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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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POLICE DEPARTMENT 

CITY OF 

BOSTON 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 49 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT — NO. 49] 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



of th 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



for the 



CITY OF BOSTON 







for the Year Ending 



NOVEMBER 30, 1959 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 




t^-o^. ^_^J l/^Gl 




APPRECIATION 

The pleasing result of this report has only been possible through the 
assistance and materials of many individuals and firms. We are in- 
debted to: 

Jack Drummey and Rev. Xavier Cox, O.F.M., for their manj' 

creative contributions. 
The Boston Herald and Traveler. 
The Boston Globe. 

The Boston Record- American-Sunday Advertiser. 
Colourpicture Publishers, Inc. 
Warren Kay Vantine Studio. 
The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter to the Governor 
Historic Boston 



The Department 

Signal Ser^•ice 

Distribution and Changes 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty 



Award of Medals 



The Department in Action 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Detective Bureau . 
Automobile Unit 
Lost and Stolen Property Unit 

Homicide 

Domestic Relations Unit 
Narcotics and Vice Unit 
Ballistics Unit 
Emergency Equipment . 
Biological Chemist . 
Identification Unit . 



Traffic Division 

Central Complaint and Records Bureau 

Crime Prevention Bureau 

Police Signal System 

Harbor Service . 

Police Academy . 

Medical Department 

Hackney Carriages 



Statistics . 

City Prison . 

House of Detention 

Motor Vehicle Service 

Combination Ambulances 

Automobile Maintenance 



Horses 



Page 

2 



14 
16 
16 
17 
17 
20 
22 
23 
25 
26 
27 
28 

32 

35 

38 

40 

41 
42 
44 
45 

46 

46 

47 
48 

48 

49 

49 



Listing Work in Boston 

Listing Expenses 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 

Police Work on Jury Lists 

Special Police 



Pistols, Revolvers, and Machine Guns . 

Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns, and Rifles 
Gunsmiths 



Public Lodging Houses 



Property Clerk . 

Lost and Found Property 



Special Events 

Miscellaneous Business .... 
Pensions and Benefits .... 

Boston Police in Early Years 

Statistical Tables 

Distribution of Police Force, Signal Ser\-ice 
and Other Employees .... 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength 
of Police Department .... 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who 
Died During the Year .... 

Members of Department Retired 
Officers Promoted 



Members of Police Force Appointed in the 
Year Indicated 

Members of Police Force Born in the Year 
Indicated 

Number of Days' Absence from Dutv hv 
Reason of Disability ... 

Accidents 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions . 

Arrests and Oftenses . 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 

Licenses of All Classes Issued . 

Dog Licenses . . 

Financial Statement . 

Male and Fema'e Residents Listed 



GOVERNOR FOSTER FURCOLO 




COMMISSIONER LEO J. SULLIVAN 



THE STORY OF 



S^oston 





JOHN B. HYNES 
Mayor, 1950-1959 



JOHN F. COLLINS 
Mayor, 1960- 



Boston was founded in the year 1630 by a chartered company of EngHsh Colonists under the Governor- 
ship of John Winthrop. 

The peninsula was called "Trimountaine" by the Colonists because of the three peaks which could be 
seen across the river toward the south. It was called "Mishawmut" by the Indians, a name which the Colonists 
contracted to "Shawmut." Then "Shawmut of the Indians" was named "Boston" in honor of and in gratitude to 
the merchants of Boston of Lincolnshire, England, who had subscribed generously to the stock of the company. 

The heart of Boston's business center today pulsates over territory once the cwAc center and the residen- 
tial area of the early colonies. The first center of town life was the "market place" in front of the Old State House, 
and where this building now stands was reared the first meeting house of the Colonists. In the market place were 
set up the stocks, the pillon.-, and whipping post where culprits were publicly punished. 

America's first public school, now called the Boston Latin School, was established in 1635. It is the oldest 
school in the United States with a continuous existence whose purpose has not changed from that time to the present 
—"to prepare boys for the University" — and today this school maintains its tradition of high scholarship. Five 
signers of the Declaration of Independence — John Hancock, Samuel Adams, and Robert Treat Paine from Massa- 
chusetts, Benjamin Franklin from Pennsylvania, and William Hooper from North Carolina — had been pupils of 
this school. 

Boston, the "Hub of the Universe," throughout the centuries has given America many gifts. Her memories 
go back to 1630, to Indians and whipping posts and sailing ships, but her outlook is on the nuclear missile world and 
frcm her laboratories come the ideas that will help to shape the Space Age. 

Her universities have made her a world center of education, medicine, research, electronics, art, and the 
theater. She is a city of many nationalities, narrow cowpath alleys, and sweeping superhighways. 

The City of Boston is one of the oldest metropolitan areas in the United States, where many of the most 
significant events connected with the earh' history of our country took place. Boston is the locale of many of the 
shrines intimately connected with the Revolution and the birth of freedom in these United States. Among the 
many historical sites are: 




COPP'S HILL BURYING GROUND 

In 1660 the colonists began to use this hill for a burving ground. 
More than a century later the British troops used it for a battery- 
site in the Revolution. Here the redcoats set up their heavy 
cannon, trained on Charlestown and Bunker Hill across the water. 




PAUL REVERE HOUSE 

This is the oldest house in Boston, probably built in the 1670's. 
Paul Revere lived here from 1770 to 1800. From it he presumably 
left for the Boston Tea Party in 1773 disguised as an Indian. 
He was living here when he set out on his historic ride to Lexington 
in April. 1775. 



OLD CORNER BOOK STORE 

This is one of the oldest brick Iniildings in Boston. Built between 
17 1 2 and 17 15, it was first an apothecary shop and then a book- 
store for nearly three quarters of a century. This was a meeting 
place for such literary celebrities as Longfellow, Emerson, Haw- 
thorne, Holmes, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Whittier, and Julia 
Ward Howe. 



OLD STATE HOUSE 

This building, built in 17 13, truly saw at first hand the birth of the 
Revolution. Generals Howe, Clinton, and Gage held a British 
council of war here before the Battle of Bunker Hill, and in 1776 
the Declaration of Independence was read from the balcony to 
crowds that cheered in the street below. 



IUlu iJi 



KING'S CHAPEL 

The church was organized here in i6S6. The present building was 
completed in 1754. In colonial days this church was a royal 
favorite. Queen Anne gave its red cushions and vestments, and 
George III gave its communion plate. The burying ground, 
sheltering Governor Winthrop and William Dawes, Jr., was for 
the first thirtv \-ears of the colonv its onlv cemeterv. 



OLD NORTH CHURCH 

This is Boston's oldest church building still standing and was 
built in 1723. On the night of April 18, 1775, two lanterns were 
hung in its steeple to signal Paul Revere that the redcoats were 
leaving for Lexington and Concord. In a sense, they signaled the 
actual start of the Revolution. The old bells in the steeple are 
the same bells that rang out in 1781 with the joyous news of 
Cornwallis' surrender at Yorktown. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 

American philosopher and statesman, born in 1706 and died in 

I7QO. 

On the lawn of City Hall is the first portrait statue erected in 
Boston, that of Benjamin Franklin in 1856. 

The bronze tablets on the pedestal depict high lights in the life 
of this many-sided Bostonian. He is shown operating a printing 
press, signing the Declaration of Independence, signing the 
Treaty of Peace with France, and experimenting with lightning. 

The sculptor, in a personal letter, said that he found one side of 
Franldin's face to be gay and .smiling, while the other was that of a 
sober, sedate statesman. Visitors viewing this statue mav be 
able to detect this difference in the statue. 



FANEUIL HALL 

This is the "Cradle of Liberty." Here took place some of the 
earliest and most stirring mass meetings of Boston patriots who 
were determined that Am.ericans should govern themselves 
without interference from the British Crown. Within these 
walls were the voices of a new nation calling her sons to fight for 
liberty. 









DEPT. SUPT. ANDREW MARKHARD 



DEPT. SUPT. FRANCIS M. TIERNAN 




SUPERINTENDENT FRANCIS J. HENNESSY 





DEPT. SUPT. JOHN J. DANEHY 



DEPT. SUPT. JAMES J. HINCHEY 



ORGANIZATION OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 








il POLICE 1 
[^COMMISSIONER 1 










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DEPUTY 

SUPERINTENDENT 

CHIEF CLERK 




PROPERTY CLERK 




SECRETARY 




LEGAL 
ADVISOR 




SENIOR 
BUILDINO 






DEPARTMENT 
MEDICAL 




DIRECTOR OF 
SIGNAL SERVICE 




BOARDS 

TRIAL 
SURVEY 

MERIT 
REVIEW 

TAX 1 
APPEAL 




















1 
















LICENSES 
AUDITING 
BUDGET 
FINANCE 
PAYROLL 




CUSTODY OF 
EQUIPMENT 
UNIFORMS a 
SUPPLIES 


SECRETARIAL 
STAFF 




BUILDINO 
MAINTENANCE 








SIGNAL BOX 
MAINTENANCE 








BOARD 

OF 
SURVEY 














1 












1 








1 




PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 












CABSTAND SIGN 
MAINTENANCE 






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LOST-STOLEN 

a ABANDONED 

PROPERTY 






STABLE 

AND 
HORSES 








INSPECTOR 

OF 
CARRIAGES 










1 














1 




PERSONNEL 
RECORDS 








1 




SUPERVISOR OF 

AUTOMOTIVE 

EQUIPMENT 












TAXI 
LICENSES 
























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IIOTOR VEHICLE 
MA INTENANCE 

















SUPERINTENDENT 
OF POLICE 




I DIVISION 11 I I DIVISION 13 [ | DIVISION 14 [ | DIVISION 15 | | DIVISION 16 [ | DIVISION IT | | DIVISIOnTb] | OIVISIOW 19 | 



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NEW EQUIPMENT INSPECTED BY COMMISSIONER AND SUPERINTENDENT 



THE DEPARTMENT 



Commissioner's Office 

Police Commissioner 
Secretary . . . . 
Confidential Secretary 
Legal Advisor 
Assistant Secretaries . 



Recapitulation 



Police Commissioner . 
Secretary 

Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Secretaries . 
Legal Advisor 
Police Force . 
Signal Service 
Employees 



I 
I 
I 

2 
I 

2,809 

24 
202 



Grand Total 3,041 



The Police Force 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents . 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives . 
Detectives (First, vSecond, and Third Grade) 



I 

4 

27 

81 

237 

'194 



Patrolmen t2.26i 

Patrolwomen 4 



Total 



* Includes 2 patrolwomen 

t Includes 6 patrolmen in armed service 



2,809 



Employees of the Department ( Xot Included in Above) 



Biological Cheinist 

Assistant Biological Chemist 

Chauffeur 

Chauffeur-Laborer 

Cleaners 

Clerk-Clerk-Typists 

Clerk-Stenographers 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 

Elevator Operators 

Elevator Operator-Laborers 

Firemen (Stationary) 

Fireman (Steam) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Janitresses . 

Laborers 

Laborer^Relief Elevator Operators 



I 
I 

I 
I 
5 
M 
4 
I 
8 
2 

7 
I 
S 

2 

10 

2 



Matron, Chief . 
Matron, Assistant Chief . 
Matrons, Assistant 
Mechanics .... 
Medical Examiner 
Property Clerk . 
Repairman .... 
Senior Btiilding Custodian 
Junior Btiilding Custodians 
Shorthand Reporters . 
Statistical Machine Operators 
Statistician .... 
Stenographers 
Telephone Operators . 

Total 



I 

I 

1 1 

19 
I 
I 
I 
I 

5 
2 


I 

13 
12 

202 



Director 

Assistant Director 
Chauffeur-Laborers 
Linemen 
Machinist 



Signal Service 

1 Painter and Groundman 

I vSignalmen 

3 



lO 



Total 



I 

7 

24 



MOUNTED DETAIL 

IN FRONT OF THE CATHEDRAL 

OF THE HOLY CROSS 




Distribution and Changes 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table i. During the year yg patrolmen were appointed; 
lo patrolmen resigned (2 while charges were pending); 2 patrolmen were reinstated; i patrolman terminated his 
services; i captain was promoted to deputy superintendent; 2 lieutenants assigned as lieutenant-detectives; 5 ser- 
geants assigned as sergeant-detectives; 14 patrolmen were promoted to sergeants; 7 patrolmen assigned as first-grade 
detectives; 8 patrolmen assigned as second-grade detectives; 20 patrolmen assigned as third-grade detectives; 2 
patrohvomen assigned as third-grade detectives; i lieutenant, 8 sergeants, 47 patrolmen, and i patrolwoman were 
retired on pensions; i deputy superintendent, i lieutenant, i sergeant, and 12 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, 
IV, and V.) 



Police Officers Injured While on Duty 









Number of Duties 




Number of Men 




Lost This Year by 


How Injured 


Injured in 


Numbei of Duties 


Men on Account 


Year Ending 


Lost by Such Men 


of Injuries Received 




November 30, 1959 




Previous to Decem- 
ber I, 195S 


In arresting priscjners 


(A) 


I ,UtJO 


,Sj() 


In pursuing criminals 


i(> 


397 


— 


Bv cars and other vehicles 


67 


1,172 


1.824 


Various other causes 


136 


1.565 


1.392 


Totals 


2.S8 


4.140 


4.042 



10 



WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 




In 1922 Waller Scott created a fund 
with his gift to the City of Boston of $2,000 
for the purpose of honoring the fireman or 
policeman who, in the judgment of the 
Commissioner of his department, had 
"especially distinguished himself for valor. " 

DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 




Established by an act of the City Council 
on February 7, iSgS, for any member 
cited for extraordinary courage or bravery. 



ICam lEnfDrrFttt^nt (Hobt of 1Etl|irB 



Ah a ICaui lEnfnrcfmpnt ©ffirrr. m^ fundamentJ Lt,j h /„ 

M'ri'e tnanhina; to iafequara iit/es and propertu; to protect trie innocent aaainst 
deception, tne iveah aaainst oppression or intimidation, and the peaceful aaainst 
uioience or disorder; and to respect tne L^onititutionat riahti of alt men to liberttf, 
ei^uaiitif and justice. 

J} mtli l^eep »jy private life unstiilicd as an example to all; maintain conra- 
qeottS calm in tfte face of danqer, scorn, or ridicule; itei'etop self -restraint; and lu- 



ifant\ 



It mindful of the ive[ 



fare of ottiers. ..J^onest in tnouqnt and deed in t>ot(i 
mtj personal and ofricial life, ~y witl be exeniplarti in obefjincf tne laws of tlie 
land and tfte reqnlations of mit department. lA/natet'er ^ see or (tear or a con- 
pdentiai nature or tftat is confided to me in mij official capacltu irill dp tjept 
■et unless reueiation is necessaru in trie performance of mif dutij. 



ever secret 



Jl llltii never act officiouSut or permit personal feeiinus. prejudices, animosities 
or friendships to influence ntit decisions. lAAfli no compromise for crime and 
tvitli relentless prosecution of criminals, ^ will enforce tne lav courteoyisltt and 
appropriatelu without jear or favor, malice or ill mil, never emplouinq yinnecesiaru 
'iolence and never acceptina qratuittes. 



force or VI o 



S rWOniltZF the badije of mtj office as a iumbol of public faith, and J 
accept it as a public trust to be held so lonq as ^ am true to the ethics of the 
police service. ^ will constantlu strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, ded- 
icating muself before Ljod to mii chosen profession . . . law enforcement. 



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II 



AWARD OF MEDALS 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1959, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Awards, as recom- 
mended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual ball of the Boston Police Relief Association held at the Boston Garden, 
December 8, 1959, as follows: 

The ]\'aller Scott Medal jor Valor, a Department Medal oj Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Aii'ard to Patrolman Joseph L. Benson, Jr., 

Division 14 

Patrolman Joseph L. Benson, Jr., of Division 14 is hereby awarded the Walter Scott Medal foi Valor, a Depaitment Medal of 
Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on October 10, 1959. 

At about 2:50 A.M. on October 10, 1959, Patrolman Joseph L. Benson, Jr., was trying doors of business establishments on his 
route. After checking both doors of a cafe at 1430 Commonwealth avenue, he proceeded to the rear to check the padlock on a chain 
link fence, and observed a man feigning sleep in the rear of a station wagon. The patrolman then heard sounds coming from the venti- 
lator of the cafe. 

He ordered the occupant of the car to stand against the wall with his hands in the air, and commanded the person in the cafe 
to come out. Both men were arrested for breaking and entering in the nighttime. 

The Commissioner is pleased to recognize the devotion to duty of Patrolman Benson, a member of the force only four months. 
He showed exceptional initiative in detection in the above case and courage by apprehending two criminals and holding them until 
assistance arrived. By his alertness and disregard for his own safety, this officer has been responsible for ridding our community of two 
felons, one of whom has a criminal record dating back many years. 

Department Medals oj Honor and Thomas F. Sullivan Aivards 

The Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award are hereby awarded to .Sergeant Francis T. Cahill and 
Patrolman James E. Powers of Division 2 for meritorious service on December 19, 1959. 

On December 19, 1959, while off duty on his way to work at about 6:15 a.m.. Sergeant Francis T. Cahill, while driving along 
Washington street in the vicinity of Franklin street, heard a man shouting "Holdup." He observed two men running up Bromfield 
street and went after them. He captured one man in Province court who had a fully-loaded revolver in his hand. 

On the way to the nearest police box, the prisoner suddenly turned on the sergeant and attempted to seize his revolver. At 
this time Patrolman James E. Powers arrived and assisted Sergeant Cahill in subduing the prisoner and taking away from him a fully- 
loaded automatic pistol that he had concealed under his shiit in an improvised shoulder holster, a five-inch hunting knife, two boxei 
of ammunition, a roll of adhesive tape, a roll of twine, and several notes of "Caution" intended for future victims. 

Investigation disclosed that just prior to the arrest the prisoner had attempted to hold up a stockman on the second floor of 
the F. W. Woolworth Company store located at 490 Washington street, Boston. After being outwitted and followed along Wash- 
ington street by the victim, the prisoner attempted to hold up two employees of the Boston Ice Company on Washington street. 

After listening to the evidence in this case. Chief Justice Elijah Adlow of the Boston Municipal Court commended .Sergeant 
Cahill for his courage in making this important arrest. This prisoner has been in serious trouble since 1929 when he was convicted in 
New York on a robbery charge and sent to Sing Sing Prison. About six and one-half years later, on March 10, 1936, he was found 
guilty of a similar oflense in Boston and sentenced to State Prison for a term of fifteen to twenty years, eleven of which he spent in 
Bridgewater State Hospital. On expiration, he was returned to State Prison to serve a three-year sentence on a charge of armed 
robbery for which he had been convicted in Middlesex Superior Court on March 23, 1936. 



Patrolman Joseph M. Connolly of Division 13, on detail to Division 17, is hereby awaided a Department Medal of Honor and 
the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on January 2, 1959. 

On January 2, 1959, at about 2:30 a.m.. Patrolman Joseph M. Connolly discovered an open window on a side entrance at 
the Municipal Building, 6 Cummins Highway, Roslindale. After careful inspection the oflicer observed that the window had appar- 
ently been forced by means of a tool. Patrolman Connolly entered through the open window and, hearing noise from the basement, 
descended and apprehended two "safebreakers" endeavoring to pry open a metal container. After arresting and searching his prison- 
ers, Patrolman Connolly ordered them to a police signal box and summoned assistance. 

A sum of money taken in the building and foimd on one of the prisoners was used in evidence when the two men were ar- 
raigned in court on charges of breaking and entering in the nighttime and possession of burglarious tools. 



Patrolman John S. Corbett of Division 11 is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan award 
for meritorious duty performed on January 22, 1959. 

About 4:30 A.M., Januaiy 22, 1959, Patrolman John S. Corbett heard a noise coming from the rear of a cafe on Dorchester 
avenue. Upon looking through the glass in the door, the ofiicer observed a man, holding a pinch bar, breaking through the wall of 
the cafe. 



12 

Patrolman Corbett hailed officers who were patrolling the district in a sector car. At his request they went to tlie rear of the 
stote while he covered the front. As the culprit was attempting to escape, Patrolman Corbett ordered him to halt, and discharged 
one shot from his service revolver. The culprit had entered through a rear window and had attempted to break into the <'afe through 
a hole which he had dug in the wall. 

The prisoner was a paiolee from Concord Reformatory and had a record of breaking and entering and larceny dating back to 
193S. 

The defendant appeared in Dorchester Court, charged with two counts of breaking and entering a building in the nighttime 
;ind larceny therein, and possession of burglarious tools. 



Patrolman Thomas J. P. Gavin of Division 16 is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honoi and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Award for meritorious duty performed on February 14, 1959. 

On February 14, 1959, two small boys were drowned in Muddy River, near Charlesgate West, when they broke through the 
ice on the river. Patrolman Thomas J. P. Gavin responded at the scene of these drownings shortly after the boys had been suljmerged 
in the water. After removing his outer clothing and ecjuipment. Patrolman Gavin went out on the ice, which broke under his weight, 
and then swam to the area where he observed a boy's cap floating. He made several dives into the water and brought to the surface 
an unconscious boy. 

The ofiicer then attempted to return to the shore of the river but, due to the frigid temperature of the water and the Vjreaking 
ice which numbed his body, he had to be assisted from the water by members of the Boston Fire Department, who had arrived at the 
scene with rescue equipment. 

4( 4: 4: 4: =(E ^ 

Detectives Alan J. Crisp and Thomas J. McGuire of the Robbery Squad of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation are hereby 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 25, 1959. 

About 12:15 A-*'- on Saturday, April 25, 1959, Detectives Alan J. Crisp and Thomas J. McGuire, while cruising in the Jamaica 
Plain area, observed dense smoke coming from a two-family duplex wooden frame dwelling house on Cornwall street. 

An alarm was given to the Fire Department and, while awaiting arrival of the fire apparatus, the two officers groped their 
way through heavy smoke and assisted two women and two children to the street. The officers then re-entered the house and made 
a thorough search to insure that all occupants had been assisted to safety. These rescues were eflfected before there was time for the 
arrival of the fire apparatus. 

****** 

Detectives John F. Doherty and Edward F. Connolly, detailed to the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, are hereby awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 28, 1959. 

On April 28, 1959, Detectives John F. Doherty and Edward F. Connolly by their keen observation brought under their sur- 
veillance a dangerous, heavily armed, paroled convict, identified previously by victims of package store armed holdups. His suspicious 
actions in the vicinity of a Back Bay liquor store and his seeming reluctance to wander any distance from his parked car, later found 
to be stolen, aroused the interest of the officers. 

After careful observation the officers closed in on the suspect, seized, disarmed, and handcuffed him. Investigation disclosed 
a fully loaded automatic pistol on his person and two fully loaded automatic pistols in the car. 

At Police Headquarters the prisonei confessed to the commission of a series of armed holdups in tlie greater Boston area. 

In their investigation of the guns found in the prisoner's possession, the officers discovered all to be stolen. One gun was 
found to have been the one used in a recent riot and bieakout at the Concord Reformatory. Astute questioning of the prisoner by the 
officers brought forth a revelation of inestimable value to police officials in the state — the manner in which the gun had been smuggled 
into the Reformatory. This knowledge will enable prison officials to tighten security measures in these institutions, resulting in 
elimination of a potential death threat to prison guard personnel. 

The prisoner was indicted and is at present serving a lengthy sentence at Walpole State Prison. The effective and efficient 
manner in which Detectives Doherty and Connolly eflfected the arrest of this armed criminal prevented possilile injury and loss of life 
both to themselves and to his intended victims. 



Sergeant-Detective Joseph M. Joidan and Detective Joseph Pirrello, detailed to the Bureau of Cruninal Investigation, are 
hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on November 29, 
1958. 

On the morning of November 29, 1958, these officers, in response to a radio message, went to a location where a taxi driver 
reported he had just been robbed by two men, one of whom was armed. The victim furnished a description of the criminals, and shortly 
thereafter the officers came upon two men who answered the description furnished by the holdup victim. 

As Sergeant-Detective Jordan and Detective Pirrello were taking the suspects into custody, one man pulled away, drawing a 
fully-loaded revolver from his coat pocket and pointing the same at the detectives. After a struggle he was disarmed, and both men 
were placed under arrest. 

After interrogation at headquarters, they admitted to the armed robberies of four taxi drivers. The prisoners were arraigned 
in Roxbury District Court and charged with armed robbery, unlawful possession of a firearm, and assault with intent to murder. 




Commissioner Sullivan 
Presents Medal of Honor to 
Det. Edward Connolly 



Richard Cardinal Gushing 
Presents Walter Scott Medal 
for Valor to Patrolman 
Joseph L. Benson 



Supt. Francis J. Hennessy 
and Cohasset Police Chief 
Hector J. Pelletier Present 
Medals to Det. Joseph 
Pirello and Sgt. Det. Joseph 
M. Jordan 




Commissioner of Public 
Safety J. Henry Goguen 
Presents Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards to Dels. Alan Crisp 
and Thomas McGuire 



Mayor John B. Hynes 
Presents Thomas F. Sullivan 
Award to Patrolman Joseph 
M. Connolly 




14 



DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 




Mi£; 










ARRESTS 

The total number of arrests, counting each 
arrest as that of a separate person, was 81,209. 

There were 10,972 arrests on warrants and 
32,537 without warrants; 37,700 were summoned 
by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 71,942; of 
females, 9,267; of delinquents, 2,025; of minors, 
4,740. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 
29,297. 

The total number of days' attendance at 
court by officers was 40,467, and the witness fees 
earned amounted to $23,209.12. 

There were 24,782 persons arrested for 
drunkenness. 

Eighty-seven were committed to the State 
Prison; 933 to the House of Correction; 57 to the 
Women's Prison; 28 to the Reformatory Prison; 
181 to the Youth Service Board; and 2,933 to 
other institutions. 

The value of property taken from prisoners 
and lodgers was $177,299.30. 

The value of property stolen in the city 
amounted to $3,405,314, and the value recovered 
amounted to $2,294,514. 




EXPLAINING THE LINE-UP IS ONE OF THE DEPARTMENT'S PUBLIC SERVICES 



A CHART OF THE POLICE CALL SYSTEM 




l6 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION | 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 



The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several units, 
namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, Homicide, Lost and 
Stolen Property, Identification, and Missing Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the following phases 
of police work and investigations: banking, express thieves, general investi- 
gation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, vice and obscene literature, pawnbrokers, 
junk shops, secondhand dealers, pickpockets, shophfters, domestic relations, 

and subversive activities. 

CAPT. JAMES V. CROWLEY 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a year 
for various police departments throughotit the United States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate in 
everv way possible with outside police departments in investigation of crime and prosecution of criminals. 

DETECTIVE BUREAU 

A Detective Bureau was established in the Boston Police Department on November 6, 1950, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. Detectives assigned to this Bureau are detailed to the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation and the various police divisions. 




APPREHENDED AND SEARCHED . 



TAKEN INTO CUSTODY 




17 



AUTOMOBILE UNIT 



This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and is in daily communication with police authori- 
ties of the United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, Post Office Department, and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The Automobile Unit index contains records of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars 
reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons, and cars whose oper- 
ators are wanted for various offenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the department and the Automobile 
Unit through information obtained from this index. 

All applications for used car dealers" licenses are investigated by officers of tliis unit. Frequent examina- 
tions are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this unit during the year identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, restoring them to their owners, and have 
assisted in solving many crim.es by means of their positive identifications. 



LOST AND STOLEN PROPERTY 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities 
and towns throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen in sucli places. All pawnl.irokers and 
secondhand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of 
articles reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the recovery 
of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which maj^ 
have been stolen. 



DISARMING A FELON 



RECOVERED LOOT . 




i8 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This Department 
for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 



Month 


Bought by 


Sold bv 


Sold bv 


Dealers 


Dealers 


Individuals 


195S 








December 


2,202 


2,168 


1,336 


1959 








January 


2,816 


2,491 


1,370 


February 




















2,408 


2,358 


711 


March . 




















3.044 


2,971 


902 


April . 




















3.617 


3.256 


1,245 


May 




















3.137 


3.384 


1,150 


June 




















3.304 


3.694 


1,073 


July . 




















3.061 


3.356 


977 


August 




















2.951 


3,108 


867 


September 




















2,539 


2,882 


880 


October 




















2,971 


2,834 


89s 


November 




















2,707 


2,854 


650 


Totals 




34,757 


35,356 


12,056 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston 
for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 



Month 


Reported 


Recovered 


Recovered 


Not 


Stolen 


During Month 


Later 


Recovered 


19'iS 










December .... 


376 


340 


26 


10 


1959 










January 


382 


356 


20 


6 


February 










288 


261 


22 


5 


March . 










262 


245 


12 


5 


April 










310 


290 


13 


7 


Ma>- 










323 


305 


10 


8 


June 










2S8 


272 


10 


6 


July 










312 


288 


16 


8 


August . 










339 


319 


9 


II 


September 










289 


255 


II 


23 


October . 










327 


298 


16 


13 


November 










313 


275 





38 


Totals . . 


3,Soq 


3.504 


165 


140 




MURDER IN THE SHADOWS 



This photograph won a 

1959 Award of the Boston Press Photographers 



20 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HOMICIDE UNIT 



Officers of this unit investigate all homicide cases and interrogate 
persons involved in or who have knowledge of crimes of murder, manslaughter, 
abortion, and other violent crimes. They prepare, supervise, and present 
evidence at inquests. 

BOSTON'S MAD BOMBER . . . 



'iltijlilim 

HIIIiHIIIlll 

lllli 









C 


;apt. jo 


SEP 


H B 


. FALLON 


Investigated 


Abortions 5 


Accidental shooting 










2 


Asphyxiation 










2 


Bums 












16 


Drowning 














13 


Electricity 














I 


Explosion 














I 


Falls 














32 


Homicides 














31 


Machinery 














2 


AI.T.A. . 

















Motor vehicles 












43 


Natural causes 












1,294 


Poison 












1 
J 


Railroad train 












I 


Stillborn 












2 


Suicides . 












30 


Total 














1,481 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 

Abortion 

Assault and battery 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 

Assault and battery with dangerous weapon 

Assault with intent to murder 

Homicide 

Robbery 

Violation of firearm law 



22 

32 

20 

o 

24 

5 
5 



21 



Recapitulation of Homicides 

Twenty-four cases were presented to the courts as criminal homicides and the following action was taken: 
6 Indicted for six cases of manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

1 Indicted for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to murder, second degree 

2 Indicted for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

I Indicted for murder, first degree — committed to Bridgewater State Hospital 

1 Indicted for manslaughter — still pending in court 

2 Indicted for murder, second degree — still pending in court 
I Indicted for murder, first degree — still pending in court 

1 "No Bill " returned by the Grand Jury on one case of manslaughter — indicted for assault and battery 
4 "No Bill" returned by the Grand Jury on three cases of manslaughter 

2 Held for the Grand Jury on two cases of manslaughter 

2 Cases still pending in lower court on two cases of manslaughter 
I Defendant escaped Ijefore hearing in lower court 

(Twenty-four defendants involved in twenty-three homicides) 

3 Persons committed suicide after killing four persons 

4 Murder cases still under investigation 



DEATH CAME SWIFTLY . . . 




22 

THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION I 



DOMESTIC RELATIONS UNIT 

The Domestic Relations Unit was organized on July ii, 195S, and charged with the following 
responsibilities: 

(a) To work with and assist the City of Boston Public Welfare authorities and the directors and supervisors of the Division 
of Aid to Dependent Children in the investigation and prosecution of all frauds and larcenies perpetrated upon these agencies by those 
not legally or properly entitled to assistance. 

(b) To cooperate with and assist the police officers in the various divisions whenever required in the service of warrants in 
iiunsiipport cases. 

(f) To cooperate with the clerks of the municipal and district courts in Boston in the execution and service of nonsu|)port 
warrants which are outstanding. 

(d) To examine the so-called "dead warrant files" of the Police Department in all cases where the depemlents of the accused 
are receiving city aid of any type and to further investigate and apprehend the named offenders. 

(e) With the cooperation and permission of the clerks of the several municipal ami district courts in Boston, to examine ;ill 
nonsupport cases where warrants have been "returned without service" and where the named defendant's dependents are receiving 
aid with a view to further investigate, arrest, and prosecute wherever possible. 

The members of this unit do not in any way embarrass or interfere with those who are rightly and justifiably 
receiving aid and enter into the cases only where there are reasonable grounds which lead the court authorities or 
Public Welfare officials to believe that fraud exists. 

Investigations Involving Welfare Cases 

Cases referred to the Domestic Relations Unit by the City of Bo.ston Welfare Department 2,526 

Cases referred by other souices (nonsupport warrants returned without service, anonymous letters, and police reports) . . 700 

Total ?,.226 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the 
Domestic Relations Unit Secured Evidence 

(a) Arrests for larceny by reason of fraudulently receiving welfare aid to a total amount of S93, 1 00 49 

49 were convicted of laiceny 

In these cases the court ordered the defendants to make restitution to the City of Boston of a total amount of 
$93,100. 

{b) Arrests for nonsupport and illegitimacy 482 

53 committed to penal institutions 
425 weie ordered to pay support through the court 
4 cases were dismissed by the court 

Cases investigated involving fraud or collusion where no evidence was uncovered i.4<'4 

Cases involving nonsupport where investigation is continuing 1 85 

Cases involving illegal receipt of welfare aid which were settled without court action by the Legal Division of the City of Boston 

Welfare Department 180 

As the result of investigations made by this unit of 711 recipients, the City of Boston Welfare Depart- 
ment discontinued aid in 2S6 cases and reduced aid in 425 cases. 

Amount of money ordered by the various courts to I^e paid through the Probation Departments in cases 
of arrests for nonsupport of family and illegitimate children dtiring the past year amounted to $253,526.44. In addi- 
tion to this amount, $110,580, made up of reiinbursements in cases of larceny bj^ fraud, totals $364,106.44, which 
has been saved the City of Boston. 



n 



NARCOTICS AND VICE UNIT 

The Narcotics and Vice Unit is charged with the investiga- 
tion and prosecution of persons who commit crimes against 
chastity, morality, decency, and good order, involving the unlaw- 
ful sale, distribution, and use of narcotic drugs and derivatives 
and the importing, jjrinting, publishing, selling, distributing, 
or exhibiting of obscene or impure literature, prints, pictures, 
etc. This unit also cooperates with federal agencies in the in- 
vestigation of interstate prostitution and transportation of 
narcotic drugs and obscene literature. 




LT. DET. EDWARD F. BLAKE 



NARCOTICS AND PORNOGRAPHY 



AN EVERLASTING BATTLE 




Narcotic DruK Law violations 
Prostitvition and related offenses 
Pretended fortunetelling 



Investigations 

2gq Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. 

Total 



422 
3 



33 

S7S 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Narcotics and Vice Unit Secured Evidence 



Illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs . 
Prostitution and related offenses , 
Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc 



171 

330 

30 



Pretended forlvuietellint! 



Total 



3 

534 



Recapitulation 



Narcotic Drug Violations : 

Sentenced to institutions or fined 
Placed on probation 
Placed on file .... 
Found not guilty 



Total 



Prostitution and Related Offenses: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined . 
Placed on probation 

Placed on file 

Committed to mental institutions 
Found not guilty . . . . 



Total 



Obscene Literature, Prints, Pictures, etc.: 
Sentenced to institutions or fined 
Placed on file .... 
Found not guilty 



Total 



Pretended Fortunetelling: 

Found guilty and fined 



140 
8 



171 



2 2 2 

"56 

32 

2 

iS 

330 



27 
2 
I 

30 



POLICE AND BASEBALL PLAYERS TEAM UP FOR THE JIMMY FUND . 




^^^ ;^ 1fi^& 



i^. 



T: / •• ■ 




25 



rHE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION | 



BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation expert in ballistics, explosives, and 
munitions. All evidence found at the scene of crime where firearms or explosives were used is examined. Suspected 
weapons are catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent bullets and discharged cases from these 
weapons are filed. Cases involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the various courts. 

This unit responds to all calls where threats of bombing are received and makes a thorough examination of 
the premises to make certain that no bombs are planted thereon. 



All department firearms, accessories pertaining to same, and tear gas equipment have been inspected and 



serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are returned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on 
stolen firearms, and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen Property Unit and at the files of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Safety. 

When firearms property of the United States are found used in crime or recovered otherwise, such property 
is returned to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police departments, federal agencies, military and naval intelli- 
gence units. 



THE BALLISTICS STORY IS TOLD TO FASCINATED HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 



26 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



Emergency Equipment 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supply of emergency equipment consisting of 12-gauge 
riot shotguns, ammunition, belts with bayonets attached, bulletproof vests, tear gas gun kit and assembly, and gas 
masks which provide complete respiratorx- protection for the wearer in all oxygen-deficient or highly gaseous at- 
mospheres. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced whenever necessary. 



During the past year this unit assisted in 373 cases as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths ■.. 

Armed robbery 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 

Bomb scares 

Bombs, e.xplosives, etc 

Bullets recovered, no other crime involved 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc. 

Fireanns law, violation of 

Murder 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 

Suicide, attempt 

Weapons, examined and held for safekeeping 

Weapons, examined and returned to owners 

Weapons foimd, disposal, etc 



4 

25 

31 
21 

17 

7 
27 

12 

12 

2 

16 

5 
61 



Total 373 



HEART VICTIM AIDED 



NEW FIRST AID EQUIPMENT . . . 




BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST 

The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in its nature, tlie frequency of any particular type 
being governed by the circumstances of the cases. A breakdown into types indicates the general scope of the 
laboratorv'. 



Material No. 

Sought of Tests 

Acetaldehyde 7 

Acetone 2 

Alcohol, ethyl 382 



Alcohol, methyl 

Alkaloids 

Arsenic 

Barbiturates .... 

Bromides 

Carbon monoxide . 

Chlorides 

Chlorinated hydrocarbons 
Corrosives .... 

Demeral 

Doriden 

Ethylene glycol 
Hydrocyanic acid . 

Lead 

Paraldehyde .... 
Salicylates .... 
Spectrophotometry, visual 
Spectrophotometr\-, ultra-violet 
Miscellaneous .... 



17 

5 

2 

61 

I 

40 

2 

.s 
2 
I 
I 
I 
4 
3 
7 
12 

44 

7Q 



Material 

Sought 
Acid phosphatase . 
Auto, examination of 
Bloodstains 
Bloodstains, typing. 
Cement .... 
Cloth patterns 
Clothing .... 
Explosives and residues 
Fibers .... 
Glass .... 

Hair 

Paint .... 

Photographs 

Photographs, infra-red . 

Powder residue, clothing 

Scene, examination of 

Spectrographic examination 

Spermatozoa . 

Tire marks 

Tool marks 

X-ray diffraction examination 

Miscellaneovis . 



No. 
of Tests 
7 
4 
,57 
5 
3 

2 

70 
2 
4 

3 
2 

4 

IS 

13 
1 1 
12 

3 

6 
2 

3 
2 
8 



Cases 

Medical 
Year Examiners 

1955 322 

1956 278 

1957 - 314 

1958 355 

1959 418 



Department 


Total 


125 


447 


93 


371 


74 


388 


87 


442 


66 


4S4 



CHEMIST FRANK STRATTON LENDING LAB SUPPORT TO HOMICIDE EVIDENCE 




28 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



CRIMINAL RECORDS AND IDENTIFICATION 

Records — Activities 

Recorded in the Main Index File 828,118 

Recorded in the Female Record File . 21,417 

Recorded in the Male Record File . 229,536 



Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone . 1,087 

Requests received by correspondence 6,274 

Requests for certified records . . 1,288 

Requests for jury records . . 2,853 

Requests in connection with appli- 
cants for licenses .... 10,606 v-a^^ ^ x 

i\ 

Total 22,108 f*"^"^^ .=r-i 

Requests received from various public 
agencies : 

Stragglers and deserters (anned 

forces) 1.929 

Auxiliary police applicants . 54 ^ — ^ v' 

Grand Total .... ^^U^KHll^Mltttt^^SSSlUtl^^mm^^mmm^lSS- 

Photography 

Number of photographs on file November 30, 1958 658,242 

Made and filed during the year 19-790 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, 1958 19,929 

Number of " foreign " photographs received during the year 1,35^ 

Total 699,317 

Number on file in the " Local Segregated " file (gallery) 61,357 

Number on file in the " Foreign Segregated " file 18,156 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) 86 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 14 

Scenes of crime photographed 270 

Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 7, 916 

Other cities and towns i-937 

Number of rectigraph photographs 4,572 

Number of negatives of criminals 3,9 5 S 

Number of prints made from same 19,790 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 764 

Number of prints from same 1,528 

Number of reorders of criminal photographs 2,354 

Number of stand-up photographs made 14 

Prints made from same 42 

Number of photographs of police officers 158 

Number of scenes of crime visited 1,190 

Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) 1,965 

Number of prints of same 5,895 

Color photography : 

Color "mug" photographs on file 4,250 

Color photographs taken and processed no 




29 



Fingerprint File 



Number on file November 30, 1958 

Taken and filed during the year: 
Male . . . " . 
Female .... 



Received from other authorities: 
Male 
Female 



Number on file November 30, 1959 .... 

Finger|Drints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns 



Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 

Special police officers 

Hackney carriage drivers 

Civilian employees 

Firearms Act (revolver licenses) 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) November 30, 195S 
Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) November 30, 1959 



Five-Finger System of Fingerprinting 
(Established May 27, 1952) 

Number of 5-finger cards in file November 30, 1959 

Number of main index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system, November 30, 1959 .... 
Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in Identification Section, November 30, 1959 
Number of connections made by latent prints since system estabhshed 



208,443 

2,223 
409 



380 
137 

211,592 



3,149 

3>i49 

152 

79 

152 

1,847 

18 

4,732 

88,989 
90,983 



17,580 
8,790 

563 
320 



FINGERPRINTING IS EXPLAINED TO TFIE CITIZENS OF TOMORROW . . . 



30 



Missing Persons 



Total numlxT of persons rcporU'd missiii},' in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. . 

Total number still missin;,' . . . . 



*i,oo8 
959 

49 



* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing 
who were found or returned within a few hours after report was made 





Age and 


Sex of Persons Missing 


in Boston 






Age 


MiSSINl, 


FOI'ND 


Stii.i. Missin<, 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, imder 21 years .... 
Over 21 years 


i«o 
160 
23« 


91 
209 
130 


176 
131 
216 


202 

1^3 


4 

9 

22 

35 


2 
7 
5 


Totals 


57« 


430 


3+3 


4i(, 


U 



Reported missing in Boston 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) 

Reported missing and returned same day (otitside cities and towns) 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Welfare and the Girls' and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training vSchools 

Total number of persons rejjorted missing 

Persons Reported Missing by Police Divisions for Past Year 

Division i (North End section) 

Division 2 (Downtown section) 

Division 3 (West End section) 

Division 4 (South End section) 

Division 6 (South Boston district) 

Division 7 (East Boston district) 

Division 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

Division 1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 

Division 17 (West Roxbury district) . 

Divisiott 18 (Hyde Park district) 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) 

Total 

(Patients missing from the Boston State Hospital are now being carried by the Department of Public Safety) 

Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 

Tracers sent out on persons reported missing 

*Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the department 

In 89 cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, 70 were identified through fingerprint impressions. 
Five persons afflicted with amnesia were identified. 



1,008 
7. 171 
1,117 
2.517 

28s 

l2,og8 



8 
o 

16 

lOI 

86 

47 
217 

17s 
122 

45 
34 
36 

35 
20 
20 
46 

1,008 



521 
3,108 

573 



31 

Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police De])artments 5,911 

Warrants received from other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston 1,162 

Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston .... 174 

Total warrants received for service in Boston 7,247 

Warrants sent out for service to divisions and units within the department 5,594 

Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts 1,059 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts . . 213 

Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this de]iartment 381 

Total warrants processed 7,247 

Warrants returned without service to our divisions and units 1,798 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 737 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 4,712 

Summonses 

Total number received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 6,318 

Total number served 5,753 

Total number not served 565 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 23,904 

Total number served 21,645 

Total numl)er not served 2,259 

Requests for Information 

Requests for information from police jour- 
nals in regard to accidents and thefts 

for the fiscal year ending Novem- A VISIT FROM GREEK POLICE OFFICERS — 

ber 30, 1959 5,385 INSP. CHRIS PATSOURIS AND LT. PETER PSARRIS 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

A multilith machine under direct supervision 
of an experienced operator enables this department to 
prepare and complete printing of circulars containing 
photographs and fingerprints of persons either re- 
ported missing or wanted for criminal offenses. This 
multilith machine is also used to print de])artment 
fomis. 

The multilith machine is completely equipped 
with camera, arc lights, vacuum frame, which add to 
the varied output of this machine. This machine is 
capable of printing in approximately two hours' time 
descriptive circulars of persons wanted. In some in- 
stances circulars are completed and mailed to outside 
cities before a fugitive arrives at his destination. 

This unit also has a high-speed electric addresso- 
graph machine and two electric mimeograph machines 
which are used to make daily manifolds, warrant 
manifolds, bulletins, and circular letters for the vari- 
ous units and divisions, including Police School 
lessons. 




32 

THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The Traffic Division of the Boston Police Depart- 
ment supervises the regulation of traffic and the 
enforcement of automobile laws and parking regula- 
tions in the area of the city comprised of Divisions 
I, 2, 3, 4, and i6. The Traffic Division prepares and 
supervises the mailing of parking violation notices for 
the entire department. It also maintains a safety 
patrol. 

The Traffic Problem 

During the past year an increase of 3 per cent in 
the volume of vehicular traffic was reflected in statistics 
compiled by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles. Total 
registrations October 31, 1959, amounted to 1,755,816, 
exceeding the corresponding figure for 1958 by 50,488. 



NO MATTER WHAT THE WEATHER . . . 





PRECIOUS MOMENTS LOST 



Parking 

For the fiscal year ending November 30, 1959, the Traffic Division issued 248,196 notices of parking 
\iolations. Court prosecutions amounted to 20,708. Vehicles towed from the public ways amounted to 19,110. 
Total parking violations, looked up by the personnel of the Traffic Division and mailed to automobile owners 
through facilities of the Chief Clerk's Office, amounted to 495,538. 

Parking fines paid at the Municipal Court of Boston for violations within the jurisdiction of that court 
amounted to $314,696.00. Parking meter revenue within the same area amounted to $314,855.75. Parking 
meter revenue for the entire city amounted to $454,774.28. 



A WORD TO THE 
WISE WAS NOT 
SUFFICIENT . . . 




34 

M-i Safety Squad 

The M-i S:ifet\' Squad of the Traffic Division continued its activities, bringing its message of safety to 
the many children of our public and parochial schools. During the summer months this program is conducted 
at the various playgrounds in cooperation with the City of Boston Park Department. 

A feature of their work is the weekly Safety Squad radio presentation which is tape-recorded each Thurs- 
day and released on Sunday morning through the facilities of Radio Station WORL. The cast is composed entirelj' 
of school children, and their efforts are enjoyed by a large and enthusiastic radio audience. 

The officers of the Safety Squad make many public appearances throughout the year, addressing indus- 
trial, armed services, and civic club groups. Their services are also employed in the conduct of jxirades, the regula- 
tion of holiday shopping crowds, and in the elimination of illegal parking. 




LOCAL TV COOPERATES WITH SAFETY EDUCATION 



Progress 

Construction of the Central Artery has now been completed and it is in full operation. The beneficial 
effect of this roadway was felt immediately. In addition to providing freer and faster access to the downtown 
section of Boston, it also provides through traffic with the means of bypassing this area. 

A public parking garage at the intersection of Kingston and Bedford streets has been completed and 
placed in operation. Man}- areas adjacent to the Central Artery have been made available for public parking, and 
it is hoped that additional metered parking spaces will be provided in the under roadway of the artery when it is 
turned over to the city. 

Other Activities 

In addition to routine traffic assignments, details were provided for several multiple alarms of fire and 
other t\-pes of public emergency as well as for a variet}' of events of a public nature including a full schedule of 
parades, several conventions, both state-wide and national, celebrations, and rallies. Escort service was provided 
for numerous distinguished visitors to our city, including the President of the Philippines, the Canadian Ambas- 
sador, the Secretar}- of Labor, the Governor of Puerto Rico, several senators and governors, high church dignitaries 
— among whose number were the Apostolic Delegate to the United States, our ow^n Cardinal Archbishop, the head 
of the Armenian Churches in America — civic groups from points as far distant as Japan, and persons prominent in 
the world of entertainment, including Jackie Gleason, "Cookie" Byrnes, "Bat" Masterson, and the Lone Ranger. 



35 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT AND 
RECORDS BUREAU 




The Central Complaint and Records Bureau completed its first 
fiscal year of operation. The new Bureau consolidates and centralizes into 
one unit the entire records and communications facilities of the Department. 
The modem electronics communication equipment at the Central Complaint 
Room and the IBM facilities at the Record Section have greatly improved 
the internal operations of the department, resulting in greater efficiency and 
economy. 

The Central Complaint Room, formerly the Bureau of Operations, 
located at the seventh floor of Police Headquarters, has been completely re- 
constructed and equipped with the most modern police communications ' •'' 
facilities available. The basic function of this room, its personnel, and equipment is to register every complaint, 
incident, or request for police service as well as to dispatch police vehicles to process any complaint or incident 
requiring police action. 

The Central Complaint Room has control over all communications equipment, consisting of telephone, 
teletype, radio, and telegraph. 

There were 331,434 outgoing telephone messages and 3,000 toll calls made by the department through 
our switchboard; 305,164 emergency telephone messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through 
either DE 8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 421,913 telephone messages were received through 
our switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 208,416 teletype messages 
and 669 telegrams were processed, 12,098 of these teletype messages relating to missing persons; 17,746 automobiles 
and registration plates were reported lost or stolen and 14,569 were reported recovered; and 495,046 radio messages 
were sent. 

NERVE CENTER IN ACTION . . . 




36 

Five main transmitters (Station KCA-(S6o, 2 at Poliee Headquarters and ^ at Suffolk Court House); 
2 emergencN' transmitters at White Stadium, Jamaica Plain, for ci\-i!ian defense; 2-\vay radio equi])ment in 124 
automobiles; 29 comhinaticn patrol wagon-ambulances and boat transmitters and receivers; 36 wired Ijroadcast 
amplifiers; 8 pickup receivers; and 10 receivers on motorcycles were maintained by members of this unit. 

An intercity and interdepartmental radio receiver and transmitter which is tuned into a frequency with 
the Arlington, Barnstable, Cambridge, Lynnfield, Metropolitan, Milton, Quincy, Reading, Revere, State, Water- 
■ town, Weymouth, and Worcester Police Departments is in operation in this unit and is used for emergency messages 
with these departments. 

On an average day some 1,900 radio transmissions are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. During the year, new Soundscriber equipment has been installed at the Central 
Complaint Room. This equipment records accurately each radio transmission and provides the department with 
an important administrative record of the same. 

During the j-ear personnel of the Bureau constructed 7 rotary master street files, 5 of which are located 
at the Central Complaint Room and 2 at the Central Records Section. These new files provide quick information 
on over 7,000 streets, radio car sectors, public buildings, parks, places of interest, etc., and are maintained up to 
date at all times. An important feature of the rotary files is the establishment of a Master Disaster Plan which 
enables the department to quickly mobilize its facilities to handle any emergency. The effectiveness of this new 
plan was ably demonstrated at the bombing incident which occurred on June 11, 1959, at the North Station. 

During the past fiscal year the system which was inaugurated at this Bureau for the charging of a fee for 
police reports of accidents and other matters to insurance companies and other interested persons produced a total 
of $17,500. The system of charging a fee for Lord's day work permits which was instituted at this Bureau produced 
a total of $2,762 for the fiscal year. The Kodak Verifax copying machine used to reproduce copies of reports re- 
quested represents a sound investment and in addition to this function it is used extensively for other departmental 
activities. 

The Statistical Section of the Central Complaint and Records Bureau is located on the fourth floor of 
Police Headquarters. This section, with its modem IBM data processing equipment, prepares accurate and de- 
tailed reports and exerts control over all departmental reporting procedures, particularly those involving statistics 
for uniform crime reporting procedures which are forwarded to the F.B.I. 

Valuable information concerning the incidence and frequency of various types of crime is prepared in 
detail bv machine ojieration and forwarded to Division Commanders for their information and guidance. This 
information has resulted in increased efficiencv in the field of crime detection. 




*. *. 




VISITING LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS AT THE TURRET . 



CALLING ALL CARS . 




38 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU 




CAPT. JOSEPH F. CUMMINGS 



The Crime Prevention Bureau operates for the prevention of delin- 
quency among juveniles and maintains a program of constant cooperation 
with all other agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of 
maladjusted children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate 
factors that induce criminal tendencies among children. 

2. In this program enlist the aid of the general public, all child 
welfare agencies, divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude of citi- 
zens toward law-enforcement agencies, and especially educate the public and 
the police in the ])roblem of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile 
crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children, investigating 
and taking the necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotels, bus and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of people congregate. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged, and the needy, locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist in the investigation of cases in which women are 
involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 

The juvenile oflJicers an'ested and prosecuted i,Q5cS male and 401 female juveniles in the following age 



groups : 



Age 



14 



15 



16 



Male 
Female 



30 
1 



63 
9 



141 
4 



171 
24 



283 
99 



438 
106 



57S 
iit> 



In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way involved in 
unlawful activities concerning juveniles, 402 male and 53 female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought to their respective stations, for questioning in regard to criminal offenses com- 
mitted on each division, 3,977 male and 638 female juveniles. As a result of interrogation, together with personal 
interviews with the parents of these children, it was determined for the best interests of the children, parents, and 
the city to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile jilan in the City of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child, which is dramatically liornc out by the fact that the number of recidivists 
still remains below i per cent. It is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston, with the child being 
returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first offenders, without having 
the stigma of a juvenile record attached to that child who, after the proper disciplinary action by the parents, would 
not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delincjuency pattern again. 

There were 7,429 cases processed by the Juvenile Bureau for this period, including the cases brought to 
court and the cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinar}- action. 



39 

This Bureau presented igo lectures to as many different orj^anizations in an effort to educate the public to 
the scope of juvenile delinquency, the elementary causes of it, the policies, plans, and procedures of the Crime Pre- 
vention Bureau as established by the Police Commissioner. The results of these lectures are reflected in many ways, 
such as the multitude of organizations which are now conducting campaigns against the sale of indecent literature 
and photographs to children, the organizations which are now offering athletic programs to children, and, most im- 
portant of all, the supervisory interest that parents are now taking in their children. It cannot go without mention 
that the tremendous cooperation this Bureau is receiving from the clergy, the schools, and the agencies of Boston 
is directly related to this program of acquainting the public with the ju\'enile delinquency problem in Boston. 

During the fiscal year the juvenile officers have personally contacted 7,800 persons who are engaged in 
some phase of children's welfare work in the City of Boston, including schoolteachers, librarians, court attaches, 
clergymen, boys' club and girls' club workers, and those people who staff the many agencies working for the better- 
ment of children. This phase of the program is to make all of these people fully aware of the fact that the police 
are cognizant of their importance in the over-all battle against delinquency and realize that it shall be defeated onlv 
by the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of 
attendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officialh- recog- 
nized that truancy has decreased in Boston because of the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers, through their contact with the different agencies, 
have found what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted bv 
the agencies after a referral had been made to them by the officer who, because of his knowledge of the neighborhood 
to which he is assigned, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. • 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report submitted in the year 1958 shows that the juvenile 
pattern has taken a downward trend in the City of Boston, when it is jjublic knowledge that the trend is upward 
in the greater part of the country today. 



The policewomen assigned to the Crime Prevention Bureau accomplished the following: 



Arrests 

Wayward child 
Runaways 

Making false statement to obtain alcoholic beverage 
Nine counts — serving to a minor 
Stubborn child 
I Larceny in building 

1 Neglect of minor child 

2 Two counts — violation of Labor Law, Chapter 140 
I Violation of Labor Law, Chapter 149, Section Si 



Cases and Investigations 

Referred to outside Police Departments 

Girls questioned 

Boys questioned 

Homes visited . 

Girls delivered to parents 

Girls brought home 

Licensed premises insj^ected 

Investigations . 



4 Minors served 

4 Lord's day violations 



Cases Before the Licensing Board 

1 Lack of cooperation 

2 Violation of Labor Law (liiring minors)' 




162 

,11 

45;, 

5 

■ 8 

Sq2 1 



il.Jiv/ 



SWITCH 

KNIFE 

AND 

GARRISON 

BELT 




STANDARD 
EQUIPMENT 



40 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 



Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 578. Of these 
544 are connected with the underground system and 34 with 
the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 
2,265 trouble calls; inspected 578 signal boxes; 16 signal 
desks; 18 motor generator sets; 440 storage batteries. Re- 
pairs have been made on 153 box movements; 26 registers; 
169 locks; 16 time stamps; 36 vibrator bells; 46 relays; 
63 electric fans; 41 motors; 23 generators. This unit is 
responsible for the installation and maintenance of all 
electric wiring and equipment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 
578 telephone, and 83 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service unit supervises all telephone and 
teletype installations and minor teletype repairs throughout 
the department. It also maintains 48 headquarters-to- 
station house telephone circuits; 18 teletype-writer circuits; 
18 radio-wired broadcast circuits; 6 radio-car response 
circuits; a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank 
station of the Metropolitan District Police; also a circuit, 
with equipment, in booth at the East Boston end of the 
vSumner Tunnel; and the intercommunication units through- 
out the department. 




A MOUNTIE CHECKS WITH THE DESK 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the 
Year Ending November 30, 1959 

(Included in Table XV) 

Payrolls $123,051.66 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor . . . ... . . . 33,365.16 

Total $156,416.82 



41 



rHE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HARBOR SERVICE 

The duties jDerformed by the Harbor PoHce, Division 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows : 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports 1,041 

Number of \'es£els ordered from the channel 11 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream 11 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water front 262 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 2 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 3 

Number of cases investigated 1,129 

Number of dead bodies recovered 9 

Number rescued from drowning 16 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 81 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 45 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 2,158 

Number of coal permits granted to bunker or discharge o 

Number of dead bodies cared for 9 

Number of hours grappling 78 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc $26,300 

Since December i, 1958, 1,117 vessels from domestic ports and 1,041 vessels from foreign ports arrived at 
the Port of Boston. 

Harbor Patrol Service 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police boats "William H. McShane," "WiUiam H. 
Pierce," "Patrol Boat 63," and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the upper and lower harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea 
Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay, and Neponset River. 

OUR NEW PATROLBOAT ON SHAKEDOWN CRUISE . . . 




42 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



POLICE ACADEMY 



The Police Academy was established November i6, itjji, for the purpose of promoting the efficienc)- of 
the department through the indoctrination of recruits in basic routines and techniques. 

On appointment, new patrolmen pursue an intensive eight weeks' course of study under the direction of 
experienced superior ofiftcers. Regular courses in conduct, discipline, care of department equipment, use of revolvers 
and clubs, report writing, procedure with regard to violators of law and/or ordinances are supplemented by the 
appearance of qualified speakers, specialists in their fields, to acquaint the new officers with such subjects as radia- 
tion detection, first aid, judo, the proper handling of traffic, etc. 

At the completion of the course a formal graduation is held, which the families and friend? of the gradu- 
ates attend. That evening the patrolman receives his assignment and the following day commences his regular 
tours of duty. 

The Academy constitutes a regular unit of the department throughout the year. The instructors are 
responsible for the revision of the courses of study to keep abreast of developments of the law and police and safety 
procedures. As required, classes are conducted for personnel of all ranks for orientation in significant developments 
which contribute to efficiency and public safety. The supervision of firing sessions at the newly constructed Revolver 
Range at Moon Island is also the responsibility of the Academy faculty. 



THE SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS 



THE COMMISSIONER CONGRATULATES . . 




43 




S^olice department 



^rn\>^ '(^-^ TO <ir|.;i^-m'"A" TT f AT 



mrS firneyuf/t/ rr ///A /f/fa ft ro/r/'Sr o/ (fu/i'ffr/aji f/i //tr 

Ponton Police Scabemp 

^n tfstimoiio Inhrrrnf //tfS ^fV/r/Z/fff fS fffKf /'(//(// )f ((((//iryf'/u o/ Wi 
■/('/fff ^O 



0}}if)K^:KfH(y. 



a 



^^<^/v,> 




'T^^Ac^/^'v^-i-J^ 






e^ 



/9.?) 




>:/... f ,„, 



FROM THE MARINES TO THE POLICE . 



LEO LAUGHLIN OF THE FBI 

i 




44 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 




Dr. Joseph W. Devine is the Medical Examiner for the PoHce De- 
partment, with offices provided for him on the seventh floor of Police Head- 
quarters. A suite consisting of the doctor's private office, a completely- 
modernized examination and treatment room, and a waiting room constitutes 
his quarters. 

Upon entrance into the department, all persons certified for ap- 
pointment to any position, either for the uniformed force or civilian capacity, 

are given a thorough examination, and the physical report on each is sub- ^^^^^^B| ilk 

mitted. ^^ JOSEPH W. DEVINE 

The Medical Examiner examines all members of the uniformed force who are injured either on or ofY duty. 
Those members whose injuries bring about a period of absence and those members who are incapacitated by a pro- 
longed illness are given periodic examinations at their homes or in hospitals, if they are unable to visit the Medical 
Examiner at Police Headquarters, to determine their availability to perform police duty. The diagnosis and prog- 
nosis in each case is submitted for the information of the Police Commissioner. Accurate records are maintained, 
which aid in decisions affecting continuance in the service or retirement, as the case may be. 

Preventative medicines are furnished and administered by the Medical Examiner during any outbreak 
of communicable diseases that ma>- occur, such as influenza, poliomyelitis, etc. 

During the year 1959, 2,741 examinations were made, and the required diagnosis and prognosis submitted 
in each case. 



ADMINISTERING ANTI-POLIO SHOTS . 



COMPLETE PHYSICAL CHECK-UP . . . 





45 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 



Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, hmits the number of 
licenses to set up and use hackney carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, December i, 1958, to November 30, 1959, due 
to changes of ownership andiregrants, a total of *i,972 licenses were granted. 

There were 243 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., 
found in carriages during the year, which were turned over to the office of 
Inspector of Carriages. One hundred one of these were restored to the 
owners, and the balance of 142 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney 
carriages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 



Hackney Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage licenses received 

Carriages licensed (''renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 
Carriages licensed ("regrants") 




CAPT. WILLIAM J 



Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 

Carriages licensed — " changes of ownership " 

Carriage licenses in effect November 30, 1959 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1959 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 

Carriages inspected 

*256 "regrants" 

Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected 



iM J. 


TAYLOR 




1,972 


1,716 




256 






1,972 




447 




190 


1959 






1^525 




1,972 



Drivers' licenses granted 



Drivers' licenses revoked, ;i,^: of which revocations 23 were rescinded and the licenses restored; leaving 
the net figure shown of such revocations as 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1959 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1959 
(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 

Drivers' licenses suspended 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 



6,207 
123 

6,084 



10 

*5.764 

3 
638 

243 



'Includes 8 female hackney carriage drivers 



Public Taxicab Stands 

There are 388 established public taxicab stands, 
with capacity for 994 cabs, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for 
the occupation of private hacknej' stands (that is, 
upon private property) by licensed hackney carriage 
owners. 

During the year 27 applications (capacity, 373 
carriages) for such private hackney stands were 
granted. 



Sight-Seeing Automobiles 

During the year ending November 30, 1959, 
licenses for 19 sight-seeing automobiles were granted. 

There were 23 sight-seeing drivers' licenses 
granted. 

Hackney Carriage Violations 

During the past year, 638 tags were issued to 
taxicab drivers for various violations. Forty-three 
penalties were imposed, which included j,;^ revoca- 
tions. This system of discipline has continued to 
result in relieving courts of many minor cases which 
would tend to congest their dockets. 



46 



STATISTICS 



CITY PRISON 



The Citv Prison is located in the New Court House Building', Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within jurisdiction of the Central Mu- 
nicipal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper until 
the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by count>' authorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles .Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, December i, 1958, to November 30, 1959, 1,3,919 men were committed to the City Prison, 
as follows: 

Adultery 2 

Assault and battery 48 

Breaking and entering 3 

Dangerous weapons i 

Default -'o 

Drunkenness 1-2,272 

Fornication 4 

Fugitives from justice 19 

Illegitimacy S 

Larceny 31 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 8 

Lewdness i 

Nonsupport 33 

Polygamy i 

Rape 3 

Robbery i 

Safekeeping 109 

Suspicious persons 48 1 

Vagrancy . 2 

Violation of city ordinance 2 

Violation of drug law 9 

Violation of liquor law i 

Violation of Massachusetts automobile law 23 

Violation of park rules i 

Violation of probation 7 

Miscellaneous 832 

Total 13-919 

Two hundred and fort}--three male lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



47 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 



The House of Detention for Women is located in the New Court House building, Somerset street. All 
women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, and, unless otherwise released, are held in 
charge of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed b>- count>' authorities to the 
instituticn to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 



During the year 2,867 were committed as follows: 

Abandonment 

Abortion 

Adultery 

Assault and battery 

Delincjuent children 

Drunkenness 

Fornication 

Idle and disorderly 

Larceny 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 
Liquor law, violation of ... . 

Neglect of children 

Probation and parole, violation of 

Runaways 

Safekeeping 

Stubborn children .... 

Suspicious persons 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Thirteen women lodgers were receix-ed and cared for during the vear. 



I 
I 

17 
27 

3 

2>o33 

6 

63 
82 

30 
3 
6 

23 
15 

14 
8 

304 
231 

2,867 



THE NATION'S NUMBER ONE DRILL TEAM AND COLOR GUARD 




48 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 



There are 213 motor \ 


■ehic 


es in the service at the present time which 


are distril 


lutcd as follows 




Divisions 


Combination 

Patrol and 

Ambulances 


Passenger 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


-Motorcycles 


Totals 


Headquarters 
Division i 














2 


38 
3 


9 


— 


47 
5 


Division 2 . 














I 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 3 
Division 4 
Division 6 . 
Division 7 
Division g . 














I 

3 

2 
2 
2 


3 
7 
5 
5 
6 


— 


2 
4 
4 

I 


4 
12 
II 
II 

9 


Division 10 . 
Division 11 














2 

2 


5 
6 





2 

2 


9 
10 


Division 13 














I 


4 


— 


6 


II 


Division 14 . 
Division 15 . 
Division 16 , 
Division 17 . 
Division iS . 












■ 


2 
I 

2 

I 
I 


5 
4 
4 
4 
4 


— 


2 

3 

2 


9 
5 
6 

8 
7 


Division iq . 
Traffic Division 
Unassigned . 














2 
2 


5 

7 
10 


— 


2 
17 


9 
24 
12 


Totals 


29 


*I28 


g 


47 


213 



*Included in the total of 128 passenger automobiles there are 3 station wagons: I at Division 2; i at Division 9; and 
I at Division 18 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 



The department is equipped with combination 
3. 4, 6, 7, g, 10, II, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to 



Boston City Hospital .... 


9,812 


Massachusetts General Hospital . 


3,040 


Calls where services were not required 


1,836 


Boston State Hospital .... 


858 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital 


783 


Carney Hospital 


671 


Peter Bent Brigham HosjDital 


526 


Southern Mortuary .... 


381 


East Boston Relief Station . 


375 


Home 


30-' 


United States Veterans' Hospital 


25-' 


Faulkner Hospital 


249 


Beth Israel Hospital 


238 



142 

138 



automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Divisions i, 2, 

convey sick and injured persons to the following places: 

Children's Hospital 238 

Northern Mortuary 

Physicians' offices 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals . . 112 

Police station houses 81 

Chelsea Naval Hospital .... 65 

Boston Lying-in Hospital .... 50 

New England Hospital for Women . . 46 

St. Margaret's Hospital .... 41 

Psychopathic Hospital 38 

Roslindale General Hospital ... 37 

United States Public Health Hospital . 37 

Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital . 29 



49 



Deaconess Hospital 

Longwood Hospital 

Floating Hospital . 

Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 

Harley Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 

Soldiers' Home .... 

Washingtonian Hospital 

New England Baptist Hospital . 

Winthrop Community Hospital . 



27 Parker Hill Hospital 

iS Lemuel Shattuck Hospital 

17 Kenmore Hospital . 

16 Whidden Memorial Hospital 

15 Allerton Hospital . 

13 Milton Hospital 

12 Boston Sanatorium 

ic Lawrence Memorial Hospital 

g Metropolitan State Hospital 

8 Total 



20,545 



Automobile Maintenance 
General repairs, replacement of parts, supplies, and accessories 

Storage 

Gasoline 

Oil and grease 

Total 



$91,960. 19 

244.00 

87,470.06 

5,460.14 

1185,134.39 



Horses 

On December i, 1958, there were 13 saddle horses in the service, attached to Division 16. During the 
year 3 were retired and i purchased. At the present time there are 11 horses in service. 



PLEASE GIVE 




50 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON 



Year 


Canvass 


1903* 


iSi,o45 


1904 












19.V195 


1905 












194.547 


1906 












105,446 


1907 












1 9 5, goo 


1908 












201,552 


1909 












201,391 


19101 












203,603 


1911 












206,825 


1912 












214,178 


1913 












215,388 


1914 












219,364 


1915 












220,883 


1916t 












— 


1917 












221,207 


1918 












224,012 


1919 












227,466 


1920 












235,248 


1921§ 












480,783 


1922 












480,106 


1923 












477,547 


1924 












485,677 


1925 












489,478 


1926 












493,415 


1927 












495,7''7 


1928 












491,277 


1929 












493,250 


1930 












502,101 



Year 


Canvass 


1931 


500,986 


1932 








499,758 


1933 








501,175 


1934 








502,936 


1935II 








509,703 


1936 










514,312 


1937 










" ■520,838 


1938 










529,905 


1939 










534,230 


1940 










531,010 


1941 










541,335 


1942 










539,408 


1943 










540,517 


1944 










543,051 


1945 










549,899 


1946 










545,506 


1947 










551,145 


1948 










548,111 


1949 










544,898 


1950 










541,762 


1951 










534,418 


1952 










526,396 


1953 










i . 5^6,927 


19.S4 










506,072 


1955 








''. ' 


513,230 


1956 










501,671 


1957 










486,421 


1958 










474,032 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May i 
t 1910 listing changed to April i 

I 19 16 listing done by Board of Assessors 

§ 192 1 law changed to include women in listing 

II 1935 first year of listing as of January i, instead of April I 

The following shows the total number of persons listed in January of the present year: 

Male 212,725 

Female 252,742 

Total 465,467 



Listing Expenses 

The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, twenty years of age or more, not including the 
services rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list . . . $50,000.00 Rental of folding chairs and 

Newspaper notices . . 1,387.47 tables S122.00 

Stationery 5,608.07 

Directory 75 oc Total $57,192.54 



51 



January 2 
January 3 
January 4 
January 5 
January- 6 
January 7 
January 8 
January 9 
January 10 
January 11 
January 12 



N 


umber of Policemen 


Employed in Listing 




547 


January 13 . 




547 


January 14 






13-' 


January 15 






545 


January 16 






470 


January 17 






370 


January 18 






299 


January 19 






158 


January 20 






141 


January 21 






72 


January 22 






96 







91 

66 

49 
38 
27 

23 
19 
14 
II 

S 



Police Work on Jury Lists 

The Police Department under the provisions of Chapter 34S, Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commis- 
sioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 



The police findings in 1959 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 

Convicted of crime 

Unfit for various reasons 

Apparently fit 

Total 16,969 

The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department for delivery 11,916 summonses to persons for 
jury service. 



2,789 

377 
241 

1,702 

11,860 



THE SIXTH MEMBER OF THE PUGSLEY FAMILY JOINS THE FORCE . 





i\V 



\. 



/ 



A 




52 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the city, on a written application of any officer 
or board in charge of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of any responsible corporation or 
person, to be liable for the official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for the year commencing as of April i, 1959, 
were fingerprinted by the department, as has been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for by the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending November 30, 1959, there were 1,021 special police officers appointed; 2 applica- 
tions for appointment were refused for cause; 6 appointments were canceled for nonpayment of license fee; and i 
appointment was canceled for other reason. 



Appointments were made on applications received as follows 

From corporations and associations . 

From theaters and other places of amuseinent 

From city departments 

From churches 

From private institutions 

Total 



621 

144 

221 

30 

5 



1,021 




CHECKING BRASS CASINGS 



A "Reloading Unit" was established in the Department in March of 
1959 and is located in Division 19, the Mattapan Station. Deputy Superin- 
tendent Andrew Markhard. drillmaster, is in charge, and the unit is operated 
by Patrolman Spalding Sanden. 

A total of 14c, 7 10 rounds of first-class ammunition was manufactured 
during the remainder of the fisoal year, which was used in the training of 
patrolmen in the handling of firearms and in pistol team matches. 

It is anticipated that the reloading unit will produce a total of over 
200,000 rounds of ammunition during this year, 196c, which will result in 
substantial saving to the city. 




MOULDING 38-CALIBER BULLETS 



53 

Pistols, Revolvers, and Machine Guns 
The follcwinj^ table sl:cws tlie number of applications made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to 
carry pistols or revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the num- 
ber of such applications granted, and the number rejected: 



Year 


Applications 


Granted 


Rejected 


1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 


2,8qq 
2,825 
2,476 
2,163 
i.oSo 


2,828 
2,740 
2,410 
2,046 
*ti,oi7 


71 
8S 
57 
117 
72 



* Incluiles I no fee, 3 withdrawn, and 14 licenses to possess macliine guns 

t The effect of Chapter 688, Acts of 1957, changed license period from one to two years, accounting for decrease in number of 
licenses granted 



Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns, and Rifles — Gunsmiths 





Applications 


Granted 

1050 


Rejected 


Gunsmiths 

Firearms dealers 

Shotguns and rifles 

Permits to purchase 


b 

14 

7 
I 


b 

14 
7 






I 



Public Lodging Houses 

Public lodging houses licensed by the Police Commissioner under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections ^y 
36, G. L. iTer. Ed.), showing locations and numljcr of lodgers accommodated: 



Location 


Number 
Lodged 


61 Brookline avenue 

1-3 Dover street 

287 Hanover street 

8 Pine street 

87 Vernon street ' . . . . 

Total 


1,744 
2,671 

S95 
66,231 

256 

71,797 



54 



PROPERTY CLERK 



The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all lost, stolen, and abandoned property, money, 
or other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and property taken from persons arrested 
for any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come into the posses- 
sion of the department. 

All orders for supplies, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year 182 motor vehicles came into custody of this office; 40 vehicles were returned to legitimate 
claimants and 130 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 80 motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of department automobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. Dur- 
ing the vear, on 7,578 occasions, department cars were repaired and, on 2,274 occasions, cars were serviced. One 
hundred thirty-one department cars and 167 privately owned cars were towed by the department wrecker. The 
department operates a motorcycle repair shop where, on 803 occasions, motorcycles were rejxiired and serviced 
during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all 
garages in the various divisions, and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department 
vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand December i, 1958 389 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 1959 272 

Total 661 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 108 

Worthless 97 

Perishable articles delivered to Overseers of Public Welfare 4 

Sold at public auction 131 

Total number of articles disposed of 340 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, 1959 321 



IN MEMORIAM 




55 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



The following is a list of the special events which occurred durino; the year, giving the number of police 
detailed for dutv at each: 



I9}S 



Dec. 


I 


Dec. 


^ 


Dec. 


5 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


lo 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


2 3 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


29 


Dec. 


31 


W 


i9 


Jan. 


25 


Feb. 


2 


Feb. 


2 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


•5 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 


26 


Feb. 


26 


Feb. 


28 


Mar. 


3 


Mar. 


6 


Mar. 


7 


Mar. 


12 


Mar. 


14 


Mar. 


15 


Mar. 


17 


Mar. 


19 


Mar. 


20 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


22 


Mar. 


22 


Mar. 


26 


Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


30 


April 


I 


April 


4 


April 


4 


April 


1 1 


April 


15 


April 


16 


April 


16 


April 


18 


April 


18 



Parade of the Holy Name Societies 

Funeral of Patrolman James V. McCabe 

Parade of Boston College alumni and students .... 
Boston Garden, Boston Police Relief Association Ball . 

\'isit of Pat Boone, television star 

Funeral of Lieutenant Patrick L. Mulvey 

f^eparture of Richard Cardinal Cushing and his party for Rome 

Boston Police Department Band participation in the Boston Clolir Santa Fund Drive 

Funeial of Deputy Superintendent Francis G. Wilson . . 

Christmas Eve carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

Funeral of Patrolman George E. Smith ......... 

New Year's Eve celebrations 



Janus 



Mothers' March on Polio in connection with the March of Dimes 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Class of 1959 of St. Jolin's Seminary receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders 

Holy Name Church, West Roxbury, Class of 1959 of St. John's Seminary receiving the Sacrament of Holy Orders 

Boy Scout Sunday, ceremony at Holy Cross Cathedral 

Boston Garden, Boston j4 mcr;co» Silver Skate Carnival 

Heart Fund collections by volunteers 

State House, reception of His Excellency Governor Foster Furcolo .... 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, "Going Away" services for the Missionary Society of St 
Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Consecration Ceremonies of Bishop James Schucckosin 
Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, "Ladies' Night" 

Funeral of Patrolman Rudolph B. Slamin 

Funeral of Fire Commissioner Francis X. Cotter 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboy basketball game . . 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboy basketball game .... 
Boston Garden, New England schoolboy basketball game .... 
Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency state-wide natural disaster exercise 

Funeral of Right Reverend Richard J. Haberlin 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Catholic Youth Organisation Camp Fire Sund,- 

South Boston, Evacuation Day parade 

Boston Garden, schoolboy basketball play-off game 

Boston Garden, schoolboy basketball play-off game . . 

Boston Garden, schoolboy basketljall play-ofi game 

Visit of His Excellency Sean T. O'Kelly, Presiilent of Ireland, and his party 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Sean T. O'Kelly, Pre.sident of Ireland, and Mrs. O'Kelly attend 

\'isit of Sean T. O'Kelly, President of Ireland, to the Roberts Center, Boston College . 

Funeral of Patrolman A. C. Fitzgerald 

Easter parade 

Parade to Kenmore Theatre 

Funeral of Sergeant Thrjmas A. Gormley 

South Station, arrival of Archbishop Seon Manogian, head of the Armenian Churcii of Ame.i.M 

Cathedral Club road race 

N.A.A.C.P. motorcade parade 

City of Boston Public Works Department parade 

Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity of Boston University parade 

Symphony Hall, musical demonstration by Sisters and pupils of the Catholic schools . 
Symphony Hall, musical demonstration by Sisters and pupils of the Catholic schools . 
Franklin Park, White Stadium, Civil Defense alert test 



High Mas 



56 



TQ.IQ 


Apiil 


ly 


April 


20 


April 


20 


April 


20 


April 


25 


April 


25 


April 


26 


April 


27 


April 


28 


May 


I 


May 


I 


May 


2 


May 


2 


May 


7 


May 


9 


May 


9 


May 


12 


May 


13 


May 


14 


May 


i6 


May 


17 


May 


17 


May 


17 


May 


17 


May 


i8 


May 


20 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


24 


May 


27 


May 


27 


May 


29 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


31 


June 


I 


June 


3 


June 


7 


June 


8 


June 


10 


June 


II 


June 


II 


June 


12 


June 


14 


June 


14 


June 


14 


June 


16 


June 


16 


June 


17 


June 


17 



.\fcn 



i^ir pilgrimage l<; 



Nation 



Dorchester, St. Peter's Holy Child Baseball League parade and liaseball game 

City of Boston Patriots' Day celebiations and parade 

Boston Athletic Association Marathon 

Logan Airport, East Boston, departure of Richard Cardinal Cushing and party on tl 
Our Lady of Lourdes in France 

Visit of Fidel Castro, Prime Minister of Cuba 

Visitors to U.S.S. "'Wasp" at South Boston Naval Annex 

Massachusetts National Guard, loist Infantry Regiment parade .... 

Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's Relief Fund Annual Concert and Ball . 

American Cancer Association, house collections 

Massachusetts Bar Association Centennial Salute to the Superior Court . 

Boston Technical High School Cadets parade 

Parkway Little League, parade and baseball game at Little League Field 

East Boston, Little League parade and baseball game at the American Legion Park 

Boston University, U.S. Army R.O.T.C. parade 

Allston, South, Little League parade and basel)aU game at Smith Playground 

Interfraternity Conference, I\LLT., parade 

Columbia Pictures parade 

State of Israel Anniversary parade 

Franklin Field, Dorchester, annual celebration commemorating the Birth of the Israel 

Claremont Neighborhood Association parade 

Holy Cross Cathedral, U.S.O. Armed Forces Religious Emphasis Day in Bojton . 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday 

St. Francis de Sales Church, Roxbury, Boston Fire Department Mas3 and Communion Breakfast 

N.A.A.C.P. meeting and parade 

Funeral of Patrolman Charles Doherty 

City Hall, Mayor's Field Day activities 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Massachusetts Catholic Daughters Annual May Day Mass 

Protestant Laymen's Communion Breakfast 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Sunday 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion, parade 

Holy Trinity Church, South End, Military Mass 

Holy Cross Cathedral, Annual Mass and Communion Breakfast of Local 25 . 

Charlestown, All Veterans Committee parade 

City Hall, Mayor's Field Day activities 

Parade of the Boston vSchool Cadets 

South End, Little League parade and baseball game 

Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day 

Back Bay, AMVETS parade 

Cecil Fogg Post American Legion parade 

Boston Park Department cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day 

Open House at St. John's Seminary 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade 

City Hall, Mayor's Field Day activities 

I\It. Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial exercises 

Boston College Commencement exercises 

City Hall, Mayor's Field Day activities 

State House, National Lancers escort for His Excellency Governor Foster Furcolo to Harvard University 

Explosion at M.T.A., North Station 

Dorchester Lower Mills, Knights of Columbus road race 

Foiest Hills Cemetery, Boston Fiiemen's Memorial Day exercises . 

Polish Legion of American \'eterans 

Boston Common, 94th Infantry Division formal review in honor of Major General Ralph A. Pallidino 

Funeral of Patrolman Cornelius J. McNeil 

Charlestown, "Night Before" Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street duty, traffic duty, 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street duty, block parties, dances, and historical pageant 



md lianquets 



S!irin3 of 



57 



10 


59 


June 


IS 


June 


19 


June 


21 


June 


22 


June 


27 


June 


21 


June 


28 


June 


28 


June 


29 


June 


30 


July 


I 


July 


,^ 


July 


4 


July 


/ 


July 


7 


July 


/ 


July 


" 


July 


7 


July 


/ 


July 


I.S 


July 


19 


July 


20 


July 


25 


Aug. 


I 


Aug. 


I 


Aug. 


2 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


26 


Aug. 


28 


Aug. 


3" 


Sept. 


I 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


>3 


Sept. 


15 


Sept. 


15 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


19 


Sept. 


20 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


27 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


3 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


••5 


Ort. 


6 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


8 



Hartford R, 



ines in C 



lilr 



Funeral of Right Reverend Francis A. Burke .... 

Stoughton street, Dorchester, Daily Vacation Bible School parade 

Roxbury, parade of St. John the Baptist Confraternity 

Mayor's Charity Field Day at Fenway Park 

Fourth Marine Division Association parade .... 

AMYETS parade 

St. Margaret of Scotland Guild, Inc., parade 

Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Masons parade .... 

Our Lady of Victories, South End, Mass attended by the Archdiocese of Bo.-;ton Pilgrims to the Sh 

WBZ parade 

Discontinuance of service on the Old Colony Division of the New York, New Haven tS 

City of Boston Parks and Recreation Department Independence Day celebrations 

Independence Day parade 

Boston Common, Independence Day band concert and fireworks displaj' 

Columbus Park, South Boston, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display 

East Boston, Independence Day band concert and firewcjrks display 

Jamaica Plain, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display 

Smith Field, Allston, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display . 

Franklin Field, Dorchester, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display 

Columbia Stadium, South Boston, drum and bugle corps exhibition 

\'isit of the Chiefs of Police from Connecticut 

"Jimmy Fund" Ijaseball game at Fenway Paik 

South Boston Naval Annex, visit of H.M.S. "V^ictorious" 

North End, .Societa Agrippina of Minea parade 

Funeral of Patrolman Frederick W. Almeida 

North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Minea parade 

North End, Santa Maria .S.S. Delia Cava Society parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso DiSciacca parade 

North End, Son Rocio di Anzcsne Society parade 

Funeral of Patrolman John F. McNichols .... 

North End, St. Anthony's Feast Day parade 

North End, St. Anthony's Feast Day parade 

Strike of the Prudential Insurance Company agents 

Archdiocesan Labor Institute parade and Mass at St. James Church 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, His Eminence Richard Cardinal Gushing, celebration of 
for Gray Nuns of Lexington ........... 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Bunker Hill Monument, Crusade of Prayers 

Northeastern University parade 

Parade of the employees of the City of Boston, Hospital Department 

American National Latvian League in Boston, Inc., parade 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Funeral of Patrolman Simon W. Varakis 

Funeral of Patrolman Charles N. Walker 

Preliminary Election 

Cathedral of the Holy Ci OSS, Opera "Murder in the Cathedral" .... 

Visit of the " Lone Ranger," radio and TV star 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity . 

Departure of the Ancient ami Honoralile Artillery Company for Europe 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, "Red Mass" 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" parade and exhibition drill on Boston C 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football game 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" parade ami exhibition drill at Clear 

Sack Theatres parade ............. 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" ])arade and exhibition drill at Summer and Washington 

WCfJP parade 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" p.arade and exhibition drill at Dock square 



;inada 



Solemn Requiem High 



[uare, Hyde Park 



Ma 



^treets 



ss 



'<J59 
Ucl. 9 


Ocl. 


1 1 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Ocl. 


15 


Ocl. 


i6 


Oct. 


l8 


Oct. 


l8 


Ocl. 


22 


Ocl. 


25 


Ocl. 


30 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


I 


Nuv. 


I 


Nov. 


I 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


lO 


Nov. 


1 1 


Nov. 


1 1 


Nov. 


II 


Nov. 


15 


Nov. 


17 


Nov. 


I8 


Nov. 


22 


Nov. 


23 


Nov. 


23 


Nov. 


26 


Nov. 


27 


Nov. 


29 



Keninore siiiuire, "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration . 
Boston Parks and Recreation Oeparlment football games . 

Columbus Day parade 

( )livia James House, South Boston, road race 

\'isit of Crown Prince Asfa Wossen and party from Ethiopia 

Aleppo Temple Shrine parade 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games . 
Polish-American Women's Club of South Boston parade 
Rally of Filene's employees in connection with the United Fund Campaign 
Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games . 

Collins for Mayor street parade 

Halloween celebrations 

Cathedral of the HcjI)' Cross, Girl Scout Sunday . 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games . 

"Build a Better Boston" street parade 

City Election 

Funeral of Patrolman Leonard Allen 

Saint Ann's, Dorchester, Holy Name Society parade . 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games . 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, looth Anniversary of the Sisters of Charity 

\'eterans Administration parade 

Department of Massachusetts, American Legion, Veterans' Day parade . 

Olivia James House, South Boston, road race 

Boston University parade 

Boston Sanatorium, 50th Anniversary 

Metropolitan District Police Relief Association Biennial Ball 

Pilgrimage to National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington 

Boston College Stadium, Annual Boston Park League Championship football game 

Sack Theatres parade 

Funeral of Dr. Sara Jordan, cofounder of the Lahey Clinic 

White Stadium, South Boston and East Boston High Schools footb.all gam 

Boston College Gold Key Society parade 

Sunday visitors to the Christmas displays in downtown Boston 



Men 
. 20 

.,•25 

120 

10 

10 

10 

25 
10 

50 
25 
10 

570 

15 

25 

10 

1,220 

35 
10 

27 
15 
10 
440 
10 
10 
10 

15 
10 
40 
10 
10 
40 

ID 

35 



Note 

December i, 1958, to January 5, it)Sq, inclusive, 6 officers performed a total of 216 duties for that period 
in connection with the Citv of Boston decorations in the vicinity of Boston Pttblic Garden. 

December i, iqsS, to January 7, igsg. inclusive, 36 officers performed a total of 1,368 duties for that 
period in connection with the City of Boston Festival on Boston Common. 

March 10, iQSO, to March 15, iqso, inclusive, 15 officers perforined a total of 9c duties for that period in 
connection with the Horticultural Society Flower Show at Symphon>- Hall. 

March 23, 1959, to March 25, 1959, inclusive, 18 officers performed a total of 54 duties for that period 
in connection with the Garment Workers' Union labor dispute. 

April 13, 1959, to April 19, 1959, inclusive, 6 officers performed a total of 42 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the Metropolitan Opera at the Metropolitan Theatre. 

Tune 5, igsg. to June 28, 1959, inclusive, 45 officers performed a total of 1,080 duties for that period in 
connection with the Boston Arts Festival display on the Public Garden. 

June 22, 1959, to June 27, 1959, inclusive, 8 officers performed a total of 48 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the visit of Mayor Gizo Tahayama of Kyoto, Japan, and his party. 

November 25, 1959, to November 30, 1959. inclusive, 36 officers performed a total of 216 duties for that 
period in connection with the City of Boston Christmas decorations on Boston Common. 



59 




Miscellaneous Business 





I'fS'J 57 


11)57-5''^ 


195^^-59 


Abandoned children cared for ... 


.>,■> 


28 


3 - 


Building^s found open and made secure 














4,140 


3>4S4 


2,qS6 


Dangerous buildings reported 
















5 '5 


67 


71 


Dangerous chimneys reported 
















17 


12 


17 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 
















828 


826 


925 


Defective drains and vaults reported 
















5 


y 


2 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 
















3 


7 


7 


Defective gas pipes reported 
















7 


7 


6 


Defective hydrants reported 
















10 


16 


10 


Defective street lights reported . 
















2,762 


2,400 


1,014 


Defective sewers reported 
















54 


71 


51 


Defective streets and walks reported 
















I, '140 


1. 75 1 


1,081 


Defective water pipes reported 
















1,^0 


68 


48 


Fire alarms given 
















9,080 


7,Sqo 


10,150 


Fires extinguished 
















652 


749 


636 


Insane persons taken in charge . 
















q6o 


783 


1,098 


Lost children restored ... 
















1 ,088 


809 


778 


Number of persons committed to bail 
















2,704 


2,782 


2,681 


Persons rescued from drowning . 
















5 


7 


17 


Sick and injured persons assisted 
















20,(K)5 


18,765 


21,167 


Street obstructions removed 
















41 


30 


34 


Water running to waste reported 
















.^7t) 


275 


276 



Pensions and Benefits 
On December i, 1958, there were 828 persons on the pension roll. During the year ,^6 died, viz., i lieutenant, 
3 sergeants, 27 patrolmen, 3 civilians, and 2 annuitants. Forty-seven were added, viz., i lieutenant, 7 sergeants, 32 
patrolmen, i patrolwoman, and 6 annuitants, leaving 839 on roll at date, 719 pensioners and 120 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during the year amounted to $1,856,373.71. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted to $207,550. There are 25 beneficiaries of the 
fuml at the present time, and there has been paid to them the sum of $4,202 during the year. 



6o 




FINIS 



6i 



BOSTON POLICE --IN EARLY YEARS 



In the common law a constable is called a 
"peace" officer or "conservator of the peace." 

In the civilization which produced the common 
law, this public duty was imposed locally upon officers 
called constables, selected for the purpose from the 
inhabitants of the parishes or townships which they 
served. These officers were armed with very large 
powers of quelling threatened or incipient breaches of 
the peace, arresting without warrants, imprisoning, 
breaking open houses, and the like. One of their i^rin- 
cipal duties was to keep watch and ward, similar in 
main purpose to the day and night patrol of a police 
department, "ward, guard, or custodian" being chiefly 
intended for the day to apprehend rioters and robbers 
on the highway, while "watch" was applicable to 
night onlv. 



On April 12, i6ji, it 'd'as ordered by "court" that icalches 
he set at sunset, and two days later a " Court of Guard" was estab- 
lished. This, the first Boston "-catch," was continued until on 
February 27, i6_j6, the selectmen ordered a watch. Citizens per- 
formed this duty under a penalty of a fine for failing to comply. 



The constable had to be of good character 
and an actual resident of the parish he served. No 
salary was attached to this position. His personal 
presence in the parish was indispensable, for he was 
presumed to be known to all the inhabitants of the 
parish and they were all bound to obey his orders and 
to aid and assist him whenever called upon in the 
exercise of his lawful authority. Strangers could not 
long remain in the community without his knowledge, 
nor little could go on without coming to his ears. 



In ijni the watch was increased to fifteen and permission 
was requested to prosecute those who abused them while they were 
performing their duty. In lyio walchboxes were set up in various 
parts of the town, and in the year lyii fire wards were appointed. 



As cities grew up and crimes increased, however, 
defects developed in the method of policing by con- 
stables. Without adequate compensation, the con- 
stables could not aff'ord to devote the time required to 
properl}' safeguard the peace. Then again, if there 
were several constables in a communitv, each was an 




independent officer, and there was no system com- 
pelling them to cooperate with each other. In short, 
while the common-law constables possessed practically 
the same ])owers as those of the modern police, they 
ceased to be adequate instruments for preserving the 
peace when conditions of society became more complex. 
This was due to the lack of singleness of purpose, 
cooperation, and discipline which are fundamental 
features of every good police department of modern 
times. 



On May 14, I7(J(^, the Legislature passed an act under 
which the Boston watch was reorganized. The watchmen carried a 
badge of office — a hook 7:'illi n hill — mid a rattle. 



The offices of constable and of the watch and 
ward were transplanted in Massachusetts with the 
common law, but, with the growth of Boston into a 
city, the method of policing by the common-law con- 
stables apparently became inadequate. By a law 
passed in i6gg it was provided that in cases where 
no military watch was established justices of the 
peace, acting with the selectmen of a town, or, in case 
no justice of .the peace dwelt in the town, the select- 
men alone, could order a suitable watch nightly from 
nine o'clock in the evening until sunrise the next day 
and the place or places where the same should be kept. 



62 




and also a "ward" on the Lord's day and otlier days, 
and apijoinl the members of such watch and ward. 



In 1812, on the Declaration of War with England, 100 
special police ixre appointed, and the permanent watch was in- 
creased to forty-six men. On February 23, 1S22, the Legislature 
passed an act establishing the City of Boston, and the new Police 
Court held its first session on June 20 of that year. 



The act also required that the watchmen should 
walk the rounds in and about the inhabited parts of 
the town to prevent any danger by lire, and to see 
that good order was kept. All male persons in the town 
of the age of sixteen year.s or upward, being able- 
bodied and having certain property qualifications, 
were made liable to keep watch and ward. The serv- 
ices of these members of the watch and ward were 
compulsory, and no provision was made for their com- 
pensation. 



On May 26, 1854, at precisely 6 p.m., under an act passed 
the previous year, the Boston watch and police ceased to exist and the 
"Boston Police Department" came into being. It consisted of 
approximately 250 men under a Chief of Police, and the "old" 
watch hook, after being in use for i$4 years, gave way to the club. 
The night men, however, retained the rattle. 



By chapter 5 of the Province Laws of 1761-62, 
the selectmen of Boston were authorized to choose 
not exceeding thirty of the inhabitants to serve as 
watchmen, the town "agreeing to pay the charge," 
and to appoint one of each division of the watch to be 



head or constaljle of that division. This act, which 
was originally to continvie for tliree years, was revive<.l 
from time to time until No\-einber i, 17S5, when it 
linally expired. 

By chapter 26 of the Acts of 1801, the select- 
men of Boston were authorized to appoint such a 
number of watchmen as they deemed expedient, to be 
paid by the town, together with a head constable to 
superintend the watch, and a constable for each divi- 
sion of the watch. The constables of divisions were to 
report every morning to the head constable "an ac- 
count of their doings and of the state of the town 
during the night," which was later brought to the 
attention of the selectmen. 



//; 1S60 a sailboat was purchased for the Harbor Police to 
facilitate their protection of the water front. In 1S71 the "Central 
Office" of the Police Department was put in communication with all 
police stations through the means of telegraph. 



Under the city charter of 1S22, the administra- 
tion of the "police" was transferred from the select- 
men to the mayor and aldermen of the city. 

It was not until the passage of an act in 185.5, 
however, that the creation of an organization ap- 
proaching the present conception of a police depart- 
ment was authorized. By this act, the City Council 
was authorized to unite b\- ordinance the watch and 



63 



police departments of the city and to establish regula- 
tions therefor. 



In 1S74 mounted police were introduced for the first time 
and twenty-eight horses were provided. During this year the first 
police steamer, "The Protector," 7i'as built, equipped, and com- 
missioned. 



It was further provided that the mayor and 
aldermen should have all the powers and duties in 
relation to the officers and policemen which they had 
over the watchmen and the police of the city. 



The ajjpointmeiit and coiitnil of police officers 
of the department continued vested in the mayor and 
aldermen until 1878, when a board of police com- 
missioners, three in number, appointed by the mayor, 
was created. 

In 1885 the administration of the department 
was transferred to a board of three appointed by the 
Governor. 

In igoO the administration of the departmenr 
was transferred to a single police commissioner ap- 
pointed by the governor. 




The First City in the United States to Use an Automobile As a Police 
Cruiser Was Boston. Placed in Service at Station 16 in July, 1903, It Covered 
About 60 Miles a Day Through the Back Bay District. Chauffeur-Driven, 
a Uniformed Officer Rode on a Seat High Enough "to Allow Him to Look 
Over the Back Fences." 



STATISTICAL TABLES 



M --C — 



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64 



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102 


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Die.sel and C.as. Eng. Operator 
Director. Signal Sei'vicc 
.\ssistanl Director . 
lOU'vator ( )perators 
l-'.levator ( )perator-Laborers . 
I'iremen (Stationar\-) 
I'ireman (Steam) 

Hostlers 

Janitors 

Janitresses .... 

Laborers 

Laborer-Relief Operator 

Linemen 

Machinist .... 
Mati-on, Chief 
Matron, Assistant Chief 
Matrons, Assistant 
Mechanics .... 
Medical Examiner . 
Painter and Groundman 
Property Clerk 
Reiiairman .... 
Senior Building Custodian 
Junior Building Custodians . 
Shorthand Reporters 
Signalmen .... 
Statistical Machine Operators 
Statistician 
Stenographers . 
Telephone ( )])erators 


1 



65 



66 



TABLE II 

Changes in Authorized and Actutd Strength of Police Defartment 





Authorized 
Strength 


ACTUAI 


. Strength 




Ranks and Grades 


Nov. 30 
1959 


Nov. 30 
1959 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
( Plus or 
Minus) 




Police Commissioner 


1 


1 


- 




Secretary 


1 


1 


— 




Confidential Secretary 


1 


1 


— 




Assistant Secretaries 


2 


2 


— 




Legal Advisor 


1 


1 


— 




Superintendent 


1 


1 


— 




Deputy Superintendents 


4 


4 


— 




Captains 


32 


27 


Minus 5 




Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 


85 


81 


Minus 4 




Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 


238 


237 


Minus 1 




Patrolmen 


*2,501 


2,453 


Minus 48 




Patrolwomen 


tl2 


6 


Minus 6 




Totals 


2,879 


2,815 


Minus 64 



' Include.- 192 Dricrtivc-Patrolmcii 
t Inchules 2 Detcctivc-Patrolwomfii 



67 



TABLE III 

Uist of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the Year Ending 

November 30, 1959 



r.AXK 


Name 


Division 


Date of Death 


Cause of Death 


Patrolman . 


Charles M. Walker 


2 


Sept. 17, 


1959 


Heai-t trouble 


Patrolman 


Simon W. Varakis 


4 


Sept. 18, 


1959 


Accident 


Lieutenant . 


Patrick J. Muivey 


6 


Dec. 6, 


1958 


Diabetes 


Patrolman 


Fretlerick W. Almeida 


7 


July 29, 


1959 


Heart tionblc 


Sergeant 


Thomas A. fiorinlcy 


8 


]\Lu'. 30, 


1959 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman . 


Leonard Allen 


8 


Oct. 31, 


1959 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


George W. Allen 


',) 


Ocl. 17, 


1959 


Accident 


Patrolman 


Charles Doherty 


9 


May 15, 


1959 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman . 


Ivudnlph B. Slamin 


16 


Feb. 22, 


1959 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


.loim F. MeXichola.s 


16 


Aug. 24, 


1959 


Diabetes 


Patrolman 


George E. Smith 


17 


Dec. 25, 


1958 


Accident 


Patrolman 


Cornelius J. McNeil 


19 


.June 13, 


1959 


Pneumonia 


Patrolman . 


Mifhael A. C. iMtzgei-ald 


Traffic 


Mar. 22, 


1959 


Carcinoma 


Deputy-Superintend- 
ent .... 


Francis G. Wilson 


Bui-eau of Criminal 
Livestigation 


Dec. 20, 


li)5S 


Heart trouble 


Detective-Pat r( )1 m a n 


.John J. Comiiilly 


Bureau of Criminal 

Investigation 


.Ian. 27. 


19.i9 


Heart troulilc 



68 



TABLE IV 

Members of Departinetit Retired During tlie Year Ending November 30, 1959, Giving Age 
at the Tim^e of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each 



Name 










Cause of Rcti 


■em( lit 






Age at Time 
of Retirement 


Y'ears of 
Service 








Augusta, Ail lion R. (5) 


3'J Years' Service .... 


(i5 


37 


B:iliszewsl<i, Waiter J. (:i) 










Incapacitated 










35 


10 


Blaol<, Wiiiiam 11. (5) . 










30 Years' Service 










65 


38 


Boland, Joseph F. . 










Incapacitated 










m 


38 


Braniey, Joseph M. (I?) . 










Incapacitated 










32 


7 


Bresnahan, John C. 










Incapacitated 










(13 


39 


Brogan, Henry F. (3) . 










Incapacitated 










(15 


29 


Bi'ooics, Eugene A. (5) . 










30 Years' Service 










(14 


39 


Christensen, Jaeoi) ^I. . 










Incapacitated 










(18 


39 


Coleman, Francis C. 










Incapacitated 










(1(1 


39 


Coleman, Peter F. . 










Incapacitated 










(IS 


39 


Collins, James J. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










(11 


32 


Connolly, Thomas J. 










Incapacitated 










(11) 


39 


Connor, John E. (2) 










Incapacitated 










5(j 


29 


Daly, Etiward J. 










Incapacitated 










07 


39 


DeFranzo, John F. (4) . 










Incapacitated 










45 


7 


Delamere, Clifford P. (1) 










Incajjacitatcd 










39 


15 


Dohertv, George E. 










Incapacitated 










()5 


39 


Donnell, Frederick J. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










03 


32 


Donovan, Francis V. 










Incapacitated 










65 


39 


Donovan, Henry A. 










Incapacitated 










66 


39 


Dooley, James F. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










05 


32 


Enos, Edmund F. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










02 


32 


Fitzgerald, James W. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










00 


32 


Fli )pin, Willis J. 










Incapacitated 










02 


37 


Ga lant, Lawrence E. 










Incapacitated 










05 


39 


Galvin, James J. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










65 


38 


Gavin, Joseph D. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










63 


30 


Golden, Peter T. (3) 










Incapacitated 










00 


35 


Grimes, Samuel J. . 










Incapacitated 










68 


39 


Halleran, Martin J. (3) 










Incapacitated 










00 


29 


Kreinsen, Charles L. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










62 


35 


Lawience, Artliur M. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










65 


39 


Long, William H. . 










Incapacitated 










05 


39 


Lyden, James P. (3) 










Incapacitated 










46 


16 


MacDonald, Harold F. (3) 










Incapacitated 










34 


11 


Madden, John J. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










57 


30 


Mahoney, \Mlliam J. (3) 










Age 










(15 


32 


McBrearty, Joseph (.5) . 










30 Years' Service 










(14 


32 


MoUoy, John H. . 










Incapacitated 










65 


39 


Mortelle, John J., Jr. (3) 










Incapacitated 










61 


34 


Murphy, James J. (3) . 










Age 










65 


31 


Murjjhy, Joseijh L. 










Incapacitated 










72 


39 


Murphv, Michael J. 










Incapacitated 










05 


39 


INIurphy, Thomas \j. (4) 










Age 










70 


48 


McCarthy, Michael J. . 










Incapacitated 










66 


39 


McHugh, ALirgaret M. . 










Incapacitated 










65 


38 


McKeon, Patrick F. 










Incapacitated 










60 


39 


McManus, Frank (1) 










Age . . . 










70 


21 


Neidzvecki, Stanley A. (5) 










30 Y'ears' Service 










02 


34 


O'Hara, Daniel J. . 










Incapacitated 










05 


39 


Peterson, Albert E. (3) . 










Age .... 










58 


31 


Ryan, George R. (3) 










Incapacitated 










30 


2 


Schofield, John F. (1) . 










Incapacitated 










41 


13 


Sheridan, John J. . . . 










Incapacitated 










65 


38 


Skrickus, Edward R. (3) 










Incapacitated 










48 


19 


Smith, William F. . 










Incapacitated 










65 


39 


Sweeney, James A. 










Incapacitated 










05 


36 


Tiernan, Arthur M. 










Incapacitated 










65 


39 


Tohin, John F. (3) . 










Age .... 










01 


33 



(1) Retired under Boston Retirement System 

(2) Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 57 

(3) Retired under State-Boston Retirement System 

(4) Civilians retired under State-Boston Retirement System 

(5) Retired Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58 



69 



TABLE V 

Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending November 30, 1959 



Date 



Rank and Name 



1958 

Deccmljer 24 
1959 



Caiitain Francis M. Tiernan to rank of Depnty Fnpcrintendcnt 



June 19 


Patrolman Lester J. Brennan to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Philip C. Brennan to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Palrolman Charles T. ("ohh to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Francis J. Collins to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman George F. Delaney to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Richard T. Fay to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Charles E. Hall, Jr., to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Henry II. Iluling to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman N. Albert Malaguti to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Daniel O'Coinicll to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Edward .1. O'Neil to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Herbert C. Rodday, Jr., to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman \\'illiam J. Ryan to rank of Sergeant 


June 19 


Patrolman Robert T. Whitley to rank of Sergeant 



70 



TABLE VI 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1959, Who Were Appointed 

in the Year Indicated 



Date oi- 

Al'l'OINTMENT 








Lieutenants and 
Lieutenant- 
Detectives 


Sergeants 
and 

Sergeant- 
Detectives 


Detectives — 
First, Second, 
and Third Grade 


1% 

-S p 


Totals 


1916 








1 









1 


1919 . 










— 


2 


3 


4 


12 


1 


24 


49 


1920 . 










— 


— 


1 


1 


7 


4 


11 


24 


1921 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


— 


6 


11 


1922 . 










— 


— 


2 


5 


1 


4 


— 


12 


1923 . 










— 


1 


4 


1 


3 


3 


3 


15 


1924 . 










— 


— 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


9 


1925 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


6 


3 


9 


20 


1926 . 










— 


— 


4 


8 


7 


9 


38 


66 


1927 . 










1 


1 


— 


2 


4 


6 


20 


34 


1928 . 










— 


— 


1 


- - 


3 


3 


17 


24 


1929 . 










— 


— 


1 


7 


24 


11 


61 


104 


1930 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


•) 




<» 


15 


1931 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


5 


9 


1937 . 










— 


— 


4 


13 


41 


14 


57 


129 


1940 . 










— 


— 


5 


11 


34 


7 


44 


101 


1941 . 










— 


— 


— 


3 


5 


7 


30 


45 


1942 . 










— 


— 


— 


5 


33 


lit 


73 


130 


1943 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


<) 


9 


31 


51 


1944 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


18 


73 


98 


1945 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


1 


3 


31 


37 


1946 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


17 


14 


170 


205 


1947 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


15 


139 


161 


1948 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


/ 


4 


119 


130 


1949 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


3 


121 


125 


1950 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


151 


156 


1951 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10 


270 


280 


1952 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


79 


81 


1953 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


103 


106 


1954 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


99 


103 


1955 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


97 


104 


1956 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


121 


123 


1957 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


121 


121 


1958 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


95 


95 


1959 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


35 


Totals 


1 


4 


27 


81 


237 


194 


2,265 


2,809 



TABLE VII 

Members of Police Force on November 30, 1959, \V ho Were Born in Year Indicated 















0; 




































^ ^ 






Date ok 
Birth 


-r 


~ 




z- i ■'.- 


X. *^ > 


,'§o 

0) aj.S 




Totals 




'% 


.£i 


— 


"^ r-'^ 


^ ~ -^ 


>a3 J5 


S is 






1 


S — 


z 


^ tt c^ 


j.' _ Si 


^ 'P -r^ 


p ^ 






r 


5^ 


s- 


-■^ -^ .^ 


■~ — -7 ^ 


^ jC r 


~ ^ 






Y, 




^ 


' — ' 


■J. '■ ' 


^ 


— 




1888 


_ 


_ 




1 








1 


1889 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 








1 


1 


1891 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 








2 


2 


1892 










— 


— 


— 


— 


2 





3 


5 


1893 










— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


3 


5 


1894 










— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


3 


6 


14 


1895 










— 


— 


1 


3 


6 


6 


23 


42 


1896 










— 


2 


3 


>) 


9 


5 


25 


46 


1897 










— 


1 


3 


.") 


12 


1 


||,» 


41 


1898 . 










-- 


— 


■) 


7 


4 


G 


17 


36 


1899 










— 


1 


1 


-> 


6 


9 


22 


42 


1900 










1 


— 


■ ) 


.3 


13 


10 


29 


60 


1901 










— 


— 


2 


1 


10 


/ 


31 


51 


1902 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


9 


1 


20 


32 


1903 . 










— 


— 


I 


6 


8 


— 


12 


27 


1904 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


1 


13 


21 


1905 










— 


— 


— 


6 


8 


5 


8 


27 


1906 










— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


6 


13 


25 


1907 . 










— 


— 


2 


•) 


7 


3 


20 


34 


1908 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


9 


4 


23 


38 


1909 










— 


— 


— 


5 


6 


6 


36 


53 


1910 . 










— 


— 


2 


— 


13 


11 


26 


52 


1911 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


3 


32 


43 


1912 . 










— 


— 


1 


3 


8 


7 


37 


56 


1913 










— 


— 


o 


•) 


1.") 


3 


32 


54 


1914 










— 


— 


•) 


3 


-1 


7 


41 


57 


1915 . 










— 


— 


- 


3 


14 


11 


41 


69 


1916 . 










— 


— 


— 


7 


13 


/ 


62 


89 


1917 . 










— 


— 


— 


•) 


9 


S 


81 


100 


1918 . 










— 


— 


— 


•) 


3 


6 


97 


108 


1919 . 










— 


— 


— 


3 


1 


S 


89 


101 


1920 










— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


6 


100 


113 


1921 










— 


-^ 


— 


-- 


3 


/ 


9.") 


105 


1922 . 










— 


— 


— 


1 


3 


4 


136 


144 


1923 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


4 


1 22 


130 


1924 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


••> 


8 


1 II 


121 


1925 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


1 19 


125 


1926 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


6 


137 


147 


1927 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


138 


144 


1928 . 










— 


-- 


— 




— 


1 


115 


116 


1929 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


68 


68 


1930 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


63 


64 


1931 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


57 


60 


1932 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


53 


53 


1933 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


36 


36 


1934 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


31 


31 


1935 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


13 


1936 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


7 


Tdtals 




1 


! 


27 


SI 


237 


191 


2,265 


2,809 



The average age nl llic iui'iuIhts ot Uic lorce on NovemV)er 30, 1959, was -11.22 years. 



/- 



TABLE VIII 

Number of Days' Absence fro/// D/ity by Reaso/i of Disability During the Year Ending 

Novei//ber ML l')5'J 



Drccinher, I'J.JS 


3,210 


.Inly. 1959 .... 


2,(310 


January, 1059 . 


3,785 


Aii{i;ii,st, 1959 


2,682 


I'Vhniary, 1959 . 


3,159 


September, 1959 


2,824 


March. 1!I59 


3,238 


OcIoIkt, 1959 . 


3,220 


April, 1959 .... 


3,080 
3,070 


N()\ember, 1959 

Total .... 


3,461 


May, 1959 .... 


. 37,019 


June, 1959 .... 


2,650 







A\('ragt' Lumber of men ou the force 
Average number of men sick daily 



2,82(i 
101 or 3 57 per cent 

















TABLE 


IX 


























Report of Accide/its for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 










I'.NDEn 4 VE.\n.^ 


.5 T.) M Ye.\r^ 


15 TO 54 Ye.\rs 


55 YE.\ns .\Ni) ( 


\EIi 


TdT.M.S 


Cause of .\ccn)E.\T 


Killed 


Injured 


Killi'd 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 


Killed 


Ilij 


ni'd 


Killed 


Injured 




M 


l' 


.M 


1' 


.\1 


|- 


.M 


V 


.\1 


1' 


.\1 


1' 


.M 


1' 


M 


1- 


.\1 


I- 


M 


F 


cyck's .... 


— 


— 


9 


.5 


1 


— 


7o 


21 


-- 


— 


1( 


1 


— 




.) 


— 


1 


— 


94 


30 


trriages, Licensed . 


- 


— 




1 


- 


— 


— 


1 




— 


17 





— 




■) 


2 


- 


— 


1! 


10 


lasting .... 


— 


~ 


2 


— 


— 


— 





3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 


S 


3 


)gs, Bitten by . 


— 


— 


12.5 


7! 




— 


604 


20S 


— 


— 


278 


78 


— 


— 


54 


27 


— 


— 


1,061 


392 


ectric Wires, Live . 


- 




— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


1 




•> 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


O 


— 


:cavations in Street 


— 


- 


— 






— 


— 


— 




— 


3 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


Hiiig Objects . 


— 


— 


() 


■I 


- 


~ 


15 


(i 




— 


49 


4 


- 




,s 


7 


— 


— 


78 


19 


Il.«, N'arious Causes 


— 


— 


2Uil 


1 :',.-, 


2 


— 


.302 


1.53 


i 


1 


1,34 1 


400 


•) 


2 


700 


430 


11 


3 


2,018 


1,181 


:i>-. Cut by 


— 


— 


17 


11 




— 


7(i 


30 


— 


— 


104 


52 


1 




10 


4 


1 


— 


207 


97 


iliircyeles 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17 


1 


— 




■) 


• ) 


— 




1!) 


3 


ii'ii Vehicles, Commercial 


— 


1 


HI 


s 


') 


— 


51 


15 


;1 


1 


173 


70 


1 


■J 


39 


22 





4 


282 


121 


jtor Veliicles, Pleasure . 


1 


i 


l.il 


7(1 




1 


351! 


100 


13 


■J 


1,103 


009 


8 





l(i7 


113 


22 


11 


1,751 


952 


eetcars .... 














1 


1 


- 


— 


1 1 


15 


2 




9 


.s 


■ ) 




24 


24 


eets. Defects in 


— 


— 


- 






— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


1 


12 


— 


— 


5 


7 


— 


— 


!l 


20 


lins, Railroad . 


— 


— 


— 








1 






1 


;; 


1 


1 




I 


— 


1 


1 


5 


1 


nicies, Fire Department 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 




— 




1 


1 










1 


— 


1 


1 


1 


licles, Hand Drawn 


— 


— 




— 


■- 


— 


1 








1 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


5ce!laneous 


1 


1 


i:-!i 


S(i 


I 


1 


270 


101 





4 


953 


257 


3 


1 


109 


97 


14 


/ 


1,523 


541 


Total Killed 


2 


3 


— 


— 


9 


2 


— 


— 


30 


11 


— 


— 


18 


11 


— 


— 


59 


27 


— 


— 


Total Injured 


— 


— 


049 


:597 




— 


1,813 


703 


— 


— 


4.070 


1„581 


— 




1,174 


720 




— 


7.706 


3,401 



7J 



TABLE X 

Total Number of Persons Arrested by Divisions and Units for All Types of Ojfenses, Covering 
Both Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 



DlVLSIOXS 


.Males 


Fenuilcs 


Totals 


Division 1 


1,717 


155 


1,872 


Division 2 


997 


235 


1,232 


Division 3 


2,835 


358 


3,193 


Di\-ision 4 


12,254 


1,323 


13,577 


Division 6 


3,940 


211 


4,151 


Division 7 


1,986 


176 


2,162 


Division 8 


12 


— 


12 


Division 9 


6,834 


1,001 


7,835 


Division 10 


5,942 


720 


6,662 


Division 11 


3,264 


177 


3,441 


Division 13 


1,113 


126 


1,239 


Division 14 


2,965 


435 


3,400 


])i\ision 15 


3,091 


154 


3,245 


Division 16 


5,065 


526 


5,591 


Division 17 


1,289 


59 


1,348 


Division 18 


695 


60 


755 


Division 19 


1,574 


79 


1,653 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation .... 


1,607 


454 


2,061 


Traffic Division 


14,762 


3,018 


17,780 


Totals 


71,942 


9,267 


81,209 



TABLE XI — GROUP A 

Alajor Ojfeiises (Not Arrests) Known to the Police luul Reported to the h'.B.I. Under 
Unifonit Crime Reporting Procedure for the Year landing November 30, 1959 



Classification of Offenses 


Offciiscs 
Reported 


Uiifciundcd 


Artual 
Offenses 


Cleared 
1)V Ari-est 


Not 
Cleared 


J. 


Criminal homicide: 














(a) ]\Iui-der and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 


33 


o 


31 


27 


4 




(6) Manslaughter by negligence 


52 


18 


34 


31 


3 


2 


Forcible rape 


inn 


6 


91 


87 


7 


3. 


Robbery 


458 


ly 


439 


207 


232 


4. 


Aggravated assault 


653 


16 


637 


514 


123 


5. 


Burglary — breaking and entering . 


3,382 


159 


3,223 


1,298 


1 ,925 


6. 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) : 














(a) 150 and over in value . 


2,187 


59 


2,128 


671 


1 ,457 




( h) Under -150 in value 


3,915 


139 


3,776 


1 ,905 


1,871 


7. 


Auto theft 


4,271 


567 


3,704 


864 


2,840 




Totals 


15,051 


985 


14,066 


5,604 


8,462 



TABLE XI — GROUP B 

Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table XI 
for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 



Group A 





Vauie of Property Stolen in Boston 


Type of Property 


Stolen 


Reco\ered 


Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous 


1329,199 00 

164,835 00 

46,744 00 

186,485 00 

2,044,586 00 
633,465 00 


$43,386 00 

15,137 00 

7,927 00 

30,431 00 

2,061,280 00 

136,353 00 


Totals 


83,405,314 00 


$2,294,514 00 



/.T 



«: 



TABLE XI — GROUP C 

Breakdozcn of Offenses SJioivn Under Table XI — Group A and Value of Pro-perty Stolen 
by Type of (Jjfense, for Year Ending November 3(1, 1959 



Classification or Offenses 



Robbery: 

(a) Hifi'liway (streets, alleys, etc.) 

{h) Conunercial house (not c, d, /) 

(c) Oil station 

(d) Chain store 

(e) Residence (anywhere on jireinises) 

(/) Bank 

(f/) Miscellaneous 

Total — robbery 

Burglary — breakini;: or entering: 
(a) Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 

(6) Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 



Total — burglary . 

Larceny — theft (except auto, by \-alue) 

(a) $50 and over 

{b) .15 to $50 

(f) Under $5 



Total — 1 



arceny 



Auto theft: 

(n) Jov-riding 
(6) All other . 

Total ■ 

Grand Total 



auto theft 



Number of 
Actual Offenses 



221 

84 

5 

9 

35 

1 

84 



439 



405 
1,027 

1,559 
232 



3,223 



2,128 
2,718 
1,058 



5,904 



2,7()8 
936 



3,704 



\'alue of 
Property Stolen 



$49,553 

20,825 

292 

3,755 

471 

4,080 



$79,570 



$89,059 
180,941 

365,000 
62,007 



$698,207 



$515,925 

64,549 

2,471 



$582,945 



$1,498,168 
546,418 



$2,044,586 



5,405,314 



TABLF. XI — GROUP D 



Number of Iiulivhliuils Arreslfd, No/ the Nuiiiher of Char^eSy ]\' hose ('uses Have Reached h'iiial Disposition, ivith 

'J'liiff/i Arrests Iiirhtdeil, for the Year luid'Dig November Ml, I'J^'J 



Classification of Offenses 



Poisons 
Released 
by Police 



PEnSONS ClIAIiOEI) B^ THE PoMCE 



Charged 



Arrested 



Suinnidiicd 



Persons Foitnd Guilty 



Of Offense 
Charged 



Of Lesser 
Offense 



Criniii)nl homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonncgUgent manslaughter 
(5) Manslaughter by negligence . 

Forciljle rape 

Roliliery 

Aggi-avatcd assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny-- theft (except automoljile theft) 

Automobile theft 



Total, Part I Classes . 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting .... 
Embezzlement and fraud .... 
Stolen property, liuying, receiving, possessing 
Wea]5ons, carrying, jxjssessing, etc. . 
Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses 

Oft'en.ses against family and children . 

Narcotic drug laws 

Lifiuor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated .... 
Violation of road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws . 

All other offenses 



Total, Part II Classes 
Grand total 



10(1 

HI 

150 

74 



043 



21 
18 

152 

35 



35 



109 



:570 



20 

20 

49 

193 

29() 

721 

1,39!) 

540 



3,23S 



831 

39 

310 

t)3 

133 

102 

577 

809 

72 

50 

24,543 

321 

33 

412 

337 

11,495 

28,3(i2 

1,783 

2,210 



72,54S 



1 ,32: 



20 

20 

47 

179 

285 

032 

1,0()4 

443 



,(;!)() 



739 

39 

285 

61 

120 

102 

555 

807 

71 

46 

24,537 

308 

33 

411 

328 

630 

4,044 

585 

1,914 



2 
14 
11 
89 
335 
97 



.548 



92 

25 
9 



22 
02 

1 
10 

6 
13 

1 

9 

10,859 

24,318 

1,198 

296 



35,027 



rS(i 



.38,3 n 



30,921 



37,4r)9 



14 

18 
108 
147 
555 
1,171 
413 



2,426 



547 

34 

231 

54 

113 

88 

486 

708 

59 

40 

24,463 

253 

26 

318 

257 

11,109 

28,007 

1,637 

1,115 



09,605 



r2,031 



2 
8 
9 
27 
39 
51 
19 
44 

199 



14 
1 
1 

2 

1 

15 

2 

2 
1 

7 
1 
5 
30 
9 

15 
11 



117 



31( 





























77 


TABLE XI — GROUP E 










Arrests for I he Year Ending 


Novembe 


'• 30, 1959 








Nature of Offense 


.Males 


Females 


Totals 


On 
Warrants 


Witliout 
Warrant.s 


Sunimor.ed 
by tlic 
Ccurt 


Murder ami nonnegiigeiit niaiislauiiiitcr 


23 


i 


24 


8 


10 


_ 


Neslioent manslaughter 










20 


3 


23 


13 


10 


— 


Rape 












78 


— 


78 


17 


00 


1 


Robbery .... 












2()9 


3 


272 


09 


189 


14 


Aegra\'ated assault . 












358 


52 


410 


118 


274 


18 


Burglary — breaking and entering 










924 


15 


939 


307 


530 


96 


Larcc"v — theft (e.xcept auto tlieft) 








1 ,323 


347 


l,i;7() 


440 


848 


370 


Auto theft 








l(i2 


2 


104 


45 


117 


2 


Other assaults 












933 


88 


1,021 


711 


204 


106 


Forgery and counterfeiting 












49 


5 


54 


32 


22 


— 


Embezzlement and fraud 












32 1 


(Hi 


390 


282 


83 


25 


Stolen property . 












S'.l 


2 


91 


30 


59 


2 


Wea]5ons, possession cf 














ii;i 


4 


i(;.-i 


2() 


131 


8 


Prostitution 














33 


90 


123 


5 


118 


— 


Sex offenses 














47(1 


205 


081 


192 


457 


32 


Family and children . 














1 ,072 


45 


1,117 


1,008 


25 


84 


Narcotics laws . 














79 


12 


91 


11 


78 


2 


Liquor laws . 














.",() 


15 


05 


38 


15 


12 


Diunkenness 














22,8S() 


1,902 


24,782 


— 


24,782 


— 


Disorderly conduct . 














231 


129 


363 


39 


310 


14 


^'agranc}- 














28 


9 


37 


4 


32 


1 


Gambhng 
















434 


31 


405 


171 


293 


1 


Driving wliile intoxicated 
















381 


9 


390 


58 


323 


9 


Road and driving hiws 
















11,027 


499 


11,526 


612 


38 


10,876 


Parking violations 
















23,512 


4,918 


28,430 


4,071 


3 


24,356 


Traffic violations 
















2,215 


100 


2,315 


420 


582 


1,313 


All other offenses 
















2,142 


422 


2,564 


840 


1,370 


348 


Su.spicion 
















1,212 


141 


1,353 


— 


1 ,353 


— 


Arrests for otlier departments 












1,454 


152 


1,000 


1,399 


203 


4 


Totals 


71,942 


9,207 


81,209 


10,972 


32,537 


37,700 



ys 



TABLE XII 



l^a^f ciiid Sex of All P/'isoi/s Arrt'slcil for Offenses Showing Under Table XI — (Iroup A', Covering Both 
Pending mid ('niii pleteil Cases, But Pxiluiliiig Traffic Arrests for the Year Ending November 30, !95'J 













ruder 15 


15 


16 


17 


18 


10 


Nati-rk ok Officnse 




























M 


V 


AI 


I' 


Al 


F 


AI 


]■ 


A I 


I- 


A I 


I" 


INIvirdcr and noiincfili^cnt man.slausliler 















— 














Manslaufihlci- hy ii('Kliu<'ii''<' • 




. 


1 




— 


— 


— 


— 






1 








Forcible ia])r 










— 


— 


4 


— 


2 


— 


1 


- 


;] 




3 




Rohhery 










25 


-- 


13 


— 


17 


— 


18 


— 


16 


- 


21 




Afifira\-ated assault 










13 


1 


12 


— 


HI 


■•> 


17 


— 


22 


I 


1 1 


1 


Burglary - breaking or oiitcrin}? 










188 


") 


8') 


1 


S7 


- 


07 


1 


30 


1 


37 


- 


I.arroiiy — theft (except auto tlief t ) 










238 


93 


84 


35 


75 


3( 


5( 


12 


61 


( 


6( 


9 


Auto theft 










")? 


— 


87 


1 


102 


( 


S5 


1 


77 


— 


38 


— 


Other assaults 










]•! 


8 


14 


1 


21 


'P 


27 


1 


21 


- 


31 


3 


Forgery and counterfeiting . 










1 






- 


1 


— 




1 




1 


1 


— 


Embezzlement and fraud 










— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


- 


1 


— 


1 


— - 


•) 


o 


Stolen projierty .... 










1 


— 


3 


— 


4 


— 


1 


— 


5 


— ' 


4 


1 


Weapons, possession of . 










3 


— 


5 


— 


6 




11 


— 


10 


— 


12 


— 


Prostitution 










— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Sex offenses 










28 


2 


10 


1 


1 1 


12 


12 


o 


12 


7 





5 


Family and children 










— 


— 


— 


- 




-- 


1 


- 


1 


— 


,c 


1 


Narcotics laws .... 










— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


1 


••> 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


Liciuor laws 










— 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


1 


— 


Drunkenness 










3 


'> 


13 


4 


31 


3 


68 


3 


121 


11 


150 


9 


Disorderly conduct 










2 


•) 


12 


— 


24 


1 


• >■•> 


3 


22 


^ 


23 


6 


Vagrancy 










— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


1 


1 


■— 


- 


1 


-- 


1 


Gamliling 










— 


— 


— 


— 


1 




/ 




11 


— 


6 


1 


Driving while intoxicated 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 






o 


- 


7 


— 


Suspicion 










1 


— 





— 


12 


— 


74 


2 


75 


3 


82 


4 


All other (except traffic) 










ill 


42 


52 


32 


63 


41 


6e 


21 


77 


17 


93 


19 


Ai-rests for other departments and agencies 






21 


11 


22 


8 


IS 


12 


24 


8 


38 


IC 


41 


S 


Totals.— Males 






742 





422 





500 


— 


558 





621 





614 





Females 









166 





S3 





112 


— 


oC 


— 


77 





72 

































70 






TABLE XII- 


- Continucc 












Ige and Sex of All Persons Arrested for Offenses S/wvchi}^ Under Table XI — 


CroHp A, 


Covering Both 


Pending and Completed Cases, But 


Excluding Traffic 


■ Arrests for the Year 


linding N 


ovember 30, 1959 


Nature of Offense 




20 


21 


22 


2i 


24 


25 29 
































.M 


1' 


.M 


F 


M 


I' 


.M 


1' 


M 


]•■ 


M 


F 


iMurder and noiinegligent manslaughter 




3 





1 




1 




1 










2 


_ 


Manslaughter by negligence .... 






■) 


-- 


1 






— 


1 


— 


1 




11 


1 


Forcible i-ape 








3 




1 




4 


— 


6 


— 


1 


-- 


i<: 


— 


Robbery 








20 


— 


12 


- 


13 




13 




,S 




40 


2 


Aggra\-ated assault 








17 


2 


21 


— 


11 


1 


1( 


1 


1 1 


1 


19 


12 


Burglary — breaking or entering 








46 


2 


3t. 


- 


32 


1 


32 




21 




KM, 


— 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 








63 


•> 


46 


(I 


32 


11 


32 


3 


26 


12 


129 


19 


.\.uto tiieft 








43 


^ 


28 


1 


2(1 


1 


Hi 


— 


27 


1 


4S 


3 


Other assaults 








34 


n 


36 


') 


38 


4 


41 


1 


39 


4 


!S(, 


1 1 


Forgery and coimterfeiting . 








1 


- 


■) 




3 


— 


1 


— 


5 




1 1 


1 


F]mbezzlement and fraud 








<1 


1 


4 


•) 


8 


1 


13 


1 


12 


4 


47 


15 


Stolen property .... 








4 


— 


4 


— 


2 


— 


-1 


— 


3 




i(j 


1 


Weapons, possession of 










S 




14 


— 


6 


1 


V' 


— 


8 


— 


27 


— 


Prostitution 










— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


t 


1 


3 


1 


6 


5 


26 


Sex offenses 










9 


8 


19 


11 


19 


16 


15 


6 


23 


12 


76 


50 


Family and children 










18 


2 


19 


4 


35 


1 


25 


2 


44 


7 


221 


10 


Narcotics laws 










2 


2 


3 


— 


4 


1 


'> 


1 


1 


1 


Ml 


1 


Liquor laws 










] 


— 


2 


- 


- 


1 


I 


1 


-) 




.) 


3 


Drunkenness . 










85 


5 


711 


45 


4<)4 


38 


444 


30 


456 


37 


2.075 


194 


disorderly conduct 










22 


IC 


15 


4 


1(1 


!* 





S 


7 


(.1 


36 


22 


Vagrancy . 










1 


— 


— 


1 


1 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


— 


Gambling 










6 


1 


13 


- 


,S' 


— 


15 


— 


21 




82 


5 


Driving while intoxicated 








C) 


— 


15 


1 


9 


— 


12 


— 


t) 


1 


69 


3 


Suspicion 








62 


10 


84 


5 


60 


10 


58 


9 


54 


1 


227 


43 


\11 other (except traffic) 








85 


21 


85 


12 


84 


12 


67 


13 


70 


11 


382 


68 


Vrrests for other departments and agencies 






46 


4 


49 


5 


51 


6 


57 


3 


66 


9 


288 


21 


Totals: — ]\Iales 






599 


1,224 


— 


945 





884 


— 


922 


— 


4,165 


— 


Females 









88 





103 





121 


— 


85 




123 


■ 


514 



So 

TABLE XII — Concluded 
.l,i,v <ii/J .SV.v nf All l\'rso)is .\n;-sh'tl for (Jjfenses Showing Under Table XI — Croup E, Covering Both 
P,')/,l!)/x mid CoiiipU'U'd Cases, Hnl Excluding Traffic Arrests for the Year Ending November 30, 1959 





















50 








30 


34 


35 


39 


40 


44 


45 


49 


.V.\i) 


)VKI! 


\{m\. 


NATlliK OF OfFKNSK 




























.M 


1'' 


M 


F 


M 


1' 


M 


1" 


-M 


I" 


White 


All 

Other 


Murder and nonnegligeiit manslaughter 


8 


1 


1 









3 


— 


3 




16 


S 


Manslaughter by negligenee . 






1 


— 


4 


1 


•> 




1 


— 


4 


1 


20 


;{ 


F()rcil)le rape 






11 


— 


6 


- 


1 




■) 


— - 


5 


— 


42 


3f) 


Hdliliei-y 






20 


1 


13 




12 




1 


— 


7 


- 


179 


93 


AggraA-ated assault .... 






')-! 


12 


25 


5 


>)•) 


3 


13 


4 


25 


3 


178 


232 


Bui'glary breaking or enlering 






Oil 


1 


34 




19 




12 


— 


23 


— 


773 


IBP) 


Larceny 1 heft (exeept auto t-hel't) . 






133 


28 


94 


•)•) 


()() 


.) 


41 


23 


87 


25 


1 ,298 


372 


Auto theft 






33 


2 


15 


1 


5 


— 


4 


— 


4 




585 


124 


Other assaults 






io;i 


15 


ik; 


Id 


86 


5 


42 


5 


70 


( 


674 


347 


Forgei'y and eounterfeiting 






10 


1 


6 


1 


I 


— 


4 


— 


2 


— 


47 


i 


ICmiiezzlement and fraud 






92 


13 


44 


14 


28 


8 


37 


5 


22 


— 


319 


71 


Stt)len property 






i 


- 


11 




5 


- - 


5 


— 


/ 


— 


77 


|! 


Weapons, possession of .... 






14 


■) 


12 


— 


G 


1 


7 


— 


4 


— 


108 


57 


Prostitution 






5 


19 


3 


4 


6 


7 


4 


4 


8 


8 


28 


95 


Sex offenses 






82 


32 


43 


21 


28 


11 


31 


8 


49 


— 


396 


285 


Family and children .... 






2.59 


7 


166 


6 


132 


3 


68 


2 


72 


— 


801 


3i(; 


Narcotics laws 






15 


2 


6 


2 


5 


— 


7 


— 


8 


1 


27 


64 


Li(luor laws 






5 


3 


7 


— 


11 


3 


2 


1 


10 




43 


22 


Drunkenness 






2,393 


253 


2,519 


275 


3,005 


262 


3,007 


265 


7,305 


466 


20,948 


3,834 


Disorderly conduct .... 






9 


18 


7 


6 


3 


f,' 


6 


4 


5 


3 


233 


13n 


Vagrancy 






4 


1 


1 


— 


2 


— 


5 


1 


8 


1 


30 


t 


Gambling 






76 


3 


54 


8 


43 


6 


36 


4 


55 


3 


269 


I9(i 








67 


1 


48 


— 


34 


1 


41 


2 


59 


— 


322 


6S 


Suspicion 






164 


20 


94 


15 


64 


8 


33 


1 


65 


4 


849 


504 


All other (except traffic) 






275 


44 


176 


18 


157 


23 


120 


12 


149 


16 


1 ,642 


922 


Arrests for other departments and agencies 




262 


24 


169 


9 


125 


9 


98 


4 


78 


1 


1,222 


384 


Totals: — Males 




4,177 


— 


3,674 


— 


3,871 


— 


3,633 


— 


8,134 


— 


31,126 


8,357 


Females 




~ 


503 




418 




363 




345 




539 







<?/ 



TABLE XIII 

S/iozvi/ig tlie Number of Licenses of All K'nuls Issued by the Police Co»i)iiissioiter and the Amoutil of Mone 
Receii-ed ironi All Sources and Paid to the City Collector-Treasurer During the Year Ending November SO, 195 



CLASS OF LICENSE 


.s'p 


3 


y 0. 

•J. o 


Applications 
Withdrawn or 
Xo Action 






Q 

X 

"y" X 

O o 

o a 
g> 


3-3 
~i 1 

'i '■''- 




3 '^ 


AniouMl 


Auctioneer (Class 1) 


70 


1)4 


1 


- 


,") 








— 


~ 


$(i40 00 


Auctioneer (otlicr classes) 


9 


9 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19.5 00 


Bicycle registrations 


2,210 


2,210 


- 


— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


21.S 


-v,2 -M 


Dog 


n.WM) 


12.0 IS 


12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29.294 .50 


Driver (hackne\- carriage) 


G,207 


(i,().Sl 


— 


— 


123 


— 


— 


10 




.') ^,"» 


12,108 00 


Firearms, dealer in 


14 


14 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




3,50 00 


(iunsmitli 


6 


6 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30 00 


Hackney carriage (and regrants) 


1,072 


1,072 


— 


— 


— 


— 


447 


— 


— 


."ili 


17,41(1 00 


Hackney carriage (replacement of drivers' 
























badges) 


4ti 


4(j 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 


— 


4(1 00 


Handcart (common carrier) 


3 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 






— 


— 


(1 00 


Junk collector 


10(i 


id:! 


— 


— 


1 


•> 










1,.545 00 


Junk shopkeeper 


47 


4G 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 




3,4.50 00 


Musician (coUeclive and sound car) 


1(1 


u; 




— 


— 


— 








— 


.5(1 00 


Musician (itinerant) 


14 


11 


- 


- 


^» 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


110 00 


Puwnliroker 


47 


41) 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


— 


1 


— 


2,300 00 


Public lodging house 


Ti 


— 


.5 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Revolver (including machine gun) . 


1 .080 


1,013 


1 


3 


72 


- 


7 


73 


— 


— 


5,0G5 00 


Kevolver, |)erniit to imrehase . 


I 


— 


-- 


— 


1 




— 


- 




— 


— 



S2 



Ta\BLK XIII — Concluded 

Iiotviiii^ I lit' N limber of Liceiisi-s of All Kii/Js Issticil b\ I he Police Connii'iss'ioiier mid the Aiiioioil of Aloi'ey 
leceived from Ml Sources ami Paul In the City Col lector-Treasurer Diirht;^ the Year limlinn November 30, l'J5'j 



fciiiiilh:uul Mi'liclcs 

i'i'()ii(lliaii(l iiii)l(ir \c'liiclc dciili'i' 

li(il;fUiis mill lilies, dealer in 

inlil-seeirifi .■iilldiniiliile .... 

ifjlil-seeiiifi driver 

|)eeial police 

tl'opt railway, eonduetoi'. nioldrmari, ainl 
starter 

'ojiies of licenses and repl.ii-einenl doy 
tags 

'opies of jioliee reports .... 

)aniafi:e to |)oliee properly 

eimluirsemciits 

ale of coiulemiied property 

ale of lost, stolen, and abandoned prop- 
erty 

ale of pawnbroker and seroiidhand arli- 
cles report blanks 

unday permits 

se of police jjroperty .... 



Totals 

•redit by City Collector-Treasurer for 
money received for damage to police 
property and telephone commissions . 



Grand Total 



:i()3 
2:!,S 

i 

I '.I 
2:1 

1, 02:'. 
:'.'.)7 



26,802 



2IIII 
2:(l 

I'.) 
2:; 

Till 



26,322 



221 



245 



214 



17 



478 



85 



III 



18 



859 



S8,7li() 00 

11,550 00 

175 00 

1,271 00 

Mi 00 

:i,!i7o 00 

5 1)2 00 



151 


25 


I7,4:;ii 


01 


1)1)5 


t t 


876 


70 


7(iS 


10 


3,440 


70 


400 


00 


2,762 


00 


1,485 


51) 


S127,847 


12 



14,761 88 



.S142,6()'.) 00 



Sj 



TABLE XIV 

Number of Do^^ Licenses Issued During ^^"' Year Ending November 3(1, 1959 



Divisions 


.Alalfs 


Frmalps 


Spayed 


K'cniiel.s 


Ti^ansfcrs 


With 
Fee 


Without 
Fe(> 


Totals 


1 . . . 


43 


5 


11 


— 


— 


59 


— 


59 


2 . . . 


3 


2 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


5 


3 . . . 


1 01' 


44 


43 


— 


— 


189 


1 


190 


4 . . . 


420 


100 


134 


2 




662 


1 


663 


6 . . . 


483 


58 


186 


— 


— 


727 




727 


7 . . . 

8 . . . 

9 . . . 


612 


83 


243 


— 


— 


938 


— 


938 


823 


107 


212 


— 


— 


1,142 




1,142 


10 . . . 


6.1.-, 


84 


216 


— 


— 


955 


— 


955 


11 . . . 


1).J2 


79 


4,S7 


1 


- 


1,519 


3 


1 .522 


13 . . . 


528 


58 


199 


— 


— 


785 


— 


785 


14 . . . 


668 


78 


328 


4 


— 


1 ,07S 


• ) 


1 .080 


15 . . . 


276 


35 


123 


3 


— 


437 


1 


438 


16 . . . 


308 


89 


138 


3 


— 


538 


1 


539 


17 . . . 


931 


84 


555 


8 


— 


1 ,578 


1 


1 ,579 


18 . . . 


828 


76 


461 


1 


1 


1 ,367 


• ) 


1 .369 


19 . . . 


604 


40 


294 


2 


— 


940 


- 


940 


Totals 


8,242 


1,022 


3,630 


24 


1 


12,919 


*12 


12,931 



* Total of 12 (lo^ lici'ii.^r.^ is.-^ucil witli(jul 
forpoiatioii, inc-orpoiuted pxclu.sivol.\' for pia'|)o; 
dogs "specially traiiifd to lead or serve a blind 



fee. ill arconlaiirc uitli law. iiirhulcs: 1 kciinei tor a "donn'stic cliaritalilc 
se.^ of proteftinj; animals from cruelty," clc (located on Division 4); and 11 
person" (from Division.s 3, 11, 14. 15, Ki, 17. and 18) 



'U 



TABLE XV 

Fina>nidl Shitcnwiit for tJie Year Ending November 30, 1959 



EXPENDITURES 



tinorp 1. rEKSo.NAL Skhvices: 

10 Permanent employees 
12 Overtime 



(iROUP 2. CoXTUACTIAL SERVICES: 



21 
22 
26 

27 

28 
29 



C'ommnnieations 

l>i}rht, heat, and power .... 
Repains and maintenance of buildings and 

structures 

Repairs and ser\-ieing of eciuipment . 
Transportation of persons .... 
Miscellaneous contractual services . 



Group 3. Supplies and Materials: 

30 Avitomotive .... 

32 Food 

33 Heating 

34 Household ... 

35 Medical, dental, and hospital 

36 Office ..... 
39 Miscellaneous 



$16,538,256 04 
485,826 91 



$77,360 05 
48,165 12 

53,490 40 

63,439 84 

18,054 66 

122,240 62 



$140,919 38 
16,285 88 
43,009 34 
18,039 07 
508 98 
78,737 55 
160,251 15 



Group 4. Current Charges axd Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 

Group 5. Equipment: 

50 Automotive $110,487 85 

56 Office furniture and eciuipment 17,322 88 

59 Miscellaneous 14,393 35 



Total 

RECEIPTS 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 

Refunds, miscellaneous 

Use of police property 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen, and abandoned property 

For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage ilrivers' badges, copies of 

licenses and records, sale of report blanks 

Reimbursement of lost and damaged uniforms and eciuipment 

For damage to police property (paid at Headciuarters) 

Total 

Credit by City Collector-Treasurer for money received for damage to iiolice i)roperty, 
commissions on telephones, and dog fines 

Grand Total 



17,024,082 95 



382,750 69 



457,751 35 
25,884 01 



142,204 


08 


$18,032,673 


08 


$72,952 50 


29,294 


50 


721 


69 


1 .485 


50 


4,208 


80 


18,033 


26 


155 


10 


995 


77 


$127,847 


12 


14,761 


88 


$142,609 


00 



85 



TABLE XVI 

loz^'iiii/ the X iinihcr of Male and hciiialc Pcisoiis Twenty ]'cars of .h/c or More Who Were Residents of the 
ty of Boston on the first Day of January. 1959, Listed by the Listimj Board in the Se-c-eral Jl'ards and Prc- 
lets of Said City 



Wards 



I'rcc. 1 Prec. 2 Piec. 3 



Piec. 4 



Prof. 5 



Pri'O. 6 



Pri'c. S 



Prec. '.) 



10 



Prec. 11 



Prec. 12 



2,135 
1,828 
2,331 
2.635 
2,().'i() 
1,71 i 
1,053 
1,3!)2 
2,006 
1,704 
1,046 
1,72J 
1,361 

i,'.»i;4 

2,316 
1,662 
1,S3() 
2,845 
2,338 
1,111 
2,008 
1,017 



2 225 
1,617 
2,145 
2,255 
1,817 
1. 731) 
1 ,966 
2,339 
2,2 J4 
1,692 
1,519 
1,4S5 
1,495 
1,681 
1 ,696 
1 ,258 
l,li:i3 
1.412 
1,511 
1 ,070 
1,309 
1,1.39 



2,312 
1,993 
2,160 
1,834 
2,721 
1,7(11 
1,877 
983 
1,63'J 
1,773 
1,759 
1.775 
1,339 
2.0 10 
1.141 
1.71(1 
1.415 
1.731 
1.017 
1,026 
2,011 
1,191 



2,161 
1,916 
2,180 
2,026 
1.832 
1 .608 
1,953 
1,476 
1,667 
1 ,858 
1,9.33 
1,819 
1,(J67 
2,145 
1,176 
2,39 1 
1,125 
1.057 
1.340 
1.031 
1.792 
1 .070 



2.312 
1. 789 

667 
2,565 
2.682 
l.(i32 
1.772 
1.431 
1,796 
1,641 
1,979 
1 ,438 
1,374 
2,0.58 

981 
l.(;il 
1.312 
1.334 
I.. 525 
1,069 
2,016 
1,361 



2,236 
1,783 

818 
1,942 
2,107 
1.621 
1,890 
1.007 

836 
1.797 
1.448 
1.798 
1,641 
1,834 
1.172 
2.311 
1,62,1 
1.616 
1.125 
2,161 
1,399 
1,150 



2,173 
1,625 
925 
1,314 
2,638 
1,(_;32 
1,964 
1,671 
1,09!1 
2.475 
1.540 
1,862 
1,794 
1,927 
1,530 
1,.582 
1,1.54 
1.271 
9(JS 
898 
1,129 
1,102 



2,012 

1,91 1 
2,154 
2,385 
1,.550 
1,791 
1,725 
1,073 
1,878 
1,936 
1,611 
1,813 
1,608 
1,352 
1,.531 
1,848 
1,740 
1,049 
1,516 
3,008 
1,241 



1,918 

2,71 1 
2,076 
2,564 
1,.5S7 
1 ,773 
1,014 
1.472 
1.911 
1,623 
1,.594 
1,770 
2,154 
1,432 
2,022 
1.110 
2.250 
888 
1,832 
2,325 
1,7'. (7 



2,198 

2,098 
1,505 
2,185 

1,872 



1,620 
1,421 
2.009 
2,228 
1,.5(;3 
1,615 
2.170 
1,131 
1.007 
1,675 
1,034 
2,856 



2,117 



4,li; 



1,576 



1 ,699 
2,479 
1,733 
1 ,203 
1,726 
1,188 
2.030 
1.215 
1,107 
2,333 
1,.386 



1 ,883 



1,522 



1,574 

1,576 

1,280 
1,116 
1,636 
1,261 
1,246 
1,009 
1,827 



,SV) 



TABLE XVI — Concluded 



SlinwiiH/ the Xiiinbcr af Male and l-ciiialc I'crsoiis 7'i^'cnly ]'cars of .h/c or Marc li'lio Here l\'csi<lc!'ts af tli 
(■/7\' of Hosloii on llic I'irst Ihix of January, l'i=<'J. Listed hy the Ijslin;/ Hoard in the Se-eeral Wards and Prt 
einets of Said City 



W A III IS 


I'rcc. i:; 


Free. 11 


I'rcc. 15 


Vrrr. 1(1 


I'rc-c. 17 


i'rci-. IS 


I'rcc. Ill 


j'ri'c. 2:1 


I'rcc. 21 


I'rcc. 22 


Total> 


\V:,nl 1 . . 


2,1112 


l,:i5i 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


211,07! 1 


Ward 2 . . . 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12,.551 


WanI :! 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


22,00c. 


W.-inl 1 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,33(1 


W.-inl .-).., 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2(i,«8.5 


W.inl (i 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


M.SKi 


Ward 7 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




18,421 


Ward S . . , 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


i:i.(l35 


Waid !) . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13,893 


Ward 10 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


l(i,72il 


Ward 11 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


— 


17,303 


Ward 12 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19,805 


Ward Ki . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


I8,G5S 


Ward It 


l.TlHi 


1,'.M(I 


i,;<7',i 


1,412 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29,955 


Ward 15 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15,502 


Ward l(i . . . 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,732 


Ward 17 . . . 


1,112 


1,1 15 


(il2 


8!)2 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21,051 


Ward 18 . . . 


1.(17.". 


1,1(11 


1,1(15 


1,42') 


2,432 


\:m\ 


l.,S(l(l 


1,604 


1 ,500 


— 


33,801 


Ward 19 


1.112 


<s2:i 


l,(i:il 


1,57:5 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19.753 


Ward 20 


1,171 


i,2.i:) 


2,(1(1(1 


2,242 


2,o:iS 


1.242 


l,:i42 


1 ,9U5 


1,434 


— 


30,424 


Ward 21 . . . 


1,511 


l,:i(i ) 


1,7(15 


1,517 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


28,600 


W ard 22 . . . 


l.OI'.l 


1,42-; 


1,171 


1,421 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


22.200 
4 35,40 < 


Grand Total