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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.] 

arije Commontoealtl) of jfWasigacfjusiettg 



FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 

FOR THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1946 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



^i-vt-4A^\ \t)4S/'^i-v;>4<^ 



CONTENTS. 



Letter to Governor .... 

Personnel 

New pension legislation 
Traffic conditions 

Crime 

Juvenile delinquency . 
Police Academy .... 
Hackney carriage licenses 
The Department .... 

Police force 

Signal service .... 
Employees of the department . 
Recapitulation .... 
Distribution and changes . 
Police officers injured while on duty 
Work of Department 

Arrests 

Drunkenness .... 
Uniform crime record reporting 
Special patrolmen 

Receipts 

Expenditures .... 
Presentation of Medals 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 
Department Medals of Honor . 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation . 
Its organization and duties 
Automobile division . 
Used car dealers' licenses granted 
Lost and stolen property division 
Homicide Squad .... 

General 

Identification section 

Multilith .... 

Main index file . 

Criminal record files . 

Cabinets of segregated photographs of crimin; 

Criminal identification 
Requests for information from police journal 
Criminal records for the department furnished 
Missing persons' unit 
Warrant unit 
Summons file 
Ballistics unit 
Biological chemist 



als arrested 



Page 

7 

7 

8 

9 

10 

10 

11 

12 

13 

13 

13 

13 

14 

14 

14 

15 

15 

16 

18 

19 

19 

19 

20 

20 

20 

21 

21 

21 

22 

23 

23 

25 

26 

26 

26 

26 

27 

27 

29 

29 

29 

31 

31 

32 

34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Traffic Division . 

Activities 

Safety education 

Parking 

Hackney carriages 

Traffic problems . 
Bureau of Operations 

Duties .... 

Accomplishments 
Crime Prevention Bureau 

Creation 

Formation . 

Duties in general 

Summary of work accomplished 
Plant and equipment 
Special events 
Miscellaneous business 
City Prison .... 
House of Detention . 
Police Signal System . 

Signal boxes 

Miscellaneous work . 

Communications system 
Harbor Service . 

Patrol service 

Horses 

Vehicle Service . 

Combination ambulances 

List of vehicles used by the department 
Hackney Carriages 

Limitation of hackney carriage licenses 

Establishing public taxicab stands 

Private hackney stands 

Sight-seeing automobiles . 

Issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations 

Appeal Board 
Wagon Licenses . 
Listing work in Boston 

Listing expenses . 

Number of policemen employed in listing 
Police work on jury lists . 
Special police 
Musicians' Licenses . 

Itinerant 

Collective 
Carrying dangerous weapons 
PubUc lodging houses 
Miscellaneous licenses 
Pensions and benefits 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 5 

Page 

Financial 78 

Adjustment of claims, etc 78 

Statistical: 

Personnel, salary scale and distribution of the police force, 

signal service and employees 80 

Changes in authorized and actual strength of police department . 83 

List of police officers in active service who died .... 84 

List of officers retired 85 

Officers promoted .89 

Number of men in active service by year appointed ... 90 

Men on the police force and year born 91 

Number of days' absence from duty by reason of disability . 92 

Accidents 93 

Number of arrests by police divisions 95 

Arrests and offenses 96 

Age and sex of persons arrested 114 

Comparative statement of police criminal work . . . .115 

Licenses of all classes issued 116 

Dog licenses 118 

Wagon licenses 118 

Financial statement 119 

Payments on account of signal service 121 

Male and female residents listed 122 



€i)e ComtnontDeaIti) of Ma&satimittti. 



REPORT. 

Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1946. 

To His Excellency Maurice J. Tobin, Governor. 

Your Excellency, — In compliance with the provisions of 
Chapter 291, Acts of 1906, as amended, I have the honor to ■ 
submit a report of the work of the Boston Police Department 
for the year ending November 30, 1946. 

Personnel. 

It is with deep regret that I report the death of Sergeant 
William F. Healey of Division 4, veteran of World War I, who 
was killed in line of duty on the evening of October 2, 1946, 
while attempting to apprehend a vicious armed criminal. 

As stated in my previous report, the war made appreciable 
inroads in the officer personnel of the department. This* 
condition was further emphasized by the fact that there was 
no Civil Service list available to fill existing vacancies in the 
grade of patrolman, which was caused by a dearth of appli- 
cants for the position. Since the termination of actual hos- 
tiHties, this condition has been rectified by the establishment of 
an eligible Hst for patrolmen, and it is confidently expected 
that such a list will continue to be available to fill vacancies 
in the grade of patrolman. 

Police officers who were members of the armed forces during 
World War II and who have been honorably discharged have 
been reinstated as they applied for their former positions. 
Under the law, veterans of World War II are granted a period 
of two years during which they may apply for reinstatement 
to their former positions. On November 30, 1946, there were 
24 patrolmen still in the armed forces. 

Because of the unavailability of applicants to fill vacancies 
of patrolmen created in the department through the shortage 
of officers who joined the avmed forces, qualified appHcants 
were appointed to these vacancies as provisional temporary 
patrolmen. When such temporary patrolmen qualified for 
permanent positions by taking a Civil Service examination and 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan; 

obtaining a passing mark, they were appointed on permanent 
basis in the department. I am pleased to report that every 
provisional temporary patrolman who was certified for perma- 
nent appointment by the Civil Service Commission has been 
appointed. 

May I repeat what I stated in my previous report, that a 
police officer is one of the few individuals called upon to do 
extra work without additional compensation. In these in- 
stances, wherever possible to do so, it has been my policy to 
grant such officers time off in consideration of the extra hours 
of duty performed. However, it seems inconsiderate to expect 

' officers to perform extra hours of duty without receiving in 
return some other compensation than time off, especially 
considering the fact that officers in cities comparable in size 
to Boston and even in some cities in the metropolitan area 
which are smaller than Boston receive higher salaries for reg- 
ular police work. The salaries of officers of this department 
are undeniably below a standard required for the type of 
work and the responsibility these officers assume. It appears 
to me to be a solemn obligation on the part of the citizens of 
Boston to demand that their police officers be given adequate 

'compensation for their responsibilities, or at least that they 
receive rates of pay commensurate with those of officers of 
near-by cities and towns. 

The following new pension legislation relating to Boston 
police officers was enacted during the past year : 

Acts of 1946. 
(Chap. 265.) 
An Act Relative to the Pensions of Certain Mem- 
bers OF the Police Department of the City of 
Boston Retired for Disability. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Chapter three hundred and fifty-three of 
the acts of eighteen hundred and ninety-two is hereby 
amended by striking out section two, as most recently 
amended by section one of chapter four hundred and 
forty-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and forty-five, 
and inserting in place thereof the following section: — 
Section 2. The amount of the annual pension of members 
of the police department retired under the provisions of 
this act who are certified to be permanently incapacitated 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 9 

by injury sustained in the actual performance of duty, or 
who are incapacitated for active service and have served 
in said department for not less than twenty-five years in 
the case of veterans of World War I or World War II, or 
for not less than thirty years in the case of those who are 
not such veterans, shall be two thirds of the annual com- 
pensation allowed to men of the grade in which such 
member served, and the amount of the annual pension of 
other persons retired under the provisions of this act shall 
be one half of the annual compensation allowed to men of 
the grade in which such member served. Said pensions 
shall be paid by the city of Boston. 

Sect. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 2, 1946. 

The enactment of liberal pension legislation has resulted in 
the retirement of many members of the Force. During the 
year from December 1, 1945, to November 30, 1946, a total 
of 124 officers were retired on pensions. i 

Traffic Conditions. 

It is apparent to all thinking citizens that the traffic problem 
in Boston is one that demands immediate corrective treat- 
ment. Even today with a Hmited registration of motor 
vehicles, our streets and parking facilities as they exist are 
unable to handle this problem efficiently. 

The existing facilities, such as the Sumner Tunnel with its 
single tube, have proved incapable of handling smoothly and 
quickly the traffic that pours in and out of Boston at that 
point. 

Many suggestions have been offered, among them being the 
building of a parking area under Boston Common, a central 
artery from Cambridge and skirting the downtown section to 
Roxbury, terminating on the surface at Blue Hill avenue. A 
highway was proposed running along the southerly side of 
Charles river from Embankment road to Bay State road to 
correct the traffic situation that prevails in the Back Bay dis- 
trict. Various suggestions have also been offered for off-street 
parking facilities that would contribute to relieving congestion. 
Though all these proposals exist on paper, nothing has as yet 
been started. The result is that traffic congestion in Boston 
is extremely bad and is especially apparent during rush periods 
and in stormy weather. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

It is obvious to anyone that these conditions, unless steps 
are immediately taken to alleviate them, will grow worse as 
more automobiles become obtainable by the public. In the 
face of this condition the Police Department is doing its ut- 
most to move traffic into, through; and out of Boston with as 
much facility as possible. It has to contend with many 
problems. The downtown commercial establishments must 
load and unload goods for delivery, which causes delays in the 
flow of traffic moving through the streets concerned. Mer- 
chants are anxious that customers be given ample time to park 
their cars and shop, which forces police officers on traffic duty 
to tag many cars for overstaying the prescribed time limit for 
parking. During the past year the Traffic Division has tagged 
more cars in the downtown section than were tagged last year. 

Crime. 
It was freely predicted that the postwar period would be 
visited with an increase of crime in our large cities, but I am 
happy to report that Boston has successfully met this problem 
and kept it under rigid control. In all probability there will be 
a certain amount of criminal problems in every large city at all 
times, but where a police department is alert and receives the 
full support of the citizens in carrying out their duties, organ- 
ized crime will be discouraged to the extent that it will never 
secure a foothold. Boston still enjoys an enviable position in 
the solution of murder and manslaughter cases as compared to 
cities of equal or greater size. Criminal statistics of the 
department are reported upon in the following sections of this 
report. 

Juvenile Delinquency. 

It is increasingly evident that the problem of juvenile 
delinquency resolves itself into one of discipline, a discipline 
that must be instituted by parents and applied in later years 
by children themselves, based upon the training the parents 
are bound to give them. It is appalling to read in the news- 
papers of the serious offenses committed by juveniles, and the 
one startling conclusion that forces itself upon the reader is 
that thfere must be a lack of proper supervision over these 
youthful offenders. Until parents exercise the obligations of 
parenthood imposed upon them, it does not seem likely that 
any great progress will be made in substantially reducing the 
offenses committed by young people. In the main, these 
offenses may seem petty, such as malicious destruction of 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

property, both public and private, yet it must be remembered 
that such offenses are costing private individuals as well as tax- 
payers a considerable sum of money every year which could be 
used to much better advantage in worth-while projects. 

There are many agencies concerned with the correction of 
these offenders and they are undoubtedly accomplishing much 
good, but, regardless of how they strive in their efforts to make 
these young people good citizens, their work will be without 
avail unless parents take upon themselves a serious interest 
in their welfare. 

The department maintains a Crime Prevention Bureau 
which confines its efforts primarily to the prevention of crime 
among adolescents. It cooperates in every way possible with 
those social agencies, juvenile probation officers, and school 
attendance officers who deal with youth. It is pleasing to note 
that there is a fine spirit existing between these agencies and 
the Bureau, and I am confident that continued cooperation will 
be instrumental in doing its full share to correct delinquency 
among young people in this city. 

Police Academy. 

The Police Academy of the department was established on 
February 25, 1946, for the purpose of promoting the efficiency 
of the department and its service to the public. It is staffed 
by trained superior officers. Classes are held for superior 
officers and patrolmen. All new patrolmen receive a course 
of training, and from time to time various courses dealing with 
special phases of police work will be given for all members of 
the Force. Several superior officers were chosen and sent to 
Washington for special training at the National Police Academy 
and they are selected to serve as instructors in specialized fields 
of police work. 

I extend my deep gratitude to the trustees of "The Moses 
Kimball Fund for the Promotion of Good Citizenship," who 
sponsored a scholarship for a specially selected officer of this 
department during the past year at Harvard University. 

The courses completed were as follow^s: Urban Sociology; 
The Boston Community; Reading and Research in Sociology; 
Group Prejudice and Conflict; Topics in Local Government; 
Reading and Research in Psychology. 

The officer selected in this instance had a college back- 
ground and throughout the courses met all the standards 
required for graduate students at Harvard. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

This officer also attended courses on community relations 
at Wellesley College during the summer months. He is 
a member of the faculty of the Police Academy, and his 
instruction to police officers will, no doubt, prove invaluable. 

Officers of this department assigned to homicide investiga- 
tions also attended Harvard University during the past year 
and were enrolled for a specialized course known as "Seminar 
in Legal Medicine for Police Officers." 

As previously stated in my reports, it is my conviction 
that a modern police force should have its members trained 
in the latest methods ^nd scientific developments brought 
forth in combatting crime. 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. 
In my previous report I stated that I had appeared before 
a legislative committee and at the public hearing held by the 
Department of Public Utilities and urgently recommended 
that an increase be granted in the then maximum number 
of hackney carriage licenses. I am happy to report that this 
increase was granted on December 31, 1945, by the Depart- 
ment of Public Utilities, which established the maximum 
limit of hackney carriage licenses at 1,525. This gave me 
permission to issue 192 additional hackney carriage licenses. 
There were over 1,500 applicants for such licenses, and the 
procedure was estabhshed of issuing them only to honorably 
discharged war veterans. 

Conclusion. 

In completing my third year as Commissioner, I take this 
opportunity to pay tribute to the unselfish efforts of the 
personnel of the department in rendering to the citizens of 
Boston adequate police protection wherever needed. The 
citizens can indeed be proud of the members of their police 
force. 

May I express to your Excellency my sincere appreciation 
of the constant support you have extended to me during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



1947.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



13 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



p< 

Secretary. 


DLicE Commissioner. 

Assistant Secretaries. 


1 
3 


The Police Force. 




Superintendent . 


1 


Patrolmen .... 


*1,956 


Deputy Superintendents 


3 


Patrolwomen 


14 


Captains 


33 






Lieutenants 


70 






Sergeants . 


156 


Total .... 


2,233 


* As of November 


30, 1946, 24 patrolmen in the armed service. 

Signal Service. 




Director 


1 


Signalmen .... 


5 


Assistant Director 


1 


Signal Maintenance man 




Chauffeurs . 
Linemen 


2 
6 


(Temporary) . 


1 


Mechanic .' . 


1 




— 


Painter 


1 


Total .... 


18 


Employ 


EES OF THE DEPARTMENT. 




Biological Chemist . 


1 


Laborers .... 


2 


Assistant Biologica 


I 


Laborers (Temporary) 


16 


Chemist (Temporary) 


1 


Matrons .... 


8 


Chauffeurs . 


2 


Mechanics .... 


19 


Cleaners 


4 


Property Clerk . 


1 


Cleaner (Temporary) 


1 


Repairmen .... 


2 


Clerks .... 


36 


Shorthand Reporters 


2 


Clerk (Temporary) . 


1 


Signalman .... 


1 


Diesel and Gasoline En- 




Statisticians 


2 


gine Operator 


1 


Steamfitter 


1 


Diesel and Gasoline En- 




Stenographers . 


21 


gine Operators (Tem- 




Assistant Superintendent 




porary) .... 


2 


of Buildings . 


1 


Elevator Operators . 


8 


Superintendent of Repair 




Firemen, Marine 


3 


Shop .... 


1 


Firemen, Stationary 


6 


Telephone Operators 


6 


Hostlers 


9 


Telephone Opera tors 




Janitors .... 


29 


(Temporary) . 


2 


Janitors (Temporary) 


19 






Janitresses . 


2i 


Total .... 


210 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

e 

Recapitulation. 



[Jan. 



Police Commissioner . 
Secretary, Assistant Secretaries 

Police Force 

Signal Service .... 
Employees 


1 

3 

2,233 

18 

210 


Grand Total .... 


, 2,465 



Distribution and Changes. 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 

During the year 203 patrolmen and 39 provisional temporary 
patrolmen were appointed; 1 patrolman reinstated; 29 patrol- 
men and 14 provisional temporary patrolmen resigned (3 
patrolmen and 1 provisional temporary patrolman while 
charges were pending); 3 patrolmen and 2 provisional tempo- 
rary patrolmen were dismissed; 38 provisional temporary 
patrolmen and 1 provisional temporary patrolwoman termi- 
nated their services; 7 lieutenants, 18 sergeants and 3 patrolmen 
were promoted; 2 deputy superintendents, 2 captains, 1 
lieutenant-inspector, 1 lieutenant, 12 sergeants, 105 patrolmen, 

1 patrolwoman and 7 civilians retired on pensions ; 3 lieutenants, 

2 sergeants and 14 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
The following statement shows the number of police officers 
attached to the various divisions and units who were injured 
while on duty during the past year, the number of duties lost 
by them and the number of duties lost by police officers during 
the past year wiio were injured previous to December 1, 1945: 



How Injured. 



Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1946. 



Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 



Number of Duties 
Lost this Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. I, 1945. 



In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 

Totals . 



145 
31 

74 
148 
398 



3,271 
444 

1,570 
2,207 
7,492 



743 
209 

585 

718 

2,255 



1947.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Arrests. 
The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that 
of a separate person, was 74,549, as against 65,593 the pre- 
ceding year, being an increase of 8,956. The percentage of 
decrease and increase was as follows: 

Per Cent. 

1. Offenses against the person Increase 11.56 

2. Offenses against property committed with violence, Increase 5.96 

3. Offenses against property committed without vio- 

lence Increase 1.59 

4. Malicious offenses against property .... Decrease 18.73 

5. Forgery and offenses against the currency Increase 11 .59 

6. Offenses against the license laws .... Increase 22.27 

7. Offenses against chastity, morality, etc. Decrease .47 

8. Offenses not included in the foregoing . . . Increase 28 . 55 

There were 13,710 persons arrested on warrants and 32,237 
without warrants; 28,602 persons were summoned by the coiu't. 
The number of males arrested was 66,947; of females, 7,602; 
of foreigners, 4,504, or approximately 6.04 per cent; of minors, 
7,696. Of the total number arrested, 26,094, or 35 per cent, 
were non-residents. (See Tables X, XI.) 

The average amount of fines imposed by the courts for the 
five years from 1942 to 1946, inclusive, was $167,510; in 1946 
it was $172,942, or $5,432 more than the average. (See 
Table XIII.) 

The average number of days' attendance at court for the 
five years from 1942 to 1946, inclusive, was 34,785; in 1946 
it was 32,539, or 2,246 less than the average. (See Table 
XIII.) 

The average amount of witness fees earned for the five 
years from 1942 to 1946, inclusive, was $8,164; in 1946 it 
was $6,940, or $1,224 less than the average. (See Table XIII.) 

The number of arrests for all offenses for the year was 
74,549, being an increase of 8,956 over last year and 4,508 
more than the average for the past five years; (See Table 
XIII.) 

Of the total number of arrests for the year (74,549) 218 
were for violation of city ordinances that is to say; that one 
arrest in 341 was for such offense, or .29 per cent. (See Table 
XI.) 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Fifty-five and thirty-five one-hundredths per cent of the 
persons taken into custody were between the ages of twenty- 
one and forty. (See Table XII.) 

Drunkenness. 

In the arrests for drunkenness the average per day was 64. 
There were 381 more persons arrested than in 1945, an increase 
of 1.63 per cent; 20.96 per cent of the arrested persons were 
non-residents and 12.35 per cent of foreign birth. (See Table 
XL) 

There were 23,676 persons arrested for drunkenness, being 
381 more than last year and 1,891 less than the average for 
the past five years. Of the arrests for drunkenness this year, 
there was an increase of 3.27 per cent in males and a decrease 
of 11.12 per cent in females over last year. (See Tables XI, 
XIII.) 

The number of persons punished by fine was 21,018, and 
the fines amounted to $172,942. (See Table XIII.) 

One hundred persons were committed to the State Prison; 
1,474 to the House of Correction; 70 to the Women's Prison; 
115 to the Reformatory Prison; and 1,600 to other institutions. 

The total years of imprisonment were 1,335 years (483 
sentences were indefinite); the total number of days' attend- 
ance at court by officers was 32,539 and the witness fees earned 
by them amounted to $6,940. (See Table XIII.) 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers 
was $231,045. 

Five thousand one hundred six persons were accommodated 
with lodgings, a decrease of 1,179 from last year. 

There was an increase of 4.44 per cent in the number of 
sick and injured persons assisted, and a decrease of about 
15.89 per cent in the number of lost children cared for. 

The average amount of property (including automobiles) 
stolen each year in the city for the five years from 1942 to 
1946, inclusive, was $483,115; in 1946 it was $570,842, or 
$87,727 more than the average. The amount of stolen 
property which was recovered by the Boston police this year 
was $473,431 as against $513,928 last year. (See Table XIII.) 

In connection with arrests recorded, it is interesting to 
note that 26,094 persons, or 35 per cent of the total arrests 
during the past year, Avere persons residing outside the city 
limits of Boston. This shows clearly the extent to which 
Boston is called on to perform police work for non-residents. 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



17 



The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of non-residents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparisons of Boston with other cities, 
either of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 35 
per cent of the arrests in Boston is of non-uesidents, whereas 
other cities have but a negligible percentage of arrests of 
non-residents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1946, as 
compared with the same period ending with November 30, 
1945, a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major 
offenses may be of interest and is submitted below: 





Year Ending 

November 30, 

1945. 


Year Ending 

November 30, 

1946. 




Arrests. 


Arrests. 


Offenses Against the Person. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Aggravated assault 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
With Violence. 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Offenses Against Property Committed 
Without Violence. 

Auto' thefts (including attempts) .... 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Offenses Against the Liquor Law. 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 

Drunkenness , 

Offenses Not Included in the Foregoing. 

Auto', operating under the influence of liquor 

Auto', operating so as to endanger .... 


16 

49 

108 

.305 

237 

1,439 

190 
1,721 

131 
23,295 

305 
.531 


16 

52 

151 

299 

227 

1,363 

183 
1,875 

127 
23,676 

368 
543 


Totals 


28,327 


28,880 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, "\dolations of city 
ordinances, gaming and miscellaneous offenses. Arrests for 



RfiLfcAS^O 



BY 



ptt»L\C 



U*R>^R^ 



^mO.T.«'<=" 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



the year totaled 74,549, of which 66,947 were males and 
7,602 were females. This total compares with 65,593 for the 
preceding year. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This department, during the past year, has continued its 
cooperation in fuwiishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses : 



1. 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



7. 



Felonious homicide : 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter. 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 
Rape. 
Robbery. 

Aggravated assault. 
Burglary — breaking or entering. 
Larceny : 

(a) $50 and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value. 
Auto' theft. 



The following comparative tables show the number of cer- 
tain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 
1945, to November 30, 1946, as against December 1, 1944, to 
November 30, 1945. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. Comparative Table. 



Offenses. 


Decembek 1, 1945, to 
November 30, 1946. 


December 1, 1944, to 
November 30, 1945. 
















Reported. 


Cleared. 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


Reported. 


Cleared. 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


Aggravated assault 


204 


186 


91.17 


176 


171 


97.15 


Breaking and entering .... 


1,240 


908 


73.22 


1,219 


834 


68.41 


Larceny (under $50) .... 


2,173 


1,247 


57.38 


1,901 


1,107 


58.23 


Larceny ($50 and over) .... 


1,034 


502 


48.. 54 


834 


426 


51.07 


Larceny of automobile .... 


2,728 


2,578 


94.50 


2,532 


2,430 


95.97 


Manslaughter by negligence . 


60 


60 


100.00 


64 


64 


100.00 


Murder and non-negligent manslaughter, 


21 


19 


90.47 


25 


23 


92.00 


Rape 


101 


99 


98.01 


100 


97 


97.00 


Robbery 


308 


181 


58.76 


267 


168 


62 . 92 


Totals 


7,869 


5,780 


73.45 


7,118 


5,320 


74.74 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 19 

A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following: 

Cases Per Cent 

Reported. Cleared. Cleared. 

1945 7,118 5,320 74.74 

1946 7,869 5,780 73.45 

A comparison shows a decrease in clearance under 1946 of 
1.29 per cent. 

There was an increase in cases reported as compared with 
1945 of 751, or 10.55 per cent. 



Special Patrolmen, 

The Voluntary Unpaid Auxiliary Police Force was created 
for civilian defense. Its purpose was to maintain order 
during air raids and black-outs and, with the cessation of 
actual hostilities, the need for this type of service was no 
longer essential. However, because of the reduction in the 
Uniformed Pohce Force brought about by its members entering 
the armed forces and the absence of a Civil Service Eligible 
List, special patrolmen were recruited to augment the regular 
Force in case of any emergency. Each applicant was thor- 
oughly investigated as to character and reputation and was 
trained in his duties by superior officers. 

One thousand three hundred special patrolmen have served 
without pay patriotically and faithfully and are still serving in 
this capacity. 

Receipts. 
In the past police year ending November 30, 1946, receipts 
totaled $102,458.51, as compared with $83,487.14 in the 
previous year. 

ExPENDITtJRES. 

During the twelve months ending November 30, 1946, the 
total expenses of the Boston Police Department amounted to 
$7,060,429.47. This included the pay of the poHce and em- 
ployees, pensions, supplies, expense of listing ($64,778.48, the 
annual listing on January 1 of all residents twenty years of 
age or over), and the maintenance of the Police Signal Service. 

In the corresponding period of 1945, expenditures totaled 
$6,426,363.77. 

A financial statement showing expenditures of the depart- 
ment in detail is included in this report, (Table XVII.) 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Presentation of Medals. 
The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1946 and Department 
Medals of Honor, as recommended by a Police Board of 
Merit, were awarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 9, 
1946, as follows: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor to Patrolman William A. Oliver 
OF Division 10. 

Patrolman William A. Oliver of Division 10 is hereby- 
awarded the Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed on March 14, 
1946. 

Patrolman Oliver, while off duty, responded to the outcries 
of two women who had been accosted by an armed man. The 
officer was attacked with a knife by the man and seriously 
slashed, but succeeded in disarming his assailant and placed 
him under arrest. He was sentenced to a long term in State 
Prison. 

Department Medals of Honor. 

Sergeant Joseph L. Connors, Patrolmen Daniel T. Doyle, 
Fenwick W. Wright and Thomas F. Hickey, all of Division 8, 
are each awarded a Department Medal of Honor for merito- 
rious police duty performed on July 13, 1946. AVhile assigned 
to the patrol boat "William H. Pierce," they rendered heroic 
service to 18 men who were hopelessly trapped by a serious 
fire on Pier 3. 

Patrolman Louis Van Ounsen of Division 16 is hereby 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious police 
duty performed on July 28, 1946, for alertness and devotion to 
duty in arresting a man who, while in custody, fired three shots 
at the officer, one of which passed through his body. The 
prisoner escaped temporarily, but Patrolman Van Ounsen had 
in his possession a memorandum which resulted in the capture 
of the criminal and an accomplice. Both were convicted and 
sentenced to long terms in State Prison. 



1947.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 
Its Organization and Duties. 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is the central detective 
agency of the department and is composed of several sub- 
divisions, namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, 
Homicide, Lost and Stolen Property, Identification, Missing 
Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the follow- 
ing phases of police work and investigations : banking, express 
thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, 
pawnbrokers, junk shops, second-hand article dealers, pick- 
pockets, radicals, shoplifters, night motor patrol. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives • from justice and conduct hundreds 
of investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
prosecution of criminals. 

Automobile Division. 

This division investigates all reports of automobiles stolen 
and is in daily communication with police authorities of the 
United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in 
cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department, and immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile division index contains records of approxi- 
mately 700,000 automobiles, consisting of cars stolen in Boston, 
cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased and sold, 
cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons 
and cars whose operators are wanted for various offenses. 
Many arrests are made by officers of the department and the 
automobile division through information obtained from this 
index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are inves- 
tigated by officers of this division. Frequent examinations 
are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this 
division during the year identified a number of automobiles 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Used Car Dealers' Licenses Granted. 

During the year 292 applications for such licenses were 
received. Of these 286 were granted (3 without fee), 8 were 
rejected. Of the 8 rejected, 2 were subsequently reconsidered 
and granted and are included in the total number of 286 on 
which favorable action was taken. 

Of the licenses granted, 21 were surrendered voluntarily 
for cancellation, 1 was canceled for cause, 1 was revoked and 
20 transferred to new locations. (See Table XIV.) 

Provision for Hearing Before Granting License 
as Used Car Dealer of the Third Class. 

Under provisions of Chapter 96, Acts of 1938, effective 
June 13, 1938, no license shall be issued to a person as a Used 
Car Dealer of the Third Class (Motor Vehicle Junk License) 
until after hearing, of which seven days' notice shall have 
been given to owners of property abutting on premises where 
such license is proposed to be exercised. 

Hearings to the number of 30 were held under this provision 
of law. 

Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1946. 





Bought by 


Sold by 


Sold by 




Dealers. 


Dealers. 


Individuals. 


1945. 








December 


1,009 


1,137 


1,281 


1946. 








January 


1,186 


1,445 


1,529 


February 








1,143 


1,414 


960 


March . 








1,587 


1,686 


1,396 


April 








1,484 


1,709 


1,262 


May 








1,526 


1,839 


1,192 


June 








1,272 


1,594 


1,090 


July 








1,491 


1,784 


1,184 


August . 








1,430 


1,554 


1,216 


September 








1,668 


1,965 


1,345 


October 








2,118 


2,230 


1,449 


November 








2,000 


2,048 


1,303 


Totals . . . 


17,914 


20,405 


15,207 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



23 



Record of All Auiomohiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1946. 



Month. 


Reported 
Stolen. 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 
Later. 


Not 
Recovered. 


1945. 










December 


231 


220 


- 


2 


1946. 










January .... 


232 


223 


5 


_ 


February . 






245 


235 


4 


4 


March 






304 


296 


7 


2 


April . 






260 


255 


7 


1 


May . 






232 


218 


4 


8 


June . 






240 


225 


6 


4 


July . •. 






156 


138 


7 


6 


August 






191 


176 


12 


6 


September 






215 


199 


9 


7 


October 






233 


221 


14 


9 


November 






189 


171 


9 


18 


Totals 


2,728 


2,577 


84 


67 



Lost and Stolen Property Division. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found in 
this city is filed in this division. Many cities and towns 
throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen 
in such places. All pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers 
submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A 
comparison of the description of articles reported lost or 
stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by 
dealers resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth 
of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. Approxi- 
mately 150,000 cards were filed in the stolen property index 
during the year. 

In addition, members of this Bureau visit pawnshops and 
second-hand shops daily and inspect property pawned or 
purchased, for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



Homicide Squad. . 
It is the duty of officers of this unit to investigate all homicide 
cases. They are required to interrogate persons involved in, 
or who have knowledge of, crimes of murder, manslaughter, 
abortion or other violent crimes. 



24 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Officers of this unit prepare, supervise and present evidence 
at inquests. 

Personnel of the unit are subject to call throughout the 
day and night. The statements and admissions taken from 
defendants and witnesses have proven of inestimable value in 
prosecution of cases. 

The homicide file contains reports of deaths by violence 
that occur in Boston and a record of accidents where persons 
are injured that are reported to the Police Department. 

The following is a report of the Homicide Unit of the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation of all deaths reported for the period 
December 1, 1945, to November 30, 1946, inclusive: 



Abortions 








2 


Falhng objects . 




3 


Alcoholism . 




6 


Fires . 




17 


Asphyxiation 




16 


Gored by bull . 




1 


Automobile 




55 


Homicides . 




21 


Bicycle 




1 


Natural causes . 




779 


Burns . 






15 


Poison 




7 


Drowning 






13 


Railway (steam) 




10 


Electricity 






1 


Railway (street) 




10 


Elevator 






5 


Stillborn 




11 


Explosion 






1 


Suicides 




55 


Exposure 






1 






Falls . 






42 


Total . 


1,072 


The following case? 


were presented for prosecutio 


n in the 


several courts: 








Abortion 


7 


Manslaughter (negligent) 


10 


Accessory to abortion 


2 


Manslaughter (auto) 


50 


Conspiracy 


1 


Murder 


12 


Assault and battery . 


4 


Accessory to murder . 


1 


Assault to rape . 


1 


Violation, Firearm Law 


10 


Assault to murder 


3 


Violation, Motor Vehicl 


e 


Accessory to assault t( 


) 


Theft Act 


1 


murder 


5 






Assault with weapon 


19 


Total . 


133 


Manslaughter (non-negli 


- 






gent) 


7 






The following inqu 


ests were 


held: 




Abortion 


1 


Illuminating gas 


1 


Alcoholism . 






1 


Railway (steam) 


3 


Automobile 






4 


Railway (street) 


1 


Bullet wounds 






3 


Murder 


1 


Drowning . 






2 






Fall . 






1 


Total . 


19 


Fire . 








1 









1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 25 

Two hundred ninety-two cases of violent deaths were in- 
vestigated by the Homicide Unit. Presiding justices of the 
courts deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in two 
hundred seventy-three cases. 

Recapitulation of Homicides. 

Murder . . . * 12 

Six defendants prosecuted for four murders (four defendants 

in one case). 
Two persons committed suicide immediatelj- after commit- 
ting murder. 
Two defendants were found to be insane and were committed 

by the court to the Boston State Hospital. 
Two defendants after a hearing in the lower court were dis- 
charged, the court finding no probable cause to hold them 
for murder. 
Two murders are unsolved. 

Manslaughter (non-negligent) 9 

Seven defendants prosecuted for murder and murder com- 
plaints subsequently reduced to manslaughter. 
Two persons were killed by police officers in line of duty. 
Manslaughter (negligent) — 

Total 21 

Clearance of murders and non-negligent manslaughters, 
90.4 per cent. 

General. 

Members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation during 
the year made investigations on 4,775 cases. Files and assign- 
ment .books contain records and reports on 74,778 cases. 
Complaints are received from many sources, including cases 
referred to the Bureau by justices of courts, the District 
Attorney, Attorney-General, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and hundreds of outside police agencies. 

Statistics of the work of the Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion are included in the general work of the department, but, 
as the duties of the Bureau are of a special character, the 
following statement will be of interest: 

Number of persons arrested 1,375 

Fugitives from j ustice from other states arrested and delivered to 

officers of these states 79 

Number of cases investigated 4,77-5 

Number of extra duties performed 7,661 

Number of cases of abortion investigated 7 

Number of days spent in court by officers 2,177 

Number of years' imprisonment: 159 years, 2 months, 16 days 

and 30 indefinite periods 
Amount of property recovered .$131,544.63 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Identification Sectfon. 

The Identification Section was established as the Bureau of 

Records on October 17, 1931, and was merged with the Bureau 

of Criminal Investigation on January 30, 1945. A summary 

of the activities for the past year of the various units follows. 

Multilith and Mimeograph. 
There were 621,085 impressions turned out on the mimeo- 
graph machines, comprising daily manifolds for the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation and other units, warrant manifolds, 
bulletins and circular letters. There were 42 forms and 
circulars photographed and printed in upon a zinc plate. 
There were approximately 60 Multilith plates and 42 films 
used by this unit. 

Multilith Recapitulation. 

Impressions printed on the Multilith machine . . 501,500 
Included in this figure are the following: 

Department forms 74 

Letters 7 

Circulars . . . . . . . .5 

Main Index File. 
The Main Index File forms the basis on which all other files 
are dependent. It is at all times being checked to maintain 
accuracy. There are now recorded in this file 631,500 persons. 

Criminal Record Files. 
The Criminal Record Files contain a record of each person 
whose fingerprints are contained in the fingerprint files, in 
addition to those applicants for licenses having records. At 
the present time there are in the Female Record Files 15,177 
records, and in the Male Record Files there are 176,247 records. 
These records are continually being brought up to date by 
cooperation with outside departments and the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

Cabinets of Segregated Photographs of Criminals Arrested. 
Photographs of criminals arrested by the Boston Police 
Department and photographs received from other sources are 
filed in segregated cabinets. Photographs received from out- 
side departments are placed in the "Foreign Segregated" file, 
and those taken by the Boston Police Department are in the 
"Local Segregated" file. Photographs of all criminals are 
segregated into four distinct sections, namely: white, yellow, 
negro, and gypsy. Each of these groups is subdivided accord- 
ing to sex and also classified under head of the crime in which 
subjects speciahze. The "Local Segregated" file contains 
55,755 photographs, and the "Foreign Segregated" file, 
20,884 photographs. The Identification Section has rendered 
efficient and beneficial service to officers of other departments 
in exhibiting photographs of criminals in the segregated and 
main files to victims of robberies, confidence games, pick- 
pockets, etc. In many instances, important identifications 
have been made which have resulted in arrests and convictions. 



Criminal Identification. 
This table gives a brief outline of some of the more important 
accomplishments of the Criminal Identification Unit. The 
table refers to the number of individuals photographed and 
fingerprinted, also the number of copies prepared. 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . 178 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) ... 96 

Scenes of crime photographed . . . • 262 

Circulars sent out 21,500 

Photograph File: 

Number on file November 30, 1945 201,269 

Made and filed during the year 12,247 

Total 213,516 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, 

1945 20,001 

Number of "foreign" photogi'aphs received during the year, 883 

Grand total 234,400 

Photographs sent to: 

State Bureau of Identification 5,156 

Other states and cities 846 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Miscellaneous Department Photography: 

Films 150 

Prints made from same 400 

Number of rectigraphic photographs 3,860 

Number of civihans photographed 288 

Number of negatives of criminals . . . ■ . . . 2,656 

Number of prints made from same 15,626 

Number of latent fingerprints photographed and printed . 715 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints .... 816 

Number of prints from same 1,632 

Number of visitors photographed 150 

Prints made from same 450 

Number of exposures of pantoscopic camera .... 24 

Number of reorders of criminal photographs .... 4,001 

Number of stand-up photographs made 25 

Prints made from same 125 

Number of photographs of police officers .... 412 

Photography (Supplementary): 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,068 

Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) .... 1,088 

Number of prints of same 1,630 

Number of enlargements: 

11 inches by 14 inches 550 

8 inches by 10 inches ....... 4,500 

Fingerprint File: 

Number on file November 30, 1945 156,513 

Taken and filed during the year: 

Male 2,931 

Female 280 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 1,587 

Female 249 

Number on file November 30, 1946 161,560 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation . . . . . . 2,060 

State Bureau of Identification ■ . 3,132 

Other cities and states 190 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers ■ 206 

Special police officers 328 

Hackney carriage drivers 2,051 

Civilian employees 51 

Civilians fingerprinted and prints filed 200 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 

30, 1945 48,389 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian file) November 

30, 1946 51,222 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 

Requests for Information from Police Journals. 
The officer attached to the Section, detailed to impart 
information from the pohce journals on file at Headquarters, 
reports services performed as follows : 

Number of requests complied with for information from the 

pohce journals in regard to accidents and thefts . . 1,858 
Days in court 10 



Criminal Records for the Department Furnished. 

All criminal records for the entire department are furnished 
by the Identification Section, as well as certified copies of 
convictions for presentation in courts, both here and in other 
cities. 

The following figures represent requests received for these 
records from December 1, 1945, to November 30, 1946: 



Requests received by telephone .... 

Requests received by correspondence 

Requests for certified records 

Requests for jury records 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 



1,460 
3,285 
1,368 

1,852 
8,487 



Total 16,452 

The following figures represent requests received from 
various public agencies for records: 

U. S. Coast Guard 240 

U. S. Marine Corps 175 

Stragglers and deserters (Army and Navy) .• . . . . 4,650 



Grand total ' 21,517 



Missing Persons' Unit. 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston ... * 1,589 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,438 



Total number still missing 151 

* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies, and numerous 
cases of children reported missing who were found or returned within a few hours after 
report was made. 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston. 



Age. 


Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


384 


100 


360 


93 


24 


7 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years, 


215 


254 


202 


243 


13 


11 


Over 21 years. 


364 


272 


308 


232 


56 


40 


Totals 


963 


626 


870 


568 


93 


58 



There was reported to this department from outside depart- 
ments and agencies a total of 4,036 missing persons. 
Grand total of number of persons reported 

missing 5,625 



Persons Reported Missing, by Police Divisions, for Past Year. 

Division 1 (North End section) 14 

Division 3 (West End section) 37 

Division 4 (South End section) 154 

Division 6 (South Boston district) .... 89 

Division 7 (East Boston district) 68 

Division 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) . . 229 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) . . . 228 

Division 11 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) . 122 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) .... 59 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 83 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) .... 68 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 45 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) .... 36 

Division 18 (Hyde Park district) 21 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) * 336 

Total 1,589 

* Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital, a mental institution. 

Persons Interviewed.— At the Missing Persons Unit, 300. 
This does not include the number interviewed at other units 
and divisions of the department. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 

There were handled l:»y the Missing Persons Unit approxi- 
mately 3,500 pieces of correspondence relating to location of 
friends and relatives. There has been a tremendous increase in 
inquiries from persons displaced in war-torn countries, and 
every effort is made to assist these persons. 

About 2,000 descriptive circulars on missing persons were 
sent out. Approximately 900 tracers were also sent out on 
persons reported missing. 

In 37 cases of unknown dead bodies, 20 were identified 
through fingerprint impressions. 

Three individuals afflicted with amnesia were identified. 

Warrant Unit. 

Number of Warrants Received and Dispositions Thereof. 

Warrants received . 2,922 

Arrested on warrants 1,740 

Warrants returned without service 859 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the department 

and to other jurisdictions 2,164 

Active warrant cards on file issued to the Boston Police Depart- 
ment 5,200 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department forwarded 

to other cities and towns in this state 69 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department for persons 

now out of state 65 

Active warrants received from other departments throughout 

the country for service (cards in our files) .... 157 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers ... 53 

Summons File. 
The following figures represent summonses received from 
outside cities and towns for service in Boston for the past year: 

Total number received 2,975 

Total number served 2,781 

Total number not served 194 

The following figiu'es represent summonses sent from the 
Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns: 

Total number received 15,074 

Total number served 14,337 

Total number not served 737 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BALLISTICS UNIT OF THE BUREAU OF CRIMINAL 
INVES,TIGATION. 

Formation and Duties. 

Activities of this unit, with its personnel, are under the 
supervision of the Commanding Officer of the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation. 

The unit consists of experts in ballistics, explosives, muni- 
tions, and gunsmith. 

Officers of this unit examine all evidence found at the scene 
of a crime where firearms or explosives are used and send 
written reports of findings to the Commanding Officer of the 
Bureau. A copy of this report is also forwarded to the Com- 
manding Officer of the division on which the crime was com- 
mitted. 

The unit receives from the various Division Commanders 
all firearms, explosives, cartridges and all substances of this 
nature coming into their possession. Receipts are given for 
same, and final disposition is recorded. 

The unit prepares cases for court where ballistic evidence is 
required to properly present the facts, and officers appear in 
the courts when needed for this purpose. 

The unit is responsible for the proper maintenance of de- 
partmental small arms and all emergency equipment. 

Emergency Equipment on All Divisions. 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a sufficient 
supply of emergency equipment. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns 
and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made, and equipment replaced when- 
ever necessary. 

Accomplishments. 

Members of this unit are subject to call for extra duty when 
crimes of violence occur in which firearms or explosives are 
used. 

During the past year there has been a total of 42 extra calls 
outside of the regular working hours. Officers investigating 
these ballistic cases are designated to testify in court, pre- 
senting all ballistic evidence. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to the same, 
and tear gas equipment have been inspected and serviced. The 
servicing by the gunsmith resulted in a substantial saving to 
the department. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the 
courts and held for ballistic purposes are cleaned and recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are re- 
turned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on stolen firearms, 
and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen 
Property L^nit and at the files of the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Safety. 

When firearms, property of the United States, are found 
used in crime or recovered otherwise, such property is returned 
to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are dis- 
posed of by the courts. 

The members of this unit have worked in cooperation with 
other police departments. Federal agencies, military and naval 
intelligence units. 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST OF THE BUREAU OF 
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

Summary of the Year's Work. 
Work at the Laboratory. 

The chemical laboratory of the Boston Police Department 
is located at the Southern Mortuary and since its opening in 
1934 has worked on 3,761 cases. The average number of cases 
for the last five years was 342. During the past year 332 cases 
were submitted to the laboratory. 

The laboratory draws cases from two main sources: the 
department and the Medical Examiners of Suffolk County. 
Cases submitted by the Medical Examiners are toxicological 
in nature, reports being made directly to the Medical Exam- 
iners. In the majority of these cases investigation of the cir- 
cumstances is made by the various divisions or the homicide 
squad. Recent years brought an increase in the number of 
department cases. 

Medical 
Examiners' 
Yeab. Cases. 

1941 271 

1942 323 

1943 263 

1944 227 

1945 237 

1946 226 

The major decrease in the Medical Examiners' cases comes 
in those submitted from the Northern District. The slight 
drop in department cases is in the group submitted directly to 
the laboratory (hospital, armed services, etc.), cases submitted 
from the various divisions being essentially the same in number 
as in 1945. Divisions 4 and 10 again led the other divisions in 
number of cases submitted to the laboratory. 

The assignment of an assistant chemist to the laboratory 
during the past year has been a valuable aid, making it possible 
to complete routine work within normal working hours. Dur- 
ing the year, emergency calls during the night totaled 31. 



jartment 
leases. 


Total 
Cases. 


61 


332 


57 


380 


67 


330 


88 


315 


117 


354 


106 


332 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



35 



Attendance Before Judicial Bodies. 
Attendance before courts and grand juries requires a sig- 
nificant number of hours. The past year brought a marked 
increase, such attendance being required on 143 different days. 
The average court attendance for the past five years was 103 
days. Since the chemist may attend more than one court in a 
single day, the distribution of attendance is interesting: 

District Courts 55 days 

Grand Juries 40 days 

Superior Court 84 days 



Nature of the Work. 
The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in 
its nature, the frequency of any particular type being governed 
by the circumstances of the cases. A breakdown into types 
indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



Material Sought. 

Acids 

Alcohol, ethyl 

Alcohol, methyl 

Alkalies . 

Animal tests 

Antimony 

Arsenic . 

Barbiturates 

Carbon monoxide 

Chloral . 

Chlorides (drowning) 

Drugs, miscellaneous 

Fluorides 

Hydrocyanic acid . 

Lead 

Morphine and opium 

Nicotine . 

Paraldehyde . 

Phenols . 

Volatile oils , 

Strychnine 

Toxicology, alkaloid group 

Toxicology, general 

Toxicolog}', metals 

Toxicology, volatile group 



No. of 




No. of 


Cases. 


Material Sought. 


Cases. 


3 


Auto, examination of . 


14 


195 


Bloodstains . 


42 


112 


Blood type 


2 


2 


Burning, evidence of 


1 


3 
1 


Casts .... 


1 


Cloth prints . 


5 


Clothing, examination of 


58 


5 


Explosions 


1 


25 


Fibers .... 


2 


37 


Glass .... 


2 


2 


Hair .... 


5 


6 


Infra-red photography 


18 


3 


Microscopy, general 


3 


7 


Paint .... 


1 


4 


Photographs . 


48 


3 


Plant material 


2 


2 


Powder residue, clothing 


5 


1 


Powder residue, hands 


11 


2 


Scene, examination of . 


15 


1 


Spectrographic analyses 


2 


1 


Spectrophotometric analysis 


1 


3 


Sperm .... 


9 


1 


Tissue .... 


3 


7 


Ultra-violet light examina- 




1 


tion .... 


3 


1 


Miscellaneous 


11 



* Routine test on tissue analyses for alcohol. Five cases showed methyl alcohol present. 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

In reviewing the toxicological field, a few shifts are worth 
noting. There has been a rather marked increase in bar- 
biturate cases. In view of the growing problem of these 
hypnotic drugs, such an increase is not surprising. Carbon 
monoxide cases have also increased, but this is partly a 
reflection of multiple deaths in several fires. The other 
items in the toxicological field present the usual picture of 
frequency. 

In reviewing the department cases, the types of work 
present much the same distribution as in other years. The 
amount of photographic work done in the laboratory was 
appreciably decreased, as in many cases the type of evidence 
found was already well illustrated in the laboratory files. 
The infra-red work has continued to be a very useful 
tool in firearms cases and in the examination of clothing. 

Cooperation with Other Agencies. 

During the past year the chemist delivered lectures to 
several professional groups, police, medical examiners, etc., 
on various topics pertaining to chemistry and criminal inves- 
tigation. A number of new slides have been added to the 
chemist's file, bringing the total to some 500 slides. 

There has also been occasion to cooperate with law enforce- 
ment agencies in other New England states either with 
suggestions or with work on evidence. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 



TRAFFIC. 

The Traffic Division consists of territory witliin the 
boundaries of Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, and 16, and the traffic post 
at Cottage Farm Bridge, Division 14. It is the duty of this 
division to direct and control the flow of vehicular traffic, to 
enforce the parking rules and regulations, to enforce the 
various automobile laws, and to safeguard the pedestrian. 
The Traffic Division is also responsible for the control and 
supervision of hackney carriages. 

Activities. 
The removal of wartime ration restrictions of gasoline and 
rubber, the resumption of automobile production, and the 
increase in highway repair projects, curtailed during the war 
years, contributed an added vehicular traffic burden during 
the past year. High wartime profits, wages, bonuses, and 
the like were reflected in the abnormally large crowds of 
shoppers and entertainment seekers encountered daily in down- 
town Boston. The Traffic Division coped with these con- 
ditions in a creditable manner. In addition, it provided for 
the following special events : 

1945. 

Dec. 18. Disabled servicemen's show — R. K. O. Boston Theater. 

Dec. 22. Crippled children's show — R. K. O. Boston Theater. 

Dec. 24. Details for carol singers and Midnight Masses. 

Dec. 31. Details for New Year's Eve activities, 

1946. 

Jan. 7. Inaugural of the Honorable James M. Curley as Mayor of 

Boston. 
Jan. 16.] 

to [ Visit of U. N. Site Committee. 
Jan. 22.J 

Jan. 31. Visit of General Dwight D. Eisenhower. 
Feb. 19. Disabled servicemen's show — Wilbur Theater. 
Feb. 27. Boston Fire Department Memorial Mass. 
Mar. 4.] 

to [ Novena services — various churches. 
Mar. 9.j 
Mar. 19] 

to \ Spring flower show — Mechanics Building. 
Mar. 23.J ' 
Mar. 6 

to [ Details in connection with Lenten services at various churches. 

April 20. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1946. 

April 4] 

to > Metropolitan Opera Company — Boston Opera House. 
April 13.J 

April 6. Army Day exhibit — Boston Common. 

April 6. Visit of Cardinal Tien. 

April 6 1 

to [ Home builders' show — Mechanics Building. 
April 13.J 

April 9. Bataan Heroes' parade. 

P^^ I Details in connection with baseball season in vicinity of Fenway 

Oct^ ll.J ^^*'^'- 

April 13. Cathedral Club road race. 

April 19. Patriots' Day parade and exercises. 

April 20. Annual Marathon road race. 

May 1. Patriotic rally, Ladies' Auxiliary, V. F. W. 

May 4. Massachusetts Girl Scouts state rally — Boston Common. 

May 4. Park Department May Day festival — Boston Common. 

May 8. Boston English High School cadets and alumni parade. 

May 10. Boston Technical High School cadets parade. 

May 13. Arrival of Ringling Brothers circus at South Boston yards — 

shunted by trucks to Boston Garden. 

May 19. American Legion parade and Field Mass — Fenway Park. 

May 20. Filene's New England Revelation exhibition. 

May 22. Merchant Marine dedication exercises — Boston Common. 

May 26. Boston schoolboy cadets annual parade. 

May 27.1 

to \ Summer meeting — Suffolk Downs. 
July 6.J 

May 30. American Veterans of World War II parade. 

June 1. Park Department children's pet show. 

June 2. Pohcemen's Memorial Sunday. 

June 3. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade. 

June 3. Emmanuel College class day. 

June 6. Visit of Governor and Lancers to Harvard College. 

June 9. Firemen's Memorial Sunday. 

June 9. Suffolk County Council, V. F. W., parade and exercises. 

June 14. Flag Day parade and exercises. 

July 4. Independence Day parade and exercises. 

July 9. All-Star baseball game — Fenway Park. 

Aug. 22. Boston Herald Show — Charles River Basin. 

Sept. 2. Boston Central Labor Union parade. 

Sept. 2. j Ygi^gj-ans of Foreign Wars National Encampment] — meetings, 

q ? c f parades, exercises, and MiUtary Ball. 

Sept. 30.1 

to [• Fall Meeting — Suffolk Downs. ^• 

Oct. 26.J 

Oct. 5. Red Mass — Immaculate Conception Church. 

Oct. 6. Fire Prevention parade. 



Confraternity of Christian Doctrine Convention — meetings 
and Pontifical Mass. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 

1946. 

Oct. 7 1 

to [ Fire Department exhibition drills. 

Oct. 11. J 
Oct. 9 

to [ World Series games — Fenway Park 

Oct. 11 

Oct. 26 

to 

Oct. 29 

Oct. 27. Bob Hope show, Community Fund — Esplanade. 

Oct. 30. Rodeo parade. 

Nov. 11. Armistice Day parade. 

Escorts. 
Arrangements were made for the most advantageous routes 
and escorts were furnished for the following distinguished 
visitors: Mrs. F. D. Roosevelt, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Gen- 
eral Kenney, Eddie Rickenbacker, General Bor-Komorowski, 
Polish Army Chief of Staff, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
Admiral Chester Nimitz, General Jonathan B, Wainwright, 
Lord Wilson of the British Imperial Staff, the President of 
Cuba, General Papagos, Greek Army Chief of Staff, General 
Carl Spaatz, General Omar Bradley, Admiral Kirk, General 
Gonzales of Cuba, Mayor Edward Kelly of Chicago, M. Albert 
Chambron, French Minister of Population, Bob Hope, and 
delegations from the United Nations Organization. 

Safety Education. 

The Traffic Division provided a program of safety educa- 
tion in our schools, our playgrounds, and our highways through 
the medium of the M-1 Safety Educational car. Safety talks 
and demonstrations were provided for the children in our 
public, parochial, and private schools throughout the school 
year and in our playgrounds and at our beaches during the 
summer months. Under the supervision of officers assigned 
to Safety Education, the M-1 Safety Squad, comprised of 
school children, produced safety skits which we^e broadcast 
every Saturday morning through radio station WORL. 

In the industrial field the officers were called upon regu- 
larly to address drivers and related groups on the subject of 
highway safety. The public address system of this car proved 
very effective in the handling of parade and shopping crowds, 
and the enviable safety record enjoyed by the department 
in this regard is attributable in no small measure to the work 
of these officers. 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Parking. 

The Traffic Division issued 105,000 notices for violations 
of the parking rules as established by the Boston Traffic 
Commission, an increase of 20,000 over the preceding year. 
Of these, 93,600 were disposed of in the Clerks' Offices as 
non-criminal charges, and 11,400 were prosecuted in the 
traffic sessions of the various courts. 

Hackney Carriages. 
The Traffic Division was charged with the control and 
supervision of hackney carriages throughout the past year. 
During that time a total of 1,920 offenses were heard at this 
division and disciplinary action taken. An additional 167 
out-of-town drivers, not licensed in Boston, were prosecuted in 
the various courts by officers of this division for violations 
of the Hackney Carriage Rules and Regulations. 

Traffic Problems. 

Boston's traffic problems are many but not insurmountable. 
The most important problem facing us today is that of off-street 
parking. No useful purpose can be served by road construc- 
tion and widening, prohibition of street parking, and other 
solutions offered for the elimination of traffic congestion, if we 
fail to provide adequate parking facilities. No vehicle can 
bring business to Boston unless it can stop to transact that 
business; and providing that place to stop should be our 
principal concern. 

Bus companies using Boston's streets as terminals are, and 
will continue to be, a source of traffic congestion until such 
time as proper off-street termmals are constructed. The 
unrestricted operation of large trailer trucks in the market and 
leather districts constitutes traffic problems awaiting solution. 
Restriction to nighttime operation seems to be indicated. 

Road surfacing projects seriously interfered with the normal 
flow of daytime traffic, and some thought should be given 
toward scheduling this type of work for the nighttime and 
week-end hours. Legislation with a view to pedestrian con- 
trol would provide a means so sorely needed to combat the 
"jay walker" problem. The present practice of routing of 
parades with no regard for the resulting traffic conditions 
indicates the need of a police voice in such matters. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

Finally, the burden of through traffic, the solution of which 
by means oT circumferential and aerial highways is so vigor- 
ously sponsored by interested groups, still weighs heavily 
upon us and, from all appearances, will be with us for some 
time to come. However, the widespread discussion of our 
traffic problems is a healthy indication of the public's aware- 
ness of and interest in the existing conditions, and it is the hope 
of this department that such interest will soon be converted 
into action. 



42 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS. 

Duties. 
The Bureau of Operations has control of all communications 
equipment, consisting of telephone, teletype, radio, and tele- 
graph, and through its facilities has directed movement of radio 
cars, police boats, and ambulances. 

Accomplishments. 
During the period from December 1, 1945, to November 30, 
1946, personnel of the Bureau managed transmission, reception, 
and handling of: 

242,165 outgoing telephone messages and 4,756 toll calls 
made by the department through our switchboard. 

Approximately 380,000 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the "turret" through either 
''DEVonshire 1212" or the department intercommuni- 
cating system. 

Approximately 487,000 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of which were transferred 
to the "turret" for handling. 

139,514 teletype messages, including fiHng of same and 
making and delivering of copies of such messages as 
necessary to the proper bureau or unit. 

1,065 telegrams, including the filing of same and making 
and delivering of copies to the proper bureau or unit. 

5,625 teletype items for persons reported missing 
by divisions and units of the department, and other states, 
cities, and towns. Copies of these were dehvered to the 
Identification Unit of the Bureau of Criminal Investiga- 
tion, and cards filled out for our files. 

241,006 radio messages sent, including "Sound Scriber" 
recording of same. 

5,776 lost or stolen automobile forms filled out and 
delivered to the Automobile Unit of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation, 2,345 of which were reported stolen in 
Boston, together with records made and delivered of all 
recovered cars; copies of both kept in the files of this 
Bureau. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 43 

A daily journal has been kept in which all of the fore- 
going, together with reports of crimes, deaths, accidents, 
and other matters submitted by divisions and units of the 
department, were recorded. 

Files are kept in the unit of : 

(1) The police personnel of the department, with name, 
rank, cap, and badge numbers, together with the address, 
telephone, date of appointment and promotion, etc., as 
well as a file of former officers. 

(2) The Police Department civilian personnel, includ- 
ing home address and telephone number. 

(3) The Fire Department, which includes the name, 
rank, and address of its members, and the radio sector in 
which they live. 

Two main radio transmitters (Station "WQIP," Police 
Headquarters, and ''WRAS," Suffolk County Court House), 
86 automobile and 4 boat transmitters and receivers, 27 wired 
broadcast amplifiers, and 7 pickup receivers maintained and 
kept in repair by members of this unit. Two-way radio has 
been installed in 24 combination patrol wagon-ambulances. 



44 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU. 

Ceeation. 
This bureau, created August 9, 1943, was established as a 
separate unit of the department, with quarters upon the 
fourth floor of Police Headquarters. 

Formation. 
The bureau is under the command of a captain who is 
assisted by the following personnel: 1 lieutenant, 1 acting- 
sergeant (patrolwoman), and 13 patrolwomen. 

Purpose. 

The Crime Prevention Bureau was originally organized to 
handle techniques of law enforcement in treatment of juveniles 
and prevention of juvenile delinquency. 

Emphasis has been placed on the value of policewomen in 
both of these fields. 

Duties in General. 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended 
to eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies 
among children. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies, and divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental 
attitude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and 
especially educate the public and the police in the problem 
of crime prevention and suppression. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way 
contribute to delinquency of children; investigating and 
taking necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged, and 
the needy, taking pains to locate missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and 
assist in the investigation of cases where women are 
involved. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

Comment. 

The work of our policewomen in handling juvenile delin- 
quency and the youth problems of today, especially in cases 
concerning women and young girls, is outstanding. They have 
been commended by the courts, probation departments, and 
most of the social service agencies of the city. The organiza- 
tion of this bureau is fast proving itself a step in the right 
direction. 

There is reason to believe that there will be an increase 
rather than decrease in law-enforcement problems during these 
years of postwar adjustment. 

However, work performed by members of this unit shows 
that they are organized and prepared to take an efficient part 
in any program that may arise due to these conditions. 

Summary of Work Accomplished. 
Inspections and hivestigations. 
During the past year there were 31,580 inspections by the 
personnel of this bureau in connection with the following 
places: 



Bus and railroad terminals 


Dance halls 


Cafes 


Hotels 


Restaurants 


Theaters 



In addition to these, they made 994 investigations of cases 
where women and young girls and children were concerned — 
a total of 32,574. 

Arrests. 



Adultery 


1 


Neglected children 


8 


Assault and battery 


1 


Neglect of minor children 


6 


Assault and battery with 




Procuring fraudulent enter 


- 


dangerous weapon 


5 


tainment 


1 


Contributing to delinquency 




Rape .... 


3 


of a minor .... 


18 


Runaways 


71 


Deserter 


1 


Stubborn children 


4 


Drunkenness .... 


4 


Suspicious persons 


8 


Escapees .... 


8 


Unnatural acts 


2 


Fornication .... 


1 


Vagrancy 


20 


Idle and disorderly persons . 


6 


Violation of alcoholic bever- 




Indecent assault 


2 


age control 


2 


Insane person 


1 


Violation of parole 


7 


Larcency .... 


9 


Violation of probation . 


30 


Lewd and lascivious cohabi- 








tation 


5 


Total arrests . 


224 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PLANT AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
lost, stolen, and abandoned property, money or other property 
alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and 
property taken from persons arrested for any cause. In its 
custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements 
which come into possession of the department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, repair work, 
plumbing, steamfitting, etc., uniforms, and equipment are 
issued by this office. Bills therefor are checked with the 
cross-record system maintained for the purpose of comparing 
prices before such bills are prepared for payment. 

During the year 60 motor vehicles came into custody of 
this office; 58 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants, 
and 5 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 
9 motor vehicles in custody. 

This office is responsible for the receipt, care, and distribu- 
tion of uniforms and equipment to members of the police force, 
and also for the repairing and salvaging of reclaimed garments 
and equipment. An individual record of items of uniform 
and equipment issued to police officers is maintained. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of department automo- 
biles is located in the basement of Station 4. The shop is oper- 
ated on a 24-hour basis. During the year, on 6,232 occasions 
department cars were repaired at the repair shop in Division 4, 
and on 1,372 occasions cars were serviced. (Servicing includes 
greasing, changing of oil, checking of battery and electrical 
equipment, brakes, cooling systems, tires, steering systems, 
wear of clutch, etc.) Also 73 department cars and 63 privately- 
owned cars were towed by the department wrecker. A radio 
repair shop is attached to the maintenance shop where a 
24-hour daily service is maintained. The department operates 
a motorcycle repair shop, now located in the rear of Station 19, 
where, on 296 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced 
during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions, and is required to investigate and report 
on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 

The Lost and Found branch of the department has been 
active during the past year, as shown by the following schedule : 

Articles on hand December 1, 1945 1,806 

Articles received during the vear to November 30, 

1946 . . . . " 563 

Total 2,369 

Disposed of: 

To owners through efforts of the Propertv Clerk's 

Office ' . . 103 

Delivered on orders from divisions ... 6 

Worthless 412 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of 

PubUc Welfare 12 

Sold at public auction 625 

Total number of articles disposed of . . . , 1,158 
Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1946 . 1,211 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1945. 




Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


23 



Dec. 24. 



SPECIAL EVENTS. 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the number of police detailed for duty 
at each : 



Men. 

Boston Garden, ball of Boston Police Relief Associ- 
ation 422 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank A. Catarius ... 70 
Boston Common, City of Boston Christmas tree 

exercises 30 

Christmas Eve, carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

and Boston Common 58 

Funeral of Sergeant Francis I. Mullen ... 70 

New Year's Eve celebration 761 

Funeral of Sergeant John J. Cashman, retired . 12 

City Hall, arrival of Mayor James M. Curley . . 15 

Funeral of Patrolman Alfred Buresh .... 38 

Funeral of Patrolman Roy C. Somerville ... 38 
Boston Garden, Boston Evening American Silver 

Skate carnival 52 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Mahoney ... 38 
Boston Garden, Franklin D. Roosevelt memorial 

assembly in behalf of Infantile Paralysis Fund . 97 

Funeral of Patrolman James J. Coughlin, retired . 18 

Visit of Genwal Dwight D. Eisenhower ... 72 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph P. CuUinane ... 78 

Funeral of Patrolman George L. Cox .... 38 
State House, reception of His Excellency, Governor 

Maurice J. Tobin 118 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas W. Kenefick, retired . 12 
Funeral of Patrolman Wilbur L. Melvin, retired . 12 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Boston Fire Depart- 
ment Memorial Mass 22 

Boston Garden, ball of Boston Firemen's Relief 

Association 92 

Funeral of Lieutenant John J. Gale .... 48 
Funeral of Patrolman Richard F. Preston ... 38 
South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . . 356 
Dudley Street Baptist Church, Boston Fire Depart- 
ment memorial service 22 

Funeral of Sergeant John E. Geary, retired . . 12 
Roxbury, William F. Reddish Athletic Association 

ten-mile road race ....... 62 

Parade, American Defenders of Bataan and Correg- 

idor 220 



Dec. 


26. 


Dec. 


31. 


1946. 




Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


21. 


Jan. 


27. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


29. 


Jan. 


31. 


Jan. 


31. 


Feb. 


7. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


23. 


Feb. 


25. 


Feb. 


27. 



Mar. 



Mar. 


6. 


Mar. 


16. 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar. 


24 


Mar. 


30 


Mar. 


30 



April 9. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. "49 

1946. Men. 

April 13. Funeral of Patrolman Robert A. Maher ... 86 

April 13. Cathedral Club road race 138 

April 15. Funeral of Patrolman Edward V. Cusack, retired 38 

April 16. Funeral of Patrolman Clarence B. Ochs ... 78 

April 19. City of Boston Patriots' Day celebration . 134 

April 20. Marathon race 331 

April 21. Easter parade on Commonwealth avenue ... 32 

April 26. Funeral of Sergeant Thomas McTiernan, retired . 12 

May 1. Boston Common, Department of Massachusetts 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary, May Day 

exercises 23 

May 4. Boston Common, Boston Park Department May Day 

festival and United Labor rally .... 38 

May 6. Funeral of Lieutenant Martin J. Shannon ... 48 

May 6. Funeral of Patrolman James H. McLaughlin, retired, 38 

May 8. Parade, English High School cadets .... 162 

May 10. Technical High School, parade to East Newton 

Street Armory 23 

May 12. Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Boston Fire Depart- 
ment Memorial Mass and parade .... 46 
Funeral of Patrolman Philip J. Gilson .... 78 
Boston Trade School, parade to East Newton Street 

Armory 24 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade and 

field Mass at Fenway Park 46 

Boston Elevated Railway employees, parade and 

Memorial Mass at Cathedral of the Holy Cross . 23 

Kearsarge Association of Naval Veterans, parade 

and services at Union Church 20 

Parade, Boston school cadets 440 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 26, 1946 . 76 

Boston Park Department cemeteries on Sundaj', May 

26, 1946 14 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 146 

Boston Park Department cemeteries on Memorial 

Day 25 

May 30. American Veterans of World War 11, parade and 

exercises on Boston Common 36 

May 30. Kearsarge Association of Naval Veterans, parade and 

exercises on Boston Common 31 

May 30. ^Memorial Day services at New Calvary Cemetery, 
under ausnices of Boston Police Post, No. 1018, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, and Boston Police Post, 

No. 251, the American Legion 154 

June 1. Pai'ade, R. K. O. Radio Pictures, Inc 38 

June 1. Boston Common, children's pet show, sponsored by 
Boston American and R. K. O. Radio Pictures, 

Inc 28 

June 2. Old Calvary Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Sun- 
day exei'cises 288 



May 
May 


13. 
15. 


May 


19. 


May 


19. 


May 


26. 


May 
May 
May 


26. 
26. 
26. 


.May 
May 


30. 
30. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1946. 




June 


3. 


June 


6. 


June 


7. 


June 


7. 


June 


9. 


June 


9. 


June 


9. 


June 


9. 


June 


10. 


June 


14. 


June 


15. 


June 


16. 


June 


17. 


June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 


27. 


July 


3. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 


July 


4. 



July 20. 

July 20. 
July 22. 

Aug. 5. 

Aug. 7. 

Aug. 7. 

Aug. 8. 

Aug. 15. 

Aug. 21. 

Aug. 28. 

Sept. 2. 
Sept. 2. 



Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade . 

Visit of General Dwight D. Eisenhower 

Funeral of Patrolman Ottis J. Wynn .... 

Funeral of Patrolman Peter C. Eldridge, retired 

Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises 

Suffolk County Council, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
parade 

Dorchester, John B. Kelly Associates road race 

National League Field, memorial holy hour 

Funeral of Lieutenant Edward T. Leary 

Flag Day pax'ade and exercises on Boston Common . 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebration . 

Charlestown, "Night Before," Bunker Hill Day 
celebration, concessions, street patrol and traffic 
dut}^ . 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day, celebrations, con- 
cessions, street patrol, traffic duty, sports, and 
band concerts 

State Primary 

National League Field, Mayor's Charity Field Day . 

Brighton, "Night Before," Independence Day bon- 
fire at Smith Field 

City of Boston official flag raising and Independence 
Day parade 

Frankfin Field, N. E. A. A. U. meet .... 

Independence Day celebration, various band con- 
certs, display of fireworks, and community show 
on Boston Common 

Suffolk Downs race track, East Boston, Boston 
Traveler "Soap-Box Derby" 

East Boston, Boston Park Department boxing show, 

East Boston, Bethlehem Ship Building Company 
employees' strike 

Funeral of Patrolman Lawrence A. Bradlej', retired, 

Funeral of Patrolman Patrick McManus 

Funeral of Patrolman John F. Burke, retired 

Readville Playground, Boston Park Department 
boxing show 

Roslindale, Fallon Field, Boston Park Department 
boxing show 

South Boston, Columbus Stadium, Boston Park 
Department boxing show 

Boston Common, Boston Park Department play- 
ground circus 

Boston Central Labor Union, Labor Day parade 

Militarj^ Order of Cooties, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars of the United States, National Encamp- 
ment parade 



Men. 

222 
83 
78 
12 

28 

82 
42 
68 
48 
148 
68 



68 
314 



214 
1,724 

87 



38 

55 
12 



62 

53 
12 

22 
46 
85 
12 

12 

12 

12 

22 

288 

582 



1947.] 

1946. 

Sept. 2. 



Sept. 3. 

Sept. 3. 

Sept. 4. 

Sept. 4. 

Sept. 5. 

Sept. 5. 



Sept 


22 


Sept. 


26 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


9. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


26. 


Oct. 


26. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


27. 


Oct. 


30. 


Oct. 


31. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


4. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

Men. 

Downtown Boston, street duty in connection with 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

National Encampment 302 

Harvard Stadium, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the 
United States, National Encampment drum and 

bugle corps band competition 22 

Downtown Boston, street duty in connection with 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

National Encampment 302 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

National Encampment parade 1,092 

Downtown Boston, street duty in connection with 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

National Encampment 211 

Downtown Boston, street duty in connection with 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

National Encampment 161 

Boston Garden, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the 

United States, military ball 88 

Vicinity of Jewish cemeteries 24 

Funeral of Captain Thomas F. .Muh'ey, retired . . 18 

Funeral of Sergeant William F. Healey ... 98 

Harvard-Tufts football game 15 

Boston Fire Department fire prevention parade and 

exhibition drill on Boston Common .... 105 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 39 
Boston Fire Department fire prevention exhibition 

drill at Washington and Summer streets ... 30 
Fenway Park, World Series baseball game ... 62 
Fenway Park, World Series baseball game ... 52 
Fenway Park, World Series baseball game ... 52 
Various Boston Park Department football games 32 
East Boston, Columbus Day parade . . . . 312 
Harvard-Coast Guard Academy football game . . 20 
Various Boston Park Department football games . 40 
Funeral of Patrolman John J. Dever, retired . . 30 
Roxbury, Roxbury centennial celebration ... 68 
Harvard-Holy Cross football game .... 15 
Boston Garden, Catechetical Congress of the Con- 
fraternity of Christian Doctrine Memorial Mass . 35 
Various Boston Park Department football games . 42 
Boston Garden, Catechetical Congress of the Con- 
fraternity of Christian Doctrine exercises . 38 

Rodeo parade 44 

Funeral of Sergeant William H. Foley, retired . . 12 

Halloween celebration 684 

Veterans of World War I and World War II parade 

and political rally at Symphony Hall . 120 

Various Boston Park Department football games . 42 

Funeral of Patrolman Alexander J. Herring, retired, 12 



52 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

1946. Men. 

Nov. 5. State Election 1,728 

Nov. 10. Various Boston Park Department football games . 42 
Nov. 11. Parade, Department of Massachusetts, American 

Legion 625 

Nov. 14. Funeral of Captain Louis E. Lutz, retired ... 20 
Nov. 16. National League Field, Boston College-Tennessee 

football game 32 

Nov. 17. Various Boston Park Department football games . 42 

Nov. 23. Harvard-Yale football game 45 

Nov. 23. National League Field, Boston College-Alabama 

football game 25 

Nov. 24. Fens Stadium, Boston Park Department champion- 
ship football game 20 

Nov. 30. National League Field, Boston College-Holy Cross 

football game 35 

Note. 

March 18 to March 23, inclusive, 1946, 22 officers performed a 
total of 132 duties for that period in connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society flower show at Mechanics Building, 

June 26 to July 2, inclusive, 1946 (Sunday excepted), 12 officers 
performed a total of 72 duties for that period at the office of the 
Board of Election Commissioners, City Hall Annex, during recount 
of ballots cast at the State Primary. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 



53 



1943=44. 



1944=45. 



1945=46. 



Abandoned children cared for . 

Accidents reported .... 

Buildings found open and made secure 

Cases investigated .... 

Dangerous buildings reported . 

Dangerous chimneys reported . 

Dead bodies recovered and cared for 

Defective cesspools reported 

Defective drains and vaults reported 

Defective fire alarms and clocks reported, 

Defective gas pipes reported 

Defective hydrants reported 

Defective lamps reported . 

Defective sewers reported . 

Defective streets and walks reported 

Defective water pipes reported 

Disturbances suppressed 

Extra duties performed 

Fire alarms given .... 

Fires extinguished .... 

Insane persons taken in charge 

Intoxicated persons assisted 

Lodgers at station houses . 

Lost children restored 

Number of persons committed to bail 

Persons rescued from drowning 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Stray teams reported and put up 

Street obstructions removed 

Water running to waste reported 

Witnesses detained .... 



20 
5,623 
2,708 
82,678 
180 
78 
606 
115 
54 
47 
51 
64 
4,661 
180 
2,897 
133 
1,689 
42,292 
7,352 
563 
749 
606 
23,957 
1,549 
3,477 
16 
12,213 
18 
154 
761 
10 



28 
6,458 
2,815 
84,224 
150 
95 
632 
194 
107 
82 
94 
123 
5,608 
251 
2,626 
231 
2,371 
40,910 
7,557 
588 
593 
945 
6,285 
1,661 
3,431 
5 
13,663 
29 
190 
605 
9 



20 

6,795 
3,426 
84,757 
221 
96 
782 
291 
104 
16 
69 
118 
3,961 
228 
3,030 
201 
2,379 
36,420 
9,038 
929 
695 
835 
5,106 
1,397 
3,722 
36 
14,270 
29 
66 
466 
5 



54 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



CITY PRISON. 

The City Prison is located in the new Court House building, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses, the prosecution of 
which is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court, 
are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, 
ate held in charge of the keeper until the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution 
to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street 
Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1945, to November 30, 1946, 
10,849 men were committed to the City Prison for the following : 



Drunkenness 


9,920 


Suspicious persons 


174 


For safe keeping 


104 


Nonsupport - . . 


78 


Assault and battery 


66 


Larceny 


64 


Fornication 


57 


Lewd and lascivious cohabitation . . . . ' . 


47 


Adultery 


42 


Violation of probation 


42 


Vagrancy 


22 


Violation of Massachusetts automobile law . . . . ' 


22 


Default 


18 


Fugitives from justice 


16 


Delinquent children 


12 


Threats and intimidation 


11 


Violation of Rules and Regulations of Park Commission 


9 


Violation of drug law 


8 


Illegitimacy 


7- 


Runaways 


7 


Sauntering and loitering 


5 


Violation of liquor law 


4 


Indecent exposure 


4 


Breaking and entering 


3 


Lewdness 


2 


Polygamy 


2 


Robbery 


2 


Keeping house of ill fame 


1 


Miscellaneous 


100 


Total 


10,849 



Lodgers received at the City Prison for period December 1, 
1945, to November 30, 1946, numbered to 439. 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



55 



HOUSE OF DETENTION. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention. They 
are then held in charge of the chief matron until the next 
session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, 
they are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 3,416 were committed for the following: 



Drunkenness . 








2,461 


Fornication 








103 


Adultery 








90 


Idle and disorderly 








88 


Larceny .... 








. . 75 


Assault and battery 








. . 15 


Keeping house of ill fame 








6 


Various other causes . 








561 


Total 


3,399 


Recommitments. 


From municipal court 

Grand total 


. . 17 


3,416 



56 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM. 

Signal Boxes. 
The total number of boxes in use is 566. Of these 488 are 
connected with the underground system and 78 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 
In the past year employees of this service responded to 
1,900 trouble calls; inspected 566 signal boxes; 16 signal 
desks; 18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Re- 
pairs have been made on 90 box movements; 18 registers; 
85 locks; 22 time stamps; 20 vibrator bells; 48 relays; 
20 electric fans; 15 motors; 15 generators. This unit has 
the instalhng and maintenance of all electric wiring and equip- 
ment at all stations and Headquarters building. There have 
been made 100 plungers; 100 box fittings; 100 line blocks; 
15 automatic hooks; and 400 street-obstruction horses. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 584 tele- 
phone, and 68 blinker-Hght circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype 
installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the de- 
partment. It also maintains 44 Headquarters-to-station-house 
telephone circuits, 18 teletype-writer circuits, 18 radio-wired 
broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits, a circuit, 
with equipment, at the Chadesbank station of the Metro- 
politan District Pohce; also a circuit, with equipment, in 
booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel, and the 
intercommunications units throughout the department. 

All patrol-box telephone, signal, and blinker-light repairs 
are made by signal service members. 

The unit also installs and maintains all police traffic booths, 
taxicab signs, and street-obstruction signs. 

Signal desks and P. B. X. switchboards, installed at all 
station houses in connection with the police signal system over 
department-owned lines, are maintained by this unit. 

There , are assigned to the unit 1 GMC truck, 23^-ton 
capacity; 2 utility trucks, 3^-ton capacity each; 1 4-door Ford 
sedan; and 1 GMC service truck, ^-ton capacity. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 57 

The following 'list comprises the property of the signal 
service maintenance at the present time: 

16 open circuit blinker-type sig- 793,000 feet of underground cable 

nal P. B. X. desks 179,000 feet of overhead cable 

716 circuits 35,000 feet of duct 

40 test boxes 81 manholes 

400 cells of sulphuric acid storage" 22 motor generator sets 

type battery 18 motor-driven flashers 

2,000 taxicab signs 3 GMC trucks 

50 traffic booths 1 Ford truck 

566 police signal boxes 1 Ford sedan 

20 battery-charging units ' 

Communications System. 

The Police Signal Service Unit is responsible for the main- 
tenance of the signal system of the department. 

New cable and cable joints w^ere installed by the signal 
service at a great saving in cost to the department. 

Fourteen thousand feet of cable were installed, replacing 
some of the old cable retained in the new system. 

Fourteen signal boxes, struck and damaged by motor 
vehicles, were replaced with new equipment. 

Ten taxicab signs, struck and damaged by motor vehicles, 
were replaced with new signs. 



58 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



HARBOR SERVICE. 

The special duties performed by the Harbor Police, styled 
Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows : 



Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, 
stages, etc 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 

Number of vessels ordered from the channel 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger. 

Number of vessels granted permission to discharge cargoes in 
stream 

Number of alarms of fire attended on waterfront . 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm . 

Number of boats challenged 

Number of boats searched for contraband 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted . 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of dead bodies recovered .... 

Number rescued from drowning .... 

Number of vessels ordered to put on anchor lights 

Number of cases w^here assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of coal peimits granted to bunker or discharge 

Number of dead bodies cared for .... 

Number of hours grappling 



$24,952 

440 

63 

29 

31 

224 

7 

10 

5 

11 

1,863 

9 

11 

10 

215 

167 

1,459 

15 

9 

115 



Since December 1, 1945, there have arrived at the Port of 
Boston from domestic ports 3,151 vessels and 842 vessels from 
foreign ports. 



1947.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 59 



PATROL SERVICE. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the 
police patrol boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "William H. 
McShane," "WiUiam H. Pierce," "Argus," and "The Dis- 
patch" in the upper and lower harbors, Mystic river, Chelsea 
creek. Fort Point channel, Reserve channel, Dorchester bay 
and Neponset river. 

A Dodge Marine utility boat, equipped with an inhalator, 
stretcher, and grappHng irons, patrolled the Charles river in 
the vicinity of Spring Street bridge. West Roxbury, from 
August 15, 1946, to October 21, 1946. 



HORSES. 

On November 30, 1945, there were 18 saddle horses in the 
service, attached to Division 16. 

During the year no horses were purchased nor were any 
retired to farms or disposed of otherwise. 



60 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



VEHICLE SERVICE. 

There are 131 automobiles in the service at the present 
time; 43 attached to Headquarters; 7 attached to the Traffic 
Division; 15 in the City Proper and attached to Divisions 1, 
2, 3, and 4; 6 in the South Boston district, attached to Divi- 
sion 6; 6 in the East Boston district, attached to Division 7; 
11 in the Roxbury district, attached to Divisions 9 and 10; 
4 in the Dorchester district, attached to Division 11; 4 in the 
Jamaica Plain district, attached to Division 13; 5 in the 
Brighton district, attached to Division 14; 4 in the Charles- 
town district, attached to Division 15; 4 in the Back Bay and 
the Fenway, attached to Division 16; 4 in the West Roxbury 
district, attached to Division 17; 4 in the Hyde Park district, 
attached to Division 18; 4 in the Mattapan district, attached 
to Division 19, and 10 unassigned. (See page 62 for distribu- 
tion of automobiles.) 

Cost of Running Automobiles. 

General repairs and replacement of parts .... $56,992 65 

Storage 180 00 

Gasoline 35,113 75 

Oil and grease 2,570 01 

Anti-f reeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses, etc. , 229 03 

Registration fees 79 00 

Total $95,164 44 

Combination Ambulances. 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 10,302 

Calls where services were not required 1,344 

Massachusetts General Hospital 464 

Boston State Hospital 395 

Home 387 

Southern Mortuary 380 

City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) . . . . . 254 

Carried forward 13,526 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



61 



Brought forward 
Psychopathic Hospital 
St. Ehzabeth's Hospital 
Carney Hospital . 
United States Marine Hospital 
Children's Hospital 
Police station houses 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Morgue 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Physicians' offices 

Boston Lying-in Hospital . 

United States Veterans' Hospital 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 

Forest Hills Hospital . 

New England Hospital for Women 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Revere General Hospital 

Harley Hospital . 

Evangeline Booth Hospital 

Fort Banks Hospital . 

AUerton Hospital . 

Bellevue Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Sullivan Square Emergency Hospital 

Longwood Hospital 

Kenmore Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 

Soldiers' Home .... 

Audubon Hospital 

Bay State Hospital 

Bosworth Hospital 

Cambridge Relief Hospital . 

Charlesgate Hospital . 

Central Hospital .... 

East Cambridge Emergency Hospital 

Glenn Hospital 

Haynes Memorial Hospital 

Maiden Hospital . 

New England Baptist Hospital 

Somerville Hospital 

Strong Hospital . 

Whidden Memorial Hospital 

Total .... 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



LIST OF VEHICLES USED BY THE DEPARTMENT. 



Divisions. 


"3 

O 3 

H 


go 


o 

H 


o 
o 


"3 


Headquarters . 








— 


34 


9 


1 


44 


Division 1 . 








2 


2 


— 


— 


4 


Division 2 . 








1 


2 


— 


— 


3 


Division 3 . 








1 


2 


— 


— 


3 


Division 4 . 








2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 6 . . . 








2 


4 


— 


3 


9 


Division 7 . 








2 


4 


— 


4 


10 


Division 9 . 








1 


4 


— 


— 


5 


Division 10 








2 


4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 11 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 13 








1 


3 


— 


3 


7 


Division 14 








2 


3 


— 


3 


8 


Division 15 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 16 . .■ 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 17 








1 


3 


— 


1 


5 


Division 18 








1 


3 


— 


1 


5 


Division 19 








1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Traffic Division 








— 


7 


— 


6 


13 


Unassigned 








3 


7 


— 


3 


13 


Totals 








25 


97 


9 


25 


156 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES. 

During the police year, December 1, 1945, to November 30, 
1946, there were 2,096 * licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages granted, being an increase of 479 as compared with 
last year. 

There were 528 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which 
were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Two 
hundred fifty-one of these were restored to the owners, and 
the balance of 277 placed in the custody of the Lost Property 
Division of the Property Clerk's Office. 

Continuing with the hackney carriage license year as of 
February 1, 1946, "new" applicants for hackney carriage 
drivers' licenses were fingerprinted by the department, as has 
been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for in the 
Records Division of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made 
a part of and considered with the application to drive. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 



Hackney Carriage Licenses. {To Set' Up and Use the Vehicle.) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,743 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes 

of ownership") 1,719 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 377 

Applications for carriage licenses rejected .... 103 

Applications filed without action 544 

2,743 



Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 
Carriage licenses revoked .... 
Carriage owner stripped of credentials 
Carriages inspected 



508 

183 

3 

1 

1,400 



■ 377 "regrants." 



64 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 5,469 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after in- 
vestigation 17 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected . . . 174 

191 

Drivers' licenses granted . 5,278 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 59; of which revocations 22 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored — leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 37 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1946 (at end of police 
year) — (licensed since February 1, 1946, beginning of 

hackney carriage driver license year) *4,919 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials . 248 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "set ups" investigated . 1,965 

Days spent in court 110 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 528 

* Includes 25 female hackney carriage drivers. 

Limitation of Hackney Carriage Licenses. 

Under provisions of Section 4, Chapter 392, Acts of 1930, 
as amended by Section 1, Chapter 280, Acts of 1934, the 
Police Commissioner was required to fix a limit for the number 
of hackney carriage licenses to be issued, which limit shall 
be based upon the number of licenses then issued and out- 
standing but shall not be in excess of 1,525, and he may from 
time to time, after reasonable notice and hearing, decrease 
the number so fixed, but in no event to number less than 900. 

If a hackney carriage license applicant is refused a license 
by reason of the fact that the maximum number of licenses 
limited under the Act, with amendment, referred to has been 
issued, the Department of Public Utilities, on petition of such 
applicant, may after a hearing determine that public con- 
venience and necessity require a higher limit than that fixed 
by the Police Commissioner or previously established by said 
department, and shall establish the limit so required, in which 
case the limit set by said department shall be considered final 
until changed as herein provided. 

Establishing Public Taxicab Stands. 
In accordance with Chapter 508, Acts of 1938, referred to, 
the Police Commissioner as of February 11, 1939, at 7.45 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 65 

o'clock a. m., established public taxicab stands in the City 
of Boston, which stands are free and accessible to all taxicabs 
whose owners are licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

(See list of public taxicab stands on file in the office of 
Inspector of Carriages.) 

During the police year, December 1, 1945, to November 30, 
1946, there were 9 public taxicab stands, with capacity for 
27 cabs, established; 9 public taxicab stands, with capacity 
for 22 cabs, abolished; 2 taxicab stand locations were reduced 
in capacity; and 1 taxicab stand location was increased in 
capacity. 

There are 475 established public taxicab stands, with 
capacity for 1,246 cabs, at the present time. 

There are, also, 8 established public stands for horse-drawn 
vehicles, with capacity for 10 vehicles, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, referred to, provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon private 
property) by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 18 applications (capacity 353 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles . 
By the provisions of Section 1 of Chapter 399 of the Acts 
of 1931, which went into effect June 9, 1931, the term ''sight- 
seeing automobile" was defined as follows: 

"The term 'sight-seeing automobile' as used in this 
act, shall mean an automobile, as defined in section one 
of chapter ninety of the General Laws, used for the carry- 
ing for a consideration of persons for sight-seeing purposes 
in or from the city of Boston and in or on which auto- 
mobile guide service by the driver or other person is 
offered or furnished." 

Previous to this enactment a sight-seeing automobile was 
held to mean an automobile "which was capable of seating 
eight or more persons and was used or offered for the trans- 
portation of persons for hire." 

It is further provided by Chapter 399, Acts of 1931, as 
amended by Chapter 93, Acts of 1933, that it shall be unlawful 



66 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

for a person or corporation to offer or furnish service by a 
sight-seeing automobile in or from the City of Boston, unless 
said automobile is first licensed by the Police Commissioner, 
and unless thereafter there is obtained from the Department 
of Public Utilities a certificate, declaring that public con- 
venience and necessity require such operation; and further, 
it is provided that it shall be unlawful for a person to operate 
said automobile as a driver in or from said city unless he is 
licensed so to do. 

During the year ending November 30, 1946, there have 
been issued licenses for 16 sight-seeing automobiles and 12 
designated stands for the same. One designated stand for 
sight-seeing automobile was rejected. 

Continuing with our practice, "new" sight-seeing drivers 
for the year commencing as of March 1, 1946, were finger- 
printed as in the case of "new" hackney carriage drivers, and 
their records, if any, searched for in the Records Division of 
the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

The fingerprint blank with any record thereon was made a 
part of and considered with the application to drive. 

There were 21 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Issuing of Tags for Hackney Carnage Violations. 

The system of issuing tags to drivers for violation of rules 
has continued to show good results. During the past year, 
1,886 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. 
One thousand nine hundred thirty-one penalties were imposed, 
which included 59 revocations. This system of discipline has 
continued to result in relieving courts of many minor cases 
which would tend to congest their dockets. 

There stiU continues to be a minimum of crime among the 
4,919 drivers licensed by the Police Commissioner. 

Appeal Board. 

In accordance with Hackney Carriage Rules and Regula- 
tions, hackney carriage drivers and owners dissatisfied with 
findings of the Inspector of Carriages have the right of appeal 
to the Commissioner, provided appeal is made in writing 
within 48 hours of date of finding. 

Such appeals are heard by an Appeal Board, consisting of a 
Deputy Superintendent of Police and two Captains, designated 
by the Commissioner. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 67 

Hearings on such appeals shall be public; the appellant shall 
have the right to be represented by counsel, to introduce 
evidence, and to cross-examine witnesses. 

The Board shall file its report and recommendations with 
the Commissioner who takes such action thereon as he deems 
advisable. 

In accordance with such provision, many matters of appeal 
from imposition of penalties (as well as fitness of applicants 
for hackney carriage drivers' licenses whose application had 
been rejected) were referred by the Commissioner to the Board. 



68 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



WAGON LICENSES. 

Licenses are granted to persons or corporations to set up 
and use trucks, wagons, or other vehicles to convey merchandise 
from place to place within the city for hire. 

During the year 33 applications for such licenses (10 "hand- 
carts" and 23 "wagons") were received and granted. One 
wagon was canceled for nonpayment. (See Tables XIV, XVI.) 

Commencing as of July 1, 1931, two kinds of wagon licenses 
were issued : 

1. For the licensee who operated from an ofl&ce, 
garage, stable, or order box, the license stated that it was 
"Not at a designated stand in the highway." 

2. For the licensee who required a definite stand, 
the license stated that it was "For a designated wagon 
stand in the highway." 

Applications for such designated stands were accompanied 
by written approval of owners, lessees, or official represent- 
atives of abutting property. 

Of the 33 granted, 15 were for licenses from offices, garages, 
stables, or order boxes, and 18 were for designated stands in the 
highway. 

Note. 
Legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property 
for hire: 

Chapter 122, Acts of 1937, effective June 21, 1937. 

"No person holding a certificate (common carrier) 
or a permit (contract carrier) issued under the provisions 
of (Chaper 264, Acts of 1934, by the Department of 
Public Utilities) and authorizing the transportation of 
property for hire by motor vehicle within the City of 
Boston shall be required to obtain a license from the 
Police Commissioner for said city on account of such 
transportation or the use of motor vehicles therein." 

The legislation referred to did not affect customary pro- 
cedure of this department in issuing a "wagon" license for a 
horse-drawn vehicle or for a handcart to convey merchandise 
for hire. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 69 

A motor vehicle for which there has been issued a certificate 
or permit by the Department of Public Utilities, authorizing 
transportation for hire, shall not be required to be also licensed 
by the Police Commissioner on account of such transportation 
for hire in this city. 

However, should it be intended to locate such motor vehicle 
at a designated stand in the highway in the business of trans- 
portation for hire, the owner thereof, to lawfully occupy such 
designated stand, has no alternative but to take out a "wagon" 
license to be granted by the Police Commissioner. 



70 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903* 


181,045 


1925 .... 


489,478 


1904 . 






193,195 


1926 . 






493,415 


1905 . 






194,547 


1927 . . 






495,767 


1906 . 






195,446 


1928 . 






491,277 


1907 . 






195,900 


1929 . 






493,250 


1908 . 






201,552 


1930 . 






502,101 


1909 . 






201,391 


1931 . 






500,986 


1910 t 






203,603 


1932 . • 






499,758 


1911 . 






206,825 


1933 . 






501,175 


1912 . 






214,178 


1934 . 






502,936 


1913 . 






215,388 


1935!! 






509,703 


1914 . 






219,364 


1936 . 






514,312 


1915 . 






220,883 


1937 . 






520,838 


1916 t 






- 


1938 . 






529,905 


1917 . 






221,207 


1939 . 






534,230 


1918 . 






224,012 


1940 . 






531,010 


1919 . 






227,466 


1941 . 






541,335 


1920 . 






235,248 


1942 . 






539,408 


1921 § 






480,783 


1943 . 






540,517 


1922 . 






480,106 


1944 . 






543,051 


1923 . 






477,547 


1945 . 






549,899 


1924 . 






485,677 







* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

J 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

II 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of April 1. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 71 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year : 

Male 256,184 

Female 289,322 

Total 545,506 

Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
20 years of age or more, not including the services rendered 
by members of the police force, were as follows : 

Printing police list ' . . $42,766 96 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list . . 18,450 OOi 

Newspaper notices 685 56 

Circulars and pamphlets . . . ' . . . . 308 25 

Telephone rental 30 85 

Stationery 2,516 86 

Directory 20 00 

Total $64,778 48 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing. 

January 2 492 

January 3 .^ 516 

January 4 493 

January 5 465 

January 6 73 

January 7 427 

January 8 438 

January 9 400 

January 10 . . . 400 

January 11 347 

January 12 304 

January 13 71 

January 14 233 

January 15 124 

January 16 36 

January 17 21 

January 18 11 

January 19 11 

January 20 , . 7 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 
The Pohce Department under the provisions of Chapter 348, 

Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 



72 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

The police findings in 1946 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,090 

Physically incapacitated 190 

Convicted of crime 346 

Unfit for various reasons 583 

Apparently fit 8,318 

Total 10.527 

In addition to the above the Election Commissioners sent 
to the Police Department for delivery 8,318 summonses to 
persons for jury service. 



1947.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 73 



SPECIAL POLICE. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen 
for the year commencing as of April 1, 1946, were fingerprinted 
by the department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Records. 

During the year ending November 30, 1946, there were 
1,501 special police officers appointed; 20 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause; 3 appointments were 
canceled for nonpayment of license fee; 159 appointments were 
canceled for other reasons; 2 appointments were revoked; and 
there were 18 applications either withdrawn or on which no 
action was taken. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows : 

From corporations and associations 849 

From theaters and other places of amusement .... 332 

From city departments 198 

From United States Government 52 

From churches 29 

From state departments 25 

From private institutions 16 

Total 1,501 



74 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



MUSICIANS' LICENSES. 

Itinerant. 

During the year there were 16 apphcations for itinerant 
musicians' licenses received, all of which were approved. 

Instruments used by itinerant musicians are inspected each 
year by a qualified musician before licenses are granted. 

During the year 13 instruments were inspected with the 
following results : 



Kind of Insthument. 


Number 
Inspected. 


Number 
Passed. 


Street pianos 

Hand organs 

Accordions 


6 
3 

4 


6 
3 

4 


Totals 


13 


13 



Collective. 

Collective musicians' licenses are granted to persons over 
sixteen years of age to play on musical instruments in company 
with designated processions at stated times and places. 

The following table shows the number of applications made 
for these licenses during the past five years and the action 
taken thereon : 



Yeab. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


1942 


65 


65 




1943 


31 


31 


- 


1944 . .' 


22 


22 


- 


1945 


38 


38 


- 


1946 


74 


74 


" 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



75 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS. 
The following table shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused, and the number revoked : 



Year 



Applications. 



Granted. 



Rejected. 



Licenses 
Revoked. 



1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 



4,030 
3,714 
3,324 
3,201 
3,381 



3,863 


167 


3,615 


99 


3,158 


166 


3,103 


98 


*t 3,180 


201 



* 58 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 19 licenses to possess machine guns. 



76 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES. 
The following shows the number of public lodging houses 
licensed by the Police Commissioner under Sections 33 to 36, 
both inclusive, of Chapter 140 of the General Laws (Ter- 
centary Edition), and the location of each house and the num- 
ber of lodgers accommodated : 



Location. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

8 Pine Street 

79 Shawmut Avenue 


33,253 

70,986 

1,057 


Total 

For Accommodation of Service Men. 

48 Boylston Street (Boston Young Men's Christian Union), 

36 Commonwealth Avenue (Columbus Home Corporation), 

287 Hanover Street (Boston Seamen's Friend Society, Inc.), 

238 St. Botolph Street (Boston Young Men's Christian 
Association) 

Sleeping facilities in 14 police stations 


105,296 

5,210 

7,729 

10,484 

4,444 
76 


Grand total 


133,239 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 77 



MISCELLANEOUS LICENSES. 

The total number of applications for miscellaneous licenses 
received was 35,315. Of these, 527 were rejected (2 subse- 
quently granted), 585 were withdrawn or no action taken, 
leaving a balance of 34,205, which were granted. 

Of the granted applications, 78 were canceled for non- 
payment, leaving in force a net of 34,127 granted "with" and 
"without" fee. 

During the year 129 licenses were transferred, 1,051 canceled 
for various reasons, and 73 revoked or suspended. 

The officers investigated 2,253 complaints arising under 
these licenses. 

The fees collected and paid into the city treasury amounted 
to $85,060. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1945, there were 488 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 29 died, viz.: 2 captains, 2 lieutenants, 
4 sergeants, 21 patrolmen and 2 annuitants. Ninety-seven 
were added, viz.: 2 deputy superintendents, 2 captains, 
1 lieutenant-inspector, 1 lieutenant, 12 sergeants, 78 patrol- 
men, 1 patrolwoman, and the widows of Sergeants William F. 
Healey and Francis I. Mullen, Patrolmen Francis P. Higgins, 
James J. Mahoney, and Joseph P. Cullinane, who died from 
disability received in the performance of duty, leaving 557 
on the roll at date, 506 pensioners and 51 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $660,202.04, and it is estimated 
that $1,012,017 will be required for pensions and annuities in 
1947. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 44 beneficiaries of the fund at the 
present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$6,736 during the past year. 



78 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



FINANCIAL. 

The total expenditures for police purposes during the past 
year, including pensions and annuities, listing residents twenty 
years of age or more, and the maintenance of the police signal 
service, were $7,060,429.47. (See Table XVII.) 

The cost of maintaining the police signal service during the 
year was $71,362.46. (See Table XVIII.) 

The total revenue paid into the city treasury from the fees 
for licenses over which the police have supervision, for the 
sale of unclaimed and condemned property, report blanks, 
etc., was $102,458.51. (See Tables XIV and XVII.) 



ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS, ETC. 
For damage to police property, for telephone commissions, 
and for dog fines, there was received by the City Collector 
and credited to this department $4,446.24. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(79) 



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2 


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1 1 i 1 1 "I CO o t^ 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 irtcot^ooi 1 1 


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o 


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1 1 1 1 1— icocor^l 1 1 

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- 


1 1 1 1 l^coooooi 1 1 


■SUBJIIAIQ AJBJOdUiaj, 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i •-< 


■aoiAjag paiujy 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 


•Jjjaio A-).iacloJd 


llllll"^coill 


■sSuipjtng 
JO jnapuaiuuadng 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 


■nopuajaQ jo asnojj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 ic^^oi 1 1 


•neajng 
uoijuaAajj aniuQ 


1 1 1 1 |«.-<IC^-*I 1 


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IBuuuijQ JO HBaang 


1 1 1 ll-lCOOlTfOJl"-!! 


■snop'BJtado jo n^ajng 


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(N 


•aotgO s.^uapua^uuadng 


1 1 i>-i.-icqcoco-<i<l 1 1 


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MrtCMI li-ll I'll 1 1 


Annual 
Salary. 


$10,000 
5,000 
3,300 
7,500 
4,700 
4,200 
3,100 
2,900 
2,000-2,500 
2,400-2,500 
3,400 
2,500 


o 

H . 

g 

K 
O 

z; 

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03 


Commissioner . 
Secretary . 
Assistant Secretaries 
Superintendent . 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains 
Lieutenants 
Sergeants . 
Patrolmen . 
Patrolwomen 
Biological Chemist . 
Biological Chemist, Assist 





( I I— » I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 rt 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


111 i I 1 1 1 1 1 t-" 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 O ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 rl 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 —1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


III 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 --l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 "-I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' ' ' ' ^ ' ' 


i I-t 1 1 1 1 1 i I 1 >—* I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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III '-(IIIMII'HIII, 11,11 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (N 1 I ,,, 1 1 1 1 


111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '—'. 1 I 1 1 I 1 ! 1 1 


111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CI 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 


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III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 <N 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 ■<)< 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1,700-1,900 

1,300 
1,050-3,800 

2,200 
3,600 
3,000 
1,500-1,700 
2,200-2,400 
2,164 
1,700 
1,700 
1,300 
1,700 
2,500 
1,600-1,900 
2,200-2,600 
2,000 
4,000 
1,900-2,200 
2,700 


Chauffeurs 

Cleaners 

Clerks 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Opera- 
tors 

Director, Signal Service, Assistant, 
Elevator Operators .... 

Firemen (Stationary) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Janitresses 

Laborers 

Linemen and Cable Splicers . 

Matrons 

Mechanics 

Painter 

Property Clerk 

Repairmen 






<30 



6q 



^ 



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$2,600 
2,360 
1,977.21 
1,500-4,000 

3,000 
2,300 
1,800 










2 


« 


Signalmen . . . . 

Statisticians 

Steamfitter 

Superintendent of Buildings, As.sist- 
ant 

Superintendent, Repair Shop . 

Telephone Operators 


■5 

1 





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1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



83 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 









Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Nov. 30, 
1946. 


Nov. 30, 
1946. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner 


1 


1 


- 


Secretary .... 






1 


I 


- 


Assistant Secretaries 






2 


2 


- 


Superintendent 






1 


1 


- 


Deputy Superintendents 






5 


3 


Minus 2 


Captains .... 






31 


33 


Plus 2 


Lieutenants 






70 


70 


- 


Sergeants .... 






187 


156 


Minus 31 


Patrolmen 






2,157 


1,956 


Minus 201 


Patrolwomen . 






15 


14 


Minus 1 


Totals 






2,470 


2,237 


Minus 233 



84 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1947.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



85 



Table IV. 

List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1946, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Ahern, Hugh F.* ... 


Incapacitated 


51 years. 


20 years. 


Anderson, George J. . 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


25 " 


Bailey, Charles ; 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


26 " 


Bankoff , Jacob * . 




Incapacitated 


35 " 


6 " 


Bell, Charles D . 




Incapacitated 


55 " 


26 " 


Bohmbach, Irene C. ( 

woman) 
Bradley, Joseph H. 


Patrol 


Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 


57 " 
49 " 


25 " 
23 " 


Bradley, Lawrence A.f 




Incapacitated 


52 " 


17 " 


Brauneis, William * 




Incapacitated 


47 " 


20 " 


Brennan, Oliver L 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


Brosnihan, Patrick J.* 




Incapacitated 


51 " 


23 " 


Butler, Richard J. 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


27 " 


Callinan, Patrick J.t . 




Incapacitated 


49 " 


20 " 


Carey, George F. 




Incapacitated 


53 " 


26 " 


Claflin, James R. 




Incapacitated 


63 " 


36 " 


Clapp, Charles H.* 




Incapacitated 


50 '•• 


20 " 


CoUins, William Ct . 




Incapacitated 


46 " 


19 " 


Connell, Michael J.f . 




Incapacitated 


56 " 


22 " 


Connelly, Francis W.t 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


16 " 


Coutu, Joseph R.f 




Incapacitated 


45 " 


20 " 


Coyne, Thomas F. 




Incapacitated 


57 " 


26 " 


Craig, Cecil V. . 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


Crimmins, John J. 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


27 " 


Cusack, Edward V.f . 




Incapacitated 


51 " 


19 " 


Delaney, Francis X.* . 




Incapacitated 


47 " 


21 " 


Delaney, William H., Jr.* . 




Incapacitated 


53 " 


19 " 


DeLoid, Alfred K.t . 




Incapacitated 


47 •■■ 


20 " 


Der Ananian, Arthur * 




Incapacitated 


37 " 


9 " 


Desmond, William T. 




Incapacitated 


51 " 


26 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, chapter 32, sections 56 and 57. 

t State-Boston Retirement System. 



86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Table IV. — Continued. 



[Jan. 



List oj Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1946, Giving Age at. the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Donovan, Joseph H., Jr.* . 


Incapacitated 


47 years. 


19 years. 


Dow, Carl A.* . 






Incapacitated 


54 " 


19 " 


Drown, George L. 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


26 " 


Duggan, Thomas G. . 






Incapacitated 


59 " 


26 " 


Dunne, James t . 






Incapacitated 


55 " 


22 " 


Dunsford, Charles L. . 






Incapacitated 


53 " 


26 " 


Eagan, John F. . 






Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


Evans, William H. 






Incapacitated 


.53 " 


26 " 


Finnegan, Stephen F.t 






Incapacitated 


51 ■' 


22 " 


Fraga, Manuel F., Jr. 






Incapacitated 


55 " 


26 " 


Eraser, Frank S.t 






Incapacitated 


50 ■' 


22 " 


Fredey, Frank E.t 






Incapacitated 


54 •' 


26 " 


Gardner, George W. . 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


26 " 


Glynn, Martin F. 






Incapacitated 


48 " 


26 " 


Gray, George E.* 






Incapacitated 


51 •' 


16 " 


Hagerty, Jeremiah J. . 






Incapacitated 


56 " 


26 " 


Hanberry, William F. 






Incapacitated 


54 ■' 


26 " 


Hansen, William . 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


27 " 


Hart, Patrick J. . 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


26 " 


HLxon, James R. . 






Incapacitated 


59 " 


27 " 


Holmes, Thomas J.t . 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


19 " 


Hoyt, Irving H. . 






Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


Hurley, Patrick A. 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


27 " 


Jacobson, Harold M.t 






Incapacitated 


45 " 


17 " 


Jenkins, Berton W. 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


26 " 


Jobert, Arthur J. 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


25 " 


Jones, Hugh C. . 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


26 " 


Kavanagh, Thomas S. J. 






Incapacitated 


64 " 


37 " 


Kelleher, Morgan F. . 






Incapacitated 


67 •' 


38 " 


Kelly, John M.t . 






Incapacitated 


50 •• 


19 " 


Kilgallon, Michael J. . 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


26 " 


Killeen, William J.t . 






Incapacitated 


51 ■• 


18 " 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, chapter 32, sections 56 and 57. 



1947.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

Table IV. — Continued. 



87 



List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 
1946, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


King, Coleman F. . . . 


Incapacitated 


56 years. 


25 years. 


Kingman, George P. . 




Incapacitated 


49 " 


25 " 


Kirchgassner, John F.t 




Incapacitated 


51 " 


22 " 


Knox, James P.f 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


20 " 


LaCrosse, Henry J. 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


24 " 


LaMarche, Hormisdas 




Incapacitated 


.50 " 


27 " 


Lane, Raymond J.* . 




Incapacitated 


45 " 


17 " 


LeBlanc, Elkanah W. D. 




Incapacitated 


64 " 


36 " 


Lordan, John J. . 




Incapacitated 


68 '• 


41 " 


Lundy, Herbert B. 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


MacDonald, Byron S.* 




Incapacitated 


48 " 


20 " 


MacDonald, Duncan J.f 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


19 " 


Mahoney, John J.t 




Incapacitated 


51 " 


17 " 


Manning, John V.* 




Incapacitated 


38 " 


1 " 


Martin, Francis J. 




Incapacitated 


59 " 


25 " 


Moran, Thomas J. 




Incapacitated 


55 " 


26 " 


Morrissey, Patrick J.* 




Incapacitated 


52 " 


22 '- 


IMulvihill, Timothy E.* 




Incapacitated 


48 " 


19 " 


McAllister, James W. . 




Incapacitated 


55 " 


26 " 


McBrien, Hugh B. 




Incapacitated 


59 " 


25 " 


McCarthy, Hfnry C* 




Incapacitated 


32 " 


5 " 


McCarthy, John F.* . 




Incapacitated 


47 " 


17 " 


McCarthy, John P. . 




Incapacitated 


53 ■' 


26 " 


McGovern, James J.t 




Incapacitated 


52 " 


22 " 


McGrade, Thomas F. J. . 




Incapacitated 


65 " 


37 " 


Mclnerney, Francis C. 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


McKenna, Francis X.* 




Incapacitated 


44 ■• 


16 ' 


McLaughlin, Lawrence J. . 




Incapacitated 


51 ■' 


26 " 


McManus, John L.* . 




Incapacitated 


54 " 


20 ■' 


McNamara, Aloysius T.* . 




Incapacitated 


45 " 


16 " 


McNealy, John P. 




Incapacitated 


65 " 


38 •' 


McWeeny, James J.t . 




Incapacitated 


50 " 


20 ■' 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, chapter 32, sections 56 and 57. 



88 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
Table IV. — Concluded. 



[Jan. 



List of Officers Retired During the Year Ending November SO, 
1946, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 


Cause of 
Retirement. 


Age at Time 
of Retirement. 


Years of 
Service. 


Neylon, Patrick .... 


Incapacitated 


58 years. 


26 years. 


Norton, William A.* . 






Incapacitated 


48 " 


15 " 


O'Brien, Michael F. . 






Incapacitated 


56 " 


26 " 


O'Brien, Thomas F. . 






Incapacitated 


54 " 


26 " 


O'Dwyer, Thomas C* 






Incapacitated 


33 " 


5 " 


Owens, Walter P. 






Incapacitated 


50 " 


26 " 


Perry, Carleton B. 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


26 " 


Perry, Frederick V. . 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


26 " 


Pierce, John H.t . 






Incapacitated 


52- " 


21 " 


Pimental, John L. 






Incapacitated 


49 " 


24 " 


Quinn, Martin F. 






Incapacitated 


57 " 


26 " 


Riley, Francis C. 






Incapacitated 


56 " 


26 " 


Rush, William M.* . 






Incapacitated 


47 " 


20 " 


Schofield, John J. 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


25 " 


Sellers, William E.f . 






Incapacitated 


49 '• 


20 " 


Shea, Michael J.J 






Incapacitated 


36 " 


6 " 


Shone, John W^. . 






Age 


70 " 


37 " 


Smith, George J. 






Incapacitated 


50 '• 


25 " 


Stewart, Albert J.f . 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


21 " 


Stilphen, Harold E.f . 






Incapacitated 


47 " 


20 " 


Suszinski, Bernarcl E.* 






Incapacitated 


43 " 


16 " 


Tarpey, Bernard M.* 






Incapacitated 


50 '■ 


23 " 


Tighe, John J. . 






Incapacitated 


51 " 


26 " 


Timmins, Arthur D. . 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


26 " 


Trainor, Thomas N. . 






Incapacitated 


64 " 


38 " 


Walsh, Francis H.* . 






Incapacitated 


47 " 


17 " 


Walsh, Patrick J. 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


26 " 


Ward, John J» . 






Incapacitated 


56 " 


26 " 


Welby, Daniel J. 






Incapacitated 


55 " 


24 " 


Welch, Michael J. 






Incapacitated 


65 " 


33 " 


Worms, Jesset 






Incapacitated 


52 " 


19 '■ 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, chapter 32, sections 56 and 57. 

t State-Boston Retirement System. 



1947.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



89 



Table V. 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1946. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1946. 

January 2 
January 2 
January 2 
January 2 
January 2 
August 14 
August 14 
August 14 
August 14 
August 14 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 
September 18 



Lieutenant John H. Cloran to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Arthur H. Vickerson to rank of Captain. 
Patrolman John J. Sullivan to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Charles S. Fried to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John J. Dunne to rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant John D. Ahern to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Francis J. Hennessy to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant William Belle to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Patrick J. O'Reilly to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John J. Danehy to rank of Captain. 
Sergeant John H. Flood to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Mark J. Leonard to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant James J. Sullivan to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Fred L. Robbins to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Michael H. Blute to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Gilbert H. Noyes to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Henry F. Tanner to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Joseph J. Palombo to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant John J. Cunniffe to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant George V. Stevens to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Charles J. Masuret to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant James F. Flaherty to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Timothy F. Collins to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Andrew C. Hagerty to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Cecil E. Lewis to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Raymond A. L. Monahan to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Patrick J. Connolly to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Edward F. Conley to rank of Lieutenant. 



90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table VI. 

Number of Men in Active Service on November 30, 1946, Who 
Were Appointed on the Force in the Year Stated. 





fl 


T3 












Date Appointed. 


-a 
a 

a 
a 

3 

m 


1 

Q 


1 

U 


i 

cS 

3 


a 

o 
in 


d 

1 
2 


Totals. 


1907 






1 


1 






3 


1908. 










— 


— 


1 


1 




_ 


3 


1909 . 










_ 


- 


1 


_ 




— 


2 


1911 . 










- 


— 


_ 


— 




_ 


1 


1912 . 










_ 


— 


1 


3 




1 


6 


1913. 










_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


1916. 










- 


- 


1 


1 


— 


2 


4 


1917. 










- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


1919 . 










1 


2 


15 


17 


46 


226 


307 


1920 . 










- 


- 


3 


5 


22 


70 


100 


1921 . 










- 


1 


- 


7 


14 


46 


68 


1922 . 










- 


_ 


- 


6 


8 


30 


44 


1923. 










- 


- 


3 


4 


13 


55 


75 


1924. 










- 


- 


_ 


5 


2 


33 


40 


1925 . 










- 


- 


- 


1 


9 


53 


63 


1926 . 










- 


- 


3 


9 


12 


180 


204 


1927. 










_ 


- 


4 


2 


5 


67 


78 


1928. 










- 


- 


_ 


2 


3 


53 


58 


1929 . 










- 


- 


- 


3 


11 


134 


148 


1930. 










- 


- 


- 


1 


5 


22 


28 


1931 . 










- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


12 


13 


1937. 










- 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


173 


173 


1938 . 










_ 


— 


_ 


— 


— 


2 


2 


1940 . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


129 


129 


1941 . 










_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


56 


56 


1942. 










- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


163 


163 


1943 . 










— 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


60 


60 


1944 . 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


135 


135 


1945 . 










- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


63 


53 


1946. 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


215 


215 


Total 


3 








1 


3 


33 


70 


156 


1,970 


2,233 



Table VII. 

Men on Police Force on November 30, 1946, Who Were Born in 
the Year Indicated on the Table Below. 



Date of Birth. 





i 




£5 






a 


-o 


a> 


CJ 


13 




a 






a 


a 


>.a3 




II 


o. 


3 


Q 



Totals. 



1878. 
1880. 
1881 . 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891 . 
1892. 
1893. 
1894 . 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899 . 
1900. 
1901 . 
1902. 

1903 . 

1904 . 

1905 . 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 

1909 . 

1910 . 

1911 . 
1912. 

1913 . 

1914 . 

1915 . 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919 . 
1920. 

1921 . 

1922 . 

1923 . 

1924 . 



1 
2 

2 
2 

2 

4 

2 

4 

11 

11 

17 

12 

17 

22 

11 

5 

14 

5 

3 

4 

2 

1 



1 

7 
15 
18 
22 
30 
23 
44 
59 
84 
72 
78 
91 
89 
86 
62 
81 
77 
39 
31 
28 
28 
31 
53 
44 
64 
71 
51 
67 
52 
62 
63 
68 
67 
59 
47 
37 
32 
22 
11 

3 



2 

1 

2 

5 

1 

5 

8 

18 

22 

28 

37 

25 

51 

75 

105 

95 

101 

118 

125 

106 

73 

100 

86 

43 

38 

30 

29 

31 

53 

44 

64 

71 

51 

67 

52 

62 

63 

68 

67 

59 

47 

37 

32 

22 

11 

3 



Totals 



33 70 156 1,970 2,233 



The average 
42.84 years. 



of the members of the force on November 30, 1946, was 
(91) 



92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 








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94 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 





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1947.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



95 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1946. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation 

Division 1 

Division 2 

Division 3 

Division 4 

Division 6 

Division 7 

Division 8 

Division 9 

Division 10 

Division 11 

Division 13 

Division 14 

Division 15 

Division 16 

Division 17 

Division 18 

Division 19 

Traffic 


975 
2,514 
1,890 
3,216 
10,273 
5,700 
3,776 
44 
4,552 
4,932 
2,357 
1,209 
1,904 
6,438 
3,864 
1,196 
966 
1,386 
9,755 


400 
157 
111 
395 
1,506 
351 
202 

465 

554 

130 

83 

229 

232 

588 

64 

58 

139 

1,938 


1,375 

2,671 
2,001 
3,611 

11,779 
6,051 
3,978 
44 
5,017 
5,486 
2,487 
1,292 
2,133 
6,670 
4,452 

■ 1,260 
1,024 
1,525 

11,693 


Totals 


66,947 


7,602 


74,549 



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GO 





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Rape . 
Rape, assault to 
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Rob, assault to . 
Robbery (armed) 
Robbery (unarmed) 


02 


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iived at 
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rs 
amaged 

drivers' 


o 
(-1 


pawnbroker and second-hand ar- 

!S report blanks. 

■ police property .... 


ney re- 
•operty, 
fines. 


. 


ge to police property (rece 

.dquarters). 

d, automobiles abandoned 

d, by police officers on ace 


d, gasoUne tax . 

d, hospital service to police 

d, miscellaneous 

d, transportation of prisone 

)ursement for lost and d 

orms and equipment. 

cement of hackney carriage 


^es. 

condemned property . 
f lost, stolen and abandone 


otals 

, by City Collector for mo 
ed for damage to police pi 
phone commissions and dog 


'c3 
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2 


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OS 73 
o d 
O OS j^ 



118 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 
Number of Dog Licenses Issued During Year Ending November 30, 1946. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Spayed. 


Kennels. 


Transfers. 


With 
Fee. 


Without 
Fee. 


Totals. 


1 . . . 


49 


9 


3 






61 


2 


63 


2 






- 


1 


1 


— 


- 


2 


- 


2 


3 






234 


58 


50 


1 


- 


343 


6 


349 


4 






462 


132 


88 


- 


1 


683 


5 


688 


6 






637 


75 


114 


2 


1 


829 


16 


845 


7 
8 
9 






581 


79 


89 


- 


- 


749 


13 


762 






1,026 


156 


174 


_ 


_ 


1,356 


31 


1,387 


10 






650 


103 


109 


— 


— 


862 


16 


878 


11 






1,833 


201 


480 


3 


- 


2,517 


91 


2,608 


13 






621 


56 


190 


2 


- 


869 


23 


892 


14 






672 


85 


226 


1 


1 


985 


13 


998 


15 






312 


49 


47 


- 


- 


408 


9 


417 


16 






493 


140 


138 


- 


1 


772 


14 


786 


17 






1,297 


118 


549 


2 


1 


1,967 


76 


2,043 


18 






803 


89 


262 


1 


- 


1,155 


34 


1,189 


19 






611 


49 


147 


1 


— 


808 


41 


849 


Chief Clerk's 


















Office . 


29 


7 


3 


- 


- 


39 


- 


39 


Totals 


10,310 


1,407 


2,670 


13 


5 


14,405 


390 


14,795 



Total of 390 dog licenses issued without fee, in accordance with law, include: 2 kennels for a "domestic 
charitable corporation incorporated exclusively for purpose of protecting animals from cruelty," etc. (located 
on Division 4); 3 dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Divisions 16, 17 and 18); and 
385 dogs licensed belonging to persons "in the military or naval service of the United States in time of war." 



Table XVI. 

Total Number of Wagon Licenses Granted in the City by 
Police Divisions. 



Division 1 * 
Division 2 

Division 4 



10 

4 

14 



Division 6 
Division 7 

Total 



I 

4 

33 



* Includes 10 handcart common carriers. 



1947. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



119 



Table XVII. 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1946. 





Expenditures. 


A. Personal Service: 




1. 


Permanent employees . 


$5,713,809 44 


2. 


Temporary employees . 


67,678 46 
$5,781,487 90 


B; Contractual Services: 




1. 


Printing and binding . 


$136 25 


3. 


Advertising and posting 


458 68 


4. 


Transportation of persons . 


21,260 83 


5. 


Express charges 


231 53 


8. 


Light, heat and power . 


38,276 87 


10. 


Rent, taxes and water . 


674 75 


12. 


Bond and insurance pre- 






miums 


268 10 


13. 


Communication 


34,632 76 


14. 


Motor vehicle repairs and 






care 


41,387 26 


16. 


Care of animals 


2,435 00 


18. 


Cleaning 


2,280 22 


22. 


Medical 


23,543 66 


28. 


Expert 


340 00 


29. 


Stenographic, copying, etc. . 


— 


30. 


Listing 


64,778 48 


35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc., 


1,708 16 


37. 


Photographic and blueprint- 






ing 


2 75 


39. 


General repairs 


63,521 94 

295,937 24 


D. Equipment: 




3. 


Electrical .... 


$3,404 23 


4. 


Motor vehicles 


28,500 00 


6. 


Stable 


— 


7. 


Furniture and furnishings . 


486 89 


9. 


Office 


2,999 91 


10. 


Library 


811 75 


11. 


Marine 


257 60 


12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory, 


— 


13. 


Tools and instruments . 


4,859 15 


14. 


Live stock .... 


— 


15. 


Tires, tubes, accessories 


12,430 65 


16. 


Wearing apparel . 


87,983 09 


17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


3,571 54 
145,304 81 




Carried forward . 


. . . . $6,222,729 95 



120 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Table XVII. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement Jor the Year Ending November 30, 1946. 

D. 



Supplies: 




1. Office 


$37,841 25 


2. Food and ice . 


8,371 33 


3. Fuel 


26,979 97 


4. Forage and animal 


6,516 65 


5. Medical, surgical, laboratory. 


301 47 


8. Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


8,357 98 


11. Gasoline, oil and grease 


40,861 99 


13. Chemicals and disinfectants. 


4,188 85 


16. Miscellaneous 


12,907 94 




146,327 43 


Materials; 




1. Building 


1,072 00 


10. Electrical . . . 


22,421 42 


13. Miscellaneous 


7.615 06 



Special Items: 
7. Pensions and annuities . 660,202 04 

11. Workmen's compensation . 61 57 



31,108 48 



660,263 61 
Total $7,060,429 47 

1945 Unliquidated Reserve (included in above table). 

1944 Unliquidated Reserve 17 00 

Special Items (not included in Police Department appropriation): 

Emergency Compensation Allotment . . . $40,467 23 

Departmental Equipment — Non Revenue: 

Motor vehicle .... $80,629 79 

Office 1,621 20 

$82,250 99 

Receipts. 
For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . . $51,828 75 
For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) . 33,231 25 

Refunds, miscellaneous ......... 7,934 82 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 2,496 86 
For itinerant musician badges, replacement dog tags, re- 
placement hackney carriage driver badges, copies of 
licenses, sale of report blanks and use of pohce property, 1,742 00 
Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equip- 
ment 683 59 

For damage to police property (received at Headquarters), 95 00 

Total $98,012 27 

Credit by the City Collector for money received for damage 
to police property, commissions on telephone and dog 
fines 4,446 24 

Grand Total $102,458 51 



1947.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 121 



Table XVIII. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year 
Ending Novemher 30, 1946. 
(Included in Table XVII.) 

Pay rolls $45,059 18 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . 26,303 28 

Total $71,362 46 



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INDEX. 



A. Page 

Accidents 24, 53, 93, 94 

caused by automobiles 93, 94 

number of, reported 53 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares 93, 94 

Adjustment of claims 78 

Ambulance service 60 

Arrests 15-19, 25, 54, 95-115 

age and sex of 114 

comparative statement of . . . 7 . , . . 115 

for drunkenness 16, 18, 54, 105 

foreigners 16,96-113 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc. . . . 15,105,113 

increase in number of 15 

minors 15, 96-113 

nonresidents 15-17, 96-113 

number of, by divisions 95 

number of, punished by fine 15, 16 

on warrants .15, 96-113 

summoned by court 15,96-113 

total number of 15-18,96-113 

violation of city ordinances 15, 17, 108 

without warrants 15, 96-113 

Articles lost and found 47 

Auctioneers 116 

Automobiles . . . .17, 18, 21-23, 46, 60, 93, 94, 99, 100, 107 

accidents due to 93, 94 

cost of running police 60 

deaths caused by 24, 93, 94 

operating while under influence of liquor .... 17, 107 

police 46, 60-62 

public 63, 116 

safety-educational 39 

sight-seeing 65, 66, 116 

stolen and recovered 17, 21, 23, 42, 100 

used, dealers in 21-22,116 

B. 

Benefits and pensions . 77 

Biological chemist 34-36 

Buildings 53, 99 

dangerous, reported 53 

(125) 



126 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Bureau of Crime Prevention 44-45 

creation 44 

duties in general 44 

formation 44 

inspections and investigations 45 

purpose 44 

summary of work accomplished 45 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 21-36 

automobile division . . . 21 

ballistics division 32-33 

biological chemist 34 

criminal identification . 27 

homicide squad 23 

identification section 26-31 

lost and stolen property division 23 

missing persons 29, 30 

multilith 26 

photography, fingerprinting 26-28 

summons file 31 

used cars dealers' licenses granted 22, 116 

warrant file 31 

Bureau of Operations 42—43 

accomplishments 42 

recording of radio messages 42 

c. 

Carriages, pubUc 63-66, 116 

appeal board 66 

articles left in 64 

issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations .... 66 

number licensed 63, 116 

private hackney stands 65 

public stands for taxicabs established 64 

Cases investigated 25, 53 

Children 16,29,44,53,97 

abandoned, cared for 53 

lost, restored 29, 53 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 15, 17, 108 

City Prison 54 

Claims, adjustment of 78 

Collective musicians 74, 116 

Commitments 16, 54, 55 

Communications system 57 

Complaints 77, 116 

against miscellaneous licenses 77,116 

Courts 15, 16, 24, 35, 96-113, 115 

fines imposed by 15, 16, 115 

number of days' attendance at, by biological chemist . . 35 
number of days' attendance at, by officers . . . .15, 16, 115 

number of persons summoned by 15,96-113 

prosecutions in 24 



p. D. 49. 



127 



Page 

Crime 10 

Crime prevention 44 

Criminal identification 27 

Criminal work 115 

comparative statement of 115 



D. 



Dangerous weapons .... 






75, 96 


Dead bodies 






. 31, 58 


recovered 






58 


Deaths 






. 14, 25, 31, 34, 84, 93, 94 


by accident, suicide, etc. 






. 25, 93, 94 


of police officers 






14, 84 


Department medals of honor . 






20 


Disability, absence on account of . 






92 


Distribution of force 






. 14, 80-82 


Disturbances suppressed 






53 


Dogs 






116, 118, 120 


amount received for licenses for 






. 116, 120 


number licensed 






. 120 


Drivers 






. . .64, 66, 116 


hackney carriage 






64, 116 


sight-seeing automobile 






65, 116 


Drowning, persons rescued from . 






., . 53, 58 


Drunkenness 






16, 17, 53, 54, 55, 105 


arrests for, per day . 






16 


foreigners arrested for 






16, 105 


increase in number of arrests for 






. . 16 


men committed to City Prison 






54 


nonresidents arrested for 






16, 105 


total number of arrests for 






. 16, 17, 105 


women committed to the House oi 


Det 


antic 


)n . . . . 55 



E. 

Employees of the Department 13, 80-82 

Events, special 48 

Expenditures 19, 78, 119 

Extra duties performed by officers 25, 53 

F. 

Financial 19, 77, 78, 116, 119 

expenditures 19, 78, 119 

miscellaneous license fees 77,116,120 

pensions 77, 120 

receipts 19, 78, 116, 120 

signal service 78, 121 

Fines 15, 16, 115 

amount of . . . 15, 16, 115 

average amount of 15, 115 

number punished by 16 



128 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Fingerprint 26, 28 

Fire alarms 53, 58 

defective, reported 53 

number given 53 

Fires 24, 53, 58 

extinguished 53, 58 

on waterfront, attended 58 

Foreigners, number arrested 15,96-113 

Fugitives from justice 25, 109 

Q. 

Gaming, illegal 109 

H. 

Hackney carriage drivers 64, 116 

Hackney carriages 12, 40, 63-67, 116 

Halloween celebration 51 

Handcarts 68, 116 

Harbor service 58, 59 

Homicide squad 23 

Horses . ' 59 

House of Detention 55 

Houses of ill fame, keeping 55, 105 

I. 

Imprisonment 16, 25, 115 

persons sentenced to 16 

total years of 16, 25, 115 

Income 19, 77, 78, 116, 120 

Information from police journals, requests for 29 

Inquests held 24 

Insane persons taken in charge 53 

Intoxicated persons assisted 53 

Itinerant musicians 74, 116 

J. 

Jimk collectors 116 

Junk shopkeepers 116 

Jury lists, police work on 71 

Juvenile delinquency 10 

L. 

Lamps, defective, reported 53 

Licenses, miscellaneous 77, 116 

Listing, police 19, 70, 119, 122, 123 

expenses of 19, 71, 119 

number listed 71, 122, 123 

number of policemen employed in 71 



p. D. 49. 



129 



Page 

Lodgers at station houses 16, 76 

Lodging houses, pubhc . . . 76, 116 

appUcations for Hcenses 116 



authority to Hcense . . . . 

for accommodation of service men 

location of 

number of persons lodged in . 
Lost and found articles . . . . 
Lost and stolen property division . 



76 
76 
76 
76 
47 
16, 23, 47 



Lost children 16, 29, 53 



M. 



Maintenance shop . . . . 
Men committed to City Prison 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business . 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for . 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revoked 

number issued . . . . 

number transferred . 
Missing persons . . . . 

age and sex of . 

number found . . . . 



46 

54 

15, 96-113 

53 

77, 116 

77, 116 

77, 116 

77, 116 

77, 116 

77, 116 

. 29-31 

30 

29 



number reported 29, 30 

reported by Police Divisions 30 

Musicians 74, 116 

collective 74, 116 

itinerant 74, 116 

N. 

New pension legislation 8 

Nonresident offenders 15, 16, 17, 96-113 



o. 

Offenses 

against chastity, morality, etc. 
against license laws . 
against Uquor law 
against the person . 
against property, malicious 
against property, with violence 
against property, without violence 
forgery and against currency . 
miscellaneous .... 
recapitulation . 



15, 17, 96-113 

15, 104-106, 113 

15, 103-113 

17, 103 

15, 17, 96, 113 

15, 101, 113 

15, 17, 98, 113 

15, 17, 99, 113 

15, 102, 113 

15, 17, 107-113 

113 



130 P. D. 49. 

P. Page 

Parking 40 

Parks, public 93, 94 

accidents reported in 93, 94 

Pawnbrokers 21, 23, 116 

Pensions and benefits 8, 77, 120 

estimates for pensions 77 

new legislation 8 

number of persons on rolls 77 

payments on account of 77, 120 

Personnel 7, 13, 80 

Photographic, etc 26 

Plant and equipment 46 

Police academy 11 

Police, special 73 

Police buildings, use of 76 

Police charitable fund 77 

PoUce Department 13, 14, 77, 80-92, 115 

authorized and actual strength of 83 

distribution of personnel 14, 80 

horses in use in 59 

how constituted 13 

Memorial Day observance 49 

officers : 

absence on account of disability 92 

active service, number of officers in 90 

allowances for pay, Department rule on ... . 82 

appointed 14, 90 

arrests by 15, 95-115 

average age of 91 

date appointed 90 

detailed, special events 48-52 

died 7, 14, 84 

in armed service 7 

injured 14 

killed in line of duty 7 

medals of honor 20 

nativity of 91 

pay allowances, Department rule on 82 

pensioned . 8, 14, 85-88 

policewomen 13 

promoted 14, 89 

reinstated 7, 14 

resigned 14 

retired 14, 85-88 

time lost on account of disability 14 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 20 

vehicles in use in 60, 62 

work of 15 

Police listing 19, 70, 119, 122, 123 



p. D. 49. 



131 



Police signal box service . 

miscellaneous work . 

payments on account of . 

property assigned to . 

signal boxes .... 
Promotion of police .... 
Property 

lost, abandoned and stolen 

recovered 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 

stolen 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 
Prosecution of homicide cases 
Public carriages .... 
Public lodging houses 



Page 
13, 56, 57, 78, 121 
56 
78, 121 
57 
56 
. 14, 89 
16, 21-23, 117, 120 
16, 21-23, 117, 120 
16, 21-25, 115 
116, 120 
16, 115 
16 
24 
63, 116 
76, 116 



R. 

Radio, two-way 

soundscriber for recording messages 

Receipts, financial 

Requests for information from police journals 
Revolvers 

licenses to carry 



42 

42 

19, 78, 116, 120 

29 

75, 116 

75, 116 



s. 

Safety-educational automobile 

Salaries 

Second-hand articles 

Second-hand motor vehicle dealers 

Sergeant Ballistician 

Service Men .... 

Sick and injured persons assisted 

Sight-seeing automobiles 

Signal service, police 

Special events . 

Special police 

Station houses . 

lodgers at . 
Stolen property 

recovered . 

value of 

Street railway conductors, motormen and starters 
Streets .... 

accidents reported in 

defective, reported . 

obstructions removed 
Summons file 



13, 56 



39 

80 
116 
21, 116 
32 
76 
16, 53, 58 
65, 116 
-57, 78, 121 
48-52 
19, 73 
16, 76 
16, 76 
16, 21-25, 115 
16, 23,25, 115 
16, 25, 115 
. 116 
53, 93, 94 
. 93, 94 
. 93, 94 
53 
31 



132 P- D. 49. 

T» Page 

Tagging 66 

Theatrical-booking agencies 116 

Traffic conditions 9 

Traffic Divisions 37-41 

activities 37 

problems 40 

safety -educational automobile 39 

u. 

Uniform crime record reporting 18 

Used cars 21-22,116 

licensed dealers 22, 116 

•provisions for hearing before granting third-class license . . 22 
purchases and sales reported 22 



V. 



Vehicles 

ambulances, combination 

automobiles 

in use in Police Department 

public carriages 

wagons and handcarts 
Vessels 



60-69, 116, 118 

60 

. 60-62 

. 60-62 

63 

68, 116, 118 

58 



w. 

Wagons 68, 116, 118 

legislation affecting motor vehicles transporting property for 

hire 68 

number licensed by divisions 118 

total number licensed 68, 116, 118 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 20 

Warrant file 31 

Water pipes, defective, reported 53 

Water running to waste, reported 53 

Weapons, dangerous 75 

Witnesses '. 15, 16, 53, 115 

fees earned by officers 15, 16, 115 

number of days' attendance at court'by'officers'as . . 15, 16, 115 

number of, detained at station houses 53 

Women committed to House ofjDetention 55 

Work of the Department 15 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FEINTING DEPARTMENT 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06314 397 6 



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