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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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City of Boston 

Administrative Services Department 

Printing ojiSSSS*, Suction 




1960 



ANNUAL 



REPORT 





POLICE DEPARTMENT 



OF THE CITY OF 



BOSTON 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 49 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT — NO. 49] 



FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



of th 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



for the 



CITY OF BOSTON 




for the Year Ending 



NOVEMBER 30, 1960 



& 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



APPRECIATION 

The pleasing result of this report has only been possible through the 
assistance and materials of many individuals and firms. We are in- 
debted to: 

Jack Drummey for his creative contributions. 

The Boston Herald and Traveler. 

The Boston Globe. 

The Boston Record-American-Sunday Advertiser. 

Colourpicture Publishers, Inc., for the front cover photograph of 
"Boston's Beautiful Copley Square." 

Warren Kay Vantine Studio. 

Joseph E. Mearn, Tremont Newspaper Mat Company, Inc. 




(MlSSIOjrj-yi, ■ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter to the Governor . . ... 

The Department 

Signal Service 

Distribution and Changes 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty 

Award of Medals .... 



The Department in Action 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Detective Bureau . 
Automobile Unit 
Lost and Stolen Property Unit 

Homicide 

Domestic Relations Unit 
Narcotics and Vice Unit 
Ballistics Unit 
Emergency Equipment . 
Biological Chemist . 
Identification Unit . 



Traffic Division 

Central Complaint and Records Bureau 

Crime Prevention Bureau 

Police Signal System 

Harbor Service . 

Police Academy . 

Medical Department 

Hackney Carriages 



Statistics . 

City Prison . 

House of Detention 

Motor Vehicle Service 

Combination Ambulances 

Automobile Maintenance 

Horses 



Page 

2 

10 
10 
I I 
II 



20 
22 
22 
23 
23 
26 
28 
29 
31 

33 

34 

33 
41 
43 
45 
46 

47 

40 

5° 

5i 
S 1 
52 
53 
53 
54 

54 



Page 

Listing Work in Boston 55 

Listing Expenses 55 

Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 56 

Police Work on Jury Lists .... 56 

Special Police 57 

Pistols, Revolvers, and Machine Guns . . 58 

Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns, and Rifles — 

Gunsmiths 58 

Public Lodging Houses 5S 

Property Clerk 50. 

Lost and Found Property .... 59 

Special Events 60 

Miscellaneous Business 64 

Pensions and Benefits 64 

Statistical Tables 66 

Distribution of Police Force, Signal Service, 

and Other Employees 66 

Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength 

of Police Department 68 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who 

Died During the Year 6g 

Members of Department Retired . . . 70 

Officers Promoted 71 

Members of Police Force Appointed in the 

Year Indicated 72 

Members of Police Force Born in the Year 

Indicated 73 

Number of Days' Absence from Duty by 

Reason of Disability 74 

Accidents 74 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions . . 75 

Arrests and Offenses 76 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested ... 80 

Licenses of All Classes Issued .... 83 

Dog Licenses 85 

Financial Statement 86 

Male and Female Residents Listed . . 87 



Governor 
FOSTER FURCOLO 




Governor-Elect 
JOHN A. VOLPE 



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Commissioner 
LEO J. SULLIVAN 




BOSTON 



A CITY OF 



LIVING HISTORY 



STANDING ON 



THE BRINK OF A 



GREAT FUTURE 




JOHN F. COLLINS 
Mayor, i960- 



BOSTON 



- HER EYES ARE ON THE FUTURE 



Boston is a city with a proud, 
inspiring, and envied record of 
achievement in every major field of 
human endeavor. Your city is one 
of the great cities of the world. None 
has made a finer contribution to the 
history, the culture, the way of life 
of this nation of ours. 

Yet, too much of Boston's great- 
ness lies in its past; thus our 
thoughts, our dreams, our plans for 
you and your city are focused on 
the future. Among Boston's greatest 
assets are its hills and parks, its 
harbors and rivers, but above all its 
people. Bostonians love their city; 
thus they stand ready to do their 
share towards making it a better 
place, for, after all, there is a little 
bit of Boston in everyone who calls 
himself an American. 



We have begun to rebuild Bos- 
ton and we find all America cheering 
us on. We are planning with people, 
not for people, and our efforts are 
being rewarded by marvelous co- 
operation and understanding. 

During the decade that lies 
ahead, you, who guard our lives and 
our property, will witness a new 
look in the old town. Each of you 
will have a voice, a role, a responsi- 
bility in devoting your energies and 
your resources to the creation of a 
better city and a better life for all 
our citizens. 




^uj^ 



John F. Collins, 

Mayor of Boston 



........ 




Architect's rendering of Prudential Center in Boston, 
to become world's largest (315 acres) unified business, 
civic, and residential development. Focal point of 
Center is 52-story Prudential Tower which will rise 
more than 750 feet to become tallest office building in 
the world outside Manhattan. On eastern section 
(right) will be six apartment houses providing approxi- 
mately 1,750 residential units. For western section 
(left) of site is planned a 25-story, 1,000-room hotel to 
be operated by Hotel Corporation of America. Behind 
hotel is City of Boston Municipal Auditorium. Other 
structures are commercial buildings which will house 
banking facilities, restaurants, specialty shops, and 
other retail stores. 



PROPOSED NEW GOVERNMENT CENTER 




NEW DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION 




■ 

SUPERINTENDENT FRANCIS J. HENNESSY 



The chain of command of the Uniformed Force is 
organized under the Superintendent of Police, Francis 
J. Hennessy, with the following Deputy Superintend- 
ents in charge of the major areas of responsibility: 
Francis M. Tiernan, in charge of the Bureau of Crimi- 
nal Investigation; James J. Hinchey, Commanding 
Officer of the Traffic Division; Andrew Markhard, 
Director of Training and Civil Defense activities; 
John J. Slattery, Jr., District Inspector, First District, 
comprising Divisions i, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 15; Joseph J. 
Cummings, District Inspector, Second District, Super- 
visor of Divisions 6, 9, 10, 14, and 16; and William J. 
Hogan, District Inspector, Supervisor of Divisions 11, 
13, 17, iS, and 10. Deputy Superintendent John J. 
Danehy, Chief Clerk of the Department, reports 
directlv to the Police Commissioner. 




DEPT. SUPT. ANDREW MARKHARD 





DEPT. SUPT. FRANCIS M. TIERNAN 




DEPT. SUPT. JOHN J. DANEHY 



DEPT. SUPT. JAMES J. HINCHEY 





Deputy Superintendent William J. Hogan 



Deputy Superintendent Joseph J. Cummings 




Deputy Superintendent John J. Slattery, Jr. 
RE-EMPHASIZING THE DEPARTMENT SLOGAN 



pset 





* *0& Q -r* -* " A/A 




-j.iMtia.tf 1 




ORGANIZATION OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 




AU TO SQ UAD 

DOMESTIC 
RELATIONS UNIT 

HOMICIDE SQUAD 

NARCOTICS ANO 
VICE SQUAO 

ROBBERY SOUAO 

SPECIAL SERVICE 
SQUAD 



1 


OISTRICT-1 






DISTRICT-Z 






OISTRICT-3 



IDENTIFICATION 
UNIT 



BALLISTICS 
UNIT 



BIOLOGICAL 
CHEMIST 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT 






AND RECORDS 








BUREAU 














STATISTICAL 
MACHINE SECTION 














CENTRAL COMPLAINT 
ROOM 
















RADIO 
MAINTENANCE 





POLICE 
ACADEMY 



REVOLVER 
RANGE 



DIVISION 1 



DIVISION 2 



| DIVISION 3 



DIVISION 4 



DIVISION 6 



DIVISION 7 



DIVISION 8 
HARBOR MASTER 
HARBOR PATROL 



DIVISION 9 



DIVISION 10 



DIVISION lT"| | DIVISION 13 | | DIVISION 14 | | DIVISION IS | | DIVISION 16 | | DIVISION IT [ | DIVISION ts| | OIVISION 19 | 



BOSTON POLIC 




BOSTON'S NEWEST CRUISER-PATROL WAGON 



THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner . 
Secretary 

Confidential Secretary 
Legal Advisor 
Assistant Secretaries 



Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 
Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 



The Police Force 



7 
26 

87 

255 

s igo 



Patrolmen 
Patrolwomen 



f2,200 

3 



Total 2,769 

* Includes 2 patrolwomen 

I Includes 6 patrolmen in armed service 



Director .... 
Director, Assistant 
Linemen and Cable Splicers 
Machinist 



Signal Service 



10 
1 



Motor Equipment Operators and Laborers 
Painter and Groundman .... 

Signalmen-Electricians 

Total 



3 

1 
_6 



Employees of the Department (Not Included in Above) 



Biological Chemist .... 
Biological Chemist, Assistant 

Clerk-Typists 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine ( )perator 
Elevator Operators 

Head Clerks 

Head Administrative Clerk . 
Hearings Stenographers 
Hostlers 



Jamtresses 

Junior Building Custodians . 
Matron, Chief .... 

Matron, Assistant Chief 
Matrons, Police .... 
Medical Examiner .... 
Motor Equipment Repairmen 
Multilith Operator and Cameraman 
Principal Clerks .... 



1 Principal Clerk-Typists 5 

1 Principal Clerk-Stenographers .... 3 

2 Principal Statistical Machine Operator . . 1 

1 Property Clerk 1 

7 Senior Building Custodian 1 

ig Senior Clerk-Typists 13 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographers 2 

7 Senior Statistical Machine Operator ... 1 

6 .Statistical Machine Operators .... 7 

6 Steam Firemen 8 

51 Storeroom Helper and Motor Equipment 

1 Operator 1 

1 Superintendent of Police Buildings ... 1 

1 1 Superintendent of Police Buildings, Assistant 1 

1 Telephone Operators 1 1 

20 Working Foreman and Motor Equipment 

1 Repairman 1 

Total 196 



II 



Recapitulation 

Police Commissioner i 

Secretary i 

Confidential Secretary i 

Legal Advisor i 

Assistant Secretaries 2 

Police Force 2,769 

Signal Service 23 

Employees 19b 

Grand Total 2,994 



CALLING 

ALL 

CARS 




Distribution and Changes 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. During the year 50 patrolmen were appointed; 
11 patrolmen resigned (2 while charges were pending); 3 captains were promoted to deputy superintendents; 

7 lieutenants were promoted to captains ; 1 6 sergeants were promoted to lieutenants ; 40 patrolmen were promoted 
to sergeants; 13 patrolmen assigned as first-grade detectives; 13 patrolmen assigned as second-grade detectives; 

8 patrolmen assigned as third-grade detectives; 5 captains, 3 lieutenants, 3 sergeants, 48 patrolmen, and 1 patrol- 
woman were retired on pensions; 3 sergeants and 16 patrolmen died. (See Tables III, IV, and V.) 



Police Officers Injured While on Duty 



How In-jured 



Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

November 30, i960 



Number of Duties 
Lost by Such Men 



Number of Duties 
Lost This Year by 
Men on Account 
of Injuries Received 
Previous to Decem- 
ber 1, 1959 



In arresting prisoners 
In pursuing criminals 
By cars and other vehicles 
Various other causes 

Totals 



76 

15 

78 

166 



1,001 

235 
1,366 

2,882 



607 

13 
1.864 

1,783 



335 



5.484 



4,267 



12 




OUR "SENIOR SENATOR" ARRIVES AT THE BALL 



HIS EMINENCE, CARDINAL CUSHING, 
PRESENTS MEDAL OF HONOR TO 
DETECTIVE JOSEPH G. CUNNINGHAM 



DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT JAMES HINCHEY 

PINS MEDAL ON 

DETECTIVE JAMES R. BICKERTON 





AWARD OF MEDALS 





DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 



WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for i960, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual Ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association held at the Boston Garden, November 30, i960, as follows: 

The Waller Scott Mcdul for Valor, a Department Medal of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award to Detective Joseph G. Cunningham, 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 

Detective Joseph G. Cunningham of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, Special Service Squad, is hereby awarded the 
Walter Scott Medal for Valor, a Department Medal of Honor, and the Thomas F. .Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on 
July 13, i960. 

On July 13, i960, Detective Cunningham, while off duty, observed a man whom he recognized as an escapee from Walpole 
Stale Prison and known to be a vicious, dangerous, and most wanted criminal. This man had evaded capture for more than six months 
and was the leader of a gang responsible for a wave of armed robberies in this community. 

Detective Cunningham carefully shadowed his suspect to a dwelling on Dorchester avenue and then alerted four other members 
of the Special Service Squad who responded immediately. Investigation revealed that an apartment at that address had been rented 
to a former associate of the suspect, and the detectives kept it under close surveillance. When it was determined that three most 
dangerous, heavily armed felons were "hiding out" in this apartment, additional assistance was requested from Police Division II. 
Upon arrival these officers were deployed around the building as a security measure. 

Detective Cunningham, with his brother officers, Detectives Walsh, Moar, Powers, an.! Nee, employing the element of sur- 

crashed through the front and rear of the apartment simultaneously. At the moment of entrance the leader of the gang 

attempted to .haw a fully loaded revolver from his belt. Detective Cunningham, with his revolver ready, shouted "Try it, and I'll 

kill you." The gang leader slowly raised his hands and surrendered. His confederates were quickly subdued and disarmed by the 

ives. 

These hardened criminals were subsequently convicted of a series of armed robberies and other serious offenses and are now 
serving long terms in State Prison. 



14 



Department Medals of Honor and Thomas /•'. Sullivan Awards 



The Departraenl Medals of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Awards are hereby awarded to Detectives Edward J. Walsh, 
fames \V. Moar, Francis D. Powers, and John v. \ee of the Buicau (if Criminal Investigation, Special Service Squad, for meritorious 
service performed in the ease previously cited. 



Patrolmen Philip J. O'Neill, Francis X. Malone, and Wairen R. Bradley of Division 14 arc hereby awarded a Department 
Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on November 12, 1959. 

In the early morning of November 12, 1959, radio car Patrolmen O'Neill and Malone and route officer Patrolman Bradley, 
while at Union square, Allston, observed smoke coming from a large wooden dwelling, a licensed lodging house, located at 502 Cam- 
bridge street. The officers immediately sounded an alarm of fire and also notified the Central Complaint Room. 

Knowing that this building was the dwelling of many aged and infirm persons and fearful of a catastrophe, Patrolmen O'Neill, 
Malone, and Bradley ran to the house and observed flames shooting from the rear of the building. Unable to arouse the occupants 
they battered in the front and rear doors, entered the burning building, and ran from door to door awakening the residents. In 
several cases the officers were compelled to break inner doors. With the flames spreading rapidly, the three patrolmen continued their 
search through the dark and heavy smoke of the three floors of the premises until all the occupants had been assisted to the street. 



Patrolmen Vincent J. Mercadante and Joseph J. Mikenas, Jr., of Division 9 are hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor 
and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on November 2, 1959. 

On November 2, 1959, two men, one armed with a nickel-plated revolver, leaving a third man at the wheel of a waiting auto- 
mobile with the motor running, entered the package g Is store at 108 Blue Hill avenue, Roxbury. The armed man, pointing the 

revolver at the clerk, shouted, "I want the money," and as the clerk opened the cash register, reached in and seized the contents. 
Both men then ran from the store. 

At that moment Patrolmen Mercadante and Mikenas, in cruising wagon of Division 9, were passing the store. Observing men 
running and the clerk at the doorway waving his arms, the officers immediately sensed that a holdup was in progress. 

As the fleeing bandits entered their "getaway car," Patrolman Mercadante drove the cruising wagon at an angle in front of 
the car, while Patrolman Mikenas approached the vehicle on foot. The driver of the "getaway car" drove over the sidewalk, narrowly 
missing Patrolman Mikenas, and sped away. The officers took up pursuit and after a furious chase through narrow Roxbury streets 
forced the bandits' car to the curb. 

These armed robbers were placed under arrest and are now serving long prison terms. 



Detectives Joseph F. Denney, William T. Eunson, and Thomas J. McGuire of the Robbery Squad are hereby awarded a De- 
partment Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty. 

These detectives were assigned in a continuing investigation of armed holdups committed in Cumbeiland Farms, Inc., dairy 
stores, First National Stores, and various liquor stores and markets. Working as a three-man team, they spent not only their regular 
hours of duty but many extra hours staked out in various areas and obtaining and breaking down all available information. Working 
slowly and carefully, they finally produced a so-called facsimile description of a suspect. 

Patiently searching the files of the Identification Section, the detectives located a photograph of a hardened criminal who had 
been recently released from the Massachusetts State Prison. The photograph was identified by a victim of two separate armed robberies 
at a First National Store in Eliot square, Roxbury. 

As a result of this positive identification, these detectives staked out in the vicinity of Crescent avenue and Raven street, Dor- 
chester, and on November 28, 1959, apprehended their suspect. The prisoner was found to have in his possession twenty-three one- 
dollar bills covered with blue ink which had spilled on them at the time of the First National Store robbery. 

The prisoner confessed to the commission of fifteen armed holdups in this city between August 15, 1959, and November 27, 
1959, and has been convicted for his crimes. 

The detectives also seized a .45-calibre automatic pistol and recovered a stolen car used in the commission of these robberies. 



*"* 



Deputy Superintendent 
Andrew Markhard 
congratulates Medal Winners 



I » .... 

m0 * 



Deputy Superintendent 
Joseph J. Cummings 
congratulates Medal Winners 



Deputy Superintendent 
William Hogan presents 
Department Medal of 
Honor 



Commissioner Sullivan 
presents Department Medal 
at Ball 



Chief Hector Pelletier, 
Cohasset, Massachusetts 




[6 

Patrolman John F. Chenette of the Traffic Division is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas I\ 
Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on January 24, i960. 

( in January -?4, cg6o, Patrolman Chenette. who was assigned to a paid detail for the Boston Edison Company near the inter- 
section of Cambridge and Charles streets, was informed that a young lady had been assaulted by a man in the "pedestrian passageway" 
under Charles street and that she was then on her way to the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Patrolman Chenette made an immediate and diligent search of the area but was unable to locate the attacker and telephoned 
the information to Division 3. 

The officer returned to his assignment, and about ten minutes later a young woman, who refused to identify herself, came to 
him and informed him that she had been assaulted in the same "pedestrian passageway" by a young man, about nineteen years of age, 
wearing a tweed jacket, which he had thrown over her head while he attempted to wrestle her to the ground. 

Patrolman Chenette received permission to absent himself from the detail while he procured civilian attire on his assumption 
that the wanted man was somewhere in the vicinity and would hesitate to put in an appearance while an officer in uniform was present. 
He returned to the intersection so attired and began a search for the culprit. His efforts were rewarded when he observed a young man 
who answered the description of the attacker loitering in front of the Nurses' Home of the Massachusetts General Hospital at a position 
from which he commanded an unobstructed view of both entrances to the "pedestrian passageway." 

Patrolman Chenette approached the man, identified himself as a police officer, and questioned him at length regarding these 
offenses. After close interrogation the suspect admitted to these attacks and also to other cases of molesting young women in this area. 
He was placed under arrest and subsequently committed as a defective delinquent. 



Patrolman James R. Bickerton, Identification Section of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, is hereby awarded a Depart- 
ment Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 7, 1959. 

( hi April 7, 1959, a 65-year-old widow was the victim of a vicious felonious assault in her own home in the South End District. 
Questioned at the Boston City Hospital, she described her assailant as a young man wearing a United States Navy uniform. 

With only this meager description, detectives of Division 4 were unable to identify the attacker and requested the services of a 
fingerprint expert. 

Patrolman Bickerton responded and after a lengthy and diligent search discovered four fresh prints on the headboard of the 
bed. These four latent prints were forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D. C, for compaiison search with 
prints on file in that Bureau. Sometime later information was received from J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation, that these prints were those of a young United States Navy seaman, and he was apprehended and convicted of this atrocious 
crime. 

When the assailant of this woman fled from her home, there were no witnesses or clues to assist in the solution of this crime 
other than the slight description of the criminal received from the hospitalized victim. The resultant indictment, conviction, and sen- 
tencing of the offender was solely and directly the result of the diligence and devotion to duty displayed by Patrolman Bickerton. 



Patrolman Nicholas M. Clinton, Jr., of Division 11 is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. 
Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on March 16, i960. 

About 2:20 a.m., March 16, i960, Patrolman Clinton, while patrolling his route in the Dorchester District, heard a noise coming 
from one of the stores in that area. He immediately investigated and upon inspecting the premises at 157 Neponset avenue, occupied 
by the Bearing Service Company, found that the front door had been forced. 

Patrolman Clinton entered the store with drawn revolver and in the office found a man, whom he ordered to walk with his 
hands up from the office to the front of the store. The subject complied with this command, and as he walked toward Patrolman. 
Clinton, the officer observed a knife in his hand. Patrolman Clinton disarmed him and took him to Station 1 1, where he was identified. 
He admitted forcing the door and stealing United States currency. He was booked on suspicion of breaking and entering a building 
in the nighttime and larceny. 



Detectives Charles W. Miller, Jr., John T. Carter, and Alan J. Crisp of the Robbery Squad are hereby awarded a Department 
Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 1, i960. 

Since January 6, i960, the taxicab operators of this city and surrounding cities and towns had been the victims of assault and 
robbery by a male person who seemed to defy the police in Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston. These crimes were com- 
mitted in the dead of the night, and the above-mentioned detectives spent many extra hours of duty on their own time in an attempt to 
locate and arrest this dangerous felon. 







A GROUP OF MEDAL WINNERS 



F.B.I. SPECIAL AGENT LEO LAUGHLIN PRESENTS MEDALS 



SENATOR LEVERETT SALTONSTALL PINS MEDAL OF HONOR 



DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT FRANCIS TIERNA] 
PRESENTS DEPARTMENT MEDAL 




18 

At about i :.v a-m., April i. [960, a man employed by the Checker Taxi Company as an operator was engaged by a man .-it 
Washington and Avery streets who directed him to drive to Brighton by way of Storrow Drive. He did as directed and. upon arriving 
at Myrick street, Brighton, lie was assaulted and robbed by the fare, and the Checker taxicab was stolen from him. 

At about 1:50 a.m., same date, a radio alarm was received as the result of the driver's calling the Central Complaint Bureau, 
stating that the holdup man was operating the cab stolen from him, Massachusetts registration A2745. 

These detectives worked out a plan of attack based on the pattern used by the holdup man on previous occasions and went 
immediately to the vicinity of Cottage Farm Bridge and Commonwealth avenue. The suspect was netted in the trap. The Checker 
taxicab was spotted on the Boston University Bridge by Detectives Miller and Carter, who followed the rah into Mountfort and St. 
Mary's streets, at which point the detectives blocked it from entering Mountfort street in Boston, The operator jumped out of the stolen 
cab and refused to stop when so ordered by the detectives. He was chased on foot for about [50 yards when Detectives Miller and 
Carter discharged their service revolvers at the fleeing bandit, striking him in the right thigh. 

The prisoner was searched by Detective Miller at the time of arrest, and a wallet taken from the taxicab driver in the holdup 
which occurred earlier that morning was found in his possession, together with property of other victims. 



Patrolman Gerald R. Bulman, Special Service Squad of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, is hereby awarded a Depart- 
ment Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 22, i960. 

On April 22. i960, Patrolman Bulman, with Detective Edward J. Walsh, were patiently shadowing a known drug addict in 
the South End District. This addict, a young woman, was observed taking a taxi to Roxbury with a male companion. The officers 
followed and took both into custody on suspicion of violation of the Narcotic Drug Law. A search of the man at Police Headquarters 
provided the officeis with a key to a locker, the location of which the prisoner refused to disclose. After a search of bus terminals, rail- 
road depots, and subway stations they finally located the locker in the Dudley Street MTA Station. This locker revealed a brown 
paper bag containing heroin and other narcotic drugs valued at more than S5,ooo. 

On being confronted with this evidence, the prisoner at first refused to talk, but after diligent interrogation by the officers he 
admitted that he was both an addict and a "pusher" of narcotic drugs. He further revealed that he had stolen these drugs in a break 
into the home of a New York City narcotics peddler and that he came to Boston to sell the drugs to addicts in this city. 

As a result of this arrest and investigation New York City Police were able to break up a notorious ring of narcotic peddlers 
who have been operating successfully in that area and have shut off an extensive source of illegally obtained narcotic drugs. 



Patrolman Thomas M. Lambert of Division 16 is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Award for meritorious duty performed on May 19, i960. 

On Thursday, May 19, i960, an elderly lady, while in the vestibule of St. Cecilia's Church, Belvidere street, was assaulted by 
a man who grabbed her around the throat, threw her to the floor, then stole her handbag and ran from the church. A priest heard the 
screams of this woman and pursued her assailant to the vicinity of Boylston and St. Cecilia streets, where the man disappeared. 

Patrolman Lambert, performing traffic duty on Boylston street, was informed by the priest of what had taken place. The 
officer recalled observing a man answering the description given him entering the premises of a nearby cafe a few moments earlier. 
Patrolman Lambert searched these premises and found the suspect hiding in the basement. He was placed under arrest on suspicion of 
the above assault and robbery. Fr< >m under a parked automobile on St. Cecilia street the officer later recovered a handbag of the victim, 
who identified her assailant. 

Further investigation revealed that the prisoner was the perpetrator of other attacks on helpless elderly women in this vicinity. 



Detective John R. Donovan an 1 Patrolman Robert T. Glynn of Division 15 are hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor 
and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on March 31, i960. 

In the early morning of March 31. i960, Patrolman Glynn, while patrolling his assigned sector, observed on the rear seat of a 
Ford station wagon, parked on Harvard street, Charlestown, a huge brown canvas bag with a locked zippered top, marked "Hillcrest 
Dairy, Worcester, Massachusetts," said bag having been slashed open. 

Patrolman Glynn called the officer in charge at the station relative to his suspicions concerning the car and the canvas bag, 
and he was instructed to bring the bag to the station for safekeeping. The Worcester Police Department was then contacted, and it 
was learned that the "Hillcrest Dairy" had been entered during the night of March 20, i960, the safe ripped open, and about Sio.ooo 
in cheeks and United States currency stolen. 

Armed with this information, all dwellings on Harvard street were checked for the owner or occupants of the station wagon. 
During this time Detective Donovan had the suspicious car under surveillance and was rewarded when he observed two men walking 
down Harvard street, one carrying a large cardboard box. As they started to raise the upper tail gate of the vehicle, Detective Donovan 
approached with gun in hand an 1 place 1 them under arrest. 

Investigation revealed these prisoners to be notorious "safe breakers," and they were sentenced to the State Prison for long 
terms. 



• 1 AM 



i#Br».'^ 



OUR "PRINCE OF THE CHURCH," CARDINAL CUSHING, ARRIVES AT OUR 
ANNUAL BALL ACCOMPANIED BY POLICE COMMISSIONER LEO 
SULLIVAN AND HIS AIDE, DETECTIVE JAMES CONROY 




Deputy Superintendent 

John Slattery presents Awards 



Deputy Superintendent 
John Danehy presents Medal 



Superintendent Francis J 
Hennsssy congratulates 
Medal of Honor Man 





20 



DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 




ARRESTS 

The total number of arrests, counting each 
arrest as that of a separate person, was 80,551. 

There were 11,478 arrests on warrants and 
32,389 without warrants; 36,684 were summoned 
by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 70,824; 
of females, 9,727. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 
38,557. The amount of fines totaled $223,218.00. 

The total number of days' attendance at 
court by officers was 40,171, and the witness 
fees earned amounted to $32,156.00. 

There were 24,412 persons arrested for 
drunkenness. 



Two hundred seven were committed to the 
State Prison; 1,276 to the House of Correction; 
65 to Concord Reformatory; 716 to Bridgewater 
Reformatory; 59 to the Women's Reformatory; 
394 to the Youth Service Board; and 2,845 t° 
the County Jail. 

The value of property taken from prisoners 
and lodgers was $221,163.00. 

The value of property stolen in the city 
amounted to $3,575,781.00 and the value re- 
covered amounted to $2,050,731.00. 



ICw. 




NEWSBOYS LOOK OVER JUVENILE TROUBLE SPOTS WITH SUPERINTENDENT HENNESSY 






Captain Francis X. Quinn — i 



Captain Patrick J. O'Donnell — 2 



Captain John J. McArdle — 3 






Captain Michael F. O'Brien — 4 



Captain Herbert F. Mulloney — 4 



Captain Paul R. Dailey — 6 



22 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 



The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several units, 
namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, Homicide, Lost and 
Stolen Property, Identification, and Missing Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the following phases 
of police work and investigations: banking, express thieves, general investi- 
gation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, vice and obscene literature, pawnbrokers, 
junk shops, secondhand dealers, pickpockets, shoplifters, domestic relations, 
and subversive activities. 




Capt. Warren A. Blair 
S.S. Squad 



Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a 
year for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate 
in every way possible with outside police departments in investigation of crime and prosecution of criminals. 

DETECTIVE BUREAU 

A Detective Bureau was established in the Boston Police Department on November 6, 1950, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. Detectives assigned to this Bureau are detailed to the Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation and the various police divisions. 



EVER SO GENTLY 



THANK GOD WE GOT OUT IN TIME 




2.3 



AUTOMOBILE UNIT 

This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and is in daily communication with police au- 
thorities of the United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, Post Office Department, and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The Automobile Unit index contains records of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars re- 
ported purchased and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons, and cars whose oper- 
ators are wanted for various offenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the department and the Automobile 
Unit through information obtained from this index. 

All applications for used car dealers' licenses are investigated by officers of this unit. Frequent examina- 
tions are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this unit during the year identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, restoring them to their owners, and 
have assisted in solving many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 



LOST AND STOLEN PROPERTY UNIT 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities 
and towns throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen in such places. All pawnbrokers and 
secondhand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of 
articles reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the recovery 
of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



DEEP SNOW OFFERS NO OBSTACLE 



OK— WE'RE ON THE WAY 




2 4 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This Department 
for the Year Ending November 30, i960 



Month 


Bought by 
Dealers 


Sold by 
Dealers 


Sold by 
Individuals 


!959 
December 


2,390 


2,501 


i-578 


January 
February 
March . 
April . 
May . 






19 


60 












2,648 

2,999 
2,964 
3,420 
3,48o 


2,4S2 

2,756 
3,243 
3,217 
3-527 


i,i3S 

7/i 
903 

1,010 
1,084 


June 

July . 

August 

September 

October 

November 




















3,255 
2,741 
2,903 
2,465 
3,136 
2,500 


3,590 

2,944 
3,235 
2,909 
3,246 
2,293 


973 
830 
916 
805 

831 
884 


Totals 




















34,901 


35-943 


1 1,720 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston 
for the Year Ending November 30, i960 



Month 


Reported 


Recovered 


Recovered 


Not 


Stolen 


During Month 


Later 


Recovered 


J 959 










December .... 


308 


2S9 


14 


5 


iq6o 










January . 


299 


272 


20 


7 


February 










322 


298 


15 


9 


March 










282 


252 


19 


11 


April 










338 


305 


25 


S 


May 










353 


328 


13 


12 


June 










338 


300 


27 


1 1 


July 










292 


264 


18 


10 


August 










356 


312 


29 


15 


September 










329 


296 


19 


14 


October . 










372 


34i 


10 


21 


November 










439 


374 





65 


Totals .... 


4,028 


3,631 


209 


1 88 




VHrShmBPI 



TAKE IT EASY, FELLA — YOU'RE NOT GOING ANYWHERE 



26 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HOMICIDE UNIT 



Personnel assigned to this unit supervise the investigation of homicide 
cases and deaths of a suspicious or violent nature. They are assigned to 
procure and present evidence at inquests. Transcripts of statements received 
by these officers from witnesses and defendants are prepared for use as 
evidence in trials of capital cases. 




CAPT. JOSEPH B. FALLON 



ICY ROADS + HIGH SPEED 




Investigatec 


1 




Abortions .... 10 


Accidental shooting 




2 


Asphyxiation 




4 


Burns 






iS 


Drowning . 






i5 


Electricity 






i 


Elevator 






4 


Explosion . 






3 


Falling objects . 






i 


Falls . 






17 


Homicides 






24 


Machinery 






3 


M.T.A. 






4 


Motor vehicles 






38 


Motorcycles 






3 


Natural causes 






1,380 


Plane crash 






59 


Railroad train . 






1 


Shot by police office 


r 




1 


Stillborn . 






2 


Suicides 






29 



Total . 



1,619 



Cases Presented in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 



Abortion 

Assault and battery 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 

Assault and battery with dangerous weapon 

Assault with intent to murder 

Conspiracy .... 

Homicides 

Robbery .... 

Violation of firearm law 



6 

15 
28 
iS 

7 

1 

iS 

3 




27 
Recapitulation of Homicides 

Defendant charged with manslaughter (auto) — - "No Probable Cause" in lower court — found guilty of four 

violations of auto law 
Defendants charged with manslaughter — held for Grand Jury — ''No Bill" returned by Grand Jurv 
Defendant charged with manslaughter — "No Bill " returned by Grand Jury — indicted for assault and battery 
Defendant charged with manslaughter — adjudged delinquent child (manslaughter) — committed to Youth 

Service Board 
Defendant charged with manslaughter — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty in Superior Court 
Defendants indicted for manslaughter — still pending in court 
Defendant charged with murder — dismissed in lower court 
Defendant charged with murder — still confined in Boston City Hospital 

Defendants charged with murder — ''No Probable Cause" in lower court — guilty of assault and battery 
Defendants charged with murder — reduced to affray in lower court 
Defendant charged with murder — "No Bill" returned by Grand Jury 
i Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree, ruled insane — committed to Massa- 
chusetts Correctional Institution (Bridgewater) 
i Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree, found "Not Guilty" by reason of insanity 
— remanded to Boston State Hospital 

t Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — still pending in court 

(Twenty-four defendants involved in eighteen homicides) 
? Persons committed suicide following commission of three murders 

1 Murder cases still under investigation 

2 1Q59 murders cleared by arrest 

GET HIM TO THE HOSPITAL QUICKLY — THE PARTICULARS WE'LL GET LATER 



*'%«• 




28 

THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



DOMESTIC RELATIONS UNIT 

The Domestic Relations Unit was organized on July n. 1958, and charged with the following 

responsibilities: 

(a) To work with and assist the City of Boston Public Welfare authorities and the directors and supervisors of the Division 
of Aid to Dependent Children in the investigation and prosecution of all frauds and larcenies perpetrated upon these agencies by those 
not legally or properly entitled to assistance. 

(ft) To cooperate with and assist the police officers in the various divisions whenever required in the service of warrants in 
nonsupport cases. 

(r) To cooperate with the clerks of the municipal and district courts in Boston in the execution and service of nonsupport 
warrants which are outstanding. 

(d) To examine the so-called "dead warrant files" of the Police Department in all cases where the dependents of the accused 
are receiving city aid of any type and to further investigate and apprehend the named offenders. 

(c) With the cooperation and permission of the clerks of the several municipal and district courts in Boston, to examine all 
nonsupport cases where warrants have been "returned without service" and where the named defendant's dependents are receiving 
aid with a view to further investigate, arrest, and prosecute wherever possible. 

The members of this unit do not in any way embarrass or interfere with those who are rightly and justi- 
fiably receiving aid and enter into the cases only where there are reasonable grounds which lead the court authori- 
ties or Public Welfare officials to believe that fraud exists. 



Investigations Involving Welfare Cases 

C: 1 ses referred to the Domestic Relations Unit by the City of Boston Welfare Department 2,350 

Cases referred by other sources (nonsupport warrants returned without set vice, anonymous letters, and police reports) . 297 



Total 2.647 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the 
Domestic Relations Unit Secured Evidence 

(a) Arrests for larceny by reason of fraudulently receiving welfare aid to a total amount of $170,731 77 

77 were convicted of larceny 

In these cases the court ordered the defendants to make restitution to the City of Boston of a total amount of 
$70,731- 

(b) Arrests for nonsupport and illegitimacy 612 

97 were committed to penal institutions 
515 were ordered to pay support through the court 

Cases investigated involving fraud or collusion where no evidence was uncovered 2,000 

Cases involving nonsupport where investigation is continuing 194 

Cases involving illegal receipt of welfare aid which were settled without court action by the Legal Division of the City of 

Boston Welfare Department 165 

As the result of investigations made by this unit of 815 recipients, the City of Boston Welfare Department 
discontinued aid in 305 cases and reduced aid in 510 cases. 

Amount of money ordered by the various courts to be paid through the Probation Departments in cases of 
arrests for nonsupport of family and illegitimate children during the past year amounted to $210,560. In addition 
to this amount $102,746, made up of reimbursements in cases of larceny by fraud, totals $313,306, which has been 
saved the City of Boston. 



2 9 



NARCOTICS AND VICE UNIT 

The Narcotics and Vice Unit is charged with the investi- 
gation and prosecution of persons who commit crimes against 
chastity, morality, decency, and good order, involving the unlaw- 
ful sale, distribution, and use of narcotic drugs and derivatives 
and the importing, printing, publishing, selling, distributing, or 
exhibiting of obscene or impure literature, prints, pictures, etc. 
This unit also cooperates with federal agencies in the investiga- 
tion of interstate prostitution and transportation of narcotic 
drugs and obscene literature. 




Capt. Edward F. Blake- 
Narcotics and Vice Unit 



Narcotic Drug Law violations 
Prostitution and related offenses 
Pretended fortunetelling 



282 

2 



Investigations 

Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. 

Total 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the Narcotics and Vice Unit Secured Evidence 

Pretended fortunetelling 

Total 



Illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs . 
Prostitution and related offenses . 
Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. 



157 
28 



41 
688 



474 



PORNOGRAPHIC MATERIAL SEIZURE 



(Top) PEYOTE, A POWERFUL HARMFUL DRUG 
(Bottom) MEMBERS OF NARCOTIC UNIT 




3° 



Recapitulation 



Narcotic Drug Violations: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined 
Suspended sentence . 
Placed on file 
Found not guilty 
Cases pending . 



Total . 

Prostitution and Related Offenses 
Sentenced to institutions 
Suspended sentence 
Placed on file 
Found not guilty 
Cases pending . 

Total . 



or fined 



Obscene Literature, Prints, Pictures, etc. : 
Sentenced to institutions or fined 
Placed on file .... 
Found not guilty 
Suspended sentence . 

Total 



Si 

4') 

4 

14 

39 

1 57 

72 

ji 
26 
38 



287 



1 2 

1 

4 
1 r 

28 



Pretended Fortunetelling: 

Found guilty and probation 



Members of this unit have worked in close cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal 
Narcotic Bureau, Post Office Department, Alcohol Tax Unit of the Federal Government, the District Attorney's 
Office, as well as the state and local police departments. 

Officers of this unit have appeared at thirty-six engagements to speak before various civic, religious, and 
educational groups on narcotic problems. A complete exhibition of narcotic and harmful drugs is on display in 
this office. Visiting law enforcement officers as well as civilians on tour of Police Headquarters are shown this 
display as part of education in problems of narcotic law enforcement. 



Robert E. Bradley — 15 John F. McElhinney — 14 

M 



Charles J. Deignan — 13 



Joseph V. Saia — 11 




John J. O'Keefe — 10 



Dennis F. Dalton — 9 



Arthur C. Cadegan — 8 



Francis C. Berringer- 



3i 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation expert in ballistics, explosives, and 
munitions. All evidence found at the scene of crime where firearms or explosives were used is examined. Suspected 
weapons are catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent bullets and discharged cases from these 
weapons are filed. Cases involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the various courts. 

This unit responds to all calls where threats of bombing are received and makes a thorough examination of 
the premises to make certain that no bombs are planted thereon. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to same, and tear gas equipment have been inspected and 
serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are returned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on stolen 
firearms, and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen Property Unit and at the files of the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Public Safety. 

When firearms property of the United States are found used in crime or recovered otherwise, such property 
is returned to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police departments, federal agencies, military and naval intelli- 
gence units. 



COMMISSIONER LEO SULLIVAN AND SUPERINTENDENT HENNESSY WITH YANKEE STARS YOGI 
BERRA, BILL SKOWRON, AND GIL MacDOUGALL, MAKING A "BIG HIT" FOR THE JIMMY FUND 




32 

THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION | 

Emergency Equipment 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supply of emergency equipment consisting of 1 2-gauge 
riot shotguns, ammunition, belts with bayonets attached, bulletproof vests, tear gas gun kit and assembly, and gas 
masks which provide complete respiratory protection for the wearer in all oxygen-deficient or highly gaseous at- 
mospheres. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced whenever necessary. 

During the past year this unit assisted in 496 cases as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths .... is 

Armed robbery . 17 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 38 

Bomb scares 34 

Bombs, explosives, etc 22 

Bullets recovered, no other crime involved 7 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc. . 54 

Firearms law, violation of 141 

Murder 7 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 6 

Suicide, attempt 2 

Weapons, examined and held for safekeeping 44 

Weapons, examined and returned to owners 15 

Weapons, found, disposal, etc 94 

Total 496 

Cornelius F. O'Brien— 16 Leo E. Hoban— 17 John F. Petitti— 18 Edward W. Mannix, Jr.— 1 




Thomas M. Corbett— B.C.I. 



Bernard P. Slattery— Traffic 



Herbert J. Langlois — Hdqrs. James V. Crowley — Robbery Un 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST 

The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in its nature, the frequency of any particular type 
being governed by the circumstances of the cases. A breakdown into types indicates the general scope of the 
laboratory. 



Material 










No. 


Material 






No. 


Sought of Tests 


Sou-lit 




if Tests 


Acetaldehyde 7 


Acid phosphatase . 




5 


Alcohol, ethyl . 


3 5 7 


Auto, examination of 




13 


Alcohol, i-propyl 


1 


Bloodstains 




43 


Alcohol, methyl 


15 


Bloodstains, typing 




3 


Alkalies 


7 


Cement 




3 


Alkaloids . 


b 


( 'loth patterns 




4 


Arsenic 


1 


Clothing . 




7° 


Barbiturates 


44 


Fibers 




1 


Bromides .... 




1 


Glass 




2 


Carbon monoxide . 




3i 


Hair . 




4 


Chlorinated hydrocarbons 




5 


Paint 




5 


Ethylene glycol 






2 


Powder residue, clothing 






10 


Fluorides .... 






I 


Powder residue, other . 






5 


Hydrocyanic acid 






2 


Restoration serial numl ler 






2 


Mercury . 






2 


Scene, examination of 






6 


Paraldehyde 










7 


Spectrographic examination 






1 


Photographs, color . 










28 


Spermatozoa . 






5 


Photographs, normal 










9 


Tire marks 






1 


Photographs, infra-red . 










9 


Tissue .... 






2 


Salicylates 










3 


Ultra-violet examination 






2 


Spectrophotometry, visual 










34 


X-ray diffraction 






2 


Spectrophotometry, ultra-violet 








74 


Miscellaneous . 






17 


Miscellaneous .... 








1 1 








Cases 








Medical 






Year 


Examiners Department 


Total 




1956 


278 93 


373 




1957 


314 74 


388 




1958 


35S 87 


442 




1959 


418 66 


484 




i960 












388 


80 


468 





ONE OF THE MANY GRUESOME SCENES AFTER AN ILL-FATED AIRLINE FLIGHT FROM LOGAN AIRPORT 



vXS^il^-Bi* 



s 



s* 






34 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 




IDENTIFICATION UNIT 

Records — Activities 

Recorded in the Main Index File . 843,270 

Recorded in the Female Record File . 21,984 

Recorded in the Male Record File . 233,330 

Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone . . 1,146 

Requests received by correspondence 6,582 

Requests for certified records . . 1,238 

Requests for jury records . . . 2,008 

Requests in connection with appli- 
cants for licenses .... 10,136 

Total 21,110 



Requests received from various public 
agencies : 

Stragglers and deserters (armed 

forces) 1,871 

Auxiliary police applicants . 



Grand Total 



Photography 



Number of photographs on file November 30, 1959 

Made and filed during the year 

Number of ''foreign" photographs on file November 30, 1959 

Number of ''foreign" photographs received during the year 

Total 

Number on file in the ''Local Segregated" file (gallery) 
Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file 
Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . 
Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 
Scenes of crime photographed 
Photographs sent to : 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and towns 
Number of rectigraph photographs 
Number of negatives of criminals . 
Number of prints made from same 
Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 
Number of prints from same 
Number of reorders of criminal photographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made 
Prints made from same . ... 

Number of photographs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime visited 
Number of exposures (4 by 5 camera) 
Number of prints of same . 

Color photography: 

Color ''mug" photographs on file 

Color photographs taken and processed 



14 



22,995 



699,317 

i8,73S 
18,156 

i,545 

737,753 

60,208 

17,926 

10O 

18 

365 

7,494 
2,463 
5,280 

3-747 
i8,735 
i,i39 
2,27s 
2,470 

27 

189 

100 

1,279 

2,594 

7.782 



9,000 
160 



35 



Fingerprint File 

Number on file November 30, 1959 

Taken and filed during the year: 

.Male 

Female 

Received from other authorities: 

.Male 

Female 

Number on file November 30, i960 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and towns 

Fingerprints taken other than those of criminals: 

Police officers 

Special police officers .... 
Hackney carriage drivers 

Civilian employees 

Firearms Act (revolver licenses) 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) November 30, 1959 
Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) November 30, i960 

Five-Finger System of Figerprinting 
(Established May 27, 1952) 

Number of 5-finger cards in file November 30, i960 

Number of main index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system November 30, i960 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in Identification Section November 30, 1960 

Number of connections made by latent prints since system established 



211, S9 2 



2,435 

4vS 



359 

129 

214,953 



3>36i 
3,36i 

174 

5° 
1,047 

1,769 
12 

353 

90,983 

95.311 



18,892 

9,446 

667 

359 



TESTING FOR LATENT PRINTS ON STOLEN VEHICLE 




Missing Persons 



Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 
Total number found, restored to relatives, etc. . 

Total number still missing . 



1,123 

1.07.? 

So 



* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing 
who were found or returned within a few hours after report was made 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 



Age 


Mis 


SING 


Foi 


IND 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, under 21 years .... 
Over 21 years 


197 
183 
222 


150 
237 
134 


194 
172 
202 


147 
229 
129 


3 

11 
20 


3 
8 

5 


Totals 


602 


521 


568 


505 


34 


16 



Reported missing in Boston 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Welfare and the Girls' and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training Schools 



Total number of persons reported missing 



1,123 
7,164 
2,53i 

281 
12,276 



Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 



Persons Reported Missing 

1 (North End section) . 

2 (Downtown section) . 

3 (West End section) 

4 (South End section) . 

6 (South Boston district) 

7 (East Boston district) 
9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

14 (Brighton district) 

15 (Charlestown district) 

16 (Back Bay district) 

17 (West Roxbury district) 

18 (Hyde Park district) . 

19 (Mattapan district) 



by Police Divisions for Past Year 



Total 



10 
o 

19 

127 

95 

53 

22S 

1S9 
i39 
50 
33 
4i 
3i 

2 3 
21 

54 



1,113 



(Patients missing from the Boston State Hospital are now being carried by the Department of Public 



Safety) 



Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 
Tracers sent out on persons reported missing 



5i5 

3,132 
589 



*Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the department 

In 82 cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, 66 were identified through fingerprint impressions. 
Three persons afflicted with amnesia were identified. 



37 



Warrants 



Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 

Warrants received from other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston 
Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston 



Total warrants received for service in Boston 



Warrants sent out for service to divisions and units within the department 
Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts .... 
Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this department 

Total warrants processed 



Warrants returned without service to our divisions and units 
Warrants returned without service to other departments 
Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 



6,0.31 
1,317 

14'/ 

7.497 

5,545 

1,160 

162 

"SO 

7,497 

2,107 

S61 

5,231 



Summonses 



Total number received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 
Total number served 



Total number not served 



Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 
Total number served 



Total number not served 



7,303 

6,616 


687 

28,116 

26,187 



1,929 



HONEST! I WONT DO IT AGAIN 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

A multilith machine under direct supervision 
of an experienced operator enables this department to 
prepare and complete printing of circulars containing 
photographs and fingerprints of persons either re- 
ported missing or wanted for criminal offenses. This 
multilith machine is also used to print department 
forms. 

The multilith machine is completely equipped 
with camera, arc lights, vacuum frame, which add to 
the varied output of this machine. This machine is 
capable of printing in approximately two hours' time 
descriptive circulars of persons wanted. In some in- 
stances circulars are completed and mailed to outside 
cities before a fugitive arrives at his destination. 

This unit also has a high-speed electric addressc- 
graph machine and two electric mimeograph machines 
which are used to make daily manifolds, warrant mani- 
folds, bulletins, and circular letters for the various 
units and divisions, including Police School lessons. 




38 

THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The' Traffic Division of the Boston Police Department is responsible for the control of traffic and the en- 
forcement of parking regulations within that area of the city composed of Divisions i, 2, 3, 4, and 16, between the 
hours of 8 a.m. and 12 midnight, daily except Sundays. Its work is supplemented by the divisions concerned which 
provide coverage for school crossings and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. traffic posts. The Traffic Division processes parking 
violation notices for the entire department and prepares them for typing and mailing at the Chief Clerk's Office. 
The Traffic Division provides a safety patrol for duty throughout the entire city. 

The Traffic Problem 

Statistics released by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles indicate an increase in the volume of vehicular traffic 
during the past year of 4 per cent. Total registrations on October 31, iq6o, amounted to 1,825,148, as compared 
with 1,755,816 on the corresponding date in 1959. 



DRIVING AND DRINKING BRINGS THIS RESULT 




DAILY 

RUSH-HOUR 

TRAFFIC 

INTO 

THE 

CITY 




Parking 

Notices of parking violations issued by the 
Boston Police Department showed a marked in- 
crease over the previous year as noted below: 





Year ending 


Year ending 




Ni iv. 30, 


Nov. 30, 




i960 


1959 Increase 


Traffic Division 


299,148 


248,196 50,952 


Other divisions 


275,866 


247,342 28,524 



Total notices issued 



575.014 



495.538 79,476 



The number of vehicles towed from public 
ways by the Traffic Division reflected an increase 
over the previous year due, in part, to the recent 
extension of the towing area in the Back Bay and 
Beacon Hill. Vehicles towed by the Traffic Di- 
vision during the current year amounted to 
21,029. For the previous year, 19,110. 

Parking fines paid at the Municipal Court of 
Boston for the year ending November 30, i960, 
amounted to $367,245.56, an increase over the 
previous corresponding year of $52,549.56. Park- 
ing meter revenue in the area north and east of 
Massachusetts avenue amounted to $275,515.75. 
Parking meter revenue for the entire city 
amounted to $430,900.79. 




40 



M-i Safety Squad 



The M i Safety Squad of the Traffic Division continued its program of safety instruction, making daily visits 
to tlic students in the public, parochial, and private schools of the city, in cooperation with the various schools, 
the squad prepared and presented weekly programs on safety subjects over Radio Station WORL. Their services 
also were made available to the City of Boston Park Department in connection with its recreation program. 




SLOW DOWN AND LIVE 



IT MAY BE YOUR LIFE 



Other Activities 



In addition to the usual schedule of parades and functions of a public nature, traffic details were provided 
for many emergencies, notably the M.T.A. strike, the fire at the South Station M.T.A. facilities, and the East 
Boston air disaster. Special events for which details were provided included the inaugural ceremonies of Mayor 
John F. Collins, the State Democratic Convention, and the motorcade and reception at the Boston Garden to 
President-elect John F. Kennedy. Outstanding visitors to our city, for whom escorts were provided by the Traffic 
Division, included President-elect John F. Kennedy, Vice-President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson, Vice-President 
Richard M. Nixon, the Honorable Henry Cabot Lodge, several United States senators and governors, the King and 
Queen of Thailand, the Prime Minister of Israel, Ambassadors from South Africa and from East Africa, General 
Gruenther of the American Red Cross, the Honorable Conrado Estrella of the Philippines, the United States Am- 
bassador to India, the National Commanders of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxil- 
iary, the Blind Veterans Association, the Archbishop of Syria, and the Bishop of Portugal. 



4i 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT AND 
RECORDS BUREAU 



The Central Complaint Room is located on the seventh floor of 
Police Headquarters and is equipped with the most modern police communi- 
cations facilities available. The basic function of this room, its personnel, 
and equipment is to register every complaint, incident, or request for police 
ser\ ice as well as to dispatch police vehicles to process any complaint or in- 
cident requiring police action. 

The Central Complaint Room has control over all communications 
consisting of telephone, teletype, radio, and telegraph. 




Lieut. Det. John J. Bonner 
Central Complaint and Records Bureau 



There were 514,011 outgoing telephone messages and 2,904 toll calls made by the department through our 
switchboard; 370,157 emergency messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through either 
DE 8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 504,483 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 265,312 teletype messages and 
589 telegrams were processed, 12,453 of these teletype messages relating to missing persons; 18,192 automobiles 
and registration plates were reported lost or stolen, and 15,182 were reported recovered; and 572,528 radio messages 
were sent. 

IN TOUCH WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS THROUGHOUT THE STATE 




4 2 



Five main transmitters (Station KCA 860, 2 al Police Headquarters and 3 at Suffolk Court House); 2 emer- 
gency transmitters at White Stadium, Jamaica Plain, lor civilian defense; two-way radio equipment in 124 auto- 
mobiles; 30 combination patrol wagon-ambulances and boat transmitters and receivers; 36 wired broadcast ampli- 
fiers; 8 pickup receivers; and 10 receivers on motorcycles were maintained by members of this unit. 

An intercity and interdepartmental radio receiver and transmitter which is tuned into a frequency with the 
Arlington, Barnstable, Brookline, Cambridge, Lynnlicld, Metropolitan, Milton, Newton, Quincy, Reading, Revere, 
State, Watertown, Weymouth, and Worcester Police Departments is in operation in this unit and is used for emer- 
gency messages with these departments. 

On an average day some i,goo radio transmissions are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. A Soundscriber records accurately each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an important administrative record of same. 

This Bureau maintains 7 up-to-date rotary master street files, 5 of which are located at the Central Complaint 
Room and 2 at the Central Records Section. These files provide quick information on over 7,000 streets, radio car 
sectors, public buildings, parks, places of interest, etc. An important feature of the rotary files is the establishment 
of a Master Disaster Plan which enables the department to quickly mobilize its facilities to handle any emergency. 
The effectiveness of this new plan was ably demonstrated during Hurricane "Donna," September 12, iq6o, and 
during the airline disaster in Boston Harbor, October 4, i960. 

The Statistical Section of the Central Complaint and Records Bureau is located on the fourth floor of Police 
Headquarters. This section, with its modern IBM data-processing equipment, prepares accurate and detailed 
reports and exerts control over all departmental reporting procedures, particularly those involving statistics for 
uniform crime reporting procedures, which are forwarded to the F.B.I, 

Valuable information concerning the incidence and frequency of various types of crime is prepared in detail 
1 ly machine operation and forwarded to Division Commanders for their information and guidance. This informa- 
tion has resulted in increased efficiency in the field of crime detection. 



OUR BOYS IN BLUE PARTICIPATE IN VETERANS' DAY OBSERVANCE 




43 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU 




Capt. Paul Sullivan 
Crime Prevention Bureau 



The Crime Prevention Bureau operates for the prevention of de- 
linquency among juveniles and maintains a program of constant cooperation 
with all other agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of malad- 
justed children. 

Duties in General 

i. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate 
factors that induce criminal tendencies among children. 

2. In this program enlist the aid of the general public, all child 
welfare agencies, divisions and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude of 
citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, and especially educate the public 
and the police in the problem of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile 
crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children, investigating and 
taking the necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotels, bus and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of people congregate. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged, and the needy, locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist in the investigation of cases in which women 
are involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 

The juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,717 male and 438 female juveniles in the following age groups: 
Age 7 S 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 



Mali: 
Female 



Hi 
o 



39 
1 



.S3 
5 



81 
13 



131 
38 



218 

7i 



31'' 
85 



414 

1 1 1 



44i 
114 



In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way involved in un- 
lawful activities concerning juveniles, 374 male and 56 female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought to their respective stations, for questioning in regard to criminal offenses committed 
on each division, 3,191 male and 597 female juveniles. As a result of interrogation, together with personal inter- 
views with the parents of these children, it was determined for the best interests of the children, parents, ami the 
city to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the City of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child, which is dramatically borne out by the fact that the number of recidivists 
still remains below 1 per cent. It is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston, with the child being 
returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first offenders, without having 
the stigma of a juvenile record attached to that child, who, after the proper disciplinary action by the parents, would 
not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delinquency pattern again. 

There were 6,373 cases processed by the Juvenile Bureau for this period, including the cases brought to court 
and the cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinary action. 



44 




JUNIOR G-MEN GET FIRSTHAND INSTRUCTION 
IN THE USE OF IDENTIFICATION EQUIPMENT 



JUVENILE OFFICER ROBERT MURPHY WITH "WEAPON 
DISPLAYED AT CIVIC FUNCTION 



This Bureau presented 150 lectures to as many different organizations in an effort to educate the public 
to the scope of juvenile delinquency, the elementary causes of it, the policies, plans, and procedures of the Crime 
Prevention Bureau as established by the Police Commissioner. The results of these lectures are reflected in many 
ways, such as the multitude of organizations which are now conducting campaigns against the sale of indecent 
literature and photographs to children, the organizations which are now offering athletic programs to children, 
and, most important of all, the supervisory interest that parents are now taking in their children. It cannot go 
without mention that the tremendous cooperation this Bureau is receiving from the clergy, the schools, and the 
agencies of Boston is directly related to this program of acquainting the public with the juvenile delinquency prob- 
lem in Boston. 

During the fiscal vear the juvenile officers have personally contacted 7,9 iq persons who are engaged in some 
phase of children's welfare work in the City of Boston, including school teachers, librarians, court attaches, clergy- 
men, bovs' club and girls' club workers, and those people who staff the many agencies working for the betterment 
of children. This phase of the program is to make all of these people fully aware of the fact that the police are 
cognizant of their importance in the over-all battle against delinquency and realize that it shall be defeated only by 
the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of at- 
tendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officially recognized 
that truancy has decreased in Boston because of the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers, through their contact with the different agencies, have 
found what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted by the 
agencies after a referral had been made to them by the officer who, because of his knowledge of the neighborhood 
to which he is assigned, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. 



It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report submitted in the year 1959 shows that the juvenile 
pattern has taken a downward trend in the City of Boston, when it is public knowledge that the trend is upward 
in the greater part of the country today. 



45 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 



Signal Boxes 

The total number of 
boxes in use in 582. Of 
these 547 are connected 
with the underground 
system and 35 with the 
overhead. 




Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,908 trouble calls; inspected 582 signal boxes, 16 
signal desks, 18 motor generator sets, 440 storage batteries. Repairs have been made on 178 box movements, 26 
registers, iqi locks, 16 time stamps, 21 vibrator bells, 46 relays, 32 electric fans, 23 motors, 16 generators. This 
unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 582 telephone, and 83 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs through- 
out the department. It also maintains 48 headquarters-to-station house telephone circuits, 18 teletype-writer cir- 
cuits, 18 radio-wired broadcast circuits, 5 radio-car response circuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank 
station of the Metropolitan District Police, and the intercommunication units throughout the department. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the 
Year Ending November 30, 1960 

(Included in Table XV) 

Pa; rolls 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor .... 

Total 



$124,482 . 51 
57,998. 26 

$182,480.77 



46 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HARBOR SERVICE 



The duties performed by the Harbor Police, Division 8, comprising 

as follows: 



the harbor and the islands therein, 



Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports 

Number of vessels ordered from the channel 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water front 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of dead bodies recovered 

Number rescued from drowning 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of dead bodies cared for . 

Number of hours grappling .... 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc 



1,229 
10 

15 
189 

3 
6 

i>257 
21 

19 
7S 
44 
1,990 
21 

125 

$28,100 



Since December 1, 
Port of Boston. 



1959, 1,990 vessels from domestic ports and 1,229 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the 



Harbor Patrol Service 



A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police boats "William H. McShane," "William H. 
Pierce," "Patrol Boat 45," "Patrol Boat 6,}," and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the upper and lower harbors, Mystic 
River, Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay, and Neponset River. 



THE HARBOR PATROL RETRIEVES BODY OF VICTIM OF BOAT MISHAP 




47 



THE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



POLICE ACADEMY 



The Police Academy was established November 16, 193 1, for the purpose of promoting the efficiency of the 
department through the indoctrination of recruits in basic routines and techniques. 

On appointment, new patroolmen pursue an intensive eight weeks' course of study under the direction of ex- 
perienced superior officers. Regular courses in conduct, discipline, care of department equipment, use of revolvers 
and clubs, report writing, procedure with regard to violators of law and/or ordinances are supplemented by the 
appearance of qualified speakers, specialists in their fields, to acquaint the new officers with such subjects as radi- 
ation detection, first aid, judo, the proper handling of traffic, etc. 

At the completion of the course a formal graduation is held, which the families and friends of the graduates 
attend. That evening the patrolman receives his assignment and the following day commences his regular tours 
of duty. 

The Academy constitutes a regular unit of the department throughout the year. The instructors are re- 
sponsible for the revision of the courses of study to keep abreast of developments of the law and police and safety 
procedures. As required, classes are conducted for personnel of all ranks for orientation in significant developmens 
which contribute to efficiency and public safety. The supervision of firing sessions at the newly constructed Re- 
volver Range at Moon Island is also the responsibility of the Academy faculty. 

The Drillmaster with his assistants is responsible for the Police Academy and its activities and maintaining 
at high efficiency the Police Department Band and Drill Team. 

COMM. SULLIVAN WITH DRILLMASTER, DEP. SUPT. MARKHARD, AT GRADUATION EXERCISES OF CLASS OF '6c 






ii i 



'I 



IflflWIM'Jil 





POLICE ACADEMY GRADUATES— CLASS OF ig6o 



Deputy Supt. John Danehy at 
Graduation Exercises 



Outstanding Student — Class of i960 



^jr- ^ 



Special Agent in charge F.B.I. 
Leo Laughlin Addresses New Officer; 




49 



FHE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Dr. Joseph W. Devine is the Medical Examiner for the Police De- 
partment. A suite is provided on the seventh floor of Police Headquarters, 
which consists of the doctor's office, a fully equipped and modernized exami- 
nation and treatment room, a waiting room and secretary's office. 

Upon entrance into the department, all persons certified for appoint- 
ment by the Division of Civil Service either for the uniformed force or in 
civilian capacity, as well as those employed for civilian duty on a temporary 
basis, are examined, and a physical report on each is submitted to the Police 
Commissioner. 




DR. JOSEPH W. DEVINE 



All members of the uniformed force are examined for injuries incurred either in the performance of duty or 
when off duty. Those members whose injuries bring about a period of absence and those incapacitated by a pro- 
longed illness are given a periodic examination. The diagnosis and prognosis in each case as to their availabilitj 
to perform police duty is submitted to the Police Commissioner with recommendation. Permanent records are 
maintained which aid in decisions affecting continuance in the service or retirement, as the case may be. 

Preventative inoculations are administered by the Medical Examiner to the members of the force to meel 
any exigency, such as in the case of an epidemic of influenza, poliomyelitis, etc. These immunizations are given on 
a voluntary basis. Also on a voluntary basis, and at various intervals, members of the force report to the Medical 
Department for the purpose of donating their blood to the American Red Cross. 

At the close of the year i960, over 2,700 members of the department received medical examination, and 
reports bearing upon each case were submitted for the attention of the Police Commissioner and for the personnel 
record of each officer concerned. 



LIFE BLOOD— TO SAVE A LIFE 



OUR JUDO EXPERTS DURING WORKOUT 




50 



l"HE DEPARTMENT IN ACTION 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 



Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, limits the number of 
.licenses to set up and use hackney carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, December 1, 1959, to November 30, i960, due 
to changes of ownership and regrants, a total of *2,o28 licenses were granted. 

There were 216 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., 
found in carriages during the year, which were turned over to the office of 
Inspector of Carriages. One hundred and thirteen of these were restored to 
the owners, and the balance of 103 placed in the custody of the Property 
Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney car- 
riages, as well as licenses to drive the same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 




CAPT. WILLIAM J. TAYLOR 



Applications for carriage licenses received 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 
Carriages licensed ("regrants") 



1,681 
347 



Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 

Carriages licensed — " changes of ownership " 

Carriage licenses in effect November 30, i960 (at end of police year) — licensed since February 1, i960 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 

Carriages inspected .... ... 



2,028 



2,028 

50.3 
156 

i.5 2 5 

2,028 



*347 regrants 
Hackney Carriage Drivers 



Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 
Applications for drivers' licenses rejected . 



Drivers' licenses granted 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 34; of which revocations 21 were rescinded and the licenses restored; leaving 

the net figure shown of such revocations as 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, i960 (at end of police year) — licensed since February 1, i960 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) . 

Drivers' licenses suspended 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers .... 



6,249 

126 

6,123 
13 



*5,888 

2 

65-' 
216 



"Includes 8 female hackney carriage drivers 



Public Taxicab Stands 

There are 385 established public taxicab stands, 
with capacity for 985 cabs, at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for 
the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, 
upon private property) by licensed hackney carriage 
owners. 

During the year 28 applications (capacity, 377 
carriages) for such private hackney stands were granted. 



Sight-Seeing Automobiles 

During the year ending November 30, i960, 
licenses for 20 sight-seeing automobiles were granted. 

There were 24 sight-seeing drivers' licenses 
granted. 

Hackney Carriage Violations 

During the past year, 652 tags were issued to 
taxicab drivers for various violations. Thirty-six 
penalties were imposed, which included 34 revocations. 
This system of discipline has continued to result in 
relieving courts of many minor cases which would tend 
to congest their dockets. 



STATISTICS 



51 




CITY PRISON Bj 

The City Prison is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset 
street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is 
within jurisdiction of the Central Municipal Court are conveyed to the City 
Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper until 
the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are con- 
veyed by county authorities to the institution to which thev have been sen- 

' , , ., " , . c . , T ., , .. , . " PATRICK J. O'REILLY 

fenced, or to the Charles Street ail to await such grand uirv action. „.^ _ . 

J City Prison 

During the year, December 1, 1959, to November 30, i960, 13,927 men were committed to the City Prison 

as follows: 

Assault and battery 27 

Breaking and entering 1 

Default n 

Drunkenness ! 2,540 

Fugitives from justice 11 

Illegitimacy 9 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 2 

Nonsupport 17 

Rape 1 

Robbery 1 

Soliciting alms 1 

Suspicious persons 393 

Vagrancy 5 

Violation of drug law 13 

Violation of liquor law 2 

Violation of Motor Vehicle law 15 

Violation of probation 18 

Miscellaneous 860 

Total 13,927 

Two hundred and twenty-five male lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



52 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 



The House of I )etention for Women is located in the New Court House Building, Somersel stret t. All women 
arrested in the city art- conveyed to the House of Detention, and, unless otherwise released, are held in chargi of the 
chief matron until the next session of the court before which thej are to appear. 

[f sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the in- 
stitution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 3,023 were committed as follows: 

Abandonment 

Abortion .... 

Adultery .... 



Assault and battery 
Delinquent children 
Drug law, violation of 
Drunkenness 

Forgery 

Fornication .... 
Idle and disorderly 
Keeping house of ill fame . 
Larceny .... 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 
Lewdness .... 
Liquor law, violation of 
Neglect of children 
Probation and parole, violation of 
Runaways .... 
Safekeeping .... 
Stubborn children 
Suspicious persons 
Miscellaneous 



Total 

Fifteen women lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 
READY ON THE RIGHT — READY ON THE LEFT 



w * 'i Wf'TOaHgf t imwm 



4 

3 

1 
20 

7 
16 

2,089 

8 

3 

29 
2 

109 

20 

1 

6 

12 

40 

17 
10 

13 
354 
259 

3.023 




— — -t 



53 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 



There are 21 


7 motor i 


'ehicles in the 


service at the present time whirl 


arc distributed as follows: 


Divisions 


Combination 

Patrol and 
Ambulances 


Passenger 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


Motorcycles 


Totals 


Headquarters 


— 


38 


9 


— 


47 


Division 1 














2 


3 


— 




5 


Division 2 














1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 3 














1 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 4 . 














3 


7 


— 


1 


11 


Division 6 . 














2 


5 


— 


4 


11 


Division 7 














2 


5 




4 


11 


Division 9 . 














2 


6 


— 


1 


9 


Division 10 . 














2 


5 


— 


2 


9 


Division 11 














2 


6 


— 


2 


10 


Division 13 














2 


4 


— 


6 


12 


Division 14 . 














2 


5 


— 


2 


9 


Division 15 . 














1 


4 


— 


— 


5 


Division 16 . 














2 


4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 17 . 














1 


4 


— 


3 


8 


Division 18 . 














1 


4 


— 


2 


7 


Division 19 . 














2 


5 


— 


2 


9 


Traffic Division 














— 


8 




21 


29 


Unassigned . 














2 


9 


— 


— 


11 


Totals 


3° 


*I28 


9 


5° 


217 


* Iru'lllilprl in 


thp t 


I'll 1 


f T >f 


nas^pncrpr 


: n 1 1 1 


mnl 


"nip-; there :irp 1 < 


:il h in wn'i iiK- 1 


1 1 [ livioi in 


— ■ 1 -it 111 tneirvn 


n • n n rl t -it 



Divisii n in. 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Divisions r, 2, 3, 4, 
(>, 7, 0, 10, 11. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, iS, and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey sick and injured persons to the following places: 



Boston City Hospital 








10,823 


Massachusetts General Hospital 




3,327 


( 'alls where services were not required 




i,S77 


Boston State Hospital 




1. 144 


Carney Hospital . 








715 


East Boston Relief Station 








701 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital 








580 


Southern Mortuary 








495 


!'■ ter Bent Brigham Hospital 








428 


Home 








34o 


Beth Israel Hospital . 








329 


Faulkner Hospital 








325 


United States Veterans' Hospital 






321 


Children's Hospital 






267 


Physicians' offices 








1 Oo 



Northern Mortuarv .... 
Police station houses .... 
Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals 
Chelsea Naval Hospital 
St. Margaret's Hospital 
New England Hospital for Women 
Roslindale General Hospital 
Boston Lying-in Hospital 
Deaconess Hospital .... 
Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 
Longwood Hospital .... 
Floating Hospital .... 
United States Public Health Hospital 
New England Baptist Hospital 
Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 



120 

105 

91 

72 

59 
57 
5° 
30 
30 
20 
28 

24 
22 
21 
20 



54 

Psychopathic I [ospital 

Harley Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 
Kenmore 1 [ospital .... 
Lemuel Shattuck I [ospital 
Winthrop Community Hospital 
Boston Sanatorium .... 

Soldiers' Home 

Bournewood Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Milton Hospital 

Mt. Auburn Hospital 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital 



10 Parker Hill Hospital . 

14 Whidden Memorial Hospital 

14 Hahnemann Hospital 

8 Washingtonian Hospital . 

8 Allerton Hospital 

8 Brighton Memorial Hospital 

Brookline Hospital 
Cambridge City Hospital . 
Metropolitan State Hospital 
Newton-Wellesley Hospital 
Sancta Maria Hospital 



Total 
Automobile Maintenance 



General repairs, replacement of parts, supplies and accessories 

Storage 

Gasoline 

Oil and grease 



Total 



Horses 



22,413 



1101,633.23 

250.00 

91,82c;. 18 

4,824. 68 

^9 8 >537-09 



On December 1, 1959, there were 11 saddle horses in the service, attached to Division 16. During the year 
one horse was donated to the department. At the present time there are 12 horses in service. 



THE BUSIEST SWITCHBOARD IN BOSTON 




55 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON 



Year 


Canvass 


1903* 


181,045 


1904 












193,105 


1905 












194.547 


1906 












195,446 


1907 












195,900 


1908 












201,552 


1909 












201,391 


19I0f 












203,603 


1911 












206,825 


1912 












214,178 


1913 












215,388 


1914 












219,364 


1915 












220,883 


1916J 












— 


1917 












221,207 


1918 












224,012 


1919 












227,466 


1920 












235> 2 48 


1921 § 












480,783 


1922 












480,106 


1923 












477-547 


1924 












485,677 


1925 












489,478 


1926 












493,415 


1927 












495,767 


1928 












491,277 


1929 












493,250 


1930 












502,101 



Year 


Canvass 


1931 


500,986 


1932 












499,758 


1933 












501,175 


1934 












502,936 


1935|[ 












509,703 


1936 












5!4,3 12 


1937 












520,838 


1938 












529,905 


1939 












534,230 


1940 












53i,oio 


1941 












541,335 


1942 












539,408 


1943 












54o,5i7 


1944 












543,o5i 


1945 












549,899 


1946 












545,5o6 


1947 












55i,H5 


1948 












548,111 


1949 












544,898 


1950 












541,762 


1951 












534,4i8 


1952 












526,396 


1953 












526,927 


1954 












506,072 


1955 












5!3,23o 


1956 












501,671 


1957 












486,421 


1958 












474,032 


1959 












465,467 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May I 

t 1910 listing changed to April I 

I 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing 

|| 1935 first year of listing as of January 1, instead of April I 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in January of the present year: 

Male 217,022 

Female . 253,780 

Total 470,802 



Listing Expenses 

The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, twenty years of age or more, not including the 
services rendered by members of the police force, were as follows: 

Printing police list $50,000.00 

Newspaper notices 1,294.32 

Stationery 6,226.46 

Directory . . . 75.00 

Total $57,595-78 



56 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 



January 4 
January 5 
January 6 

January 7 
January 8 
January 9 
January 10 
January 1 1 
January 12 
January 13 
January 14 
January 15 
January 16 
January 17 
January 18 
January 19 
January 20 
January 21 
January 22 
January 23 



300 


January 24 


29s 


January 25 


301 


January 26 


290 


January 27 . 


296 


January 28 . 


61 


January 2g 


a 


January 30 . 


263 


February 1 . 


297 


February 2 


299 


February 3 


298 


February 4 


299 


February 5 


61 


February 8 . 


22 


February 9 


268 


February 10 


2Q5 


February 1 1 


295 


February 12 


284 


February 15 


27I 


February 16 


76 





35 
221 

231 

2 1 2 
183 

177 
20 
93 

>°5 
75 
73 
58 
43 
20 
16 
14 
14 
7 
3 



Police Work on Jury Lists 

The Police Department under the provisions of chapter 348, Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commis- 
sioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 
The police findings in i960 may be summarized as follows: 
Dead or could not be found in Boston 
Physically incapacitated 



Convicted of crime . 
Unfit for various reasons 
Apparently fit . 



2,671 
466 

193 

1,501 

11,990 



Total 16,821 

The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department for delivery 12,038 summonses to persons for 
jury service. 



PRESIDENT-ELECT KENNEDY RETURNS 
TO BOSTON 



BOSTON POLICE HONORARY GUARD 
FOR PRESIDENT KENNEDY 




57 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the city, on a written application of any officer or 
board in charge of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of any responsible corporation or per- 
son to be liable for the official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for the year commencing as of April i, i960, were 
fingerprinted by the department, as has been the custom, and their records, if any, searched for by the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending November 30, i960, there were 1,047 special police officers appointed; 1 applica- 
tion for appointment was refused for cause; 5 appointments were canceled for nonpayment of license fee; and 15 
appointments were canceled for other reasons. 

Appointments were made on applications received as follows: 

From corporations and associations ■ 616 

From theaters and other places of amusement 15° 

From city departments 246 

From churches 3° 

From private institutions 5 



Total 



1.047 



I DON'T WANNA DO A "LAST HALF 




58 



Pistols. Revolvers, and Machine Guns 



The following table shows the number of applications made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to carry 
pistols or revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the number of 
such applications granted, and the number rejected: 



Ykar 



Applications 



Granted 



Rejected 



I95 6 
i 957 
1958 
'959 
jq6o 



2,476 



2,l63 



1,089 
I , I 93 



2,740 
2,419 
2,046 
1,017 



85 

57 

117 

72 
1 ( 
9i 



* Includes 4 no fee, I withdrawn, and 8 licenses to possess machine guns. 



Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns, and Rifles — Gunsmiths 





Applications 


Granted 
i960 


Rejected 


Gunsmiths 


6 


6 





Firearms dealers 


IS 


iS 





Shotguns and rifles 


8 


8 





Permits to purchase 


2 


1 


1 



Public Lodging Houses 



Public lodging houses licensed by the Police Commissioner under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections 33-36, 
G. L. (Ter. Ed.), showing locations and number of lodgers accommodated: 



Location 



Number 
Lodged 



61 Brookline avenue 
1-3 Dover street . 
287 Hanover street 
S Pine street 
Total . 



5,33$ 

2,553 

025 

73> 4S 

Si, 864 



59 

PROPERTY CLERK 

The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all lost, stolen, and abandoned property, money or 
other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and property taken from persons arrested for 
any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come into the possession 
of the department. 

All orders for supplies, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year 133 motor vehicles came into custody of this office; 30 vehicles were returned to legitimate 
claimants and 126 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now 51 motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of department autmobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. During 
the year, on 7,62s occasions, department cars were repaired, and, on 2,607 occasions, cars were serviced. Two 
hundred twenty-eight department cars and 142 privately owned cars were towed by the department wrecker. The 
department operates a motorcycle repair shop where, on 683 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced 
during the year. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for the inspection of /all department vehicles, all 
garages in the various divisions, and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department 
vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand December 1, 1959 321 

Articles received during the year to November 30, i960 . . . . . .214 

Total ... . . 335 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 97 

Worthless 102 

Sold at public auction 163 

Total number of articles disposed of 362 

Total number of articles on hand November 30, i960 173 



GUN VOLLEY COMMEMORATING OUR DEPARTED COMRADES 




6o 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



rp5P 



The following is a list of the special events which occurred during the year, .^ixiii^c the number of police de- 
tailed for duty at each : 

Men 

Boston Garden, Celebrities Night, benefit of Jewish Memorial Hospital 15 

Community Opticians television program 7 

Boston Garden, Boston Police Relief Association Ball 320 

Boston Police Department Band participation in the Boston Globe Santa Fund Drive 38 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Consecration Ceremonies of Bishop Thomas J. Riley 20 

Official observance of return of President Eisenhower 120 

Christmas Eve carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 70 

New Year's Eve celebrations 1.050 

Men 

Symphony Hall, Inauguration Ceremonies of the Honorable John P. Collins, Mayor-Elect of Boston ... 40 

Funeral of Patrolman Oliver S. Greenridge 35 

Funeral of Sergeant James F. P. Hourihan 40 

Funeral of Patrolman Arthemer Davis 35 

Strike of construction workers at the new East Boston Tunnel 20 

Strike of construction workers at the new East Boston Tunnel 20 

Funeral of Patrolman Francis L. Donovan 35 

Holy Name Church, West Roxbury, part of the class of i960 of St. John's Seminary receiving the sacrament of holy 

orders i" 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, part of the class of i960 of St. John's Seminary receiving the sacrament of holy orders . 20 

Funeral of Patrolman Robert F. Sheridan 35 

Boston Garden, Boston American Silver Skate Carnival 28 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph S. Ganno 35 

Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency, national home preparedness program, meeting of officers assigned as super- 
visors 25 

Funeral of Patrolman Stephen H. O'Meara 35 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, departure services for priests of the Apostle Missionary Society to Peru, South America 15 

State House, reception of His Excellency Governor Foster Furcolo 145 

Heart Fund collections by volunteers 35 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboys basketball game 14 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboys basketball game 14 

Cathedial of the Holy Cross, Catholic Youth Organization Camp Fire Sunday 22 

Special State Primaries in Ward 20, West Roxbury 65 

South Boston Evacuation Day parade 470 

Funeral of Rev. J. Norman Marcotte, S.M., pastor of Our Lady of Victories Church 15 

Statler Hilton Hotel, Massachusetts Safety Council "Smile Party " '. 8 

Symphony Hall, Opera Group ball 15 

Funeral of Patrolman Harold J. Harkness 35 

Funeral of Patrolman John F. Schneider 35 

Boston College Law Scliool, Police Community Relations Institute 60 

Boston College Law School, Police Community Relations Institute 6o 

Vincent Club annual show at New England Mutual Hall n> 

N.A.A.C.P. motorcade parade 10 

Cathedral Club road race 50 

Symphony Hall, Filene's Foundation concert 20 

Special State Election, Ward 20, West Roxbury 65 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph B. Curley 35 

Funeral of Patrolman James F. Wilson 35 

Seminar on Identification and Records by the Federal Bureau of Investigation at New Englan 1 Mutual Hall . 12 

Seminar on Identification and Records by the Federal Bureau of Investigation at New England Mutual Hall 12 

Easter parade 25 

William F. Sinclair Post, American Legion, parade 10 

Boston Athletic Association Marathon 265 

Patriots' Day parade 105 

Roxbury, Patriots' Day parade 10 

Eliot .Square, Roxbury, road race 12 

Funeral of Sergeant Thomas F. O'Keefe 40 

Uphams Corner, Dorchester, Masonic Organizations parade 15 

St. Francis Council, Knights of Columbus, parade , 15 

Boston Garden, Boston Firemen's Relief Fund annual concert an 1 lull 30 

Department of Massachusetts, Veterans of Foreigns Wars, May Day rally and parade 50 

Presidential Primaries . . 1,170 

Boston University U.M.O.G. parade 5 

Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, Ladies Night at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel 25 



Dec. 


5 


Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


1 1 


Dec. 


21 


Dec, 


23 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


31 


196 





Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


8 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


1 1 


Jan. 


13 


fan. 


10 


Feb. 


2 


Fel). 


2 


Feb. 


3 


Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


9 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


IS 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


28 


Mar. 


7 


Mar. 


s 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


15 


Mar. 


'7 


Mar. 


19 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


24 


Mar. 


28 


Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


30 


April 


2 


April 


2 


April 


2 


April 


2 


April 


5 


April 


12 


April 


>3 


April 


13 


April 


14 


April 


17 


April 


19 


April 


19 


April 


19 


April 


10 


April 


19 


April 


2 2 


April 


24 


April 


24 


April 


25 


April 


25 


April 


26 


April 


28 


April 


28 



6i 



iq6 





April 


28 


April 


3° 


April 


30 


May 


I 


May 


6 


May 


7 


May 


7 


May 


7 


May 


7 


May 


8 


May 


8 


May 


12 


May 


13 


May 


13 


May 


14 


May 


M 


May 


14 


May 


15 


May 


15 


May 


t5 


May 


1 7 


May 


is 


May 


19 


May 


21 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


22 


May 


25 


May 


25 


May 


25 


May 


28 


May 


29 


May 


29 


May 


29 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


3" 


May 


30 


May 


30 


June 


5 


June 


5 


June 


6 


June 


6 


June 


1 1 


June 


1 1 


June 


1 1 


June 


1 2 


June 


1 2 


June 


13 


June 


13 


June 


13 


June 


14 


June 


16 


June 


16 


June 


'7 


June 


■7 


June 


17 


June 


17 


June 


18 


June 


18 


June 


19 


June 


26 


I une 


26 


July 


3 



shin 



1 party 



n their pilgrimage 



1 >v the Yankee I )i 



vision, Post No 



American Cancer Association house collections 
AJlston, Allston North Little League parade 
Wei Roxbury, Parkway Little League parade 
Dorchester, St. Peter's Holy Child Baseball League parade 
Boston Technical High School Cadets parade 
Roxbury, Upper Roxbury Little League parade 

Allston, Little League parade 

Funeral of Patrolman Donald R. Dorion .... 

Mission Hill, Roxbury Little League parade 

Logan Airport, East Boston, Departure of Richard Cardinal Cu 

of Our Lady of Lourdes in France .... 

Boston Fire Department parade 

Boston University R.O.T.C. parade .... 

First Corps of Cadets Armory, "Survival Day" program sponsored 

American Legion 

Funeral of Sergeant Robert A. Hayhurst 

Charlestown, Little League parade 

Radio Station WBZ parade 

South End, Claremont Neighborhood Association parade 
Boston Arena, "Opera for Young People" 
Dorchester, Lubavitz Yeshiva parade .... 
Kenmore Square, State of Maine Day parade 

Integration Committee parade 

Northeastern University Politics Chili parade 

Mayor's Luncheon at 1200 Beacon Street 

West End, St. Domenic Society parade .... 

Cemeteries and vicinity 

West End, St. Domenic Society parade .... 

South End, Hiram Grand Lodge parade 

Charleston n, All Veterans Committee parade 

South End, Truck Drivers and Chauffeurs Union Local No. 25 parade 

Back Bay, Protestant Laymen's Communion Breakfast Committee parade 

Funeral of Captain Francis W. Russell 

City Hall, Mayor's Field Day activities .... 

Boston School Cadets parade 

Cemeteries and vicinity 

Cemeteries and vicinity . 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion .... 
366th Infantry AMVET Post 128 parade .... 
Cemeteries and vicinity on Memorial Day .... 
Dorchester, William G. Walsh Post No. 367, American Legion 

Pad; Pay, AMVETS parade 

Cecil Fogg Post, American Legion, parade .... 
Allston Brighton Post, American Legion, parade 

Society Santa Maria DiAnzano parade 

Mount Hope Cemetery, Policemen's Memorial exercises 

Sacred Heart School Drill Team parade 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade 

Arrival and Visit of His Holiness Yasken I, Catholicos of All A 

Mayor's Charity Field Day activity on Boston Common 

Bo ton College, Class Night exercises in McHugh Forum . 

Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston Firemen's Memorial Day exercises 

Boston College Commencement exercises .... 

Roslindale, Knights of Columbus, Rosary Crusade for Peace 

Boston College Commencement exercises .... 

Symphony Hall, Twenty-fifth Reunion activities of Harvard CI 

Mayor's Charity Field Day at Fenway Park 

State House, National Lancers escort for His Excellency Governor Foster Furcolo to Harvard University 

Charlestown, "Night. Before" Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street duty, traffic duty 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade .... 

< ii herine Laboure School of Nursing parade 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day celebrations, street duty, block parties, dances, and historic, 

Boston Arena, Democratic Pre-Primary Convention . 

Boston Arena, Democratic Pre-Primary Convention 

Upper Roxbury Little League parade .... 

Ho.! on if, -rulil salute to recreational boating 

Madonna Delia Sacra Lettera parade .... 

Si. Margaret of Scotland Guild, Inc., parade 

366th Infantry, AMVETS, Post No. 128, parade 



Men 



Memoria 



Day par 



ass of 1935 



ade 



lo the Shrine 



90, 1 ' 



f the 



and banquets 



il pageant 



62 



tq6o 



July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


|ulv 


7 


July 


id 


July 


HI 


luly 


13 


July 


16 


July 


17 


July 


1 7 


July 


23 


July 


25 


July 


29 


July 


3° 


Aug. 


2 


Aug. 


5 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


7 


Aug. 


1 1 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


14 


Aug. 


15 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


19 


Aug. 


19 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


21 


Aug. 


21 


Aug. 


22 


Aug. 


23 


Aug. 


25 


Aug. 


26 


Aug. 


28 


Aug. 


30 


Sept. 


4 


Sept. 


4 


Sept. 


5 


Sept. 


8 


Sept. 


9 


Sept . 


1 1 


Sept. 


11 


Sept. 


12 


Sept. 


12 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


23 


Sept. 


24 


Sept. 


25 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


29 


Sept. 


3" 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


5 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


8 



Independence Day parade 

Boston Common, Independence Day band concerts and fireworks display 

Eas1 Boston, Independence Day celebrations 

Columbia Park. South Boston, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display 

Smith Field, AUston, Independence Day celebrations 

Franklin Field, Dorchester, Independence Day celebrations 
Arrival and visit of Their Majesties, the King and Queen of Thailand 
North End Society of Men and Women of the Blessed Lady of Grace parade 
Visit of Most Reverend John P. Verancio, Bishop of Portugal . 

Funeral of Patrolman William T. Duddy 

North End. San Rocco Society parade 

North End, San Rocco Society parade 

Arrival of Senator John F. Kennedy at Logan Airport 
Columbus Park, South Boston, drum and bugle corps exhibition 

North End, San Lucy Society parade 

North End, St. Joseph Society parade 

Arrival of United States Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge 

East et ling Company motorcade 

North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade 
North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade 
North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade- 
Copley Square, Loyal Orange Institution parade .... 

Thomas J. O'Connor Committee parade 

North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade . 

Funeral of Detective Albert A. Hurst 

North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade , 
North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade . 
Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of North and South Ameri 

parade 

Ancient Egyptian Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of North and South Americ 

parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso DiSciacca parade 
Army and Navy Union of the United States of America parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso DiSciacca parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso DiSciacca parade 
North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso DiSciacca parade 
North End, San Rocco di Anzano Society parade 

Metropolitan Transit Authority strike 

Hyde Park, James E. Shea Post No. 190, American Legion, parade 

Dorchester, St. Kevin's Drum and Bugle Corps parade 

North End, St. Anthony's Feast Day parade .... 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Jamaica Plain, Disabled American Veterans, Chapter 52, parade 

The Armenian Youth Federation parade 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Catholic Labor Guild parade 

Visit of Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, Democratic Nominee for Vice-President 

Departure of Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, Democratic Nominee for Vice-President 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

East Boston, Friends of St. Lazarus parade 

Hurricane "Donna" 

Pemberton Square, Massachusetts Sweepstakes Committee 

State Primary Election Day 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Sin iw Topper motorcade 

Back Bay, The Husky Key, Northeastern University, parade 

Jimmy Fund baseball game at Fenway Park 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Funeral of Patrolman James H. Bryne 

Visit of the Honorable Richard M. Nixon, Vice-President of the United States 

Departure of the Honorable Richard M. Nixon, Vice-President of the United States 

Massachusetts Federation of Music Clubs motorcade . 

Departure of Ancient, and Honorable Artillery Company for Florida 

Funeral of Patrolman George Farran 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 

March of Dimes motorcade 

Mass rally of Filene's employees for United Fund Campaign 

Aleppo Temple of the Shriners parade 

Aleppo Temple of the Shriners parade 



in National Convention 



in N 



ation 



ilC 



nvention 



63 

i960 Men 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Solemn Pontifical "Red Mass" 20 

West Roxbury, Jerry Williams meeting at the Highland Club 10 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 25 

Boston Fire Department and Quincentennial Committee for the Promotion of Portuguese Discoveries parade . 310 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drills 20 

Summer Street, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration 25 

Columbus Day parade 190 

( llivia James House, South Boston, road race 20 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Catholic observance of the discovery of America 10 

East Boston, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration 20 

Columbia Stadium, South Boston, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration ... 15 

Si ait h Station, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration 20 

Peabody Square, Dorchester, Boston Fire Department " Fire Prevention Week " demonstration .... 10 

Fields Corner, Dorchester, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration 15 

R< is] indale, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" demonstration 15 

South End, Lee Association patade 10 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 25 

Grand Commandery of Knights of Templar parade 35 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 25 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 25 

Halloween celebrations 5X5 

Brighton, St. Kevin's Emerald Gems parade 10 

East Boston, plane crash at Logan International Airport 155 

South End, Citizens Committee for a Better South End parade 10 

Southern Mortuary, identification of plane crash victims 24 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 25 

South End, Phyllis Wheatly Temple No. 22, I.B.P.O.E.W., parade 10 

Arrival of Senator John F. Kennedy and reception at the Boston Garden 955 

Arrival of Henry Cabot Lodge, Republican nominee for Vice-President 55 

Departure of Senator John F. Kennedy 100 

State and Presidential Election 1,190 

"Curtis for Congress" Committee cavalcade 10 

Veterans Administration parade 10 

Veterans Day parade 285 

South Boston, Olivia James House, road race 20 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Girl Scout Sunday 20 

Funeral of Patrolman John W. McKenzie 35 

Boston College Stadium, Park League championship football game 45 

White Stadium, South Boston, and East Boston High School football game 40 

Boston Garden, Boston Police Relief Association annual concert and ball 295 

Note 

December 1, 1959, to January 5, i960, inclusive, S officers performed a total of 280 duties for that period in 
connection with the City of Boston decorations in the vicinity of the Boston Public Garden. 

December 1, 1959, to January 5, i960, inclusive, 36 officers performed a total of 1,296 duties for that period 
in connection with the City of Boston Christmas Festival on the Boston Common. 

January 28, i960, to June 22, i960, inclusive, 16 men performed a total of 2,400 duties for that period in 
connection with the Bethlehem Steel Company strike in East Boston. 

February 10, i960, to March 2, i960, inclusive, 18 men performed a total of 37S duties for that period in 
connection with the Willem Van Rie murder trial in Superior Court. 

April 18, i960, to April 24, i960, inclusive, 8 men performed a total of 56 duties for that period in connection 
with the i960 Metropolitan Opera season at the Metropolitan Theatre. 

June 3, i960, to June 19, i960, inclusive, 39 men performed a total of 663 duties for that period in connection 
with the Boston Arts Festival at the Public Garden. 

July 1, i960, to September 20, i960, inclusive, 7 men performed a total of 567 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the historic sites area. 

August 1 1, i960, to August 14, i960, inclusvie, 10 men performed a total of 40 duties for that period in con- 
nection with the Watchtower Society for Jehovah's Witnesses Convention at Fenway Park. 

September 22, i960, to September 29, i960, inclusive, 6 men performed a total of 42 duties for that period 
in connection with the Supreme Council of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rites, Thirty-third Degree Masons, 
Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, convention. 

November 23, i960, to November 30, i960, inclusive, 30 men performed a total of 210 duties for that period 
in connection with the City of Boston Christmas decorations on the Boston Common. 



Oct. 


9 


( lit. 


9 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


1 1 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


( let. 


13 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


M 


Oct. 


LS 


Oct. 


16 


Oct. 


23 


Oct. 


23 


Oct. 


30 


(let. 


31 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


5 


X. IV. 


6 


Nov. 


6 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


8 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


13 


Nov. 


14 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


24 


Nov. 


30 



64 




FIRST ON THE SCENE AT A DWELLING FIRE 
Miscellaneous Business 





1957-58 


i95 8 -59 


1959-60 


Abandoned children cared for 


28 


3 2 


5° 


Buildings found open and made secure 














3,454 


2,986 


2,402 


Dangerous buildings reported 














67 


7i 


45 


Dangerous chimneys reported 














12 


17 


4 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 














826 


925 


1,022 


Defective drains and vaults reported 














9 


2 


5 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 














7 


7 


3° 


Defective gas pipes reported . 














7 


6 


1 1 


Defective hydrants reported . 














16 


10 


2 


Defective sewers reported 














7 1 


51 


31 


Defective street lights reported 














-,400 


1,014 


281 


Defective streets and walks reported 














i,75i 


1,081 


619 


Defective water pipes reported 














68 


48 


33 


Fire alarms given 














7,890 


10,150 


1 1 .093 


Fires extinguished 














74') 


636 


2,259 


[nsane persons taken in charge 














783 


i,oq8 


1-453 


Lost children restored .... 














809 


7 7 s 


804 


Number of persons committed to bail 














2,782 


2,68 1 


2,658 


Persons rescued from drowning 














7 


i/ 


iS 


Sick and injured persons assisted . 














18,765 


21,167 


22,160 


Street obstructions removed 














3° 


34 


57 


Water running to waste reported . 












-'75 


276 


95 



Pensions and Benefits 

On December 1, 1959, there were 839 persons on the pension roll. During the year 40 died, viz.: 1 lieutenant, 
4 sergeants, ,31 patrolmen, 1 patrolwoman, and 3 annuitants. Forty-five were added, viz.: 3 captains, 3 lieutenants, 
3 sergeants, 22 patrolmen, 1 patrolwoman, 1 civilian, and 12 annuitants, leaving 844 on roll at date, 714 pensioners 
and 130 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during the year amounted to $1,926,304.73. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted to $207,550.00. There are 24 beneficiaries of 
the fund at the present lime, and there has been paid to them the sum of $3,817.50 during the year. 






ransi 



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STATISTICAL TABLES 



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H 

02 

o 

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o 

M 


Commissioner .... 

Secretary 

Confidential Secretary . 

Assistant Secretaries 

Legal Advisor .... 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants .... 
Lieutenant-Detectives . 

Sergeants 

Sergeant-Detectives 
Patrolmen .... 
Detectives-First Grade . 
Detectives-Second Grade 
Detectives-Third Grade 
Patrolwomen .... 
Biological Chemist . 
Biological Chemist, Assistant 
Clerk-Typists .... 
Diesel and Gas. Eng. Operator 
Director, Signal Service 
Director, Assistant 
Elevator Operators 



66 



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» - - | « ~ | » « | | | | | | | | | 


crt 


Head Clerks .... 

Head Administrative Clerk . 
Hearing Stenographers . 
Hustlers 

Janitresaes .... 

Junior Building Custodians . 

Linemen and Cable Splicers . 

Machinist .... 

Matron, Chief 

Matron, Assistant Chief 

Matrons, Police 

Medical Examiner . 

Motor Equipment Operators 

and Laborers. 
Motor Equipment Repairmen 

Multilith Operator and Cam- 
eraman. 
Painter and Groundman 

Principal Clerks 

Principal Clerk-Typists 

Principal Clerk-Stenographers 

Principal Statistical Machine 

Operator. 
Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian . 

Senior Clerk-Typists 

Senior Clerk-Stenographers . 

Senior Statistical Machine Op- 
erator. 
Signalmen-Electricians . 

Statistical Machine Operators 

Steam Firemen 

Storeroom Helper and Motor 
Equipment Operator. 

Superintendent of Police 
Buildings. 

Superintendent of Police 
Buildings, Assistant. 

Telephone Operators 

Working Foreman and Motor 
Equipment Repairman. 


X 

la 

H 



67 



68 



TABLE II 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength of Police Department 





Authorized 

Strength 


Actual Strength 


Ranks and Grades 


Nov. 30 

19(50 


Nov. 30 
19(10 


Net Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus) 


Police Commissioner 

Confidential Secretary 

Assistant Secretaries 

Superintendent 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen 


1 
1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

7 

32 

88 

255 

*2,4()0 

tl2 


1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

1 

7 

2(1 

87 

255 

2,388 

5 


Minus (1 
Minus 1 

Minus 12 
Minus 7 


Totals 


2,801 


2,775 


Minus 2(i 



* Includes 188 Detective-Patrolmen 
f Includes 2 Detective-Patrolwomen 



6 9 



TABLE III 

List of Police Officers in Act ire Service Who Died During the Year Ending 

November 80, 1960 



Rank 


Name 


Division 


Date of Death 


Cause of Death 


Patrolman 


William T. Duddy 


2 


July 10 


I960 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman . 


Joseph B. Curley 


3 


Apr. 9 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Sergeant 


Robert A. Hayhurst 


3 


May 10 


1900 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


James F. Wilson 


4 


Apr. 9 


1900 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


Harold J. Harkness 


6 


Mar. 21 


1900 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman . 


Robert F. Sheridan 


9 


Jan. 30 


1900 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


( Uiver S. Greenidge 


10 


Jan. 3 


1960 


Accident 


Patrolman . 


Stephen H. O'Meara 


10 


Feb. 14 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman . 


Arthemer Davis 


11 


Jan. 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


Joseph S. Ganno 


15 


Feb. 5 


1900 


Infection 


Sergeant 


Thomas F. O'Keefe 


15 


Apr. 19 


1900 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman . 


Francis L. Donovan, Jr. 


16 


Jan. 14 


1960 


Accident 


Patrolman . 


John W. McKenzie 


17 


Nov. 10 


1960 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman . 


Donald E. Dorion 


19 


May 4 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


John F. Schneider 


Traffic 


Mar. 24 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


James H. Byrne 


Traffic 


Sept. 25 


1960 


Liver trouble 


Patrolman 


George Farran 


Traffic 


Sept, 28 


1960 


Heart trouble 


Sergeant 


James F. P. Houlihan 


Crime Prevention 
Bureau 


Jan. 5 


1960 


Carcinoma 


Detective-Patrolman 


Albert A. Hurst 


Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation 


Aug. 9 


1960 


Carcinoma 



7o 



TABLE IV 

Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending November 30, 1960, (living Age 
at the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years Service of Each 



Name 



Cause of Retirement 



Age at Time 
of Retirement 



Years of 
Service 



Abdou, Peter J. (3) 
Ahern, William A. (3) . 
Berlandi, Albert J. (3) . 
Cahill, Timothy (5) 
Callahan, Cornelius J. (3) 
Carley, Frederick F. (5) 
Casey, Elmer J. 
Clarke, Richard (3) 
Coleman, Parker A. 
Crowley, James J. . 
Crowley, Patrick J. 
Cullity', John J. (3) 
Cunniffe, John J. 
Daddieco, Louis J. (3) 
Delodge, John J. (5) 
Donovan, Francis C. 
Donovan, Stella M. (4) 
Donovan, William D. 
Dunn, Frank S. (3) 
DuWors, Cletus (3) 
Foley, Joseph P. (3) 
Foley, Maurice J. (3) 
Garrity, Patrick J. . 
Gaw, Stanley A. 
Giovannucci, Joseph 
Gregory, John V. (3) 
Harkins, John J. (5) 
Hartigan, William J. (3) 
Healy, Edward S. (3) . 
Hoist, Henry 0. (3) 
Horton, Waldo B. . 
Kelly, Thomas J. (3) . 
Khoury, Alfred R. (4) . 
Lafford, Lindsay J. (5) . 
Leach, John A. (3) 
Lewis, Cecil E. 
Lydon, James P. 
Madden, John J. . 
McAuliffe, Irene 
McCallum, John R. (3) 
McCarthy, Maurice E. (5) 
McColgan, James W. (3) 
MeDonough, Edward R. (3) 
McKelligan, Frank E. (3) 
McXamura, Lawrence 
Moore, Walter E. (3) 
Moran, Luke (3) 
Morrissey, William J. (5) 
Moulds, John J. (5) 
Murphy, John J. (3) 
Murphy, Joseph ( ). (5) . 
Nugent, Francis V. (3) . 
O'Brien, Harold B. 
O'Connell, Daniel M. . 
Reddv, James J. (6) 
Rowlands, Grafton R. (5) 
Russell, Francis W. (3) . 
Simpson, Stephen B. (5) 
Sullivan, Dennis R. (5) . 
Sullivan, James J. . 
Vickerson, Arthur H. (3) 
Williams, Henry J., Jr. (1) 
Wyand, Harrington B. . 



Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Age 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Age 

Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

Age 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Age 

30 "V ears' Service 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Age 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Age 

30 , i cars' Service 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 



43 
60 
34 
68 
56 
65 
64 
60 
64 
66 
65 
59 
65 
49 
62 
65 
70 
65 
61 
38 
48 
60 
65 
65 
65 
48 
58 
65 
40 
65 
64 
61 
50 
65 
59 
65 
65 
68 
63 
62 
65 
40 
50 
64 
65 
42 
61 
57 
64 
65 
65 
49 
63 
65 
68 
64 
65 
65 
60 
65 
58 
60 
66 



12 
31 

9 
33 
31 
33 
40 
30 
40 
40 
37 
34 
38 
15 
31 
40 
14 
40 
31 
13 
19 
33 
40 
39 
40 
13 
30 
35 
10 
34 
40 
34 
14 
40 
29 
40 
40 
40 
38 
34 
32 

6 
18 
32 
39 
12 
34 
30 
31 
29 
40 
17 
37 
39 
20 
33 
36 
31 
30 
37 
33 
30 
40 



(1) Retired under Boston Retirement System 

(2) Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 57 

(3) Retired under State-Boston Retirement System 

(4) Civilians retired under State-Boston Retirement System 

(5) Retired Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58 

(6) Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58 



TABLE V 
Officers Who Were Promoted During the Year Ending November 30, I960 



71 



Date 



Rank and Ni 



4 
4 
4 

4 
4 

4 

4 

17 



1960 

May 27 
May 27 
May 27 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
August 17 
October I'.i 
October 19 
October 19 
November 23 
November 
November 
November 
Novembei 
November 
Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembei 
November 
November 23 
November 23 
Novembei- 23 
November 23 
November 23 
November 23 



23 

23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 



Captain Joseph J. Cummings to rank of Deputy Superintendent 
Captain William J. Hogan to rank of Deputy Superintendent 
Captain John J. Slattery, Jr., to rank of Deputy Superintendent 
Lieutenant Edward F. Blake to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Warren A. Blair to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Arthur C. Cadegan, Jr., to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Thomas M. Corbett to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Michael F. O'Brien to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Bernard P. Slattery to rank of Captain 
Lieutenant Paul J. Sullivan to rank of Captain 
Sergeant Irvin W. Arntz to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant James J. Bowes to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant John R. Bradley, Jr., to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Andrew C. Bulens to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant John R. Chisholm to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Hubert R. Darcy to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Francis E. Devin to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Joseph P. Hanley to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant James J. MacDonald to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant William J. O'Brien to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Walter A. Rachalski to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Edwin J. Riley to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant Herbert W. Walsh to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman Joseph P. Aprea to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Charles V. Barry to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Louis A. Carangelo to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas F. Cunningham to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Paul B. Curtis to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James F. Doherty to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James E. Dwyer to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James F. Foley to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Foley to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas J. P. Gavin to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Stanley J. Jundzil to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Daniel P. Lovett to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Edward M. Lydon to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Marlborough to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Nolan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James F. O'Connor to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas J. O'Malley, Jr., to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Charles D. Walsh to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James J. Walsh to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Walter Wamness to rank of Sergeant 
Sergeant Albert L. Flattery to rank of Lieutenant- 
Sergeant James B. Richardson to rank of Lieutenant 
Sergeant John R. West to rank of Lieutenant 
Patrolman John J. Banks, Jr., to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Robert F. Bird to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Buckley to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Joseph L. Burke to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John F. Chalpin to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Leroy B. Chase, Jr., to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Michael E. Connolly to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas A. Connors to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman James J. Donovan to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John W. Engelhardt to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Harry F. Guilfoy to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Arthur E. Horick to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Robert G. Hudson to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Michael J. Kovalski to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Anthony J. Leone to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Thomas J. Mahoney to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman George F. McAndrew to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Ernest M. Reid to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman Paul J. Russell to rank of Sergeant 
Patrolman John J. Torpey to rank of Sergeant 



72 



TABLE VI 

Members of Police Force on November 80, I960, Who Were Appointed 



the ) 



car 



Indicated 



Date of 
Appointment 


a 

- 

5" 


■i. 



— 
a 
- 

a rfi 


C 


Lieutenants and 
Lieutenant- 
Detectives 


Sergeants and 

Sergeant - 
Detectives 


: — 
x - r 

o \ — 


p ■- 


Totals 


1916 








1 








1 


1919 













2 


■_) 


1 


11' 


3 


15 


35 


1920 













— 


1 


1 


5 


3 


7 


17 


1921 . 













— 


— 


2 


3 


■ — 


5 


10 


1922 













— 


1 


5 


1 


3 


— 


10 


1923 













1 


o 


1 


3 


3 


2 


12 


1924 . 













— 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


8 


1925 . 













— 


— 


2 


5 


3 


7 


17 


1926 . 













— 


3 


8 


7 


8 


31 


57 


1927 . 










1 


1 


— 


2 


3 


li 


16 


29 


1928 













— 


1 


— 


2 


2 


15 


20 


1929 . 













— 


1 


8 


23 


9 


53 


94 


1930 













— 


— 


4 


2 


— 


8 


14 


1931 . 













— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


4 


8 


1937 . 













2 


4 


11 


41 


14 


56 


L28 


1940 . 













1 


5 


13 


33 


/ 


41 


100 


1941 . 













— 


— 


4 


6 


7 


27 


44 


1942 













— 


3 


4 


38 


18 


66 


L29 


1943 . 













— 


— 


2 


12 


8 


29 


51 


1944 . 













— 


— 


4 


7 


18 


67 


96 


1945 . 













— 


— 


2 


1 


3 


31 


37 


1946 . 













— 


1 


6 


19 


17 


158 


201 


1947 . 













— 


— 


3 


9 


14 


133 


159 


1948 . 













— 


— 


1 


13 


3 


112 


129 


1949 . 













— 


— 


— 


1 


3 


11!) 


123 


1950 . 













— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


147 


154 


1951 . 













— 


— 


— 


2 


10 


265 


277 


1952 . 













— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


78 


81 


1953 













— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


99 


103 


1954 













— 


— 


— 


— 


('. 


96 


102 


1955 













— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


95 


103 


1956 . 













— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


120 


121 


1957 













— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


120 


120 


1958 . 













— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


94 


94 


1959 













— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


35 


1960 













— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


50 


Totals 


1 


7 


26 


87 


255 


190 


2,203 


2,76!) 



73 



TABLE VII 
Mi mbers of Police Force on November SO, 1900, Who Were Born in Year Indicated 



Date ok 
Birth 


:£ 


'j. 


X 


Lieutenants and 
Lieutenant- 
Detectives 


Sergeants 

and 

Sergeant- 
Detectives 


Detectives — 
First, Second, 
and Third Grade 


S CD 

£ P 


Totals 


1888 . 

1889 . 










— 


— 


— 


I 


— 




1 


1 
1 


1891 . 

1892 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


1 

2 


1 

4 


1893 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


3 


5 


1894 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


4 


8 


1895 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


4 


10 


21 


1896 . 










— 


2 


3 


•) 


8 


5 


17 


37 


1897 . 










— 


1 


3 


5 


11 


— 


17 


37 


1898 . 










— 


— 


2 


7 


4 


3 


18 


34 


1899 . 










— 


1 


1 


3 


6 


9 


14 


34 


1900 










i 


— 


•> 


5 


12 


9 


27 


56 


1901 . 










— 


— 


1 


1 


10 


7 


30 


49 


1902 . 










— 


— 


— 


3 


7 


1 


17 


28 


1903 . 










— 


— 


1 


6 


8 


— 


11 


26 


1904 . 










— 


— 


1 


1 


5 


1 


13 


21 


1905 . 










— 


— 


1 


5 


8 


5 


8 


27 


1906 . 










— 


— 


— 


1 


6 





12 


25 


1907 . 










— 


— 


2 


2 


7 


3 


20 


34 


1908 . 










— 


— 


— 


>> 


9 


4 


23 


38 


1909 . 










— 


— 


— 


5 


8 


6 


33 


52 


1910 . 










— 


2 


— 


1 


14 


11 


23 


51 


1911 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


10 


2 


29 


41 


1912 . 










— 


— 


1 


3 


10 


7 


34 


55 


1913 . 










— 


1 


1 


2 


17 


3 


30 


54 


1914 . 










— 


— 


4 


1 


6 


7 


39 


57 


1915 . 










— 


— 


1 


5 


11 


11 


41 


69 


1916 . 










— 


— 


— 


10 


13 


7 


58 


88 


1917 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


8 


9 


77 


98 


1918 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


5 





96 


109 


1919 










— 


— 


1 


2 


3 


9 


86 


101 


1920 










— 


— 


— 


2 


8 


7 


92 


109 


1921 . 










— 


— 


— 


1 


4 


7 


92 


104 


1922 . 










— 


— 


1 


— 


3 


5 


132 


141 


1923 










— 


— 


— 


1 


6 


4 


118 


129 


1924 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


7 


no 


120 


1925 . 










— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


4 


117 


127 


1926 . 










— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


7 


136 


149 


1927 . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


139 


146 


1928 . 








— 


— 


— 


■ — 


3 


1 


113 


117 


1929 . 








— 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 


— 


69 


69 


1930 . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


71 


72 


1931 . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


60 


63 


1932 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


57 


57 


1933 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


41 


42 


1934 . 










— 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 


— 


33 


33 


1935 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


22 


22 


1936 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


7 


Totals 


1 


7 


26 


87 


255 


190 


2,203 . 


2,769 



The average age of the members of the force on November 30, 1960, was 41.54 years. 



74 



TABLE VIII 

Number of Days' Absence from Duty by Reason of Disability During the Year Ending 

November SO, I960 



December, 1959 


3,392 


July, 1960 . 


3,320 


January, I960 . 


4,357 


August, 1960 . 


3,537 


February, 1960 . 


4,635 


September, 1960 


3,292 


March, 1960 


4,338 


October, 1960 . 


3,911 


April, 1960 . 


3,459 
3,800 


November, 1960 

Total .... 


3,512 


May, 1960 .... 


. 45,076 


June, 1960 .... 


3,523 







Average number of men on the force 
Average number of men sick daily 



2,808 
123 or 4.38 per cent 



TABLE IX 

Report of Accidents for the Year Ending November SO, 1960 





Under 4 Vears 


£ 


to 14 Years 


15 to 54 Years 


55 Years and C 


VER 


Totals 


Cause of Accident 


Killed 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 




M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


iicycles .... 


— 


— 


5 


2 


— 


— 


59 


17 


— 


— 


8 


1 


— 


— 


4 


2 


— 


— 


76 


2: 


Carriages, Licensed 


— 


— 


2 


2 


— 


— 


4 


2 


— 


— 


5 


2 


— 


— 


■ ) 


1 


— 


— 


13 


; 


basting .... 


— 


— 


1 


■> 


— 


— 


17 


5 


— 


— 


2 


4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20 


1) 


>ogs, Bitten by . 


— 


— 


128 


78 


— 


— 


548 


201 


— 


— 


295 


90 




— 


60 


23 


— 


— 


1,031 


395 


lectric Wires, Live . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


3 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


/ 


- 


xcavations in Street 
























1 
















1 


ailing Objects . 


— 


1 


5 


3 


— 


— 


27 


2 


3 


— 


83 


20 


— 


— 


8 


6 


3 


1 


123 


31 


alls, Various ( Jauses 


— 


— 


232 


164 


3 


— 


399 


147 


4 


1 


1,439 


492 


6 


2 


778 


507 


13 


3 


2,848 


1,310 


lass, Cut by 


— 


— 


17 


6 


— 


— 


58 


32 


— 


— 


114 


43 


— 


— 


9 


6 


— 


— 


198 


87 


!otorcycles 














1 


3 


1 


— 


27 


4 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 


28 


8 


otor Vehicles, Commercial 


3 


— 


6 


18 


2 


— 


39 


22 


3 


— 


154 


94 


4 


2 


24 


18 


12 


2 


223 


152 


otor Vehicles, Pleasure . 


2 


1 


135 


79 


2 


2 


304 


157 


I 


') 


939 


549 


11 


4 


141 


135 


•>•> 


9 


1,519 


920 


reetcars .... 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 


10 


15 


1 


1 


8 


10 


■ ) 


1 


21 


25 


reets, Defects in 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


— 


1 


16 




— 


■> 


i 


— 


— 


3 


27 


■ains, Railroad . 






— 


1 




— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


4 


2 


— 


— 


3 


2 


— 


— 


8 


5 


•hides, Fire Department 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


— 


— 


— 


— 






— 


5 


— 


•hides, Hand Drawn 






















1 


— 














1 


— 


•hides, Horse Drawn 














1 
























1 


— 


iscellaneous 


■> 


3 


182 


141 


— 


— 


324 


131 


7 


2 


1,109 


383 


li 


2 


221 


117 


15 


7 


1,836 


772 


Total Killed 


7 


5 


— 


— 


8 


2 


— 


— 


26 


5 


— 


— 


28 


11 


— 


— 


69 


23 


— 


— 


Total Injured 


— 


— 


714 


496 


— 


— 


1,787 


723 


— 


— 


4,199 


1,716 




— 


1,261 


835 


— 


— 


7,961 


3,770 



75 



TABLE X 



Total Number of Persons Arrested by Divisions and Units for All Types of Offenses, 
Covering Both Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending November 30, 1060 



Divisions 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Division 1 


1,667 


129 


1,796 




1,024 


345 


1,369 


Division 3 


2,349 


291 


2,640 


Division 4 


11,920 


1,407 


13,327 


Division 6 


3,301 


159 


3,460 


Division 7 


1 ,527 


135 


1,662 




13 


— 


13 


Division 9 


7,658 


1,271 


8,929 


Division 10 


5,654 


734 


6,388 


Division 11 


2,765 


177 


2,942 


Division 13 


1,347 


149 


1,496 


Division 14 


2,557 


356 


2,913 


Division 15 


2,930 


180 


3,110 


Division 16 


4,956 


572 


5,528 


Division 17 


1,272 


49 


1,321 


Division 18 


742 


50 


792 


Division 19 


1,342 


71 


1,413 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation .... 


1,578 


426 


2,004 


Traffic Division 


16,091 


3,221 


19,312 


Superintendent's Office 


131 


5 


136 


Totals 


70,824 


9,727 


80,551 



76 



TABLE XI — GROUP A 



Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B.I. Under 
Uniform Crime Reporting Procedure for the Year Ending November 30, 1000 



Classification of Offenses 


Offenses 
Reported 


Unfounded 


Actual 
Offenses 


Cleared 
by Arrest 


Not 
Cleared 


1. Criminal homicide: 












(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 


26 


— 


26 


25 


1 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence 


61 


20 


41 


33 


8 


2. Forcible rape 


92 


4 


88 


87 


1 




621 


24 


597 


298 


299 


4. Aggravated assault .... 


669 


18 


651 


595 


56 


5. Burglary — breaking or entering 


3,395 


112 


3,283 


1,035 


2,248 


6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft) : 












(a) $50 and over in value . 


2,295 


80 


2,215 


777 


1,438 


(b) Under $50 in value 


4,345 


122 


4,223 


2,495 


1,728 


7. Auto theft 


4,506 


711 


3,795 


790 


3,005 


Totals 


16,010 


1,091 


14,919 


6,135 


8,784 



TABLE XI — GROUP B 

Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table XI 

the Year Ending November 30, 1960 



Group A for 





Value of Property Stolen in Boston 


Type of Property 


Stolen 


Recovered 


Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 


$416,121 00 
219,097 00 
123,569 00 
148,794 00 

1,967,329 00 
700,871 00 


$46,782 00 

13,639 00 

1,600 00 

27,507 00 

1,825,064 00 

136,139 00 


Totals 


$3,575,781 00 


$2,050,731 00 



77 



TABU-: XI— GROUP C 

Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table XI - Group A and Value of Property Stolen 
by Type of Offense, for Year Ending November SO, I960 



Classification of Offenses 


Number of 
Actual Offenses 


Value of 
Property Stolen 


Robbery: 

(a) Highway (streets, alleys, etc.) 

(b) Commercial house (not c , d, /) 

(c) Oil station 

(d) Chain store 

(e) Residence (anywhere on premises) 

(/) Bank 

(g) Miscellaneous 








335 
99 
8 
15 
36 
12 
92 


$33,807 
32,936 
995 
22,290 
2,893 
17,180 
12,658 


Total — robbery 


597 


$122,759 


Burglary — breaking or entering: 

(a) Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 

(b) Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 


421 
1 .053 

1,599 
210 


$124,368 
254,183 

441,680 
25,565 


Total — burglary ... 


3 283 


$845,796 


Larceny — theft (except auto, by value) 

(a) $50 and over 

(b) $5 to $50 

(c) Under $5 


2.215 
2,948 
1.275 


$569,152 

66,785 

3,960 


Total — larceny 


6.438 


$639 897 


Auto theft: 

(a) Joy-riding 

(6) Allother 


2,735 
1,060 


$1,370,784 
596,545 


Total — auto theft 


3,795 


$1,967,329 


Grand Total 




$3,575,781 













TABLE XI — GROUP I) 

Number of Individuals Arrested, Not the Number of Charges, Whose Cases Have Reached Final Dispositia 
with Traffic Arrests Included, for the Year Ending November SO, 1960 



Classification of Offenses 



Persons 
Released 
by Poliee 



Pehsons Charged by the Police 



Charged 



Arrested 



Summoned 



Persons Found Guilt 



Of Offense 
Charged 



Of Lesser 
Offense 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault .... 
Burglary — breaking or entering 
Larceny — theft (except auto theft) . 
Auto theft 



Total, Part I Classes 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting . 
Embezzlement and fraud 
Stolen property, buying, receiving, possessing 
Weapons, carrying, possessing, etc. . 
Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex Offenses 

Offenses against family and children 
Narcotic drug laws .... 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct .... 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated 
Violation of road and driving laws 
Parking violations .... 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws . 

All other offenses 

Arrests for other departments 

Total, Part II Classes . 

Grand total 



9 
6 

10 
262 

76 
355 
214 

68 



1,000 



13 

5 

19 

14 

1 

275 

55 



41 



92 



1,515 



36 

27 
77 
386 
486 
899 
,876 
676 



4,463 



98S 

35 

373 

93 

140 

279 

554 

1 ,025 

92 

77 

24,412 

234 

58 

786 

327 

9,453 

30,537 

1 ,069 

2,281 

1,760 



(4,573 



36 

26 
76 
366 
469 
765 
1,431 
(505 



3,774 



908 

35 

358 

90 

140 

279 

537 

976 

92 

55 

24,395 

220 

57 

778 

321 

523 

4,637 

499 

1 ,920 

1,760 



38,580 



1 

1 

20 

17 

134 

445 

71 



689 



80 

15 

3 



17 
49 

22 

17 

14 

1 

8 

6 

8,930 

25,900 

570 

361 



35,993 



79,036 



42,354 



6 

1 
33 

218 

251 

756 

1,540 

459 



3,264 



675 
26 

280 

74 

121 

262 

459 

817 

77 

61 

24,308 

199 

52 

636 

235 

9,227 

30,224 

1,028 

1,387 



70,148 



36,682 



73,412 



6 
6 
16 
53 
64 
36 
33 
47 



261 



27 
5 
2 
3 
2 
2 

12 
2 
2 



10 

22 
11 

10 

18 



128 



389 



























79 


TABLE XI --GROUP E 








Arrests for the Year Endin 


7 November 30, 1960 






Nature of Offense 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


On 


Without 


Summoned 
by the 








Warrants 


Warrants 


Court 


durder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


29 


7 


36 


13 


23 




Negligent manslaughter 








23 


4 


27 


12 


14 


1 


Jape 










77 


— 


77 


20 


56 


1 


Jobbery 










376 


10 


386 


94 


272 


20 


Aggravated assault .... 










423 


63 


486 


161 


308 


17 


Burglary — breaking and entering 










882 


17 


899 


217 


548 


134 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 










1 ,423 


453 


1,876 


477 


954 


445 


Auto theft 










654 


22 


676 


159 


446 


71 


Other assaults .... 












903 


85 


9S8 


679 


229 


80 


Forgery and counterfeiting 












27 


8 


35 


16 


19 


— , 


Embezzlement and fraud 












325 


48 


373 


288 


70 


15 


Stolen property . 












89 


4 


93 


39 


51 


3 


Weapons, possession of 














133 


7 


140 


20 


120 


— 


Prostitution 














56 


223 


279 


13 


266 


— 


Sex offenses 














412 


142 


554 


139 


398 


17 


Family and children . 














984 


41 


1,025 


955 


21 


49 


Narcotics laws . 














75 


17 


92 


18 


74 


— 


Liquor laws . 














61 


16 


77 


31 


24 


22 


Drunkenness 














22,552 


1,860 


24,412 


62 


24,333 


17 


Disorderly conduct . 














196 


38 


234 


28 


192 


14 


Vagrancy 














45 


13 


58 


8 


49 


1 


Gambling 














699 


87 


786 


340 


438 


8 


Driving while intoxicated 














309 


18 


327 


25 


296 


6 


Road and driving laws 














9,028 


425 


9,453 


501 


22 


8,930 


Parking violations 














25,273 


5,264 


30,537 


4,596 


41 


25,900 


Traffic violations 














1,021 


48 


1,069 


227 


272 


570 


All other offenses 














1,834 


447 


2,281 


819 


1,101 


361 


Suspicion 














1,306 


209 


1,515 


10 


1,505 


— 


Arrests for other departments 












1 ,609 


151 


1,760 


1,511 


247 


2 


Totals 


70,824 


9,727 


80,551 


11,478 


32,389 


36,684 



So 






































TABLE XII 


















Age and Sex of All Persons Arrested for Offenses Shown Under Table XI -- ( 


iroup 


E, Corer i i 


"J I' a 


ih Pending 


and Completed Coses, But Excluding Traffic Arrests for the 


Year 


End 


'no X 


ore oilier Si 


), I960 




Nature of Offense 


Under 15 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




























M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


V 


M 


V 


M 


F 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 






2 












1 





1 




Manslaughter by negligence . 








— 












1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


- - 


Forcible rape 










5 




3 







— 


7 




3 




3 




Robbery 










42 


• > 


1.1 


2 


17 


3 


24 


1 


33 




311 


— 


Aggravated assault 










33 


1 


8 




19 


4 


14 




20 




15 


3 


Burglary — breaking or entering 










202 


8 


93 


1 


71 


1 


CO 


1 


48 


1 


3d 


1 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 










30(5 


122 


90 


50 


72 


38 


7< i 


17 


63 


10 


08 


8 


Auto theft .... 










78 


— 


92 


•> 


92 


1 


90 


1 


05 


i 


54 


— 


Other assaults . 












21 


4 


9 


4 


10 


3 


l(i 


3 


20 


>> 


28 


1 


Forgery and counterfeiting 












— 


— 








— 


— 


1 




i 


1 


1 


Embezzlement and fraud 












— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


3 




4 


— 


Stolen property 












4 


— 


7 


— 


1 


— 


12 


1 


4 




2 


■ — 


Weapons, possession of 














3 


— 


1 




10 


1 


8 


1 


13 


— 


3 


— 


Prostitution 














— 


— 




4 


— 


— 


1 


1 




8 


1 


13 


Sex offenses 














16 


4 


i 


— 


(i 


5 


12 


3 


14 


•> 


20 


10 


Family and children 














— 


— 














4 


1 


8 


1 


Narcotics laws 














— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


Liquor laws 














— 


— 




— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


1 


1 





— 


Drunkenness . 














3 


— 


14 


— 


32 


4 


101 


4 


127 


3 


148 


4 


Disorderly conduct 














5 


1 


14 


3 


29 


5 


30 


3 


23 


3 


17 


3 


Vagrancy . 














— 


— 






— 


— 


2 




9 


2 




— 


Gambling . 














— 


— 






— 


— 


5 


1 


13 


3 


13 


1 


Driving while intoxicated 












— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


2 




6 




3 


— 


Suspicion .... 












— 


— 


1 


— 


3 


— 


83 


< 


94 


15 


92 


9 


k\\ other (except traffic) 












118 


70 


36 


33 


47 


44 


lil 


29 


73 


Hi 


85 


17 


Arrests for other department 


■i and agencies 








22 


17 


29 


16 


37 


24 


33 


8 


42 





03 


5 


Totals:— Males 

females . 










858 


— 


422 


— 


452 


— 


639 


— 


685 


— 


714 


— 












229 




lb") 




134 




83 




75 




77 



8i 



TABLE XII Continued 



ge and Sex of All Persons Arrested far Offenses Shewn Under Table XI - Group E, Covering Both Pending 
and Completed Coses, But Excluding Traffic Arrests fir the Year Ending November SO, I960 



Nature of Offense 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


29 




























M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


A I 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


urder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


, 




•> 




1 


1 




1 


1 




2 


2 


anslaughter by negligence . 








1 




1 








3 


— 


— 


— 


7 


1 


ireible rape .... 










3 


— 


7 


— 


') 




5 


— 


3 


— 


10 


— 


obbery 










26 




23 


— 


Hi 




14 


— 


(i 


1 


56 


— 


ygravated assault 










26 




24 


4 


24 


3 


10 


4 


11 


'> 


01 


15 


urglary — breaking or entering 










27 


— 


28 




35 


— 


24 


— 


13 


— 


86 


1 


ireeny — theft (except auto theft) 










50 


10 


40 


10 


47 


13 


39 


13 


20 


8 


140 


34 


uto theft .... 










20 




24 


1 


16 


2 


17 


— 


15 


2 


47 


4 


ther assaults . 












39 


3 


32 


3 


38 


2 


33 


2 


37 


•) 


155 


13 


wrgery and counterfeiting 


























2 


— 




2 


— 


mbezzlement and fraud 












3 


— 


7 


3 


2 


5 


13 


1 


6 


— 


51 


12 


;olen property 












6 


— 


1 




8 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


9 


— 


eapons, possession of 














L2 


1 


/ 




7 


1 


6 


— 


4 


— 


17 


1 


costitution 














1 


11 


3 


11 


5 


33 


1 


12 


3 


7 


15 


59 


»x offenses 














15 


4 


19 


13 


15 


11 


13 


i 


13 


4 


51 


27 


amily and children 














12 


3 


29 


."i 


23 


5 


40 


1 


41 


5 


210 


4 


arcotics laws 














1 


1 


3 


2 


5 


3 


4 


— 


2 


2 


23 


o 


iquor laws 
















1 


•_> 


— 


■ ) 


1 


2 


1 


— 


— 


3 


1 


runkenness . 














101 


4 


725 


38 


497 


38 


423 


33 


374 


28 


1 ,899 


190 


isorderly conduct 














14 


4 


16 


3 


12 


1 


4 


3 


2 


— 


12 


1 


agrancy . 














1 


— 




— 


1 


1 




1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


ambling 














14 


— 


15 


2 


19 


6 


23 


4 


25 


1 


133 


10 


riving while intoxicated 












10 


— 


18 


— 


10 




6 


— 


5 


1 


65 


6 


ispicion .... 












99 


14 


89 


24 


85 


21 


73 


13 


52 


1 1 


204 


35 


11 other (except traffic) 












93 


10 


'89 


14 


73 


10 


71 


15 


58 


11 


292 


41 


rrests for other departments and agencies 






00 


4 


70 


3 


58 


5 


62 


1 


69 


4 


270 


11 


Totals: — Males 






635 


— 


1,286 


— 


1,001 


— 


886 


— 


701 


— 


3,826 


— 


Females 








70 




136 


" 


162 





114 




89 




477 



82 



TARLK XII Conclu 



(led 



Age (mil Sex of All Persons Arrested for Offenses Shown I nder Table XI - Group E, Covering Both Pending 
and Completed Cases, But Excluding Traffic Arrests far the Year Ending November 30, 1960 



Nature of Offense 



30 34 



M 



35 39 



M 



40-44 



M 



45 49 



M 



50 

And Over 



M 



Hack 



White 



All 
Other 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 
Manslaughter by negligence . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 

Auto theft 

Other assaults . 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property 

Weapons, possession of . 

Prostitution 

Sex offenses 

Family and children 

Narcotics laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness . 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy .... 

Gambling .... 

Driving while intoxicated 

Suspicion .... 

All other (except traffic) 

Arrests for other departments and agencies 



Totals:— Males 
Females 



8 
2 

10 
39 
61 
64 

144 
23 

171 
6 
73 
11 
17 
11 
73 

246 

18 

14 

i,64 

8 

3 

124 
50 

188 

271 

288 



4,570 



9 

1 
38 

4 
13 

9 



36 

1 

8 

3 

1 

308 



18 
5 
28 
38 
1 



3 
2 

2 
10 
26 

32 

76 
11 
97 

9 



9 

3 

41 

131 

3 

9 

2,153 

3 

5 

69 

37 

74 

123 

14t 



23 
3 
9 



15 

14 

6 

3 

1 
230 



16 

20 
1 1 



1 

6 

8 

24 

31 

59 

72 



o 
5 
3 

108 
4 
7 

,833 



IS4 

31 

77 

115 

149 



11 
17 
10 



6 

22 
18 
44 

4 
41 

2 

29 

10 

5 

3 

25 

63 



3,20/ 
4 
3 

55 
31 
48 
88 
107 



1 

3 

2 

15 



4 
9 

1 

1 

220 

2 

9 



6 

24 

9 



3 

4 
2 

5 
19 
14 
83 

6 
78 

6 
28 

6 

(I 

4 
35 
69 

9 

12 

,270 

2 

26 

127 
35 
44 

141 
89 



3,127 



3,696 



3,821 



8,123 



559 



38; 



374 



313 



2 

483 

2 

5 

7 
4 
5 
40 
6 



598 



13 
23 
36 

243 

247 

687 

1,413 

585 

678 

28 

321 

72 

85 

68 

358 

707 

36 

57 

20,489 

18? 

55 

411 

268 

897 

1,517 

1,274 



30,750 



2 
5 

21 
19 
31. 



3.92 



TABLE XIII 

Showing the Number of Licenses of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the 
deceived from All Sources and Paid to the City Collector-Treasurer During the Year Ending 



83 



Amount of Move 
November 30, 196 



CLASS OF LICENSE 



Auctioneer (Class 1) . 

Auctioneer (other classes) 

Bicycle registrations . 

Dog 

Driver (hackney carriage) 

Firearms, dealer ill . 

Qunsmith 

Hackney carriage (and regrants) 

Hackney carriage (replacement of dr 
badges) 

Handcart (common carrier) 

Junk collector .... 
Junk shopkeeper 

Musician (collective and sound ear) 
Musician (itinerant) . 
Pawnbroker .... 

Public lodging house . 
Revolver (including machine gun) 
Revolver, permit to purchase . 



O o 

■-3 > 



10 
2,334 

15,514 
6,249 

15 


2,028 

54 

4 

95 

45 

13 

<i 

14 

4 

1,193 

2 



3 

as a> 

CO QJ 

m 

TO -4-3 



Go' 

10 

2,334 

15,501 

6,123 

15 



L' Ill's 

54 
4 

89 
45 
13 
8 
44 

1,097 



13 



03 > — 



< 



120 



91 






503 



15 



50 



279 
549 



104 



Amount 



8 4 


























TABLE XIII -Concluded 










Showing the Number of License* of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the 


.1 mow 


/ of Mom 


Received from All Sources and Paid to 


'lie City Collector-Treasurer Duriii 


(/ the Year h 


Inding 


Xoreml 


,er ■!(), 196 




CO 


■n 


3fe 


QQ ~ C 




£ 


CD 






-p 




CLASS OF LICENSE 


3 £ 


1 « 


co O 


.2 £'-*3 


XI 


"* s^ 




■a I 


t 


- M 

3 GO 


Amount 




- — . 


?:£ 


l^ 


gj£;z; 


■~f- 


gJ? o 


§> 


r x 


~z 


S £ 






<! 


3 


3 


< 


~ 


O 


o 


- 


H 


o 




Secondhand articles 


315 


nil 


3 


— 


1 


— 


4 


— 


5 


— 


$9,330 mi 


Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 


236 


233 


I 




— 


2 


16 


1 


2 


14 


1 1 ,650 00 


Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 


S 


7 


— 


— 


— 


1 




— . 




— 


175 00 


Sight-seeing automobile .... 


21) 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


— 


— 


1,358 mi 


Sight-seeing driver 


24 


24 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


— 


— 


IN III) 


Special police 


1,047 


7(15 


24(3 


— 


I 


5 


15 


— 


— 


19 


3,975 III) 


Street railway, conductor, motorman, and 
























starter 


80 


XI) 


— 


— 


— 





— 


— 


— 


— 


III) no 


Copies hi licenses and replacement dog 
























tags 








— 










— 


— 


104 III) 


lopies of police reports .... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,396 00 


Damage to police property 


— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


939 17 


Reimbursements 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 






— 


— 


— 


957 53 


Sale of auctioneer record books 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— ' 


— 


— 


12 75 


Sale oi condemned property 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,663 38 


Sale of lost, stolen, and abandoned prop- 
























erty 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2,372 45 


Jale of pawnbroker and secondhand arti- 
























cles report blanks 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


43! 00 


Sunday permits 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3,094 00 


Jse of police property .... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1,245 00 


Totals 


29,416 


28,908 


272 


l 


226 


9 


539 


67 


10 


972 


$136,774 28 


'i-edit by City Collector-Treasurer for 
























money received for damage to police 
























, property, telephone commissions, and 


























— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17,627 68 


Grand Total .... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


$154,401 96 



























TABLE XIV 
Number of Dog Licenses Issued During the Year Ending November 30, 1960 



Divisions 


Males 


Females 


Spayed 


Kennels 


Transfers 


With 
Fee 


Without 
Fee 


Totals 


1 


46 


9 


15 


— 


— 


70 


— 


70 


2 


3 


2 


3 


— 


— 


8 


— 


8 


3 


117 


49 


46 


1 


— 


213 


— 


213 


4 


4S7 


102 


141 


3 


— 


733 


1 


734 


6 . . . 


681 


153 


278 


1 


— 


1,113 


— 


1,113 


7 . 

8 

9 . . . 


688 


S9 


25 1 


— 


— 


1,028 


— 


1 .028 


1,076 


245 


284 


2 


— 


1,607 


— 


1.607 


10 . 


943 


91 


244 


— 


— 


1 ,278 


— 


1,278 


11 


1 .043 


148 


576 


3 


1 


1,771 


3 


1,771 


13 . . . 


541 


87 


231 


— 


— 


859 


— 


S59 


14 


908 


155 


506 


3 


— 


1 ,572 


3 


1 .575 


15 


277 


52 


1 28 




1 


458 


1 


45!) 


16 


339 


99 


147 


4 


— 


589 


1 


590 


17 


955 


97 


612 


9 


— 


1 ,673 


2 


1 .675 


18 . 


842 


103 


498 


— 


1 


1,444 


•> 


1,446 


19 . 


641 


64 


378 


2 


— 


1,085 


— 


1,085 


Totals 


9,587 


1,545 


4,338 


28 


3 


15,501 


*13 


15,514 



* Total of 13 dog licenses issued without 
corporation, incorporated exclusively for purpo 

dogs "specially trained to lead or serve a blind 



fee, in accordance with law, includes: I kennel for a "domestic charitable 
ses of protecting animals from cruelty," etc. (located on Division 4): and 12 
person" (from Divisions 11. 14. 15. Hi, 17. and 18). 



86 



TABLE XV 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending November SO, I960 



EXPENDITURES 



Group 1. Personal Services: 

10 Permanent employees 
12 Overtime 



Group 2. Contractual Services: 

2 1 Communications 

22 Light, heat and power .... 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings and 

structures 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment 

28 Transportation of persons 

29 Miscellaneous contractual services 



Group 3. Scituks and Materials: 

30 Automotive 

32 Food 

33 Heating .... 

34 Household . 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 

36 Office 

39 Miscellaneous . 



81(1.773,377 96 
572,382 56 



$68,853 is 
54,571 SO 

102,568 19 

76,911 43 

21,545 82 

132,115 87 



$146,535 17 
18,077 40 
41,327 93 
22,400 27 
1,816 97 
91,839 77 
174,461 68 



: 17,345.7(1(1 



45(1,5(1(1 29 



1911,459 19 



Group 4. Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous .... 

Group 5. Equipment: 

50 Automotive 

56 Office furniture and equipment . 

59 Miscellaneous .... 



Croup 7. Structures vnd Improvements: 
70 Buildings and improvements 



Total 



119, SCI SO 
13,467 40 
24,621 87 



31,439 76 



157,951 13 



17,295 77 



.118,505,472 66 



RECEIPTS 

For licenses issued by the Police Commissioner 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 

Refunds, miscellaneous 

Use of police property 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abandoned property 

For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage drivers' badges, copies of 

licenses and records, sale of report blanks 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equipment .... 
For damage to police property (paid at Headquarters) 

Total 

( !redit by City Collector-Treasurer for money received for damage to police property 
commissions on telephones, and dog fines 

Grand Total 



870.210 33 


35,971 


50 


957 


53 


1,245 


00 


2,372 


45 


19.04S 


00 


30 


30 


939 


17 


8130,774 


28 


17.027 


08 



$154,401 96 



87 



TABLE XVI 

Showing the Number of Male and Female Persons Twenty Years of Age or Mori Who Were Residents of the City, 
Boston on the First Day of January, 1960, Listed by the Listing Board in the Several Words and Precin 
of Said City 



Wards 


Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Tree 3 


Prec. 4 


Prec. 5 


Prec. 6 


Prec. 7 


Prec. 8 


Prec. 9 


Prec 10 


Prec. 1 1 


Prec. 1 


Ward 1 . 


2,148 


2,(1! 14 


2,517 


1,983 


2,377 


2,283 


2,206 


2,012 


1,0(12 


2,205 


2.155 


1,91 


Ward 2 . 


1,845 


1,570 


1,996 


1,936 


1,73!) 


1,836 


1,648 












Ward 3 . 


2,272 


2,189 


2,155 


2.187 


1,120 


2,570 


1,986 


2,907 


3,!) 12 








Ward 4 


2.572 


2,382 


1,929 


2,119 


2 568 


2,070 


2,272 


2.375 


2.124 


2,500 






Ward 5 . 


2,745 


1,929 


2,788 


2,118 


3,008 


24,00 


2,933 


3,100 


3.113 


2,173 


1,624 


1,6', 


Ward 6 . 


1,754 


1,74(1 


1.774 


1,689 


1,656 


I.03S 


1,676 


1,627 


1.037 








Ward 7 . 


1,687 


2,041 


1,911 


1,979 


1,757 


1,944 


1,804 


1,804 


1,749 


1.905 






Ward 8 . 


1.417 


2,404 


847 


1,463 


1,452 


1,203 


1,567 


1,705 


994 








Ward 9 . 


2,163 


2,434 


1,752 


1,618 


1,606 


84(3 


994 


1,068 


1,459 








Ward 1(1 


1,689 


1,681 


1,801 


1,889 


1.621 


1,829 


2.401 


2.081 


1.931 








Ward 11 . 


1,910 


1,524 


1,050 


2,003 


1.024 


1.427 


1,607 


1,966 


1,241 


1.07 1 






Ward 12 . 


1,762 


1,483 


1,696 


1.83.5 


1.387 


1,869 


1.920 


1,0 12 


1.000 


1,450 


1,725 


1,5. 


Ward 13 . 


1,317 


1,401 


1,349 


1,717 


1,393 


1,686 


1,803 


1.826 


1,790 


2,057 


2,437 




Ward II. 


2,065 


1,687 


2,008 


2,194 


2,081 


1,825 


1,968 


1,609 


2,152 


2,201 


1,768 


1 .5! 


Ward 15 . 


2,340 


1,783 


1,159 


1,136 


980 


1,173 


1,523 


I.3S1 


1,423 


1. ISS 


1,151 




Ward Hi . 


1,607 


1,231 


1,694 


1,866 


2.170 


2,337 


1,644 


1, 196 


2,019 


1,661 


1,750 


1,-' 


Ward 17 


1,870 


1,086 


1,208 


1,119 


1,298 


1,658 


1,144 


1,369 


1,108 


2,1 S3 


1,21)5 


1.1 


Ward 18 . 


2,04 1 


2,337 


1,814 


1,046 


1,360 


1,639 


1.277 


1.707 


2,403 


1 , 1 45 


2,056 


1,6: 


Ward HI 


1,646 


1,500 


1.012 


2,019 


1,541 


1.135 


1.180 


1,055 


913 


1,052 


1,252 


1.3! 


Ward 20 . 


1 .620 


994 


978 


1,552 


1,053 


1,549 


1,299 


1,419 


1,735 


1,528 


1,070 


1.1 


Ward 21 . 


2,363 


1,592 


2,052 


1,861 


2,101 


1,409 


2,094 


2,148 


2,330 


1.946 


2,03!) 


1.6 


Ward 22 . 


927 


1,125 


1,102 


1,004 


1,215 


1,096 


I.03S 


1.161 


1,769 


2,675 


1,300 


1,6 



88 



TABLE XV] Concluded 

owing the Number of Male and Female Persons Twenty Years of Age or More Who Were Residents of the City of 
ston on the First Day of January, I960, Listed by the Listing Board in the Several Wards and Precincts 



Said City 



Wards 


Prec. 13 


Prec. 14 


Prec. 15 


Prec. 10 


Prec. 17 


Prec. is 


Prec. 19 


Prec. 21) 


Prec. 21 


Prec. 22 


Totals 


■dl 


2.0s;. 


1,379 






— — 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29,259 


d 2 . . . 


— 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12.570 


•d 3 . 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21,298 


■d 4 . 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


22,911 


■el 5 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29,900 


•d 6 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


15,197 


■(17. 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,581 


■(18. 

•A <) 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


.— . 


13,052 
14,030 
16,983 


( l J 
(1 10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


. — 


d 11 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


10,926 


(1 12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19,984 


(1 13 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,770 


(1 11 . . . 


1.713 


1,969 


1,948 


1,423 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


30,203 


.I 15 . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15,540 


d l(i . . . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


20,759 


•d 17 . . . 


996 


1,181 


1.009 


880 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


20.455 


(1 18 . 


1,089 


1,1 19 


1,399 


1,397 


1.759 


2,062 


1,862 


1,620 


1,520 


— , 


34.402 


d 19 


1,174 


845 


1.039 


1,588 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


20.273 


d 20 


1,169 


1,174 


1,869 


1,827 


1,890 


1,17(1 


1,300 


1,792 


— 


.— 


28,744 


(1 21 . . . 


1,559 


1,354 


1,756 


1,534 




— 


— 


— 


— 


.— . 


29,790 


,1 22 . . . 


1,070 


1,346 


1.150 


1,509 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


.— . 


21,163 


Grand Total 






















470,802