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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOIM 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 





I ) 



(PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.1 

^Ije Commontuealtf) of Jllassiactusiettsi 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, ,1953 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 






5:> 



CONTENTS 



Page 

I^otter to tlie Governor 5 

Tlic J)ei)artment 6 

Police Force ■ 6 

Signal Service 6 

JOmployees of the Dei)artmenl 6 

Recapitulation 7 

Distribution and Changes 7 

Polic-e Officers Injured While on Duty 7 

Presentation of Medals 8 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 8 

Department Medals of Honor 8 

\\ork of tlie Department 10 

Arrests 10 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting . 1 1 

Detective Bureau 12 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 13 

Automobile Unit 13 

Lost ami Stolen Property Unit 15 

Homicide Unit 15 

Identification Unit 16 

Ballistics Unit 21 

Biological Chemist 22 

Trafhc Division 23 

Activities -3 

Parking 24 

Safety Education 24 

Traffic Problems 25 

Bureau of Operations 26 

Duties 26 

Accomplishments 26 

Crime Prevention Bureau 27 

Duties in General 27 

Summary of Work Accomplished 27 

City Prison 29 

House of Detention 30 

Police Signal Sj'stem 31 

Signal Boxes 31 

Miscellaneous Work 31 

Payments on Account of Signal Service 32 

Harbor Service 33 

Harbor Patrol Service 33 

Motor Vehicle Service 34 

Combination Ambulances 35 

Automobile Maintenance 36 

Horses 36 



4 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Page 

Hackney Carriages 37 

Hackuej" Carriage Licenses 37 

Hacknej'' Carriage Drivers' Licenses 37 

Public Taxicab Stands 38 

Private Hackney Stands 38 

Sight-seeing Automobiles 38 

Hackney Carriage Violations 38 

Listing Work in Boston 39 

Listing Expenses 39 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 40 

Police Work on Jury Lists 40 

Special Police 41 

Carrying Dangerous Weapons 42 

Public Lodging Houses 42 

Property Clerk 43 

Lost and Found Property 43 

Special Events 44 

Miscellaneous Business 48 

Pensions and Benefits 49 

Statistical Tables 51 

Distribution of the Police Force, Signal Service and Other 

Employees 52 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Depart- 
ment 55 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the 

Year 56 

]\Iembers of Department Retired 57 

Officers Promoted 60 

Members of Police Force Appointed in the Year Indicated . 61 

Members of Police Force Born in the Year Indicated . . 62 

Number of Daj^s' Absence from Duty by Reason of Disabilit}^ . 63 

Accidents 64 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions 65 

Arrests and Offenses 66 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 83 

Licenses of All Classes Issued 84 

Dog Licenses 86 

Financial Statement 87 

Male and Female Residents Listed 89 



^\)t Commonloealti) of Msissadjuittti. 



REPORT. 



Headquabters of the Police Department, 
Office of the Police Co>lmissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, l'J53. 

To His Excellency Christian A. Herter, 

Governor of the Commonwealth. 
Your Excellency: 

In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 291, Acts 
of 1906, as amended, I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the activities of the Boston Pohce Department for 
the year ending November 30, 1953. 

The morale of this organization is excellent, and it is a 
pleasure to express my appreciation to the members of the 
Department for their loyalty and efficiency in carrying out 
their assignments. 

I extend my sincere thanks to Your Excellency for the 
support you have given the Department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 

Police Commissioner. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



THE DEPARTMENT 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 
Police Commissioner . . 1 
Assistant Secretaries . . 2 

The Police Force 



Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains .... 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant- 
Detectives .... 

Sergeants and Sergeant-De- 
tectives .... 



1 

2 

33 

83 

229 



Detectives (First, Second 

and Third Grade) . . *193 
Patrolmen .... t2,278 
Patrolwomen .... 9 



Total 



2,828 



* Includes 2 patrolwomen. 

t Includes 15 patrolmen in armed service. 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Chauffeur-Laborers 
Linemen . 



Signal Service 

1 Mechanic 

1 Painter and Groundman 

2 Signalmen 
10 

Total 

Employees of the Department 
(Not included in above) 



Biological Chemist 

Assistant Biological Chem- 
ist .... 

Chauffeur 

Chauffeur-Laborer 

Cleaners .... 

Clerks . : . • 

Clerk-Stenographers . 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine 
Operators . 

Elevator Operators 

Elevator Operator-Laborer 

Firemen, Marine . 

Firemen, Stationary . 

Fireman, Steam 

Hostlers . . . • 

Janitors .... 

Janitresses 



1 Laborers .... 
Laborer-Relief Elevator 

1 Operators . 

1 Matron, Chief 

1 Matron, Assistant Chief 
4 Matrons, Assistant 

30 Mechanics 

2 Medical Examiner 
Proi)erty Clerk 

2 Repairman 

8 Shorthand Reporters 

1 Statisticians . 

2 Stenographers 
7 Supeiintendent of ikiildiiifis 

1 Assistant 

9 Telephone Operators . 
43 

2 Total 



1 
1 
9 

25 



13 



2 

2 
1.5 



10 



195 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 7 
Recapitulation 

Police Commissioner . 1 

Assistant Secretaries 2 

Police Force 2,828 

Signal Service 25 

Employees 195 

Grand Total 3,051 



Distribution and Changes 
Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. Dur- 
ing the year, 92 patrolmen were appointed; 17 patrolmen re- 
signed (1 while charges were pending); 3 patrolmen were 
dismissed; 14 patrolmen were reinstated; 6 sergeants promoted 
to lieutenants; 21 patrolmen promoted to sergeants; 2 lieu- 
tenants assigned as lieutenant-detectives; 3 sergeants assigned 
as sergeant-detectives; 3 patrolmen assigned as third-grade 
detectives; 1 captain, 3 lieutenants, 7 sergeants, 1 patrol- 
woman and 66 patrolmen retired on pension ; 1 deputy superin- 
tendent, 2 sergeants and 10 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, 
IV and V.) 



Police Officers Injured While on Duty 
Police officers injured performing police duty during the 
past year shoAving number of duties lost. Also number of 
duties lost by police officers injured prior to December 1, 1952. 



How Injured 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30. 1953 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Sucli Men 


Number of Duties 
Lost This Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1952 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pursuing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


64 
17 

54 
131 


1,167 
177 

1,193 
1,907 


797 

223 

1,371 
1,244 


Totals . 


266 


4,444 


3,635 



8 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Presentatiox of Medals 
The Walter Scott Medal for ^'alor for 1953 and Department 
Medals of Honor, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, 
were awarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 9, 1953, as 
follows: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor to Detective Edward L. Twohig, Jr., 
OF Division 4 

Detective Edward L. Twohig, Jr., of Division 4, is hereby 
awarded the AValter Scott ]\Iedal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious dut}^ performed on May 17, 
1953. 

Detective Twohig, then a patrolman, while on his way to 
work, was informed that several variety stores had been held 
up by armed bandits and one woman was shot in the head. 
Shortl}" after, the officer observed a man running from a 
variet}'- store toward a parked car. He immediately grappled 
with the man until he was wounded by a burst of gunfire from 
the parked car. Despite his wound he held on to the prisoner 
and fired after the fleeing car. Officer Twohig called upon a 
citizen for assistance, gave him his gun to cover the prisoner, 
and then collapsed. This arrest brought about the appre- 
hension of a gang which had been involved in a number of 
armed holdups. 

Department Medals of Honor 
Patrolman John J. Coffey of Division 17 is awarded a De- 
partment Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed on 
December 31, 1952. Patrolman Coffey, within a short time 
after receiving information of an assault and robberj^ in a 
market, traced the culprit to a drugstore. As Patrolman 
Coffey entered the store, the criminal attempted to pull a 
loaded revolver from his pocket but he was overpowered by 
the officer after a struggle. He was later identified with several 
other robberies. 

Patrolmen Daniel E. Donahue and Peter J. Donovan of 
Division 15 each is awarded a Department Medal of Honor for 
meritorious duty performed on Januar}'- 20, 1953. These 
officers, while patrolling in a cruising car, observed a man 
whose description tallied with that of a man wanted for armed 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUAIEXT — Xo. 49. 9 

robbery. Thc}' took him into custod.y and he was found to 
have a fully-loaded automatic pistol in a shoulder holster. He 
was later identified by the ^■ictims of several armed robberies. 

Patrolmen Thomas F. Mills and John A. Schofield of Di- 
vision 16 each is awarded a Department Medal of Honor for 
meritorious duty performed on Januarj^ 22, 1953. These 
officers, while patrolling in a cruising car, received a radio 
message giving the registration number and description of 
three men wanted for holding up a gas station attendant in 
Quincy, Mass. Sometime later they observed three men in a 
lunchroom answering the descriptions. They were placed 
under arrest and one of them w^as found to have a fully-loaded 
pistol. Part of the stolen money was later found in the get- 
away car. 

Patrolman William R. Grew of Division 4 is awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed 
on December 24, 1952. Patrolman Grew, while patrolling his 
route, heard a woman screaming and then observed that she 
was being pursued by a man who was pointing a revolver at 
her. The officer overtook the man and after a struggle suc- 
ceeded in wresting a fully-loaded revolver from him. 

Patrolman Edward A. Curie}' of the Traffic Division is 
awarded a Department JMedal of Honor for meritorious duty 
performed on July 24, 1953. Patrolman Curley, while per- 
forming traffic duty in Dewey Square, was attracted by shouts 
of a holdup. He then observed a man with a revolver running 
along Atlantic Avenue and gave chase. After firing several 
shots he finally caught up with the man and disarmed him 
after a struggle. The prisoner was identified by the victim of 
the holdup. 

Patrolman Joseph P. Toomey of Division 18 is awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed 
on September 12, 1953. Patrolman Toomey, after spending 
many hours while off dut}^ investigating an armed holdup of 
a cleansing store, finally apprehended a man in a downtown 
hotel who answered the description of the wanted man. Upon 
questioning, he admitted 18 robberies of cleansing shops in and 
around Boston. 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Arrests 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 93,294, as against 84,288 for 1952. 

There were 17,764 arrests on warrants and 33,378 without 
warrants; 42,152 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 83,703; of females, 9,588; 
of foreigners, 2,961; of dehnquents, 3,029; of minors, 7,920; of 
nonresidents, 31,176. 

The number of persons punished by fines Avas 34,604, and 
the assessment of fines imposed b}^ the courts amounted to 
$163,282.57. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers 
was 40,334, and the witness fees earned amounted to $19,065.90. 

There were 26,451 persons arrested for drunkenness, an 
average of 72 per day, as against 26, 182 or an average of 72 per 
day in 1952. 

One hundred fifty-eight persons were committed to the 
State Prison; 1,945 to the House of Correction; 35 to the 
Women's Prison; 118 to the Reformatory Prison; and 3,044 to 
other institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 1,829 
(705 sentences were indefinite). 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was 
$151,625.16. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to $3,023,- 
770.57, and the value recovered amounted to $2,312,608.23. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what percent- 
age of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This percentage 
is so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of this 
class of arrrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in making 
comparison of Boston with other cities, either of the cost of 
policing or of criminal statistics, that 33 per cent of the arrests 
in Boston is of nonresidents, whereas other cities have but a 
negligible percentage of arrests of nonresidents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1953, as com- 
pared with the same period ending with November 30, 1952, 
a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major offenses 
may be of interest and is submitted herewith: 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



11 



Offenses 



Year Ending 

November .30, 

1952 



Arrests 



Year Ending 

November 30, 

1953 



Arrests 



Aggravated assault 

Auto', oixirating so as to endanger .... 

Auto', operating under the influence of litiuor 

Auto', thefts (including attempts) .... 

Burglary, breaking and entering (including 
attempts) 

Drunkenness 

Larceny (including attempts) 

Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Rape (including attempts) 

Robbery (including attempts) 

Totals 



287 
644 
509 

1.37 

1,206 

26,182 

2,753 

106 

57 

21 

62 

248 



312 
618 
487 
151 

1,201 

26,451 

2.708 

146 

62 

23 

100 

295 



32,212 



32,554 



The balance of arrests consisted largely of so-called minor 
offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city ordinances, 
gaming and miscellaneous offenses. 



Uniform Crime Record Reporting 
This department, during the past year, has continued its 
cooperation in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses : 

1 . Felonious homicide : 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

2. Rape 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated assault 

5. Burglary — breaking and entering 
0. Larceny: 

(a) $50 and over in value 
(6) Under $50 in value 
7. Auto, theft 



12 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



The following comparative tables show the number of certain 
offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 1952, 
to November 30, 1953, as against December 1, 1951, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1952. 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting — Comparative Table 



Offenses 


December 1, 1952, to 
November 30, 1953 


December 1, 1951, to 
November 30, 1952 




Reported 


Cleared 


Reported 


Cleared 


Aggravated assault 


256 


179 


218 


188 


Breaking and enterins 


1,090 


637 


1,200 


674 


Larceny (under $50) . 


2,789 


1,171 


2,661 


1,095 


Larceny ($50 and over) 


1,806 


818 


1,804 


813 


Larceny of automobile 


2,167 


836 


2,192 


619 


Manslaughter by negligence . 


54 


41 


56 


48 


Murder and non-negligent man- 
slaughter 


21 


17 


20 


19 


Rape 


62 


53 


59 


57 


Robbery 


267 


175 


198 


124 


Totals 


8,512 


3,927 


8,408 


3,637 


A recapitulation of the foregoir 


ig shows the following: 






Cases 
Reported 


Cleared 


1952 




8.408 


3,637 


1953 .... 






8,512 


3,927 



DETECTIVE BUREAU 
A Detective Bureau was established in the Boston Police 
Department on November G, 1950, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. Detectives assigned 
to this Bureau are detailed to the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation and the various Police Divisions. 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCl .AIEXT - No. 49. 13 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several 
units, namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, 
Homicide, Lost and Stolen Property, Identification, Missing 
Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the follow- 
ing phases of police work and investigations: banking, express 
thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, pawn- 
brokers, junk shops, second-hand article dealers, pickpockets, 
shoplifters. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also handle 
cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of in- 
vestigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every way possible with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and prose- 
cution of criminals. 

Automobile Unit 

This unit in^'estigates all reports of automobiles stolen and 
is in daily communication with police authorities of the United 
States and Canada. Many investigations are made in co- 
operation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post 
Office Department and immigration authorities of the United 
States. 

The automobile unit index contains records of cars stolen 
in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased 
and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by 
missing persons and cars whose operators are wanted for 
various offenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the 
department and the automobile luiit through information 
obtained from this index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealers' Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this unit. Frequent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this unit during the year identified a number of automobiles 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their owners, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes bj' means of their positive identifications. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1953 



Month 


Bought by 


Sold by 


Sold by 


Dealers 


Dealers 


Individuals 


1952 








December 


2,709 


2,750 


1,570 


1953 








January 


2,809 


3.018 


1,519 


February 






2,596 


2,905 


903 


March . 






3,981 


3,954 


1,601 


April 






3,647 


4,105 


1,530 


May 






3,285 


3,905 


1,383 


June 






3,488 


4,096 


1,382 


July . 






3,114 


3,493 


1,214 


August . 






3,214 


3,643 


1,047 


September 






2,948 


3,215 


953 


October . 






3,216 


3,568 


1,015 


November 






3,017 


2,703 


981 


Totals . 


38,024 


41,355 


15,098 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year 
Ending November 30, 1953 



Month 


Reported 
Stolen 


Recovered 
During 

Month 


Recovered 
Later 


Not 
Recovered 


1952 










December . 


216 


200 


12 


4 


1953 










January 


157 


143 


11 


3 


February 








157 


148 


9 





March 








233 


220 


11 


2 


April . 








172 


161 


8 


3 


IViay . 








224 


210 


12 


2 


June . 








185 


171 


12 


2 


July . . 








172 


166 


2 


4 


August 








187 


176 


8 


3 


September 








202 


194 


2 


6 


October 








204 


192 


6 


6 


November 








167 


145 


9 


13 


Totals 


2,276 


2,126 


102 


48 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



15 



Lost and Stolen Property Unit 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities and towns through- 
out the United States forward lists of propertj- stolen in such 
places. All pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers submit 
daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison 
of the description of articles reported lost or stolen and those 
articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted 
in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property 
and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and second-hand shops are inspected daily, for 
the purpose of identifying property which may have been 
stolen. 

HoMiciDK Unit 

Officers of this unit investigate all homicide cases and 
interrogate persons involved in oi- who have knowledge of 
crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion and other violent 
crimes. They prepare, supervise and present evidence at 
inquests. 

Deaths Reported 



Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Burns 

Drowning 

Electricity 

Elevator . 

Exposure 

Falling objects 

Falls 

Homicides 



1 
9 
20 
15 
1 
2 

1 

4 

30 

22 



Motor vehicles 
Natural causes 
Poison 
Railroad . 
Railway . 
Shooting (accidental) 
Stillborn . 
Suicides . 



Total 



Abortion . . . . 

Assault and battcrx' 
Assault to rob 
Assault and batterj' (sharp 

instrument) 
Assault and battery (intent 

to murder) .... 
Assault and battery (with 

weapon) . . . . 

Auto 

Poison 

Gunshot 



Cases Presented for Prosecution 

3 Extortion .... 

1 Inciting to commit perjuiy 

2 Manslaughter (auto) . 
Murder 

17 Violation firearm law . 



Total 



52 

1,025 

2 

3 

4 

1 

10 

46 

1,254 



I 

2 

29 

20 

9 

98 



10 
Inquests 



Total 



16 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Three hundred and ten cases of violent deaths were in- 
vestigated by the Homicide Unit. Presiding justices of the 
courts deemed it unnecessary' to conduct inques'ts in three 
hundred and five. 

Recapitulation of Homicides 

MUKDER 22 

Sixteen defendants awaiting trial. 

Three defendants, prosecuted for murder, pleaded guilty to 

manslaughter and were sentenced to State Prison. 
Two murders still under investigation as to perpetrators. 
One defendant prosecuted for murder. No probable cause 

found. 

Six i)ersons were unlawfully beaten to death. 

3 with question of robbery as motive. 
2 husband and wife difficulty. 

1 argument over liquor. 
Five persons were unlawfully shot to death. 

4 husband and wife difficulty. 

1 argument over female. 

Five i)ersons were unlawfully stabbed to death with a 
sharp instrument. 

2 husband and wife difficulty. 
1 argument over female. 

1 argument while drinking. 
Two persons were unlawfully strangled to death. 

1 husband and wife difficulty. 

1 argument while drinking. 
Three persons unlawfully burned to death in dwelling 

house set on fire by arsonist. 
One new-born infant smothered to death by mother. 

Identification Unit 

Records — Activities 

Ftecorded in the Main Index File 725,120 

Recorded in the Female Record File 18,297 

Recorded in the Male Record File 204,371 



Photography 

Number of photographs on file November 30, 1952 

Made and filed during the year 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, 1952 
Number of "foreign" photographs received during the year 

Totals 



413,491 

12,640 

24,065 

1,068 

451,264 



1953.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



17 



Photographs: 

Number on file; in the "Local Segregated" file (gallery) 
Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file . 
Identification of ci-iminals arrested locally (gallery) 
Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere! (galleiy) . 
Scenes of crime photographed 



Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State l^ureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns .... 

Number of rectigraph pliotographs . 
Number of negatives of criminals 
Number of prints made from same . 
Number of exposures of laUuit fingerprints 
Number of prints from same .... 
Number of exposures of Pantoscopic camera . 
Number of re-orders of criminal pliotographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made . 

Prints made from same 

Number of photographs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime visited 
Number of exposures (4" bj' o". camera) 
Number of prints of same 



7<),297 

25,133 

67 

29 

273 



5,05G 
792 

4,572 

2,527 

12,635 

847 

1,476 

7 

1,120 

9 

45 

138 

1,062 

1,274 

3,041 



Fingerprint File 
Number on file November 30, 1952 . 

Taken and filed during the year: 

Male 

Female 



190,301 



Received from other authorities: 

Male 

Female 

Number on file November 30, 1953 . 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns . . . . , 



Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 

Special police officers 

Hackney carriage drivers 

Auxiliary police 

Civilian employees 

Civilians fingerprinted for National Defense, Security, etc. . 
Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1952 

Total number of fingeiprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1953 



1,486 
322 

510 

112 

192,731 

1,808 

3,577 

108 

138 
144 

2,763 

195 

12 

3,654 

72,6«)3 
75,795 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Five-Finger System, of Fingerprmiing 
(Established May 27, 1952) 

Number of 5-finger cards in file November 30, 1953 . . . 4,696 

Number of main-index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system, 

November 30, 1953 2,348 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes filed in Identifi- 
cation Section, November 30, 1953 396 

Number of connections made by latent prints since system 

established 29 

Crim in al Records 

Requests received bj- telephone 1,256 

Requests received by correspondence 6,683 

Requests for certified records 1,404 

Requests for jury records 2,133 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses . . . 11,663 

Total 23,139 

Requests received from various public agencies: 

U. S. Marine Corps 306 

Stragglers and Deserters (Army and Navy) .... 3,652 

Auxiliary Police applicants 195 

Grand Total 27,292 

Missing Persons 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston . . . *1,513 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,185 

Total number still missing 328 

* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous 
cases of children reported missing who were found or returned within a few hours after 
report was made. 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 



Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 
















Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years. 


213 


75 


190 


65 


23 


10 


Over 15 years, 
under 21 years. 


268 


224 


229 


192 


39 


32 


Over 21 years, 


471 


262 


331 


178 


140 


84 


Totals 


952 


561 


750 


435 


202 


126 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 19 

Reported missing in Boston 1,513 

Reported to this de|)artment from outside departments and 

agencies 4,812 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) . . . 1)60 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and 

towns) 1,535 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Girls' 
and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools" 274 

Total number of persons reported missing . . . 9.094 



Persons 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 



sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 
sion 



Reported Missing by Police Divisions for 

1 (North End section) 

2 (Do\vntown section) 

3 (West End section) . 

4 (South End section) 

6 (South Boston district) 

7 (East Boston district) 
9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

10 (Roxbur^y Crossing section) . 

11 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

14 (Brighton district) . 

15 (Charlestown district) 

16 (Back Bay district) 

17 (West Roxbury district) 

18 (Hyde Park district) 

19 (Mattapan district) 



Past 



Total 



Year 

11 



27 

149 

80 

57 

211 

252 

75 

53 

43 

62 

38 

30 

48 

*377 

1,513 



Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital, a mental institution 



Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 

Descriptive circulars sent out 

Tracers sent out on persons reported missing . 



t618 

3,942 

530 

1,680 



t Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the 
department. 



In 48 cases of unknown dead bodies. 26 were identified through finger- 
print impressions. 

One person afflicted with amnesia was identified. 



20 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Warrants 

Warrants received 3,741 

Arrested on warrants 2,820 

Warrants returned without service 773 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units within the department 

and to other jurisdictions 3,741 

Active warrant cards on file issued to the Boston Police Depart- 
ment 7,350 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department forwarded 

to other cities and towns in this State 599 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department for persons 

now out of State lOG 

Active warrants received from other departments throughout 

Massachusetts for service (cards in our files) . . . . 515 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers . . . 105 

Summonses 

Total number received from outside cities and towns for service 

in Boston 4,990 

Total number served 4,725 

Total number not served 265 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section 

for service in outside cities and towns . . . . . 25,251 
Total number served 24,689 

Total number not served 562 

Requests for Information 
Information furnished from police journals in regard to accidents 

and thefts 3,276 

Daj's in court 15 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 21 



BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation expert in ballistics, explosives and munitions. 
All evidence found at the scene of crime where firearms or 
explosives were used is examined. Suspected weapons are 
catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent 
bullets and cartridge cases from these weapons are filed. Cases 
involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the 
various courts. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to the same, 
and tear gas equipment have been inspected and serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition b}^ the 
courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are returned 
to the rightful o\\Tiers. A file is kept on stolen firearms and 
checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen Property 
Unit and at the files of the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Safety. 

When firearms, property of the United States, are found 
used in crime or recovered otherwise, such property is returned 
to the proper mihtary or naval authorities after cases are 
disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police depart- 
ments, federal agencies, military and naval intelligence units. 

Emergexcy Equipment on All Divisions 
All pohce divisions and several units have on hand a supply 

of emergency equipment. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns 

and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced 

whenever necessary. 



22 



POLICE COiMIMISSIONER. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST 
The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in 
its nature, the frequency of any particular type being governed 
by the cu'cumstances of the cases. A breakdown into types 
indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



^laterial 
Sought 



Acetone . 

Alcohol, ethyl 

Alcohol, methyl 

Alcohol, iso-propyl 

Alkaloids (general) 

Arsenic . 

Barbiturates . 

Benzoic acid . 

Caffeine . 

Carbon monoxide . 

Chloral . 

Chlorides (drowning) 

Cocaine . 

Cj'anides 

Demerol . 

Drugs, powders, tablets 

Dyes 

Ergot 

Heroin . 

Lead 

Mercury . 

Morphine and derivativ 

Nicotine . 

Paraldehyde . 

Phosphorus . 

Salicylates 



No. 

of Tests 

2 
268 
*22 
1 
5 
7 

74 
2 
1 

41 
3 

5 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 
1 
2 

6 
2 

1 
5 
1 

12 



Material 

Sought 

Acid phosphatase . 
Auto, examination of . 
Bloodstains 
Bloodstains, typing 
Bottle contents, analj^sis of 
Casts .... 
Clothing .... 
Dirt, debris, etc 
Feces .... 
Glass .... 
Hair .... 
Inflammables 
Microscopic examination 
iVIiscellaneous 
Photographs . 
Photographs, infra-red 
Powder residue, hands . 
Powder residue, clothing 
Scene, examination of . 
Spectrographic analyses 
Spectrophotometric, ultra- 
violet .... 
Spectrophotometric, visual 
Spermatozoa . 
Strj^chnine 
Tissue .... 



No. 
of Tests 



9 

58 

2 

6 

2 

76 

2 

1 

6 

2 

2 

5 

25 

12 

4 

4- 

7 

8 

1 

91 

54 

5 

1 

4 



* Routine tests on tissue analj-ses — five positive. 



Cases 

Medical 

Year Examiners Department Total 

1949 274 94 368 

1950 . . . ■ 276 83 359 

1951 332 93 425 

1952 319 98 417 

1953 320 129 449 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 23 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 

The Traffic Division embraces the area lying within the 
jurisdiction of Divisions One, Two, Three, Four and Sixteen as 
well as the traffic post at Boston Universit}'- Bridge, Division 
Fourteen. It is charged with the enforcement of statutes, 
ordinances, rules and regulations pertaining to traffic within 
this area, the processing of parking violation notices for the 
entire department and the providing of a safety educational 
program directed to the general public. 

Activities 

During the past j-ear we were confronted with an increasing 
volume of traffic. While exact figures for the City of Boston 
are not available, it is conservatively estimated that the daily 
volume of traffic within the city is approximately 20-25% of 
the total registration of the Commonwealth. This figure at 
October 31, 1953, reached 1,410,269. A year ago it was 
1,305,240. 

Major construction in the form of the new central artery 
continues across the section of the city lying between the 
Charles River and Fort Point Channel, requiring traffic detours 
at several points along its length. 

The Broadway Bridge was out of service for the greater 
part of the year while undergoing extensive repair. The Warren 
Avenue Bridge was closed to heavy trucking during the entire 
year and the Dover Street Bridge was seriously damaged by 
fire October 22, 1953, closing to traffic for an indefinite period. 
Necessary detours were established for the rerouting of traffic 
which would normally flow over these bridges. 

A full schedule of parades was conducted during the year 
with traffic detours arranged by this division. Considerable 
congestion was experienced during the conduct of the Columbus 
Day parade and the Armistice Day parade, a situation which 
cannot be avoided while such events are scheduled during 
hours when retail stores are running on a "business as usual" 
basis, as is the case on both holidays. 

Traffic details were provided for several emergency situations,, 
including multiple alarms of fire aboard the U.S.S. Leyte and 
the S.S. Falcon. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Escort sei'Aice was pl•o^•ided for many distinguished visitors 
to our city, including President Eisenhower, Ex-President 
Truman, the Royal Family of Greece, the Chancellor of West 
Germany, the Japanese Ambassador, General \'an Fleet, 
Bishop Sheen, the Greek Orthodox Bishop, various dignitaries 
of the Lutheran Church, the Commander of the AM VETS 
Association, ]\Iary Pickford, Danny Thomas and Ed Sulli^^an. 

Parking 

During the year ended November 30, 1953, the Traffic 
Division issued a total of 457,406 notices of parking violations, 
representing the output of the entire department. Of this 
figure, 283,121 were reported by officers of the Traffic Division, 
the balance by officers of the other divisions of the Department. 

The parking law was amended by the Legislature as of 
May 1, 1953, providing a more lenient schedule of penalties, 
extending to twenty-one days the period in which the violator 
might return the notice of violation, and requiring further 
notice by the court before a warrant for this type of violation 
might issue. 

On November 9, 1953, parking was restricted in the down- 
town section of the city between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 
9:30 A.M. on a sixty-day trial basis. 

While the purpose of one of the recent amendments to the 
parking law was to permit the violator more time in which to 
return the notice of violation and thus relieve the heavy court 
docket, the very opposite condition prevailed and court prose- 
cutions for such failures reached unprecedented heights, a 
further indication that a real solution to the parking problem 
hes in a parking law with "teeth" in it. 

Revenue from parking violations in the Central Municipal 
jurisdiction amounted to $348,890.37 for the year ended 
November 30, 1953. Parking meter revenue for the same 
period amounted to $610,496.00. 

Safety Education 

A safety education program is conducted by the Traffic 
Division through the medium of the M-1 Safety Squad. 

Complete coverage is made of all schools located within the 
city-public, parochial and private. Safety talks are provided 
by the officers of this squad with actual demonstrations of the 
principles of safety in action. 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 25 

Children are given an opportunity to appear on weeklj^ 
radio programs with their teachers under the supervision of 
the safety officers and broadcast through the facihties of 
Station W M E X. 

The safety program is continued through tiie vacation 
periods with appearances at the various phiygrounds, beaches 
and other places where children gather. 

The services of the safetj^ officers arc also made available 
to industrial groups for lectures on the subject of safety. 
Their services arc also employed in connection with the conduct 
of our many parades and in the handling of pedestrian traffic 
during the seasonal shopping peaks. 

Traffic Problems 

While various regulations have been adopted with a view 
to solving Boston's parking situation, it still remains as the 
number one traffic problem. Though by no means a cure-all, 
more adequate off-street parking facilities and a much stiffer 
code of penalties for violators would go a long way toward 
easing the present congestion. 

Truck terminals in the down-town section of the city add 
somewhat to the traffic burden and it is recommended that such 
enterprises either provide off-street facilities for the conduct 
of their business or re-locate on the fringe area of the city. 

The new central artery presents a major traffic problem. 
This is to be expected while construction is under way and 
considerable attention must be given to it. 

Parades conducted through the shopping district while 
stores are open for business constitute a serious traffic problem 
which can be corrected in a practical waj^ by scheduling the 
parades during the morning hours w^hen the stores are closed.. 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS 

Duties 
The Bureau of Operations has control of all communica- 
tions equipment, consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and 
telegraph, and through its facilities has directed movement of 
radio cars, police boats and ambulances. 

Accomplishments 
During the period from December 1, 1952, to November 30, 
1953, personnel of the Bureau of Operations managed trans- 
mission, reception and handling of: 

301,442 outgoing telephone messages and 4,280 toll 
calls made by the department through our switchboard. 
Approximately 415,280 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the ''Turret" through either 
"DE 8-1212'' or the department intercommunicating 
system. 

Approximately 411,354 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of which were transferred 
to the "Turret" for handling. 

171,430 teletype messages and 824 telegrams were 
processed; 9,094 of these teletype messages related to 
missing persons. 

7,618 automobiles and registration plates were reported 
lost or stolen and 6,352 were reported recovered. 

418,325 radio messages were sent, including "Sound 
Scriber" recording of same. 
Four (4) main transmitters (Station KCA-860, 2 at Police 
Headquarters and 2 at Suffolk County Court House) ; 2 emer- 
gency transmitters at White Stadium, Jamaica Plain, for 
civiUan defense; 111 automobiles; 30 combination patrol- 
wagon ambulances and 4 boat transmitters and receivers; 
36 wired broadcast amplifiers and 8 pickup receivers were 
maintained and kept in repair by members of this unit. 

A radio shop is attached to the Department Automobile 
Maintenance Shop, where a 24-hour daily service is maintained. 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 27 



CRBIE PRIOVENTION BUREAU 
The Crime Prevention Bureau operates for the prevention 
of dehnquency among juveniles, and maintains a program of 
rehabilitation for maladjusted children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended to 
eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies among 
children. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies and divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude 
of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and especially 
educate the public and the police in the problem of crime 
prevention and suppression. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way con- 
tribute to delinquency of children; investigating and taking 
necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged and the 
needy; locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist 
in the investigation of cases where women are involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 
Inspections and Investigations 
During the past year there were 13,048 inspections by the 
personnel of this bureau in connection with the following 
places: 

Bus and railroad terminals Hotels 

Cafes Theatres and amusement 

Restaurants centres 

Dance halls 

Six hundred investigations involving women, young girls 
and children were completed. 



28 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Arrests 



Abuse of female child . 

Allowing premises to be used 
for immoral purposes 

Attempts to procure abor- 
tion 

Conspiracy to commit abor- 
tion 

Contributing to delinquency 
of a minor .... 

Drunkenness .... 

Fornication . . . ' . 

Idle and disorderly person . 

Keeping and maintaining un- 
licensed lodging house 

Larceny 

Lewd person in speecli and 
behavior .... 



2 


Neglected child 


1 


1 
2 


Neglect of minor child 
Polygamy 
Runaways 
Stubborn child 


1 

1 

20 

3 


2 

8 
2 

2 
3 


SP of breaking and entering 

in nighttime ... 1 
SP of rape .... 3 

^'agrant 1 

Molation of parole . . 4 


Molation of probation . 
^^'ayward child 


7 

1 


1 
3 


Total .... 


71 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 29 



CITY PRISON 

The City Prison is located in the new Court Hou.se building, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of 
which is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court 
are conveyed to the City Prison, and, unless otherwise released, 
are held in charge of the keeper initil the next session of the 
court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand juiy, 
they are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1952, to November 30, 1953, 
13,854 men were committed to the City Prison, as folloAvs: 

Drunkenness 13,073 

Suspicious persons 17S 

For safekeeping 87 

Violation of rules and regulations of Park Commission . 79 

Nonsupport 70 

Larceny 60 

Assault and battery 50 

Violation of probation 36 

Default 30 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law .... 27 

Illegitimacy 26 

Adultery 13 

Fornication d 

Fugitives from justice 9 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 6 

Threats and intimidation 5 

Vagrancy 4 

Violation of liquor law 4 

Lewdness 3 

Delinquent children 2 

Runaways 2 

Violation of drug law 2 

Carrying dangerous weapon 1 

Indecent exposure 1 

Soliciting alms 1 

Miscellaneous 76 



Total 13,854 

Two hundred and thirty-three male lodgers were received 
and cared for during the year. 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the new 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, and, 
unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the chief ma- 
tron until the next session of the court before which they are 
to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, 
they are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institu- 
tion to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles 
Street Jail, to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 2,687 were committed, as follows: 

Drunkenness 2,024 

Suspicious persons 227 

Larceny 86 

For safekeeping 40 

Runaways 33 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 29 

Violation of probation and parole 29 

Adultery 23 

Delinquent children 20 

P'ornication 17 

Idle and disorderly 16 

Neglect of children 16 

Assault and batter}' 14 

Stubborn children 13 

Violation of drug law 5 

Abortion 1 

Keeping house of ill fame 1 

Various other causes 91 

Total 2,685 

Recommitments 

From municipal court 2 

Grand Total 2,687 

Five women lodgers were receiv^ed and cared for during the 
year. 



19.53.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 
Signal Boxes 
The total number of boxes in use is 57 L Of these 494 are 
connected with the underground system and 77 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
1,800 trouble calls; inspected 571 signal boxes; 16 signal 
desks; 18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs 
have been made on 90 box movements; IG registers; 80 locks; 
8 time stamps; 10 vibrator bells; 46 relays; 20 electric fans; 
20 motors; 20 generators. This unit is responsible for the 
installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equip- 
ment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 571 
telephone and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and tele- 
type installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the 
department. It also maintains 48 Headquarters-to-station 
house telephone circuits; 18 teletype-writer circuits, 18 radio- 
wired broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits; a 
circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank station of the 
Metropolitan District Police; also a circuit, with equipment, 
in booth at the East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel; and 
the intercommunication units throughout the department. 

The following list comprises the property of the signal 
service maintenance at the present time: 

16 open circuit blinker-type signal P.B.X. desks 
717 circuits 
35 test boxes 
400 cells of storage-type batter\^ 
2,000 taxicab signs 
100 traffic booths 
571 police signal boxes 
20 battery-charging units 
827,000 feet of underground cable 
163,500 feet of overhead cable 
35,278 feet of duct 
77 manholes 
22 motor generator sets 
18 motor-driven flashers 



32 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

300 iron road horses 

2 gasoline electric generators 

4 Chevrolet trucks 

1 Ford truck 

1 Chevrolet sedan 

Payments ox Account of the Signal Service During 

THE Year Ending November 30, 1953 

(Included in Table XV) 

Payrolls $88,044.11 

Signal and tiaffic upkeep, rei)nirs and supplies therefor 48,046.65 

Total $136,090.76 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



33 



HARBOR SERVICE 
The duties performed by the Harbor Police, Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows: 

Number of vessels l)oarded from foreign ports .... 958 

Number of vessels ordered from the chamiel .... 10 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream . 2 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water front . . . 344 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 3 

Number of sick and injured pensons assisted 9 

Number of cases investigated 1,721 

Number of dead bodies recovered 8 

Number rescued from drowning 15 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 103 

Number of obstructions removed from channel .... 56 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 2,230 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge . . 

Number of dead bodies cared for 8 

Number of hours grappling 29 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, 

stages, etc $13,085 

Since December 1, 1952, 1272 vessels from domestic ports 
and 958 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the Port of 
Boston. 



HARBOR PATROL SERVICE 
A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police 
boats, "Michael H. Crowley," "Wilham H. McShane," 
"Wilham H. Pierce," and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the 
upper and lower harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort 
Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay and Neponset 
River. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 

There are 187 motor vehicles in the service at the present 
time which are distributed as follows : 





S„5 










Divisions. 


O 3 




^ 
h 


c' 

c 
o 


1 


Headquarters 


— 


36 


9 


— 


45 


Division 1 


2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 2 


2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 3 


1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 4 


3 


7 


— 


— 


10 


Division 6 


2 


5 


— 


3 


10 


Division 7 


2 


6 


— 


4 


12 


Division 9 


1 


5 


— 


— 


6 


Division 10 


2 


5 


— 


1 


8 


Division 11 


2 


4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 13 


1 


4 


— 


3 


8 


Division 14 


2 


5 


— 


2 


9 


Division 15 


1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 16 


2 


4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 17 


1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 18 


1 


4 


— 


2 


7 


Division 19 


2 


5 


— 


— 


7 


Traffic Division .... 


— 


6 


— 


12 


18 


Unassigned 


2 


8 


— 


3 


13 


Totals 


29 


119 


9 


30 


187 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



35 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 7, 9, 10. 11, 
13, 14, 15, 1(). 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 



City Hospital 

( 'all.s where services wei-e not iiHiuiied 

Boston State Hospital 

Massachusetts Cieneral Ilospita 

Southern Alortuary 

City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) 

Home 

('arncy Hospital .... 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Tnited States \'eterans' Hosi)ital 

I'eter Bent Brigham Ho.spital 

Heth Israel Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Police station houses . 

Children's Hospital 

Psychopathic Hospital 

United States Marine Hospital . 

Roslindale General Hospital 

Chelsea Xaval Hospital 

Northern Mortuarj' 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

New lingland Hospital for Women 

Boston L}^ing-In Hospita 

Phj'sicians' offices 

Deaconess Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Audubon Plospital 

Sancta Maria Hospital 

Long^'ood Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Mt. Auburn Hospital . 

Bay State Hospital 

Cliardon Street Home; . 

Kenmore Ho.spital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hosjjita 

McLean Hospital . 

Floating Ho.spital 

Soldiers' Home 

Bournewood Ho.spital . 

Lahey Clinic . 



12,823 

2,446 

798 

591 

485 

454 

333 

326 

277 

135 

119 

109 

98 

96 

84 

83 

73 

72 

59 

58 

47 

40 

32 

29 

28 

28 

19 

18 

16 

13 

11 

10 

9 

9 

8 

8 

7 

7 

6 

6 



36 POLICE COABIISSIONER. 

]\Iilton Hospital 6 

Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 6 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 5 

Haj'nes INIemorial Hospital 5 

Washingtonian Hospital 5 

Xew England Baptist Hospital 4 

Winthrop Communitj^ Hospital 4 

Bellevue Hospital 3 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 3 

Allerton Hospital 2 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 2 

Quincy City Hospital 2 

Baker Memorial Hospital 

Brusch Medical Center 

Cambridge City Hospital 

Evangeline Booth Hospital 

Grover Manor Hospital 

Melrose Hospital 

Somerville Hospital 

Whidden Memorial Hospital 



Total 19,925 

Automobile Maintenance 

General repairs, replacement of parts and accessories . . $56,233 00 

Storage 243 00 

Gasoline 73,966 25 

Oil and grease 4,538 16 

Antifreeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses, etc. 1,709 80 

Total $136,690 21 



HORSES 
On November 30, 1953, there were 15 saddle horses in the 
service, attached to Division 16. 



1953.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 37 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, limits the 
number of licenses to set up and use hackney carriages in the 
City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, December 1, 1952, to November 30, 
1953, due to changes of ownership and regrants, a total of 
*2,029 licenses were granted. 

There were 318 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which were 
turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. One 
liundred seventy-seven of these were restored to the owners; 
and the balance of 141 placed in the custody of the Property 
Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same : 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 
{To Set Up and Use the Vehicle) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,029 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes 

of ownersliip") 1,640 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 389 

2,029 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 509 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 120 

Carriage license revoked 1 

Carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1953 (at end of police 
year) — licensed since February 1, 1953 (beginning of 

hackney carriage license year) 1,516 

Carriages inspected 1,910 

* 389 "regrants" — also includes 2 canceled for nonpayment. 

Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 5,631 

Applications for drivers' licenses withdrawn after 

investigation 27 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected . . . 141 

168 

Drivers' licenses granted t5,463 

t Includes 5 canceled for nonpayment. 



38 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 30; of which revocations 8 were 
rescinded and the licenses restored; leaving the net figure 

shown of such revocations as 22 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1953 (at end of police 
year) — licensed since February 1 , 1953 (beginning of 

hackney carriage license year) J5,210 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials 31 

Complaints against owniers, drivers and "setups" investigated 754 

Daj's spent in court 60 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 318 

X Includes 15 female hackney carriage drivers. 

Public Taxicob Stands 
There are 497 established pubHc taxicab stands with capacity 
for 1,278 cabs, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for the occupation 
of private hackney stands (that is, upon private propertj?^) by 
licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year, 27 applications (capacity, 426 carriages) 
for such private hacknej^ stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing A utomohiles 

During the year ending November 30, 1953, there have been 
issued licenses for 24 sight-seeing automobiles and 16 designated 
stands (capacity, 18 automobiles) for same. 

There were 31 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. One 
application for license to drive sight-seeing automobile was 
rejected. 

Hackney Carriage Violations 

During the past year 691 tags were issued to taxicab drivers 
for various violations. Sixty-one penalties w^ere imposed, 
which included 30 revocations. This system of discipline has 
continued to result in relieving courts of many minor cases 
which would tend to congest their dockets. 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 
LISTING WORK IN BOSTON 



39 



Year 


Canvass 


Year 


Canva.ss 


1903 * . . . . 


181,045 


1928 .... 


491,277 


1904 










193,195 


1929 










493,250 


1905 










194,547 


1930 










502,101 


1906 










195,446 


1931 










500,98() 


1907 










195,900 


1932 










499,758 


1908 










201,552 


1933 










501,175 


1909 










201,391 


1934 










.502,936 


1910 1 










203,003 


1935 










509,703 


1911 










200,825 


1936 










514,312 


I9I2 










214,178 


1937 










.520, 8:^8 


1913 










215,388 


1938 










529,905 


1914 










219,364 


1939 










.534,230 


1915 










220,883 


1940 










.531,010 


1916 J 










— 


1941 










.541, .335 


1917 










221,207 


1942 










.539,408 


1918 










224,012 


1943 










540,517 


1919 










227,466 


1944 










543,051 


1920 










235,248 


1945 










549,899 


1921 § 










480,78;i 


1946 










545,506 


1922 










480,106 


1947 










551,145 


1923 










477,547 


1948 










548,111 


1924 










485,677 


1949 










544,898 


1925 










489,478 


1950 










541,762 


1926 










493,415 


1951 










534,418 


1927 










495,767 


1952 










526.396 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

t 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

J 1916 Usting done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

I 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of April 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in 
January of the present year : 

Male 245,882 

Female 281,045 

Total 526,927 

Listing Expenses 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
twenty years of age or more, not including the services rendered 
by members of the police force, were as follows : 

Printing police list .S67,054 20 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list . . 20,129 04 

Newspaper notices 1,031 35 

Telephone rental 42 62 

Stationery 3,546 87 

Directory 60 00 

Total .S91,864 08 



40 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 

January 2 706 

January 3 651 

January- 4 132 

January 5 665 

Januar}- 6 597 

January 7 554 

January 8 518 

Januarj'' 9 313 

January 10 210 

January 11 85 

January 12 92 

January 13 70 

January- 14 51 

January 15 23 

January 16 24 

January 17 20 

Januarj' 18 5 

January 19 5 

Police Work ox Jury Lists 
The Police Department under the provisions of chapter 348, 
Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commissioners in ascer- 
taining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The poUce findings in 1953 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,848 

Physicallj' incapacitated 135 

Convicted of crime 180 

Unfit for various reasons 768 

Apparently fit 9,487 

Total 12,418 

The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department 
for delivery 9,078 summonses to persons for jury service. 



1953.J PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 41 



SPECIAL POLICE 

Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of 
aii}^ responsible corporation or person, to ])e liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for 
the year commencing as of April 1, 1953, were fingerprinted by 
the department, as has been the custom, and their records, if 
any, searched for by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending November 30, 1953, there were 
1,210 special police officers appointed; 2 applications for 
appointment were refused for cause; 14 appointments were 
canceled for nonpayment of license fee; and 9 appointments 
were canceled for other reasons. 

Appointments were made on applications received as 
follows : 

From corporations and associations 634 

From theaters and other places of amusement . . . 246 

From city departments 303 

From churches 21 

From private institutions 12 

Total 1,216 



42 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS 
The following table shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused, and the number revoked: 



Year 


Applications 


Granted 


Rejected 


Licenses 
Revoked 


1949 .... 


2,654 


2,567 


87 


3 


1950 .... 


2,735 


2,651 


84 


2 


1951 .... 


2,727 


2,673 


54 


3 


1952 .... 


2,807 


2,748 


59 


2 


1953 .... 


2,910 


*t2,833 


77 


5 



* 34 canceled for nonpayment. 

til licenses to possess machine guns. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES 
Public lodging houses licensed by the PoUce Commissioner 
under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections 33-36, G. L. 
(Ter. Ed.), showing locations and number of lodgers 
accommodated : 



Location 



Number 
Lodged 



17 Davis Street . 
1-3 Dover Street 
287 Hanover Street 
8 Pine Street 
453 Shawmut Avenue 
87 Vernon Street . 
Total . 



32,858 
2,868 
6,721 

35,459 
3,279 
1,085 



82,270 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 43 



PROPERTY CLERK 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of 
all police buildings, lost, stolen and abandoned property, 
money or other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, 
and all articles and property taken from persons arrested for 
any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and 
gaming implements which come into the possession of the 
Department. 

All orders for supphes, building maintenance, uniforms and 
ecjuipment are issued by this office. 

During the year IGO motor vehicles came into custody of 
this office, 100 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants 
and 04 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 38 
motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of department auto- 
mobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. During the year, 
on 5,333 occasions, department cars were repaired and, on 
2,057 occasions, cars were serviced. Thirty-four department 
cars and 157 privately-owned cars were towed by the depart- 
ment wrecker. The Department operates a motorcycle repair 
shop where, on 314 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and 
serviced during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for 
the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions, and is required to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving department vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand December 1, 1952 818 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1953 . 554 

Total 1,372 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 103 

Worthless 249 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of 

Public Welfare 11 

Sold at public auction 269 

Total number of articles disposed of . . (i32 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1953 . 740 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Dec. 


1 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


31 


1953 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


25 


Jan. 


26. 


Feb. 


3. 


Feb. 


10. 


Feb. 


18. 


Feb. 


23. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

The following is a list of the special events which occurred 
during the year, giving the number of police detailed for duty 
at each : 



Men 

East Boston, Boston and Albany, Pier 3, general 

alarm of fire 52 

Boston Garden, Boston Police Relief Association Ball 295 

New Year's Iwe celebrations 1,395 

First Corps of Cadets Armory, Inaugural reception 
and ball in honor of His Excellency, Governor 

Christian A. Herter 20 

Mechanics Building, Victory Dinner for His Ex- 
cellency, Governor Christian A. Herter ... 15 
Boston Garden, Boston American Silver Skate 

Carnival 30 

Funeral of Detective James A. Powers ... 40 

Funeral of Detective Francis J. O'Connor ... 40 

Parade of U. S. Marine Corps recruits ... 35 

Funeral of Patrolman Albert R. Elwood ... 40 
State House, reception of His Excellency, Governor 

Christian A. Herter 85 

Boston Garden, Boston Daily Record "Ice Follies" 

show for the benefit of disabled veterans . . 20 

Parade of Boston University 35 

South Boston, Evacuation Day parade . . . 385 

Funeral of Patrolman Merrill S. White ... 40 

Cathedral Club road race 90 

Easter parade on Commonwealth avenue ... 20 
Boston Garden, Boston Fire and Protective Depart- 
ments' Annual Concert and Ball .... 40 
Funeral of Sergeant William J. Condon ... 40 
Funeral of Detective William J. Collins ... 40 
City of Boston Patriots' Day parade and celebrations 95 
Parade of R. H. White Corporation .... 100 
Boston Athletic Association Marathon . . . 295 
Boston Garden, Jewish Memorial Hospital, charitable 

affair 25 

Parade of Boston University, R.O.T.C. ... 20 

Parade of U. S. Army, R.O.T.C 20 

Parade of Boston Technical High School ... 22 
Boston Garden, Boston Post "Music Festival" for 

charitable purposes 30 

Boston Ciarden, Catholic Daughters of America rally 35 

Parade of Jordan Marsh Company .... 50 

Parade of Boston Trade School 22 

City of Boston "air raid test" 1,050 



Feb. 25. 



Mar. 


13. 


Mar. 


17. 


Mar. 


25. 


April 


4. 


April 


5. 


April 


6. 


April 


16. 


April 


18. 


April 


20. 


April 


20. 


April 


20. 


April 


26. 


April 28. 


April 


28. 


May 


1. 


May 


1. 


Mav 


2. 


May 


4. 


May 


5. 


May 


7. 



May 


18. 


May 


21. 


May 


21. 


IMay 


24. 


May 


24. 


May 


24. 


May 


27. 


May 


30. 


Mav 


30. 


jNlay 


30. 


June 


1. 


June 


5. 


June 


7. 



June 


10. 


June 


11. 


June 


14. 


June 


15. 



June 


17. 


June 


18. 


June 


19. 


June 


21. 


June 


27. 



1 953.] PUBLIC DOCUiAIEXT — No. 49. 45 

1953 Men 

May 7. Paiaile of Boston Uiiivor.Mty, R.O.T.C. ... 20 

May 7. Parade of U. 8. Army, R.O.T.C^ 20 

May 10. Cathedral of tlie Holy Cross, lioston Fire Department 

Communion Mass and paiade to Bradford Hotel 25 

Maj- 17. New Old South Church, Masonic Communion 

Service and parade 30 

Funeral of Patrolman Froth^rick J. Barrett ... 40 

Cit}- of Boston "'Clean-Up Campaign" parade . . 35 

W.C.O.P., New England "Hill Billy Jamboree" 

parade 50 

Parade of Ukranian Church Society .... 50 

Cemeteries and A'icinity on Sunday, May 24 . . 180 

Boston Park Department ccmeteiies and ^•icinity on 

Sundaj-, May 24 15 

Parade of Boston School Cadets 220 

Parade and exercises of Kearsarge Association of 

Naval Veterans 35 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . . . 200 

Boston Park Department cemeteries and vicinity on 

Memorial Daj- 35 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade . 145 

Funeral of Patrolman Owen Heaney .... 40 

Mt. Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Day 

e.xercises 350 

June 8. Symphony Hall, Harvaid College Class of 1928 Re- 
union activities 20 

June 10. Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Harvard College Class of 1928 

Reunion activities 15 

American Variety Artists Guild motorcade ... 45 

Sight-seeing tour of patients of the Long Island 

Hospital 30 

Boston Firemen's Memorial Sunday exercises . . 25 

Worcester, Massachusetts, assignment of Boston police 

officers for duty in connection with hurricane . 33 

June 16. Worcester, Massachusetts, assignment of Boston 

police officers for duty in connection with hurricane 33 

June 16. Charlestown, "Night Before" Bunker Hill Day 

celebrations, street duty, traffic duty and banquets 40 

June 17. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street 

duty, block parties, dances and historical pageant 90 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade . . . 240 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street 

duty 25 

Funeral of Detective Maurice E. West ... 40 

Parade of St. John the Baptist Confraternity . . 30 

International Youth Conference of the Augustana 

Luther League parade and Bean Supper on Boston 

Common 130 

June 29. Fenway Park, Boston Red Sox-New York Giants 

l)aseball game, sponsored by the Boston American- 
Record for the benefit of disabled veterans . . 30 



July 


24. 


Aug. 


10. 


Aug. 


10. 


Aug. 


17. 



4G POLICE COMMISSIOXER. 

1953 Men 

July 3. City of Boston distribution of ice cream at various 

playgrounds and schoolyards 105 

July 4. Cit3' of Boston, Independence Day parade and 

exercises 80 

July 4. Boston Common, Independence Daj' band concert 

and fireworks display 25 

July 4. Columbus Park, South Boston, Independence Day 

band concert and fireworks display .... 20 

Julj' 4. Franklin Field, Dorchester, Independence Daj- band 

concert and fireworks display 20 

July 4. Smith Field, Brighton, Independence Daj- band 

concert and fireworks display' 20 

July 6. Fenway Park, Mayor's Charity Field Day ... 35 

July 11. Parade of Order of Elks of the World, Commonwealtli 

Lodge, No. 19 40 

July 22. Funeral of Hon. Maurice J. Tobin, Ex-Governor of 

Massachusetts 50 

Funeral of Deputy Superintendent Justin McCarthy 80 

Funeral of Sergeant Charles C. Flaherty ... 40 

Funeral of Patrolman Leo V. Carleton ... 40 

Ted Williams "Welcome Home" motorcade and 

dinner at Statler Hotel 120 

Aug. 18. Commonwealth Pier, depaiture of Archbishop 

Richard J. Cushing and pilgrimage for Europe . 15 

Aug. 23. Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Red Mass ... 15 

Sept. 6. Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 20 

Sept. 7. Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 20 

Sept. 11. North End, Feast of St. Rosalie parade ... 20 

Sept. 12. North End, Feast of St. Rosalie parade ... 20 

Sept. 13. North Ilnd, Feast of St. Rosalie parade ... 20 

Sept. 13. Roxbury, St. Cyprian's Church parade ... 20 

Sept. 13. Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 15 

Sept. 19. Arrival and visit of His Imperial Highness, Crown 

Prince Akihito of Japan, and party .... 40 

Sept. 20. Visit of His Imperial Highness, Crown Prince Akihito 

of Japan, and party 15 

Sept. 21. Visit and departure of His Imperial Highness, Crown 

Prince Akihito of Japan, and party .... 40 

Sept. 21. Visit of President Dwight D. Eisenhower and address 

at Boston Garden G50 

Sept. 22. Preliminary Election Day 1,725 

Sept. 26. Roxbury Day parade 55 

Sept. 27. Fenway Park, Holy Name Society religious rally for 

men 80 

Sept. 29. Aleppo Temple parade 70 

Sept. 30. State House, Governor Christian A. Herter's reception 

for Korean prisoners of war and parade to Hotel 

Touraine ' 40 

Oct. 3. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company fall parade 30 

Oct. 4. Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" 

parade and drill on Boston Common ... 60 



r953 




Oct. 


4. 


Oct. 


11. 


Oct. 


12. 


Oct. 


16. 



Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


21. 


Oct. 


25. 


Oct. 


31. 


Oct. 


31. 


Nov. 


1. 


Nov. 


3. 


Nov. 


4. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


8. 



19-33.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 47 

Men 

Bcston Park Department football games ... 25 

Boston Park Department football games ... 25 

Cit;y of Boston Columbus Day parade .... 120 
South Boston. U. S. Naval Annex, U. S. .Viroraft 

Lcyte explosion 55 

Oct. 1(). Boston Garden, Labor Unions' reception for Arch- 

bi.shop Richard J. Cushing 35 

Boston Park Department football games ... 25 

Rodeo parade 45 

Boston Park Department f()()tl)all games ... 25 

Halloween celebrations 1.030 

Boston Park Department Halloween parlies . . 140 

Boston Park Department football games ... 27 

City Election 1,725 

Visit of King Paul and Queen Frederika of Greece . 160 

Boston Park Department football games ... 23 
Boston Garden, National Conference of Youth 

Organizations Pontifical Mass 20 

Nov. 1 I. Department of Massachusetts, The American Legion, 

Armistice Day parade 495 

Nov. 14. II. H. White's motorcade 45 

Nov. 15. State Civil Defense Agenc.\', Region 5, "civil defense 

test" in municipalities bordering the districts of 

Roxbuiy, Jamaica Plain, Brighton and West 

Roxbury 65 

Boston Park Department football games ... 17 

Funeral of Detective Joseph L. Crowley ... 40 
Fenway Park, Boston Park Department chami)ion- 

.ship football game 25 

White Stadium, high school football games . . 45 

Boston Park Department football games ... 12 

Note 

December 1, 1952, to January 8, 1953, inclusive, 12 officers performed a 
total of 468 duties for that i)eriod in coimection with the City of Boston 
Christmas Festival on Boston Common. 

March 15 to March 21, 1953, inclusive, 10 officers performed a total of 
70 duties for that period in coiuiection with the Horticultural So(^iety 
Flower Show at Mechanics Building. 

April 19 to April 23, 1953, inclusive, 22 officers performed a total of 120 
duties for that period in connection with the World Mission Exhibit 
sponsored bj- the Society for the Propagation of the P'aith at Boston Garden. 

June 7 to June 14, 1953, inclusive, 38 officers performed a total of 304 
duties for that period in connection with the Boston Art Festival on the 
Boston Public fiarden. 

October 27 to October 31, 1953, inclusive, 18 officers performed a total 
of 90 duties for that i)eriod in coimection with the .\ichdiocesan Show at 
Mechanics Building. 

November 24 to November 30, 1953, inclusive, 16 officers performetl a 
total of 112 duties for that period in connection with the City of Boston 
Christmas Festival on Boston Common. 



Nov. 


15. 


Nov. 


21. 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


26. 


Nov. 


29. 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS 



1950=51 1951=52 1952=53 



Aliandoned children cared for 
Buildings found open and made secure 
Cases investigated .... 
Dangerous buildings reported . 
Dangerous chimneys reported 
Dead bodies recovered and cared foi- 
Defective drains and vaults reported 
Defective fire alarms and clocks repoi'ted 
Defective gas pipes reported . 
Defective hj'drants reported . 
Defective street lights i-eported 
Defective sewers reported 
Defective streets and walks reported 
Defective water pipes reported 
Fire alarms given 
Fires extinguished 
Insane persons taken in charge 
Lodgers at station houses 
Lost children restored 
Number of persons committed to bail 
Persons rescued from drowning 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Street obstructions removed . 
Water running to waste reported 
Witnesses detained . 



37 


26 


4,387 


3,951 


109,878 


114,588 


46 


41 


25 


14 


842 


831 


18 


3 


8 


3 


25 


20 


40 


14 


3,676 


3,586 


159 


104 


3,053 


3,025 


68 


41 


7,964 


9,255 


792 


781 


710 


789 


260 


242 


1,368 


1,278 


2,635 


2,535 


36 


20 


17,343 


17,827 


66 


327 


477 


382 


1 


61 



29 

3,733 

1 1 1 ,008 

38 

23 

777 

14 

7 

4 

37 

3,837 

133 

2,332 

66 

8,524 

1,436 

889 

227 

1,217 

2,576 

16 

19,161 

99 

462 

32 



1953.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS 

On December 1, 1952, there were 709 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 25 died, viz: 3 captains, 1 lieutenant, 
3 sergeants, 15 patrolmen, 2 civilians and 1 annuitant. Sixty- 
eight were added, viz: 1 captain, 2 lieutenants, 7 sergeants, 
44 patrolmen, 2 civilians and the widows of Captain Hugh D. 
Brady, Sergeant William J. Condon and Patrolmen Samuel A. 
Dunlap, John J. Feeney, Edward P. Greeley, Edward F. 
Harrington, Frank J. Hughes, Martin A. Monahan, Francis J. 
O'Connor, John J. O'Connor, Frank A. Spitz and Thomas N. 
Trainor, who died from disability received in the performance 
of dutj'-, leaving 752 on roll at date, 67G pensioners and 76 
annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during 
the past year amounted to $1,377,183.62, and it is estimated 
that $1,717,827.71 will be required for pensions and annuities 
in 1954. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550. There are 34 beneficiaries of the fund at the 
present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$5,172.00 during the past year. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



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Biological Chemist 

Assistant Biological Chemist . 

Chauffeur 

Chauffeur-Laborers 

Cleaners 

Clerks 

Clerk-Stenographers 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operators 
Director, Signal Service . . . . 
Assistant Director, Signal Service 

Elevator Operators 

Elevator Operator-Laborer 

Firemen (Marine) 

Firemen (Stationary) .... 

Fireman (Steam) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Janitresses 

Laborers 

Laborer-Relief Elevator Operators . 
Linemen and Foremen .... 

Matron, Chief 

Matron, Assistant Chief - . . . 







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Matrons, Assistant 

Mechanics 

Medical Examiner 

Property Clerk 

Repairman 

Shorthand Reporters 

Signalmen 

Statisticians 

Stenographers 

Assistant Superintendent of Buildings . 




r-i 





1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



55 



TABLE II 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of 
Police Department 



Ranks and Grades 



Authorized 
Strength 



Nov. 30, 
1953 



Actual Strength 



Nov. 30, 
1953 



Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus) 



Police Commissioner 
Secretary . . . . 
Assistant Secretaries 
Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains . . . . 



Lieutenants and Lieutenant-De- 
tectives 

Sergeants and Sergeant-Detec- 
tives 



Patrolmen 
Patrol women 



1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
34 

83 

229 
*2,501 

tl2 



2 

1 

2 

33 

83 

229 

2,469 

11 



Minus 1 



Minus 1 
Minus 1 



Minus 32 
Minus 1 



Totals 



2,867 



2,831 



Minus 36 



* Includes 193 Detective-Patrolmen. 
t Includes 2 Detective-Patrolwomen. 



56 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



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1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 49. 



57 



TABLE IV 

Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1953, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement 
and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



Cause of 
Retirement 



Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 



Years of 
Service 



Adair, Andrew K. 
Ahern, Arthur J.J 
Ahern, Willliam F.J . 
Anderson, James H. . 
Bemis, Fred S.f . 
Brady, PhiUp H.* 
Britt, William H. 
Burns, Daniel F. 
Butler, John J.* . 
Cahill, Fred S.f . 
Cameron, William J.J 
Cawley, Michael t 
Crocker, Frederick t ■ 
Crowley, William J. . 
Cunningham, Joseph J. 
Dennehy, Michael J. . 
D'Entremont, Raymond J. 
DiXatale, Salvatore . 
Donahue, William M. 
Donovan, Cornelius J. 
Egan, Edward C. 
Ferreira, Joseph L.t . 
Gallagher, John F.f . 
Garnett, Robert C. 
Gould, William S. 
Grant, Patrick J. 
Hanley, Martin T.J . 
Hargadon, Peter J. 
Heffeman, John J.f . 
Hickey, Thomas H.f . 
Higgins, John F.J 



Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 
Incapacitated 



60 
46 
59 
56 
55 
55 
58 
65 
53 
51 
44 
60 
58 
61 
55 
66 
64 
65 
68 
66 
62 
56 
59 
64 
60 
65 
33 
61 
59 
60 
33 



31 

15 
27 
33 
26 
22 
33 
31 
26 



26 
22 
30 
32 
34 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
26 
30 
33 
33 
30 

7 
31 
30 
27 

5 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

t Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

§ Civilians retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 



58 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE IV — Continued 

Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending November 
30, 1953, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name 


Cause of 
Retirement 


Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 


Years of 
Service 


Howard, Robert F.t 


Incapacitated 


53 


22 


Hudson, Joseph G.* . 








Incapacitated 


o7 


29 


Hughes, Thomas F., Jr.J 








Incapacitated 


27 


3 


Jasper, Benjamin B.J 








Incapacitated 


32 


1 


Joyce, Coleman S. 








Incapacitated 


60 


32 


KeUy, Martin P . 








Incapacitated 


57 


32 


Kelly, Thomas J. 








Incapacitated 


66 


33 


Kennedy, William E. . 








Incapacitated 


64 


31 


King, Harry 








Incapacitated 


5() 


31 


Kraby, Thurston 0. . 








Incapacitated 


64 


33 


Lentini, Frank C.J 








Incapacitated 


44 


16 


Leonard, John J.J 








Incapacitated 


40 


12 


Littlefield, Nelson E.f 








Incapacitated 


55 


24 


Lodge, James A. . 








Incapacitated 


.55 


30 


Lombard, Richard F.* 








Incapacitated 


55 


26 


Lowney, John F., Jr. . 








Incapacitated 


64 


33 


MacLeod, Robert S. . 








Incapacitated 


56 


33 


Manson, Harry C.J 








Incapacitated 


52 


27 


McDonald, Arthur V.J 








Incapacitated 


56 


23 


McEvoy, Thomas B.J 








Incapacitated 


43 


13 


McGeouch, Robert C.t 








Incapacitated 


56 


26 


McKinnon, Raymond J 








Incapacitated 


39 


10 


McQuilliam, Edward W.J 








Incapacitated 


51 


15 


Miller, John H.J . . 








Incapacitated 


31 


6 


Mortimer, Norman A. 








Incapacitated 


59 


33 


Moynihan, John J. 








Incapacitated 


65 


33 


Mullen, Andrew J. 








Incapacitated 


63 


33 


Mullen, Martin A.§ . 








Incapacitated 


60 


27 


Neelon, RajTnond V. . 








Incapacitated 


65 


33 


Nelson, Carl 








Incapacitated 


64 


33 


Norton, Harold J 








Incapacitated 


40 


3 


O'Handley, Joseph P. 








Incapacitated 


57 


33 


Olson, Frederick R.t . 








Incapacitated 


54 


22 


Philbrook, William C. 








Incapacitated 


68 


33 



1953.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



TABLE IV — Concluded 

Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending November 
30, 1953, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name 


Cause of 
Retirement 


Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 


Years of 
Service 


Robbins, Fred L.* . . . . 


Incapacitated 


56 


29 


Russell, Jolin A. . 








Incapacitated 


63 


33 


Sharkey, Daniel I'.t . 








Incapacitated 


57 


26 


Sheehan, David ,F. 








Incapacitated 


36 


33 


Shelburne, Samuol 








Incapacitated 


67 


33 


Shpakofski, Frank Z.t 








Incapacitated 


60 


27 


Telless, Leslie H.§ 








Incapacitated 


60 


30 


Tello, George J.t 








Incajiacitated 


27 


5 


Titus, Harold B. . 








Incapacitated 


56 


33 


Torres, Gregorio t 








Incapacitated 


55 


29 


Traverse, Edward W.t 








Incapacitated 


34 


4 


Wall, Marie E.t . 








Incapacitated 


43 


9 


West, John F. 








Incai)acitated 


59 


33 


Wilson, Frederick L., Jr. 








Incapacitated 


60 


30 


Wilson, Thomas . 








Incapacitated 


60 


30 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

t Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

§ Civilians retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 



60 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE V 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1953 



Date 



Rank an'd Name 



1952 

December 3 1 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 

1953 
April 1 
April 8 
June 10 
June 10 
August 19 
August 19 
August 19 
October 22 
October 28 
October 28 
October 28 
October 28 
October 28 
November 3 
November 24 
November 24 
November 24 
November 24 
November 24 
November 24 
November 24 



Sergeant Bartholomew J. Adley to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant John R. Nee to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Michael F. O'Malley to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Arnold L. Mongiovi to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James E. Mooney to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John F. Shea to rank of Sergeant 

Sergeant William X. Earle to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Howard F. Earle to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Howard G. Kelly to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Moulds to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Peter J. Bermingham to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Charles A. Donovan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Joseph P. Rowan to rank of Sergeant 
Sergeant Bartholomew E. Spellman to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman William J. Burke to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Arthur W. Corkery to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Theodore J. Lukosi to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. McNulty to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Edward J. Schofield to rank of Sergeant 
Sergeant Joseph E. Slattery to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Samuel K. Abany to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John F. Brennan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Martin F. Curran to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas E. Flanagan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John T. Hanlon to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Frank J. Keating to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Ivers E. Winmill to rank of Sergeant 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



61 



TABLE VI 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1953, Who 
Were Appointed in the Year Indicated 



Date of 
Appointment 


a 

OJ 
13 
£3 
Q> 

3 

3 
CO 


c 

Q) 

-a 
5- 


d 
O 


T3 

C 

•2 c £ 
C oJ > 

m 

~ a o 


-3 

oj 0) g 

03 


si"? 




Totals 


1912 
1916 
1917 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1937 
1938 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 








1 


2 


1 

9 
2 
2 
1 
4 
2 

5 
4 
2 
1 


1 

1 
1 

10 
4 
4 
6 
4 
4 
2 

13 
3 

6 
4 

11 

9 


33 
12 

(3 
2 
5 
1 
() 
9 
7 
3 

27 
4 
4 

45 

32 
5 

20 
3 
2 
1 
2 


17 
7 
3 
5 
7 
1 
9 

17 

11 
() 

11 

1 

16 

8 

5 
19 

9 
18 

4 
12 

G 

1 


78 

30 

18 

G 

24 

19 

22 

82 

37 

33 

80 

12 

5 

74 

1 

67 

40 

111 

42 

94 

37 

220 

175 

154 

143 

174 

322 

94 

93 


1 
2 

1 

150 

55 

33 

20 

44 

27 

39 

126 

62 

44 

125 

20 

10 

146 

1 

116 

50 

150 

54 

114 

42 

234 

181 

154 

143 

174 

323 

94 

93 


Totals . 


1 


2 


33 


83 


229 


193 


2,287 


2,828 



62 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE VII 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1953, Who Were 
Born in Year Indicated 















JTl 






Date of Birth 


c 
o 

"a 


c 
a 




■0 

c 
-2 fi 2 


T3 


it 


5 «^ 


Totals 




CJ 


-Sa 




C 5j > 




£ 03 


s s 






V 


i'l 


"3 

"S. 


c5 C — 


C cj g 

2 Sis 
MS ® 


2§1 


II 






m 


Q^ 


o 


3^° 




Q^^ 


t^ 




1885 . 








1 








1 


1886 








- 


- 


- 




— 


1 


1 


2 


1887 








— 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


2 


1888 








- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


3 


1889 








- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


3 


10 


15 


1890 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


7 


9 


1891 








- 


_ 


— 


3 


2 


2 


24 


31 


1892 








- 


- 


- 


3 


7 


5 


27 


42 


1893 








- 


- 


2 


4 


() 


9 


39 


60 


1894 








- 


- 


1 


3 


9 


7 


36 


56 


1895 








- 


— 


4 


5 


7 


10 


41 


67 


1896 








- 


1 


4 


5 


15 


9 


40 


74 


1897 








1 


- 


5 


10 


17 


9 


40 


82 


1898 








- 


- 


4 


8 


7 


10 


35 


64 


1899 








- 


- 


2 


3 


C 


10 


29 


50 


1900 








- 


- 


2 


7 


14 


11 


45 


79 


1901 








- 


- 


4 


1 


12 


5 


44 


66 


1902 








- 


- 


1 


3 


<) 


3 


21 


37 


1903 








- 


- 


1 


4 


9 


1 


20 


35 


1904 








_ 


— 


— 


2 


5 


1 


18 


26 


1905 








- 


- 


- 


3 


9 


5 


11 


28 


1906 








- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


4 


17 


26 


1907 








- 


- 


- 


4 


8 


4 


27 


43 


1908 








- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


3 


28 


41 


1909 








- 


- 


- 


3 


8 


7 


40 


58 


1910 








- 


- 


- 


1 


10 


9 


39 


59 


1911 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


45 


51 


1912 








- 


- 


- 


2 


7 


6 


45 


60 


1913 








- 


- 


_ 


4 


7 


3 


44 


58 


1914 








- 


- 


- 


2 


4 


4 


54 


64 


1915 








- 


- 


_ 


- 


9 


7 


61 


77 


1916 








- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


9 


82 


105 


1917 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


9 


96 


107 


1918 








- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


8 


101 


111 


1919 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


3 


9 


98 


110 


1920 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


113 


116 


1921 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


115 


115 


1922 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


125 


129 


1923 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


123 


123 


1924 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


— 


108 


108 


1925 








- 


_ 


- 


— 


— 


— 


107 


107 


1926 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


122 


122 


1927 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


102 


103 


1928 








- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


77 


77 


1929 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


22 


22 


1930 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


5 


5 


1931 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals . 


1 


2 


33 


83 


229 


193 


2,287 


2,828 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1953, 
was 40.31 3'ears. 



1953.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



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64 



POLICE COISIMISSIONER. 









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1953.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 



TABLE X 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year 
Ending November 30, 1953 



Divisions 



Males Females 



Totals 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation 



Division 


1 


Division 


2 


Division 


3 


Division 


4 


Division 


G 


Division 


7 


Division 


8 


Division 


9 


Division 


10 


Division 


11 


Division 


13 


Division 


14 


Division 


15 


Division 


16 


Division 


17 


Division 


18 


Division 


19 



Traffic 



Totals 



83,706 



913 


211 


1,124 


2,714 


183 


2,897 


1,952 


410 


2,362 


4,561 


370 


4,931 


13,346 


1,302 


14,648 


4,154 


201 


4,355 


2,867 


168 


3,035 


37 


2 


39 


6,157 


605 


6,762 


5,436 


434 


5,870 


2,527 


127 


2,654 


1,030 


67 


1,097 


3,375 


214 


3,589 


4,940 


231 


5,171 


4,654 


837 


5,491 


915 


24 


939 


964 


62 


1,026 


1,384 


64 


1,448 


21,780 


4,076 


25,856 



9,588 



93,294 



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Hackney carriage (and regrants) 

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86 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE XIV I 

Number of Dog Licenses Issued During the Year Ending November 30, 1953 



Divisions 


Males 


Females 


Spayed 


Kennels 


Transfers 


With 
Fee 


Without 
Fee 


Totals 


1 






38 


6 


6 


- 


- 


50 


- 


50 


2 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 






223 


70 


90 


1 


- 


384 


- 


384 


4 






550 


110 


156 


2 


- 


818 


2 


820 


6 






540 


67 


153 


- 


- 


760 


8 


768 


7 






715 


97 


210 


- 


1 


1,023 


10 


1,033 


8 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 






821 


112 


245 


- 


- 


1,178 


10 


1,188 


10 






510 


57 


147 


- 


- 


714 


2 


716 


11 






1,420 


124 


603 


3 


2 


2,158 


29 


2,187 


13 






556 


59 


215 


1 


- 


831 


10 


841 


14 






532 


47 


245 


4 


1 


829 


17 


846 


15 






295 


48 


93 


- 


1 


437 


10 


447 


16 






461 


138 


188 


4 


- 


791 


9 


800 


17 






1,146 


101 


565 


4 


- 


1,816 


15 


1,831 


18 






910 


93 


398 


6 


1 


1,408 


8 


1,416 


19 






695 


76 


306 


- 


1 


1,078 


12 


1,090 


Totals . 




9,418 


1,205 


3,620 


25 


7 


14,275 


*142 


14,417 



* Total of 142 dog licenses issued without fee, in accordance with law, include: 2 kennels for a "domestic 
charitable corporation, incorporated exclusively for purposes of protecting animals from cruelty," etc. (located 
on Division 4); 6 dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Divisions 15, 16, 17 and 19); 
and 134 dogs licensed belonging to persons "in military service of the United States in time of war." 



1953. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



87 



TABLE XV 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1953 



EXPENDITURES 

Group 1. 
Personal Services: 

100. Permanent employees . . $12,206,507 14 

110. Temporary employees . . 4,105 40 

120. Overtime 455,281 96 

$12,665,894 50 

Group 2. 
Contractual Services: 

210. Communications . . . $52,649 07 
220. Light, heat and power . . 39,330 04 
230. Professional and technical serv- 
ices 22,538 77 

240. Recording and judicial services 392 40 
260. Repairs and maintenance of 

buildings and structures . 42,846 66 
270. Repairs and servicing of equip- 
ment 56,793 17 

280. Transportation of persons . 25,565 51 
290. Miscellaneous contractual sei-v- 

ices 154,351 60 

394,467 22 

Group 3. 

Supplies and Materials: 

300. Automotive .... $104,489 77 

310. Building 597 88 

320. Food . . . , . . 10,491 51 

330. Heating 36,611 99 

340. Household 22,830 59 

350. Medical, dental and hospital 856 49 

360. Office 61,443 44 

370. Police, traffic control and fire- 
fighting . . . . . 48,750 73 
380. Public works .... 24 20 
390. Miscellaneous .... 154,178 44 

440,275 04 

Group 4. 
Current Charges and Obligations: 

420. Dues and subscriptions . . $1,395 43 

430. Insurance 245 00 

440. Licenses 49 00 

470. Rents 5,382 10 

490. Miscellaneous current charges, 

obligations .... 8 00 

7,079 53 

Carried forward $13,507,716 29 



88 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

TABLE XV — Concluded 



Brought forward 


• • . . 


$13,507,716 29 


Group 5. 






Equipment: 






500. Automotive .... 


$65,895 45 




510. Electrical and mechanical 






machinery .... 


37 12 




520. Engineering and scientific 


449 70 




530. Firefighting .... 


110 75 




560. Office furniture and equipment 


4,218 69 




580. Signal 


6,214 20 




590. Miscellaneous .... 


4,586 22 


81,512 13 


Total 


$13,589,228 42 



RECEIPTS 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . . $62,047 50 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) . 32,562 75 

Refunds, miscellaneous 3,169 22 

Use of police property 913 50 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property 2,513 40 
For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage 
drivers' badges, copies of licenses, sale of report blanks, 

sales of auctioneers' record books 702 35 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equip- 
ment 73 97 

For damage to police property (paid at Headquarters) 672 15 

Total $102,654 84 

Credit by City Collector for money received for damage 
to police property, commissions on telephones, and 
dog fines 10,188 64 

Grand Total $112,843 48 



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