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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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IPUBLIG DOCUMENT -NO. 49. 1 



FORTY-NINTH \NNUAL RFPOR ! 



Or THE 



Police Commissioner 



cm Ut BOSTON 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1954 




PRINTEI :IE POLI * 



m 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT -NO. 49.1 

^ ^\)t Commonluralti) of illassacijiisetts 

FORTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Police Commissioner 

? 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1954 




Printed by Order of the Police Commissioner 



?•^ 







CONTENTS 



Page 

Ijctter to the Governor 5 

The Department 6 

Police Force 6 

Signal Service 6 

Employees of the Department 6 

Recapitulation 7 

Distribution and Changes 7 

Police Officers Injured Wliile on Duty 7 

Presentation of Medals 8 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 8 

Department Medals of Honor 8 

Work of the Department 12 

Arrests 12 

Uniform Crime Record Reporting 13 

Detective Bureau 14 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 15 

Automobile Unit 15 

Lost and Stolen Property Unit 17 

Homicide Unit 17 

Identification Unit 19 

Ballistics Unit 24 

Biological Chemist 25 

Traffic Division 26 

Activities 26 

Parking 27 

Safety Education 27 

Traffic Problems 28 

Bureau of Operations 29 

Duties 29 

Accomplishments 29 

Crime Prevention Bureau 31 

Duties in General 31 

Summary of Work Accomplished 31 

City Prison 33 

House of Detention 34 

Police Signal Sj'stem 35 

Signal Boxes 35 

Miscellaneous Work 35 

Payments on Account of Signal Service 36 

Harbor Service 37 

Harbor Patrol Service 37 

Motor Vehicle Service 38 

Combination Ambulances 39 

Automobile Maintenance 40 

Horses 40 



4 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Page 

Hackney Carnages 41 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 41 

Hackney Carriage Drivers' Licenses 41 

Public Taxicab Stands 42 

Private Hacknej' Stands 42 

Sight-seeing Automobiles 42 

Hackney Carriage Violations 42 

Listing Work in Boston 43 

Listing Expenses 43 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 44 

Police Work on Jury Lists 44 

Special Police 45 

Carrj'ing Dangerous Weapons 46 

Public Lodging Houses 46 

Property Clerk 47 

Lost and Found Property 47 

Special Events 48 

Miscellaneous Business 53 

Pensions and Benefits 54 

Statistical Tables 55 

Distribution of the Police Force, Signal Service and Other 

Emploj'ees 56 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Depart- 
ment 59 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the 

Year 60 

Members of Department Retired 61 

Officers Promoted 64 

Members of Police Force Appointed in the Year Indicated . 65 

Members of Police Force Born in the Year Indicated . . 66 

Number of Days' Absence from Duty by Reason of Disability . 67 

Accidents 68 

Number of ;ViTests by Police Divisions 69 

Arrests and Offenses 70 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 86 

Licenses of All Classes Issued ....:... 88 

Dog Licenses 90 

Fmancial Statement 91 

Male and Female Residents Listed 92 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



3ri)c CommontueaUi) of iHassacfjusiettsi. 



REPORT. 



Headquarters op t}ie Police Department, 
Office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley Street, 

Boston, December 1, 1954. 

To His Excellency Christian A, Herter, 

Governor of the CommomceaUh. 
Your Excellency: 

In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 291, Acts 
of 190C, as amended, I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the activities of the Boston PoHce Department for 
the year ending November 30, 1954. 

The morale of this organization is excellent, and it is a 
pleasure to express my appreciation to the members of the 
Department for their loyalty and efficiency in carrying out 
their assignments. 

I extend my sincere thanks to Your Excellency for the 
support you have given the Department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Sullivan, 

Police Commissioner. 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



THE DEPARTMENT 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 
Police Commissioner . . 1 
Assistant Secretaries . . 2 



The Police Force 



Superintendent 


1 


Detectives (First, Seconc 




Deputy Superintendents 


2 


and Thu-d Grade) . 


*189 


Captains .... 


32 


Patrolmen . . . . 


1 2,309 


Lieutenants and Lieutenant- 
Detectives .... 


85 


Patrolwomen . . . . 


7 






Sergeants and Sergeant-De- 




Total . . . . 


2,854 


tectives .... 


229 






* Includes 2 patrolwomen. 








t Includes 9 patrolmen in arm 


ed ser\"ice. 






Signal Service 




Director .... 


1 


Painter and Groundman 


1 


Assistant Director 


1 


Signalmen . . . . 


G 


Chauflfeur-Laborers 


2 




— 


Linemen 


10 


Total . . . . 


21 


Employees of the Department 




(Not included in above) 




Biological Chemist 


1 


Laborers 


12 


Assistant Biological Chem 




Laborer-Relief Elevato 


r 


ist 


1 


Operators . 


2 


Chauffeur .... 


1 


Matron, Chief 


1 


Chauffeur-Laborer 


1 


Matron, Assistant Chief 


1 


Cleaners 


4 


Matrons, Assistant 


11 


Clerks .... 


25 


Mechanics 


18 


Clerk-Stenographers 


2 


Medical Examiner 


1 


Diesel and Gasoline Engin( 




Property Clerk 


1 


Operators . 


2 


Repairman 


1 


Elevator Operators 


7 


Shorthand Reporters . 


2 


Elevator Operator-Laborers 


3 


Statisticians . 


2 


Firemen, Marine . 


2 


Stenographers 


15 


Firemen, Stationary . 


7 


Superintendent of Buildings 


) 


Fireman, Steam . 


1 


Assistant . 


1 


Hostlers .... 


9 


Telephone Operatoi-s . 


10 


Janitors .... 


42 






Janitresses 


2 


Total 


188 



1954.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



Recapitulation 

Police Commissioner 1 

Assistant Secretaries 2 

Police Force 2,854 

Signal Service 21 

Employees 188 

Grand Total 3,060 



Distribution and Changes 
Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. During 
the year 146 patrolmen were appointed; 1 patrolwoman re- 
signed; 18 patrohnen resigned (4 while charges were pending); 
6 patrolmen were reinstated; 6 sergeants were promoted to 
lieutenants; 15 patrolmen were promoted to sergeants; 1 
lieutenant assigned as lieutenant-detective; 1 sergeant as- 
signed as sergeant-detective; 2 third-grade detectives as- 
signed as second-grade detectives; 9 patrolmen assigned as 
third-grade detectives; 1 captain, 3 lieutenants, 8 sergeants, 
1 patrolwoman and 74 patrolmen retired on pension; 1 
lieutenant, 1 sergeant and 12 patrolmen died. (See Tables 
III, IV, and V.) 

Police Officers Injured While On Duty 
Police officers injured perfomiing police duty during the 
past year showing number of duties lost. Also number of 
duties lost by police officers injured prior to December 1, 1953. 



How Injured 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

Nov. 30. 1954 


Number of 

Duties Lost 

by Such Men 


Number of Duties 
Lost This Year by 

Men on Account 

of Injuries 
Received Previous 

to Dec. 1, 1953 


In arresting prisoners . 

In pui'suing criminals . 

By cars and other 
vehicles 

Various other causes . 


77 
20 

6G 
121 


973 
338 

2,006 
1,595 


1,208 
525 

793 
1,190 


Totals . 


284 


4,912 


3,716 



a POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Presentation op Medals 
The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1954 and Depart- 
ment INIedals of Honor, as recommended by a Police Board 
of Merit, were aAvarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police 
Relief Association, held at the Boston Garden, December 3, 
1954, as follows: 

The Walter Scott ]\Iedal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor to Patrolman Harold F. IMacDonald 
OF Division 10 

Patrolman Harold F. MacDonald of Division 10 is hereby- 
awarded the Walter Scott Medal for Valor and a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed on November 
25, 1953. 

At 7:00 P.M., Wednesday, November 25, 1953, while Patrol- 
man MacDonald and his partner, Patrolman Francis J. Car- 
doza, were cruising in Huntington avenue, they received a 
radio broadcast to be on the lookout for two armed hold up 
men who had just held up at gun point a cleansing shop on 
Division 16, and may be using a motor vehicle. Shortly after, 
the}^ observed a motor vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed 
and they pursued this car along Huntington avenue into 
Ruggles street and forced it to the side of the road in Tremont 
street. As they left the pohce car to approach the vehicle, the 
occupant on the passenger side jumped from the car with a 
revolver in his hand, fired several times point blank at Patrol- 
man MacDonald, one of the shots striking the officer in the 
chest and severely wounding him. However, in spite of his 
wound, he grappled with and held on to the second bandit 
who A\as behind the wheel of the car until help arrived and 
brought the officer to the City Hospital and the bandit to 
the station. Officer Cardoza attempted to catch the bandit 
who shot Officer MacDonald but lost him. However, he was 
later captured in Worcester as the result of information fur- 
nished them but only after he was seriously woimded in his 
attempt to shoot his way free. 

Department Medals of Honor 

Patrolman Louis G. Caristi of the Superintendent's Office 

is awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious 

duty performed on March 20, 1954. At 10:55 a.m., March 20, 

1954, while on duty in a department car in the vicinity of 



1954.1 I'UliJ.K' JX)CUMKXT Xo. 40. 9 

the South Boston Army Base, Btitrohnaii C'uiisli rcccixed u 
radio call relative to a hold u}) of a liciuor store on East liroad- 
way, South Boston. The officer proceeded aloii.u L street 
toward Columbia road, turninp; right on Colimihia road in 
the direction of Columbia Station and, at a point between 
K and I streets, ob.served a man answeiing the description of 
the number one suspect walking in the same direction. The 
officer parked the car and went after the suspect on foot and, 
seeing the officer, the suspect i-an to the opposite side of Colum- 
bia road, the beach side, disobeying the officer's command to 
halt, vaulted the stone wall and landed on the sandy beach. 
As the officer approached the wall he observed the suspect 
emptying the pockets of his jacket and trying to biuy same 
in the sand. After a brief struggle the officer took the suspect 
in custody and ordered him over the wall, at \\hich time Uvo 
cruising cars arrived and the officers held the suspect while 
Officer Caristi retrieved the inoney, bills and coins in the sand. 
At Division G the suspect was identified and later in a line-up 
was identified as one of the bandits m'Iio had held up two 
liquor stores, one drug store and an attempted robbery of a 
shoe store. 

Patrolman Kenneth G. I.ehane of ])i^•ision 9 is awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed 
on April 17, 1954. About 1:10 a.m., April 17, 1954, while 
Patrolman Lehane Avas on his way home from a paid detail 
in his own car, and while making a left turn into Washington 
street, Dorchester, from Blue Hill avenue, he observed two 
men coming up Washington street toward Blue Hill a\'enue. 
The officer kept these men under observation and observed 
them push open a wooden door leading into an alley behind 
a block of stores on Washington street and Blue Hill avenue. 
The officer parked his car and crossed over the street to the 
door through which the men had entered. He listened and 
heard large objects being pushed around and a few minutes 
later heard an object, later identified as a safe, being rolled 
down the stairs. The officer called a passing citizen to summon 
aid while he pushed open the door and entered the alley. He 
observed a man climbing to the roof of a building and another 
man standing in the open rear door of a delicatessen, and 
when the man saw the officer he turned and started running. 
The officer pursued him up Washington street and overtook 
him, and after a brief struggle placed him under arrest. At 



10 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

the station the suspect was identified and admitted that he 
and three other men had planned to break and enter the 
building and force open the safe. The other three men were 
subsequently arrested. 

Patrolman Herbert M. Hazelton of Division 11 is awarded 
a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed 
on May 27, 1954. About 1:10 a.m., May 27, 1954, while 
Patrolman Hazelton was off duty and in uniform while 
returning from a paid detail, he observed a man acting in a 
suspicious manner in the vicinity of a clothing store on Wash- 
ington street, Dorchester. The officer drove his automobile 
to the rear of Dorchester Court which is directly across the 
street and kept the suspect under surveillance. The suspect 
then kicked in the window of the front door of this store and 
then ran down adjacent Tremlett street and concealed him- 
self. Minutes later the suspect returned and entered the 
building through the broken front door window. The officer 
with drawn revolver Avent to the front of the store and arrested 
the suspect as he emerged carrying thirteen suits of men's cloth- 
ing in his arms. At the station the suspect was identified 
as one who had a long criminal record dating as far back as 
1923, including a sentence of five to twelve years in State 
Prison for assault with intent to rob and three to five years for 
breaking and entering in the nighttime. He also served time 
in San Quentin Prison for burglary. 

Sergeant-Detective William C. Williams and Detectives 
Thomas J. Mahoney and Edwin P. Cashman of the Detective 
Bureau each is awarded a Department Medal of Honor for 
meritorious duty performed on June 26, 1954. About 6:10 
P.M., June 26, 1954, while Sergeant-Detective Williams with 
Detectives Mahoney and Cashman were patrolling Divisions 
10 and 13, and when in Washington street, near Egleston 
square, they received a radio message relative to a holdup 
that had just taken place at a grocery store on Centre street, 
Jamaica Plain. These officers proceeded immediately toward 
the scene of the crime, and when in Boylston street near 
Amory street, observed an automobile traveling in an easterly 
direction in Boylston street, and when about fifty feet from 
Amory street colHded with the rear end of another car. The 
operator jumped from the car and made an attempt to run 
from the scene. Sergeant-Detective WilUams and Detective 
Mahoney gave chase along Boylston street into Amory street 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 11 

when Detective jNIahoney discharged three shots from his 
service revolver into the air which had the desired effect of 
stopping the man who stumbled, at which time a .32 caUber 
German Mauser fell from his person to the sidewalk. The 
money taken in the holdup Avas recovered in the rear of the 
car and at Headquarters the bandit admitted his part in 
the holdup. 

Patrolmen Walter J. Lindsay and Walter C. Libby of 
Division 1 each is awarded a Department Medal of Honor 
for meritorious duty performed on August 31, 1954. About 
12:25 P.M., August 31, 1954, shortly before the steeple of the 
Old North Church, Salem street, collapsed and fell to the 
street, partly on the adjacent buildings causing the roofs of 
these buildings to collapse. Patrolmen Lindsay and Libb}^ 
carried from the fourth floor of one building an 82-year-ol(l 
invalid confined to a wheel chair for the past sixteen years, 
and also removed a 90-year-old woman who had also been 
confined to her home for several years. The same officers, 
with members of the Fire Department and Police Department 
evacuated about thirty people from the above buildings and 
about one hundred families from adjoining buildings, and 
about five minutes after the above people had been evacuated 
the steeple crashed. At the time of the steeple falling an 
unknown woman was observed standing in Hull street by 
Officer Lindsay who, unmindful of the danger to himself, 
leaped for the woman, pushing her into a doorway, the officer 
being struck on the back by the faUing debris to which he paid 
no attention. This act no doubt saved the woman from pos- 
sible death or serious injury, as the spot where she was pushed 
from was covered with debris from the steeple. 

Detective Arthur O'Shea of Division 9 is awarded a Depart- 
ment Medal of Honor for meritorious duty performed on 
September 23, 1954. On September 23, 1954, about 11:45 
A.M., Detective O'Shea received information that a suspicious 
character, who might be connected with an atrocious murder 
which took place a month before, had gone to a certain house 
in the Roxbury District. As there was no time to secure help. 
Detective O'Shea entered the house where this individual was 
supposed to be armed, and arrested him. After being ques- 
tioned by Detective O'Shea, the suspect confessed to the 
murder and was delivered to the Brighton Station for 
prosecution. 



12 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Arrests 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of 
a separate person, was 98,124 as against 93,294 for 1953. 

There were 18,49G arrests on warrants and 33,137 without 
warrants; 4G,491 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested Avas 87,609; of females, 10,515; 
of foreigners, 2,315; of delinquents, 3,448; of minors, 8,543; 
of nonresidents, 31,647. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 38,167, and 
the assessment of fines imposed by the courts amounted to 
§157,671.00. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers 
was 41,725, and the witness fees earned amounted to 820,142.60. 

There were 25,680 persons arrested for drunkenness, an 
average of 70 per day, as against 26,451 or an a\erage of 72 
per day in 1953. 

One Imndred nineteen persons were committed to the State 
Prison; 1,951 to the House of Correction; 40 to the Women's 
Piison; 90 to the Reformatory Prison; and 3,062 to other 
institutions. The total years of imprisonment were 1,334 
(529 sentences A\'C!-e indefinite), inclufling tln-ec life sentences 
to the State Prison. 

The value of property taken from prisonei's and lodgers 
was $144,040.01. 

The value of propert}^ stolen in the city amounted to 
$3,050,739.06, and the value recovered amounted to 
§2,314,025.55. 

The Commissioner has attempted to find out what percentage 
of arrests in other cities is of nonresidents. This percentage is 
so small in other cities that statistics are not kept of this class 
of arrests; therefore, it should be borne in mind in making 
comparison of Boston with other cities, either of the cost of 
policing or of criminal statistics, that 32 per cent of the arrests 
in Boston is of nonresidents, whereas other cities have but a 
neghgible percentage of arrests of nonresidents. 

For the twelve months ending November 30, 1954, as 
compared Avith the same period ending with November 30, 
1953, a brief comparison of the number of arrests for major 
offenses may l)e of interest and is submitted herewith: 



1954.1 



PUBLIC D()CU,A[r:XT — Xo. 49. 



13 



Okfenses 


Year Endin-g 

November 30, 

1953 


Ye.vr Endin-g 

November 30, 

1954 




Arrests 


Arrests 


Aggravated assault 




312 


338 


Auto', operating so as to endanger 




018 


009 


Auto', operating under the influence of liquor 




487 


490 


Auto', thefts (including attempts) .... 




151 


152 


Burglarj', breaking and entering (including at- 
tempts) 




1,201 


1,.35.5 


Drunkenness 




20,451 


25,080 


Larceny (including attempts) 




2,708 


3,125 


Liquor law, violation of (State) .... 




140 


101 


Manslaugliter 




G2 


51 


Murder 




23 


23 


Rape (including attempts) 




100 


55 


Robbery (including attempts) 




295 


268 


Totals 


32,554 


32,447 



The balanco of arrests consisted largely of so-called minor 
offenses, such as traffic violations, violations of city ordinances, 
samins; and miscellaneous offenses. 



Uniform Crime Record Reporting 
This department, during the past year, has continued its 
cooi)eration in furnishing returns to the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Washington, D. C, of the following serious 
offenses : 



1, 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



/. 



Felonious homicide : 

(a) Murder and n on -negligent manslaugliter 

(6) "Manslaughter by negligence 
Rape 
Robbery 

Aggravated assault 
Burglary — breaking and entering 
Larceny : 

(a) SoO and over in value 

(6) Under $50 in \alue 
Auto, theft 



14 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



The following comparative tables show the number of 
certain offenses reported and cleared for the period December 1, 
1953, to November 30, 1954, as against December 1, 1952, to 
November 30, 1953. 



Uniform Crime Record Reporting— Co 


mparative 


Table 


Offenses 


December 1, 1953, to 
November 30, 1954 


December 1, 1952, to 
November 30, 1953 




Reported 


Cleared 


Reported 


Cleared 


Aggravated assault . 


278 


234 


256 


179 


Breaking and entering . 


1,544 


784 


1,090 


637 


Larceny (under S50) 


3,101 


1,275 


2,789 


1,171 


Larceny (§50 and over) . 


1,690 


882 


1,806 


818 


Larceny of automobile . 


2,313 


730 


2,167 


836 


Manslaughter by negligence . 


39 


35 


54 


41 


Murder and non-negligent man- 
slaughter .... 


16 


10 


21 


17 


Rape 


60 


C2 


62 


53 


Robbery 


265 


142 


267 


175 


Totals .... 


9,312 


4,160 


8,512 


3,927 



A recapitulation of the foregoing shows the following : 

Cases 
Reported Cleared 

1953 8,512 3,927 

1954 9,312 4,160 



DETECTIVE BUREAU 
A Detective Bureau was established in the Boston Police 
Department on November 6, 1950, in accordance Avith the 
provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. Detectives assigned 
to this Bureau are detailed to the Bureau of Criminal Investi- 
gation and the various police divisions. 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 15 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several 
units, namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, 
Homicide, Lost and Stolen Property, Identification, Missing 
Persons, Night Motor Patrol. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the follow- 
ing phases of police work and investigations : banking, express 
thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, pawn- 
]:)rokers, junk shops, second-hand articles dealers, pickpockets, 
shoplifters. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed 
within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. They also 
handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds 
of investigations during the course of a year for various police 
departments throughout the United States and foreign coun- 
tries. Further, they cooperate in every way possible with 
outside police departments in investigation of crime and 
l)rosecution of criminals. 

Automobile Unit 

This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and 
is in daily communication with police authorities of the United 
States and Canada. Many investigations are made in coopera- 
tion with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post Office 
Department and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The automobile imit index contains records of cars stolen in 
Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars reported purchased 
and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing 
persons and cars whose operators are wanted for various 
offenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the department 
and the automobile unit through information obtained from 
this index. 

All applications for Used Car Dealer's Licenses are investi- 
gated by officers of this unit. Freciuent examinations are 
made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the 
conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of 
this unit during the year identified a number of automobiles 
which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, 
restoring them to their o\Miers, and have assisted in solving 
many crimes l)y means of their positive identifications. 



16 



POLICE COI\Ii\IISSIOXER. 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This 
Department for the Year Ending November 30, 1954 



^Io\TH 


Bought l)y 


Sold by 


Sold by 




Dealers 


Dealers 


Individuals 


1953 








December 


2,811 


3,173 


1,347 


1954 








January 


2,139 


2,584 


1,184 


February 








2,55.8 


3,022 


796 


March . 








3,449 


4,153 


1,179 


April . 








3,28G 


3,829 


1,203 


May . 








3,144 


3,695 


1,120 


June 








3,402 


3,965 


1,295 


July 








3,025 


3,747 


1,010 


August 








3,142 


3,598 


958 


September 








2,854 


3,357 


890 


October 








3,363 


3,630 


1,120 


November 






3,075 


3,479 


971 


Totals . 


36,248 


42,232 


13,073 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year 
Ending November 30, 1954 



AIOXTH 


Reported 
Stolen 


Recovered 
During 
Month 


Recovered 
Later 


Not 
Recovered 


1953 










Deceml:)cr 


207 


194 


10 


3 


1954 










January . 


169 


IGO 


6 


•> 


February 








193 


181 


9 


3 


March 








195 


186 


5 


4 


April . 








193 


181 


11 


1 


May . 








197 


178 


17 


2 


June . 








194 


184 


S 


2 


July . 








198 


184 


11 


3 


August 








184 


170 


8 


6 


September 






254 


236 


9 


9 


October 






270 


246 


10 


14 


November 






285 


253 


3 


29 


Totals 


2,539 


2,353 


107 


79 



1954.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



17 



Lost and Stolen Property Unit 
A description of all articles reported lost, stolen or found 
in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities and towns through- 
out the United States forward lists of property stolen in such 
places. All pawnbrokers and second-hand dealers submit 
daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A com- 
parison of the description of articles reported lost or stolen 
and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers 
resulted in the recovery of thousands of dollars' worth of 
stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and second-hand shops are inspected daily, 
for the purposes of identifying property which may have 
been stolen. 

Homicide Unit 

OflScers of this unit investigate all homicide cases and 
interrogate persons involved in or who have knowledge of 
crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion and other violent 
crimes. They prepare, supervise and present evidence at 
inquests. 

Deaths Reported 

Airplane . 

Alcoholism 

Asphyxiation 

Burns 

Drowning 

Electricity 

Elevator . 

Falling objects 

Falls 

Homicides 

Motorcycles 



1 


Motor vehicles 


42 


1 


Natm-al causes 


. 1,038 


17 


Poison .... 


1 


20 


Railroad .... 


4 


8 


Railway .... 


4 


2 


Shooting (accidental) . 


1 


4 


Stillborn .... 


4 


3 


Suicides .... 


38 


25 
18 






Total 


. 1,233 


2 







Cases Presented for Prosecution 



Abortion .... 

Aiding and assisting a pris- 
oner charged with felony 
in endeavoring to escape 
from jail . 

Assault and battery 

Assault and battery (sharp 
instrument) 

Assault with intent to mur- 
der 

Assault to rob 

.\s8ault and battery (with 
weapon) .... 

Attempting to escape from 
jail 



12 
9 

14 

1 
3 



Conspiracy .... 

Criminal negligence 

Giving article to prisoner 
without permission of 
keeper .... 

Manslaughter (auto) . 

Murder 

Violation of firearm law 

Unlawful possession of 
machine gun 

Total .... 



12 
3 



3 
30 
16 

6 



124 



Inouests 



Auto 

Drowning 
Fire in dwelling 



Total 



18 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Four hundred and twenty-six cases of violent deaths were 
investigated by the Homicide Unit. Presiding justices of 
the courts deemed it unnecessary to conduct inquests in four 
hundred and twenty-three. 

Recapitulation of Homicides 

MURDEB 18 

Three defendants indicted for first degree murder awaiting 

trial. 
Two defendants indicted for second degree murder awaiting 

trial. 
Three defendants indicted for first degree murder pleaded 

guilty to second degree murder. 
One defendant indicted for second degree murder pleaded 

guilty to manslaughter. 
One defendant indicted for second degree murder found 

guilty. 
One defendant indicted for manslaughter found guilty. 
One defendant indicted for manslaughter found not guilt3^ 
One defendant held bj'^ the lower court for the Grand Jury 

for manslaughter — Grand Sxvcy retm-ned No Bill. 
Two defendants held by the lower court for miuder awaiting 

presentation of cases to the Grand Jurj-. 
One defendant indicted for manslaughter pleaded guilty to 

assault and battery. 
Two murders still under investigation as to the perpetrators. 

Nine persons were unlawfully beaten to death. 
4 with robbery as motive. 
1 husband and wife difficulty. 
4 argument over liquor. 

Three persons were unlawfully shot to death. 
1 jealousj' between man and woman. 
1 argument over woman. 

1 argument over liquor. 

Five persons were unlawfullj- stabbed to death with a 
sharp instrument. 

2 husband and wife difficult3\ 

1 with robbery as motive. 

2 with rape as motive. 

One person unlawfully burned to death in dwelling house 
set on fire bj' arsonist. 

Seven investigations made for police of other states in 
regard to murder. One arrest made of man wanted for three 
murders in another state. 



1954.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



19 



Identification Unit 

Records — Activities 

Recorded in the Main Index File 740,048 

Recorded in the Female Record File 18,753 

Recorded in the Male Record File 206,740 



Photogra'phy 

Number of photographs on file November 30, 1953 

Made and filed dm-ing the year 

Nimiber of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, 1953 
Number of "foreign" photographs received during the year 



Total 



Photographs: 

Number on file in the "Local Segregated" file (gallery) 
Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file . 
Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) 
Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) . 
Scenes of crime photographed 



Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns 



Number of rectigraph photographs . 
Number of negatives of criminals 
Number of prints made from same . 
Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 
Number of prints from same 
Niunber of exposm'cs of Pantoscopic camera 
Number of re-orders of criminal photographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made . 
Prints made from same .... 
Number of photogiaphs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime visited 
Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) . 
Number of prints of same .... 



451,264 

14,435 

25,220 

1,155 

492,074 



82,194 

26,288 

79 

33 

255 



5,794 
947 

5,864 

2,887 

14,435 

685 

1,248 

4 

1,349 

8 

40 

127 

1,551 

1,806 

3,942 



Fingerprint File 

Number on file November 30, 1953 192,731 

Taken and filed during the year: 

Male 1,828 

Female 355 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 541 

Female 101 

Number on file November 30, 1954 195,556 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 2,183 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification . . . 4,086 

Other cities and towns 134 



20 POLICE COMISIISSIONER. 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 127 

Special police officers 183 

Hackney carriage drivers 1,142 

Auxiliary police 201 

Civilian employees 2 

Civilians fingerprinted for National Defense, Security, etc. . 3,205 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1953 75,795 

Total number of fingerprints on file (Civilian File) November 30, 

1954 77,120 



Five-Finger System of Fingerprinlimj 

'(Established May 27, 1952) 

Number of 5-finger cards in file November 30, 1954 . . . 7,412 

Number of main-index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system, 

November 30, 1954 3,706 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes filed in Identifi- 
cation Section, November 30, 1954 358 

Number of connections made by latent prints since system 

established 69 

Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone 1,400 

Requests received by correspondence 8,320 

Requests for certified records 1,360 

Requests for jury records 2,535 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses . . . 13,005 

Total 26,626 

Requests received from various public agencies : 

U. S. Marine Corps 238 

Stragglers and Deserters (Army and Navy) .... 2,604 

Auxiliary Police applicants 201 

Grand Total 29,669 



Missing Persons 
Total number of persons reported missing in Boston . . . * 1,195 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,067 

Total number still missing 128 

* Doe8 not include persons reported missing by \-ariou3 welfare agencies and numerous 
cases of children reported missing who were found or returned within a few hours after 
report was made. 



1954.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



21 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 



Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years. 

Over 15 3'ears, 
under 21 years, 

Over 21 years. 


192 

178 
332 


85 

203 
205 


187 

1G9 
269 


85 

185 
172 


5 

9 
63 




18 
33 


Totals, 


702 


493 


625 


442 


77 


51 



Reported missing in Boston 1,195 

Reported to this department from outside departments and 

agencies 4,485 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) . . . 1,150 
Reported missing and leturned same daj^ (outside cities and 

towns) 1,725 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare and the Guls' 
and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training 
Schools 315 

Total numl)er of persons reported missing . . . 8,870 



Persons Reported Missing by Police Divisions for 
Division 1 (North End section) 
Division 2 (Downtown section) 
Division 3 (West End section) .... 
Division 4 (South End section) 
Division 6 (South Boston district) . 
Division 7 (East Boston district) 
Division 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 
Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) . 
Division 1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 
Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 
Division 14 (Brighton district) . 
Division 15 (Charlestown district) 
Division 16 (Back Bay district) 
Division 17 (West Roxbury district) 
Division 18 (Hyde Park district) 
Division 19 (Mattapan district) 

Total 





— — 


Past Year 


12 









19 




127 




74 




27 




148 




190 




79 




46 




27 




40 




25 




10 




19 




*352 


1,195 



* Includes patients missing from the Boston State Hospital. 



22 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Persons interviewed t639 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives . . . 3,876 

Descriptive circulars sent out 

Tracers sent out on persons reported missing 857 

t Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the de- 
partment. 

In 72 cases of unknown dead bodies, 59 were identified thi'ough finger- 
print impressions. 

Two persons afflicted with amnesia were identified. 

Warrants 

Warrants received 4,426 

Arrested on warrants 4,232 

Warrants retm-ned witliout service 991 

Warrants sent out to divisions and units witliin the department 

and to other jurisdictions 4,426 

Active warrant cards on file issued to the Boston Police Depart- 
ment 6,096 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department forwarded 

to other cities and towTis in this State 832 

Active warrants issued to Boston Police Department for persons 

now out of State 158 

Active warrants received from other departments thi'oughout 

Massachusetts for service (cards in our files) .... 846 

Active warrants lodged at institutions as detainers . . . 133 

Summonses 
Total number received from outside cities and towns for service 

in Boston 4,227 

Total number served 3,954 

Total number not served 273 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section 

for service in outside cities and towns 26,952 

Total number served 25,251 

Total number not served 1,701 

Requests for Information 
Information fm'nished from police journals in regard to accidents 

and thefts 3,603 

Daj's in court 21 



MULTILITH AND MiMEOGRAPH 

Installation of a Multilith machine under direct supervision 
of an experienced operator enables this department to prepare 
and complete printing of circulars containing photographs and 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 23 

fingerprints of persons cither reported missing or wanted for 
criminal offenses. This MiiltiUth machine is also used to 
print department forms. 

The original investment in this machme has been repaid 
many times. This machine has proved to be a distinct ad- 
vantage in efficiency and speed in the issuance of department 
circulars, which serve a very important function in the appre- 
hension of fugitives from justice. 

The Multilith machine is completely equipped with camera, 
arc lights, vacuum frame, which add to the varied output of 
this machine. This machine is capable of printing in approxi- 
mately two hours' time, descriptive circulars of persons wanted. 
In some instances circulars are completed and mailed to out- 
side cities before a fugitive arrives at his destination. 

This unit, in addition to the Multilith machine, has a high- 
speed electric addressograph machine, and also an electric 
mimeograph machine. The mimeograph machine was used to 
make daily manifolds, warrant manifolds, bulletins, circular 
letters for the Bureau of Criminal Investigation and other 
unit's and divisions, and Police School lessons. 

The Multilith machine was used to make department forms, 
letters and circulars. 



24 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation expert in ballistics, explosives and munitions. 
All evidence found at the scene of crime ^\'here firearms or 
explosives were used is examined. Suspected Aveapons are 
catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent 
bullets and discharged cases from these weapons are filed. 
Cases involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented 
in the various courts. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to same, 
and tear gas equipment have been inspected and serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the 
courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are re- 
turned to the rightful o\Miers. A file is kept on stolen firearms 
and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen 
Property Unit and at the files of the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of PubUc Safety. 

When firearms, property of the United States, are found 
used in crime or recovered othei'wise, such property is returned 
to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are 
disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police depart- 
ments, federal agencies, military and naval intelligence units. 

Emergency Equipment 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supply 
of emergency equipment consisting of 12-gauge riot shotguns, 
ammunition, belts with bayonets attached, bullet-proof vests, 
tear gas gun kit and assembly, and gas masks which provide 
complete respiratory protection for the wearer in all oxygen- 
deficient or highly gaseous atmospheres. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns 
and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced 
Avhenever necessary. 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



25 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST 

The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in its 
nature, the frequency of any particular type being governed 
by the circumstances of tlie cases. A breakdown into types 
indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



Material 
Sought 

Acetone . 
Alcohol, iso-iiiop3' 
Alcohol, ethj'l 
Alcohol, methj'l 
Alkaloids, general 
Barbiturates . 
Benzedrine 
Benzoic acid , 
Calomel . 
Carbon monoxide 
Chloral . 
Chlorides 
Chloroform 
Cocaine . 
Codeine . 
Drugs, pills, etc. 
Ethj^lene glycol 
Fluorides 
Heroin . 
Hydrocyanic acid 
Mercury . 
Mineral oil 
Morphine 
Nicotine . 
Oils . . . 
Paraldehyde . 
Porphyrins 
ISalicylates 
Strychnine 
Sugar 



No. 
of Tests 

4 

C 

20G 

*14 

4 

76 
2 
1 
1 

46 
2 
6 
1 
1 
5 
5 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 
6 
1 

10 
3 
2 



of 



Material 
Sought 

Acid phosphatase . 

Auto, examination of 

Bloodstains . 

Casts 

Clothing . 

Construction, materials 

Dh't, debris, etc. . 

Documents 

Dyes 

Feces 

Glass 

Hair . . . 

Laundry marks 

Miscellaneous 

Paint 

Photographs . 

Photographs, color 

Photographs, infra-red 

Powder residue, hands 

Powder residue, clothing 

Pressure marks 

Safe insulation 

Scene, examination of . 

Spectrographic analysis 

Spectrophotometric, ultra 

violet .... 
Spectrophotometric, visual 
Spermatozoa . 
Tissues .... 
Ultra-violet examination 
X-ray diffraction . 



No. 
of Tests 

12 

10 

36 

1 

59 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

4 

2 

22 

15 

13 

12 

10 

3 

2 

11 

2 



Year 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 



* Routine tissue tests — 5 positive 

Cases 

Medical 
Examiners 



276 
332 
319 
320 
248 



Department 

83 

93 

98 
129 
108 



90 

50 

11 

3 

5 

1 



Total 
359 
425 
417 
449 
356 



26 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 

The Traffic Division embraces that area of the city which 
Hes within the jurisdiction of Divisions 1, 2, 3, and 4. Prior 
to June 28, 1954, it mcluded also the area comprising Division 
16 and the traffic post at Boston University bridge, Division 14, 
which, on that date, reverted to the respective divisions. 

The Traffic Division enforces all statutes, ordinances, rules 
and regulations pertaining to traffic within the area of its 
jurisdiction. It processes parking violation notices for the entire 
department. It provides a program of safety education. 

Activities 

An mcrease in the volume of traffic was noted during the 
past year. The Registrar of Motor Vehicles reports total 
plates issued at October 31, 1954, amounted to 1,488,884, as 
against a figure of 1,431,053 at the corresponding time in 1953. 

Construction of the John F. Fitzgerald Expressway is now 
in full swing with activity along the entire structure from 
the North Station to Fort Hill square. Demolition activity 
has begun m the next section to be undertaken, presently 
between Oliver street and Dewey square. 

A limited section of the expressway, between the Charles- 
Nashua-Leverett streets rotary and North street, was opened 
to traffic October 29, 1954. It is expected that the entire 
section between the North Station and Fort Hill square will be 
in service by late Spring, 1955. 

The opening of the expressway showed an immediate benefi- 
cial effect in the ground level traffic of the North Station 
area. However, congestion was noted on the North street 
end of the run, which terminates at the intersection of Black- 
stone street, where ground level construction is as yet incom- 
plete. This situation should adjust itself as construction is 
completed and the expressway extended. 

Despite this extensive construction program, traffic has 
moved remarkably close to the normal pattern. 

The usual parades were conducted as in former years with 
the exception of the Columbus Day parade which, as is cus- 
tomary, is conducted on the alternate years m East Boston. 
The usual traffic congestion was experienced durmg the 
Veterans' Day parade, Thursday, November 11, .1954. Most 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 27 

retail stores opened for business at 1:00 p.m., and attracted 
great numbers of shoppers. The parade, startmg at 2:00 p.m., 
is routed through the heart of the shopping district. 

Notable visitors to our city, for whom escort service was 
provided by the Traffic Division, included President Eisen- 
hower, Vice-President Nixon, Presidential Assistant Sherman 
Adams, the Emperor of Ethiopia, the Ambassadors of Korea 
and of Ireland, the Governors of Maine and ]\Iaryland, Senator 
Bridges, Admiral Strauss, the Commanders of the Marine 
Corps League and of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Im- 
perial Potentate of the Shriners of North America, James 
Melton, Jehovah Witnesses and many others. 

Parking 

Parking violation notices issued by the Traffic Division for 
the year ended November 30, 1954, amounted to 505,979, a 
gain of 48,573 over the preceding year and an all-time high 
for the department. Of this figure, 283,527 were reported by 
officers of the Traffic Division, the balance by officers of the 
other divisions of the department. 

Revenue from parking violations in the Central Municipal 
jurisdiction amounted to $405,006.15 for the year ended 
November 30, 1954. Parking meter revenue for the same period 
amounted to S594,712.14. 

The 8:00-9:30 a.m. parking regulation in the downtown 
section of the city, adopted on a 60-day trial basis November 9, 
1953, has now been made permanent. The successful enforce- 
ment of a regulation of this type requires the services of a great 
many officers but the results obtained in the form of a hghter 
early morning traffic load plus the availability of more parking 
spaces for the shopping public would seem to make it well 
worth the effort involved. 

At the present time there are three City of Boston off-street 
parking facilities in full-scale operation and the construction 
of several more is under active consideration. Consideration 
is being given also to the possibility of utilizing the area under 
the new expressway for parking purposes. 

Safety Education 
The Traffic Division conducts a Safety Education program 
which reaches mto all the schools of the city, private, parochial 
and public. The officers of the jM-1 Safety Squad fulfill a 



28 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

complete schedule of safety talks and demonstrations in the 
\arious schools and continue their A\ork in the playgrounds 
during the school vacation periods. 

The weekly half-hour radio program, supervised by these 
ofl&cers in conjunction with the teachers of the various schools, 
Avas continued this year through the facilities of Radio Station 
WMEX. This program features the children of our schools 
who take active part in the production and presentation of 
])lays on the general theme of safety. 

No effort is spared to make our children safety conscious 
and thus reduce to a minimum the accidents which can so 
easily maim or kill them. The very favorable accident record 
of our city attests in no small measure to the success of these 
efforts. 

Traffic Problems 

As new sections of the expressway are opened to travel, 
we are faced with the problem of adapting our traffic setup 
to provide for a changing pattern of traffic flow. This picture 
will continue to change from time to time as the work pro- 
gresses until the expressway is completed in its entirety and 
a permanent pattern of traffic f^o^\• is established. 

The conflict of jDarades with "business as usual" conditions 
in the heart of the city continues as a serious traffic problem. 

Illegal parking, despite record enforcement, constitutes 
our major traffic problem and indicates the need of a stiffer 
schedule of penalties. The tow law, recently enacted, might 
prove of considerable importance in attacking this i^roblem. 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 29 



BUREAU OF OPERATIONS 
Duties 

The Bureau of Operations lias control of all communications 
equipment, consisting of telephone, teletype, radio and tele- 
graph, and through its facilities has directed movement of 
radio cars, police boats and ambulances. 

Accomplishments 
Durmg the period from December 1, 1953, to November 30, 
1954, personnel of the Bureau of Operations managed transmi.s- 
sion, reception and handling of: 

312,746 outgoing telephone messages and 4,342 toll 
calls made by the department through our switchboard. 

Approximately 441,350 emergency telephone messages 
received and handled at the "Turret" through either 
"DE 8-1212" or the department intercommunicating 
system. 

Approximately 420,400 telephone messages received 
through our switchboard, many of which were transferred 
to the "Turret" for handling. 

184,352 teletype messages and 904 telegrams were 
processed; 12,661 of these teletype messages related to 
missing persons. 

9,456 automobiles and registration plates were reported 
lost or stolen and 6,748 were reported recovered. 

464,161 radio messages were sent, including "Sound 
Scriber" recording of same. 

Four (4) main transmitters (Station KCA-860, 2 at Police 
Headquarters and 2 at Suffolk County Court House) ; 2 emer- 
gency transmitters at White Stadium, Jamaica Plain, for 
civilian defense; 111 automobiles; 30 combination patrol- 
wagon ambulances and 4 boat transmitters and receivers; 
36 wired broadcast ampHfiers; 8 pickup receivers and 5 re- 
ceivers on motorcycles were maintained and kept in repair 
by members of this imit. 

All inter-city radio transmitter and receiver which is tuned 
in to a frequency with the State Police, Metropolitan Police, 



30 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

Brookline; Barnstable County, Newton, Quincy, Reading and 
Revere is now in operation in tliis unit and is used for emergency 
messages with those departments. 

An inter-departmental radio transmitter and receiver is in 
operation between the several stations or divisions of this 
department to be used in case of emergency such as failure of 
communication facilities, as in the case of the fire on the Dover 
Street Bridge where communication between the department 
and Division 6 was impaired, also in the case of the Hurricanes 
"Carol" and "Edna" when our telephone system was over- 
loaded. 

A radio shop is attached to the Department Automobile 
Maintenance Shop, where a 24-hour daily service is maintained. 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 31 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU 

The Crime Prevention Bureau operates for the prevention 
of deUnqiiency among juveniles, and maintains a program of 
rehabilitation for maladjusted children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention, intended to 
eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies among chil- 
dren. 

2. In this program, enlist aid of the public, interested 
agencies and divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude 
of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and especially 
educate the public and the police in tlie problem of crime 
prevention and suppression, 

4. Determine persons and places ^\hich in any way con- 
tribute to delinquency of children; investigatmg and takmg 
necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and mspect places of pul^lic amusement. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged and the 
needy; locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist m 
the investigation of cases -where women are in'\'olved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 
Inspections and Investigations 
During the past year there were 11,728 inspections by the 
personnel of this bureau in connection with the following 
places: 

Bus and railroad terminals Hotels 

Cafes Theatres and amusement 

Ilestaurants centers 

Dance halls 

Six hundred seven investigations involving A\omen, young 
girls and children were completed. 



32 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Abuse of female child . 
Adultery- 
Assault and battery 
Begetting 
Conspiracj'^ 
Drunkenness . 
Forgery .... 
Fornication 

Idle and disorderly person 
Kidnapping . 
Larceny .... 
Lewd and lascivious cohab- 
itation . . . . 



Arrests 
3 Neglected cliild 



2 

Neglect of minor child . 1 

Runaways .... 8 

SP of larceny ... 1 

Stubborn child ... 2 
Violation of Alcoholic 

Beverage Act ... 4 

Violation of parole . . 1 

Violation of probation . . 4 

Total .... 43 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 33 

CITY 1MU80N 

The City Prison Is loeatod in tlic now Court House l)uil<liu;;, 
Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses, the prosecution of 
whicli is within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court, 
are conveyed to the City Prison, and, unless other wse released, 
are held in charge of the keeper until the next .session of the 
court l^efoie which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are conveyed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December 1, 1953, to November 30, 1954, 
J 3, 124 men were committed to the City Prison, as follows: 

Drunkenness 12,460 

Suspicious persons 112 

For safekeeping 74 

Nonsupport 67 

Assault anci battery 58 

Violation of Massachusetts autonviliilc law .... 51 

Larceny 45 

Violation of probation 39 

Default 29 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 14 

Adultery 13 

Illegitimacy 12 

Fugitives from justice 9 

Threats and intimidation 7 

Fornication 6 

Vagrancy 6 

Violationof rules and regulations of Park Commission 5 

Violation of drug law . * 4 

Breaking and entering 3 

Lewdness 3 

Soliciting alms 3 

Carrying dangerous weapon 2 

Delinquent children 2 

Forgery 1 

Indecent exposure I 

Rape 1 

Robberj^ 1 

Stubborn child 1 

Miscellaneous 95 



Total 13,124 

Two hundred and forty-foui- male lodgeis were received 
and cared for during the year. 



34 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for "Women is located in the new- 
Court House building, Somerset street. All women arrested 
in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, and, unless 
otherwise released, are held in charge of the chief matron until 
the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they 
are convej^ed by county authorities to the jail or institution to 
which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail, 
to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 2,859 were committed, as follows: 
Drunkenness . 
Suspicious persons 



Larcenj' . 

For safekeeping . 

Runaways 

Violation of probation and parole 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Assault and battery 

Adulter}' 

Delinquent children 

Idle and disorderly 

Stubborn children 

Fornication . 

Neglect of children 

Abandonment 

Violation of drug law . 

Keeping house of ill fame 

Lewdness 

Various other causes . 



Total 

From municipal court 
Grand Total . 



Recommitments 



2,061 

292 

121 

40 

37 

36 

28 

26 

21 

21 

20 

17 

16 

10 

5 

5 

1 

1 

99 

2,857 



2,859 



Eleven women lodgers were received and cared for during 
the year. 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 35 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTE:\I 
Signal Boxes 
The total number of boxes in use is 571. Of these 495 are 
connected with the underground system and 76 with the 
overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 
In the i^ast year employees of this service responded to 
2,001 trouble calls; inspected 571 signal boxes; 16 signal desks; 
18 motor generator sets; 400 storage batteries. Repairs have 
been made on 85 box movements; 16 registers; 85 locks; 10 
time stamps; 12 vibrator bells; 40 relaj'^s; 15 electric fans; 
22 motors; 19 generators. This unit is responsible for the 
installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equip- 
ment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes arc 64 signal, 571 
telephone and 68 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and teletype 
installations and minor teletype repairs throughout the depart- 
ment. It also maintains 48 Headquarters-to-station house 
telephone circuits; 18 teletype-writer circuits, 18 radio-wired 
broadcast circuits, 6 radio-car response circuits; a circuit, with 
equipment, at the Charlesbank station of the Metropolitan 
District Police; also a circuit, with equipment, in booth at the 
East Boston end of the Sumner Tunnel; and the mtercom- 
munication units throughout the department. 

The follov.'ing comprises the property of the signal service 
unit: 

16 open circuit blinker-type signal P.B.X. desks 
717 circuits 
33 test boxes 
400 cells of storagc-tj-pe battery 
2,000 taxicab signs 
30 traffic booths 
571 police signal boxes 
20 batter3'-charging units 
835,000 feet of underground cable 
160,500 feet of overhead cable 
36,480 feet of duct 
80 manholes 
22 motor generator sets 
18 motor-driven flashers 



36 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

300 iron road horses 

1 gasoline electric generator 

4 Chevrolet trucks 

1 Ford truck 

1 Chevrolet Sedan 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the 
Year Ending November 30, 1954 

{Included in Table XV) 

Payrolls $92,419 56 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . . 42,433 49 

Total $134,853 05 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMKNT — No. 49. 



HAHBOli SERVICK 

The duties performed liy tlie Harbor Police, Division 8, 
comprising the harbor and the islands therein, were as follows: 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports .... 1,040 

Xumber of vessels ordered from the channel 12 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stroani . 6 

Number of alarms of fire attended on waterfront .... 346 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 2 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 7 

Number of cases investigated 1,540 

Number of dead liodies recovercfl . . . . 10 

Number rescued from drowning 7 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered .... 74 

Number of obstiuctions removed from channel .... 76 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 2,175 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge ... 

Number of dead bodies cared for 10 

Number of hours grappling 34 

^^'^lue of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, 

stages, etc $18,350 

Since December ], 1953,- 1,136 vessels from domestic ports 
and 1,040 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the Port of 
Boston. 



HARBOR PATROL SERVICE 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the 
police boats, ''Michael H. Crowley," "William H. McShane," 
" William H. Pierce," and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the 
upper and lower harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort 
Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay and Neponset 
River. 



38 



POLICE COMIMISSIONER. 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 
There are 192 motor vehicles in the service at the present 
time which are distributed as follows: 



Divisions. 



PhS 



p 









^ 






ra 




o 


•-9. 




"3 






^ 


^ 


o 


Sg3 


a 




f2^ 


H 


s 



Headquarters . 
Division 1 . 
Division 2 . 
Division 3 . 
Division 4 . 
Division 6 . 
Division 7 . 
Division 9 . 
Division 10 
Division 11 
Division 13 
Division 14 
Division 15 
Division IG 
Division 17 
Division 18 
Division 19 
Traffic Division 
Unassigned 
Totals 



— 


36 


9 


— 


2 


3 


— 


— 


2 


3 




— 


1 


3 


— 


— 


3 


7 


— 


— 


2 


5 


— 


3 


.2 


6 


— 


4 


1 


5 


— 


— 


2 


5 


— 


2 


2 


5 


— 


1 


1 


4 


— 


4 


2 


5 


— 


2 


1 


3 


— 


— 


2 


5 


— 


4 


1 


3 


— 


1 


1 


4 


— 


2 


2 


5 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


8 


2 


7 


— 


4 


29 


119 


9 


35 



45 

5 

5 

4 

10 

10 

12 

6 



9 

9 

4 

11 

5 

7 

7 

13 

13 



192 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 39 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles 
(patrol and ambulance) in Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey 
sick and injured persons to the following places: 

City Hospital 12,456 

Calls where services were not required 2,426 

Boston State Hospital 895 

Massachusetts General Hospital 645 

City Hospital (East Boston Relief Station) 568 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 513 

Home 435 

Southern Mortuary 271 

Children's Hospital 227 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 142 

Beth Israel Hospital 141 

United States Veterans' Hospital 141 

Faullcner Hospital 103 

Carney Hospital 102 

Police station houses 77 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 68 

Psychopathic Hospital 68 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 57 

Northern Mortuary 50 

Roslindale General Hospital 45 

United States Marine Hospital 45 

Physicians' offices 42 

St. Margaret's Hospital 28 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 26 

Deaconess Hospital 26 

New England Hospital for Women 25 

Kenmore Hospital 14 

Lahey Clinic 14 

Mt. Auburn Hospital 11 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 10 

Audubon Hospital 7 

Floating Hospital 7 

Fargo Barracks Hospital 6 

Longwood Hospital 6 

Sancta Maria Hospital 6 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 5 

Harley Hospital 5 

Milton Hospital 5 

Evangeline Booth Hospital 4 

Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 4 



40 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



Soldiers' Home 
Washingtoiiiun Hospital 
Chardon Street Home . 
Winthrop Community Hos]ntal 
Bouinewood Hospital . 
Cambridge City Hospital . 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear IiU 
AMiidden Memorial Hospit.i! 
Allertou Hospital . 
Brooks Hospital . 
Hull Street Medical Unit . 
New England Baptist Hospital 
Quincy Citj- Hospital . 
Somerville Hospital 

Total .... 



irin;ii 


y 













19,754 



Automobile Maintenance 

General rciiairs, replacement of parts and accessories . . $61,694 87 

Storage 220 00 

Gasoline 70,621 96 

Oil and Grease 5,739 74 

Antifreeze, brake fluids, patches, polishing cloths, lenses, etc. 848 91 

Total S139,125 48 



HORSES 
On November 30, 1953, there were 15 saddle horses in the 
service, attached to Division 16. During the year, three (3) 
horses Avere retired to the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital. 
There are now twelve (12) horses in the sen'ice, attached to 
Division 16. 



1954.1 rUBLlC DUCL'MbLNT Xo. 41). 41 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 

Cliuptcr 392 of the Aet.s of 1930, as nmeiidcd. limits llio 
number of licenses to .set up and use hacknej- carriages in the 
City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, December 1, 1953, to November 
30, 1954, due to changes of ownership and regrants, a total 
of *2,004 licenses were granted. 

There were 271 articles, coiisistiug of umbrellas, coats, 
handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, which 
were turned over to the office of Ins})ector of Carriages. One 
hundred twelve of these were restored to the owners, and 
the balance of 159 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public 
hackney carriages, as well as licenses to dvixQ the same : 

Hackney Carnage Licenses 
(To Set Up and, Use the Vehicle) 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,004 

( -aniages licensed ("renewal" applicntions ;uid ' changes 

of ownership ") 1,7.3(» 

Carriages licensed (■' regrants") 248 

2.004 



Carriage liceascs canceled (in favor of "'regrants" and "changes 

of ownership") 481 

Carriages licensed ("changes of ownership") 233 

Carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1054 (at end of police; 
year) — licensed since February 1 , 1954 (beginning of hack- 
ney carriage license year) 1,523 

Carriages inspected 1,875 

*248 "regrants" 



Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reix)rted on 5,785 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected 204 

Drivers' licenses granted "'5,581 

* Includes 1 canceled for nonpajinent. 



42 POLICE COIMMISSIONER. 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 40; of which revocations 2 were re- 
scinded and the licenses restored; leaving the net figure 

sho\\ai of such revocations as 38 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1954 (at end of police 
year) — licensed since February 1, 1954 (beginning of hack- 
ney carriage license year) . ....... t5,383 

Drivers' licenses suspended and drivers stripped of credentials . 27 

Complaints against owners, drivers and "setups" investigated . 087 

Daj^s spent in court 70 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 271 

t Includes l-l female hackney carriage drivers. 

Public Taxicdb Stands 
There are 486 established pubHc taxicab stands, with capacity 
for 1,267 cal)s, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for the occupation 
of private hackney stands (that is, upon private property) 
by Hcensed hackney carriage owTiers. 

During the 5'"ear, 27 apphcations (capacity, 426 carriages) 
for such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles 

Durmg the year ending November 30, 1954, there have 
l^een issued licenses for 27 sight-seeing automobiles and 16 
designated stands (capacity, 18 automobiles) for same. One 
application for license to set up and use sight-seeing auto- 
mobile was rejected. 

There were 29 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Hackney Carnage Violations 
During the past year, 652 tags were issued to taxicab drivers 
for various violations. Sixty-five penalties were imposed, 
which included 38 revocations. This system of discipline 
has continued to result in relieving courts of many minor 
cases which Avould tend to congest their dockets. 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 

LISTING WORK IN BOSTON 



43 



Year 


Canvass ; 


Year 


Canvass 


1903* .... 


181,045 


1929 .... 


493,250 


1904 








193,195 


1930 . . 






502,101 


1905 . 








194,547 


1931 . 






500,986 


1906 . 








195,446 


1932 . 






499,758 


1907 . 








195,900 


1933 . 






501,175 


1908 








201,552 


1934 . 






502,936 


1909 








201,391 


1935 . 






509,703 


1910 t 








203,603 


1936 . 






514,312 


1911 








206,825 


1937 . 






520,838 


1912 








214,178 


1938 . 






529,905 


1913 








215,388 


1939 . 






534,230 


1914 








219,364 


1940 . 






531,010 


1915 








220,883 


1941 . 






541,335 


19161 











1942 . 






539,408 


1917 








221,207 


1943 . 






540,517 


1918 








224,012 


1944 . 






543,051 


1919 








227,466 


1945 . 






549,899 


1920 








235,248 


1946 . 






545,500 


1921 § 








480,783 


1947 . 






551,145 


1922 








480,106 


1948 . 






548,111 


1923 








477,547 


1949 . 






544,898 


1924 








485,677 


1950 . 






541,762 


1925 








489,478 


1951 . 






534,418 


1926 








493,415 


1952 . 






526,396 


1927 








495,767 


1953 . 






526,927 


1928 .... 


491,277 







••' 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May 1. 

1 1910 listing changed to April 1. 

i 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

il 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of April 1. 

The following shows the total number of persons hsted in 
January of the present year: 

Male 234,692 

Female 271,380 

Total 506,072 



Listing Expenses 
The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, 
twenty years of age or more, not including the services rendered 
l)y members of the police force, were as follows : 

Printing police list 

Clerical service and material used in preparing list 
Newspaper notices 
Telephone rental . 



Stationery 
Directory 
RewTite check lists 
Precinct boxes 



«67,315 20 

19,147 00 

1,015 77 

55 7<» 

2,779 50 

05 00 

578 00 

62 32 



Total 



$91,018 58 



44 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



XUMBEU OF POLICEMEX E 



MPLOYED IN Listing 



January 2 
January 3 
January 4 
January o 
January (> 
January 7 
Jaiuiar^- 8 
January 9 
January 10 
Januarj^ 11 
January 12 
January 13 
January- 14 
January lo 
January 1(> 
January 17 
January 18 
Januarj' 1*J 
January 20 
January 21 
January 22 
Jannar\- 23 



554 

184 

520 

562 

54<> 

499 

440 

340 

119 

189 

144 

74 

58 

00 

43 

21 

22 

15 

15 

15 

8 



Police AVork on Juky Lists 

The l^olico Department iiiuier the provisions of chapter 
348, Acts of 1907. assisted the Election Commissioners in 
ascertaining the quahfications of persons proposed for jiny 
service. 

The police findings in 1954 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 1,926 

Physically incapacitated 206 

Convicted of crime 179 

Unfit for various reasons 1,203 

Apparently fit 9,050 

Total 12,564 



The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department 
for delivery 9,170 summonses to persons for jury service. 



1954.I PIBIJC DOCUMENT — No. M). 45 



SPI'XIAL POLICE 

Special police are a])pointed to serve without jja.y Irom tiie 
city, on a written application of any officer or board in charge 
of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of 
anj"- responsible cori)oration oi- person, to be liable for the 
official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for api)ointment as special i)olicemen 
for the 3'ear commencing as of Ai)ril 1, 1954, were fingerprinted 
by the department, as has been the custom, and their records, 
if any. searched for by the Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending Noveml)er 30, 1954, there were 1,167 
special police officers appointed ; 3 applications for appointment 
M^ere refused for cause; 12 appointments wei-e canceled for non- 
l)ayment of license fee; and 5 appointments were canceled for 
other reasons. 

Appointments were made on api)lications iecei\ed as follows: 

From corporations and associations 654 

From theaters and other places of amusement . . . 239 

From city departments 241 

From churches 22 

From jjrivate institutions 11 

Total 1,167 



46 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



CARRYING DANGEROUS WEAPONS 

The following table shows the number of applications made 
to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry pistols or 
revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth 
during the past five years, the number of such applications 
granted, the number refused, and the number revoked : 



Year 


Applications 


Granted 


Rejected 


Licenses 
Revoked 


1950 .... 


2,735 


2,651 


84 


2 


1951 .... 


2,727 


2,673 


54 


3 


1952 .... 


2,807 


2,748 


59 


2 


1953 .... 


2,910 


2,833 


77 


5 


1954 .... 


2,873 


*t2,814 


59 


3 



* 29 canceled for nonpayment. 

ill licenses to possess machine guns. 



PUBLIC LODGING HOUSES 
Public lodgmg houses licensed by the Pohce Commissioner 
under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections 33-36, G. L. 
(Ter. Ed.), showing locations and number of lodgers 
accommodated: 



Location 



Number 
Lodged 



17 Davis Street . 
1-3 Dover Street 
287 Hanover Street 
8 Pine Street . 
87 Vernon Street 
Total . 



32,839 
2,928 
3,534 

43,768 
1,190 



84,259 



1954.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 47 



PROPERTY CLERK 

The Property Clerk's office is charged A\'ith the care of all 
police buildings, lost, stolen and abandoned property, money 
or other propertj' alleged to have been illegally obtained, and 
all articles and property taken from persons arrested for any 
cause. In its custody are also placed all seized Ikjuor and 
gaming implements which come into the possession of the 
department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, uniforms and 
equipment are issued by this office. 

Durmg the j^ear 194 motor vehicles came mto custody of 
this office, 77 vehicles were returned to legitimate claimants 
and 77 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 73 
motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance sliojj for the servicing of department auto- 
mobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. During the year, 
on 6,004 occasions, department cars were repaired and, on 1,926 
occasions, cars were serviced. Forty-six department cars 
and 198 privatelj'-ovmed cars were towed by the department 
wrecker. The department operates a motorcycle repair shop 
where, on 361 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced 
during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Eciuipment is responsible 
for the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the 
various divisions, and is reciiiired to investigate and report on 
all accidents involving department vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand December 1, 1953 740 

Articles received during the year to Novoml^cr 30, 1954 . 710 

Total 1,450 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 110 

Worthless 308 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of 

Public Welfare 15 

Sold at public auction 218 

Total number of articles disposed of . . 651 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1954 . 799 



48 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



1953 




Dec. 


9. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


21. 


Dec. 


31. 


1954 




.Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


28. 


Jan. 


3J. 


Feb. 


1. 


Feb. 


1. 


Feb. 


1. 



Feb. 22 



SPECIAL EVENTS 

The foUowiiij^ is a list of the s[)ecial events wliich oecuiTed 
during the year, j>i\ inu; the numhci- of pohce detailed for duty 
at each : 

Men 

Boston Garden, Boston Police Bfslief Association Ball 300 

Parade of San Lucy Society 20 

Christmas Eve carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill . 65 

Xew Year's Eve celebrations 1,340 



Funeral of Detective James W. Robinson ... 40 
Mothers' March on Polio in connection with the 

]March of Dimes 50 

Boston Garden, Boston American Silver Skate Carnival 30 

Funeral of Patrolman Daniel P. Byrnes ... 40 

Funeral of Patrolman IMartin T. Heffron ... 10 
North End, Tulman Furniture Company, Friend 

street, general alarm of fire 30 

State House, reception of His Excellencj' Governor 

Christian A. Herter 130 

]*arade of Boston Caledonia Club 80 

Funeral of Lieutenant Bartholomew J. Adley . 48 

Visit of E.\-President Harry S. Truman ... 40 

South Boston, Evacuation Daj- parade . . 395 

Funeral of Patrolman Scholley J. Lake ... 40 

Cathedral Club road race 05 

Parade of St. Thomas Holy Name Society ... 20 

Funeral of Patrolman William F. Maraghey . . 40 

Easter parade on Commonwealth avenue ... 20 

Funeral of Detective Philip P. Whaland ... 40 

City of Boston Patriots' Day parade and celebrations 100 
William F. Sinclair Post, No. 250, The American 

Legion, parade and service at St. James Church . 15 

Norfolk House Center road race 45 

Boston Athletic Association Marathon .... 290 
Boston Garden, Boston Fire and Protective Depart- 
ment's Annual Concert and Ball .... 40 

City of Boston "air raid test" 1,020 

Holy Child Baseball League parade and opening game 

at Ronan Park, Dorchester 45 

American Cancer Association collections ... 35 

Funeral of Sergeant Patrick J. Gaffey .... 40 

Parade of lioston Technical High School ... 25 

Boston Garden, Catholic Daughters of America rally 40 
Dorchester Little League parade and baseball game 

at Franklin Field 25 



Feb. 22 


Mar. 1 


Mar. 8 


Mar. 17 


Mar. 19. 


April 3 


April 11 


April 12 


April 18 


April 19. 


April 19. 


April 19. 


April 19. 


April 19. 


April 19. 


April 24. 


April 25. 


April 27. 


April 28 


April 30 


May ] 


ALay 2 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 49 

1954 Men 

May 2. Boston Garden, Jewisli Memorial Hospital, charitable 

affair 2.5 

May 13. Parade of Boston University 20 

May 15. Armed Forces Day i^arade 60 

May 15. Parkway Little Lctigue parade and baseball game at 

Billings Field 20 

May 15. Allston Little l^eague jiariide and baseball game at 

Ringer Playground 20 

May 16. Sixth Anniversary Celebration of Israel parade . 45 
May 16. Allston Little League parade and baseball game at 

Smith Playground 20 

May 22. lioston Park Depart mcMit cemeteries and vicinity on 

Saturday- 10 

-May 23. Boston Common. Girl Scouts Annual Troop Flag pres- 
entation exercises 30 

May 23. Parade of St. Kevin's Church 20 

May 23. Suffolk County, The American Legion, paracU; and 

Pleld Mass at Fenway Park 30 

May 23. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sundaj- .... 80 
May 23. Boston Park Doj)artment cemeteries and vicinity on 

Sunday 15 

Maj' 25. Parade of Boston School Cadets 210 

Ma}^ 30. South Boston, parade of Allied VV'ar V^eterans Council . 30 
Maj' 30. City of Boston, Veterans' Graves Registration pa- 
rade 25 

-Maj' 30. Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday .... 165 
May 30. Boston Park Department cemeteries and vicinity on 

Sunday 30 

May 31. Parade and exercise of Kearsarge Association of 

Naval V'eterans 30 

May 31. Hyde Park, \'eterans Council parade; .... 25 

May 31. Brighton, Allied Veterans of Brighton parade 25 

May 3L Charlestown, Allied Veterans of Charlestown parade . 25 

Maj^ 31. Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day . 190 
May 31. Boston Park Department cemeteries and vicinitj^ on 

Memorial Day 40 

.June 3. \'isit of His Imperial Majesty Ilailie Selassie, Em- 
peror of Ethiopia 220 

June (). ^Nlt. Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial Day 

exercises 350 

June 7. Ancient and Honorable .Vi-tillerj' Company parade 150 

June 10. Funeral of Patrolman William Shea .... 40 

June 13. Boston Firemen's Memorial Sundaj' exercises . 25 

June 13. Dorchester, Dorchester Day, road race and parade 350 

June 13. Allied Veterans and Civic Organizations parade . . 40 
June 14. Xation-wide Civil Defense public participation 

training te.st 1,065 

June 14. Symphony Hall, Harvard College Class of 1920 

Reunion activities 20 



50 POLICE COMMISSIONER. 

1954 Men 

June 16. Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Harvard College Class of 1929 

Reunion activities 14 

June IC. Charlestown, "Night Before" Bunker Hill Day 

celebrations, street dutj-, traffic dutj- and banquets . 40 

June 17. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street 

duty, block parties, dances and historical pageant . 95 

June 17. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 230 

June 18. Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street 

duty 30 

June 20. Yankee Division Veterans Association parade . . 470 
June 20. Boston Common, Yankee Division Veterans As- 
sociation Memorial service 30 

June 20. The Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, Foiu-th Masonic 
District Communion service and parade to Me- 
chanics Building 20 

Fenway Park, Mayor's Charity Field Day ... 35 

St. John's Daj- parade 50 

I. B. O. P. Elks of the World parade .... 60 

Parade of St. Margaret of Scotland Guild, Inc. . . 20 

City of Boston distribution of ice cream and candj^ at 

various playgrounds and schoolyards ... 80 

City of Boston Independence Day parade and exercises 85 

Boston Common, Independence Day band concert and 

fireworks display (postponc^d from July 5) . . 25 

July 10. Columbus Park, South Boston, Independence Day 
band concert and fireworks display (postponed 

from July 5) 20 

July 10. Franklin Field, Dorchester, Independence Day band 
concert and fireworks display (postponed from 

July 5) 20 

July 10. Smith Field, Brighton, Independence Day band 
concert and fireworks display (postponed from 

July 5) 20 

Parade of Maria Del Soccorso Society .... 20 

Parade of San Rocco Society 15 

Parade of San Rocco Society 15 

East Boston, Empire H0I3' Ghost parade ... 20 

Funeral of Detective William J. McDonough . . 40 

366th Infantry AMVET Post, No. 128, parade . . 35 

Parade of Santa Maria S. S. Delia Cava Society . 20 

Parade of Odd Fellows 30 

South Boston, Archbishop Cushing's Marian Year 

exercises 45 

Aug. 16. Fenway Park, Boston Red Sox-New York Giants 
baseball game sponsored by the Boston American- 
Record for the benefit of disabled veterans . . 35 
Aug. 19. Funeral of Detective Hazen A. Chalmers ... 40 

Aug. 20. Army and Navy U. S. A. paiade 80 

Aug. 22. Parade of San Rocco Society 20 



June 21. 


June 27. 


June 27. 


June 27. 


July 2. 


July 5. 


July 10. 



July 


11. 


July 


17. 


July 


18. 


July 


25. 


Aug. 


2. 


Aug. 


8. 


Aug. 


8. 


Aug. 


12. 


Aug. 


15. 



1954.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 51 

1954 Alen 

Aug. 25. White Stadium, Boston P:uk Department "Junior 

Olympics" 30 

Aug. 31. Hurricane "Carol" 700 

Sept. 8. Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Consecration of Auxiliary 

Bishop Jeremiah F. Minihan 40 

Sept. 11. Hurricane "Edna" 800 

Sept. 12. Parade of St. Rosalie Society 20 

Sept. 14. State Primary Day 1,G50 

Sept. 15. Funeral of Detective John J. Geoghegan ... 40 

Sept. 17. Parade of St. Rosalie Society 20 

Sept. 18. Parade of St. Rosalie Society 20 

Sept. 19. Parade of St. Rosalie Society 20 

Sept. 19. Jewish cemeteries and vicinit}' lo 

Sept. 23. Boston Common, American Red Cross demonstration, 

displaj-s and exhibits 15 

Sept. 24. Boston Common, American Red Cross demonstration, 

displays and exhibits 15 

Sept. 25. Boston Common, American Red Cross demonstration, 

display's and exhibits 15 

Sept. 25. Roxl)ury Day parade 55 

Sept. 26. Aletropolitan Transit Authorit}' emploj'ees' i^arade to 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross' 20 

Sept. 26. Parade of St. Rosalie Society 20 

Sept. 26. Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 30 

Sept. 26. Boston Park Department football games ... 25 
Sept. 28. \'mt of Hon. Richard ]\I. Nixon, Vice President of the 

United States, and address at the Italo- American 

Voters League of Boston Banciuet at tlie First Corps 

of Cadets Armory 55 

Sept. 29. Visit and departure of Hon. Richard M. Nixon, Vice 

President of the United States 20 

Sept. 30. Funeral of Patrolman John T. Eldracher ... 40 
Oct. 1. Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company departure 

for England and France 20 

Oct. 3 Jamaica Plain, St. Thomas Church, Council of 

Catholic Women's ])arade 20 

Oct. 3. Boston Park Department football games ... 25 
Oct. 3. Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" 

parade and demonstration drill on Boston Common 55 
Oct. 4. Boston Fue Department "Fire Prevention Week" 

demonstration 15 

Oct. 5. Aleppo Temple pai-ade 70 

Oct. 5. Visit of Governor-elect Edmund S. ^luskie of INIaine . 80 
Oct. 6. Visit and departure of Governor-elect Edmund S. 

Muskie of Maine 30 

Oct. 7. Boston Fire Department "Fire Pievention AVeek" 

demonstration 15 

Oct. 8. Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" 

demonstration 15 



52 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



1954 




Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


22. 


Oct. 


24. 


Oct. 


30 


Oct. 


30 


Oct. 


31 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


7 


Nov 


7 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


13 



Nov. 21. 

Nov. 27. 
Nov. 27. 

Nov. 27. 



Prince Hall Grand l^odge of Masons paiad 
East Boston, Columbus Day parade 
Chinese ^lerchants Association parade . 
Boston Park Department football games 
Boston Park Department football games 

Rodeo parade 

Parade of Northeastern University 

Boston Park Department foot I jail games 

Halloween celebrations .... 

Boston Park Department Halloween parties 

South Boston, ^lartin F. AIcDonough Post, No, 368 

The American Legion, parade 

Boston Park Department football games 

State Election 

South Boston, Thomas J. Fitzgerald Post, No oGl 

Veterans of Foreign Wars parade ... 
Boston Park Deportment football games 
Visit of President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Department of Massachusetts, The American Legion 

Veterans Day parade .... 
Olivia James House, Inc., road race 
Parade of Boston University . 
Parade of Boston College Cold Key Society 
R. H. White's Christmas parade 
Fenway Park, Boston College-Boston University 

football game 

Fenway Park, Boston Park Department champion 

ship football game 

White Stadium high school football games . 
Fenwaj' Park, Boston College-Holy Cross football 

game 

Boston Garden, Franciscan Mission charitable show 



Men 

40 

125 

25 

25 

25 

45 

25 

25 

1,010 

130 

20 

25 

1,650 

25 

25 

550 

485 
20 
20 
20 

ITO 

25 

30 
45 

25 
35 



Note 

December 1, 1953, to January 8, 1954, inclusive, 12 officers performed 
a total of 468 duties for that period in connection with the City of Boston 
Christmas Festival on Boston Common. 

March 14 to March 20, 1954, inclusive, 10 officers performed a total of 
70 duties for that period in connectio)i with the Horticultural Society 
Flower Show at Mechanics Building. 

June 6 to June 20, 1954, inclusive, 38 officers pei formed a total of 570 
duties for that period in connection with the Boston Art Festival on the 
Public Garden. 

July 27 to September 24, 1954, inclusive, Sundays excepted, a total of 
10 officers performed a total of 590 duties for that period in connection 
with the so-called Northern Industrial Chemical Company employees' 
strike. 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xu. 49. 



53 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS 





1951=52 


1952=53 


I953»54 


Abandoned children cared for 


26 


29 


27 


Buildings found open and made secure 


3,951 


3,733 


4,459 


Cases investigated 


114,588 


111,008 


117,381 


Dangerous* buildings reported 


41 


38 


54 


Dangerous chimneys reported 


14 


23 


71 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for . 


831 


777 


679 


Defective drains and vaults reported . 


3 


14 


6 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 


3 


7 


1 


Defective gas pipes reported . 


20 


4 


7 


Defective hj'drants reported . 


14 


37 


44 


Defective street lights reported 


3,586 


3,837 


2,822 


Defective sewers reported 


104 


133 


107 


Defective streets and walks reported . 


3,025 


2,332 


2,292 


Defective wat-er pipes reported 


41 


66 


40 


Fire alarms given 


9,255 


8,524 


7,818 


Fires extinguished 


781 


1,436 


675 


Insane persons taken in charge 


789 


889 


895 


Lodgers at station houses 


242 


227 


106 


Lost children restored .... 


1,278 


1,217 


1,040 


Xumt)er of persons committed to bail . 


2,535 


2,576 


2,437 


Persons rescued from drowning 


20 


16 


9 


Sick and injured persons assisted . 


17,827 


19,161 


18,256 


Street obstructions removed . 


327 


99 


143 


Water running to waste reported . 


382 


462 


468 


Witnesses detained 


61 


32 


27 



54 POLICE COMAIISSIONER. 



PENSIONS AND BENEFITS 
On December 1, 1953, there were 752 persons on the pension 
roll. During the year 35 died, viz. : 1 deputy superintendent, 
1 captain, 4 lieutenants, 6 sergeants, 19 patrolmen and 4 annui- 
tants. Seventy were added, viz.: 1 captain, 2 lieutenants, 
5 sergeants, 45 patrolmen, 9 civilians and the widows of Ser- 
geant Charles C. Flaherty and Patrolmen William A. Campbell, 
Albert Cheshier, William J. Collins, Charles E. Hull, Jr., Harry 
King, Thurston O. Kraby and John J. Sullivan, wdio died from 
disability received in the performance of duty, leaving 787 on 
roll at date, 707 pensioners and 80 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities durmg 
the past year amounted to $1,523,487.37 and it is estimated 
that $1,828,051.00 will be required for pensions and annuities 
in 1955. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted 
to $207,550.00. There are 33 beneficiaries of the fund at the 
present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of 
$5,172.00 during the past year. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



(55) 



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ConimLssioner 

Assistant Secretaries . 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants . 

Lieutenant-Doteotivos . 

Sergeants 

Sergeant-Detoetives 

Patrolmen 

Detectives — First Grade 

Detectives — Second Grade 

Detectives— Third Grade 

Patrolwomen 



^ — — M -:f o c-i -M — — t^ ?: ri r- — o Ti M ?i ■M c — — — 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CC 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 r-^ 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i t 1 1 1 1 1 >-< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 -^ 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 c-i 1 1 1 1 ; 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 " 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 -^ 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C") 1 1 1 1 C-) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C-l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 C-l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■« 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -' 1 i 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 "-< 1 1 1 1 


1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 " 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 


1 |r-i,-l,-lrH| 1 1 lt>.roit>.>-l|Or-llOi-l| 1 1 1 


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1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 


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^'-•lll'^lllllllllllllllill 


1 1 1 1 1 '-< 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 1 1 O CM 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




Biological Chemist 
Assistant Biological Clicniist 

Chauffeur 

Chauffeur-Laborers 

Cleaners 

Clerks 

Clerk -Stenographers 
Diesel and Gas Engine Operators 
Director, Signal Service 
Assistant Director, Signal Service 
Elevator Operators 
Elevator Operator-Laborers 
Firemen (Marine) 
Firemen (Stationary) . 
Fireman (Steam) .... 

Hostlers 

.Janitors 

.T.nnitrefscs 

Laborers 

L.nborer-Rclief Elevator Operator 
Linemen and Foreman 
Matron, Chief .... 
Matron, Assistant Chief 
Matrons, Assistant . . . . 



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Mechanics 

Painter and Groundman 

Property Clerk 

Repairman 

Shorthand Reporters .... 

Signalmen 

Statisticians 

Stenographers 

Telephone Operators .... 


o 
H 





1954.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



59 



TABLE II 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of 
Police Department 



Ranks and Grades 



Authorized 
Strength 



Nov. 30, 
1954 



Actual Strength 



Nov. 30, 
1954 



Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus) 



Police Commissioner 
Secretary 

Assistant Secretaries 
Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains .... 



Lieutenants and Lieutenant-De- 
tectives 

Sergeants and Sergeant-Detec- 
tives 



Patrolmen 
Patrolwomen 



Totals 



1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
32 

85 

229 

*2,501 

tl2 



2,867 



2 

1 

2 

32 

85 

229 

2,498 
9 



2,859 



Minus 1 



]\Iinus 1 



Minus 3 
Minus 3 



Minus 8 



* Includes 189 Detective-Patrolmen 
t Includes 2 Detective-Patrolwomen 



60 



i'OJ.lCE COMMISSIONER. 



3 



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1954.] 



pii^Lic 1)(K"i;mi:xt no. v.). 



61 



TABLI: IV 
Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1954, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement 
and the Number of Years' Service of Each. 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

t Civilians retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

§ Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

ll Civilian retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

^ Retired Veterans, under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 58. 



Name 


Cause of 
Retirement 


Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 


Years of 
Service 


Ahem, John 


Incapacitated 


04 


' 33 


Bamberg, Cliailes 11. 








Inrapiuitated 


04 


34 


Banks, Leonard T. . 








Incapacitated 


<)1 


33 


Barron, Thomas E.§ 








Incapacitated 


.-)9 


27 


Benn, Harry IL 








Incnpacitatcii 


()4 


34 


Bernard, Raymond .1. 








Incapacitated 


03 


34 


Booth, William S.='- . 








Incapacitated 


49 


10 


Brown, George E. 








Incapacitated 


.jO 


31 


liurke, John R. . 








Incapacitated 


00 


33 


Burns, Eugene P.§ . 








Incapacitiited 


30 


4 


Carney, Walter P.J . 








Incapacitated 


.50 


27 


Carroll, John J.* 








Incapacitated 


02 


30 


Carroll, William J.f . 








Incapacitated 


57 


25 


Casey, John J.*[ 








30 Years' Service 


50 


33 


Casey, Joseph F.* 








Incai)acitated 


(iO 


27 


Casey, Thomas J., Jr.*^ 








30 Years' Service 


02 


30 


Chase, Roscoe M.f . 








Incapacitated 


00 


24 


Collins, Robert . 








Incapacitated 


04 


34 


Corbett, Michael R. 








Incapacitated 


57 


34 


Costello, Coleman .F.§ 








Incapacitated 


53 


26 


Cowhig, Charles C* 








Incapacitated 


50 


24 


Creighton, Edward T.§ 








Incapacitated 


54 


28 


Culkin, Edward t 








Incapacitated 


57 


25 


Curran, Leo P.t 








Incapacitated 


56 


28 


Daly, Harold B.J 








Incapacitated 


59 


24 


Dclaney, Orin A.f . 








Incapacitated 


01 


20 


Dempsey, Clinton R.§ 








Incapacitated 


35 


11 


Donahue, Joseph F.t 








Incapacitated 


58 


27 


Donahue, Patrick J.l 








30 Years' Service 


58 


30 


DonoKhue, Elizabeth C. 






Age 


65 


33 


Doyle, John P. § 






Incapacitated 


33 


7 



62 



POLICE CO:\IMISSIONER. 



TABLE IV — Continued 
Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending November 
30, 1954, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name 


Cause of 
Retirement 


Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 


Years of 
Service 


DuUea, Maurice F.f 


Incapacitated 


59 


29 


Eagan, Frederic L.J • 








Incapacitated 


47 


18 


Feeney, Daniel J.§ . 








Incapacitated 


59 


25 


Fitzgerald, Daniel 








Incapacitated 


62 


31 


Foisy, Maurice J.f . 








Incapacitat€d 


60 


27 


Friel. Thomas F. 








Incapacitated 


56 


33 


Furlong, William L.§ 








Incapacitated 


63 


26 


Gallagher, Joseph A.§ 








Incapacitated 


53 


26 


Griffin, Harold J.f . 








Incapacitated 


53 


27 


Guptill, Laura J.§ 








Incapacitated 


43 


9 


Haggerty, John L.lf 








30 Years' Ser\dce 


57 


31 


Hanagan, James E.J 








Incapacitated 


66 


16 


Hayes, Harry J. 








Incapacitated 


63 


34 


Hewitt, Charles \V.* 








Incapacitated 


49 


23 


Higgins, Lawrence J. 








Incapacitated 


57 


34 


Hines, Richard E.H . 








30 Years' Service 


59 


31 


Holmes, John D. 








Incapacitated 


58 


34 


Hurley, Michael T. . 








Incapacitated 


65 


34 


Kane, Harold V.§ . 








Incapacitated 


40 


10 


Kiley, Joseph W. 








Incapacitated 


50 


33 


Kilroy, George D.§ . 








Incapacitated 


33 


6 


Kirby Edward L.* . 








Incapacitated 


53 


27 


Lamb, Frank T. 








Incapacitated 


60 


34 


Leonard, John J.f 








Incapacitated 


54 


28 


Lucas, Chester CH . 








30 Years' Service 


55 


30 


jMacDonald, Archie D.* 








Incapacitated 


51 


17 


Marcus, Simon § 








Incapacitated 


50 


16 


Marrinich, John* 








Incapacitated 


54 


24 


Martin, Emil W., Jr.§ 








Incapacitated 


30 


12 


Mills, Lancelot J.§ . 








Incapacitated 


51 


24 


Morgan, JamSs J.* . 








Incapacitated 


53 


25 


iMorrissey, Lewis S.% 








30 Years' Service 


58 


31 


Murphy, Denis J.* . 








Incapacitated 


40 


13 


Murphy, John R. 








Incapacitated 


59 


34 


]\Iurphy, Maurice F. 








Incapacitated 


04 


34 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



63 



TABLE IV — Concluded 
Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending November 
30, 1954, Giving Age at the Time of Retirement and the Number 
of Years' Service of Each. 



Name 


Cause of 
Retirement 


Age at 

Time of 

Retirement 


Years of 
Service 


McCarthy, Charles J.f ■ 


Incapacitated 


G3 


28 


McDonnell, William 








Incapacitated 


65 


33 


McDonough, Patrickf 








Incapacitated 


60 


28 


McFarlane, John P . 








Incapacitated 


59 


34 


McGovern, Joseph L.§ 








Incapacitated 


64 


28 


McGuire, Philip B.§ 








Incapacitated 


52 


24 


McKinnon, Daniel . 








Incajiacitated 


57 


34 


McLaughlin, James P.§ 








Incapacitated 


38 


7 


McPhee, James E. . 








Incapacitated 


50 


34 


McSharry, Johnlf 








30 Years' Service 


CO 


30 


McSharry, William* 








Incapacitated 


57 


34 


Norton, Patrick J. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


34 


Nyhan, Nora 








Age 


70 


33 


O'Connor, Michael J. 








Incapacitated 


62 


34 


Pearson, Alfred E.§ . 








Incapacitated 


64 


30 


Phillips, Daniel A.f • 








Incapacitated 


57 


28 


Rathgeber, GustavJ . 








Incapacitated 


64 


18 


Reeves, Arthur E.* . 








Incapacitated 


63 


28 


Regan, John F.f 








Incapacitated 


53 


27 


Richards, Da^•^d A.t 








Incapacitated 


56 


28 


Riordan, William J. . 








Incapacitated 


61 


34 


Robinson, Charles W.l[ 








30 Years' Se^^■ice 


55 


30 


St. Pierre, Rene L.t . 








Incapacitated 


62 


21 


Shelton, Francis M.§ 








Incapacitated 


47 


8 


Slater, Louis E. 








Incapacitated 


65 


34 


Slattery, John L.** . 








30 Years' Service 


55 


32 


SpeUman, Charles R.l 








30 Years' Service 


60 


30 


Swanson, Arthur J.f 








Incapacitated 


61 


27 


Tobin, John R. . 








Incapacitated 


50 


33 


Wermers, John G.§ . 








Incapacitated 


61 


28 


Woods, Martin J.J . 








Incapacitated 


62 


23 



* Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

t Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

t Civilians retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 57. 

§ Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

II Retired Veterans, under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 58. 

** Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, section 5S 



64 



POLICE COALMISSIONER. 



TABLE V 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending 
November 30, 1954 



Date 



Raxk and Name 



1954 

January 28 
January 28 
January 28 
January 28 
January 28 
January 28 
February 10 
February 10 
Februaiy 10 
May 5 
May 5 
May 5 
May 5 
May 5 
May 5 

September 22 
September 22 
September 22 
September 22 
November 3 
November 3 



Sergeant Alexander J. Mahoney to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Daniel F. McCarthy to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant John J. Slattery, Jr., to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Albert J. Connelly to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Martin J. Halleran to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Edward F. Sherry to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman George A. Bausch to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Henry M. Couglilin to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Jeremiah P. Sullivan to rank of Sergeant 
Sergeant Leonard R. Brencr to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Paul J. Sullivan to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman John J. Bonner to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Walter E. Hooley to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman ^Michael J. Keightley to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John E. O'Leary to rank of Sergeant 
Sergeant Bernard P. Slattery to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Francis A. Campbell to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas J. Fay to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Joseph F. Waldron to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Peter J. Donovan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Edward A. Dooccy to rank of Sergeant 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



65 



TABLE VI 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1954, Who 
Were Appointed in the Year Indicated 





i 


S 




fl aj > 




m-3 






Date of 
Appointment 


1 
1 






•a 

fl 

6Q *f >■ 


EH 


g o 


Totals 




S 
.3 

3 




.9 
a 

03 


c3 13-5 
fl O u 

3 O O 

.250 


fli-f 
sal 


Igl 


^1 






m 


P 


o 


ij 


m 


Ph 




1912 








1 








1 


1916 








- 


_ 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1917 








_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1919 








1 


2 


8 


9 


31 


14 


64 


129 


1920 








_ 


_ 


2 


3 


10 


6 


25 


46 


1921 








- 


- 


2 


3 


4 


2 


18 


29 


1922 








- 


- 


1 


6 


2 


5 


5 


19 


1923 








- 


_ 


4 


4 


5 


7 


16 


36 


1924 








_ 


- 


2 


4 


1 


1 


15 


23 


1925 








— 


— 


_ 


2 


6 


8 


19 


35 


1926 








- 


- 


5 


12 


9 


15 


67 


108 


1927 








- 


_ 


4 


3 


7 


11 


33 


58 


1928 








_ 


- 


2 


_ 


3 


5 


29 


39 


1929 








- 


- 


1 


8 


26 


11 


75 


121 


1930 








_ 


- 


- 


4 


2 


- 


12 


18 


1931 








- 


_ 


- 


- 


4 


1 


5 


10 


1937 








_ 


- 


- 


12 


45 


16 


70 


143 


1938 








— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


1940 








- 


- 


- 


11 


34 


8 


61 


114 


1941 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


6 


4 


38 


48 


1942 








_ 


- 


- 


1 


20 


19 


105 


145 


1943 








_ 


- 


- 


- 


4 


9 


40 


53 


1944 








- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


19 


89 


111 


1945 








- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


35 


42 


1946 








- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


14 


215 


233 


1947 








_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


8 


169 


177 


1948 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


152 


152 


1949 








— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


1 


137 


138 


1950 








- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


172 


172 


1951 








_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


319 


320 


1952 








- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


94 


94 


1953 








— 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


120 


120 


1954 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


116 


116 


Totals . 


1 


2 


32 


85 


229 


189 


2,316 


2,854 



66 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE VII 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1954, Who Were 
Bom in Year Indicated 















.-a 






Date of Birth 


1 


2 

a 

1 




•r) 

a 


1.S 




11 


Totals 




o 


Si 




a d > 


m-^ > 


o cj 


? 9 






a 
ft 

3 




c 

ft 

o 


a « o 
Sal 

3 o o 

.pa 


■2 a -3 

a d -g 

CO 


si's 


II 




1885 








1 








1 


1886 








- 


_ 


- 




_ 


1 


— 


1 


1887 








- 


1 


1 


_ 


— 


_ 


_ 


2 


1888 








_ 


— 


1 


1 


_ 


— 


— 


2 


1889 








- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


5 


6 


1890 








_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


1 


1 


5 


7 


1891 








- 


- 


- 


3 


2 


2 


16 


23 


1892 








- 


- 


- 


3 


7 


5 


24 


39 


1893 








- 


- 


2 


3 


5 


9 


32 


51 


1894 








- 


- 


1 


2 


8 


5 


32 


48 


1895 








- 


- 


4 


5 


7 


10 


33 


59 


1896 








- 


1 


4 


5 


13 


8 


35 


66 


1897 








1 


_ 


5 


8 


17 


5 


37 


73 


1898 








- 


- 


4 


8 


7 


10 


29 


58 


1899 








- 


- 


2 


3 


6 


10 


28 


49 


1900 








- 


- 


2 


7 


14 


11 


39 


73 


1901 








- 


_ 


4 


1 


12 


5 


42 


64 


1902 








- 


- 


1 


3 


9 


2 


21 


36 


1903 








- 


- 


1 


6 


6 


1 


17 


31 


1904 








- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


1 


16 


24 


1905 








- 


_ 


_ 


3 


9 


5 


11 


28 


1906 








- 


- 


- 


1 


4 


4 


17 


26 


1907 








- 


~ 


- 


4 


8 


4 


24 


40 


1908 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


10 


4 


27 


41 


1909 








- 


_ 


— 


3 


8 


6 


39 


56 


1910 








- 


- 


- 


2 


10 


9 


38 


59 


1911 








- 


- 


_ 


- 


4 


3 


42 


49 


1912 








- 


- 


_ 


2 


7 


6 


45 


60 


1913 








- 


— 


— 


4 


7 


3 


44 


58 


1914 








- 


- 


- 


3 


4 


8 


49 


64 


1915 








- 


- 


- 


1 


12 


7 


55 


75 


1916 








- 


_ 


_ 


1 


16 


8 


79 


104 


1917 








- 


_ 


— 


_ 


3 


9 


93 


105 


1918 








- 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


8 


107 


117 


1919 








- 


_ 


- 


_ 


4 


10 


99 


113 


1920 








- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


117 


120 


1921 






i _ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


115 


115 


1922 








- 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


4 


133 


138 


1923 








- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


129 


129 


1924 








— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


122 


122 


1925 








- 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


117 


117 


1926 






- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


— 


— 


136 


136 


1927 








— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


113 


115 


1928 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


91 


91 


1929 








— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


37 


37 


1930 








_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


20 


20 


1931 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


6 


Totals . 


1 


2 


32 


85 


229 


189 


2,316 


2,854 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1954, 
was 40.17 years. 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



67 



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68 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 









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1954.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



69 



TABLE X 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions During the Year 
Ending November 30, 1954 



Divisions 



Males 



Females Totals 



Jiiueau of Criminal Investigation 

Division 1 .... 

Division 2 .... 

Division 3 .... 

Division 4 .... 

Division 6 .... 
Division 7 

Division 8 .... 

Division 9 .... 
Division 10 
Division 11 

Division 13 .... 

Division 14 .... 

Division 15 .... 

Division 16 .... 

Division 17 .... 

Division 18 .... 
Division 19 

Traffic 

Totals 



900 
2,612 
2,738 
4,232 

13,070 
3,852 
2,875 
18 
6,352 
5,764 
2,657 
1,209 
2,858 
3,918 
5,263 
1,013 
1,134 
1,305 

25,839 



232 

205 

544 

438 

1,583 

207 

174 

3 

610 

564 

129 

69 

302 

204 

785 

12 

66 

51 

4,337 



1,132 
2,817 
3,282 
4,670 

14,653 
4,059 
3,049 
21 
6,962 
6,328 
2,786 
1,278 
3,160 
4,122 
6,048 
1,025 
1,200 
1,356 

30,176 



87,609 



10,515 



98,124 



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90 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE XIV 
Number of Dog Licenses Issued During the Year Ending November 30, 1954 



DmsioNS 


Males 


Females 


Spayed 


Kennels 


Transfers 


With 
Fee 


Without 
Fee 


Totals 


1 . . . 


36 


2 


7 


- 


- 


45 


- 


45 


2 








3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


3 








201 


57 


88 


1 


1 


348 


1 


349 


4 








470 


101 


145 


2 


- 


718 


2 


720 











535 


55 


141 


- 


- 


731 


9 


740 


7 
8 
9 








641 


78 


219 


- 


- 


938 


13 


951 








841 


99 


231 


1 


3 


1,175 


13 


1,188 


10 








499 


44 


153 


- 


- 


696 


4 


700 


11 








1,305 


136 


611 


4 


- 


2,056 


30 


2,086 


13 








553 


69 


201 


2 


- 


825 


6 


831 


14 








587 


63 


270 


3 


3 


926 


17 


943 


15 








255 


42 


84 


- 


- 


381 


8 


389 


IG 








435 


148 


157 


4 


1 


745 


10 


755 


17 








1,096 


107 


554 


3 


- 


1,760 


12 


1,772 


18 








881 


95 


395 


5 


- 


1,376 


12 


1,388 


19 








657 


64 


266 


- 


1 


988 


18 


1,006 


Totalfc 






8,995 


1,162 


3,522 


25 


9 


13,713 


n55 


13,868 



* Total of 155 dog licenses issued without fee, in accordance with law, includes: 2 kennels for a "domestic 
charitable corporation, incorporated exclusivelj' for purposes of protecting animals from cruelty," etc. (located 
on Division 4); 10 dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Divisions .3, 7, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 
and 17); and 143 dogs licensed belonging to persons "in military service of the United States in time of war." 



1954. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 49. 



91 



TABLE XV 
Financial Statement for the Year Ending November 30, 1954 



EXPENDITURES 
Group 1. 
Personal Serviced: 



100. 


Permanent emploj'ees 


§12,375,541 75 


110. 


Temporary emploj^ees 


96 44 


120. 


Overtime 


434,365 62 
S 12,8 10,003 81 


Group 


2. 




CoXTRACTUAr. SERVICES: 




210. 


Communication.s 


$50,595 40 


220. 


Light, heat and power 


46,432 76 


230. 


Professional and technical serv- 






ices 


19,992 33 


240. 


Recording and judicial services 


274 20 


260. 


Repairs and maintenance of 






buildings and structures 


44,836 10 


270. 


Repairs and servicing of equip- 






ment 


60,577 44 


280. 


Transportation of persons 


30,586 83 


290. 


Miscellaneous contractual serv- 






ices 


158,914 92 



Group 3. 
Supplies and Materials: 
300. Automotive 
310. Building .... 

320. Food 

330. Heating .... 
340. Household .... 
350. Medical, dental and hosi)ita 

360. Office 

370. Police, trailic control and fire- 
fighting .... 
390. ^liscellancous 



Group 4. 
Current Charges and Obligations: 

400. Awards 

420. Dues and subscriptions . 

430. Insurance 

440. Licenses 

470. Rents 



$99,612 20 
658 94 
10,376 00 
38,118 31 
24,943 57 
594 50 
75,919 39 

40,825 43 
137,846 43 



$25 00 

1,554 75 

1,036 00 

7 00 

6,225 10 



412,209 98 



428,894 77 



8,847 85 



Carried forwani $13,059,950 41 



92 



POLICE COMMISSIONER. 



TABLE XV.— Concluded 
Financial Statement for Year Ending November 30, 1954. 





Brought forward 


. $13,659,956 41 


Group 


5. 




Equipment: 




500. 


Automotive .... 


§99,747 43 


510. 


Electrical and mochanical 






macbinerj' .... 


402 30 


520. 


Engineering and scientific 


2,841 13 


530. 


Firefighting .... 


6,543 50 


560. 


Office furniture and ofiuipment 


3,227 56 


580. 


Signal 


6,565 05 


590. 


JNIiscellaneous .... 


14,389 78 
133,716 75 




Total 


. $13,793,673 16 



RECEIPTS 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner . . . $60,003 25 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) . 31,281 25 

Refunds, miscellaneous 5,389 88 

Use of police property 890 95 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property 2,706 15 
For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage 

drivers' badges, copies of licenses, sale of report blanks . 608 60 
Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equip- 
ment 63 47 

For damage to police property (paid at Headquarters) . 1,010 72 

Total $101,954 27 

Credit by City Collector for money received for damage 
to iJolice property, commissions on telephones, and 

dog fines 7,733 26 

Grand Total $109,687 53 



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31,681 
14,613 
30,663 
24,301 
27,769 
17,051 
20,028 
17,684 
19,675 
17,437 
18,774 
23,641 
17,956 
31,911 
16,858 
22,033 
21,941 
32,410 
20,632 
27.638 
29.759 
21,611 


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1,150 
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1,743 











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1,043 
1,432 

1 ,299 








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946 

893 

1,512 

1,106 








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982 
2,449 
1,224 
1.673 

1,709 








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1,129 
2,070 
1,292 
1,313 
1,299 
1,372 
1,037 
1,503 
1,813 
1,172 









a 




1,192 

1,060 
2,053 
1,089 
1,068 
1,226 
1,172 
881 
1.219 
1.329 
1,240 








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2,185 

1,148 
1,798 
1,011 
1,230 
1.225 
1,146 
1,237 
1,151 
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S rj ca ea S3 «Sc9-cSa 53 3 5 sS S rt-c3-oJ-s a cj * :: 



INDEX. 



A 

Page 

Accidents 68 

caused by automobiles 08 

number of, reported 68 

persons killed or injured by 68 

Adjustment of claims 92 

Ambulance service 39, 40 

Arrests 12, 13, 32, 33, 34, 70-87 

age and sex of 86, 87 

for drunkenness 12, 13, 32, 33, 34, 78 

foreigners 12, 70-85 

for offenses against chastity, morality, etc 77-80, 85 

minors 12, 70-85 

nonresidents 12, 70-85 

number of, by divisions 69 

number of, punished by fine 12 

on warrants 12, 70-85 

summoned by court 12, 70-85 

total number of 12, 70-85 

violation of city ordinances 77 

without warrants 12, 70-85 

Articles lost and found 47 

Auctioneers 88 

Automobiles . . . 13, 14, 15, 16, 38, 47, 68, 73, 81, 82, 83, 85 

accidents due to 68 

cost of running police 40 

deaths caused l:)y 17, 68 

operating while under influence of liquor 13, 82 

police 36, 38-39, 47 

public 41,42,88 

safety education 27 

sight-seeing 42, 88 

stolen and recovered 15, 29, 73, 74 

used, dealers in 15, 16 



B 



Ballistics unit, B. C. I 


24 


Benefits and pensions 


54 


Biological chemist 


25 


Buildings 


53 


dangerous, reported 


53 



(95) 



96 



P. D. 49. 



Bureau of dime Prevention . 

duties in general 

inspections and investigations 

summary of work accomplished 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation . 

automobile division . 

ballistics division 

biological chemist 

homicide squad 

identification unit 

lost and stolen property division 

missing persons 

photography, fingerprinting . 

summonses .... 

used cars dealers' licenses 

warrants 

Bureau of Ojierations 

accomplishments 

recording of radio messages . 



Page 

31,32 

31 

31 

31, 32 

15 

15 

24 

25 

17 

19 

17 

20, 21 

19, 20 

22 

88 

22 

29 

29 

29 



c 

Carriages, public 41, 42, 84, 85 

articles left in 41, 42 

issuing of tags for hackney carriage violations .... 42 

number licensed 41, 84, 85 

private hackney stands 42 

Cases investigated 17, 53 

Children 20, 21, 32, 33, 53, 81 

abandoned, cared for 53 

delinquents 21 

lost, restored 21, 53 

City ordinances, arrests for violation of 77 

City Prison 33 

Claims, adjustment of 92 

Collective musicians 88 

Commitments 12, 33, 34 

Complaints against miscellaneous licenses 88, 89 

Courts 12, 22, 70-85 

fines imposed by 12 

numl)er of days' attendance at, by officers 12, 22 

number of persons summoned by 12, 70-85 

prosecutions in 17 

Crime prevention 31 

Criminal identification 19, 20 

D 

Dangerous weapons 46, 7G 

Dead bodies 22, 37, 53 

recovered 37, 53 



p. D. 49. 



97 













Pac;e 


Deaths 7, 17, 22, GO, 68 


bj" accident, suicide, etc. 








. 17, 68 


of police officers 










. 7, 60 


Department medals of honor 










8 


Detective Bureau established 










14 


Disability, absence on account of . 










67 


Distribution of force 










7, 56-58 


Dogs 










. 88, 00, 02 


amount received for licenses for 










. 88, 02 


number licensed 










. 88, 00 


Drivers 










. 41, 42 


hackney carriage 










. 41, 42, 88 


sight-seeing automobile . 










. 42, 88 


Drowning, persons rescued from . 










. 37, 53 


Drunkenness 








12, 


13, 32, 33, 34, 78 


arrests for, per da>' . 










12 


foreigners arrested for 










78 


men committed to City Prison 










33 


nonresidents arrested for 










78 


total number of arrests for 










. 12, 13, 78 


women committed to the House of 


Det 


entic 


)n 




34 



E 

Emploj'ees of the Department 6, 56-58 

Events, special 48-52 

Expenditures 01, 02 

F 

Financial 43, 88, 80, 01, 02 

expenditures 01, 02 

miscellaneous license fees 88, 80, 02 

pensions 54 

receipts 88, 80, 02 

signal service 36 

Fines 12 

amount of 12 

number punished by 12 

Fingerprint 10 

Fire alarms 53 

defective, reported 53 

number given 53 

Fires 37, 53 

extinguished 37, 53 

on water front, attended 37 

Foreigners, number arrested 12, 70-85 

Fugitives from justice 75 

G 

Gaming, illegal 77 



98 



P. D. 49. 



H 



Hackney carriage drivers 
Hackney carriages . 
Halloween celebration 
Handcarts . 
Harbor service . 
Homicide unit . 
Horses 

House of Correction 
House of Detention . 
Houses of ill fame, keeping 



41 



Page 
41, 88, 89 
42,88 
52 
88 
37 
17 
40 
12 
34 
78 



I 

Identification unit, B. C. 1 19-22 

Imprisonment 12 

persons sentenced to 12 

total years of 12 

Income 88, 89, 92 

Information from police journals, requests for 22 

Inquests held 17 

Insane persons taken in charge 53 

Itinerant musicians 88 



Junk collectors 88 

Junk shopkeepers 15, 88 

Jury lists, police work on 44 

Juvenile delinquency 70-87 



Lamps, defective, reported 53 

Licenses, miscellaneous 88, 89, 92 

Listings, police 43, 44, 93, 94 

expenses of 43 

number listed 43, 93, 94 

number of policemen emjiloyed in 44 

Lodgers at station houses 53 

Lodging houses, public 46, 84, 88 

appUcations for licenses 88 

authority to license 46 

location of 46 

number of persons lodged in . . 46 

Lost and found articles 47 

Lost and stolen property unit 17, 47 

Lost children 21, 53 



p. D. 49. 



99 



M 



Maintenance shop 
Men committed to City Prison 
Minors, number arrested 
Miscellaneous business 
Miscellaneous licenses 

amount of fees collected for 

complaints investigated . 

number canceled and revokoc 

number issued . 

number transferred . 
Missing persons 

age and sex of 

number found . 

number reported 

I'eported by Police Divisions 
Musicians 

collective .... 

itinerant .... 



12 



Page 

47 

33 

70-87 

53 

88-89 

88-89 

88-89 

88-89 

88-89 

88-89 

20, 22 

21 

21 

21 

21 

88 

88 

88 



N 
Nonresident oflenders 12, 70-8.5 



o 

Offenses against 

chastity, etc., C"la.ss 9 13, 77-80, 8.5 

the currenc}', Class 4 75, 85 

family and child. Class 10 81, 85 

the government, Class 1 70, 85 

the license laws. Class 12 13, 83-85 

motor vehicle and traffic laws, Class 11 . . .13, 81-83, 85 

the person. Class 2 13, 14-, 70, 72, 85 

the property, Class 3 13, 14, 72-74, 85 

public health. Class 7 76, 85 

public justice, Class 5 75, 85 

public peace. Class 6 76, 85 

public policy. Class 8 77, 85 

recapitulation 85 

P 

Parking 27 

Pawnbrokers 15, 17, 88 

Pensions and benefits 7, 54 

estimates for jiensions 54 

number of persons on rolls 54 

payments on account of 54 

Personnel 6, 56-58 



100 



p. D. 49. 













Page 


Photograi)hic, etc 19 


Plant and ectiiipment 










47 


Police, special . 










. 45, 89 


Police charitable fiuul 










54 


Police Department 








6, 


7, 54, 50-67 


authorized and actual strength of . 








59 


distribution of personnel 








7, 56-58 


horses in use in 








40 


how constituted 








6 


Memorial Day observance 








49 


officers : 










absence on account of disability 








67 


active service, number of officers in 








65 


appointed 








. 7, 65 


arrests by 








12, 69-87 


average age of 








66 


date appointed 








65 


detailed, special events . 








. 48-52 


detective assigned .... 








7 


died 








. 7, 60 


dismissed 








7 


in armed service .... 








. 56-58 


injured 








7 


medals of honor .... 








8 


pensioned 








7, 61-63 


policewomen 








6 


promoted 








. 7, 64 


resigned 








7 


retired 








7, 61-63 


time lost on account of disability 








7 


Walter Scott Medal for Valor 








8 


vehicles in use in 








. 38-40 


work of . . . 










12 


Police listing 










43, 93-94 


Police signal box service . 










. 35-36 


miscellaneous work . 










35 


payments on account of . 










36 


property assigned to 










35 


signal boxes 










35 


Promotion of police . 










. 7,64 


Property 






12, 15, 47, 89, 92 


lost, abandoned and stolen .... 




12, 15, 47, 89, 92 


recovered 




. 12, 15, 47 


sale of condemned, unclaimed, etc. 




. . 47,89,92 


stolen 




. . . 12, 15 


taken from jn-isoners and lodgers . 




. . 12 


Prosecution of homicide cases .... 




. 17, 18 


Public carriages 




. . 41 


Public lodging hou.ses 


. 






. 


. 46, 84 



p. D. 49. 



101 



R 



Kadio, two-way 

souiulscriber lor i-ecording messages 

Ileceipts, financial 

Requests for information from police journals 
Revolvers 

licenses to carr\- 



2i) 
29 

88-89, 92 
22 

■Hj, 7G, 88 
. 46, 88 



Safety education 

Salaries 

Secondhand articles . 
Secondhand motor vehicle dealers 
Sick and injured persons assisted . 
Sight-seeing automoljiles 
Signal service, police 
Special events . 
Special police 
Stolen property 

recovered 

value of 
Street railway conductors 
Streets 

defective, reported 

obstructions lemoved 
Summons filed . 



, motormen and starters 



12, 
12, 
12. 



27 

56-58 

15, 88 

15, 88 

37, 53 

42, 88 

35-36 

48-52 

45,89 

15-17 

15-17 

15-17 

89 

53 

53 

53 

22 



Tagging 
Traffic Division 

activities 

parlving meters . 

problems . 

safet}'' education 



• 42 
26-28 
26 
27 
28 
27 



u 

Uniform crime record reporting 13, 14 

Used cars 15, 16, 88 

licensed dealers 88 

l)urchases and sales reported 16 

V 

Veliicles 28, 38-40 

ambulances, coml>ination 39, 40 

automobiles 38-40 

in use in Police Department 27, 38-40 

public carriages 41, 42 

wagons and handcarts 88, 89 

Vessels 37 



102 



P. D. 49. 



w 



Wagongi 

total number licensed 
^^'alter Scott ^ledal for Valor 

Warrants 

^^'ater pipe?, defective, reported 
^^'ater running to waste, reported 
Weapons, dangerous 
Witnesses 

fees earned bj^ officers 

number of days' attendance at court by officers 

number of, detained at station houses . 
^Vomen committed to House of Detention . 
Work of the Department 



Page 
89 
89 
8 
22 
53 
53 
46 
12 
12 
12 
53 
34 
12 



City of Boston 
Administrative Services Department 

Printing ■ • Section