cent in ten years. A substantial portion of the credit 
for this excellent showing can be attributed to tlie fine work of 
the officers assigned to the M-I Safety Car. 

The M-I Safety Car has been affectionately called The 
Voice of Safety. Its amplifying system has broadcast safety 
messages to millions of persons, both adults and children, over 
the past ten years. Along parade routes, in the school yards 
and playgrounds, at busy street intersections, its friendly 
warnings have accomplished results where other methods have 
failed. 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. 

In my estimation there has been a noticeable lack of sufficient 
taxicabs to accommodate the requirements of the cab-riding 
public. It is especially apparent during the i)eak hour of the 
afternoon, whenever the weather is inclemc^nt, and will be 
accentuated when the City will icsume its position as an ideal 
site for conventions. 



14 POLICE C0]\IIVIISSI0XER. [Jan. 

In accordance with the provisions of Chaj)ter 280 of the 
Acts of 1934, the maximum limit for the number of hackney 
carriage licenses was fixed b}^ the Legislature at 1,525 and a 
minimum of 900. On January 6, 1940, this maximum number 
was reduced from 1,525 to 1,200 by the then Police 
Commissioner. 

Since I assumed the office of Police Commissioner on No- 
\'ember 26, 1943, this problem has received considerable study 
on my i^art and I have come to the conclusion that the City is 
serviced by an entirely inadequate number of taxicabs to meet 
the public demand. The only method under the law by which 
the Police Commissioner can bring about an increase in the 
maximum number is through legislative action. Therefore, in 
the early part of 1945 I had a bill presented to the Legislature 
requesting that the Police Commissioner be empowered to 
raise or lo\\'er the number within the limits above specified, 
whenever public con^•enience and necessity required it. The 
bill was not acted upon fa^'orably by the Legislature. 

The only alternative remaining whereby an increase might 
be realized was to have the applicants who had been refused 
a license, the maximum number having already been issued, 
submit a petition to the Department of Public Utilities, which, 
after a hearing, may determine whether or not public con- 
venience and necessity require a higher limit than that already 
established. Approximately three hundred petitions were 
filed with the Department of Public Utilities, in consequence of 
which a public hearing was held, and the matter is now before 
that department for consideration. 

In support of both the proposed bill and petitions, I appeared 
before a legislative committee and at the jjuljlic hearing held 
by the Department of Public Utilities and urgently recom- 
mended that an increase in the present maximum nimiber of 
licenses be granted. 



Decennial Census of 1945. 

Upon the request of His Honor the Mayor, the Police 
Department conducted the Decennial Census in accordance 
with Chapter 9, Section 7, of the General Laws. The census 
day was fixed as January 1, 1945, and all persons were to be 



1946. 



PUBLIC D0CU:MEXT — No. 4i). 



15 



enumerated at their usual place of residence as of that daj\ 
The result of the taking of the census by the Department was 
as follows: 



Ward No 
1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 



LXHABITAXTS. 
55,112 

25,655 

45,446 • 

30,901 

32,962 

24,986 

34,405 

28,675 

28,204 

30,313 

29,887 

36,955 

28,329 

54,145 

27,586 

33,875 

33,774 

45,104 

30,479 

37,860 

38,476 

33,257 



Total 



766,386 



In concluding my second year as Commissioner, I am hapi)y 
to pay tribute to the outstanding work of the personnel of the 
Police Department. AMiile its members were beset with the 
same concerns and worries of other men and women who had 
sons and daughters in the Armed Forces of the country, their 
duties and responsibilities as police officeis were multijilied 
many times over during the war years. Countless extra 
hours of duty were performed by them in the protection of 
properties engaged in the wiiv effort and the sui)ervisi()n of 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

public celebrations and patriotic observances. All these many- 
extra calls upon their time and strength were met cheerfully 
and promptly and with a spirit that reflects the highest credit 
upon the Force. The citizens of Boston can be justifiably 
proud of their police force. 

May I express to Your Excellency my sincere appreciation 
of the constant support you have extended to me during the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 
THE DEPARTMENT 



17 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner. 1 

Secretary. Assistant Secretaries. 3 



Chief Clerk. 
The Police Force. 



* As of November 30, 194.5, 1 Lieutenant in the armed service, 
t As of November .30, 194.5, 211 Patrolmen in the armed service. 

Signal Service. 



1 



Superiiiteiulent . 


1 


Patrolmen (Provisional 




Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 


5 

28 


Temporary) . 
Patrolwomen 


94 
15 


Lieutenants 


*63 


Patrohvoman (Provisional 




Lieutenant-Inspector 
Sergeants 
Patrolmen . 


1 

185 

t 1,867 


Temporary) 

Total .... 


1 
2,260 



Director .... 


1 


Signalmen .... 


5 


Assistant Director 


1 


Signal Maintenance man 




Chauffeurs .... 
Linemen .... 


2 
6 


(Military Substitute) . 


1 


^Mechanic .... 


1 




— 


Painter .... 


1 


Total .... 


18 


Employees 


OF THE Department. 




Biological Chemist . 


1 


Matrons .... 


8 


Chauffeurs .... 


2 


jVIatron (Intermittent 




Cleaners .... 


5 


Assistant-Provisional) . 


1 


Cleaner (Provisional 




Mechanics .... 


16 


Temporary) 


1 


Property Clerk . 


1 


Clerks 


34 




3 


Clerk (Military Substi- 




Repairmen .... 


tute) .... 


1 


Shorthand Reporters 


3 


Clerks (Provisional Tem- 




Signalman .... 


1 


porary) .... 


8 


Statisticians 


3 


Diesel and Gasoline En- 




Steamfitter 


1 


gine Operators (Provi- 




Stenographers 


24 


sional Temporary) 


3 


Stenographers (.Military 




Elevator Operators . 


8 


Substitutes) 


2 


Firemen, Marine 


3 


Assistant Superintendent 




Firemen, Stationary . 


6 


of Buildings 


1 


Hostlers .... 


9 


Superintendent of Repair 




Janitors .... 


30 


Shop .... 


1 


Janitors (Provisional 




Tailor 


1 


Temporaiy) 


16 


Telephone Operators 


6 


Janitresses .... 


2 


Tele J) hone Operator 




Laborer .... 


1 


(T('inporai'\) . 


1 


Laborers (Provi.sional 








Temporary) 


16 


Total .... 


219 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Recapitulation. 



Police Commissioner 

Secretary, Assistant Secretaries and Chief Clerk 

Police Force 

Signal Service 

Employees 

Grand Total . . . . 



[Jan. 



1 

4 

2,260 

18 

219 

2.502 



Distribution and Changes. 

Distril3ution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 

During the year 135 Patrolmen and 125 Provisional Tem- 
porary Patrolmen were appointed; 1 Sergeant and 5 Patrolmen 
reinstated; 12 Patrolmen and 23 Provisional Temporary 
Patrolmen resigned (1 Patrolman and 3 Provisional Temporary 
Patrolmen while charges were pending) ; 4 Patrolmen and' 2 
Provisional Temporary Patrolmen were dismissed; 3 Lieu- 
tenants and 20 Patrolmen were promoted; 2 Lieutenants, 11 
Sergeants and 114 Patrolmen retired on pensions; 2 Captains, 
1 Sergeant and 19 Patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various di^'isions and units Avho were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year who were injured previous to December 1, 1944: 



How Injured. 



Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 194.5. 



Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 



Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1944. 



In arresting prisoners . 


119 


2,021 


687 


In {)ur8uiiig criminals . 


19 


455 


169 


By cars and othei- 
vehicles 


75 


776 


1,213 


Various other causes . 


175 


3,895 


1,285 


Totals . 


388 


7,147 


3,354 



Per Cent. 


Increase 


5.86 


Iiiciease 


12.31 


Decrease 


2.60 


Increase 


36.69 


Decrease 


4.16 


Decrease 


4.82 


Increase 


5.86 


Increase 


8.33 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Arrests. 
The total nunilxM- of arrest-s, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 65,593, as against 61,427 the preceding 
year, being an increase of 4,166. The percentage of decrease 
and increase was as follows: 

1. Offenses against the person 

2. Offenses against property committed witli violence . 

3. Offenses against property committed without 

violence 

4. Malicious offenses against property .... 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency . 

6. Offenses against the license laws 

7. Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. 

8. Offenses not included in the foregoing 

There wei'e 13,144 persons arrested on warrants and 32,604 
^yithollt warrants; 19,845 persons w^ere summoned by the 
court. The ninnber of males arrested was 57,527; of females, 
8,066; of foreigners, 5,876, or approximately 8.95 per cent; of 
minors, 8,210. Of the total number arrested, 20,790, or 
31.69 per cent, Avei'e non-residents. (See Tables X, XL) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1941 to 1945, inclusive, was $174,311; in 1945 
it was $146,958, or $27,353 less than the average. (See 
Table XIIL) 

The average number of days' attendance at court for the 
five years from 1941 to 1945, inclusive, was 36,762; in 1945 it 
was 32,382, or 4,380 less than the average. (See Table XIIL) 

The average amount of witness fees earned for the five 
years from 1941 to 1945, inclusive, was $8,762; in 1945 it was 
$7,383, or $1,379 less than the average. (See Table XIIL) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 
65,593, being an increa.se of 4,166 over last year and 8,612 less 
than the average for the past five years. (See Table XIIL) 

Of the total number of an-ests for the year (65,593). 304 
were for violation of city ordinances, that is to say, that one 
arrest in 215 was for such offense, or .46 per cent. (See 
Table XL) 



20 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Forty-six and fifty-seven one-himdredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty- 
one and forty. (See Table XII.) 



Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 63. 
There were 1,366 more persons arrested than in 1944, an 
increase of 6.08 per cent; 20 per cent of the arrested persons 
were non-residents and 16.81 per cent of foreign birth. (See 
Table XL) 

There were 23,295 persons arrested for drunkenness, being 
1,336 more than last year and 5,353 less than the average for 
the past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness this year, 
there was an increase of 5.26 per cent in males and an increase 
of 12.95 per cent in females over last year. (See Tables XI, 
XIII.) 



Nativity of Persons Arrested. 



United States 






59,717 


Turkey 


Ireland 






1,621 


Holland 


British Provinces 






1,263 


Latvia 


Italy . 






719 


Belgium 


Russia 






484 


Africa . 


Poland 






254 


Australia 


Lithuania 






185 


Mexico 


England 






184 


Albania 


Sweden 






183 


Estonia 


Scotland 






136 


Puerto Rico 


Greece 






119 


Wales . 


Norway 






113 


Cuba . 


Portugal 






92 


Philippine 1 


China . 






88 


Rumania 


Syria . 






43 


Hungary 


Finland 






42 


Asia 


Germany 






40 


Bulgaria 


Spain . 






36 


Hawaii 


Austria 






31 


India . 


South America 






30 


Japan . 


France 






27 


Switzerland 


Denmark 






26 




West Indies 






26 


Total 


Armenia 






25 





19 
14 
9 
8 
6 
6 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
3 



65,593 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 

The number of persons punished by fine was 15,912, and 
the fines amounted to 1146,958. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred sixty-four persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 1,942 to the House of Correction; 75 to the 
Women's Prison; 134 to the Reformatory Prison; and 1,945 to 
other institutions. 

The total years of im])risonment were: 2 life, 1,938 years 
(555 sentences were indefinite); the total number of days' 
attendance at court by officers was 32,382 and the witness fees 
earned by them amounted to $7,383. (See Table XIII.) 

The value of property taken from jorisoners and lodgers 
was $253,796. 

Nine witnesses were detained at station houses; 6,285 were 
accommodated with lodgings, a decrease of 17,672 from last 
year. 

There was an increase of 11.87 per cent in the number of 
sick and injured persons assisted, and an increase of about 
7.23 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property stolen each year in the 
city for the five years from 1941 to 1945, inclusive, was 
$443,019; in 1945 it was $672,387 or $229,368 more than the 
average. The amoimt of stolen property which was recovered 
by the Boston police this year was $513,928 as against $424,835 
last year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to note 
that 20,790 persons, or 31.69 per cent of the total arrests 
during the past year, were persons residing outside the city 
limits of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which 
Boston is called on to perform police work for non-residents. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of non-residents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, 
either of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 
31.69 per cent of the arrests in Boston is of non-residents, 
whereas other cities have l)ut a negligible percentage of arrests 
of non-residents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1945, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1944, 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Jan. 



a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted below: 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1944. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1945. 




Arrests. 


Arrests. 


Offense.s Against the Person. 

Murder .......... 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto' thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offenses Against the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) 

Drunkenness 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto', operating under the influence of liquor . 

Auto', operating so as to endanger .... 


19 

65 

132 

2.53 

220 

1,283 

187 
1,804 

196 
21,959 

287 
541 


16 

49 

108 

305 

237 

1,439 

190 
1,721 

131 
23,295 

305 
531 


Totals 


26,946 


28,327 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city 
ordinances, gaming and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 
the year totaled 65,593, of which 57,527 were males and 8,066 
were females. This total compares with 61,427 for the pre- 
ceding year. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This Department, during the past year, has continued 
its cooperation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
olTenses : 

1. Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



23 



2. Rape. 

3. Robbery. 

4. Aggravated assault. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. 

6. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value. 

(b) Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto' theft. 

The following comparative tables show the number of cer- 
tain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1^ 
1944, to November 30, 1945, as against December 1, 1943, to 
November 30, 1944: 



Uniform Crime Record Reporting. Comparative Table. 



Offenses. 


December 1, 1944, to 
November 30, 1945. 


December 1, 1943, to 
November 30, 1944. 
















Reported. 


Cleared. 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


Reported. 


Cleared. 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


ggravated assault 


176 


171 


97.15 


1.55 


149 


96.12 


reaking and entering .... 


1,219 


834 


68.41 


858 


596 


69.46 


arceny (under S50) .... 


1,901 


1,107 


58.23 


1,682 


1,125 


66.88 


arceny ($50 and over) .... 


834 


426 


51.07 


713 


410 


57.50 


arceny of automobile .... 


2,. 532 


2,4.30 


95.97 


2,334 


2,246 


96.22 


[anslatighter by negligence . 


64 


64 


100.00 


52 


52 


100.00 


lurder and non-negligent manslaughter, 


25 


23 


92.00 


12 


10 


83.33 


ape 


100 


97 


97.00 


82 


81 


98.78 


obbery 


267 


168 


62.92 


197 


121 


61.42 


Totals 


7,118 


5,320 


74.74 


6,085 


4,790 


78.71 



A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following: 



1944 
1945 



Ca.ses Per Cent 

Reported. Cleared. Cleared. 

6,085 4,790 78.71 

7.118 5,320 74.74 



A comparison shows a decrease in clearance under 1945 of 
3.97 per cent. 

There was an increase in cases reported as compared with 
1944 of 1,033, or 16.97 per cent. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Volunteer Unpaid Auxiliary Police. 

Established in the Department, in accordance with the 
Acts of 1941, Chapter 719, Section 5, is an organization known 
as the Volunteer Auxiliary Police. The members are not to be 
paid for their services. Applicants, classified "1-A" under 
the Selective Service Act, are not accepted for this duty on 
account of being subject to immediate call for United States 
military service. 

These men are equipped with a badge, helmet, night stick 
and a flashlight. They are also photographed and finger- 
printed, and given the oath of office. 

Duties of the members are restricted to prevention of crime, 
protection of life and property, and such other duties as may 
be assigned to them during an emergency. 

At the present time there are 2,996 men enrolled as Auxiliary 
Policemen. They have undergone an intensive course of 
training to fit them for their duties. 

Volunteer (Unpaid Auxiliary Police. 

December 13, 1941 (first day of enrollment), to November 30, 

1945, inclusive. 

Appointed and sworn . . ... . 4,739 

Enrollment cancelled 1,836 

2,903 

Cancellations rescinded 93 

Total number of members in good standing .... 2,996 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1945, receipts 
totaled $83,487.14, as compared with $86,507.66 in the previous 
year. The decrease of $3,020.52 was due to the fact that less 
had been received from miscellaneous sources. 

Expenditures. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1945, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$6,426,363.77. This included the pay of the police and em- 
ployees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($68,253.96, the 
annual listing on January 1 of all residents twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 

In the corresponding period of 1944, expenditures totaled 
$6,202,557.44. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

A financial statement .showing expeiuHtuies of the Depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report. 

Pehsonnel. 

The ])olice pei'sonnel of the Department on November 30, 
1945, consisted of 1 Superintendent, 5 Deputy Superintendents, 
28 Captains, 63 Lieutenants, 1 Lieutenant-Inspector, 185 
Sergeants, 1,867 Patrolmen, 15 Patrolwomen, 94 Provisional 
Temporary Patrolmen, and 1 Provisional Temporary Patrol- 
woman; total, 2,260. 

On November 30, 1945, there was a total of 2,502 persons, 
including civilian employees, on the rolls of the Department. 

During the year in General Orders, officers were commended 
as follows: 

Captain, 1; Lieutenants, 6; Sergeants, 8; Patrolmen, 34; 
Department as a whole, 1. 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1945 and Depart- 
ment Medals of Honor, as recommended by the Superintendent 
and Deputy Superintendents, serving as a Board of Merit, 
were awarded at the Annual Ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 6, 1945, as 
follows : 

The Walter Scott Mijdal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor to Patrolman Francis J. Connerney 
OF Division 4. 

Patrolman Francis J. Connerney of Division 4 is hereby 
awarded the Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed on February 17, 
1945. 

Patrolman Connerney. while i)atrolling his route, endangered 
his own life in the i)ursuit and capture of an armed man who had 
shot and killed a storekeeper and his wife, and fatally wounded 
a police officer who attempted to prevent his escajje. 

Department Medals of Honor. 
Patrolman John E. Gibbons, attached to the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation, is hereby awarded a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious police duty performed on 
March 12, 1945. Patiolman Gibbons, while off duty and on a 
Boston Elevated train, disarmed and captured after a struggle 
two men wanted for a series of armed robbei-ies in Boston and 
vicinitv. 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Patrolman John J. Schofiekl of Division 4 is hereby awarded 
a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious police duty 
performed on October 16, 1944, in the pursuit and capture of 
an armed hold-up man who had committed a vicious assault 
and robbery. This bandit made his escape from the State 
Hospital and was subsequently taken into custody in April, 
1945. He was sentended to a substantial term in State Prison. 

In 1945, 23,088 days were lost l)y officers b}^ reason of disa- 
bility during the year. 

During the year, 4 patrolmen and 2 provisional temporary 
patrolmen were dismissed from the Department for violation of 
Police Rules and Regulations; 1 patrolman was punished by 
extra duty. Complaints against 2 patrolmen were dismissed 
after hearing. Complaint against 1 patrolman was placed on 
file and 1 patrolman and 3 provisional temporary patrolmen 
resigned while charges were pending. 

Organization. 
General 

1944. Order No. 

December 1, 224 Announcement made of increase in 

annual basic rates of compensation 
of Lieutenants (Lieutenant-Inspector) 
from $2,900 to $3,100; Sergeants 
(Detective-Sergeants), $2,700 to 
$2,900; and for all grades of Patrol- 
men (including Policewomen), $200, 
— thus establishing in latter grade 
new step-rates of pay, as follows: 

1st year $2,000 

2d year 2,200 

3d year 2,400 

At beginning of 4th year (and 

after) 2,500 

Superintendent's 

1945. Order. 

January 2, Commencing as of January 3, 1945, 

"Line-Up" room relocated in base- 
ment of Police Headquarters building, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



27 



January 



General 
Order No. 
12, 259 



January 26, 



Official order of Massachusetts Com- 
mittee on Public Safety regarding 
procedure to be followed in event 
rocket bombs are used along Atlantic 
coast. 



268 Effective January 29, 1945, personnel of 
Ballistics Unit transferred to Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation. 



January 27, 270 



January 30, 271 



January 30, 272 



February 20, 281 



Police Commissioner's office to be noti- 
fied by commanding officers at least 
two weeks before expiration date of 
deferment of a member, so that draft 
boards may be notified, and a regis- 
trant thus retained in proper 
classification. 

Effective February 1, 1945, Bureau of 
Records abolished, and its activities 
(criminal identification, fingerprints 
and photographs, missing persons, 
warrants and summonses) merged 
with Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion, together with transfer of its 
police and civilian personnel to the 
same bureau. 

Effective February 1, 1945, Ballistics 
Unit, attached to office of Super- 
intendent of Police, transferred to 
direction and control of commanding 
officer of Bureau of Criminal In- 
vestigation. (Effective January 29, 
1945, personnel of Ballistics Unit 
transferred to Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation.) 

Announcing death from effect of bullet 
wounds of Patrolman Frank B. 
Callahan, Division 4, who, while in 
performance of duty, was shot by a 
bandit on February 17, 1945. 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

May 18, 341 Captain Caiieton B. Perry, Division 8, 

appointed Harbor Master of Port of 
Boston. 

May 24, 345 Lieutenants James J. Crowley and 

Thomas E. Currivan; Sergeants 
Fred L. Robbins, Gilbert H. Noyes 
and Joseph L. Connors; and Patrol- 
man John J. Butler, all of Division 8, 
appointed Assistant Harbor Masters. 
Appointments of certain other officers, 
as Assistant Harbor Masters, revoked. 

June 22, 360 Effective as of June 20, 1945, increases 

granted in annual basic compensation 
of following grades: 

From. To. 
Deputy Superintendent, $4,500 $4,700 
Captain . 4,000 4,200 

In view of foregoing increase in basic 
annual pay in grades stated, yearly 
Emergency Compensation Allotment 
of $200, allowed in such grades since 
January 1, 1943, ceased. 

July 2, 369 Calling attention of Department to 

Chapter 446, Acts, 1945, effective June 
26, 1945, providing for members 
retired under Chapter 353, Acts, 1892, 
as amended, retirement allowance at 
two-thirds pay, if such member is 
certified to be permanently incapaci- 
tated by injury sustained in actual 
performance of duty. 

August 18, 401 Communication from Rudolph F. King, 

Registrar of Motor Vehicles, Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, regarding 
operation of automobiles by motor- 
ists, as to speed upon the highways, 
now that all gasoline restrictions have 
been removed. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



29 



August 22, 404 Communication from Rudolph F. King, 

Registrar, stating, in par\, that as 
speed Hmit of 35 miles an hour had 
been repealed, police, in enforcement 
of motor vehicle law, should con- 
centrate on speed violations. 



September 10, 410 



November 7, 479 



November 17, 490 



AiHiounc(>ment from His Excellency, 
Maurice J. Tobin, Governor, that 
speed limit of 35 miles an hour for 
automobiles had been revoked; 
effective as of August 21, 1945. 

On account of changes made necessary 
by Chapter 700, Acts, 1945, amend- 
ing Section 3, Chapter 148, General 
Laws (Ter. Edit.), relating to in- 
vestigation of fires, discontinuance 
was ordered of Arson Squad of 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation, 
which squad investigated incendiary 
or suspicious fires, — such" work, it is 
stated, now being carried on by police 
officers of Department of Public 
Safety in conjunction with Boston 
Fire Department. 

In consideration of extra services per- 
formed by officers of the Department 
on occasions of policing various 
events, Police Commissioner granted 
three extra days' vacation to officers 
so entitled. 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Its Organization and Duties. 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is the central detective 
agency of the Department and is composed of several sub- 
divisions, namely: Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Labora- 
tory, Homicide, Lost and Stolen Propert}', Identification, 
Missing Persons. 

In addition. Special Squads are assigned to cover the follow- 
ing phases of police work and investigations : banking, express 
thieves, general investigation, hold-ups, hotels, narcotics, 
pawnbrokers, junk shops, second-hand article dealers, pick- 
pockets, radicals, shoplifters, night motor-patrol. 

]\Iembers of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also handle 
cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of inves- 
tigations during the course of a year for various police depart- 
ments throughout the United States and foreign countries. 
Further, they cooperate in every possible way with outside 
police departments in investigation of crime and prosecution 
of criminals. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
L^nited States and Canada. Many investigations are made in 
cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department and immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile division index contains records of approxi- 
mately 700,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons 
and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the Department and the 
Automobile Division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are inves- 
tigated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations 
are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to 
the conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this division during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCU.MEXT — No. 49. 



31 



restoring; them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Used Car Dealers' Licenses CJranted. 

L^urinii the year 211 appHcations for such Hcenses were 
received. Of these 206 were granted (1 without fee), 5 were 
rejected and 1 withdrawn voUmtarily. Of the 5 rejected, 1 
was subsequently reconsidered and granted and is included 
in the total nimiber of 206 on which favorable action was taken. 

Of the licenses granted, 6 were surrendered voluntarily for 
cancellation, and 16 transferred to new locations. (See Table 
XIV.) 

Provision for Hearing Before Granting License as Used Car 
Dealer of the Third Class. 

Lender provisions of Chapter 96, Acts of 1938, effective June 
13, 1938, no license shall be issued to a person as a Used Car 
Dealer of the Third Class (Motor Vehicle Jimk License) until 
after hearing, of which seven days' notice shall have been 
given to owners of property abutting on premises where such 
license is proposed to be exercised. 

Hearings to the number of 27 were held under this provision 
of law. 

Record of Purchase and Sales of Used Cars Reported to this 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1945. 



Month. 


Bought by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Dealers. 


Sold by 
Individuals. 


1944. 

December 

1945. 

January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . 

Septemb(M' 

October 

November 




894 

924 

591 

811 

848 

901 

82.5 

1,054 

1,681 

1,413 

1,184 

1,211 


711 

793 

607 

951 

875 

878 

958 

1,008 

905 

1,091 

1.267 

1,361 


869 

698 
445 
792 
960 
886 
825 
843 
795 
902 
1,142 
1,059 


Totals . 


12,337 


11,405 


10,216 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Record of All Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 19Jf5. 



Month. 


Reported 
Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 

Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May . 

June . 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 


1944. 
1945. 






213 

159 
151 
256 
279 
229 
174 
194 
249 
227 
211 
190 


206 

151 
149 

247 
271 
225 
161 
185 
237 
210 
202 
185 


3 

4 
1 
4 
8 
2 
7 
4 
5 
5 
7 


3 

1 

4 
3 

2 
4 
7 
8 
12 
5 
4 


Totals 


2,532 


2,429 


50 


53 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this division. All surrounding cities and 
towns and many other cities forward lists of property stolen 
in such places to be filed. All pawnbrokers and second-hand 
dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. 
A comparison of the description of articles reported lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth 
of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approx- 
imately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or pur- 
chased, for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 

Homicide Squad. 
It is the duty of officers of this unit to investigate and pros- 
ecute all homicide cases. They are required to interrogate 
all persons involved in or who have knowledge of the commis- 
sion of crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion or other 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



crimes of violence. Cases assigned to inquest are prepared 
and presented by officers of this unit. The officers assigned 
to homicide work, with poHce stenographers, are subject to 
call throughout the day and night. The confessions and state- 
ments obtained by members of this unit have proven of ines- 
timable value in the successful prosecution of capital cases. 

The homicide files contain complete reports of all inquests 
and deaths by violence in Boston and also a record of all ac- 
cidents reported to the Police Department. 

The following is a report of the Homicide Unit of the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported to this unit for 
the period of December 1, 1944, to November 30, 1945, in- 
clusive: 



Abortion 


3 


Fires .... 


5 


Alcoholism . 


28 


Homicides . 


29 


Asphyxiation 


24 


Horse and wagon 


2 


Automobile 


65 


Natural causes . 


769 


Burns . 


21 


Poison 


1 


Drowning . 


27 


Railway (steam) 


10 


Electricity • 


3 


Railway (street) 


16 


Elevator 


2 


Stillborn . 


5 


Explosion 


1 


Suicides 


50 


Falls . 


49 




_ 


Falling Objects . 


3 


Total 


1,113 



The following cases were prosecuted in the courts: 



Abortions .... 4 
Accessory to abortion 2 
Assault and Battery 9 
Assault to murder . 5 
Accessory to Assault and 
Battery with intent to 
murder .... 2 
A.ssault with weapon 18 
Manslaughter (non-neg- 
ligent) .... 11 



Manslaughter (auto) 
Manslaughter (negligent) 
Murder . . . . 
Accessory to miu'der 
Perjury . . . . 
Inciting to riot . 
Violation, Firearm Law 

Total . . . . 



The following inquests were held during the year 



Abortion 
Automobile 
Fall 
Fire 

Neglect 



I 


Railway (steam) 


4 


Railway (.street) 


3 




1 


Total . 


1 





53 
6 
5 
2 
1 
5 
4 

127 



4 
2 

26 



Three hundred forty-seven cases of violent deaths were 
investigated by the Homicide Unit. Presiding justices of the 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

courts deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in three 
hundred twenty-one of these cases, acting under authority 
of Section 8, Chapter 38, General Laws (Ter. Edit.), as amended. 

Recapitulation of Homicides. 

Murders 12 

(5 murderers prosecuted) 

(2 suicides) 

(3 killed by hold-up man) 

(2 unsolved murders) 
Manslaughter (non-negligent) 13 

(11 prosecutions) 

( 2 killed by police officers) 
Manslaughters (negligent) 4 

(6 prosecutions) — 

Total 29 

Clearance of murders and non-negligent manslaughters, 92 
per cent. 

General. 

Members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation during the 
year made investigations on 4,605 ca.ses. Our files and assign- 
ment books now contain records and reports on 74,094 cases. 
Complaints are received from many sources, including cases 
referred to the Bureau by justices of courts, the District Attor- 
ney, Attorney-General, Federal Bureau of Investigation and 
hundreds of outside police agencies. 

Statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion are included in the general work of the Department, but 
as the duties of the Bureau are of a special character, the 
following statement will be found to be of interest: 

Number of persons arrested 1,985 

Fugitives from justice from other states arrested and delivered to 

officers of these states 66 

Number of cases investigated 4,605 

Number of extra duties performed 7,998 

Number of cases of abortion investigated 6 

Number of days spent in court by officers 2,052 

Number of years' imprisonment: 210 years, 10 months, 22 days 

and 44 indefinite periods. 
Amount of property recovered $125,465.40 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Identification Section. 

The Identification Section is one of the outstanding units of 
the organization and its value to the Department is indis- 
pensable. It stands in favorable comparison with identification 
units of the most advanced departments. 

Advancements and changes are constantly being made to 
maintain efficiency and to increase the worth of the unit to 
the Department as a whole. 

To bring about this efficiency of service, equipment of the 
Bureau is continually being augmented by addition of modern 
identification apparatus.' 

A summary of the activities for the past year of the various 
units follows: 

MULTILITH. 

Installation of a new Multilith machine, September 13, 1944, 
under direct supervision of experienced operators, enables this 
Department to prepare and complete printing of circulars con- 
taining photographs and fingerprints of persons either reported 
missing or wanted for criminal offenses. It is completely 
equipped with cameras for preparation of half-tones which add 
to the varied output of the machine. This machine is capable 
of printing in approximately two hours descriptive circulars of 
persons wanted, and in some cases it is possible to complete and 
mail such circulars to outside cities before the fugitive arrives 
at his destination. 

Output of Daily Manifolds, Warrant Manifolds, etc. 

There were 545,445 impressions turned out on the mime- 
ograph machines, comprising daily manifolds for the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation and other units, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins, and circular letters. 

There were 12 forms and circulars photogra[)hed and 12 
forms i^rinted in upon a zinc plate. There were approximately 
20 Multilith plates used l)y this unit and 12 films used. 

Circulars Drafted, Containing Photographs and Fingerprints of 

Fugitives. 
During the year 20,000 circulars, containing photographs 
and fingerprints of fugitives, were drafted, printed and mailed 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

from this office to every city and town in the United States with 
a population of 5,000 or more, State bureaus of identification, 
all army and navy recruiting stations, and a number of larger 
cities in foreign countries. Circulars requesting cooperation 
in return of fifteen missing persons were sent to all important 
cities in the East, and practically to every city in Massachusetts. 

Multilith Recapitulation. 
Impressions printed on the Multilith machine . 210,000 
Included in this figure are the following: 

Department forms 39 

Letters 5 

Circulars 4 

Photographic Division. 

The Photographic Division of the Identification Section is 
one of the finest and most modern in the entire country. Its 
equipment has been continually added to and renewed with 
view of maintaining a high standard of service. 

It forms an important adjunct of the Medical Examiners' 
offices and cooperates with those offices in all homicide cases. 
The Medical Examiners' oflSces are supplied with enlarged 
photographs in every homicide case. 

Enlarged photographs are filed in cabinets especially built 
to accommodate the size. The enlarged photographs, princi- 
pally scenes of homicides, hit-and-run accidents, and suspicious 
fires, have proved invaluable for court purposes. 

Main hidex File. 
The Main Index File forms the basis on which all other 
files are dependent. It is at all times being checked to main- 
tain accuracy. There are now recorded in the Main Index 
File 746,775 persons. These include all persons arrested and 
fingerprinted in the Bureau, applicants for Hackney Carriage 
licenses, and applicants for Special Officers' licenses, etc. 
Also included are records of all assignments made in the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation, also all records of arrests made 
throughout the Department; and reports of all felonies com- 
mitted within the city and all reports of investigation of these 
felonies. 



1946.] PUBLIC D()CUAIEx\T — No. 49. 37 

Criminal Record Files. 
The Criminal Record Files contain a record of each i)erson 
whose fingerprints are contained in the fingo'piint files. At 
the present time there are in the Female Rccoid Files 14,725 
records, and in the Male Record Files there are 165,050 records. 
These records are continually being brought uj) to date ])y 
cooperation with outside departments and the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. 

Cabinets of Segregated Photographs of Criminals Arrested. 
Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police 
and photographs received from other sources are filed in segre- 
gated cabinets. Photographs received from outside depart- 
ments are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file, and those 
taken by the Boston police are in the "Local Segregated" file. 
Photographs of all criminals are segregated into foin- distinct 
sections, namely: white, yellow, negro and gypsy. Each of 
these groups is subdivided according to sex and also classified 
under head of the crime in which subjects specialize. The 
"Local Segregated" file contains 54,531 photographs, and the 
" Foreign Segregated " file, 20,001 photographs. 

Exhibiting of Photographs of Criminals in Main and Segregated 

Files. 

The Identification Section has rendered efficient and bene- 
ficial service to officers of other departments in exhibiting 
photographs of criminals in the segregated and main files to 
victims of robberies, confidence games, j)ickpockets, etc. 

In many instances, important identifications have been 
made which have resulted in arrests and convictions. Valu- 
able assistance has also been I'endered to government officials 
of the following branches: Post Office, Treasury and Secret 
Service Departments, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and 
other government agencies. 

Members of Bureau Visited Scenes of Homicides, 
Burglaries, etc. 
Members of this Bureau visited scenes of homicides, bur- 
glaries, robberies, sus{)icious fires, and other crimes, and 
secured photographs of fingerprints, in many instances of the 
persons who committed these crimes. In many cases photo- 
graphs were taken of the scene where the crime was com- 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

mitted. The figures and other data in connection with the 
work are contained in a subsequent part of this report. 

Ultra-Violet Lamp {"Black Light"). 
This Bureau has successfully continued in operation of an 
ultra-violet lamp, commonly known as "black light." This 
type of lamp is used for detection of forgeries on checks and 
altered documents, fraudulent paintings, counterfeit money, 
fake antiques, and also for photographing of bloodstained 
fabrics. Fingerprints that formerly could not be photo- 
graphed are now photographed with ease through use of 
luminous powders, as anthracene or luminous zinc sulphide, 
due to radiations emitted by this lamp. 

The " Fluorosco-pe ." 
There was acquired by this Bureau a valuable piece of 
scientific equipment known as the "Fluoroscope." When rays 
of this instrument are trained on the subject before it, it 
reveals presence of any foreign substance concealed either on 
or in his person, for instance: metal, jewelry, or glass. The 
finding of glass in clothing on a person suspected of striking 
and killing a pedestrian ^^•ith an automobile is another example 
of what the instrument may accomplish in detection of crime 
and criminals. The same is none the less true of inanimate 
objects, such as packages containing bombs, or concealed 
defects in the mechanism of an automobile or other object, 
which may be responsible for serious accidents or death of 
persons. The value of this device in thwarting criminals is 
very apparent and makes an important addition to scientific 
equipment contained in this Bureau. 

Pantoscopic Camera. 
One of the most valuable pieces of equipment in the Bureau 
is the Pantoscopic camera, used for purpose of taking photo- 
graphs of bullets connected with homicide cases. By means 
of this camera the entire circumference of the bullet showing 
cannelure impressions made as it passes through the barrel of 
the revolver can be photographed. Impressions shown by the 
photograph of this bullet are carefully compared with impres- 
sions of a test bullet fired from a revolver believed to have 
been used in the homicide. If the test bullet and the real 
bullet disclose the same cannelure impressions, there is strong 
presumption created that the revolver under examination was 
the one used in the homicide. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

Developing and Printing Room. 

Developing and printing of criminal photographs by a staff 
of experienced photographers, trained in every phase of police 
photogi-ai)hy and on duty twenty-four hours a day, is prepared 
to accomplish any photographic need of the Department, 
and to give that type of service which could be rendered only 
by the most modern and best equipped photographei'. 

In conjunction with increased demands constantly made 
on this staff of technicians, and in order that their work might 
be maintained on an efficient basis, there has been installed in 
the Bureau a developing and printing room which compares 
favorably with that of any in this locality. 

Filing System of Photographs and Fingerprints of Unidentified 

Dead. 
A modern development of the photographic division was 
the installation of a filing system wherein fingerprints and 
photographs of unidentified dead are filed. The fingerprints 
are first sent to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and to 
the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps, in such cases where the 
persons are of enlistment age, in an effort to identify these 
dead. Failing in this, they are filed in the Identification 
Section for future reference. Through this method, a large 
proportion of the tentatively unidentified dead were later 
identified and their relatives notified. 

Criminal Identification . 
This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Division of 
the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. The table refers to the 
number of individuals photographed and fingerprinted, also 
the number of copies prepared. 

Identification of criminal.s arre.sted locally (gallery) . 212 

Identification of criminals arrested el-sewhere (gallery) . 175 

Scenes of crime photographed 246 

Circulars .sent out bj^ identification division 20,000 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1944 li»0,0.5i) 

Made and filed during the year 11,210 

Total 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file .Xovi 

1944 

Number of "foreign" photographs received during the j'ear, 1,393 

Grand Total 221,270 



. 201,269 
mber 30, 

18,608 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Jan. 



Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 4,474 

Other cities and states 467 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 65 

Prints made from same 130 

Number of rectigraphic photographs 3,455 

Number of civilians photographed 66 

Number of negatives of criminals 2,337 

Number of prints made from same 12,180 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and developed, 490 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints .... 542 

Number of prints from same 615 

Number of visitors photographed 60 

Prints made from same 180 

Number of exposures of pantoscopic camera .... 12 

Number of re-orders of criminal photographs .... 3,305 

Number of stand-up photographs made 10 

Prints made from same 36 

Number of photographs of police officers .... ] 99 

Number of auxiliary police officers photographed ... 10 

Supple7ne7dary: 

Number of scenes of crime visited 904 

Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) .... 1,035 

Number of prints of same 1,374 

Number of enlargements: 

11 inches by 14 inches 411 

8 inches by 10 inches 3,361 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1944 152,689 

Taken and filed during the year 1,760 

Received from other authorities 2,064 

Number on file November 30, 1945 156,513 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 1,643 

State Bureau of Identification 3,042 

Other cities and states 93 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 199 

Special police officers 575 

Hackney carriage drivers 1,500 

(civilian employees 82 

Auxiliary police officers 10 

Civilians fingerprinted and prints filed 450 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1944 45,570 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 30, 

1945 48,386 



1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



41 



Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Bureau, detailed to impart iutoi- 
mation from police journals on file at Headquarters, reports 
services performed as follows: 

Number of requet^ts complied with for information from the 

police journal in I'egard to accidents and thefts ... 1 ,3f)9 
Days in court 11 

Criminal Records for the Department Fuinished hij the Bureau. 
All criminal records for the entire Department are furnished 
by the Bureau, as well as certified copies of convictions for 
presentation in coinis, both here and in other cities. 

The following figures represent requests received for these 
records from December 1, 1944, to November 30, 1945: 



Requests received by telephone 
Requests received b}^ correspondence 
Requests for certified records 
Requests for jury records 



Total 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 

Grand total 



1 ,523 
5,398 
1,473 

2,448 

10,842 
12,082 

22,924 



The following figures represent requests received from 
various public agencies for records required due to the war 
activity : 



U. S. Coast Guard 

U. S. Marine Corps 

U. S. Naval Procurement (Air Corps Cadets) 

U. S. Merchant Marine 

Auxiliary police 

Stragglers and deserters (Army and Navy) 

Total 



G50 
253 
100 
120 
10 
7,576 

8,709 



Identification Made through Fingerprints. 

Our fingerprint men are often called on to testify both in 
our courts and in courts of other jurisdictions, when identifica- 
tions are made in our files through fingerprints; also, where 
identifications have y)een made through latent prints. 

Photographers of the Bureau are summoned principally 
before courts of this city, but on occasions where connections 
are made with latent fingerprints for outside cities, the photog- 
rapher, who enlarges the prints for purpose of charting them 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



for presentation as evidence in court, is also summoned into 
court to enable the photographs to be properly introduced. 

There have been many occasions in the past when chiefs of 
police of outside cities and towns have asked for services of 
fingerprint and photography experts, in consequence of crime 
committed in their jiu'isdiction. The Department cooperated 
by sending these men, properly equipped, to survey the scene 
of crime and reproduce any prints available for evidence. 



Missing Persons. 

The Missing Persons Division of the Bureau is performing 
a fine type of service to citizens of Boston and surroimding 
cities and towns. Its chief function necessarily is to aid 
families in location of their relatives reported lost or missing. 
It performs valuable service in identification of unknown dead 
persons found in various sections of the city. Without this 
service, such dead persons might have been interred with those 
unfortunates in potter's field. 

During the course of the year, the Missing Persons Division 
cooperated with various State institutions in locating and 
returning many wards who had left these institutions without 
permission. 



Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. 

Total number still missing 



2,169 
2,045 

124 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston. 





Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Age. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


636 


206 


623 


191 


13 


15 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


350 


319 


345 


284 


5 


35 


Over 21 years. 


399 


259 


363 


239 


36 


20 


Totals 


1,385 


784 


1,331 


714 


54 


70 



Not included in the foregoing are 160 persons reported 
missing by both the Division of Child Guardianship of the 



1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



43 



Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Girls' 
and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools. 

Not included, also, in the foregoing figures are numerous 
cases of children reported missing to this Department, who 
were found or returned within a few hours after report was 
made. 

There was reported to this Department from outside depart- 
ments a total of 4,153 missing persons. 

Grand total of nimiber of persons reported 

missing 6,482 

Pe7S07is Reported Missing, by Police Divisions, for a Twelve- 
Month Period, Commencing December 1, 191^1^, and Ending 
November SO, 1945. 

Division 1 (North End section) 46 

Division 2 (Downtown section) 3 

Division 3 (West End section) 76 

Division 4 (South End section) 163 

Division 6 (South Boston district) .... 137 

Division 7 (East Boston district) . . . 109 

Division 9 (Dudley street section of Roxbury) . 258 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) . 291 

Division 11 (Adams street section of Dorchester) . 189 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) .... 98 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 137 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) .... 125 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 74 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) .... 58 

Division 18 (Hyde Park district) 70 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) *335 



Total 



2,169 



* Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital, a mental institvition. 



Persons Interviewed. — At the "Missing Persons" ofhce there 
were interviewed about 375 persons relative to cases handled. 
This does not include the number interviewed at other units 
and divisions of the Department. 

Correspondence. — There were handled by the unit approxi- 
mately 4,500 pieces of correspondence relating to location of 
friends and relatives. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Circulars. — About 2,200 descriptive circulars on missing 
persons were sent out from the unit. 

Tracers. — There were sent out approximately 1,600 tracers 
on persons reported missing. 

Identification of Dead Bodies. — In 114 cases of unknown 
white men, 85 were identified through fingerprints. 

Amnesia. — Two individuals afflicted with amnesia were 
identified. 

Warrant File. 

Procedure as to Warrants Is.nted to or Received by this 
Department. 

A list of all warrants issued to or received by this Depart- 
ment is sent out each day on the manifold and every officer 
in the Department receives a copy of this list. Twenty-four 
hours after issuance of a warrant, if the person named therein 
has not been arrested, a form card is forwarded to the Bureau 
by the station house with all data pertaining to the warrant 
and the case. These cards are alphabetically filed so that 
almost instantaneously it may be ascertained whether a 
warrant exists in the Department for any person named. On 
service of the warrant another card goes forward to the Biu'eau 
with necessary information of service. 

Warrants Received from Outside Departments, etc. 
All warrants received from outside departments are cleared 
through the warrant file of the Bureau. All correspondence 
pertaining to movement of warrants outside of the city proper 
is handled in that Bureau. Commanding Officers of this 
Department are required, under the rules and regulations, to 
notify the Warrant Division of arrests on warrants issed to 
the Boston Police Department and on warrants of all other 
police departments; also when arrests are made without a 
warrant involving serious crimes. The rule applies to this 
procedure every hour of the day and night. The warrant files 
are immediately searched. If it appears that there is a warrant 
for the arrested person in any other jurisdiction, the officer in 
command of the arresting division or unit is immediately 
notified and given full particulars, and such other police 
division or unit in Boston or outside jurisdiction is immediately 
notified that the person is imder arrest. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 4<J. 45 

Number of WarrarUs Received in the Identification Section of 
Bureau of Criminal Invedigation and Their Disposition. 

Wni rants received 2,711 

Arrested on warrants 1,660 

Warrants returned witliout service 1,092 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the Department 

and to other jurisdictions 1,939 

Active warrant cards on file issued to Boston Pohce 4,700 
Active warrants issued to Boston Police for persons now out of 

state 23 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police, forwarded to other 

cities and towns in this State 54 

Active warrants received from other cities in Massachusetts for 

service (cards in our files) 121 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers ... 55 

Summons File. 

All summonses for service outside the City of Boston 
obtained by the several divisions and units are forwarded to 
this unit where they are recorded and sent to the chief of 
police of the city or town where a defendant resides. Sum- 
monses received from other police departments for service in 
this city are in the same manner recorded and sent to the 
respective divisions and units for service, and after service has 
been made are returned. 

The following figures represent summonses received from 
outside cities and towns for service in Boston from December 1, 
1944, to November 30, 1945: 

Total number received 2,330 

Total number served 2,207 

Total number returned (without service) 123 

The following figures represent the numl)er of simimonses 
sent from the Bureau for service in outside cities and towns: 

Received from local divisions and units and sent out . 10,615 

Total number served 10,027 

Total number not served 588 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BALLISTICS DIVISION OF THE BUREAU OF 
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Formation and Duties. 

Activities of this unit, with its per.sonnel, are under super- 
vision of the Commanding Officer of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation. 

With a Sergeant Balhstician in charge, the office consists of 
experts in balhstics, explosives and munitions. 

The Sergeant Balhstician, under direction of the Com- 
manding Officer of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, has 
charge, care and custody of all firearms, explosives and sub- 
stances of explosives coming into possession of the police. 

The Sergeant Balhstician examines all evidence found at 
scene of a crime where firearms or explosives are used and 
sends written report of his findings to the Commanding Officer 
of the Bureau. 

A copy of this report is forwarded, also, to the Commanding 
Officer of the division on which the crime was committed. 

The Sergeant Balhstician prepares cases where ballistic 
evidence is required, insofar as bullets, discharged cartridge 
cases, firearms or explosives are concerned, and appears before 
the courts in such cases to give evidence. 

The Sergeant Balhstician has custody of emergency equip- 
ment such as rifles, shotguns, machine guns, gas guns, revolvers, 
pistols, bullet-proof ve.sts, tear-gas equipment and maintenance 
of same. 

Accomplishments. 

During the year members of the Ballistics Division responded 
to 35 emergency calls after regular working hours and performed 
900 hours of extra duty in this manner. 

Members of this unit who made the investigation in connec- 
tion with these calls were designated by the Sergeant Balhsti- 
cian to give evidence in court. 

All dcjiartment firearms, accessories pertaining to same, and 
tear-gas equipment have been inspected and serviced. Sub- 
stantial savings have been made by such servicing. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by courts, 
and those held here for ballistic purposes, are kept clean and 
recorded. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

Stolon firearms received at this office are traced, returned 
to rightful owners, wherever possible, and a file maintained of 
same. United States property recovered is n^turned to the 
proper military or naval authorities. 

Authorized groui)s have visitcvl the Ballistics Division 
during the year. The office has worked in cooperation with 
military and naval intelligence units, Federal agencies and 
other police departments during the past twelve months. 

Serial Numbers on Firearms. 
There were a number of cases where serial numbers on 
firearms were erased or obliterated and had to be treated with 
chemicals to reveal numbers for identification, resulting in 
tracing of ownership of many of these weapons. 

Disposition of Confiscated Explosives. 
During the past year a large number of fragmentation 
grenades of all types and other dangerous munitions, both 
foreign and domestic, were disposed of by members of the 
Ballistics Division. 

Miscellaneous. 
Police Divisions and units are now equipped with sufficient 
supply of emergency equipment. Periodic inspections are 
made and equipment replaced whenever necessary. 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST OF THE BUREAU OF 
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Summary of the Year's Work. 
Work at the Laboratory. 

The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department 
is located at the Southern Mortuary and, since its opening in 
1934, has worked on 3,429 cases. The average anmial number 
of cases for the last five years was 342. During the ]mst year, 
354 cases were submitted to the laboratory. 

Increasing use of the laboratory is shown by the numlx^r of 
cases submitted, a constant gain being seen throughout the 
laboratory's existence. 

The increased use of the laboratory by the Dei)artment is 
more striking when ca.ses are separated according to their source- 
The laboratory draws cases from two main sources: the 



Medical 






Examiners' 


Department 


Total 


Cases. 


Cases. 


Cases. 


265 


43 


308 


271 


61 


331 


323 


57 


380 


263 


67 


330 


227 


88 


315 


237 


117 


354 



48 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Department, and the Medical Examiners of Suffolk County. 
Cases submitted by the Medical Examiners are toxicological in 
nature, reports being made directly to the Medical Examiners. 
In the majority of these cases, investigation of the circum- 
stances is made by the various divisions or the homicide squad. 
Recent years show a marked increase in Department cases. 



Year. 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 

The increase in the later war years is cjuite striking, and 
under present conditions further increase may well be expected. 
In previous annual reports it has been stated that the chemist's 
time has been fully occupied with the cases then submitted. 
Inquiry may Avell be made as to how an increase in the cases 
is handled. 

The chemist's time may be divided into its three major 
divisions. 

First 6 Months. Full Year. 

Medical Examiners' cases . . 31 .2 per cent 38.5 per cent 

Police Department cases . . 53.0 per cent 46.5 per cent 

Attendance on Courts . . . 15.8 per cent 15.0 per cent 

100.0 per cent 100.0 per cent 

Average Hours Per Case. 
Medical Examiners' cases . 3 hours per case 4 hours per case 

Police Department cases . 13 hours per case 10 hours per case 

The figures for the first six months represent the more usual 
division of time. Those for the year are affected by a single 
case in the medical examiners' group which required a tremen- 
dous amount of work. While the figures should be self- 
explanatory, we may consider wliat an increase of 30 department 
cases means: that the chemist must find somewhere two to 
two and a half months of extra working time. 

This extra working time has been achieved in two ways: 
(1) by doing less complete work on each case, and (2) by working 
overtime. 



1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



Attendance of the Biological Chemist before Judicial 

Bodies. 
In addition to work in the laboratory on case material, the 
chemist has been in attendance on courts and grand juries on 
109 days during the past twelve months. 

Nature of the Work. 
^riie work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in its 
nature, the frequency of anj^ particular type being governed 
b}' the circumstances of the eases. A breakdown into types 
indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



No. of 
Material Souglit. Cases. 

Acids > 2 

Alcohol, ethyl 204 

Alcohol, methyl . *109 

.■\lcohol, other ... 1 

Alkalies 1 

.\nimal tests .... 2 

.\r.senic 1.5 

Barbiturates . 12 

Carbon dioxide ... 1 

Carbon monoxide ... 29 

Carbon tetrachloride 1 

Chloral 2 

Chlorides (drowning) . . 3 

Fluorides .... 4 

Hydrocyanic acid ... 6 

Lead 3 

Mercury 4 

Morphine .... 1 

Nicotine 1 

Paraldehyde .... 2 

Phosphorus .... 2 

Toxicology, genera! . 3 

Toxicolog\', volatile group 1 

.\uto, examination of . 17 

Bloodstains . 51 

Blood, type .... 1 



No. of 
Material Sou<rlit. Cases- 
Burning, evidence of . . 3 
Chemicals, analysis 6 
Cloth, construction of . . 1 
Cloth prints (on autos) . 8 
Clothing, examination of 54 
Dirt, debris .... 4 

Fibers 4 

Finger nail scrapings . . 2 

Food material ... 1 

Glass 6 

Hair 14 

Infra-red photogi-aphy 34 

Microscopy, genei-al . . 3 

Paint 2 

Paper 1 

Photographs .... 64 

Pills, tablets,, etc. ... 3 

Powder residue, clothing 11 

Powder residue, hands 12 

Scene, examination of . 19 

Spectrograi)hic analysis 5 

Sperm 4 

Ti.ssue 4 

Ultra-violet examination . 9 

X-ray 4 

Miscellaneous ... 9 



* Routine test on tissue analy.scs for alcohol. Only one case showed methyl alcohol 
present, the others bciiiK ncKati\c. 

In comparing the past year's work with that of the preceding 
year, there is found to be but little change in the toxicological 
cases. Except for minor variations, there is little change from 
year to year. 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In work associated with department cases, a somewhat more 
detailed hst is given this year. Tlie examination of automo- 
biles for evidence is involved primarily in hit-and-run cases, 
less often in association with questions as to the exact manner 
of an accident. In many cases the laboratory has been suc- 
cessful in locating and developing evidence from cars. One 
interesting case involved parts of a radiator ornament. The 
first car located with broken ornament showed a break unlike 
that on the part from the scene and was released. Criticism 
was received at the laboratory, because it was most unlikely 
that there could be two cars with such a break. Shortly after- 
wards, men from the police division located the right car; 
evidence was developed, and the operator successfully prose- 
cuted. It is interesting to note that since that case we have 
had another similar coincidence. 

Fifty-one cases for bloodstains is a slight increase over last 
year. The amount of work on any one of these cases varies 
according to circumstances. In one case recently closed, 100 
individual tests were made. In this case the clothing was sent 
to the cleaners, and shoes had been cleaned, then polished, but 
successful tests for bloodstains were secured. In this case, 
infra-red photographs showing the bloodstains (invisible to 
the eye) were introduced as exhibits. 

The examination of clothing for evidence is a task which 
increased greatly in the past year. Success in finding evidence 
on clothing in cases of rather highly varied types has resulted 
in this increase. The evidence sought and foimd may be vir- 
tually anything under the sun. 

The use of infra-red photography has increased. The labora- 
tory originally undertook it because of its usefulness in locating 
bloodstains on cloth of similar color. The highly absorbing 
soot from firearm discharge opened another interesting field in 
studying })ullet holes in clothing. It has also been useful in 
auto' cases clearly showing dirt and grease marks. Results 
with injuries produced by violence appear somewhat variable, 
and the laboratory is collecting a series on our cases so as to 
learn the extent of its value in this field. 

The general use of photographs has increased slightly. A 
complete file of photographs of interesting evidence is highly 
valuable for training and lecturing. Difficulty in securing 
positive film for lantern slides minimized the increase to the 
chemist's collection, about 40 being added for the Police 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Seminar. Negatives are available, however, lor at least 
another hundred. Repeated appearances on lectures about 
forensic chemistry to professional men necessitate the securing 
of fresh illustrative material. 

Tests for powder residue have run much the same as last 
year. The test for luibvuned or partially burned powder 
grains on cloth has proven useful in a nimiber of cases. The 
paraffin test of hands for powder residue has been extremely 
helpful in checking statements of witnesses in firearm cases. 
X-ra}^ study of bullet holes made by lead bullets, and spectro- 
graphic analyses of Inillet traces have been continued as 
routine processes. 

Cases involving hair, tissue, fibers, paint, etc., have increased 
slightly. These items are most commonly associated with 
automol:)ile cases, but have in the past year appeared occa- 
sionall}' as significant evidence in other types of homicide cases. 
Recent developments have shown that with substances of 
crystalline nature X-ray diffraction can provide essential in- 
formation, and with availability of such equipment it is hoped 
to utilize this tool in cases during the coming year. 

Work with idtra-violet light has continued. However, its 
main value lies in fields which are untouched by the laboratory 
because of the necessary centering of interest on homicide and 
major cases. With increased personnel this and other types of 
work could be extended to increase the value of the laboratory 
to the Department. 

Cooperation with Other Agencies. 

During the past year the chemist delivered lectures to 
various professional groups, police, medical examiners, etc., on 
various topics pertaining to chemistry and criminal investi- 
gation. 

There has also been occasion to cooperate with law enforce- 
ment agencies in other New England states either with sugges- 
tions or with work on evidence. 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



TRAFFIC. 

The Traffic Division consists of territory within boundaries 
of Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 16 (the city proper) and the traffic 
post at Cottage Farm Bridge, Division 14. Primarily, it is 
the duty of the Traffic Division to enforce rules and regulations 
established by the Boston Traffic Commission and to provide 
for safety of the pubhc using our highways within this terri- 
tory. Traffic officers are assigned to vital traffic control points 
as well as to special duty of tagging automobiles parked in our 
streets in violation of law. 

The Traffic Division is responsible for proper control of 
licensed hackney carriages and the duty of carrying on a pro- 
gram of Safety Educational work. 

Activities. 

Usual wartime traffic problems were presented to the 
Traffic Division during the past year. While traffic has been 
heavy in the retail business section throughout the year, since 
lifting of gasoline rationing on August 15, 1945, traffic condi- 
tions in downtown Boston have taxed personnel of the Traffic 
Division to the utmost. Although it is pleasing to note that 
more people are bringing business to the city, resulting traffic 
and parking conditions have caused much comment and criti- 
cism. Unknown to critics and well-intentioned advisers, regu- 
lation of street traffic is under constant study by officials who 
have had years of practical experience in all phases of police 
work. These officials know the difficulties of the Police De- 
partment in this regard, and have knowledge of legal and 
other limitations affecting action that may be taken or even 
contemplated. Officers of the Traffic Division have expedited 
this traffic to the best of their ability, and there is no doubt 
that many technical and trivial violations have been treated 
with discretion and moderation, having in mind at all times 
the welfare of our merchants and other types of business, and 
accommodation of their patrons desiring to spend money 
for merchandise and entertainment. 

As mentioned in annual reports of the past two years, the 
traffic problem awaits construction of an intermediate high- 
way around the retail section of the city in order that vehicles 
having no business in that section can be diverted from that 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT —No. 49. 53 

area. The parking ])roblem also awaits a solution hy coii- 
stnu'tion of facilities for off-street parking. 

It is pleasing to note that the Committee; on Highway 
Development and Control of the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce is taking a ^-ery active interest in regard to these very 
important traffic difficulties, and it is hoped that prompt action 
will be taken for alleviation of the automobil(> problem in 
Boston. 

The i)edestrian ])roblem in Boston has retiuired services of 
additional officers throughout downtown Boston. It aj^pears 
that more people have been coming to Boston during the day 
and night to shop and to seek entertainment. It has been a 
pleasant duty of the persoimel of the Traffic Di\isioii to assist 
these people in every possible way. . 

In the near future something must be done to facilitate 
pedestrian as well as vehicular traffic in the Dewey Square 
area. It is estimated that 200,000 people enter and leave the 
South Station daily. After studying the pedestrian situation 
in this area, it has been suggested that an underground ramp 
should be constructed in order that pedestrians may enter the 
same near the southwestern intersection of Summer street and 
Atlantic avenue and come out in front of tlu^ main entrance to 
the South Station. 

Bus lines presented the usual traffic ])robleni in the Park 
Square area during the past year. However, it is understood 
that land has been acquired by various bus companies, and it 
is hoped that terminals will be erected without further delay, 
in order that buses may stop off the streets for receipt and dis- 
charge of passengers or during waiting time between scheduled 
trips. 

Arrangements were made for the control of traffic in con- 
nection with the following events: 

1944. 

Di'c. 21. United States Coast (itiaffl show — Metropolitan Theatre 

(entertainment for crippled children). 
Dee. 23. I. J. Fox Company .show — R. K. O. Boston (entertainment for 

orphaned children). 
Dee. 24. Carol .sinfrers — Midnight Masses. 
Dec. 31. New Year's Ev<' — Larj^i' traffic detail. 

1945. 
Jan. 3. Con.secration of Bishop Ryan at the Cathedrnl of the Holy 

Cross. 
•Ian. 4. Inaugural of His I']xceIl(Micv, Mjiuricc ,1. 'Poiiin. (lov^'itior of the 

C{)mmonw(>alth. 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1945. 

Jan. 22. Details in connection with snow removal. 

Jan. 24. " Bob " Hope show — Boston Garden. 

Jan. 24. Visit of United States Attorney General Francis Biddle. 

Jan. 29. President's Birthday Ball — Boston Garden. 

Feb. 14. Lenten services. 

Feb. 21. .\tlantic avenue traffic detail in connection with heavy United 

States Army freight movements, via Union Freight Railroad 

Company. 
Feb. 21. Maritime parade. 

Feb. 22. Reception to Governor Maurice J. Tobin. 
Mar. 3. Details in connection with strike of Boston Elevated Railway 

Company employees. 
April 11. "Kate" Smith show — Boston Garden. 
April 5 ] 

to \ Detail — Metropolitan Opera Companv, Boston Opera Hou.se. 
April 14.J 
April 19. Patriots' Day parade — Detail at Marathon Race. 

., ' f Details in connection with V-E Day. 

May 8.i ^ 

May 13. War Bond parade featuring movie stars. 

May 15. . Plymouth Theatre (special performance for disabled veterans). 

May 20. Parade and Field Mass — Suffolk County Council, American 

Legion. 

May 22. Parade of merchant seamen. 

June 3. Pohce Memorial Sunday detail. 

June 4. Ancient and Honorable Artillery parade. 

June 5. Shubert Theatre (special performance for disabled veterans). 

June 7. Visit of General George S. Patton, Jr. — parade. 

June 8. Consecration of Bishop Kelliher at Cathedral of the Holy Cross. 

June 9. Visit of "Bing" Crosby. 

June 10. Holy Hour — Fenway Park. 

June 11. Suffolk Downs Racing Season (special details for, until .'\ug. 11). 

June 14. Flag Day parade. 

July 4. Lidependence Day parade. 

Aug. 13. Visit of "Judy" Garland, movie actress. 

» -r. ( V-J Day — special details. 
Aug. 18. i J i^ 

Sept. 1. American Legion parade. 

Sept. 26. Visit of General Omar N. Bradley. 

Sept. 30. United War Fund "Red Feather" parade. 

Oct. 7. Fire Prevention parade. 

„ ' '} Fire Department exhibitions — downtown Boston. 

Oct. 10. Chinese Benevolent AssQciation parade. 

Oct. 13. Red Ma.ss — Immaculate Conception Church. 

Oct. 14. Columbus Day parade. 

Oct. 18. Visit of General George C. Kenney. 

Oct. 19. Parade in honor of General George C. Kenney. 

^. / ^r, ( Traffic details — Navy Dav. 
Oct. 28. J J ^ 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 55 

1945. 

Nov. 5. Visit of Admiral ^Villiam F. Ilalsey. 

Nov. S. Hodoo oaradc. 

Xov. 12. Armistice Day parade. 

Nov. 12. Vi.sit of General Dvvight D. Eisenhower. 

The Traffic Divi.sion has exerted every efTort (hiring the 
past year to faciUtate traffic in connection with various ])aracles. 
However, considerable difficulty has been experienced, and it 
seems that one of the most urgent requirements for efficient 
handling of traffic in this city is a standard parade route. 
Recent parade routes, appro\'ed by the Board of Street Com- 
missioners, have called upon the Traffic Division to do what 
seemed the impossible. These routes and formation points 
cut off the only marginal highways over which traffic could be 
re-routed around the parade area. Resulting conditions re- 
quired services of the entire personnel of the Traffic Division, 
including men of the night platoon, to properly control vehicular 
traffic. Undoubtedly, we are entering a period when parades 
will be more prevalent than ever and it is hoped that a standard 
parade route for Boston will be adopted. 

Recommendations have been made through th(^ Superin- 
tendent of Police to the Boston Traffic Commission for pro- 
curement of traffic detour signs, to be placed in streets during 
parades, while streets are under repair, and during emergencies. 

Arrangements w^re made for the most advantageous routes 
to destinations, and escorts were furnished for many distin- 
guished visitors and organizations, some of which are enu- 
merated as follows: Bishop Ryan; "Bob" Hope; United States 
Attorney General Francis Biddle; film-radio performers 
"Kate" Smith, Joan Fontaine, Jane Wyman, and Ritz broth- 
ers; Iwo Jima heroes; disabled \'eteran groups; General George 
S. Patton, Jr.; Bishop Kelliher; "Bing" Crosby; "Judy" Gar- 
land; General Omar N. Bradley; General George C. Kenney; 
Admiral William F.Halsey;and General Dwight D. Eisenhower 

Tr.vffic Conditions. 
During the past few yeai's tractor-tiailers and other large 
commercial vehicles hav'e been cau.se of congestion throughout 
the business section of the city. This matter has been referred 
to in previous annual iei)()rts, and there has been much 
comment concerning building of tei'ininals outside the business 
area of the city. However, n(jthing constructive has been 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

done to relieve this situation which is rapidly becoming more 
serious. It is urgently hoped that definite constructive action 
will be taken immediately in regard to this important problem. 

Repair of Fort Point Channel Bridge in Summer street has 
been the source of considerable traffic congestion in vicinity 
of the South Station. This bridge has been under. repair since 
August 7, 1945. One side of the bridge was closed continually 
from August 13 to November 27, 1945. While daily traffic in 
this area has been heavy, the Traffic Division was simply 
overwhelmed during the period that major warships were in 
port for celebration of "Navy Day." Investigation made 
concerning opening of this bridge to permit passage of ships 
revealed that it opens on an average of five times each day. 
On October 22, 1945, the bridge opened twelve times. 

During the past year considerable traffic congestion has 
also been caused by opening of the Northern Avenue Bridge 
during periods when traffic is very heavy. During these 
periods, traffic on Atlantic avenue, one of the main thorough- 
fares, is practically at a standstill. Investigation made in this 
regard revealed that this bridge opens for at least a period of 
ten minutes on an average of eight times a day. Frequently, 
the bridge is open for a much longer period, due to faulty 
mechanism. 

The vehicular traffic load in the South Station-Atlantic 
avenue area .would be lightened considerably by extension of 
Dorchester avenue from its present terminus at Congress 
street to a point adjacent to the intersection of Northern 
avenue and Atlantic avenue. This would permit freer flow of 
Dorchester avenue-Atlantic avenue traffic and alleviate con- 
gestion at the Atlantic avenue intersections at Congress street 
and Dewey square. Extension of Oliver street and Pearl 
street to meet this artery would further alleviate this con- 
gestion. It would also make these lightly-traveled streets 
more attractive to vehicular traffic. 

Congestion of traflfic caused by the Union Freight Railroad 
Company on Atlantic avenue is also the source of much diffi- 
culty in connection with expediting the same. During the 
war every possible assistance was rendered to facilitate -free 
movement of freight cars on this busy artery; nevertheless, it 
must be admitted that vehicular traffic was impeded on account 
of movements of freight during the daytime. It seems that 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUxMENT — No. 49. 57 

there are no lules and regulations at the present time governing 
movement of freiglit by this Company. It is iioped that 
proper authorities will study this situation for pvn-pose of 
iiaving reasonable legislation enacted to i)revent long lines of 
freight cars from standing in Atlantic avenue all day, impeding 
free movement of \-ehicular traffic. 

S.\FETV F^DUCATIONAL AuTOMOBILE. 

Our Safety Educational automobile has been in continuous 
operation on highways of Boston during the past several years, 
educating motorists as to the proper manner in which they 
should operate their automobiles and instructing pedestrians 
as to the proper place and manner in which they should cross 
the street. Through constant and persistent short safety talks 
by officers assigned to this automobile, the general public is 
rapidly becoming more accident conscious. 

Each Saturday, between the hours of 9 and 9.30 a. m., 
broadcasts are given over a local radio network by members of 
the M-1 Safety Scjuad. It has a membei-ship consisting of 
children of school age, 16 years and under. 

During the past year, officers in the Safety car visited and 
gave safety talks and demonstrations at all the schools in 
the city: public, parochial and prij^ate. During these talks 
special attention was also given to the subjects of "Juvenile 
Delinquency" and "Fundamentals of True Americanism." 

At Park Department playgrounds during the summer 
months, many "Safety Talks" were given to children. The 
Safety car may be seen at all important parades and at Park 
Department baseball and football championship games in 
Fenway Park. The car has also been used in cooperation with 
the various "Paper Salvage Drives." 

Tagging. 
During the period from December 1, 1944, up to and in- 
cluding November 30, 1945, the Traffic Division issued approxi- 
mately 85,000 notices for violation of "paiking rules," 
established by the Boston Traffic Commission. Such notices 
were forwarded through United States mail to owners of 
offending automobiles, or by service in hand to operators. We 
have had no special parking drives. Our system of enforce 
ment has been steady, unrelenting and impartial. 



58 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Conclusion. 
In order to make Boston more attractive for business, 
immediate constructive action is imperative. Tremendous 
plans which would virtually remake downtown Boston and 
change the complexion of the metropolitan area are on paper. 
More ideas are lieing prepared. But a major question pre- 
sented here today is : Will the cure come soon enough to prevent 
an over-powering chaotic condition that will result in terrific 
business loss? It does not seem to be the time for looking at 
minor obstacles. On the contrary, Boston's traffic problem 
should be \'iewed with a long-i-ange point of view. 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS. 

Creation. 
This Bureau was created on July 11, 1934. 
The Bureau was detached from the Supeiintendent's Office 
and established at Police Head(}uaiters as a sejiarate unit, 
Apiil 2, 1937. 

Duties. 

This Bureau has control of all communications (Hjuipment, 
consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and telegraph and 
through its facilities has directed movement of i-adio cars, 
police boats and ambulances. 

The vast majority of all telephoned complaints, reports and 
recjuests for information from the general public and other 
police departments, military organizations and oi-ganizations 
that were connected with the Civilian Defen.se j^rogram, was 
handled by officers of this unit. 

Accomplishments. 
During the period from December 1, 1944, to November 30, 
1945, personnel of the Bureau managed transmission, reception 
and handling of: 

235,142 outgoing telephone me.ssages and 4,891 toll calls 
made by the Department through ovu' switchboard. 

Approximately 370,000 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the "turi'et" through either 
"Devonshire 1212" or the Department inter-communi- 
cating system. 

Approximately 485,000 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, m:uiy of wiiich were transfen-ed 
to the "turret" foi' handling. 

Due to the war and other emergencies the number of 
telephone calls has increased. This has necessitated 
installation of another panel or unit on the switchboard, 
including additional lines, and has also required additional 
operators, four on day duty and two on each toui- of night 
duty. 

Direct lines have also been installed connecting this 
unit with former report centers, telephone exchanges, 
utility companies, etc. 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

140,489 teletype messages, including filing of same and 
making and delivering of copies of such messages, as 
necessary to the proper bureau or unit. 

1,187 telegrams, including the filing of same and making 
and deli\ering of copies to the proper bureau or unit. 

6,482 teletype items for persons reported missing by 
divisions and units of the Department, and other states, 
cities and towns. Copies of these were delivered to the 
Identification Division of the Burieau of Criminal Investi- 
gation, and cards filled out for our files. 

236.401 radio messages sent, including "Sound Scriber" 
recording of same. 

8,681 lost or stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the automobile division of the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation, 2,532 of which were reported 
stolen in Boston, together with records made and delivered 
of all recovered cars, copies of both kept in the files of 
this Bureau. 

A daily journal has been kept in which all of the foregoing 
together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents and other 
matters submitted by divisions and imits of the Department, 
were recorded. 

Files are kept in the unit of: 

(1) The police personnel of the Department, with 
name, rank, cap and badge numbers, together with the 
address, telephone, date of appointment and promotion, 
etc., as well as a file of former officers. 

(2) The Police Department civilian personnel, includ- 
ing home address and telephone number. 

(3) The Fire Department, which includes the name, 
rank and address of its members, and the radio sector in 
which they live. 

Two main radio transmitters (Station "WQIP,'' Police 
Headquarters, and "WRAS," Suffolk County Court House), 
78 car and four boat transmitters and receivers, 26 wired- 
broadcast amplifiers and eight pickup receivers maintained 
and kept in repair by members of this unit. Two-way radio 
installation has been installed in 16 combination patrol wagon 
and ambulances. 

The war emergency radio unit, maintained by this Depart- 
ment at Parker Hill in Roxbury, was discontinued on October 
24, 1945. 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMKXT — No. 49. 61 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU. 

Creation. 
This Bureau, created August 9, 1943, was established as a 
separate unit of the Department, with quarters upon the 
fourth floor of Police Headquarters. 

Formation. 

The Bureau is under command of a Deputy Superintendent 
(designated as Director), who is assisted by the following 
personnel: 1 Lieutenant, 2 Acting-Sergeants (Patrol women), 
and 14 other Patrol women. 

Purpose. 

The Crime Prevention Bureau was originally organized to 
handle techniques of law enforcement in treatment of juveniles 
and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 

Emphasis has been placed on the value of policewomen in 
both of these fields. 

During the war period, our Police Department added ten 
policewomen to its staff, making a total of sixteen, and there is 
great demand for more. 

This is accelerated by a number of factors, including: 

1. Increase in the rate of venereal disease infection. 

2. Shift from the professional prostitute to the amateur 
"pickup" as source of the majority of such infections. 

3. Increase in juvenile delinquency. 

4. Wartime increase in the number of crimes com- 
mitted l)y girls. 

5. Prospect of a postwar crime wave of unprecedented 
proportions. 

Duties in General. 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended to 
eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies among 
children. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies and divisions and vmits of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude 
of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and especially to 
educate the public and the police in the problem of crime 
prevention and suppression. 



62 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way con- 
tribute to dehnquency of chikh'en; investigating and taking 
necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged and the 
needy; taking pains to locate missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls, and assist 
in investigation of cases where women are involved. 

Comment. 

The work of our policewomen in handling juvenile delin- 
quency and the youth problems of today, especially in cases 
concerning women and young girls, is outstanding. They have 
been commended by the courts, probation departments and most 
of the social service organizations of the city. The establish- 
ment of this Bureau is fast proving itself a step in the right 
direction. 

There is reason to believe that there will be an increase, 
rather than decrease, in law-enforcement problems during 
the difficult years of postwar readjustment. 

However, work performed by members of this unit shows 
that they are organized and prepared to take an efficient part 
in any program that may arise due to these conditions. 

The policewomen have, during the year of 1945, attended 
Boston College School of Social Work, where they have taken 
courses in Psychiatric Information and Elements of Law. 

During the year, a superior officer of this unit attended the 
National Police Academy of the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation at Washington, D. C, for three and one half months. 

Summary of Work Accomplished. 



Abuse of female child . 

Aceostiiiji; 

Adultery 

A.ssault with i<n)fe 

A.s.sault with intent to rape 

Attempt to commit incest 

Being abroad in nighttime 



of a minor . 
Drunkenn(;s.s . 
Escapees 
Escape fnjm iiidentur.; 



Arrests. 

1 Fornication .... 1 

1 P\igitive from justice . . 1 

1 Idle and disorderly persons . 41 

1 Indecent assault ... 2 

1 Larceny 13 

1 Lewd and lascivious co- 

2 habitation .... 3 



Contributing to delinquency Lewd person in speech and 



3 behavior .... 3 

9 Neglected children . 2 

8 Neglect of minor children . 1 

1 Open and gross lewdness . 1 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 4'). 



63 



Summary of Work Accomplished. — Concluded. 



Possession of obscene pie- 




Threats to do bodily harm 


1 


tures 


1 


Unnatural acts 


1 


Premises used for imnioial 




N'agrancy 


24 


pui-poses .... 


2 


Violation of liquoi- law . 


8 


Receiving stolen property . 


5 


\'iolation of parole^ 


7 


Runaway .... 


102 


\'ioiation of probation . 


30 


Soliciting funds in a piihlic 




\'iolation of true name . 


2 


street 


1 


VV'ayward child 


3 


Stubborn child 


12 







Suspicious person . 


2 


Total arrests . 


298 



Inspections and Investigations. 
During the period covered there were 27,674 inspections 
by personnel of this Bureau in connection with the following 
places: 



Bus and railroad teiininals. 

Cafes. 

Dance halls. 

Hotels. 



Public highways and pioperty. 

Restaurants. 

Theaters. 



In addition to these, they made 1,675 investigations of cases 
where women and young girls and children were concerned, — 
a total of 29,349. 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PLANT AND . EQUIPMENT. 

The Property Clerk'? Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause. In its 
custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements 
which come into possession of the Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms and equipment are 
issued by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the 
cross-record system maintained for the purpose of comparing 
prices before such bills are prepared for payment. 

Dvu'ing the year 60 motor vehicles came into custody of 
this office; 54 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants, 
and 13 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 7 
motor vehicles in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care and distribution 
of uniforms and equipment to members of the police force, and 
also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed garments and 
equipment. An individual record of items of uniform and 
ecjuipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is 
operated on a twenty-four hour basis. During the year, 6,642 
Department cars were repaired at the repair shop in Division 4, 
and 1,306 cars were serviced. (Servicing includes greasing, 
changing of oil, checking of battery and electrical eciuipment, 
l^rakes, cooling systems, tires, steering systems, wear of clutch, 
etc.) Also 85 Department cars and 58 privately-owned cars 
were towed by the Department wrecker. A radio repair 
shop is attached to the maintenance shop where a twenty-four 
hour daily service is maintained. The Department operates a 
motorcycle repair shoji, now located in the rear of Station 19; 
where 625 motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the 
year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible 
for the inspection of all Department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving Department vehicles. 



1946.1 



PUBLICO DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 



The Lost and Found brancli of tlu^ Department has been active 
during the past year, as shown by the following schedule: 

Articles on liMiui DccciuluT I. Iit44 .... 1.070 
Ai'ticlo.s irceivc',1 during the year to Xovemhcr 30, 

1945 1.138 



of the Property Clerk's 
divisions 



Total 

Disposed of: 

To owners tlirough ctforts 

OfKee 
Delivered on orders from 
Worthless . 
Perishable articles delivered to Over.seers of Puhlic 

Welfare 10 

Total number of ai'ticles dispo.sed of .... 

Total number of articles on hand Novembei- 30, 1945 . 



142 

10 

240 



2,208 



402 
1.806 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



SPECIAL EVENTS. 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the number of police detailed for duty 
at each: 

1944. Men. 

Dec. 1. Boston Garden, Olympics-Baltimore hockey game 

for benefit of disabled veterans 35 

Dec. 4. Boston Arena, Boston Paik Department "Cay 

Ninetees" ice show 24 

Dec. 6. Boston Garden, ball of Boston Police Relief 

Association 398 

Dec. 14. Boston Garden, United States War Bond rally under 

auspices of the Boston Retail Trade Board . . 55 

Dec. 18. Funeral of Patrolman Leon F. Farrell .... 62 

Dec. 23. Boston Common, City of Bo.ston C-hristmas tree 

exercises 22 

Dec. 24. Christmas Eve, carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

and Boston Common . . " 151 

Boston Common, City of Boston Christmas exercises, 21 

Boston Garden, "Ice Capades" for benefit of disabled 

veterans . ' 36 

Funeral of Sergeant John J. Crossen .... 70 

New Year's Eve celebration 826 

Men. 

Funeral of Patrolman John A. McGregor . . 106 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Installation of the Most 
Reverend Edward Francis Ryan as Bishop of 

Vermont 36 

Jan. 4. First Corps of Cadets armory, reception and ball 
tendered to Hon. Maurice J. Tobin, Governor-Elect 

of Massachusetts 26 

Funeral of Patrolman Jeremiah L. Donahue 98 

Bo.ston Garden, "Bob" Hope show for benefit of 

disabled veterans 108 

Funeral of Patrolman Martin J. J. O'Doiuiell, retired, 30 

Bo.ston Garden, President Roo.sevelt's Birthday Ball . 148 

Funeral of Lieutenant-Inspector John W. Kilday, 

retired 12 

Feb. 2. Boston Garden, Olympics-New York Roveis hockey 

game for benefit of Infantile Paralysis Fund . . 32 

Feb. 12. Bo.ston Garden, ball of Boston Firemen's Relief 

Association 92 

Feb. 13. Special State Primary in Ward 20 122 

Feb. 19. Funeral of Captain James Laffey, retired ... 21 

Feb. 20. Funeral of Lieutenant William H. Rymes, retired 12 

Feb. 20. Funeral of Patrolman Frederic G. Sewell, retired . 12 



Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


25. 


Dec. 


26. 


Dec. 


31. 


1945. 




Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


3. 



Jan. 


9. 


Jan . 


24. 


Jan. 


29. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


1. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

Men. 

State House, reeeptiim of His I'Acelleiicj', (lovenior 

Maurice J. Tobiii 120 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank B. ('aiiahan ... 122 
Boston CJai'den, "Ice Follies" (ov the benefit of dis- 
abled vetei-ans 23 

P'uneral of Lieutenant Edward H. Mullen, retired 12 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas G. Suj^ple ... 72 

Special State Election in Ward 20 122 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph A. Pearson ... 48 
South Boston, Commonwealth Pier, commissioning of 

the United States Hospital Shij) "Louis A. Milne " . 30 

South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . . 362 

Funeral of Patrolman Patrick J. Mullen ... 72 

Funeral of Patrolman Francis V. McBrine ... 48 
Roxbury, William F. Reddish Athk'tic Association 

ten-mile road race 34 

Easter parade on Commonwealth avenue ... 35 

Funeral of Patrolman Bernard H. McGinnis , 72 

Funeral of Sergeant Cornelius Brennan, rc'tired . 26 

Funeral of Patrolman Herbert L. Morrison ... 22 
Bo.ston Garden, "Kate" Smith all-star show for the 

benefit of the Archbi.shop Richard J. ( 'ushing Fund . 50 
City of Bcston Patriots' Day Celebration . . 136 
Roxbury, Roxbury Patriots' Day Association three- 
mile novice road race 22 

Marathon race 336 

Funeral of Captain Archibald F. Campbell, letired 22 

Funeral of Patrolman Edward A. Murphy ... 48 
Funeral of Honorable Eugene C. Hultman, Metro- 
politan District Commissioner and foi'mer Police 

Commissioner of Boston 52 

Funeral of Patrolman .\lbert F. Varner, retired . . 12 

Funeral of Sergeant Delbert R. Augu.sta, retired 12 

Funeral of Patrolman George G. Wardrop, retired 32 

Cathedral Club road race 145 

Cathedral of the Holy Cro.ss, Bo.ston Fire Department 

Memorial Ma.ss 30 

May 1. Boston Common, Department of Massachusetts 
V'eterans of Foreign Wars .Viixiliary, May Day 

exerci.ses 22 

May 3. Funeral of Captain Lawrence H. Dunn ... 86 

May 7. Funeral of Patrolman Thomas York, retired 12 

May 8. "Victory in iMirope" Day 1,526 

May 11. Funeral of Patrolman John \'. Edwards, retired . . 12 
May 11. Technical High School, [)arade to East Newton street 

armory 18 

May 13. 7th United States War Bond Drive para tie of the 
Pur[)le Hearts and show by motion picture stars on 

Boston Common 469 



1945 




Feb 


. 22. 


F.>b 


. 23. 


Feb, 


. 24. 


Feb. 


, 26 


F(>b, 


, 27. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mar 


•. 5. 


Mai' 


■. 16. 


Mai 


. 17. 


Mai' 


.24. 


Mar 


.27. 


Mar 


.31. 


Apr! 


1 1. 


Apri 


I 4. 


Apri 


111. 


Apri 


111. 


Apri 


1 11. 


Apri 


119. 


Apri 


1 19. 


Apri 


119. 


Apri 


121. 


.\pri 


123. 


Apri 


124. 


Apri 


124, 


Apri 


126. 


Aprii 


127 


April 28. 


April 


129. 



68 POLICE CO:\IMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1945. Men. 

May 16. Boston Trade School parade to East Newton street 

armory 22 

May 20. Sviffolk County Council, .\nierican Legion, jmrade and 

field Mass at Fenway Park 38 

May 20. Kearsarge Association of Naval Veterans, parade and 

services at Cathedral of the Holy Cross ... 22 

May 20. Boston Elevated Railway employees' parade and 

Memorial Mass at Cathedral of the Holy Cross 28 

May 22. Maritime Day parade 54 

May 27. Grand Clan of Massacluusetts, Order of Scottish 

Clans, parade 26 

May 27. Roxbury, Herbert J. "Wolf Post, ^'eterans of Foreign 

Wars, parade . 30 

May 27. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 27, 1945 85 

Maj- 27. Boston Park Department cemeteries on Sunday. 

May 27, 1945 12 

May 27. Parade. Bo.ston School Cadets 423 

May 30. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . 158 

May 30. Boston Park Department cemeteries on Memorial 

Day 25 

May 30. Kearsarge Association of Naval \'eterans, parade and 

exercises on Boston Common 29 

Maj' 30. Memorial Day services at New Calvary Cemetery, 
under auspices of Boston Police Post, No. 251, 
American Legion, and Boston Police Post, No. 1018, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 148 

American Veterans of World War II, parade and exer- 
cises on Boston Common 36 

^Nlount Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Sun- 
day exercises 2i)2 

Funeral of Patrolman John H. DeLory ... 48 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery (^ompany parade 216 

Charlestown, Barry playground, flag raising and 
exercises under auspices of the LTnited States Navy 
Welfare and Recreational Department and Nav.y 

Yard Athletic Association 21 

Visit and parade of General George S. Patton, Jr., 

United States Army 489 

Bo.ston Common, appearance of "Bing"' Crosby in 
connection with the 7th United States War Bond 

Drive 82 

Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises 28 

Fenway Park, Memorial Holy Hour under ausi)ices of 

Arch})ishop Richard J. Cushing 168 

Funeral of Captain Harry T. Grace .... 82 

Flag Day parade and exercises on Boston Common 141 

Charle.stown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day cele- 
bration, concessions, street patrol and traffic duty . 89 
June 17. Charle.sto\vn, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day cele- 
bration, concessions, street patrol and traffic duty . 150 



May 


30. 


June 


3. 


June 


4. 


June 


4. 


June 


5. 



June 


7. 


June 


9. 


June 10. 


June 


10. 


June 


10. 


June 14. 


June 


16. 



1946.J PUBLIC DOCUMEXT— Xo. 49. 69 

"45. Men. 

June 17. Franklin Park. I'liited States War Bond Diivc . 14 

June IS. ( 'hailcstown. iiuiikcr Hill Day parade .... 310 

Juiu' 18. ('hailcstown. Hunker Hill Day, celebration.s. conce.s- 
sions, street patrol, traffic duty, sports and band 

concerts 222 

June 24, Dorchester, John H. Kelly Associates road race . . 45 

June 24, \\'est Roxhury, West Roxbury and Roslindale Service 

Committee, parade and dedication exerci.ses 22 

June 24. Ea.st Hoston, Logan .Virport, United States \\';ir Bond 

Diive 20 

July 3, Brighton, "Night Before," Independ(>nce Day, bon- 
fire at Smith Field 20 

July 4. City of Boston official flag raising and Independence 

Day parade 52 

July 4. Franklin Field, X. E. A, A. U. meet ... 12 

July 4. Independence Day celebration, various band concerts 

and Community Festival on Boston Common 36 

July 4. Fenway Park, Army Show "Here's Your Infantry" 
in behalf of the 7th United States War Bond Drive 
under the auspices of the Boston Retail Trade 

Board 35 

July 10. Fenway Park, Red Sox-Boston Braves baseball game 
in conjunction with the Greater Boston United War 

Fund Campaign 32 

July 15. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department track meet, 18 

July 25. Funeral of Patrolman Francis P. Higgins ... 43 

July 25. Boston Common, Boston Park Department "Gay 

Ninetees " variety show I9 

Aug. 1. Flast Boston, American Legion playground, Boston 

Park Department novice boxing show ... 16 

.\ug. 1. Boston Common, Boston Park Department "(Jay 

Xinetees" vai'iety show I9 

.\ug. 8. South Boston Stadium, Boston Park Department 

novice boxing show 16 

Aug. 9. Funeral of Patrolman Robert W. Boudnuiu 48 

Aug. !(. Boston Common, United States Army ceremony 
honoring men who lo.st their lives in action during 

World War II 16 

.\ug. 14. "Victory in Japan" Day 1,636 

Aug. 15. Celebration of formal surrender of Japan 1,248 

Aug. 15. Boston Common, Boston Park Department "Gay 

Xinetees" varietj' show Ig 

Aug. 16. Celebration of formal .surrender of Japan 362 

Aug. 17. Funeral of Patrolman Patrick F. Finnegari ... 43 

Aug. 22. Boston Common, Bo.ston Park Department "Gay 

Xinetees" variety show ](5 

.Vug. 26. Vicinity of Jewish cemeteries 12 

.\ug. 29. Bo.ston Common, Bo.ston Park De[)artnient "(Jay 

Ninetees" variety show Kj 



70 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Men. 

Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department novif-e box- 
ing show 16 

Boston Common, Boston Park Department play- 
ground circus 16 

Department of Massachusetts, American Legion Con- 
vention, vicinity of Hotel Statler .... 28 

Department of Massachusetts, American Legion Con- 
vention and victory parade 539 

Vicinity of Jewish cemeteries 25 

Fenway Park, CathoHc Youth Organization cham- 
pionship baseball game 26 

Boston Common. Boston Centival Labor Union vaude- 
ville show 12 

Boston Common, Boston Park Department "Gay 

Xinetees'' variety show 16 

East Boston, American Legion playground, Boston 

Park Department "Gay Ninetees" variety show . 12 

AUston, Smith playground, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 12 

Salvation Army parade 48 

Braves Field, Catholic Youth Organization baseball 

game 16 

South Boston Stadium, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 16 

West Roxbury, BiUings Field, Boston Park Depart- 
ment " Gay Ninetees " variety show .... 16 

South Boston, in connection with visiting by persons 
on the United States Aircraft Carrier "Lake 

Champlain" 20 

Sept. 17. South Boston, in connection with visiting by persons 
on the United States Aircraft Carrier "Lake 

Champlain" 20 

Sept. 17. Roxbury, Eustis playground, Boston Park Depart- 
ment "Gay Ninetees" variety show .... 16 
Sept. 18. South Boston, in connection with visiting by persons 
on the United States Aircraft Carrier "Lake 

Champlain" 20 

Sept. 19. Dorchester, McConnell Park, Boston Park Depart- 
ment "Gay Ninetees" variety show .... 16 
Sept. 21. Hyde Park, Ross playground, Bo.ston Park Depart- 
ment "Gay Ninetees" variety show .... 16 
Sept. 23. Canadian Legion of the British Empire parade . . 32 
Sept. 23. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company Fall parade, 26 
Sept. 24. Charlestown, Barry Park, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 16 

Sept. 25. Dorchester, Town Field, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 16 



1945. 




Aug. 


29. 


Aug. 


30. 


Aug. 


31. 


Sept. 


1. 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


3. 


Sept. 


3. 


Sept. 


5. 


Sept. 


7. 


Sept. 


9. 


Sept. 


9. 


Sept. 


10. 


Sept. 


12. 


Sept. 


16. 



Sept. 


.30. 


Oct. 


5. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


7. 


Oct. 


1. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


10. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

J945. Men. 

Sept. 28. Fens Stadium, lioston Park D('i)artnu'iit "(iay 

Ninetees" variety .show 16 

SeF)t. 30. Greater Boston United War Fund -'Red Feather" 

parade 349 

Variou.s Boston Park Department football frames . 15 

North End Park, Boston Park Department "Gay 

Xinetees" variety show 16 

Roshndale, Healey Field, Bostcjn Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 16 

Boston Fire Department fire prevention j)arade and 

exercLses on Boston Common 120 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 16 

South Boston, M street, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety show 16 

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association parade. 220 

Roxbury, Eliot Square, Boston Park Department 

"Gay Ninetees" variety .show 16 

Oct. 11. Boston Garden, Greater Boston United War Fund 

"Red Feather" rally 59 

Oct. 14. City of Boston Columbus Day parade and exercises 

on Boston Common 296 

Oct. 17. Dorchester, Mary Hemenway playground, Boston 

Park Department "Gay Ninetees" variety show . 16 

Oct. 18. Arrival and visit of General George C. Kenney, United 
States Army Air Force and exercises on Boston 

Common 138 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas J. Kujawa ... 72 

Funeral of Patrolman Austin L. Long, retired . 21 

City of Boston parade in honor of General George C. 

Kenney, United States Armj'^ Air Force . . . 353 

Various Boston Park Department football games 19 

Funeral of Patrolman William J. Mackey, retired 27 

First Corps of Cadets armory, athletic show sponsorc^d 
by the Boston Board of Recreation for members of 

the United States Fleet 42 

Various Bo.ston Park Department football games 21 

Funeral of Patrolman John J. Kenney .... 48 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Mur[)hy ... 48 

Halloween celebration ....... 769 

Arrival and visit of .\dniiral \\'illiMin F. Halsey, United 

States Navy 228 

Sj^mphony Hall, i)()litical lally Hi 

City Election 1 ,580 

Rodeo parade 44 

Various Boston Park Department football games 21 



Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


28. 


Oct. 


29. 


Oct. 


29. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


11. 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1945. Men. 

Nov. 12. Arrival and visit of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, 

United States Army 220 

Nov. 12. Parade, Department of Massaohu-setts .\merican 

Legion 798 

Nov. 18. Various Boston Park Department football games 14 

Note. 

December 5 to Decemlier 14, inclusive, 1944 (Sunday excepted), 
12 officers performed a total of 108 duties for that period at office of 
the Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during 
recount of ballots cast at the State Election. 

October 3 to October 17, inclusive, 1945 (Sundays excepted), 22 
officers performed a total of 242 duties for that period at various 
regi.stration places in connection with registration of voters ior the 
year 1945. 

October 25 to October 29, inclusive, 1945, 178 officers performed a 
total of 178 duties for that period in connection with visiting by 
persons on ships of the United States Fleet in connection with celebra- 
tion of Navy Day. 

November 19 to November 21, inclusive, 1945, 10 officers performed 
a total of 30 duties for that period at office of the Board of Election 
Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during recount of ballots cast at 
the City Election. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 



73 



1942=43. 



1943=44. 



1944=45. 



Abandoned children cared for 


23 


20 


28 


Accidents reported 


4,344 


5,623 


6,458 


Buildings found oi)eti and made secure . 


2,3<MI 


2,708 


2,815 


Cases investigated 


7^,563 


82,678 


84,224 


Dangerous Iniildings reported 


105 


180 


150 


Dangerous chimneys reported 


47 


78 


95 


Dead bodies recovered and caicd foi- 


(i<)l 


«)0(i 


632 


Defective cesspools reported 


71 


115 


194 


Defective drains and vaults reported 


36 


54 


107 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported, 


34 


47 


82 


Defective gas pipes reported 


37 


51 


94 


Defective liydrants reported 


41 


()4 


123 


Defective lamps reported 


3,098 


4,661 


5,608 


Defective sewers i'ei)orted 


194 


180 


251 


Defective streets and walks reported 


2.707 


2,897 


2,626 


Defective water pipes reported 


90 


133 


231 


Disturbances suppi'i'ssed .... 


1,286 


1 ,689 


2,371 


Extra duties performed .... 


37,105 


42,292 


40,910 


Fire alarms given 


6,763 


7,352 


7,557 


Fires extinguished 


589 


563 


588 


Insane pi'i'sons taken in charge 


637 


749 


593 


Intoxicated persons assisted 


395 


606 


945 


Lodgers at station houses 


22,575 


23,957 


6.285 


Lost children restored . . 


1,770 


L549 


1,661 


.\umber of persons committed to bail . 


3,823 


3,477 


3,431 


Persons rescued from drowning 


28 


16 


5 


Sick and injured persons assisted . 


12,703 


12,213 


13,663 


Stray teams reported and put up . 


26 


18 


29 


Street obstructions removed 


117 


154 


190 


Water rumiing to waste reported . 


395 


761 


(i05 


Witnesses dctaiticii .... 


8 


10 


i) 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Jan. 



CITY PRISON. 

The City Prison is located in the new Court House build- 
ing, Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the cit}^ for offenses, the prosecution of 
which is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court 
(criminal session), new Court House building, are conveyed^ 
if in fit condition, to the City Prison and, unless otherwise 
released, are held in charge of the keeper until the next session 
of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution 
to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street 
Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1944, to November 30, 1945, 
11,041 were committed to the City Prison for the following: 



Drunkenness 

Suspicious persons 

Larceny 

Fornication 

For safe keeping .... 

Adultery 

Assault and battery 

Non-support 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 
Violation of pi-obation 

Default 

Lewdness 

Runaways 

Fugitives from justice . 

Vagrancy 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law 

Delinquent children 

Threats and intimidation 

Breaking and entering 

Violation of city ordinance 

Sauntering and loitering 

Violation of liquor law 

Indecent exposure 

Violation of drug law 

Rape 

Soliciting alms .... 
Stubborn children 
Abuse of female child . 

Illegitimacy 

Violation of Rules antl Regulations of Park ( 'omm 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total 



10,107 

289 

67 

66 

64 

54 

50 

43 

42 

29 

26 

20 

17 

13 

11 

9 

7 

7 

6 

6 

5 

5 

4 

3 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

82 

11,041 



Lodgers received at the City Prison for period December 1, 
1944, to November 30, 1945, numbered to 323. 



1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



75 



HOUSE OF DETENTION. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They 
are then held in cliargx; of the matron until the ne.xt session 
of the court before^ which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imjirisonment, or held for a grand jury, 
the}^ are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 3,985 were committed for the following: 



Drunkenness 






2,773 


Idle and disordeily .... 






150 


-Adultery 






136 


Fornication 






129 


Larceny 






83 


Assault and l)attery .... 






24 


Keeping house of ill fame 






9 


\'arious other causes .... 






610 


Total 






3,914 


Recommitment.s. 


From municipal court 71 


Grand Total 






3,985 



ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS, ETC. 

For damage to police property, for telephone commissions 
and for dog fines, there was received by the City Collector 
and credited to this Department $4,494.64. 



76 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



POLICE SIGNAL BOX SERVICE. 

Signal Boxes. 

The total luiniber of boxes in use is 564. Of these 478 are 
connected with the underground system and 86 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
1,800 trouble calls; inspected 564 signal boxes; 16 signal desks; 
18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs 
have been made on 92 box movements; 18 registers; 83 locks; 
20 time stamps; 35 vibrator bells; 50 relays; 18 electric fans; 
14 motors; 10 generators. This unit has the installing and 
maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all stations 
and Headquarters building. There have been made 101 
plungers: 00 box fittings; 80 line blocks; 14 automatic hooks; 
and 280 street-obstruction horses. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 584 
telephone, and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Box Service Unit supervises all telei^hone and 
teletype installations and minor teletype repairs throughout 
the Department. It also maintains 44 Headquarters-to- 
station-house telephone circuits, 18 teletype-writer circuits, 
18 radio-wired broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response cir- 
cuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank station 
of the Metropolitan District Police; also a circuit, with equip- 
ment, in booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel, 
and the inter-communications units throughout the depart- 
ment. 

All patrol-box telephone, signal and blinker-light repairs 
are made bj^ Signal Box Service members. 

The unit also installs and maintains all police traffic booths, 
ta.xicab signs and street-obstruction signs. 

Signal desks and P. B. X. switchboards, installed at all 
station houses in connection with the Police Signal System over 
Department-owned lines, are maintained by this unit. 

There are assigned to the unit 1 GMC truck. 2|-ton capacity; 
2 utility trucks, ^-ton capacity, each; 1 four-door Ford sedan; 
and 1 GMC service truck, ^-ton capacity. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 41). 77 

The followino- list comprises the property of th(> Si^na! 
Service inaiiittMumce at the present time: 

16 open circuit hlinkcr-typo sig- 785,000 fcut of urKlcrgrouiKJ cable 

nal P. B. X. desks 185,000 feet of overhead cable 

710 circuits 34,200 feet of duct 

48 test boxes 79 manholes 

400 cells of sulphuric aciti storaj^e- 22 motor fi;eiierator .sets 

type battery 18 motor-driven flasher.s 

2,000 taxicab signs 3 GMC trucks 

50 traffic booths 1 Ford truck 

564 police signal box(\s 1 Ford .sedan 
20 battery-charging units 

Communications System. 

The Signal Box Service Unit is responsi])le for the mainte- 
nance of the signal system of the Department. 

Officers' Recall and Citizens' Alarm features are now in- 
stalled in all police divisions and patrol boxes in the city. 
Individual line telephone service for each patrol box has been 
found advantageous and now all signal boxes are so equipped. 

New cable and cable joints were installed by the signal 
service at a great saving in cost to the Department. 

Three thousand, five hundred feet of cable were installed, 
replacing some of the old cable retained in the new system. 

Sixteen signal boxes, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new equipment. 

Eight taxicab signs, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new signs. 



78 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



HARBOR SERVICE. 

The special duties performed by the harbor police, styled 
Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows: 

\'alue of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, float 

stages, etc $36,525 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 40 

Number of vessels ordered from channel 14 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 32 
Number of permits granted to vessels to discharge cargoes in 

stream 12 

Number of alarms of fire attended on the water front . . 332 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 5 

Number of boats challenged 21 

Number of boats searched for contraband 16 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 15 

Number of cases investigated 2,195 

Number of dead bodies recovered 17 

Number rescued from drowning 2 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights ... 3 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 842 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 963 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage . . . . . 176 
Number of fuel oil permits granted to transport and doliv(>r oil 

in harbor 2 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . 3 

Number of dead bodies cared for 17 

Number of hours grappling 185 

Since August 21, 1945, when control of Boston Harbor was 
returned by the United States Coast Guard Service to the 
Harbor Master, there have arrived at the Port of Boston from 
foreign ports 353 vessels, and 959 vessels from domestic ports. 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 79 



PATROL SERVICE. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police 
patrol boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "William H. Pierce,' 
and the "William H. McShane," in the upper and lower har- 
bors, Mystic river, Chelsea creek. Fort Point channel, L street 
channel, Dorchester bay and Neponset river. 

A 19-foot speed boat acquired by the Department in 1938 
has been used in the investigation of cases and special patrol 
duty in Fort Point channel, L street channel and Chelsea 
creek, without opening the drawbridges at any tide. 

A Dodge Marine Utility speed boat, equipped with an in- 
halator, stretcher and grappling irons, patrolled the Charles 
river in the vicinity of the Spring street bridge, West Rox- 
bury, from May 9, 1945, to October 14, 1945. 



HORSES. 

On November 30, 1944, there were 19 horses in the service. 
During the year, 1 was retired from active service. 
At the present time there are 18 in the service, all of which 
are saddle horses attached to Division 16. 



80 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



VEHICLE SERVICE. 

There are 131 automobile.s in the service at the present time: 
45 attached to Headciuarters ; 3 attached to the Traffic Divi- 
sion; 15 in the City Proper and attached to Divisions 1, 2, 3, 
and 4; 6 in the South Boston district, attached to Division 6; 
6 in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 9 in the 
Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 4 in the 
Dorchester cUstrict, attached to Division 11; 4 in the Jamaica 
Plain district, attached to Division 13; 5 in the Brighton dis- 
trict, attached to Division 14; 4 in the Charlestown district, 
attached to Division 15; 4 in the Back Bay and the Fenway, 
attached to Division 16; 4 in the West Roxbury district, 
attached to Division 17; 4 in the Hyde Park district, attached 
to Division 18; 5 in the Mattapan district, attached to Divi- 
sion 19, and 13 unassigned. (See page 82 for distribution of 
automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs and replareinent of parts ... 

Storage 

Gasoline 

Oil and grease 

Anti-freeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, len.ses, etc 
Registration foes 



Total 



$60,360 


43 


180 


00 


40,357 


06 


2.709 


68 


736 


56 


68 


00 


$104,411 


73 



Combination Ambulances. 

The Department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 



City Hospital 


10,124 


Galls where services were not nnjuired .... 


1,488 


Southern Mortuary 


462 


Massachu.setts General Hospital 


434 


Boston State Hospital 


327 


Home 


305 


City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) 


991 



Carried forward 13,339 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



81 



Brought forward 
Psychopathic Hospital 
Carney Hospital .... 
United States Marine Hospital 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Morgue 

Children's Hosj)ital 

United States Naval Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital . 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

New England Hospital for Women 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 

Mas.sachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Evangeline Booth Hospital 

Police station houses . 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 

Forest Hills Hospital 

United States Veterans' Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Longwood Hospital 

Revere General Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Fort Banks Hospital 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 

Phy.sicians' offices 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Audubon Hospital 

Harley Hospital .... 

Sullivan Square Emergency Hospital 

Boston Floating Hospital 

Glenside Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 

Milton Hospital .... 

Somerville Ho.spital 

Baker Clinic 

Bellevue Hospital 

Brooks Hospital .... 

Central Hospital .... 

Charlesgate Hospital 

Corey Hill Hospital 

North End Health Unit 

Strong Hospital .... 

Sunnyside Hospital 

Waltham State Hospital 

Total 



13,339 

183 

182 

181 

170 

117 

95 

85 

59 

51 

51 

42 

39 

37 

34 

33 

33 

32 

27 

27 

22 

19 

19 

19 

18 

17 

8 

6 

5 

5 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 



14,984 



82 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



LIST OF VEHICLES USED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 



Divisions. 






Is 

ll 
c< 

IS 73 

5 =« 
U 


u O 


A 

3 


>, 

o 
o 


13 




Headcjuarters 








— 


36 


9 


1 


46 


Division 1 . 








2 


2 


— 


— 


4 


Division 2 . 








1 


2 


— 


— 


3 


Division 3 . 








1 


2 


— 


— 


3 


Division 4 . 








2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 6 . 








2 


4 


— 


3 


9 


Division 7 . 








2 


4 


— 


4 


10 


Division 9 . 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 10 








2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 11 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 13 








1 


3 


— 


3 


7 


Division 14 








2 


3 


— 


2 


7 


Division 15 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 16 








1 


3 





— 


4 


Division 17 








1 


3 


— 


1 


5 


Division 18 








1 


3 




1 


5 


Division 19 








1 


4 


— 


— 


5 


Traffic Division 








— 


3 


— 


6 


9 


Unassigned 








3 


10 


— 


4 


17 


Totals . 








25 


97 


9 


25 


156 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 83 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES. 

During the police year, December 1, 1944, to Nov^ember 30, 
1945, there were 1,617 * licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages gi-anted, being a decrease of 114 as compared with last 
year. 

There were 600 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Three 
hundred twenty-four of these were restored to the owners 
and the balance of 276 placed in the custody of the Lost Property 
Division of the Property Clerk's Office. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage li(;ense year as of 
February 1, 1945, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the Department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Records Division of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
a part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. {To Set Up and Use the Vehicle.) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 1,888 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes 

of ownership") 1,476 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 141 

Applications for carriage licenses rejected 271 

1,888 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") . 251 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 110 

Carriage licenses revoked 32 

Carriage owners stripped of credentials 5 

Carriage licenses in effect at end of police year, November 30, 
1945, licensed .since February 1, 1945 (l)eginning of hackney 
carriage license ytsar) — (excludes nvuiiber canceled in favor 
of "changes of ownership" and number revoked) 1,329 

Carriages inspected 1,408 

* 141 "regrants." 



84 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 4,269 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after 

investigation 5 

Applications for drivers ' licenses rejected . . 146 

151 

Drivers' licenses granted 4,118 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 89; of which revocations 12 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored, — leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 77 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1945 (at end of police 
year), — (licensed since February 1, 1945; beginning of 

hackney carriage driver license year) * 3,990 

Drivers stripped of credentials 318 

Complaints against owners, drivers and "set ups'' investigated, 1,790 

Days spent in court 56 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 600 

* Includes 35 female hackney carriage drivers. 

Limitation of H.\ckney Carriage Licenses. 

Under provisions of Section 4, Chapter 392, Acts of 1930, 
as amended by Section 1, Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, the PoHce 
Commissioner was required to fix a Umit for the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be issued, which hmit shall be 
based upon the number of licenses then issued and outstanding 
but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and he may from time to 
time, after reasonable notice and hearing, decrease the number 
so fixed, but in no event to number less than 900. 

In accordance therewith, the Police Commissioner, July 20? 
1934, by General Order to the Department, set the number of 
hackney carriage licenses to be in force at 1,525. 

Subsequently, the Police Commissioner, after publication 
of reasonable notice in the Boston daily newspapers and after 
public hearing, November 28, 1939, by General Order to the 
Department, announced (effective as of January 6, 1940) 
that the limit for the number of hackney carriage licenses to be 
issued under the reference in law herein set out was decreased 
to 1,200; provided, however, that the announcement shall 
not affect, in any way, the rights of any existing licensee to 
renewal of his license under provisions of said amending section. 

The Police Commissioner further announced in said sub- 
sequent General Order, effective as of January 6, 1940, that 
hackney carriage licenses may be granted to the number here- 
tofore established (1,525), except that no further original 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 85 

licenses shall be giantecl until the number of hackney carriage 
licenses outstanding shall have been reduced to less than 
1,200 by cancellation or revocation or the failure of holders of 
licenses to apply for renewals, and thereafter hackney licenses 
may be granted only up to a total not exceeding 1,200. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses 
limited under the Act, with amendment, referred to has been 
issued, the Department of Public Utihties, on petition of such 
applicant, may after a hearing determine that public conven- 
ience and necessity require a higher limit than that fixed by the 
Police Commissioner or previously established by said Depart- 
ment, and shall establish the limit so required, in which case the 
limit set by said Department shall be considered final until 
changed as herein j)r()vided. 

Abolishing Special and Public Hackney Carriage Stands. 
In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, — 

"An Act with Relation to Pubhc Stands for the Use of 
Taxicabs and Motor Vehicles for Hire in Cities . . . ," 

accepted by the City of Boston, the PoHce Commissioner as of 
February 11, 1939, at 7.45 o'clock, a. m., abolished all special 
and public hackney carriage stands, granted in accordance with 
Chapter 392, Acts of 1930. 

Establishing Public Taxicab Stands. 

In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, referred 
to, the Police Commissioner as of February 11, 1939, at 7.45 
o'clock, a. m., established public taxicab stands in the City of 
Boston, which stands are free and accessible to all taxicabs 
whose owners are licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

(See list of public taxicab stands on file in the office of 
Inspector 'of Carriages.) 

During the police year, December 1, 1944, to November 30, 
1945, there were 4 public taxicab stands, with capacity for 
8 cabs, established; 11 public taxicab stands, with capacity for 
22 cabs, abolished; and 2 taxicab stand locations were reduced 
from 6-cab capacity to 3-cab capacity. 

There are 478 established public taxicab stands, with 
capacity for 1,245 cabs, at the present time. 

There are, also, 8 established public stands for horse-drawn 
vehicles, with capacity for 10 vehicles, at the present time. 



86 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Hackney Carriage Licenses Granted. 

The total number of licensed hackney carriages at present 
is 1,329 as compared with 1,366 in the previous year; this 
number being limited in accordance with Chapter 280, Acts 
of 1934. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon private 
property) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 20 applications (capacity 355 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted. Subsequently, 
1 license (capacity 1 carriage) was canceled; leaving a total of 
19 locations (capacity 354 carriages). 

Sight-Seeing A utomohiles. 
By the provisions of Section 1 of Chapter 399 of the Acts of 
1931, which went into effect June 9, 1931, the term "sight- 
seeing automobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this act, 
shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one of 
chapter ninety of the General Laws, used for the carrying 
for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes in 
or from the city of Boston and in or on which automobile 
guide service by the driver or other person is offered or 
furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 
for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a sight- 
seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless said 
automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, and 
unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department of 
Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public convenience 
and necessity require such operation; and further, it is pro- 
vided that it shall be unlawful for a pers(3n to operate said 
automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is licensed 
so to do. 



1946.] I'UBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 87 

Suspension of Certificate of Convenience and Necessity for 
Operation of Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
As of June 3, 1942, the Department of Puhlic Utilities, in 
accordance with an p]xecutive Order and, also, a (leneral Order 
of the Office of Defense Transportation, voted suspension of all 
certificates of pulilic convenience and necessity issued l)y that 
department for o])eration of sight-seeing automobiles carrying 
persons in or from the City of Boston in accordance with 
Chapter 899, Acts of 1931, as amended, — such suspension to 
remain in full force and effect until removed by the said De- 
partment of Public Utilities or unless it may become null and 
void by operation of law. 

Providing for Licensing of Sight-Seeing Hoise-Draivn Vehicles. 

On June 3, 1942, the Police Commissioner directed that 
in accordance with vote referred to, of the Department of 
Public Utilities, in the paragraph immediately preceding, it 
shall be lawful for the owner of a licensed sight-seeing auto- 
mobile to transfer such sight-seeing automobile license to the 
class of a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle, — the fee to be 
paid therefor to the Police Department for such transfer to be 
the sum of one dollar. 

The Police Commissioner further stated that this permission 
of transfer, from the type of a motor vehicle sight-seeing auto- 
mobile to the type of a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle, is 
permissible, notwithstanding suspension referred to of June 3, 
1942, of sight-seeing automobiles, as contained in the notice of 
the Department of Public Utilities. 

Accordingly, insertion was made in the Rules and Regulations 
of this Department to the effect that Rule 66 of said Rules and 
Regulations, relating to sight-seeing automobiles, shall be 
inclusive of sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles and drivers 
thereof, insofar as they are applicable to meet the then present 
conditions of the sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle business. 

Fees Therefor. 
The fees for such sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles, com- 
parable to those for sight-seeing automobiles of similar seating 
capacities, were established as follows: 

For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to 
carry not more than twelve persons, .flO. 



88 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to carry 
more than twelve but not more than eighteen persons, $15. 

For a sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicle designed to 
carry more than twenty-tour persons, $50. 

The following statement gives details concerning motor- 
driven and horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles and stands: 



Sight-Seeing Vehicles and Stands. 

Horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles granted 

Horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles canceled 

Horse-drawn sight-seeing vehicles rejected 

Change from horse-drawn to motor-driven sight-seeing vehicles 
Motor-driven sight-seeing vehicles granted . ' . 

Motor-driven sight-seeing vehicles rejected .... 



Sight-seeing stands for horse-drawn vehicles granted 
Sight-seeing stands for horse-drawn vehicles canceled 
Sight-seeing stands for horse-drawn vehicles rejected 
Sight-seeing stands for motor-driven vehicles granted 
Sight-seeing stands for motor-driven vehicles rejected 



11 

11 

4 

5 



7 

13 

1 



Continuing with our practice, "new" sight-seeing drivers 
for the year commencing as of March 1, 1945, were finger- 
printed as in the case of "new" hackney carriage drivers, and 
their records, if any, searched for in the Records Division of 
the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were seven sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Revocation of Suspension of Certificate of Convenience and 
Necessity for Operation of Sight-Seeing Automobiles. 
Office of Defense Transportation having repealed, August 31, 
1945, its ban of 1942 on sight-seeing automobiles, under which 
the Department of Public Utilities suspended, June 3, 1942, 
certificates of public convenience and necessity issued by it 
for operation of such vehicles; and said Department of Public 
Utilities, on August 27, 1945, having found that the emergency, 
which necessitated the suspension referred to, no longer existed, 
— ordered revocation of such suspension; effective as of 
August 31, 1945. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 89 

Licenses for Horsr-Drawn Sight-Seeing Vehicles Made 
Inoperative. 

It appeariiifi by forogoiiijj; action that certificates of con- 
venience antl necessity for sight-seeing automobiles were 
restored to effectiveness as of date stated, the PoHce Commis- 
sioner (Urected tliat Ucenses for horse-drawn sight-seeing 
vehicles be made inoperative; effective as of September 15, 
1945. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carriage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violation of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year, 
2,180 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
Two thousand one hundred fifty penalties were imposed, and 89 
revocations were made. This system of discipline has con- 
tinued to result in relieving coiu'ts of many minor cases which 
would tend to congest their dockets. 

There still continues to be a minimum of crime among the 
3,990 drivers licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

Appeal Board. 

In accordance with Hackney Carriage Rules and Regula- 
tions, hackney carriage drivers and owners dissatisfied with 
findings of the Inspector of Carriages, have the right of appeal 
to the Commissioner, provided appeal is made in writing within 
forty-eight hours of date of finding. 

Such appeals are heard by an Appeal Board, consisting of a 
Deputy Superintendent of Police and two Captains, designated 
by the Commissioner. 

Hearings on such appeals shall be public; the appellant 
shall have the right to be represented by counsel, to introduce 
evidence and to cross-examine witnesses. 

The Board shall file its report and recommendations with 
the Commissioner who takes such action thereon as he deems 
advisable. 

In accordance with such provision, many matters of appeal 
from imposition of penalties (as well as fitness of applicants for 
hackney carriage drivers' licenses whose applications had been 
rejected) were referred by the Commissioner to the Board. 



90 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



WAGON LICENSES. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons or other vehicles to convey merchan- 
dise from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year, 45 applications for such licenses (13 "hand- 
carts" and 32 "wagons") were received and granted. One 
wagon was canceled for nonpayment. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued: 

1. For the licensee who operated from an office, garage, 
stable or order box, the license stated that it was "Not 
at a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, the 
license stated that it was "For a designated wagon stand 
in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of ow^ners, lessees or official representatives 
of abutting property. 

Of the 45 granted, one was canceled for nonpayment, 25 
were for licenses from offices, garages, stables or order boxes, 
and 19 were for designated stands in the highway. 

Note. 
Legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 
for hire : 

Chapter 122, Acts of 1937, effective June 21, 1937. 

"No person holding a certificate (common carrier) or a 
permit (contract carrier) issued under the provisions of 
(Chapter 264, Acts of 1934, by the Department of Pubhc 
Utilities) and authorizing the transportation of property 
for hire by motor vehicle within the City of Boston shall 
be required to obtain a license from the Police Commis- 
sioner for said city on account of .such transportation or 
the use of motor vehicles therein." 

The legislation referred to did not affect customary pro- 
cedure of this Department in issuing a "wagon" license for a 
horse-drawn vehicle or for a handcart to convey merchandise 
for hire. 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 91 

A motor vehicle for which there has been issued a certificate 
or permit by the Dej)artmeut of Public Utilities, authorizing 
transportation for hire, shall not be required to be also licensed 
by the Police Commissioner on account of such transportation 
for hire in this city. 

However, should it be intended to locate such motor vehicle 
at a designated stand in the highway in the business of trans- 
portation for hire, the owner thereof, to lawfull}^ occupy such 
designated stand, has no alternative but to take out a "wagon" 
license to be granted bv the Police Commissioner. 



92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON. 



Year. 


CANVASS. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903* .... 


181,045 


1924 .... 


485,677 


1904 .... 


193.195 


1925 .... 


489,478 


190.5 .... 


194,547 


1926 .... 


493,415 


1906 .... 


195,446 


1927 .... 


495,767 


1907 .... 


195,900 


1928 .... 


491,277 


1908 .... 


201,552 


1929 .... 


493,250 


1909 


201,391 


1930 .... 


502,101 


1910 t .... 


203,603 


1931 .... 


500,986 


1911 .... 


206,825 


1932 .... 


499,758 


1912 .... 


214.178 


1933 .... 


501,175 


1913 .... 


215,388 


1934 .... 


502,936 


1914 .... 


219,364 


1935 11... 


509,703 


1915 .... 


220,883 


1936 .... 


514,312 


1916 t .... 


- 


1937 .... 


520,838 


1917 .... 


221,207 


1938 .... 


529,905 


1918 .... 


224,012 


1939 .... 


534,230 


1919 .... 


227,466 


1940 .... 


531,010 


1920 .... 


235,248 


1941 .... 


541,335 


1921 § . . . . 


480,783 


1942 .... 


539,408 


1922 .... 


480,106 


1943 .... 


540,517 


1923 .... 


477,547 


1944 .... 


543,051 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

j 1916 listing done b.v Board of Asse.ssors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

^193.5 first year of listing as of .January 1, instead of April 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year: 

Male 256,507 

Female 293,392 



Total 



549,899 



1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



93 



TiisTiNG Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
20 years of age or more, not including the services rendered 
by memliers of the police force, wcmt as follows: 

Printing police list $43,348 50 

Clerical .service and material usrtl in piviiaiing list . 20,240 00 

Newspaper notices 1,206 08 

Circulars and pamphlets 210 00 

Telephone rental 32 93 

Stationery 2,513 45 

Directory 18 00 

Rewriting check lists 685 00 

Total $68,253 96 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 



January 2 
January 3 
January 4 
January 5 
January 6 
January 7 
January 8 
January 9 
January 10 
January 11 
Jaimary 12 
January 13 
January 14 
January 15 
January 16 
January 17 
January 18 
January 19 
January 20 
January 21 
.lanuary 22 
January 23 
January 24 
January 25 
January 26 
January 27 



609 

605 

401 

397 

382 

124 

357 

358 

359 

348 

315 

327 

112 

224 

199 

167 

154 

134 

130 

43 

59 

43 

31 

28 

16 

7 



Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 
348, Acts of 1907, assisted the T^lection Conunissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 



94 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



The police findings in 1945 may be summarized as follows: 



Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 
Convicted of crime 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit 

Total 



1,005 
226 
227 
441 

6,891 

8,790 



In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent to 
the Police Department for delivery 6,891 summonses to persons 
for jury service. 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 95 



SPECIAL POLICE. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pny from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or hoard in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to he liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special i)()li('em(Mi for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1945, were fingerprinted 
by the Department, as has been the custom, and their records^ 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

During the year ending November 30, 1945, there Avere 
1,719 special police officers appointed; 23 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause; 9 appointments were can- 
celed for nonpayment of license fee; 145 appointments were 
canceled for other reasons; and there were 61 applications 
either withdrawn or on which no action was taken. 

Appointments were made on applications recei\'ed as follows: 



From corporations and associations . 

From theaters and other places of amusement 

From United States Government 

From City Departments 

From churches 

From State Departments 

From private institutions 



811 

348 

296 

210 

31 

14 

9 



Total 1,719 



96 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



MUSICIANS' LICENSES. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 15 applications for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, one of which was disapproved. 

All of the instruments in use by the itinerant musicians are 
inspected before the license is granted, and it is arranged with 
a ciualified musician, not a member of the Department, that 
such instruments shall be inspected in April of each year. 

During the year 12 instruments were inspected with the 
following results : 



Kind of Instrument. 



Number 
Inspected. 



Number 
Passed. 



Street pianos 

Hand organs 

Accordion 

Clarinet 

Violin 


5 

4 
1 
1 
1 


5 
4 
1 
1 
1 


Totals 


12 


12 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to bands of persons 
over sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in 
company with designated processions at stated times and 
places. 

The following shows the number of applications made for 
these licenses during the past five years and the action taken 
thereon : 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1941 


98 


98 


_ 


1942 


65 


65 


- 


1943 


31 


31 


- 


1944 


22 


22 


- 


1945 


38 


38 


~ 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



97 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS. 

The following return shows the number of ai)j)li('ation.s made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revoh'ers and to possess machine^ guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused and the number revoked: 



Yeab. 



Applications. 



Granted. 



Rejected. 



Licenses 
Revoked. 



1941 .... 


2,775 


2.632 


143 


5 


1942 .... 


4.030 


3,863 


167 


5 


1943 ... 


3,714 


3,615 


99 


5 


1944 .... 


3,324 


3,158 


166 


4 


1945 .... 


3,201 


*t3,103 


98 


5 



* 43 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 24 licenses to possess machine guns. 



98 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES. 

The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Sections 33 to 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Tercen- 
tenary Edition) , and the location of each house and the number 
of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis street 

8 Pine street 




29,531 
54,704 


79 Shawmut avenue 




1,095 


Total 

For Accommodation of Service Men 

48 Boylston street (Boston Young Men's Christian 

36 Commonwealth avenue (Columbus Home Corpc 

287 Hanover street (Boston Seamen's Friend Socie 

238 St. Botolph street (Boston Young Men's Chris 
ciation) 

Sleeping faciUties in fourteen poHce stations . 


Union) . 
)ration) . 
ty. Inc.) . 
tian Asso- 


85,330 

10,706 

26,902 

6,894 

4,953 
5,120 


Grand Total 


139,905 



1946.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 99 



MISCELLANEOUS LICENSES. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 30,826. Of these 573 were rejected (1 subse- 
quently granted); 73 were withdrawn or no action taken, leav- 
ing a balance of 30,181 which were granted. 

Of the granted applications, 57 were canceled for noui)ay- 
ment, leaving in force a net of 30,124, granted "with" and 
''without" fee. 

During the year 142 licenses were transferred, 924 canceled 
for various reasons and 134 revoked or suspended. 

The officers investigated 2,309 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $74,402.75. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1944, there were 426 persons on the pen- 
sion roll. During the year 24 died, viz. : 2 captains, 1 lieutenant, 
2 lieutenant-inspectors, 4 sergeants, 13 patrolmen and 2 an- 
nuitants. Eighty-six were added, viz. : 3 lieutenants, 13 ser- 
geants, 67 patrolmen and the ^^'idows of Patrolman Eugene F. 
Brady, Patrolman Frank B. Callahan, Patrolman Stephen X. 
Mahoney, who died from disal)ility received in the performance 
of duty, leaving 488 on the roll at date, 440 pensioners and 48 
annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to S546,350.33, and it is estimated 
that $845,094.23 will be required for pensions and annuities in 
1946. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 43 beneficiaries of the Fund at the 
present time, and there has been i)aid to them the sum of 
$6,729.50 during the past year. 



100 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



FINANCIAL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and annuities, listing residents twenty 
years of age or more, and the maintenance of the police signal 
service were $6,426,363.77. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $47,779.99. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the police have supervision, for the sale 
of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, etc., 
was $83,487.14. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(101) 





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4,700 

4,200 

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3,100 

2,900 

2,700 

2,700 

2,000-2,500 

2,000-2,400 

2,400-2,500 

2,400 




RANK OR POSITION. 


Commissioner 

Secretar>- .... 
Assistant Secretaries .... 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents . 
Captains 

Lieutenant-Inspector .... 

Sergeants 

Patrolman (Aide) .... 
Patrolman and Supervisor of Stable . 
Patrolmen 

Patrolwom.en 

rary) 



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1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



105 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength uf Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


R.VNKS AND tlRADES. 


Jan. 1, 
194.5. 


Nov. .30, 
194.5. 


.Jan. 1, 
1945. 


Nov. .30, 
194.5. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Assistant Secretaries 


2 


2 


2 


2 


- 


Superintendent . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendent.s . 


5 


5 


5 


5 


- 


Captains .... 


31 


31 


27 


28 


Plus 1 


Lieutenants 


69 


69 


68 


63 


Minus 5 


Lieutenant- Inspector 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Sergeants 


187 


187 


178 


185 


Plus 7 


Patrolmen .... 


1,977 


1,977 


1,944 


1,867 


Minus 77 


Patrohvomen 


15 


15 


15 


15 


- 


Provisional T e m p o r a r y 
Patrolmen 


42 


94 


42 


94 


Plus 52 


Provisional T e m p o r a r y 
Patrolwoman . 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Totals .... 


2,333 


2,385 


2,286 


2,264 


Minus 22 



The last column (net gain or loss) represents the difference between the 
actual strength on January 1 and on November 30. 



106 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






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1946.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



107 



Table IV. 

Lid of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November SO, 
lOJfO, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Adams, John F. . 






Incaparitated 


50 


2-12 years. 


25 


11-12 years. 


Augusta. Sherman W. 






Age 


60 


" 


40 


6-12 " 


Barry. William ,J. 






Incapacitated 


.50 


4-12 ■' 


25 


5-12 " 


Bates, George R. 






Incapacitated 


50 


11-12 " 


25 


11-12 " 


Benham, William D.* 






Incapacitated 


44 


9-12 " 


18 


9-12 " 


Blackmore, George F.* 






Incapacitated 


48 


10-12 " 


20 


10-12 " 


Bohmbach, Frank, ,Jr. 






Incapacitated 


51 


6-12 ■• 


25 


2-12 " 


Bosworth, Sylvanious A. 






Incapacitated 


48 


5-12 " 


25 


" 


Bowman, Samuel F. . 








Incapacitated 


49 


5-12 " 


23 


1-12 " 


Boyd en, William B. 








Incapacitated 


52 


1-12 ■' 


25 


1-12 " 


Buckley, James J.* 








Incapacitated 


48 


8-12 ■■ 


20 


10-12 " 


Burke, Edmund J. 








Incapacitated 


51 


1-12 •■ 


25 


7-12 " 


Burns, William J.* 








Incapacitated 


50 


10-12 • 


18 


6-12 " 


Butler, Thomas F.* 








Incapacitated 


49 


3-12 ■■ 


18 


9-12 " 


Campatelli, Gino 








Incapacitated 


55 


3-12 ■' 


25 


3-12 ■' 


Carey, John J. 








Incapacitated 


42 


9-12 •■ 


15 


5-12 " 


Caulfield, Albert L. 








Incapacitated 


50 


1-12 ■• 


25 


10-12 " 


Clark, Joseph A.* 








Incapacitated 


30 


10-12 " 


8 




Clark, Walter C* 








Incapacitated 


45 


6-12 " 


18 


5-12 " 


Conway, John W. 








Incapacitated 


53 


10-12 " 


20 


6-12 " 


Coughlin, James J. 








Incapacitated 


.55 


6-12 •■ 


25 


9-12 " 


Crehan, William J.* 








Incapacitated 


50 


10-12 ■' 


18 


5-12 " 


Cronin, Timothy P. 








Incapacitated 


49 


5-12 " 


25 


4-12 " 


Cros.s, Norman P. 








Incapacitated 


51 


4-12 •• 


26 


1-12 " 


Crowley, William F.* 








Incapacitated 


49 




21 


7-12 " 


Curran, Daniel F. 








Incapacitated 


51 




25 


1-12 " 


Currie, Martin H.* 








Incapacitated 


54 


4-12 ■• 


21 


4-12 " 


Cushing, Leo E.* 








Incapacitated 


46 


7-12 " 


19 


1-12 " 


Davis, Manuel F. 








Incapacitated 


55 


4-12 " 


25 


1-12 •■ 


Delaney, Frank P. 








Incapacitated 


49 


6-12 " 


25 


9-12 " 



Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



108 



POLICE COIMMISSIONER. 
Table 1\. — Continued. 



[Jan. 



List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1,940, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time 
of Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



Dickson, William H. 
Driscoll, Walter A. 
Duggan, Jeremiah D.* 
Edwards, .John V. 
Farmer, Edward F. 
Fitzsimmons, Clarence T. 
Flaherty, John S. 
Gallagher, Frederick J 
Gallagher, William E 
Gallerani, Alfred . 
Gannon, Angustine S 
Gaspar, Joseph * 
Gilman, Frank E. 
Goodwin, Charles E. 
Gorman, William T.* 
Gray, Bernard T.* 
GrifKn, John A. . 
Hamlet, Elmer I^. J. 
Hannafin, William J.* 
Harrington, Francis M 
Hurley, Daniel F.* 
John, Augustine D.* 
Joyce, Gordon 
Keating, Hilary P. T 
Kelley, Martin J.* 
Kerrigan, James J. 
Kershaw, Harrj- T. 
Kilroy, Michael J. 
Kolaitis, Alfons G. 
Kufs, Arno P.* 
Leahy, Joseph P. 
Lang, Johannes A. H. 
Lenehan, Joseph N.* . 



Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 



47 4- 
51 

49 9- 

.5.5 10- 

52 1- 
57 
47 

49 11- 

.54 10- 

48 1- 

49 4- 

44 11- 
66 4- 
48 6- 

42 6 
46 9- 
.5.3 6 

48 8- 

43 10 

49 4 

45 1 

44 3 
52 8 
49 3 

45 11 
51 1 

56 4 

57 6 
54 5 
44 2 
.50 11 



12 years. 

12 " 
12 " 
12 " 



12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
■12 
12 
-12 
-12 
12 
12 
12 



43 1-12 



25 9- 

18 10- 

25 2- 

24 4- 

24 10- 

24 8- 

18 7- 

24 7- 

24 5- 

24 8- 
16 2- 
38 8- 

25 2- 

16 1- 

18 5- 
25 9- 

22 8 
15 8- 
25 6- 
15 5- 

17 1- 
26 

25 1 

19 3 

20 8 

26 1 
25 11 

23 4 
17 7 
25 5 

24 6 
15 



12 years. 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 
-12 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 

-12 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



1946.1 



I'UBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



109 



Table I\\ — Continued. 

List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1940, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Lynch, Jerome ,L ... 


Incapacitated 


46 


6-12 years. 


24 


years. 


Lynch, Joseph I'.* 






Incapacitated 


48 


5-12 " 


18 


10-12 


" 


Mackey. William J. . 






Incaiiacitated 


47 


5-12 


23 


6-12 


" 


Madden, Joseph V.* 






Incai)acitated 


46 




17 


2-12 


" 


Magner, Patrick J.f 






Age 


66 


8-12 " 


37 


10-12 


" 


Malouin, Ra.\ inond C* 






Incapacitated 


44 


6-12 " 


15 


5-12 


" 


Marsh, Emerson P. 






Age 


63 


8-12 " 


37 


7-12 


" 


Martin, William J.* 






Incapacitated 


48 


8-12 " 


18 


7-12 


" 


Mayo, Frederick T. . 






Incapacitated 


58 


2-12 " 


25 


8-12 


" 


Miller, Frank M. 






Incapacitated 


47 


4-12 " 


24 


4-12 


" 


Miller, Louis * . 






Incapacitated 


46 


5-12 " 


20 


8-12 


« 


Morrill, Russell S. R. 






Incapacitated 


59 


9-12 " 


25 


8-12 


" 


Morrissey, Alfred J. . 






Incapacitated 


48 


4-12 " 


25 


1-12 


« 


Morton, Louis A. 






Incapacitated 


50 


4-12 " 


25 


1-12 


" 


Mulligan. Wilfred D. . 






Incapacitated 


51 


1-12 " 


22 


8-12 


" 


Murphy, John H. 






Incapacitated 


55 


5-12 " 


25 


1-12 


" 


Murphy, Timothy F. . 






Age 


65 


1-12 " 


36 


7-12 


" 


Murray, Chester J.* 






Incapacitated 


49 


3-12 " 


20 


4-12 


" 


McCleary, Joseph W.* 






Incapacitated 


46 


11-12 " 


19 


9-12 


" 


McCollem, Cecil G. . 






Incapacitated 


57 


8-12 " 


25 




" 


McDevitt, Neil A. 






Incapacitated 


54 


11-12 " 


24 


10-12 


" 


McGee, Bernard C. . 






Incapacitated 


52 


4-12 " 


22 


5-12 


" 


McGrath, Peter . 






Incapacitated 


58 


5-12 " 


24 


2-12 


" 


McGuire, James P.* . 






Incapacitated 


46 


10-12 " 


18 




" 


McLaughlin. James H. 






Incapacitated 


50 


1-12 " 


25 




" 


McNabb, Hugh J. 






Incapacitated 


47 


11-12 " 


25 


2-12 


" 


McNicholas, John J.* 






Incapacitated 


52 


11-12 " 


19 


6-12 


" 


McShane, Henry B.* . 






Incapacitated 


42 


8-12 " 


16 




" 


Noonan, John F. 






Incapacitated 


52 


" 


24 


6-12 


" 


Nowell, Charles H.* . 






Incapacitated 


46 


4-12 " 


20 


10-12 


" 


O'Donnell, Martin J. J. 






Incapacitated 


47 


2-12 " 


22 


7-12 


- 


Ogston, Elmer R. 






Incapacitated 


57 


1-12 " 


26 




" 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Reinstated to active duty "During continuance of any existing state of War 
between the United States and any foreign country," March 30, 1945. 



110 



POLICE COiMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. — Concluded. 
List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30) 
1945, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at Time 
of Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



O'Neil. Francis J. 
O'Neill, Frank L.* 
Peterson, William C. 
Purrington, Raymond 
Quigley, Edward S. 
Reeves, Arthur E.f 
Rice, John S. 
Rider, Merle D.* 
Russell, Walter R.* 
Scales, Joseph A. 
Seibolt, Edward J. 
Sexton, John T. . 
Shorley, Ronald L. 
Slattery, Joseph A. 
Smiley, John F. . 
Smith, Charles S. 
Smith, George F. 
Sullivan, Frank V. 
Sullivan, John J.* 
Swanson, Harold E. 
Sweeney, Francis L.* 
Thayer, Raymond A. 
Tighe, Thomas J.* 
Vadeboncour, John J. 
Wagner, Albert F. 
Waite, Walter F.* 
Wallis, Robert 
Welch, Francis L.* 
Welch, James P. . 
Weldon, James J.* 
Williams, William R 
Willis, Samuel J.* 



A. 



Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 

Age 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 



6.5 .5- 

44 8- 
49 9- 
51 2- 
.56 5- 
53 10- 
51 7- 

48 1- 

55 2- 

49 1- 

50 2- 

46 9- 
57 6- 
.58 11- 
.52 9- 

50 5- 

45 8- 
66 2- 

51 3- 

56 6- 

43 5- 
47 

44 lo- 
se 3- 

48 2- 

49 10- 

47 8- 

49 2- 

48 5- 
55 9- 
.50 1- 

50 9- 



12 years 

•12 " 

■12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

•12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 ■• 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 

12 " 



37 2- 

15 3- 

25 2- 

24 10- 
26 



12 years. 

12 

12 " 

12 " 



3-12 



22 10- 

24 9- 

25 9- 
25 7- 
26 

22 10- 

38 2- 

22 4- 
25 2- 
14 2- 

23 8- 
18 11- 
25 10- 
25 2- 



25 1- 
18 5- 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 



t Reinstated July 25, 1945. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Ill 



Table V. 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1945. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1944. 

December 22 
December 22 
December 22 
December 22 
December 22 
December 22 
December 22 
December 22 

1945. 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
May 17 
July 6 
July 28 



Patrolman Edmund F. Enos to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Ward to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles W. Hewitt to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph L. Connors to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph E. Slattery to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Daniel F. Donovan, Jr., to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman .\braham Morse to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph J. Palombo to rank of Sergeant. 

Lieutenant Edward L. Twohig to rank of Captain. 
Patrolman Charles H. Berkebile to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Jerome k. Crowley to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William F. Healey to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Louis M. Czarnetzki to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James J. Collins to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Joseph D. McGillivray to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman W'illiam J. Sheehan to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Mark A. Fay to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Francis T. Cahill to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Eldred Adair to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James M. McGahan to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Denis J. Riordan to rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant William H. Britt to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Francis W. Russell to rank of Captain. 



112 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VL 

Number of Men in Active Service at the End of the Present Year 

Who Were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 



Date Appointed. 




c 

T3 
C 
0) 

c 
a 


c 
11 
-a 
c 

0) 

c 
Q 


c 

0, 
O 


c 
c 

0) 

3 
<U 


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c 
a; 

0) 


B 
1 


Totals. 


1904 . 

1907 . 

1908 . 

1909 . 

1910 . 

1911 . 

1912 . 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1916 . 

1917 . 

1919 . 

1920 . 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 

1925 . 

1926 . 

1927 . 

1928 . 

1929 . 

1930 . 

1931 . 

1937 . 

1938 . 

1940 . 

1941 . 

1942 . 

1943 . 

1944 . 

1945 . 








1 


1 
1 

2 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

16 
3 

3 

1 


1 

3 

3 

1 

1 
1 
16 
5 
6 
4 
2 
3 
1 
7 
5 
2 
2 


1 


1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

55 
23 
14 
11 
14 

5 
10 
17 

7 

4 
11 

7 


1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

261 
79 
56 
32 
63 
34 
62 

190 
75 
61 

143 
24 
14 

174 
2 

133 
57 

121 

122 

132 
37 


1 

5 
9 
3 

1 

2 

6 

2 

1 

4 

1 

351 

111 

76 

47 

82 

42 

73 

215 

87 

67 

156 

31 

14 

174 

2 

133 

57 

121 

122 

132 

37 


Totals 


1 


5 


28 


63 


1 


185 


1,882 


2,165 



Note. — 94 Provisional Temporary Patrolmen and 1 Provisional Temporary Patrol- 
woman not included. 



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woman not in<'Iuil<'ii. 

(113) 



114 



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Jan. 



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1946. 



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116 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year Eliding 
November 30, 1945. 



Divisions. 



Males. 



Females. 



Totals. 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation 




1,399 


586 


.1,985 


Division 1 




2,460 


165 


2,625 


Division 2 . . . . 






1,765 


164 


1,929 


Division 3 . . . . 






3,140 


492 


3,632 


Division 4 . . . . 






10,095 


1,804 


11,899 


Divi.sion 6 . . . . 






5,095 


377 


5,472 


Division 7 . . . . 






3,146 


252 


3,398 


Division 8 . . . . 






14 


- 


14 


Division 9 . . . . 






3,892 


557 


4,449 


Division 10 . 






4,617 


705 


5,322 


Division 11 . 






2,129 


103 


2,232 


Division 13 . 






1,265 


93 


1,358 


Division 14 . 






1,412 


157 


1,569 


Division 15 . 






4,247 


245 


4,492 


Division 16 . 


"■ 




2,595 


433 


3,028 


Division 17 . 






840 


61 


901 


Division 18 . 






659 


55 


714 


Divi.sion 19 . 






1,150 


125 


1,275 


Traffic 






7,607 


1,692 


9,299 


Totals .... 






57,527 


8,066 


65,593 



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Pawnbr 

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$74,402 75 
10 50 
93 90 

100 00 

317 00 

681 78 

572 16 

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6 27 

111 28 

427 08 

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6 07 
207 25 
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192 13 




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Brought forward 

Badges (itinerant musician) 

Copies of licenses and replacement dog 

tags. 
Damage to police property (received at 

Headquarters). 
Refund, automobiles abandoned 
Refund, by pohce officers on account of 

pay. 

Refund, gasoline tax 

Refund, hospital service to police 
Refund, miscellaneous .... 
Re fluid, transportation of prisoners 
Reimbunsement for lost and damaged 

uniforms and equipment. 
Rejjla cement of hackney carriage drivers' 

badges. 
Sale of auctioneers' record books 
Sale of condemned property 
Sale of lost, stolen and abandoned prop- 
erty. 
Sale, pawnbroker and second-hand 

articles repoit blanks. 
Use of police property .... 


Total 

Credit by City Collector for money re- 
ceived for damage to police property, 
telephone conimi.s.sions and dog fines. 


o 

-3 
c 



138 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 
Number of Dog Licenses Issued During Year Ending November 30, 1945. 



Divisions. 



Males. 



Females. 



Spayed. 



Kennels. 



Transfers. 



With 
Fee. 



Without 
Fee. 



Totals. 



1 






51 


7 


3 


2 




63 


4 


67 


2 






- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


3 






211 


64 


49 


1 


1 


326 


11 


337 


4 






463 


125 


79 


_ 


- 


667 


13 


680 


6 






606 


86 


103 


- 


- 


795 


52 


847 


7 






681 


114 


90 


- 


- 


885 


57 


942 


8 






1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


9 






909 


129 


169 


- 


- 


1,207 


77 


1,284 


10 






565 


88 


93 


1 


- 


747 


49 


796 


11 






1,567 


181 


425 


1 


- 


2,174 


270 


2,444 


13 






581 


63 


170 


2 


- 


816 


60 


876 


14 






680 


69 


214 


1 


- 


964 


70 


1,034 


15 






247 


37 


37 


- 


- 


321 


23 


344 


16 






544 


149 


168 


1 


1 


863 


19 


882 


17 






1,015 


93 


423 


2 


1 


1,534 


145 


1,679 


18 






809 


87 


244 


- 


- 


1,140 


71 


1,211 


19 






513 


49 


130 


1 


- 


693 


86 


779 


Totals 


9,443 


1,342 


2,398 


12 


3 


13,198 


1,007 


14,205 



Total of 1,007 dog licenses issued without fee, in accordance with law, include: 2 kennels for a 
"domestic charitable corporation incorporated exclusively for purpose of protecting animals from cruelty," 
etc. (located on Division 4); 2 dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Divisions 17 
and 18) ; and 1,00.3 dogs licensed belonging to persons "in the military or naval service of the United States 
in time or war." 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City, by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 * 
Division 2 f 
Division 4 



13 Division 6 
13 Divi.sion 7 
12 

Total 



1 
6 

45 



* Includes 13 handcart common carriers. 
t One canceled for nonpayment. 



1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



139 



Table XVH. 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1945. 





Expenditures. 




A. Personal Service: 






1. 


Peniianont employees . 


$5,291,772 14 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


67,348 89 


$5,359,121 03 


B. Contractual Services: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$2,4.54 07 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


487 .56 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


19,. 330 01 




5. 


Express charges 


123 86 




8. 


Light, heat and power . 


33,667 97 




10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


1,115 54 




12. 


Bond and insurance pre 


- 






miums .... 


782 25 




13. 


Communication 


31,982 51 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs an 


1 






care .... 


42,020 01 




16. 


Care of animals 


2,257 75 




18. 


Cleaning .... 


2,196 27 




22. 


Medical .... 


16,858 99 




28. 


Expert .... 


398 56 




29. 


Stenographic, copying, etc. 


16 .50 




30. 


Listing .... 


68,253 96 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc. 


1,915 53 




37. 


Photographic and blueprint 
ing .... 


- 




39. 


General repaii-s 


62,878 90 






pment: 




286,740 24 


C. Eqtj] 




3. 


Electrical 


$3,073 71 




4. 


Motor vehicles 


4,327 00 




6. 


Stable .... 


83 85 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings 


663 09 




9. 


Office .... 


3,666 27 




10. 


Library .... 


791 10 




11. 


Marine ... 


337 22 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


156 70 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


5,507 25 




14. 


Live stock 


— 




15. 


Tires, tubes, accessories 


14,673 81 




16. 


Wearing apparel 


35,355 97 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


3,431 98 


72,067 95 




Carried forward 


. 


$5,717,929 22 



140 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVIL— Concluded. 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1945. 

Brought forward $5,717,929 22 

D. Supplies: 

1. Office $38,968 19 

2. Food and ice . . 7,688 68 

3. Fuel 22,551 43 

4. Forage and animal . 6,040 95 

5. Medical, surgical, laboratory, 325 27 
8. Laundry, cleaning, toilet . 6,843 82 

11. Gasoline, oil and grease 46,730 71 

13. Chemicals and disinfectants, 3,950 22 

16. Mi.scellaneous 9,015 52 

142,114 79 



Materials: 

1. Building .... $776 63 

10. Electrical .... 12,190 66 

13. :Miscellaneous . . 6,476 35 



F. Special Items: 

7. Pensions and annuities . $546,350 33 

11. Workmen's compensation 525 79 



19,443 64 



546,876 12 



Total $6,426.363 77 

1944 Unliquidated Reserve $5,287 41 



Speci.'VL Items: (Not included in Police Department appropriation) 

I. Civilian Precautionary Assistance .... $334 86 

Emergency Compensation Allotment . . $42,425 89 

Receipts. 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner , . . $43,785 00 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 30,617 75 

Refunds, miscellaneous 1,742 49 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property, 1,197 58 
For itinerant musician badges, replacement dog tags, re- 
placement hackney carriage driver badges, copies of 
licenses, sale of report blanks, sale of auctioneers' record 

books, and use of police property 1 , 1 22 60 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equip- 
ment 427 08 

For damage to police property (received at Headcjuarters), 100 00 

Total $78,992 50 

Credit by the City C'ollector for money received I'or damage 
to police property, commissions on telephones and dog 
fines 4,494 64 



Grand Total $83,487 14 



1946.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 141 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service during the Year 
Ending November 30, 1943. 
(Included in Table XVH.) 

Pay rolls $35,484 89 

Signal and ti-affio upkeei), repairs and supplies therel'oi- 12,295 10 



Total $47,779 99 



142 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1946. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



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IS IS 



a 3 



INDEX. 



A. 

Accidents 

caused by automobiles 

number of, reportecL 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, 
Adjustment of claims 
Ambulance service . 
Arrests 

age and sex of . 

comparative statement of 

for drunkenness 

foreigners .... 

for offenses against chastity, morality, 

increase in number of . . . 

minors .... 

nativity of . 

nonresidents 

number of, by divisions . 

number of, punished by fine 

on warrants 

summoned by court 

total number of 

violation of city ordinances 

without warrants 
Articles lost and found 
Auctioneers .... 
Automobiles 22, 23, 28, 29-32, 

accidents due to .... 

cost of running police 

deaths caused by .... 

operating while under influence of li(]U( 

police ... 

public 

safety-educational 

sight-seeing 

stolen and recovered 

used, dealers in . 



etc. 



par 



64, 



Page 

33, 73, 142, 143 

142, 143 

73 

s and squares, 142, 143 

75 

80 

19-23, 34, 74, 116-135 

134 

135 

20, 22, 74, 95, 125 

20, 117-133 

19, 125, 133 

19 

19, 117-133 

20 

. 19-21, 117-133 

116 

. 19, 21 

19, 117-133 

19, 117-133 

. 19-21, 117-133 

19, 22, 129 

19, 117-133 

65 

136 

80, 121, 127-129, 142, 143 
142, 143 
80 
33, 142, 143 
22, 127 
64, 80-82 
83, 136 
57 
86-89, 136 
22, 30, 121 
30-32, 136 



B. 

Ballistics unit, transferred t(j B. CI 
Benefits and pensions . . . . 

(147) 



27 

99 



148 










P. D. 49. 


Page 


Biological chemist 47-51 


Bombs, rocket 














27 


Buildings 














73, 119 


dangerous, reported .... 














73 


Bureau of Crime Prevention . 














61-63 


creation 














61 


duties in general 














61 


formation 














61 


inspections and investigations 














63 


purpose 














61 


summary of work accomplished 














62 
















30-51 


arson squad discontinued 














29 


automobile division . 














30 


ballistics division 














46-47 


biological chemist 














47 


criminal identification 














37, 39 


homicide squad 














32 


identification section 














35-45 


lost and stolen property division 














32 


missing persons 














. 42, 43 


multilith 














35 


photography, fingerprinting 














. 36-42 


summons file .... 














45 


used cars dealers' licenses granted 














31, 136 


warrant file .... 














44 


Bureau of Operations 














. 59-60 


creation, accomplishments 














59 


recording of radio messages . 














60 


war emergency radio unit discontinued 










60 


Bureau of Records abolished, merged \ 


vith 


B. C 


. I. 








27 



c. 



Carriages, pubhc 




83-89, 136 


articles left in . . 




84 


number licensed 




83, 136 


public and special hackney carriage stands abolished 


85 


pubhc stands for taxicabs 


established .... 


85 


Cases investigated . 




. 34, 73 


Census, decennial (1945) 




14 


Children 


21, 43, 


73, 117, 118 


abandoned, cared for 




73 


lost, restored 




. 42, 73 


City ordinances, arrests for vi( 


lation of ... . 


19, 22, 129 


City Pri.son .... 




74 


Claims, adjustment of 




75 


Collective musicians 




96, 136 


Commitments .... 




. 21, 75 


Communications system . 




77 



p. D. 49. 



149 







Page 


Complaints 


!M), 115, 136 


against miscellaneous licenses 


99, 136 


against police officers 


26, 115 


Confiscated explosives, disposition of 


47 


Courts 


. 19, 21, 33, 49, 117-133, 135 


fines imposed by .... 


19, 21, 135 


number of days' attendance at, by 


officers . 


19, 21, 49, 135 


number of persons summoned by 




19, 117-133 


prosecutions in 




33 


Crime 




10 


Crime prevention .... 




12 


Criminal identification 




. 37-48 


Criminal work 




135 


comparative statement of 




135 


D. 




Dangerous weapons .... 


97, 117 


Dead bodies 


44, 78 


recovered 


78 


Deaths 


7, 18, 27, 33, 44, 48, 106, 142, 143 


by accident, suicide, etc. 


33, 142, 143 


of police officers 




. 18, 27, 106 


Department medals of lionor . 




25 


Disability, absence on account of . 




114 


Distribution of force 




18, 102-104 


Disturbances suppressed . 




73 


Dogs 




136, 138, 140 


amount received for licenses for 




136, 140 


number licensed 




140 


Drivers 




. 84, 89, 136 


hackney carriage 




84, 136 


sight-seeing automobile and sigh 


t-seeing horse-drawn 


vehicle 


86-89, 136 


Drowning, persons rescued from 


73, 78 


Drunkenness 


. 20, 22, 73, 75, 125 


arrests for, per day . 


20 


foreigners arrested for 




20, 125 


increase in number of arrests for 




20 


men committed to City Prison 




74 


nonresidents arrested for 




20, 125 


total number of arrests for 




. 20, 22, 125 


women committed to the House of Detention 


75 


E. 




Emplovees of the Department 


17, 102-104 


Events, special 


66 


Fjxecutive orders of the Governor . 


29 


Expenditures 


24, 100, 139 


Extra duties performed by officers 




. 29, 34, 73 



150 



P. D. 49. 



Financial . 

expenditures 

miscellaneous license fees 

pensions . . 

receipts 

signal service 
Fines .... 

amount of . 

average amount of 

number punished by 
Fingerprint 
Fire alarms 

defective, reported 

number given 
Fires .... 

extinguished 

on waterfront, attended 
Foreigners, number arrested 
Fugitives from justice 



Page 
24, 99, 100^136, 139 
24, 100, 139 
99, 136, 140 
99, 140 
24, 100, 136, 140 
100, 141 
. 19, 21, 135 
. 19,21, 135 
. 19,21, 135 
21 
. 35-42 
. 73, 78 
73 
73 
29, 33, 73-78 
. 73, 78 
78 
19, 117-133 
34, 130 



Q. 



Gaming, illegal 
General orders 



130 
26-29 



H. 



Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Halloween celebration 

Handcarts 

Harbor Master of Port of Boston, 

assistants appointed 
Harbor service .... 
Homicide squad . . . 

Horses 

House of Detention . 
Houses of ill fame, keeping 



appointed 



84, 136 
13, 83-89, 136 
71 

90, 136 
28 
28 
78, 79 
32 
79 
75 

75, 126 



I. 



Imprisonment .... 
persons .sentenced to 
total years of . . . 

Income 

Information from police journals, r 

Inquests held .... 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted . 

Itinerant musicians . 



24, 



equests for 



. 21, 34, 135 
21 
. 21, 34, 135 
99, 100, 136, 140 
41 
33 
73 
73 
96, 136 



p. D. 49. 



151 



J. 








Page 


Junk collectors 


136 


Junk shopkeepers 


136 


Jury lists, police work on 


93 


Juvenile <lelin(|uency 


11 


L. 




Lamps, defective, reported 


73 


Licenses, miscellaneous .... 








99, 136 


Line-up of prisoners .... 








. 26, 30 


Listing, police 






24, 92, 1 


39, 144, 145 


expenses of 








24, 93, 139 


number listed 








92,144,145 


number of policemen employed in 








93 


Lodgers at station houses 








. 21, 98 


Lodging houses, public .... 








98, 136 


applications for licenses . 








136 


authority to license .... 








98 


for accommodation of Service Men 








98 


location of 








98 


number of persons lodged in 








98 


Lost and found articles .... 








65 


Lost and stolen property division 








21, 32, 65 


Lost children ..... 








21, 43, 73 



M. 



Maintenance shop . 
Men comniitted to City Prison 
Military substitute patrolmen 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued 

number transferred . 
Missing persons. 

age and sex of . 

number found 

number reported 

reported by Police Division 
Musicians 

collective .... 

itinerant .... 



64 

74 

102 

19, 117 133 

73 

99, 136 

99, 136 

99, 136 

99, 136 

99, 136 

99, 136 

. 42-44 

42 

43 

. 42, 43 

43 

96, 136 

96, 136 

96, 136 



N. 



Nativity of persons arrested 
Nonresident offenders 



20 
19, 20, 21, 117 133 



152 






P. D. 49. 


0. 




P.\GE 


Offenses 


. 2, 19 


, 22, 117-133 


against chastity, morality, etc. 


. 19, 


125-127, 133 


against license laws 




19, 123, 133 


against liquor law 




22, 123 


against the person 


19 


22, 117, 133 


against property, malicious .... 




19, 122, 133 


against property, with violence 


19 


22, 119, 133 


against property, without violence 


19 


22, 121, 133 


forgery and against currency .... 




19. 122, 133 


miscellaneous 


19 


22, 127-133 


recapitulation 




133 


Organization 




26 


P. 






Parks, public 




. 142, 143 


accidents reported in 






. 142, 143 


Pawnbrokers .... 






. 30,32, 136 


Pensions and benefits 




. 7, 


8, 28, 99, 140 


estimates for pensions 






99 


number of persons on rolls 






99 


paj'ments on account of . 






99, 140 


Personnel 






7, 17, 25, 102 


Photographic, etc. 






36-42 


Plant and equipment 






64 


Police academy 






9 


Police, special .... 






95 


Police buildings, use of 






98 


Police charitable fund 






99 


PoHce Department . 9, 17, 18, 99, 102, 105, 106, 


107, 111, 


113, 115, 135 


authorized and actual strength of . 




105 


commendation of officers .... 




25 


distribution of personnel .... 




IS, 102 


horses in u.se in 




79 


how constituted 




17 


Memorial Day observance .... 




68 


officers: 






absence on account of disability . 




14 


active service, number of officers in 




112 


allowances for {)ay, Department rule on 




104 


appointed 




18, 112 


arrests by 


19, 


116, 117 135 


average age of 




113 


complaints against 




26, 115 


date appointed 




112 


deferment, draft board notified of . 




27 


detailed, special events .... 




. 66-72 


died 




18, 27 


disability, time lost on acccount of 




26 


dismissed . 






18, 115 



p. D. 49. 



153 



Police Department — Concluded. 




Page 


officers — Concluded. 






in armed service 




7 


increase in basic rate 




26, 28 


injured 




. 18, 26 


killed in line of duty 




7 


medals of honor . . . . 




25 


nativity of 




113 


pay allowances, Department rule o 


n . . . 


104 


pay, increas(> in basic rate of . 




10, 26, 28 


pensioned 




18, 107-110 


policewomen .... 




. 17, 26 


pi-omoti'd 




18, 111 


provisional temporary policewome 


1 . . . 


17, 102 


punishments imposed 




26 


reinstated 




18 


resigned 




18, 115 


retired 




18, 107-110 


sliding scale increase 




26 


time lost on account of disability 




18, 26 


Walter Scott Medal for Valor 




25 


vehicles in use in ... . 




80,82 


work of 




19 


Police listing 


. 24,92, 


IS9, 144, 145 


Police signal box service .... 


17, 76, 


77. 100, 141 


miscellaneous work .... 




76 


payments on account of . 




100, 141 


propertj' assigned to . . . 




77 


signal boxes 




76 


Prisoners, nativity of ... . 




20 


Promotion of police 




18. Ill 


Property 


. 21, SO- 


S2. 1S7, 140 


lost, abandoned and stolen 


SO- 


32. 137, 140 


recovered 


. 21 


, 30-32, 135 


sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc. 




136, 140 


stolen 




21, 135 


taken from prisoners and lodgers . 




21 


Prosecution of homicide cases 




33 


Provisional temporary patrolwomen 




17, 102 


Public carriages 




83, 136 


Public lodging houses .... 




98. 136 


R. 






Radio, two-way 




50 


soundscriber for recording messages 




60 


Receipts, financial 


24, 1 


00, 136, 140 


Requests for information from police journ 


lis . 


41 


Revolvers 




97, ISC) 


licenses to carry .... 




il7, 136 



154 


P. D. 49. 


S. 


Page 


Safety-educational automobile 


. 13, 57 


Salaries 


102 


Second-hand articles 


136 


Second-hand motor vehicle dealers .... 


30, 136 


Sergeant Ballistician 


46 


Service Men 


98 


Sick and injured persons assisted 


. 21, 73, 78 


Sight-seeing automobiles 


86, 136 


Sight-seeing horse-drawn vehicles 


. 86-89, 121, 136 


Signal service, police 17 


, 76-77, 100, 141 


Special events . . . " 


. 66-72 


Special police 


95 


State wards 


42 


Station houses 


21 


lodgers at 


. 21, 98 


witnesses detained at 


21 


Stolen property 


21, 30-34, 135 


recovered 


21, 32, 34, 135 


value of 


21, 34, 135 


Street railway conductors, motormen and starters 


136 


Streets 


73, 142-143 


accidents reported in 


142-143 


defective, reported 


142-143 


obstnictions removed 


73 


Summons file 


45 


T. 




Tagging 


. 57, 89 


Theatrical-booking agencies 


136 


Traffic 


12 


penalties for violating, regulations of . . . 


13 


Traffic Division . . 


. 13, 52-58 


activities 


. . 52 


safety-educational automobile 


57 


tagging 


57 



u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 22 

Used cars 30-32, 136 

licen.sed dealers 31, 136 

provisions for hearing before granting third-class license . . 31 

purchases and sales reported 31 



V. 



Vehicles 

ambulances, combination 

automobiles 

in use in Police Department 

public carriages 

wagons and handcarts 



80-85, 136, 138 

80 

. 80-82 

. 80-82 

83 

90, 136, 138 



p. D. 49. 



155 



Vessels 

Volunteer, unpaid, Auxiliary Police 



Page 
78 
24 



w. 



Wagons 

legislation afTecting motor vehiclei 
hire 

number licensed by divisions 

total number licensed 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor 
Warrant file .... 
Water pipes, defective, reported 
Water running to waste, reported 
Weapons, dangerous 
Witnesses 

fees earned by officers 

number of days' attendance at court by officers 

number of, detained at station houses 
Women committed to House of Detention 
Work of the Department 



1)0, 136, 138 
s transporting property for 

90 

138 

90, 136, 138 

25 

44 

73 

73 

97 

19, 21, 73, 135 

19, 21, 135 

19, 21, 135 

. 21, 73 

75 

19 



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