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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOT^ 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.1 

VL\)t Cotnmontoealtl) of illassact)us;etts 



FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 

FOR THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1950 




''■^:^^^ 



Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



■J 



^ 



^' 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

Letter to the Governor 5 

Tlie Department 7 

Police Force 7 

Signal Service 7 

Employees of the Department 7 

Recapitulation 8 

Distribution and Changes 8 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty 8 

Presentation of Medals 9 

Walter Scott INIedal for Valor 9 

Department Medals of Honor 9 

Work of the Department 11 

Arrests 11 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting 12 

Detective Bureau 14 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 17 

Automobile Unit 17 

Lost and Stolen Property Unit 19 

Homicide Unit 19 

Identification Unit 20 

Ballistics Unit 25 

Biological Chemist 26 

Traffic Division 27 

Activities 27 

Safety Education 28 

Parking 28 

Parking Meters 29 

Traffic Problems 29 

Horses 30 

Bureau of Operations 31 

Duties 31 

Accomplishments 31 

Crime Prevention Bureau 32 

Duties in General 32 

Summarj^ of Work Accomplished 32 

City Prison 34 

House of Detention 35 

Police Signal System 36 

Signal Boxes 36 

Miscellaneous Work 36 

Payments on Account of Signal Service 37 

Harbor Service 38 

Harbor Patrol Service 38 

Motor Vehicle Service 39 

Combination Ambulances 40 

Automobile Maintenance 41 



4 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Page 

Hackney Carriages 42 

Hackney Carriages Licenses 42 

Hackney Carriage Drivers' Licenses 42 

Public Taxicab Stands 43 

Private Hacknej- Stands 43 

Sight-seeing Automobiles 43 

Hackney Carriage ^*iolations 43 

Listing Work in Boston 44 

Listing Expenses 45 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 45 

Police Work on Jur3' Lists 45 

Special Police 46 

Carrying Dangerous Weapons 47 

Public Lodging Houses 47 

Property Clerk 48 

Lost and Found Property .48 

Special Events 49 

Miscellaneous Business 53 

Pensions and Benefits . . . . ' 54 

Statistical Tables 55 

Pei'sonnel, Salary Scale and Distribution of tlie Police Force, 

Signal Service and Other Employees 56 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Depart- 
ment 59 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died ... 60 

Members of Department Retired 61 

Officers Promoted 63 

Members of Police Force Appointed in the Year Indicated . 64 

Members of Police Force Born in Year Lidicated ... 65 

Number of Days' Absence from Dutj^ by Reason of Disability . 66 

Accidents 67 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions 68 

Arrests and Offenses 69 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 86 

Licenses of All Classes Issued 87 

Dog Licenses 89 

Financial Statement 90 

:\Iale and Female Residents Listed 92 



E^t Commontoealti) of jKlagsatijusiettg. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1950. 

To His Excellency Paul A. Dever, 

Governor of the Commonwealth. 
Your Excellency: 

In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 291, Acts of 
1906, as amended, I have the honor to submit a report of the 
Avork of the Boston Pohce Department for the year ending 
November 30, 1950. 

The Force is manned by the full quota authorized by law, 
and the degree of protection offered to the public reflected 
favorably in our crime index during 1950, as indicated in the 
statistical compilation appended herewith. 

Despite the efforts of a special detail of the Boston Police 
Department, which constantly checks on the protection of 
large sums of money in depositories throughout the city, a 
robbery of tremendous proportions was perpetrated with ma- 
chine-like dispatch in a public garage, part of which was con- 
verted into a depository for huge sums of money. Down 
through the years it has been the custom of banks and other 
financial institutions to notify the Police Department when 
moving or changing locations of large depositories for money 
and A'aluables. A simple notification in this instance would 
have alerted the police, and our inspection force would have 
undoubtedly brought to light the inadequate protection af- 
forded at this depository. The coordinated efforts of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Massachusetts State 
Police and the Boston Police Department will continue unceas- 
ingly until this robbery is solved. 

A "Detective Bureau" was established on November 6, 
1950, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 735, Acts 
of 1950. The "Five-Day Work Week" law, accepted by vote 
of the people of this community on November 7, 1950, will 
become effective on January 1, 1951, and arrangements are 



6 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

being made to provide the maximum protection of life and 
property A\dth the limited number of men allowed in our new 
quota. A "Voluntary Unpaid Auxiliary Police Force" was 
established on September 18, 1950, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 639, Acts of 1950, and the Department is 
now augmented by five hundred members of this civil defense 
organization. 

Although the total number of vehicles registered in the 
Commonwealth reached an all-time high figure during the 
current year, our efforts in the regulation of traffic have been 
reasonably successful. I am of the opinion that the many 
large projects now being constructed under your Highway 
Program mil bring substantial relief to our traffic problem. 

Work relating to the prevention of juvenile delinquency 
received the wholehearted support of the Department Crime 
Prevention Bureau in cooperation with the many social agencies, 
probation officers and school attendance officers. It is grati- 
fying to be able to report that there has been a very substantial 
decrease in the number of cases affecting juveniles in this city 
during the year. 

The morale of the Department is excellent, and it is a 
pleasure to express my appreciation to the personnel for their 
loyalty and efficiency in carrying out their assignments. 

To Your Excellency I extend my sincere thanks for the 
support you have given the Department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 

Police Commissioner. 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



THE DEPARTMENT. 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows; 

Police Commissioner .... 1 
Secretary, Assistant Secretaries . 3 



The Police Force. 



Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents . 3 

Captains .... 33 
Lieutenants and Lieutenant - 

Detectives .... 69 
Sergeants and Sergeant-De- 
tectives . . . . 185 



1 Detectives (First, Second 



and Third Grade) . . * 217 
Patrolmen . . . .f 1,985 
Patrolwomen .... 10 

Total .... 2,503 



* Includes 3 patrolwomen. 

t Includes 16 patrolmen in the armed service. 



Director . 

.\ssistant Director 
Chauffeur 
Chauffeur-Laborer 
Linemen 



Signal Service. 

Mechanic 

Painter and Groundman 

Signalmen 



Total 



Employees of the Department. 
(Not included in above.) 



20 



Biological Chemist 


1 


Matron, Chief 


, 


1 


Assistant Biological Chem 


- 


Matron, Assistant Chief 


1 


ist 


1 


Matrons, Assistant 




6 


Chauffeurs 


2 


Matrons, Assistant 


(Tern 


- 


Cleaners 


5 


porary) 




2 


Clerks .... 


34 


Mechanics 


, ^ 


21 


Diesel and Gasoline Engin< 


} 


Property Clerk 




1 


Operators . 


3 


Registered Xurse 


(Tern- 




Elevator Operators 


8 


porary) 


, 


1 


Elevator Operator-Laborer 


1 


Repairmen 




2 


Firemen, Marine . 


2 


Shorthand Reporters 


. 


2 


Firemen, Stationary 


7 


Statisticians . 


, , 


2 


Hostlers .... 


10 


Steamfitter 


^ , 


1 


Janitors .... 


41 


Stenographers 




18 


Janitresses 


2 


Superintendent of Buildings, 




Laborers 


13 


Assistant . 




1 


Laborers (Temporary) . 


2 


Telephone Operators 


^ 


8 


Laborer-Relief E 1 e v a t o 


r 








Operator 


1 


. Total 


• 


*200 



* Includes 2 employees in the armed service. 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Recapitulation. 

Police Commissioner 1 

Secretary, Assistant Secretaries 3 

Police Force 2,503 

Signal Service 20 

Employees 200 

Grand Total 2,727 

Distribution and Changes. 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. 

During the year, 86 patrolmen were appointed; 9 patrolmen 
resigned (3 while charges were pending); 1 patrolman was 
dismissed; 1 patrolman terminated service; 7 patrolmen were 
reinstated; 3 patrolmen were transferred from the Capitol 
Police; 7 lieutenants promoted to captain; 14 sergeants pro- 
moted to lieutenants; 18 patrolmen promoted to sergeant; 
8 lieutenants assigned as lieutenant-detectives; 24 sergeants 
assigned as sergeant-detectives; 72 patrolmen assigned as first- 
grade detectives; 33 patrolmen assigned as second-grade 
detectives; 110 patrolmen assigned as third-grade detectives; 
1 patrolwoman assigned as first-gi'ade detective; 2 patrol- 
women assigned as third-grade detectives; 3 captains, 3 lieu- 
tenants, 5 sergeants and 47 patrolmen retired on pension; 2 
sergeants and 20 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, and V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty. 
Police officers injured performing police duty during the 
past year showing number of duties lost. Also, number of 
duties lost by police officers injured prior to December 1, 1949. 



How Injured. 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30, 1950. 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men. 


Number of Duties 
Lost This Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1949. 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


94 
14 

74 

125 


1,340 
169 

913 
1,419 


688 
395 

1,380 
779 


Totals . 


307 


3,841 


3,242 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMF.NT — No. 49. 9 

Presentation of Medals. 
The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1950 and Dei)aitment 
Medals of Honor, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, 
were awarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 4, 1950, as 
follows : 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor to Patrolman Ben.l\min H. White 
OF Division 4. 

Patrolman Benjamin H. White of Division 4 is hereby- 
awarded the Walter Scott Medal for V^alor and a Department 
Medal of Honor for distinguished and mcMitorious service 
performed on March 16, 1950. 

Patrolman White, while on patrol duty that e\ening, heard 
several revolver shots and in his investigation, while pro- 
ceeding through an alley, was set upon by a man who pressed 
a gim against his side and threatened to kill him. The officer 
grappled with the man and after a struggle succeeded in 
wresting the revolver from him and placed him under arrest. 
Patrolman White, by his prompt action without regard for his 
own safety, showed exceptional courage in pursuing and 
apprehending this dangerous criminal who is now serving time 
in a penal institution. 

Department Medals of Honor. 

Patrolman James W. Aloar of Division 17 is hereby awarded 
a Department ]\Iedal of Honor for distinguished and meritor- 
ious service performed on September 28, 1950. 

Patrolman Moar responded to a radio message that a Ijoy 
had been struck by a train in West Roxbury and upon ai-rival 
at the scene remo^-ed his uniform tie and with his baton 
imiH-ovised a tourni(]uet, i)lacing it above the knee of the left 
leg which had been partly scvcrc^d. The boy was removed to 
the hospital where his leg was amputated. The prompt 
action of Patrolman Moar in rendering first aid und<)ul)tedly 
saved the boy's life. 

Patrolmen Patrick J. Spillane and Edward L. Donahue of 
Division 18 each are awarded a Department Medal of Honor 
for distinguished and meritorious service performed on Feb- 
ruary 9, 1950. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

While cruising, these officers received a message to be on 
the lookout for an automobile containing several young men 
who had kidnapped a young woman near her home in Dedham, 
Shortly after, an auto came to a sudden stop as the police car 
approached and the three occupants fled in different directions. 
The officers gave chase and captured two of them who were 
identified by the victim. These men and three others later 
arrested had been involved in a series of criminal attacks on 
women. 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

Arrests. 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 90,069, as against 94,079 for 1949. 

There were 15,472 arrests on Avarrants and 34,652 without 
warrants; 39,945 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 81,263; of females, 8,806; 
of foreigners, 3,798; of delinquents, 2,277; of minors, 6,236; 
of non-residents, 29,334. 

The number of persons jjunished by fines was 34,891, and 
the assessment of fines imposed by the courts amounted to 
•15188,793. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers 
was 35,713, and the witness fees earned amounted to $13,332.05. 

There were 27,292 persons arrested for drunkenness, an 
average of 75 per day, as against 27,671 or an average of 76 
per day in 1949. 

One hundred fifty-one persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 2,033 to the House of Correction; 59 to the 
Women's Prison; 96 to the Reformatory Prison; and 2,610 to 
other institutions; and the total years of imprisonment were 
1,697 (910 sentences were indefinite). 

The value of property taken from prisonei-s and lodgers was 
$145,776.14. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to 
$3,248,009.92 and the value recovered amounted to $1,735,- 
411.40. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what per- 
centage of arrests in other cities is of non-residents. This 
percentage is so small in other cities that statistics are not 
kept of this class of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in 
mind in making comparison of Boston with other cities, either 
of the cost of policing or of criminal statistics, that 33 per cent 
of the arrests in Boston is of non-residents, whereas other cities 
have but a negligible per(;entage of arrests of non-residents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1950, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1949^ 



12 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted herewith : 



Offenses. 



Yeab Ending 

November 30, 

1949. 



Arrests. 



Year Endino 

November 30, 

1950. 



Arrests, 



Aggravated assault 

Auto', operating so as to endanger .... 

.\uto', operating under the influence of liquor 

Auto' thefts (including attempts) .... 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Drunkenness 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Totals 



244 
526 
367 

128 

1,357 

27,671 

2,702 

83 

46 

12 

74 

251 



239 
665 

468 
197 

1,089 

27.292 

2.168 

97 

41 

12 

70 

288 



33,461 



32,536 



The balance of the arrests consisted largely of so-called 
minor offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city 
ordinances, gaming and miscellaneous offenses. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. 
This department, during the past year, has continued its 
cooperation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D, C, of the following serious 
offenses : 



1, 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



Felonious homicide: 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 
Rape 
Robbery 

Aggravated assault 
Burglary — breaking and entering 
Larceny ; 

(a) $50 and over in value 

(6) Under $50 in value 
Auto, theft 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



13 



The following comparative tables show the number of certain 
offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 1949, 
to November 30, 1950, as against December 1, 1948, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1949: 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting. Comparative Table. 



Offenses. 



December 1, 1949, to 
November 30, 1950. 



Reported. 



Cleared. 



December 1, 1948, to 
November 30, 1949. 



Reported. 



Cleared. 



Aggravated assault .... 

Breaking and entering 

Larceny (under $50) .... 

Larceny ($50 and over) 

Larceny of automobile 

Manslaughter by negligence 

Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 

Rape 

Robbery 



Totals 



224 

1,307 

2,971 

1,904 

1,675 

45 

12 

72 

287 



8,557 



215 

723 

1,062 

688 

4.55 

44 

9 

00 

132 



3,394 



210 

1,345 

2,981 

2,219 

1,572 

32 

15 

90 

260 

8,724 



203 

652 

1,148 

806 

490 

27 

13 



3,531 



A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following: 



1949 
1950 



Cases 

Reported. Cleared. 

8,724 3,531 

8,557 3,394 



14 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



DETECTIVE BUREAU. 
A Detective Bureau was established in the Boston Police 
Department on November 6, 1950, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. 

CHAPTER 735 — ACTS OF 1950. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Fifty. 
An Act creating a detective bureau in the police 
department of the city of boston and establishing 
the compensation of the members of such bureau. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as 
follows: 

Section 1. A detective bureau is hereby established in 
the police department of the city of Boston, with the following 
grades: Lieutenant-detective, sergeant-detective, first-grade 
detective, second-grade detective and third-grade detective. 
As soon as may be after this act becomes fully effective, the 
police officers, including superior officers, serving in the bureau 
of criminal investigation in the police department of said city, 
and the officers assigned to and carrying on criminal investi- 
gation work in the divisions of said department, shall be 
classified as detectives and become members of said bureau. 
The police commissioner for the city of Boston shall have the 
right to assign any of said detectives to any division or depart- 
ment of said police department and they shall come under the 
supervision of the superior officers of the division or department 
to which they have been assigned. Police officers so classified 
with the grade of lieutenant shall thereby qualify for the 
grade of lieutenant-detective, those with the grade of sergeant 
shall thereby qualify for the grade of sergeant-detective. 
Patrolmen special officers, so called, so classified who have 
performed criminal investigation work for ten years or more 
shall thereby qualify for rating as first-grade detective. 
Patrolmen who have performed such work for five years or 
more, but less than ten years, shall thereby qualify for second- 
grade detective, and patrolmen who have performed such 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 

work for less than five years shall thereby qualify for third- 
grade detective. The police commissioner may transfer to 
the grade of third-grade detective the regular patrolmen who 
have performed extraordinary and outstanding service in line 
of duty if he is of the opinion that such promotion is desirable 
and in the best interests of the service; provided, that in 
making such transfers, the requirements of chapter thirty-one 
of the General Laws need not be complied with; and provided, 
further, that such transfers shall be reported to the division of 
civil service as provided in section eighteen of said chapter 
thirty-one. For the purpose of promotions under section 
twentj' of said chapter thirty-one, to the grades of captain, 
lieutenant and sergeant respectively, the grades of lieutenant 
and lieutenant-detective shall be deemed to be in the next 
lower grade to that of captain; the grades of sergeant and 
sergeant-detective shall be deemed to be in the next lower 
grade to that of lieutenant; and the first-grade detective, 
second-grade detective, third-grade detective and patrolman 
shall be deemed to be in the next lower grade to that of sergeant. 

Sect. 2. The members of the detective bureau shall 
receive the following compensation: A lieutenant-detective 
shall receive an annual compensation of three hundred dollars 
in excess of the salary received by a regular lieutenant. A 
sergeant-detective shall receive an annual compensation of 
three hundred dollars in excess of salary received by a regular 
sergeant. A first-grade detective shall receive an annual 
compensation of five hundred dollars in excess of the maximum 
salary received by a regular patrolman. A second-grade 
detective shall receive an annual compensation of four hundred 
dollars in excess of the maximum salary received by a regular 
patrolman. A third-grade detective shall receive an annual 
compensation of three hundred dollars in excess of the maxi- 
mum salary received by a regular patrolman. All members 
hereafter transferred to said bureau shall serve a probationary 
period of six months as such detectives, during which period 
the commissioner may transfer them from said bureau to 
other duties in the department, provided such duties are in 
accordance with tlieir civil service rating, and a person so 
transferred shall not have any right of appeal as provided in 
chapter thirty-one of the General Laws. A member hereafter 
transferred to said bureau after he shall have served such a 
probationary period, or any officer of said department classified 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

as a detective under section one of this act at the time of 
passage hereof, may be transferred from said bureau to the 
rank held by him immediately prior to the date of his transfer 
to the detective bureau by order of the commissioner or if 
he has obtained subsequently as a result of civil service exam- 
inations a higher rank to said rank but he shall have a right 
of appeal to the trial board appointed under the provisions of 
chapter two hundred and ninety-one of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and six, which shall have the power to hear and 
determine such appeal and the provisions of said chapter 
thirty-one shall in no way be applicable to said hearing and 
determination made thereunder. The decision of such trial 
board shall be final. 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 17 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION. 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several 
units, namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, 
Homicide, Lost and Stolen Property, Identification, Missing 
Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the follow- 
ing phases of police work and investigation: banking, express 
thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, 
pawnbrokers, junk shops, second-hand article dealers, pick- 
pockets, radicals, shoplifters, night motor patrol. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds 
of investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every possible way with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
prosecution of criminals. 

Automobile Unit. 

This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and 
is in daily communication with police authorities of the United 
States and Canada. Many investigations are made in coopera- 
tion Avith the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post Office 
Department and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The automobile unit index contains records of cars stolen 
in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased 
and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by 
missing persons and cars whose operators are wanted for various 
ofifenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the depart- 
ment and the automobile unit through information obtained 
from this index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this unit. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this unit during the year identified a number of automobiles 

ftELEASED Sr 
PUILIC LURARY 
OFTROIT. MICH; 



18 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their OA\Tiers, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 

Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1950. 



Month. 


Bought by 


Sold by 


Sold by 


Dealers. 


Dealers. 


Individuals. 


1949. 








December 


2,273 


2,325 


1,535 


1950. 








January 


2,442 


2,709 


1,566 


February 








2,227 


2,661 


1,095 


March . 








2,863 


3,323 


1,508 


April 








3,147 


3,430 


1,639 


May 








2,943 


3,322 


1,669 


June 








3,013 


3,488 


1,736 


July 








3,338 


3,267 


1,809 


August . 








3,080 


3,275 


1,669 


September 








2,270 


2,339 


1,482 


October 








2,296 


2,217 


1,741 


November 








2,405 


2,452 


1,559 


Totals . 


32,297 


34,808 


19,008 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the 
Year Ending November 30, 1950. 





Reported 


Recovered 
During 
Month. 


Recovered 


Not 


Month. 


Stolen. 


Later. 


Recovered. 


1949. 










December 


169 


154 


11 


4 


1950. 










January .... 


184 


176 


7 


1 


February 










109 


103 


6 





March 










143 


136 


5 


2 


April . 










147 


138 


9 





May . 










150 


139 


t 


4 


June . 










133 


126 


5 


2 


July . 










116 


106 


/ 


3 


August 










161 


143 


10 


8 


September 








167 


154 


8 


5 


October 








150 


142 


5 


3 


November 








165 


154 





11 


Totals 


1,794 


1,671 


80 


43 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



Lost and Stolen Property Unit. 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities and towns through- 
out the United States forward lists of property stolen in such 
places. All pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers submit 
daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison 
of the description of articles reported lost or stolen and those 
articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted 
in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property 
and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pa^^^lshops and second-hand shops are inspected daily, for 
the purposes of identifying property Avhich may have been 
stolen. 

Homicide Unit. 

Officers of this unit investigate all homicide cases and in- 
terrogate persons involved in or who have knowledge of crimes 
of murder, manslaughter, abortion and other violent crimes. 
They prepare, supervise and present evidence at inquests. 



Abortion 

Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Automobile 

Burns 

Coasting 

Drowning 

Electricity 

Elevator . 

Explosion 

Falling objects 

Falls 

Fires 

Gunshot (accidental) 

Homicides 



Deaths Reported. 

3 Household accident (ci 
broken glass) 
Machinery 
INIotorcycle 
Natural causes 
Poison 

Railway (bus) 
Railwaj' (steam) 
Railway (street) 
Stillborn . 
Suicides . 



5 

18 

54 
7 
4 

17 
2 
3 
1 
4 

.50 
7 
2 

14 



t b\ 



Total 



Cases Presented for Prosecution. 



Abortion .... 

Abortion (accessory before 

fact) 

Abortion (accessory after 

fact) 

Assault and battery 

Assault to rob 

Assault and battery with 

sharp instrument 
Assault and battery with 

intent to murder 



Assault and l)att(!ry with 
weapon . . . . 

Conspiracy to rob 

Manslaughter (iion-negl 
gent) .... 

Manslaughter (auto) . 

Murder .... 

Violation of city ordinance 

Violation of firearm law 

Total 



1 
1 
2 
925 
2 
1 
6 
4 
7 
69 

1,209 



14 
3 

6 
54 
8 
1 
3 

111 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Inquests. 

Abortion .... 1 Stabbed by unknown jjerson 1 

^utQ 1 Shot by police officer . . 2 

^^ 2 Total . . . . ~S 

Gunshot (accidental) . . 1 ^si 

Two hundred and eighty-four cases of violent deaths were 
investigated by the Homicide Unit (one abortion death prose- 
cuted in Washington, D.C.). Presiding justices of the courts 
deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in two hundred 
and seventy-seven. 

Reca'pitulation of Homicides. 
Murder 8 

One defendant died before arrest. 

Two defendants awaiting trial. 

One defendant committed to mental hospital before trial. 

Two defendants committed suicide after committing murder. 

One defendant prosecuted for murder — pleaded guilty to 

manslaughter and sentenced to State Prison. 
One unsolved. 

Manslaughter (Non-negligent) 6 

Three defendants prosecuted for two manslaughters and 
sentenced to State Prison. 

One defendant prosecuted for manslaughter and sentenced to 
House of Correction. 

One defendant prosecuted for manslaughter and sentenced to 
Women's Reformatory. 

Two defendants prosecuted for manslaughter and charge re- 
duced to assault and battery by court. 

Identification Unit. 

Records — A ctivities. 

Recorded in the Main Index File 679,709 

Recorded in the Female Record File 17,351 

Recorded in the Alale Record File 194,331 

Photography. 

Number of photographs on file November 30, 1949 . . . 311,433 

Made and filed during the year 15,985 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, 1949 . 24,534 

Number of "foreign" photographs received during the year . 886 

Total 352,838 



1950.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



21 



Photographs: 

Number on file in the "Local Segregated" file (gallery) 
Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file 
Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) 
Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) . 
Scenes of crime photographed 



Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and towns 
Number of rectigraphic photographs 
Number of negatives of criminals 
Number of prints made fron\ same . 
Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 
Number of prints from same 
Number of exposures of Pantoscopic camera 
Number of reorders of criminal photographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made . 
Prints made from same .... 
Number of photographs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime visited 
Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) 
Number of prints of same .... 



G6,966 
24,534 

108 
19 

280 



0,308 

1,014 

3,720 

2,G59 

13,295 

869 

1,738 

8 

2,715 

10 

50 

83 

1,133 

1,558 

3,116 



Fingerprint File. 

Number on file November 30, 1949 178,861 

Taken and filed during the year: 

Male 2,633 

Female 286 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 1,537 

Female 136 

Number on file November 30, 1950 183,453 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 1 ,754 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification . . . 2,654 

Other cities and towns 103 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 83 

Special police officers . ■ 297 

Hackney carriage drivers 1,281 

Civilian employees 10 

Civilians fingerprinted and prints filed 30 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1949 57,866 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1950 59,905 



22 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Criminal Records. 

Requests received by telephone 1,350 

Requests received by correspondence 8,546 

Requests for certified records 1,536 

Requests for jury records 2,065 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses . . . 12,063 



Total 25,560 



Requests received from various public agencies: 

U. S. Marine Corps 

Stragglers and deserters (Army and Navy) 
AuxiUary police applicants .... 



Grand Total 

Missing Persons. 
Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. 



Total number still missing 



475 

1,480 

489 

28,004 



"=1,332 
1,229 

103 



* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous 
cases of children reported missing who were found or returned within a few hours after 
report was made. 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston. 



Age. 


Missing. 


Found. 


Still Missing. 
















Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Under 15 years, 


200 


81 


198 


72 


2 


9 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


183 


186 


177 


178 


6 


9 


Over 21 years, 


435 


247 


385 


219 


50 


28 


Totals 


818 


514 


760 


469 


58 


46 



Reported missing in Boston 1,332 

Reported to this department from outside departments and 

agencies 4,055 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) . . . 955 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and 

towns) 1,436 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Girls' 
and Bo5^s' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools 294 

Total number of persons reported missing . . . 8,072 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



23 



Persons Reported Missing by Police Divisions for Past Year. 

Division 1 (North End section) 13 

Division 2 (Down-town section) 1 

Division 3 (West End section) 32 

Division 4 (South End section) 182 

Division 6 (South Boston district) 96 

Division 7 (East Boston district) 33 

Division 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) . . 156 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) .... 169 

Division 1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) . . 79 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 60 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 65 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) 28 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 25 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) .... 15 

Division 18 (Hyde Park district) 22 

Division 19 (^lattapan district) * 356 

Total 1,332 



* Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital, a mental institution. 



Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 

Descriptive circulars sent out 

Tracers sent out on persons reported missing . 



*412 

3,720 

540 

1.735 



* Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the depart- 
ment. 

In 73 cases of unknown dead bodies, 38 were identified through finger- 
print impressions. 

Four individuals afflicted with armaesia were identified. 



Warrants. 

Warrants received i 2,851 

Arrested on warrants 1,814 

Warrants returned without service 955 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the department 

and to other jurisdictions 2,100 

Active warrant cards on file issued to the Boston PoUce Depart- 
ment 6,500 

Active warrants issued to Boston PoUce Department forwarded 

to other cities and to^^•ns in this State 96 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department for persons 

now out of state 110 

Active warrants received from other departments throughout 

jNIassachusetts for service (cards in our files) .... 152 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers ... 78 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

Su77i7no7ises. 

Total number received from outside cities and towns . . . 3,430 
Total number served 3,203 

Total number not served 227 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Sec- 
tion for service in outside cities and towns . . . . 21,182 
Total number served 19,603 

Total number not served 1,579 

Requests for Information. 

Information furnished from police journals in regard to accidents 

and thefts ' . 2,574 

Days in court 17 

Multilith and Mimeograph. 

Number of impressions turned out on mimeograph machine . *602,040 
Number of impressions printed on multilith machine . . t367,700 

* Includes daily maaifolds, warrant manifolds, bulletins, circular letters, traffic 

forms, etc. 
t Includes department forms, letters, circulars, etc, 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 25 



BALLISTICS UNIT. 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation expert in ballistics, explosives and munitions. 
All evidence found at the scene of crime where firearms or 
explosives were used is examined. Suspected weapons are 
catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent 
bullets and cartridge cases from these weapons arc filed. Cases 
involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the 
various courts. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to the same, 
and tear gas equipment have been inspected and serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the 
courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are re- 
turned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on stolen firearms 
and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen 
Propert}'- Unit and at the files of the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Safety. 

When firearms, property of the United States, are found 
used in crime or recovered otherwise, such property is returned 
to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are dis- 
posed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police depart- 
ments, federal agencies, military and naval intelligence units. 

Emergency Equipment on All Divisions. 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supplj' 
of emergency equipment. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns 
and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced 
whenever necessary. 



26 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST. 
The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in 
its nature, the frequency of any particular type being gov- 
erned by the circumstances of the cases. A breakdown into 
types indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



Material Sought. 

Acids 

Alcohol, ethyl 
Alcohol, methyl 
.Alkalies . 
Arsenic . 
Barbiturates . 
Calcium . 
Carbon dioxide 
Carbon monoxide 
Carbon tetrachloride 
Chloral . 
Chlorides 
Chloroform 
Cincophen 
Citrates . 
Citronella 
Codeine . 
Cresols . 
Fluorides 
Hydrocyanic acid 
Lithium . 
Magnesium 
Mercurochrome 
Mercury . 
Morphine 
Paraldehyde . 
Saccharin 
Strychnine 
Toxicology, general 



No, of 

Cases. Material Sought. 

1 Auto, examination of . 
228 Bloodstains . 

*72 Cannabis 

2 Clothing, examination of 
2 Dirt, debris, etc. . 

48 Drugs .... 

2 Fibers .... 

2 Hair .... 
32 Inflammables 

1 Masks, gas, examination o 

3 Microscopy, general 

3 Nitroglycerine 

1 Paint .... 

1 Phosphatase, acid 

1 Photographs . 

1 Photographs, infra-red 

2 Plant material 

1 Powder residue, clothing 

1 Powder residue, hands 

4 Rope .... 
1 Safe insulation 

1 Scene, examination of . 

2 Spectrographic analysis 
1 Spectrophotometric analysis 
6 Sperm .... 
1 Sugar (in auto oil) 
1 Tissue .... 
6 Ultraviolet examination 

3 Miscellaneous 



No. of 



Routine test on tissue analysis for alcohol. Four cases positive. 



CASES. 

Year. 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 



17 

36 

1 

77 
4 
4 
4 
6 
1 
1 

10 
1 
8 
4 

20 

13 
2 

10 
8 
1 
1 

13 
2 

12 
4 
1 
2 
7 

10 



Medical 
Examiner. 


Department. 


Total. 


226 


106 


332 


281 


89 


370 


256 


59 


315 


274 


94 


368 


276 


83 


359 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 



TRAFFIC DIVISION. 

The Traffic Division is responsible for the control of vehicular 
traffic in that area of the city lying within the boundaries of 
Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 16, including the post at Common- 
wealth Avenue and Boston University Bridge. It enforces, 
concurrently with the foregoing divisions, statutes, rules and 
regulations pertaining to traffic within this area. Parking 
violation notices for the entire Department are processed 
through the Traffic Division. 

The Traffic Division also provides a program of safety 
education through the medium of the ]\I-1 Safety Squad. 

Activities. 

The total nimiber of vehicles registered in the Commonwealth 
as of October 31, 1950, reached an all-time high figure, 1,212,826, 
an increase of 102,881 registrations over the preceding year, 
imposing a greater traffic burden upon Boston than ever ex- 
perienced previousl3^ 

During the current year, we have experienced a great amount 
of road construction, both new and replacement. The first 
span of the proposed aerial highway system has been completed 
in the form of the new Mystic Bridge. The James J. Storrow 
Memorial Highway on the Boston side of the Charles River is 
rapidly nearing completion. Black-top surfaces have been 
applied to many of the streets in the downtown area. 

Many changes were made in our traffic pattern to accom- 
modate conditions caused by construction activity. Notably 
among them are the one-way regulations of Tremont Street 
and Beacon Street, rotary traffic around the Boston Public 
Garden, as well as temporary changes in Albany Street, 
Dover Street, Broadway and Harrison Avenue. 

This year marked the passing of authority for the issuance 
of parade permits to the Boston Traffic Commission. The 
usual schedule of parades was conducted, with minor route 
changes made necessary by construction activities. The Boston 
School Cadets parade was confined to the Back Bay district, 
and a marked improvement in traffic conditions resulted. 

Necessary traffic details were provided for the many parades, 
military convoys, conventions and other special events which 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

were held in this city during 1950. The following notables 
were among the manj^ guests of our city who were provided 
escort service: Ali Kahn of Parkistan and the Begum, Vice 
President and Mrs. Barclay, General George C. Marshall, 
Admiral Chester Nimitz, the Secretarj^ of the Navy, the 
Secretary of the Argentine Republic, the Ambassadors of 
Ireland, Holland and Italy, the High Commissioner for Ger- 
many, Senator John Foster Dulles, the Commanders of the 
Legion of Valor and the Disabled American Veterans, the 
National President of the Federation of Women's Clubs, 
•evangelists Billy Graham and Canon Green, actors Jack 
Benny and Eddie Cantor, actress Ann Sheridan and television's 
Ed Sullivan. 

Safety Education. 

The Traffic Division continued to provide a program of safety 
education for the children of our city through the medium 
of the M-1 Safety Squad. It is the duty of the officers of this 
squad to visit all the schools of the city, public, private and 
parochial, where they provide instructions and demonstra- 
tions on the subject of safety. During school vacation periods, 
their program is continued at the various playgrounds, com- 
munity centers and public beaches. 

The officers of this squad appear with various school groups 
on weekly radio programs presented through the facilities 
of Station WMEX. They have also appeared on televised 
programs in conjunction with members of the staff of the 
Registrar of Motor Vehicles. 

Many out-of-town school groups, from places as far dis- 
tant as Barrington, Illinois, have been conducted on tours of 
historic interest by officers of the Safety Squad. Adult groups 
of both social and industrial nature have been addressed by the 
officers, whose services, in this field, are in constant demand. 

The M-1 car, with its public address system, has proved 
\aluable in handling shopping crowds during the holiday 
seasons. It has also been used to good advantage in the con- 
duct of parades. 

Parking. 
On January 1, 1950, a new system for the processing of 
parking notices was inaugurated whereby the Traffic Division 
took over the issuing of such notices for the entire Depart- 
ment. Typing and mailing of the notices was let out to a 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUjNIENT — No. 49. 29 

mailing house. Under this sj'stem much (Uiphcation of work 
has been eliminated, resulting in the clearance of a greater 
volume of notices while requiring the services of fewer officers. 
For the eleven-month period ending November 30, 1950, 
320,751 notices of parking violations were issued by the Traf- 
fic Division for the entire Department, an increase of more 
than 50 per cent over the previous high figure. Because of 
a change in the law governing parking violations, which now 
extends the non-criminal feature to all offences rather than to the 
first three offences as in former years, a reduction in court prose- 
cutions was noted. Another change, imposing a fine of $1 
for the first offence in the downtown area in place of the pre- 
vious warning, contributed to an increase in revenue from this 
source, which, in the eleven-month period ending November 
30, 1950, amounted to .$312,973 in the Central Municipal 
jurisdiction as compared with $134,472 collected therein for 
the entire j^ear of 1949. 

Parking Meters. 
An additional 3,000 parking meters are currently being in- 
stalled in the Back Bay and downtown sections of the city, 
which will bring the total number of parking meters in serv- 
ice to 8,000. Of the 189,186 notices of parking violations 
reported by officers of the Traffic Division, 44,141 Avere for 
infractions of parking meter regulations. 

Traffic Problems. 

Traffic problems are increasing daily under the weight of 
an ever increasing traffic load which, in 1950, has been esti- 
mated as 20 per cent greater than at any previous time in 
our history. 

Major highway improvements designed to alleviate intown 
congestion are beginning to take shape. The plan, however, 
is a long-term one, and its beneficial effects will not be felt 
for a few years to come. 

One cage-type garage has been placed in operation during 
the past year, and others are contemplated. Off-street parking 
facilities have not kept pace with requirements, and much 
improvement can be shown in this direction. 

Trucking concerns continue to operate without proper 
terminal facilities, thereby imposing an additional traffic 
burden upon our overtaxed streets. Considerable relief 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 

would be afforded by the construction of off-street truck ter- 
minals and by the imposition of restrictions on the use and 
occupancj^ of streets by trailers. 

Two of our larger market concerns have announced their 
intention to construct modern plants in the Southampton 
Street district and to relocate at this point. Others are ex- 
pected to follow this example. It is a favorable sign because 
the real solution of our traffic problem in the market district 
lies in the decentralization or the relocation of the market 
facilities. 

A traffic problem of considerable proportions is caused 
by the operation of the drawbridges which span the Fort 
Point Channel. Shipping to and from channel abutters 
requires the closing of three and sometimes four such bridges 
to traffic. These operations seal off all roadways to the south 
of the city proper and bring traffic to a standstill. The solu- 
tion of this problem is to fill in the channel and thus not only 
gi\^e us an uninterrupted traffic flow, but permit the widening 
of Dorchester Avenue and provide additional off-street 
parking areas. 

While progress has been shown in correcting the faults 
of previous parade routes, the basic problem still remains with 
us. That is the scheduling of parades during such hours as 
business houses are open to the public, particularly on Colum- 
bus Day and Armistice Day. It is an impossibility to exer- 
cise proper control of the normal traffic of a business day while 
our streets are occupied for, parade purposes. 

Illegal parking continues to be our number one problem. 
The lack of satisfactory results obtained, despite the record 
prosecution for this type of violation during the past year, 
indicates the inadequacy of the present parking law. 



HORSES. 

On November 30, 1949, there were 16 saddle horses in the 
service, attached to Division 16. 

During the year one horse was purchased and one horse was 
retired to the Massachusetts S.P.C.A. Rest Farm. 

At the present time there are 16 horses in service. 



1950.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS. 
Duties. 
The Bureau of Operations has control of all communica- 
tions equipment, consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and 
telegraph, and through its facilities has directed movement of 
radio cars, police boats and ambulances. 

Accomplishments. 
During the period from December 1, 1949, to November 30, 
1950, personnel of the Bureau managed transmission, recep- 
tion and handling of: 

245,351 outgoing telephone messages and 4,241 toll 
calls made by the Department through our switchboard. 

Approximately 391,816 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the "Turret" through either 
"DE 8-1212" or the department intercommunicating 
system. 

Approximately 414,897 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of Avhich were transferred 
to the "Turret" for handling. 

147,607 teletype messages and 753 telegrams were proc- 
essed; 7,872 of these teletype messages related to missing 
persons. 

7,184 automobiles were reported lost or stolen; 1,734 
were reported stolen in Boston. 

359,388 radio messages were sent, including "Sound 
Scriber" recording of same. 

Four (4) main radio transmitters (Station KCA-860, 2 at 
Police Headquarters and 2 at Suffolk County Court House); 
111 automobiles; 27 combination Patrol-Wagon Ambulances 
and 4 Boat transmitters and receivers; 36 wired broadcast 
amplifiers and 8 pickup receivers were maintained and kept in 
repair by members of this Unit. 

A radio shop is attached to the Department Automobile 
Maintenance Shop, where a 24-hour daily service is maintained. 



32 POLICE COMIMISSIONER. [Jan. 



CRBIE PREVENTION BUREAU. 

The Crime Prevention Bureau handles techniques of law 
enforcement in treatment of juveniles and prevention of 
juvenile delinquency. 

Emphasis has been jilaced on the value of policewomen in 
both of these fields. 

Duties in General. 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended to 
eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies among 
children. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies and divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental at- 
titude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and 
especially educate the public and the police in the problem 
of crime prevention and suppression. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way con- 
tribute to delinquency of children; investigating and taking 
necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged and the 
needy; locating missmg persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist 
in the investigation of cases Avhere women are involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished. 
Inspections and Investigations. 
During the past year there were 20,819 inspections by the 
personnel of this biu-eau in connection with the following 
places : 



Bus and railroad terminals 


Dance halls 


Cafes 


Hotels 


Restaurants 


Theaters 



One thousand three hundred and fifty-three investigations 
involving women, young girls and children were completed. 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



Abuse of female child . 

Adultery 

Assault and battery (in 

decent) 
Begetting with child 
Breaking and entering and 

larceny 
Contributing to delinquency 

of minor 
Desertion of minor children 
Drunkenness . 
Escapee .... 
Failure to send to school 
Fornication 

Fugitive from justice . 
Idle and disorderly persons 
Kidnapping . 
Larceny .... 



Arrests. 

5 Lewd and lascivious cohabi- 
2 tation 

Lewd persons in speech and 
2 behavior ... 

J Neglected child 

Neglect of minor children 
, Robbery (armed) . 

Runaways 

Selling papers without i 
license .... 

Stubborn child 

Suspicious persons 

Violation of alcoholic bever 
age act ... 

Violation of parole 

Violation of probation . 

Wayward child 



17 
2 
4 

11 
1 
1 
2 

26 
1 
4 



Total 



6 
3 
4 
1 
36 

1 
6 
9 

10 
5 

18 
4 

185 



34 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



CITY PRISON. 

The City Prison is located in the new Court House building, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

JXIales arrested in the city for offenses, the prosecution of 
which is Avithin jvu'isdiction of the Central Municipal Court, 
are convej^ed to the City Prison, and, unless otherwise released, 
are held in charge of the keeper until the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, 
they are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1949, to November 30, 1950, 
14,348 men were committed to the City Prison, as follows : 

Drunkenness 13,491 

Suspicious persons 267 

For safekeeping 103 

Assault and battery 69 

Non-support 58 

Larceny 56 

Violation of probation 42 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law .... 32 

Default 27 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 21 

Fugitives from justice 19 

Illegitimacy 18 

Violation of drug law 15 

Adultery 11 

Fornication 11 

Threats and intimidation 9 

Soliciting alms 7 

Vagrancy 6 

Violation of liquor law 5 

Keeping house of ill fame 4 

Lewdness 4 

Violation of city ordinances 3 

Carrying concealed weapons 2 

Delinquent children . 2 

Runaways 2 

Abuse of child 1 

Indecent exposure 1 

Breaking and entering 1 

jNIiscellaneous 61 

Total 14,348 

Five hundred and twenty-four male lodgers were received 
and cared for during the year. 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



35 



HOUSE OF DETENTION. 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, and, un- 
less otherwise released, are held in charge of the chief matron 
imtil the next session of the court before which they are to 
appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, 
they are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, 3,020 were committed, as follows: 



Drunkenness . 

Suspicious persons 

Larceny . 

Runaways 

Idle and disorderly 

Violation of probation 

Lewd and lascivious co 

Adulter}' 

Fornication . 

For safekeeping 

Assault and batterj- 

Neglect of children 

Stubborn children 

Delinquent children 

L(!wdness 

Abandonment 

Violation of drug law 

Abortion 

Various other causes 

Total 



nd 
habit 



arole 
ation 



2,397 

118 

65 

50 

49 

49 

35 

32 

31 

17 

13 

13 

12 

10 

4 

3 

2 

1 
110 

3,01 1 



Recommitments. 



From municipal court 
Grand Total . 



9 
3.020 



Twentj^-one female lodgers were recei\Td and cared for 
during the year. 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM. 
SiGXAL Boxes. 

The total number of boxes in use is 567. Of these 491 are 
connected with the underground system and 76 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
1,896 trouble calls; inspected 567 signal boxes; 16 signal 
desks; 18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs 
have been made on 82 box movements; 21 registers; 70 locks; 
16 time stamps; 30 vibrator bells; 72 relays; 24 electric fans; 
19 motors; 19 generators. This unit is responsible for the 
installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equip- 
ment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 586 
telephone and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
department. It also maintains 46 Headquarters-to-station 
house telephone circuits, 18 teletype-^vriter circuits, 18 radio- 
wired broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits; a 
circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank station of the 
Metropolitan District Police; also a circuit, with equipment, 
in booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel; and 
the intercommunication units throughout the department. 

The following list comprises the property of the signal 
service maintenance at the present time : 

16 open circuit blinker-type signal P.B.X. desks 
717 circuits 
40 test boxes 
400 cells of sulphuric acid storage-type battery 
2,000 taxicab signs 
50 traffic booths 
567 police signal boxes 
20 battery-charging units 
800,000 feet of underground cable 
165,000 feet of overhead cable 
34,650 feet of duct 
SO manholes 
22 motor generator sets 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 

18 motor-driven flashers 
4 Chevrolet trucks 
1 Ford truck 
1 Chevrolet sedan 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service During 
THE Year Ending November 30, 1950. 

{Included in Table XV.) 

Payrolls $80,649.01 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . 40,910.01 

Total $121,559.02 



38 POLICE COMIMISSIONER. [Jan. 



HARBOR SERVICE. 

The duties performed by the Harbor Pohce, Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows : 

Xuml)er of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 970 

Number of vessels ordered from the channel 3 

Number of cases in which assistance was rendered to wharfinger, 2 
Number of vessels granted permission to discharge cargoes in 

stream 2 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water front . . . 333 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 2 

Number of boats searched for contraband 39 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 7 

Number of cases investigated 1,491 

Number of dead bodies recovered 13 

Number rescued from drowning 5 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 101 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 35 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 2,597 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 2& 

Number of dead bodies cared for 13 

Number of hours grappling 20 

Value of property recovered, consisting of l)oats, riggings, floats, 

stages, etc $5,127 

Since Deceml^er 1, 1949, 1,627 vessels from domestic ports 
and 970 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the Port of Boston. 



HARBOR PATROL SERVICE. 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police 
boats, "Michael H. Crowley," ''William H. McShane," 
"William H. Pierce," and "Argus," in the upper and lower 
harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, 
Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay and Neponset River. 

A Chris-Craft patrol boat, equipped with an inhalator, 
stretcher and grappling irons, patrolled the Charles River 
in the vicinity of Spring Street Bridge, West Roxbury, from 
May 30 to October 1, 1950. 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



39 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE. 

There are 185 motor vehicles in the service at the present 
time which are distributed as follows : 



Divisions. 



as 
o 3 

« g 
4< 



Headqua 


rters 


Division 


1 


Division 


2 


Division 


3 


Division 


4 


Division 


6 


Division 


7 


Division 


9 


Division 


10 


Division 


11 


Division 


13 


Division 


14 


Division 


15 


Division 


16 


Division 


17 


Division 


18 


Division 


19 


Traffic E 


ivision 


Unassigned 



Totals 



27 



39 
3 
3 
2 
7 
4 
6 
5 
5 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
5 
5 
9 
119 



30 



1 


49 


- 


5 


- 


4 




3 


- 


10 


3 


9 


4 


12 


- 


fj 


- 


7 


- 


G 


3 


8 


3 


9 


- 


4 


- 


5 


1 


5 


1 


6 


- 


7 


2 


17 


2 


13 



185 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES. 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 10,247 

Calls where services were not required 2,710 

Boston State Hospital 587 

Massachusetts General Hospital 518 

City Hospital (East Boston ReUef Station) 342 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 293 

Southern Mortuary 277 

Carney Hospital 220 

Home 160 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 85 

Faulkner Hospital 80 

Northern Mortuary 72 

Children's Hospital 65 

Beth Israel Hospital 63 

Psychopathic Hospital 62 

Physicians' offices 47 

United States Marine Hospital 47 

United States Veterans' Hospital 45 

New England Hospital for Women 38 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 34 

Police station houses 34 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 27 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 21 

Longwood Hospital 13 

St. Margaret's Hospital 13 

Chardon Street Home 12 

Harley Hospital 12 

Floating Hospital 9 

Soldiers' Home 9 

Hahnemann Hospital 8 

Lahey CUnic 8 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 8 

New England Baptist Hospital 8 

Deaconess Hospital 7 

Kenmore Hospital 7 

Audubon Hospital 5 

Evangeline Booth Hospital 4 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 4 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 4 

Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 3 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 

Allerton Hospital 2 

Bay State Hospital 2 

Bellevue Hospital 2 

Cambridge Relief Hospital 2 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 2 

Massachusetts Women's Hospital 2 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital 2 

Revere General Hospital 2 

Bosworth Hospital 1 

Forest Hills Hospital 1 

Glenside Hospital 1 

Haynes Memorial Hospital 1 

Holy Ghost Hospital 1 

Mt. Auburn Hospital 1 

Sancta INIaria Hospital 1 

Total 16,231 

Automobile Maintenance. 

General repairs, re{)lacement of parts and accessories . . $53,456 25 

Storage 237 47 

Gasoline 65,356 62 

Oil and grease 3,624 64 

Antifreeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses, 

etc 1,470 09 

Total $124,145 07 



42 POLICE COMINIISSIONER. [Jan. 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES. 

During the police year, December 1, 1949, to November 30, 
1950, there were *2,202 licenses to set up and use hackney- 
carriages granted, being an increase of 132 as compared with 
last year. 

There were 325 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. One 
hundred forty-seven of these were restored to the owners, 
and the balance of 178 placed in the custody of the Property 
Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning pubHc 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : 

Hackney Carriage Licenses. {To Set Up and Use the Vehicle.) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,202 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" ajiijlications and 

"changes of ownership") 1,647 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 555 

2,202 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 677 

Carriage license canceled by voluntary surrender .... 1 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 122 

Carriage licenses revoked 5 

Carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1950 (at end of police 
year) — licensed since February 1, 1950 (beginning of 

hackney carriage license year) t 1,518 

Carriages inspected 1,730 

* 555 "regrants." 

t Excludes 5 revoked and 1 voluntarily canceled. 

Hackney Carriage Drivers. 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 5,174 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after 

investigation 5 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected ... 68 

Drivers' licenses granted % 5,101 

X Includes 108 canceled for non-payment. 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 43 

Drivers' licoiisos revoked, 35; of whicli revocations 15 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored; leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 20 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1950 (at end of police 
year) — licensed since February 1 , 1950 (beginning of 

hackney carriage license year) § 4,825 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials 89 

Complaints against owners, drivers and "setups" investigated 1,370 

Daj^s spent in court 29 

^^rticles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 325 

§ Includes 7 female hackney carriage drivers. 



Public Taxicab Stands. 
There are 481 established pii])li(' taxicab stands with capacity 
for 1,254 cabs, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands. 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for the occupation 
of private hacknej^ stands (that is, upon private property) 
by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the j'ear, 28 applications (capacity, 474 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted; of which 1 
stand (capacity, 5 carriages) was abolished and license for 
same canceled. 

Sight-seeing A utomobiles. 

During the year ending November 30, 1950, there have- 
been issued licenses for 21 sight-seeing automobiles and 17 
designated stands for same. One designated stand for sight- 
seeing automobile was abolished. 

There were 40 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted, which 
included 1 canceled for non-payment. Two applications for 
licenses to drive sight-seeing automobiles were rejected; 3 were 
withdrawn. 

Hackney Carriage Violations. 
During the past year, 1,211 tags were issued to taxicab 
drivers for various violations. One hundred twenty-four 
penalties were imposed, which included 35 revocations. This 
system of discipline has continued to result in relieving courts 
of many minor cases which would tend to congest their dockets. 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 
LISTING WORK IN BOSTON. 



[Jan. 



Year. 


Canvass. 


Year. 


Canvass. 


1903 * . . . . 


181,045 


1927 .... 


495,767 


1904 . 






193,195 


1928 . 






491,277 


1905 . 






194,547 


1929 . 






493,250 


1906 . 






195,446 


1930 . 






502,101 


1907 . 






195,900 


1931 . 






500,986 


1908 . 






201,552 


1932 . 






499,758 


1909 . 






201,391 


1933 . 






501,175 


1910 t . 






203,603 


1934 . 






502,936 


1911 . 






206,825 


1935 li . 






509,703 


1912 . 






214,178 


1936 . 






514,312 


1913 . 






215,388 


1937 . 






520,838 


1914 . 






219,364 


1938 . 






529,905 


1915 . 






220,883 


1939 . 






534,230 


1916 t . 






— 


1940 . 






531,010 


1917 . 






221,207 


1941 . 






541,335 


1918 . 






224,012 


1942 . 






539,408 


1919 . 






227,466 


1943 . 






540,517 


1920 . . 






235,248 


1944 . 






543,051 


1921 § . . 






480,783 


1945 . 






549,899 


1922 . 






480,106 


1946 . 






545,506 


1923 . 






477,547 


1947 . 






551,145 


1924 . 






485,677 


1948 . 






548,111 


1925 . 






489,478 


1949 . 






544.898 


1926 . 






493,415 







* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

1 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

1 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

1 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of April 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed 

in January of the present year: 

Male 253,842 

Female 287,920 



Total 541,762 



1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 45 

Listing Expenses. 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
twenty years of age or more, not including the services rendered 
by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $60,043 95 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list . . 23,900 00 

Newspaper notices 880 50 

Telephone rental 44 20 

Stationery 2,109 50 

Directory 35 00 

Total $87,073 15 

Number of Policeman Employed in Listing. 

Januarj^ 3 587 

January 4 576 

January 5 535 

January 6 515 

January 7 435 

January 8 59 

January 9 391 

January 10 366 

January 11 306 

January 12 215 

January 13 159 

January 14 97 

January 15 30 

January 16 32 

Januarj' 17 15 

January 18 15 

January 19 7 

Police Work on Jury Lists. 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 
348, Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in 
ascertaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury 
service. 

The police findings in 1950 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,423 

Physically incapacitated 124 

Convicted of crime 202 

Unfit for various reasons 1 ,087 

Apparently fit 9,493 

Total 12,329 

The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department 
for delivery 9,493 summonses to persons for jury service. 



46 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



SPECIAL POLICE. 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application 
of any responsible corporation or person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1950, were fingerprinted 
by the department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any, searched for by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending November 30, 1950, there were 
1,115 special police officers appointed; 5 applications for ap- 
pointment were refused for cause ; 4 appointments were canceled 
for non-payment of license fee; and 12 appointments were 
canceled for other reasons. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows: 

From corporations and associations 607 

From theaters and other places of amusement . . . 278 

From city departments 190 

From churches 24 

From private institutions 16 

Total 1,115 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



47 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS. 

The following table shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused, and the number revoked: 



Year. 


Applications. 


Granted. 


Rejected. 


Licenses 
Revoked. 


194G .... 


3,381 


3,180 


201 


G 


1947 .... 


2,6G9 


2,571 


98 


3 


1948 .... 


2,730 


2,602 


128 


4 


1949 .... 


2,654 


2,567 


87 


3 


1950 .... 


2,735 


* 12,651 


84 


2 



* 33 canceled for nonpayment. 

t 8 licenses to possess machine guns. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES. 
Public lodging houses licensed by the Police Commissioner 
under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections 33-36, G. L. (Ter. 
Ed.), showing locations and number of lodgers accommodated: 



Location-. 


Number 
Lodged. 


17 Davis Street 

287 Hanover Street 

8 Pine Street 

238 St. Botolph Street 

79 Shawmut Avenue 


33,934 
7,742 

89,593 
1,202 

78 


Total 


132,549 



48 POLICE COMISIISSIONER. [Jan. 



PROPERTY CLERK. 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all 
police buildings, lost, stolen and abandoned property, money 
or other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, and 
all articles and property taken from persons arrested for any 
cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and 
gaming implements which come into the possession of the 
Department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, uniforms and 
equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year 70 motor vehicles came into custody of 
this office, 52 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants 
and 32 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 
15 motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of Department auto- 
mobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. During the year, 
on 5,522 occasions, Department cars were repaired and, on 
2,253 occasions, cars were serviced. Fifty-two Department 
cars and 71 privately-o^vned cars were towed by the Depart- 
ment wrecker. The Department operates a motorcycle repair 
shop, where, on 338 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and 
serviced during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all Department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions, and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving Department vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property. 

Articles on hand December 1, 1949 1,270 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1950 . 1,010 

Total 2,280 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 143 

Worthless 680 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of 

Public Welfare 24 

Sold at public auction 492 

Total number of articles disposed of . . . 1,339 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1950 . . 941 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



49 



SPECIAL EVENTS. 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the num)3er of police detailed for duty 
at each : 



Men. 

Boston Garden, St. Christopher Jamboree ... 12 

Boston Garden, Boston Police Relief Association Ball 315 

Funeral of Patrolman Owen F. Donovan ..." 40 

Funeral of Sergeant Frederick N. AVheeler, I'etired . 10 

Christmas Eve, carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill . 50 
Funeral of Deput}' Superintendent James R. Claflin, 

retired 50 

Funeral of Patrolman Patrick Dolau .... 40 

Funeral of Patrolman Michael J. Breen, retired . . 10 

Xen- Year's Eve celebration 1,500 

New Year's celebrations 1,900 

S3'mphony Hall, Inauguration of Honorable John B. 

Hynes, Maj'or-Elect 10 

Funeral of Sergeant John P. McNealy, retired . . 10 
Funeral of Patrolman William F. Heffernan . . 40 
Funeral of Patrolman John J. Mehegan ... 40 
Visit of General George C. Marshall, U. S. A. . . 110 
Funeral of Patrolman William J. Walsh ... 40 
Funeral of Sergeant Daniel F. Toomey, retired . . 10 
Boston Garden, American Silver Skate Carnival . 25 
Boston Garden, IMarch of Dimes Memorial Ball . 30 
Funeral of Sergeant Edward J. Bojde, retired . . 10 
Funeral of Sergeant John T. Clifford, Sr., retired . 10 
Boston Garden, Boston Fire and Protective Depart- 
ments Annual Concert and Ball .... 35 
Funeral of Mary Curley Donnelly and Leo F. Curley 350 
Funeral of Sergeant Thomas J. Shaw .... 40 
State House, Reception of His Excellency, Governor 

Paul A. Dever 100 

Mj'stic Bridge Authority Parade and Dedication . 100 

South Boston, Evacuation Day Parade . . . 370 

Funeral of Patrolman Michael J. Griffin, retired . 10 

P^uncral of Patrolman Thomas W. Rae, retired . . 10 

Funeral of Lieutenant John Donovan, retired . . 10 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank N. Reynolds, retired . 10 

Cathedral Club road race 100 

]'Jaster Parade on Commonwealth Avenue ... 10 

Antique Automobile Parade 50 

Funeral of Patrolman Arthur P. Larvey ... 40 

Roxbury, Night Before Patriots' Day celebration . 25 

Boston Athletic .\ssociation Marathon .... 280 

City of Boston, Patriots' Day Parade .... 100 



1949. 




Dec. 


1. 


Dec. 


5. 


Dec. 


10. 


Dec. 


13. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


24. 


Dec. 


27. 


Dec. 


31. 


Dec. 


31. 


1950. 




Jan. 


1. 


Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


5. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


14. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


25. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


29. 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb. 


4. 


Feb. 


13. 


Feb. 


14. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


25. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


20. 


ALar. 


20. 


-Mar. 


25. 


Mar. 


27. 


Apri 


[ 8. 


Apri 


9. 


Apri 


115. 


April 18. 


April 18. 


April 19. 


April 19. 



50 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1950. 




April 23 


April 23 


April 30 


May 


3 


May 


4 


May 


5 


May 


7. 


May 


10 


May 


12 


May 


15. 


May 


15 


May 


19 


May 


19 


May 20 


May 20 


May 


21 


jNIay 


21 


May 


24 


May 


25 


May 


27 


May 28 


May 28 


May 28 


May 


29 


May 


30 


May 30 


May 


30. 


June 


1 


June 


1. 


June 


3. 


June 


4. 


June 


5. 


June 


5. 


June 


9. 


June 11. 


June 14 


June 


14 


June 15 


June 16 



Boston Garden, Home for Italian Children Benefit 
Boston Common, Reverend William Graham, Revival 

Meeting 

Boston Garden, Jewish Memorial Hospital Benefit 

Parade of Boston University 

Parade of Boston Trade School 

Parade of Boston Technical High School 
Parade and Memorial Mass of Employees of Metro- 
politan Transit Authority 

Funeral of Lieutenant Edward J. Welsh, retired 
Mechanics Building, Pontifical Mass for parochial 

school children 

Parade and Concert of English High School Band at 

Boston Common 

Msit of His Excellency, John J. Hearne, Ambassador 

from Ireland 

Mechanics Building, Pontifical Mass for parochial 

school children 

Boston Garden, Boston Jubilee Ball .... 
Boston Garden, Boston Jubilee Square Dance 
Boston Common, Boston Jubilee "Baked Bean 

Supper" 

Fenway Park, Suffolk County Council, The American 

Legion, parade and field Mass 

Cemeteries and vicinity, Sunday, May 21 . 

Parade of Boston School Cadets 

Visit of Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan, Pakistan 
Boston Park Department cemeteries on Saturdav, 

May 27 

Parade of Grand Commandery of Knights Templar 
Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday, May 28 
Boston Park Department cemeteries on Sundav 

May 28 

Funeral of Patrolman William H. Evans, retired 
Parade and exercises of Kearsarge Association o 

Naval Veterans 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . 
Boston Park Department cemeteries on Memorifi 

Day 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank J. Ferry ... 
Funeral of Detective John I. Callahan ... 
Dorchester, James Munroe Club road race . 
Old Calvary Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Day 

exercises 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company Parade 
Funeral of Patrolman Daniel J. Cosgrove . 
Funeral of Patrolman Frank J. Burk 
Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises 
Parade of American Latvian National League 
Funeral of Patrolman Albert D. Ruggere 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day Banquet 
Charlestown, "Night Before" Bunker Hill Day cele 

brations, concessions, street patrol, traffic duty, 

sports and band concerts 



Men. 

15 

20 
15 
15 
10 
10 

15 
10 

25 

10 

10 

25 
20 
45 

125 

25 

16 

200 

10 

38 
100 

212 

38 
10 

20 
212 

38 
40 
40 
35 

300 
150 
40 
40 
30 
15 
40 
15 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



51 



1950. 




June 


IG 


June 


17 


June 


17 


June 


18 


June 24 


July 


3. 



July 4. 

July 4. 
July 0. 
July S. 
July II. 
July 13. 
July 14. 
July 19. 
July 24. 
July 31. 
Aug. 1. 
Aug. 1. 
Aug. 3. 
Aug. 4. 
Aug. 7. 
Aug. 14. 

Aug. 16. 

Aug. 17. 
Aug. 17. 
Aug. 21. 
Aug. 22. 

Aug. 23. 

Sept. 4. 
Sept. 10. 
Sept. 12. 
Sept. 14. 

Sept. 19. 
Sept. 23. 

Sept. 23. 
Oct. 1. 
Oct. 5. 
Oct. 8. 
Oct. 11. 
Oct. II. 



Fuiier;il of Detective William E. Jennings . 
Cliarlestown. Bunker Hill Day Parade . 
Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebration.s, conces- 
sions, street patrol, traffic duty, sports and band 

concerts 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day, celel)ratioiis, conces- 
sions 

Boston Traveler "Soap-Box Derby" at Suffolk Downs 

Race Track 

Brighton, "Night Before" Independence Day bonfire 

at Smith Field 

City of Boston, Independence Day, parade and 

exercises 

Various Independence Day cclcbnitions 

Funeral of Patrolman Wendell K. Moulton, retireil 

Boston (-ommon. Independence Day celebration 

Fenway Park, Mayor's Charity Field Day . 

Funeral of Patrolman Anthony J. Iskra 

Braves Field, Lions Club Night .... 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas P. Turley 

Funeral of Patrolman Frank C. Obert, retired 

Funeral of Patrolman Thomas J. Kenney 

Parade of Ancient Order of Hibernians 

Funeral of Patrolman Fiancis J. Kilday, retired . 

Funeral of Captain Jeremiah F. Gallivan, retired 

Archbishop Richard J. Cushing Pilgrimage . 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph E. Piatt, retired 

Parade of Syria Temple Shrine Convention Com 

mittee, Inc 

Parade of Syria Tem])le Shrine Convention Com 

mittee, Inc 

Fimeral of Patrolman John Iv. Pimental, retired . 

Masonic Pilgrimage Paiade 

Funeral of Sergeant Frank E. Oilman, retired 
Boston Common, parade and exercises of Sons o 

Union Veterans of the Civil War 
South Boston Stadium, Finals of Boston Park Depart 

ment Boxing Tournament 

Boston Common, "Jimmy Fund" Benefit . 
Jewish cemeteries and vicinity .... 
Special City Election in Ward 7 . . . . 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Installation of Bishops 
Elect Thomas F. Markham and Eric B. MacKenzie 

State Primary Day 

Hyde Park, parade and competition of the James J. 

Chittick Council, Knights of Columbus . 
Funeral of Captain Gustaf Gustafson, retired 
Boston Park Department football games 
Funeral of Honorable .lohn F. Fitzgerakl 
Boston Park Department football games 
Funeral of Detective Leon H. DeRoehn 
Parade of Boston Universitv 



Men. 

40 
275 

130 

2r> 

45 
25 

100 
100 
10 
25 
50 
40 
25 
40 
10 
40 
20 
10 
20 
15 
10 

80 

80 

10 

100 

10 

20 

15 
25 
30 

80 

25 
2,300 

30 
20 
35 
50 
35 
40 
15 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



1950 




Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


15. 


Oct. 


19. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


28. 


Oct. 


31. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


5. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


- 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


11. 


Nov. 


12. 


Nov. 


19. 



Nov. 19. 

Nov. 21. 
Nov. 22. 
Nov. 23. 
Nov. 27. 
Nov. 28. 
Nov. 29. 



Bevilaqua Associates road race 
East Boston, Columbus Da}^ Parade 
.\ntique Automobile Parade . 
Boston Park Department football games 
Funeral of Patrolman Harry G. Carlson 
Boston Park Department football games 

Rodeo Parade 

Boston Park Department football games 
Roxburj' Daj" Parade .... 
Halloween Celebration .... 
Boston Park Commission Halloween parties 
Boston Park Department football games 
Funeral of Captain James H. Egan, retired 

State Election Day 

Boston .\i-ena, Benefit for the Carney Hospital 

R. H. 'White's Christmas Parade . 

Department of Massachusetts, The American Legion 

Armistice Day Parade .... 
Boston Park Department football games 
Braves Field, Boston Park Department championship 

football game 

Boston Opera House, Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the 

Town" television show 

Boston Garden, St. Christopher Jamboree . 
Funeral of Detective Thomas H. ]\Iulvey 
White Stadium, high school football games . 
Funeral of Sergeant Thomas F. J. McGrade, retired 
Funeral of Patrolman Jeremiah J. ]\Iahoney, retired 
Funeral of Patrolman ]\Iichael J. Clasbj-, retired . 



Men. 
10 

250 
25 
15 
40 
15 
50 
15 

100 
1,150 

150 

15 

15 

2,300 

15 

150 

700 
20 

20 

15 
15 
40 
30 
10 
10 
10 



Note. 

]March 12 to ]\Iarch 18, 1950, inclusive, 14 officers performed a total 
of 98 duties for that period in connection with the ^Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society Flower Show at INIechanics Building. 

May 22 to May 2G, 1950, inclusive, 10 officers performed a total 
of 50 duties for that period in connection with the Northern Baptist 
Convention at Mechanics Building. 

September 29 to October 5, 1950, inclusive, excepting Saturdays and 
Sundaj^s, 9 officers performed a total of 45 duties for that period in 
connection with a recount of paper ballots cast at the State Primary. 

November 9 to November 11, 1950, inclusive, 15 officers performed 
a total of 45 duties for that period in connection with the strike at 
the New England Telephone and Telegraph Compan}^ 

November 13 to November 18, 1950, inclusive, 13 officers per- 
formed a total of 78 duties for that period in connection with the strike 
at the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

November 22, 24 and 27, 1950, 7 officers performed a total of 21 
duties for that period in connection with a recount of paper ballots 
cast at the recent State Election. 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



53 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS. 



1947=48. 



1948=49. 



1949-50. 



Abandoned children cared for 
Buildings found open and made secure 
Cases investigated .... 
Dangerous buildings reported 
Dangerous chimneys reported 
Dead bodies recovered and cared for 
Defective drains and vaults reported 
Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 
Defective gas pipes reported . 
Defective hydrants reported . 
Defective street Ughts reported 
Defective sewers reported 
Defective streets and walks reported 
Defective water pipes reported 
Extra duties performed . 
Fire alarms given 
Fires extinguished 
Insane persons taken in charge 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lost children restored 
Number of persons committed to bail 
Persons rescued from drowning 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Street obstructions removed . 
Water running to waste reported 
Witnesses detained . 



18 

4,478 

103,091 

101 

98 

746 

104 

88 

80 

82 

7,132 

272 

3,211 

162 

39,305 

8,041 

842 

542 

195 

1,197 

3,213 

18 

15,112 

39 

559 

7 



10 

4,383 

114,293 

58 

16 

698 

3 

9 

3 

29 

3,175 

108 

2,416 

20 

32,012 

9,008 

954 

669 

96 

1,509 

2,808 

7 

16,093 

25 

447 



22 

4,358 

114,637 

82 

27 

717 

13 

7 

28 

62 

3,456 

190 

2,814 

59 

31,017 

8,534 

823 

789 

108 

1,407 

2,540 

13 

16,354 

69 

566 

17 



54 POLICE COMMISSIONER. [Jan. 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS. 

On December 1, 1949, there were 650 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 40 died, viz. : 1 deputy superintendent, 
4 captains, 4 lieutenants, 9 sergeants, 19 patrolmen and 3 
annuitants. Fifty-four were added, viz.: 3 captains, 3 lieu- 
tenants, 5 sergeants, 39 patrolmen, 2 civilians and the widows 
of Patrolmen James J. O'Donnell and Joseph Savage, who 
died from disability received in the performance of duty, 
leaving 664 on roll at date, 610 pensioners and 54 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $1,050,761.27, and it is estimated 
that $1,290,072.89 M'ill be required for pensions and annuities 
in 1951. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 35 beneficiaries of the fund at the 
present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$5,582.77 during the past year. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(55) 







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3,300 
4,500 
3,600 

2,750-3,100 
2,750 
2,350 

2,460-4,900 
3,300 
4,700 
4,100 
2,750 
2,750 

3,325-3,500 
3,264 
2,750 
2,750 
2,350 
2,750 
2,750 
3,600 
2,950 
2,750 
2,650 


Patrohvomen 

Biological Chemist .... 

Assistant Biological Chemist 

Chauffeurs 

Chauffeur-Laborers 

Cleaners 

Clerks 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Opera- 
tors. 
Director, Signal Service 

Assistant Director, Signal Service 

Elevator Operators 

Elevator Operator-Laborer . 

Firemen (Marine) .... 

Firemen (Stationar.\-) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Janitresses 

Laborers 

Laborer-Relief Elevator Operator 

Linemen and Cable S[)licers . 

Matron, Chief 

Matron, Assistant Ciiief 

Matrons, A.s.si3tant 









5ft 



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$3,200-3,700 

3,300 

5,100 
2,950-3,200 

3,800 

3,700 

3,460 

3,027.25 
2,800-5,100 

4,100 

2,900 
9.00 per day 








o 
p 
o 


Mechanics 

Property Clerk .... 

Repairmen 

Shorthand Reporters 

Signalmen 

Statisticians 

Stenographers 

Assistant Superintendent of Build- 
ings. 
Telephone Operatore 


2 



1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



Table II. 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department. 





Authorized 
Strength. 


Actual 


Strength. 


Ranks and Grades. 


Nov. 30. 
1950. 


Nov. 30, 
1950. 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus). 


Police Commissioner 


1 


1 


— 


Secretary 


1 


1 


- 


Assistant Secretaries 


2 


2 


- 


Superintendent .... 


1 


] 


- 


Deputy Superintendents 


3 


3 


- 


Captains 


34 


33 


Minus 1 


Lieutenants and 








Lieutenant-Detectives . 


70 


69 


Minus 1 


Sergeants and 

Sergeant-Detectives 


187 


185 


Minus 2 


Patrolmen 


* 2,211 


2,199 


Minus 12 


Patrol women ..... 


tl5 


13 


Minus 2 


Totals 


2,525 


2,507 


Minus 18 



* Includes 214 detective patrolmen, 
t Includes 3 detective patrolwomen. 



60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 






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1950. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



61 



Table IV. 
Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending 
November SO, 1950, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement 
and the Number of Years^ Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at 

Time of 

Retirement. 



Years of 
Service. 



Adair, Clark D. . 








Incapacitated 


53 


29 


Anderson, Herbert F. 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


Barthel, John F. . 








Incapacitated 


56 


27 


Buccigross, Joseph A. 








Incapacitated 


56 


30 


Burke, Francis M. 








Incapacitated 


56 


30 


Burns, Michael L.* 








Incapacitated 


50 


23 


Cawley, John C.% 


- 






Incapacitated 


49 


8 


Celata, Joseph 








Incapacitated 


54 


30 


Chalifoux, Joseph 0., Jr. 








Incapacitated 


56 


30 


Christensen, Thomas S.t 








Incapacitated 


51 


23 


Clark, William J. 








Incapacitated 


52 


30 


Coakley, Martin J. 








Incapacitated 


55 


30 


Concannon, Pfi,trick F. 








Incapacitated 


58 


30 


Connor, John J. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


30 


Connors, John J. 








Incapacitated 


59 


29 


Crowley, John J.* 








Incapacitated 


57 


24 


Crowley, Joseph F. 








Incapacitated 


53 


29 


Cullen, John C. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


30 


Davis, Paul W.t . 








Incapacitated 


52 


21 


Dawson, Joseph B.f . 








Incapacitated 


51 


25 


Devereaux, James L. . 








Incapacitated 


52 


30 


Donovan, John . 








Incapacitated 


67 


36 


Downey, James A.f . 








Incapacitated 


52 


21 


Duncan, Joseph W.* . 








Incapacitated 


55 


23 


Emery, Daniel .\.§ 








Incapacitated 


60 


11 


Fahey, Thomas C. 








Incapacitated 


62 


30 


Faulstich, Joseph N.t 








Incapacitated 


56 


21 


Fox. William A. . 








Incapacitated 


57 


30 


Gannon, Patrick W.§ 








Incapacitated 


69 


U 


Gately, Edward 3.% . 








Incapacitated 


33 


4 


Girvan, George W. 








Incapacitated 


59 


29 


GrifBn, Michael J. 








Incapacitated 


58 


29 


HaU, Charles E. . 








Incapacitated 


65 


30 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table IV. — Concluded. 
Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending 
November SO, 1950, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement 
and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Name. 



Cause of 
Retirement. 



Age at 

Time of 

Retirement. 



Hancotte, John J.f 








Incapacitated 


51 


26 


Herlihj', Leo J. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


30 


Hull, Charles E., Jr. . 








Incapacitated 


.56 


30 


Jackson, William W. . 








Incapacitated 


58 


30 


Jones, Carlton D. 








Incapacitated 


56 


30 


Kreinsen, Henry E. 








Incapacitated 


59 


30 


JNIanning, Lawrence F.J 








Incapacitated 


42 


13 


Marinelli, Agostino S. 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


Milne, Charles H. 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


McCarthy, John F. . 








Incapacitated 


69 


41 


McDonald, Arthur T.t 








Incapacitated 


56 


27 


McFarland, John H. . 








Incapacitated 


53 


31 


McGuire, William 








Incapacitpted 


62 


29 


McMurray, Thomas E. 








Incapacitated 


57 


30 


McNeil, Francis J. 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


Neely, James H.t 








Incapacitated 


50 


24 


Nesbitt, Solomon A. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


30 


Nickerson, Harold E. 








Incapacitated 


54 


30 


O'Connell, Michael E. 








Incapacitated 


57 


28 


Patterson, Charles B. 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


Pierce, James F.|| 








Age 


70 


45 


Powers, John P. . 








Incapacitated 


60 


30 


Purcell, Patrick H. . 








Incapacitated 


68 


37 


Shea, Cornelius . 








Incapacitated 


68 


37 


Smith, Harry K. . 








Incapacitated 


60 


30 


Thomas, William J. . 








Incapacitated 


58 


30 


Tileston, MargaretE.il 








.\ge 


68 


28 


Timerbacka, Athnell . 








Incapacitated 


57 


30 


Van Lier, John P. H. . 








Incapacitated 


57 


30 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, chapter 32, section 57. 

t Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

§ Civilian retired under General Laws, chapter 32, section 57. 

U Civilian retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



Table V. 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1950. 



Rank and Name. 



Lieutenant Andrew Markliard to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Edwin P. Murpliy to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant John F. Pctitti to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Harold .T. Walkin.s to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant Francis O. Wilson to rank of Captain. 
Patrolman Vernon 10. White to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman William C. AVilliams to rank of Sergeant. 
Lieutenant Cornelius F. O'Brien to rank of Captain. 
Lieutenant George W. O'Donnell to rank of Captain. 
Sergeant Francis C. Beringer to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant .Joseph J. Cummings to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Herbert ,T. Langlois to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Edward W. Mannix, Jr., to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Daniel J. JMoynihan to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Patrick J. Murphy to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Francis X. Quinn to rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman James T. Barrett, Jr., to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Edward F. Gibbons to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman James \. Haynes to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Michael .1. McDonough to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman John R. Nee to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman .John .1. Ney to rank of Sergeant. 
Patrolman Fred W. Whittaker to rank of Sergeant. 
Sergeant Robert E. Bradley to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Raymond D. Clifford to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant Harold J. Finan to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant John J. Foley to rank of Liputenant, 
Sergeant Douglas McLeod to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant John J. O'Keefe to rank of Lieutenant. 
Sergeant John Stevens to rank of Lieutenant. 
Patrolman John J. Donovan to rank of Sergeant. 



64 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table V. — Concluded. 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 

November 30, 1950. 



Date. 



Rank and Name. 



1950. 




July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 


July 13 


Patrolman 



Jeremiah J. Hegarty to rank of Sergeant. 
Richard M. Horrigan to rank of Sergeant. 
John J. King to rank of Sergeant. 
Edward P. Logan to rank of Sergeant. 
William J. O'Donnell to rank of Sergeant. 
Francis A. O'Meara to rank of Sergeant. 
William J. Taylor to rank of Sergeant. 
Paul W. Wolon to rank of Sergeant. 



Table VI. 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1950, Who Were 
Appointed in the Year Indicated. 



D.\TE OF 

Appointment. 


1 


•a 


■J 


-T3 
CO C S 

a! 4) t? 

g=l 
-1^ IP o 

g3Q 


■3 

B ^, ° 


"2 

ll 

> c ^ 


_, c" 

£■3 
1^ 


Totals. 




XI 


a 


o 


ij 


-n 


Q 


C^ 




1912 








1 








1 


1916 






- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1917 






- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1919 






1 


2 


11 


13 


35 


25 


129 


216 


1920 






- 


1 


3 


6 


16 


7 


38 


71 


1921 






- 


- 


2 


4 


8 


4 


25 


43 


1922 






- 


- 


- 


8 


3 


.") 


15 


31 


1923 






- 


- 


3 


4 


10 


7 


39 


63 


1924 






- 


— 


1 


5 


1 


2 


27 


36 


1925 






- 


- 


- 


2 


7 


9 


32 


50 


192G 






- 


- 


5 


10 


12 


23 


117 


167 


1927 






- 


- 


4 


3 


7 


10 


46 


70 


1928 






- 


— 


2 


_ 


2 


6 


38 


48 


1929 






- 


- 


1 


3 


26 


12 


91 


133 


1930 






- 


- 


- 


2 


() 


- 


17 


25 


1931 






- 


- 


— 


- 


4 


1 


(i 


11 


1937 






_ 


— 


_ 


3 


28 


20 


108 


159 


1938 






- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1940 






- 


- 


- 


3 


15 


14 


88 


120 


1941 






- 


_ 


— 


_ 


2 


(i 


44 


52 


1942 






- 


- 


— 


_ 


3 


17 


134 


154 


1943 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


8 


49 


57 


1944 






— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


18 


107 


125 


1945 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


41 


45 


1946 






- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


15 


228 


243 


1947 






— 


_ 


_ 


— 


- 


4 


185 


189 


1948 






- 


— 


_ 


-^ 


- 


- 


160 


160 


1949 






— 


— 


_ 


- 




- 


154 


154 


1950 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


76 


76 


Totals . 


1 


3 


33 


69 


185 


217 


1,995 


2,503 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



65 



Table VII. 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1950, Who Were 
Born in Year Indicated. 



Date or Birth. 



to c 2 
- 2.^ 

♦i o a, 

'»3 



5i^ 

0) 



jMO 



Totals. 



1884 








1 








1 


1885 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


1886 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


11 


14 


1887 




_ 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


12 


16 


1888 




— 


- 


1 


2 


2 


1 


7 


13 


1889 




— 


_ 


1 


— 


2 


4 


15 


22 


1890 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


16 


20 


1891 




_ 


_ 


- 


3 


2 


2 


28 


35 


1892 




- 


— 


1 


4 


9 


5 


42 


61 


1893 




- 


1 


3 


4 


8 


9 


58 


83 


1894 




_ 


— 


3 


3 


10 


10 


45 


71 


1895 




- 


- 


2 


6 


9 


10 


48 


75 


1896 




- 


1 


4 


7 


15 


9 


59 


95 


1897 




1 


— 


4 


9 


20 


11 


53 


98 


1898 




_ 


_ 


3 


9 


9 


10 


55 


86 


1899 




- 


- 


2 


3 


5 


13 


39 


62 


1900 




- 


- 


2 


6 


13 


12 


53 


86 


1901 




- 


— 


4 


- 


12 


5 


52 


73 


1902 




— 


_ 


1 


2 


6 


3 


27 


39 


1903 




— 


— 


1 


2 


9 


2 


21 


35 


1904 




— 


— 


_ 


_ 


5 


1 


22 


28 


1905 




- 


— 


- 


1 


7 


6 


14 


28 


1906 




— 


— 


_ 


- 


3 


5 


19 


27 


1907 




— 


_ 


— 


2 


5 


4 


37 


48 


1908 




— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


4 


34 


43 


1909 




_ 


_ 


— 


1 


6 


8 


46 


61 


1910 




_ 


_ 


— 


— 


5 


10 


48 


63 


1911 




- 


_ 


— 


- 


1 


5 


47 


53 


1912 




— 


— 


— 


- 


4 


6 


55 


65 


1913 




— 


— 


_ 


3 


2 


5 


49 


59 


1914 




_ 


_ 


— 


— 


3 


4 


62 


69 


1915 




- 


— 


_ 


- 


1 


8 


61 


70 


1916 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


4 


9 


83 


96 


1917 




— 


— 


— 


_ 


- 


9 


91 


100 


1918 




— 


— 


_ 


— 


- 


7 


83 


90 


1919 




_ 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


8 


84 


92 


1920 




- 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


96 


97 


1921 




— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


85 


85 


1922 




— 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


5 


87 


92 


1923 




— 


— 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


68 


68 


1924 




_ 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


55 


55 


1925 




_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


60 


60 


1926 




- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


49 


49 


1927 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


18 


Totals . 


1 


3 


33 


69 


185 


217 


1,995 


2,503 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1950, was 
41.60 j'ears. 



66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



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1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



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68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table X. 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year Ending 

November 30, 1950. 



Divisions. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation 

Division 1 

Division 2 

Division 3 

Division 4 

Division 6 

Division 7 

Division 8 

Division 9 

Division 10 

Division 11 

Division 13 

Division 14 

Division 15 

Division 16 

Division 17 

Division 18 

Division 19 

Traffic 


1,251 
3,693 
2,133 
4,533 

15,295 

4,141 

2,846 

15 

4,331 

4,515 

2,280 

1,632 

1,828 

5,717 

4,650 

825 

892 

1,097 

19,589 


266 
341 
282 
524 
1,527 
258 
224 

425 

436 

75 

95 

106 

313 

588 

35 

31 

54 

3,226 


1,517 

4,034 

2,415 

5,057 

16,822 

4,399 

3,070 

15 

4,756 

4,951 

2,355 

1,727 

1,934 

6,030 

5,238 

860 

923 

1,151 

22,815 


Totals 


81,263 


8,806 


90,069 



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6 




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^^ =^-3 rt-^ 


2. " "^ 





1950.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 89 

Table XIV. 
Sumher of Dog Licenses Issued During the Year Ending November SO, 


1950. 


Dnisioxs. 


Male. 


Female. 


Spayed. 


Eennels. 


Transfers. 


With 

Fee. 


Without 
Fee. 


Totals. 


1 








44 
1 
245 
500 
655 
743 

965 
602 

1.781 
622 
641 
428 
520 

1,423 
936 
640 


4 

1 

55 

94 

96 

128 

113 
84 

182 
62 
65 
86 

163 

133 
90 
49 


10 

75 
124 
150 
174 

239 
156 
666 
234 
254 
103 
169 
655 
363 
233 


1 

3 
3 

6 

2 

4 
4 


1 
3 
2 
2 

1 


58 
2 

376 

718 

901 

1,045 

1,317 
843 

2,635 
923 
968 
617 
854 

2,216 

1,393 
922 


2 
3 
1 

4 

3 

2 

1 
4 
6 


58 

2 

376 

720 

904 

1,046 

1.321 
843 

2,638 
923 
968 
617 
856 

2,217 

1,397 
928 


Totals 


10,746 


1,405 


3,605 


23 


9 


15,788 


*26 


15,814 



* Total of 26 dog licenses issued without fee, in accordance with law, include: 2 kennels for a domestic 
.aritable corporation, incorporated exclusively for purpose of protecting animals from cruelty, etc. (located 
, Division 4); 2 dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Divisions 16 and 18); anO 
docs licensed beloneine to persons "in military or naval service of the United States in time of war. 



90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



[Jan. 



Table XV. 
Financial Statement for the Yeai^ Ending November 30, 1950. 





Expenditures. 




A. Persoxal Service: 






I. 


Permanent employees . 


$9,207,157 84 




2. 


Temporary employees . 


23,967 47 




3. 


Overtime 


259,795 85 


$9,490,921 16 


B. Cox 


TR.\CTUAL Services: 






1. 


Printing and binding 


$10,062 35 




3. 


Advertising and posting 


609 30 




4. 


Transportation of persons 


18,604 18 




5. 


Express charges 


19 90 




S. 


Light, heat and power . 


41,815 48 




10. 


Eent, taxes and water . 


647 25 




12.. 


Bond and insurance pre 








miums .... 


260 00 




13. 


Communication 


47,712 65 




14. 


Motor vehicle repairs ant 








care .... 


37,132 90 




IG. 


Care of animals 


1,924 00 




18. 


Cleaning .... 


4,011 12 




22. 


Medical .... 


21,170 78 




28. 


Expert .... 


2,175 00 




29. 


Stenographic and copying 


28,483 40 




30. 


Listing .... 


87,073 15 




35. 


Fees, service of venires, etc 


2,342 13 




39. 


General repairs 


111,108 89 


415,152 48 


C. Equipment: 




3. 


Electrical. 


.S5,956 35 




4. 


IMotor vehicles 


39,272 32 




6. 


Stable 


215 30 




7. 


Furniture and furnishings . 


2,888 20 




9. 


Office 


9,028 81 




10. 


Librar}' . . . 


2,171 98 




11. 


Marine 


345 32 




12. 


Medical, surgical, laboratory 


131 82 




13. 


Tools and instruments . 


6,635 87 




14. 


Live stock . . . . 


300 00 




15. 


Tires, tubes, accessories 


15,092 23 




16. 


Wearing apparel . 


141,357 43 




17. 


Miscellaneous equipment 


7,494 54 






Carried forward . 




230,890 17 




. . . . $ 




10,136,963 81 



1950.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



Table XV. — Concluded. 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1950. 



D. 


Supplies: 










1. 


Office 




$00,692 56 






2. 


Food and ice . 


. 


14,723 05 






3. 


Fuel 




37.769 14 






4. 


Forage and animal 


7,579 82 






5. 


Medical, surgical 


, laboratory' 


552 07 






8. 


Laundry, cleaning, toilet 


15,055 07 






11. 


Gasoline, oil and 


grease 


75,826 10 






13. 


Chemicals and c 


isinfectants 


4,963 07 






16. 


Miscellaneous 




20,975 99 


244,136 87 


i:. 


Materials: 










1. 


Building . 




$1,028 04 






10. 


Electrical. 




37,996 72 






13. 


Miscellaneous 




9,950 61 


49,575 .37 


F. 


Special Items: 








2. 


Damages . 




$25 25 






7. 


Pensions and aimuities 


* 80,075 56 














86,100 81 






Total . 




. $10 


,516,776 86 



* Pensions and annuities, and workmen's compensation 
are paid since January 1, 1950, from a special fund not 
included in Police Department allowances. 

Note. — Pensions and annuities since January 1, 1950 . 



$904,685 71 



Receipts. 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . . $57,508 25 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) . 36,143 75 

Refunds, miscellaneous 2,355 40 

Use of police property 1,146 70 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property . 1,210 80 
For itinerant musicians' badges, replacement dog tags, re- 
placement hackney carriage drivers' badges, copies of 
licenses, sale of report blanks, sale of auctioneers' 

record books 807 80 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equip- 
ment 561 26 

For damage to police property (paid at Headquarters) . 192 85 

Total $99,926 81 

Credit by City Collector for money received for damage 
to police property, commissions on telephone and dog 
fines . . ^ . . . 7,242 52 

Grand Total $107,169 ZZ 



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INDEX. 



A 

Page 

Accidents 19, 53, 67 

caused by automobiles 67 

number of, reported 53 

persons killed or injured by, in streets, parks and squares . 67 

Adjustment of claims 91 

Ambulance service 40, 41 

Arrests 11-13, 34, 35, 68-86 

age and sex of 86 

for drunkenness 11,12,34,35,78 

foreigners 11, 69-85 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc .... 77-81, 85 

minors 11, 69-86 

nonresidents 11, 69-85 

number of, by divisions , . 68 

number of, punished b}' fine H 

on warrants 11, 69-85 

summoned by court 11, 69-85 

total number of H, 12, 69-85 

violation of city ordinances 11,12,77 

without warrants 11, 69-85 

Articles lost and found 4g 

Auctioneers 87 

Automobiles 12, 13, 17, 18, 39, 48, 67, 73, 82, 85 

accidents due to 67 

cost of running police 41 

deaths caused by 19, 67 

operating while under influence of liquor 12, 82 

police . 37, 39-41, 48 

public 42, 43, 87 

safety education 28 

sight-seeing 43, 88 

stolen and recovered 17, 18, 31, 73 

used, dealers in 17, 18 

B 

Ballistics unit, B. C. 1 25 

Benefits and pensions 54 

Biological chemist 26 

Buildings 53, 72, 84 

dangerous, reported 53 

(95) 



96 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Bureau of Crime Prevention . . . 32, 33 

duties in general 32 

inspections and investigations 32 

summary of work accomplished 32, 33 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 17-26 

automobile division 17 

ballistics division 25 

biological chemist 26 

criminal identification 20-22 

homicide squad 19 

identification unit 20-22 

lost and stolen property division 19 

missing persons 22, 23 

multilith 24 

photograph}', fingerprinting 20, 21 

summonses 24 

used cars dealers' licenses 17, 18, 87 

warrants 23 

Bureau of Operations 31 

accomplishments 31 

recording of radio messages 31 



c 

Carriages, public 42-43, 87 

articles left in 42, 43 

issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations .... 43 

number licensed 42, 87 

private hackney stands 43 

Cases investigated 20, 53 

Children 11, 22, 32, 34, 35, 53, 81 

abandoned, cared for 53 

delinquents 11 

lost, restored 22, 53 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 11,12,77 

City Prison 34 

Claims, adjustment of 91 

Collective musicians 87 

Commitments 11> 34, 35, 53 

Complaints against miscellaneous licenses 87, 88 

Courts 11, 19, 20, 69-85 

fines imposed by 11 

number of days' attendance at, by officers 11,24 

number of persons summoned by 11,69-85 

prosecutions in 19 

Crime prevention 32 

Criminal identification 20, 21 



p. D. 49. 97 

Page 

Dangerous weapons 47, 70 

Dead bodies 23, 38, 53 

recovered 38, 53 

Deaths S, 19, 23, 26, 60, 67 

by accident, suicide, etc. 19, 67 

of police officers 8, 60 

Department medals of honor 9, 10 

Detective Bureau Established 14-16 

Disability, absence on account of 66 

Distribution of force 8, 56-58 

Disturbances suppressed 53 

Dogs 87, 89, 91 

amount received for licenses for 87, 91 

number licensed 87, 89 

Drivers 42, 43, 87 

hackney carriage 42, 87 

sight-seeing automobile 43, 88 

Drowning, persons rescued from 38, 53 

Drunkenness Hj 12, 34, 35, 53, 78 

arrests for, per day 11 

foreigners arrested for 78 

men committed to Citj' Prison 34 

nonresidents arrested for 78 

total number of arrests for 11, 12, 78 

women committed to the House of Detention .... 35 



E 

Emplojees of the Department 7, 56-58 

Events, special 49-52 

Expenditures 90, 91 

Extra duties performed b}' officers 53 



F 

Financial 54, 87, 88, 90, 91 

expenditures 90-91 

miscellaneous license fees 87, 88, 91 

pensions 54, 91 

receipts 87, 88, 91 

signal service 37 

Fines II 

amount of 11 

number punished bj' 11 

Fingerprint 21 

Fire alarms 53 

defective, reported 53 

number given 53 



98 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Fires 19, 38, 53 

extinguished . . . . 38, 53 

on water front, attended 38 

Foreigners, number arrested 11, 69-85 

Fugitives from justice 75 

Q 

Gaming, illegal 77 

H 

Hackne}' carriage drivers 42, 87, 91 

Hackney carriages - . . . . 42, 43, 87 

Halloween celebration 52 

Handcarts 87 

Harbor service 38 

Homicide unit 19 

Horses . 30 

House of Correction 11 

House of Detention 11, 35 

Houses of ill fame, keeping 34, 35, 78 

I 

Identification unit, B. C. 1 20 

Imprisonment 11, 20 

persons sentenced to 11 

total j^ears of 11 

Income 87, 88, 91 

Information from police journals, requests for 24 

Inquests held 20 

Insane persons taken in charge 53 

Intoxicated persons assisted 53 

Itinerant musicians 87 

J 

Junk collectors 87 

Junk shopkeepers 17, 87 

Jury lists, police work on 45 

Juvenile delinquency 6, 69-85 

L 

Lamps, defective, reported 53 

Licenses, miscellaneous 87 

Listings, police 44, 45, 90, 92, 93 

expenses of 45, 90 

number listed 44, 92, 93 

number of policemen employed in 45 

Lodgers at station houses 53 



p. D. 49. 9d' 

Page 

Lodging houses, public 47, 87 

applications for licenses 87 

authority to license 47 

location of 47 

number of persons lodged in 47 

Lost and found articles 48 

Lost and stolen property unit 19, 48 

Lost children 22, 53 

M 

Maintenance shop 48^ 

Men committed to Citj' Prison 34 

Minors, number arrested 11,69-85 

Miscellaneous business 53 

Miscellaneous licenses 87-88 

amount of fees collected for 87-88 

complaints investigated 87-88^ 

number canceled and revoked 87-88 

number issued 87-88 

number transferred 87-88 

Missing persons 22, 23 

age and sex of 22 

number found 22 

number reported 22 

reported by Police Divisions 23 

Musicians 87 

collective 87 

itinerant 87 

N 

Nonresident offenders • 11> 69-85 

o 

Offenses against 

chastity, etc., Class 9 . . . ... . . . 12, 77-81 

the currencj'. Class 4 75 

family and child. Class 10 81, 82 

the government, Class 1 69 

the license laws. Class 12 12, 84 

motor vehicle and traffic laws, Class 11 . . . . 12, 82, 83 

the person. Class 2 12, 13, 70, 71 

the property. Class 3 12, 13, 72-74- 

public health, Class 7 77 

public justice. Class 5 75-76 

public peace. Class 6 76-77 

public policy. Class 8 77 

recapitulation 85^ 



100 p. D. 49, 

Page 

Parking 29 

Parks, public 67 

accidents reported in 67 

Pawnbrokers 17, 19, 87 

Pensions and benefits 8, 54, 91 

estimates for pensions 54 

number of persons on rolls 54 

paj-ments on account of 54, 91 

Personnel 7, 56-58 

Photographic, etc 20 

Plant and equipment 48 

Police, special 46, 88 

Police charitable fund . 54 

Police Department 7, 8, 54, 56-66 

authorized and actual strength of 59 

distribution of personnel 8, 56-58 

horses in use in 30 

how constituted 7 

Memorial Day observance 50 

officers: 

absence on account of disability 66 

active service, number of officers in 64 

appointed 8, 64 

arrests by 11, 69-86 

average age of 65 

date appointed 64 

detailed, special events 49-52 

detective assigned 8 

died 8,60 

dismissed 8 

in armed service 56-58 

injured 8 

medals of honor 8, 9 

nativity of 65 

pensioned 8, 61, 62 

policewomen 7 

promoted 8, 63-64 

resigned 8 

retired 8, 61-62 

time lost on account of disability 8 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 9 

vehicles in use in 39-41 

work of 11 

Police listing 44,90,92-93 

Police signal box service 36-37 

miscellaneous work 36 

payments on account of 37 

property assigned to 36-37 

signal boxes 36 



p. D. 49. 101 

Page 

Promotion of police 8, 63-64 

Property 11,17-19,48,88,91 

lost, abandoned and stolen . . . . 11, 17-19, 48, 88, 91 

recovered 11, 17-19,48 

sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc 48, 88, 91 

stolen 11, 17-19 

taken from prisoners and lodgers 11 

Prosecution of homicide cases 19 

Public carriages 42, 87 

Public lodging houses . " 47, 87 

R 

Radio, two-way 31 

soundscriber for recording messages 31 

Receipts, financial 87-88, 91 

Requests for information from police journals 24 

Revolvers 47, 87 

licenses to carry 47, 87 

s 

Safety education 28 

Salaries 56-58 

Secondhand articles 17, 87 

Second hand motor vehicle dealers 17, 87 

Sick and injured persons assisted . . . , 38, 53 

Sight-seeing automobiles 43, 87 

Signal service, police 7, 36-37 

Special events 49-52 

Special police 46, 88 

Stolen property 11, 17-19 

recovered 11, 17-19 

value of 11, 17-19 

Street railway conductors, motormen and starters . . . , 88 

Streets 53, 67 

accidents reported in 67 

defective, reported 53, 67 

obstructions removed 53 

Summons filed 24 

T 

Tagging 43 

Traffic conditions 6 

Traffic Division 27-30 

activities 27 

parking meters 29 

problems 29 

safety education 28 



102 P. D. 49. 

Page 

Uniform crime record reporting 12-13 

Used cars 17-18, 87 

licensed dealers 18, 87 

purchases and sales reported 17-18 

V 

Vehicles 28,39-43,87 

ambulances, combination 40-41 

automobiles 39-41 

in use in Police Department 28, 39-41 

public carriages 42 

wagons and handcarts 87 

Vessels 38 

w 

Wagons 87 

total number licensed 87 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 9, 10 

Warrants U, 23-24 

Water pipes, defective, reported 53 

Water running to waste, reported 53 

Weapons, dangerous 47 

Witnesses 11, 53 

fees earned by officers 11 

number of days' attendance at court by officers as . . . 11 

number of, detained at station houses 53 

Women committed to House of Detention 35 

Work of the Department 11 



CITT OF BOSTON t^^^^o PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



1.2. 



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