(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




BOSTON PUBUC LIBRARY 
GQVBWMeilTOOCUIIIIBfrSOEBilRTMENT 

MAR 1 6 1995 



D352.2 

mB6 



Sociology & Economicf 
Detiott Public Libraty 



1961 



ANNUAL 




REPORT 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF 



OF THE 




N 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 49 



DETROIT 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 



[PUBLIC DOCUMENT — NO. 49] 



FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



of th 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



for the 



CITY OF BOSTON 




for the Year Ending 



NOVEMBER 30. 1961 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

34^10 231 



03 



J 



The Commissioxer's Office 

154 Berkeley Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 



November 30, ig6i 



To His Excellency John A. Volpe, 

Governor of Ike Commonicealth. 



Your Excellency: 

In compliance with the provisions of Chapter 291, Acts of 1906, as amended, 
I have the honor to submit the following report of the activities of the Boston Police 
Department for the year ending November ,30, 1961. 

It is a pleasure to express m}- appreciation to the members of the department 
for their loj'alty and efficiency in carrying out their assignments. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leo J. Sltllivan, 

Police Commissioner. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston Herald and Traveler 

The Boston Record-. Imcrican-Suuday Advertiser 

United Press International 

National News Pictures 

Warren Kay Vantine Studio 

The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter to tlie Governor 



The Department: 
Police Force 
Signal Service 

Employees of the Department 
Recapitulation 
Distribution and Changes 
Police Officers Injured While on Duty 



Award of Medals: 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor 
Department Medals of Honor 
Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 

Work of the Department 

Detective Bureau . 



Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Automobile Unit 
Lost and Stolen Property Unit 
Homicide .... 
Domestic Relations Unit . 
Narcotics and Vice Unit 
Identification Unit 
Biological Chemist 
Ballistics Unit 



Traffic Di\-ision 

Police Academ\- 

Central Complaint and Records Bureau 

Crime Prevention Bureau 

City Prison 

House of Detention 

Police Signal System 

Harbor Police and Emergencv Service Unit 

Alotor Vehicle Service: 
Combination Ambulances 
Automobile INIaintenance 

Horses .... 



Page 

2 



lO 
lO 

1 1 

13 
14 

14 
14 
16 

17 
19 

20 

24 
25 

26 

28 

29 

30 

32 



33 



35 
35 



Hackney Carriages: 
Hackney Carriage Licenses 
Hackney Carriage Drivers' Licenses 
Public Taxicab Stands 
Private Hackney Stands . 
Sightseeing Automobiles . 
Haclcney Carriage Violations 

Listing Work in Boston : 
Listing Expenses 
Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 

Police Work on Jury Lists .... 

Special Police 



Pistols, Revolvers and Machine Guns: 

Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns and Rifles 
Gunsmiths 



Public Lodging Houses 



Property Clerk: 

Lost and Found Property 



Special Events 
Miscellaneous Business 
Pensions and Benefits 



Statistical Tables: 

Distribution of Police Force, Signal Service 

and Other Employees .... 
Changes in Authorized and Actual Strength 

of Police Department .... 
List of Police Officers in Active Service Who 

Died During the Year .... 
Members of the Department Retired 

Officers Promoted 

Members of Police Force Appointed in the 

Year Indicated 

Members of Police Force Born in the Year 

Indicated 

Number of Days' Absence from Duty by 

Reason of Disability .... 

Accidents 

Number of Arrests by Police Di\-isions . 

Arrests and Offenses 

Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 
Licenses of All Classes Issued . 

Dog Licenses 

Financial Statement 

Male and Female Residents Listed 



P.\GE 
36 



. . . BOSTON 

Where the Priceless 
Heritage of Yesterday 
Has Been Tied In to the 
Astounding Achievements 
of Today to Prepare for 
the Glittering Promise of 
Tomorrow. 




JOHN F. COLLINS 
Mayor, i960- 



BOSTON . . BEST FOR BUSINESS . . BECAUSE THE BEST IS IN BOSTON 

Hub City of the Universe . . . that was the proud boast of our ancestors. We 
have seen that boast become an actuahty . . . first in medicine . . . foremost in 
education . . . center of scientific research . . . laboratory for the space age . . . 
where labor and management work together for the common benefit of all. 

That is Boston, the city of the future. From the cowpaths of yesterday are rising the 
skyways to the space age of tomorrow. Here in Boston the course is being set for peaceful 
pursuit in the great world of the future. Today's blood and sweat and tears are being shed that 
the children of our children will find here the opportunity for progress and prosperity that was 
the dream of our forefathers when they came here from across the sea seeking the opportunity 
to help build a great nation. 

Boston . . . the bastion of democracy . . . the first frontier of freedom. It 
is your job as the protectors of Boston's citizenry, as the "night watch" who maintains a vigil 
while we slumber, to zealously protect this frontier . . . to man the bastions and be 
ever alert to preserve the hard-won democracy instituted by those who preceded us. 

Boston reborn. . . . We are in the midst of the greatest, most daring, most im- 
aginative renewal in the history of America. It is the task of every one of us to make certain 
that the aims of our planners meet with the success we so ardently desire. There is a new look 
coming to old Boston . . . and the beauty must not be defaced. To protect it is your 
assignment ... to embellish it is our dream. 

In the year that lies ahead we must work together as a team as we have never before 
worked. . . . Our cooperative efforts to bring to fruition the dreams and hopes and aspira- 
tions for a better Boston must be realized. . . . My prayer today is that God grants us the 
strength to carry on and the wisdom to make secure the great potential of a great city. 

John F. Collins, 
Mayor of Boston. 




EDMUND L. McNAMARA 
Police Commissioner 



Commissioner Edmund L. McNamara was born in Boston in 
1920 and received his early training at the John Cheverus Junior 
High School in East Boston. Upon graduation from Clinton High 
School in Clinton, Massachusetts, he entered Holy Cross College 
where in 1943 he was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in educa- 
tion and he also established an enviable reputation as an outstanding 
athlete. 

After graduation he was commissioned an ensign in the United 
States Navy and was promoted to lieutenant senior grade and 
assigned as commander of a " PT Boat" in the southwest Pacific 
area. He participated in the invasion of the Philippine Islands 
for which service he was decorated by the Navy Department. 

Upon his discharge in 1945 Commissioner McNamara was 
appointed field agent in the Federal Bureau of Investigation, served 
in the Cincinnati and Washington field offices, and since 1948 has 
been attached to the Boston office where he served as liaison agent 
to the Boston Police Department. 

Commissioner McNamara was appointed by the Honorable 
John F. Collins, Mayor of the City of Boston, on April 6, 1962. 




SUPERINTENDENT FRANCIS J. HENNESSY 

Superintendent Hennessy was appointed a patrolman in the 
Boston Police Department on March 4, 1927. He was promoted to 
sergeant in August of 1938; to lieutenant in August of 1942; and to 
captain in 1946. 

On October 9, 1957, he was appointed to the office of Super- 
intendent of Police. He is a graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy 
and currently first vice-president and president-elect of the F.B.I. 
National Academy Associates of New England. Superintendent 
Hennessy is also a member of the Executive and Public Safety 
Committees of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association. In 
1958 he was honored by the Kiwanis Club of Boston in recognition 
for his years of dedicated huinanitarian service and leadership in 
the field of law enforcement. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 





CENTRAL COMPLAINtI 






And RECORDS 






eURfAU 










STATISTICAL 
MACHINE SECTION 










CENTRAL COMPLAINT 
ROOM 














RADIO 
MAINTENANCE 






I dR I LLMASTER 



POLICE 
ACADEMY 



REVOLVER 
RANGE 



DIVISION 1 



DIVISION e 
HARBOR MASTER 
HARBOR PATROL 



DIVISION 9 



|d {VISION io| 



I DIVISION 11 I I DIVISION 13 [ | DIVISION 14 | [ DIVISION IS | | DIVISION 16 | | DIVISION IT | | DIVISION 1S| | DIVISION 19 | 



THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 

Police Commissioner i 

Secretary i 

Confidential Secretary i 

Legal Advisor i 

Assistant Secretaries 2 



Superintendent 

Deput}' Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 



The Police Force 

I Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen 



6 

24 

83 

243 



194 

t2,i93 

3 



Total 2,747 

* Includes 2 patrolwoman 

t Includes 8 patrolmen in armed service 



Director 

Director, Assistant 

Linemen and Cable Splicers .... 

Machinist 

Motor Equipment Operators and Laborers 



Signal Service 

I Painter and Groundman 

I 

9 

I 

3 Total 



Signalmen-Electricians . 
Electrical Equipment Repainnan 



22 



Biological Chemist .... 
Biological Chemist, Assistant 

Clerk-Typists 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 
Elevator Operators 

Head Clerks 

Head Administrative Clerk . 
Hearing Stenographers 

Hostlers 

Janitresses 

Junior Building Custodians . 
Matron, Chief .... 

Matron, Assistant Chief 
Matrons, Police .... 
Medical Examiner .... 
Motor Equipment Repairmen 
Multilith Operator 
Multilith Operator and Cameraman 



Employees of the Department (Not Included in Above) 

Principal Clerks 

Principal Clerk-Typists 
Principal Clerk-Stenographers 
Principal Statistical Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian . 

Senior Clerk-Typists .... 

Senior Clerk-Stenographers . 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator . 

Statistical Machine Operators 

Steam Firemen 



I 
I 
6 
I 
7 
19 
I 

7 
6 
6 

52 
I 
I 

1 1 
I 

18 
I 



Storeroom Helper and Motor Equipment 
Operator 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 

Telephone Operators 



Working Foreman and Motor Equipment 
Repainnan 



2 
5 
3 
I 

I 
I 

13 
2 
I 



Total 



201 




NEW BPD MOBILE FIELD RADIO UNIT 



Recapitulation 

Police Commissioner 
Secretary . 

Confidential Secretary 
Legal Advisor . 
Assistant Secretaries 
Police Force 
Sii,'nal Service . 
Employees 



I 
I 
I 

I 

2 

2,747 

2 2 
201 



Grand Total 2,976 



Distribution and Changes 

Distribution of the Police Force is shown by Table I. During the year Si patrolmen were appointed; 

1 sergeant, 20 patrolmen resigned; i patrolman was dismissed; 2 captains were promoted to deputy superintendents; 

2 lieutenants assigned as lieutenant detectives; 5 sergeants assigned as sergeant-detectives; 6 patrolmen assigned 
as first-grade detectives; 5 patrolmen assigned as second-grade detectives; 24 patrolmen assigned as third-grade 
detectives; 5 third-grade detectives assigned as patrolmen; i deputy superinteiident, i captain, 4 lieutenants, 7 
sergeants, and 48 patrolmen were retired on pensions; i captain, 4 sergeants, and 15 patrolmen died. (See Tables 
III, IV, and V.) 

Police Officers Injured While on Duty 



How Injured 


Number of Men 

Injured in 

Year Ending 

November 30, 1961 


Number of Duties 
Lost by Such Men 


Number of Duties 
Lost This Year by 
Men on Account 
of Injuries Received 
Previous to Decem- 
ber I, i960 


In arresting prisoners 

In pursuing criminals 

By cars and other vehicles 

Various other causes 


101 

19 
122 
176 


1.180 

2S1 

2,5'4 

3.0I2 


152 

231 

1.535 

T,6i6 


Totals 


418 


6,987 


3.534 



10 



AWARD OF MEDALS 





WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 



CARDINAL GUSHING AWARDS SCOTT 
MEDAL TO DETECTIVE MICHAEL DE SISTO 





DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 



COHASSET CHIEF PELLETIER BESTOWS 
AWARD ON SGT. RIDGE AT ANNUAL BALL 



II 

RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1961, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual Ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association held at the Boston Garden, December 5, 1961, as follows: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor, a Department Medal of Honor, and the Tlioinas F. Sullhan A'.i'ard to Detective Third Grade 

Michael J. DeSisto, Division Three 

Detective Third Grade Michael J. DeSisto of Division 3 is hereby awarded the Walter Scott Medal for Valor, a Department 
Medal of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on November i, 1961. 

On November i, 1961, Detective DeSisto, while off duty in civilian clothes and after completing services for the Boston Police 
Relief Association, went to supper at a restaurant on Cambridge street, Boston. Shortly thereafter, a holdup man entered the estab- 
lishment, pointed a revolver at an employee, and demanded all the money in the cash register. The employee complied, and after 
seizing the cash, the gunman fled out a door into Grove street. 

At this point. Detective DeSisto was informed of the holdup and, although unarmed, the oliicer without any hesitation raced 
out and intercepted the robber on Grove street. The officer wrestled the gunman to the street and in so doing received two bullets 
in the abdomen. Despite his serious wounds, he pinned the robber to the ground, disarmed him, and held him until help arrived. Not 
until then did this courageous officer lapse into unconsciousness. He was removed to the Massachusetts General Hospital for emei- 
gency surgery in order to save his life. 



Department Medals of Honor and Thomas F. Sullivan .l:vards 

Sergeant-Detective John J. Ridge of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, Narcotics and Vice Unit, is hereby awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Awaid for meritorious duty performed on May 15, 1961. 

Sergeant-Detective Ridge, while proceeding in a radio car on Huntington avenue, near Exeter street, responded to an ADT 
alarm for a holdup of a branch of the Workingmen's Cooperative Bank, 264 Massachusetts avenue. Upon arrival he was unable to 
obtain entrance, but saw a man inside the door with a gun in his right-hand pocket. When this man saw the officer, he ran to the rear 
of the bank. 

When admitted, Sergeant-Detective Ridge was informed that the suspect had fled to the lower floor. This officer with gun 
in hand rushed downstairs, disarmed the robber, and forced him to drop a vial which contained potassium cyanide, with which he 
planned suicide. 

The suspect was identified by four bank employees as the man who had threatened them with a gun and had stolen a laige 
sum of money which was recovered. The criminal was subsequently prosecuted and sentenced to five to eight years in State Prison. 



Sergeant Charles V. Barry, Detective Third Grade Phillip J. DiNatale, and Patrolman James F. Mellon of Division 16 are 
hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on the night of 
September 13, ig6i. 

During surveillance of the Public Garden and environs for the purpose of detecting criminal activities in that area, the above 
officers observed a Ford convertible bearing a Tennessee registration plate parked at the curb in Charles street near Beacon street. In 
the car were five young men who appeared to be observing persons entering and leaving the Public Garden. 

Parking the department vehicle neaiby, the officers, who were in plain clothes, returned to the vicinity of the Tennessee car 
and, with Sergeant Barry and Detective DiNatale keeping watch on the occupants. Patrolman Mellon entered the Public Garden 
through the gate at Charles and Beacon streets. When about fifty yards inside the Garden, he heard running footsteps from behind 
and turning saw the five men approaching. One had a length of chain wrapped around his wrist and brandished it in a threatening 
manner. Another had a large screwdriver in his hand, the handle of which was .taped. Patrolman Mellon was knocked to the 
ground and heard one of the youths say, "Get his money." Regaining his footing, the officer identified himself and displayed his 
badge of office. At this point, he was joined by Sergeant Barry and Detective DiNatale, who had followed the youths and assisted 
in their arrest. 

The five perpetrators of this crime were prosecuted in the Boston Municipal Court and held in $10,000 bail for the Grand 
Jury- 



Detectives First Grade Edw-ard J. Walsh and Thomas E. Connolly of the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, Special Service 
Squad, are hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on April 
6, 1961. 



12 



Following a robbery at the Imlustrial Xational Bank, Warwick, Rhode Ishiml, on March 23, 1961, by three armed men who 
stole $34,123, these oflicers placed three locations in this city under close observation as the result of information received. 

On April 6, 1961, they arrested and questioned two men, and from information obtained these detectives proceeded to Charles- 
town, where, after an extensive search, they found a brown valise containing 83,706, two boxes of ammunition, an airlines insurance 
policy covering a flight from Miami to Boston on April 6, 1961, and two keys to a safe deposit box at the Charlestown branch of a 
Boston bank. It was established that many of the bills tallied with a list sent out by the Rhode Island State Police. 

One of the suspects finally admitted ownership of the valise and stated the money was taken in the commission of the bank 
robbery and that he left for Florida the day of the robbery, where he spent about 84,500 on clothing and gambling. 

On April 7, ig6i, as the result of further information, another man was taken into custody, and in the morning line-up 
witnesses definitely established that these men were two of the men participating in the holdup. These two prisoners were turned over 
to agents of the Federal Bureau of In\'estigation and have been sentenced to twelve years in the Federal Penitentiary. 



Patrolman Walter J. Fahey of the Traffic Division is hereby awarded the Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. 
Sullivan Awaid for meritorious duty performed on February 28, 1961. 

Patrolman Fahey, while on duty, was informed that a young girl was perched on a parapet at the edge of the roof of a seven- 
story building at 515 Washington street, apparently about to jump into the stieet. The officer proceeded to the roof by a rear stairway 
and was able to approach the girl before he was observed. At this time the girl was perilously close to the edge of the roof, with her 
feet dangling over the side. Patrolman Fahey engaged her in conversation, discussing the futility of her action, and edged slowly to- 
ward the girl. She repeated her threat to jump and raised herself as if to do so. The officer, at the risk of his own safety, made a 
lunge for the girl, caught her about the waist, and removed her from the parapet. 

The girl was identified and committed to the Metropolitan State Hospital for treatment. 



Sergeant Salvatore J. Ingenere and Patrolmen Fred P. Speranzo and Charles A. McManus of Division 9 are hereby awarded 
a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on December 26, i960. 

These officers, without regaid to time spent beyond their normal tours of duty, brought to justice a dangerous criminal guilty 
of robbing and repeatedly stabbing a young girl, necessitating emergency surgery and jeopardizing her life. 

After diligent questioning and surveillance in the area of the crime, the officers located the culprit, who was positively iden- 
tified by the victim from her hospital bed. 

The perpetrator of this brutal crime was tried in Suffolk Superior Court on March 15, 1961. found guilty and committed in- 
definitely to the Youth Service Board. 



Detective First Grade Edward T. Weiler and Patrolmen Phillip M. Coyne, John T. Dolan, and Joseph R. Goldrick of 
Division 17 are hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the Thomas F. .Sullivan Award for meritorious service performed 
on December 13, i960. 

On that date, two men, one carrying a lifle hidden under a blanket, entered the White Liquor Store at 346 Spring street. West 
Roxbury, and ordered the manager to open the cash register. The men emptied the register and removed two bottles of liquor 
from the shelf. 

Responding to a radio call, these officers pursued the "getaway car" through streets that were almost impassable from the 
blizzard of the previous day. The fleeing car skidded and lodged in a snowbank. The occupants attempted to escape on foot, but 
were apprehended at gunpoint by the officers. The suspects were immediately searched, with the stolen monej' being found in their 
possession and the rifie and liquor being found in the car. One of the prisoners had a record of nineteen previous arrests, and the 
other had robbed two liquor stores last June. 

The men admitted their part in the armed robbery and were sentenced to three to five years in State Prison. 



13 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

ARRESTS 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a separate person, was 75,214. 

There were 12,181 arrests on warrants and 26,646 without warrants; 36,387 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 66,299; of females, 8,915. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 40,891. The amount of fines totaled $190,313. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 32,758, and the witness fees earned amounted 
to $28,331. 

There were 19,976 persons arrested for drunkenness. 

There were 186 committed to the State Prison; 1,063 to the House of Correction; 53 to Concord Refonna- 
tory; 812 to Bridgewater Ref ormator}' ; 63 to the Women's Reformatory; 232 to the Youth Service Board; and 
2,354 to the County Jail. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was $194,503. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to $4,629,810, and the value recovered amounted to 
$2,931,482. 




MISSION OF MERCY TO BOSTON CITY HOSPITAL 



14 

BUREAU OF CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is composed of several units, namely, Automofjile, Ballistics, 
Chemical Laboraton-, Homicide, Lost and vStolen Property, Identification, and Missing Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the following phases of police work and investigations: 
banking, express thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, vice and obscene literature, pawnbrokers, 
junk shops, secondhand dealers, pickpockets, shoplifters, domestic relations, and subversive activities. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies conimitted within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a year 
for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate in 
every way possible with outside police departments in investigation of crime and j^rosecution of criminals. 



DETECTIVE BUREAU 

A Detecti^'e Bureau was established in the Boston Police Department on November 6, 1950, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 735, Acts of 1950. Detectives assigned to this Bureau are detailed to the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation and the various police divisions. 



AUTOMOBILE UNIT 

This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and is in daily communication with police authorities 
of the United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, Post Office Department, and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The Automobile Unit Index contains records of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars 
reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons, and cars whose 
operators are wanted for \'arious offenses. Man}- anxsts are made by officers of the department and the Automobile 
Unit through information obtained from this index. 

All applications for used car dealers' licenses are investigated by officers of this unit. Frequent examina- 
tions are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this unit during the year identified a number of 
automobiles which were reco\-ered or found abandoned on police divisions, restoring them to their owners, and have 
assisted in solving man}- crimes by means of their positive identifications. 



LOST AND STOLEN PROPERTY UNIT 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities 
and towns throughout the United States forward lists of jiroperty stolen in such places. All pawnbrokers and 
secondhand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of 
articles reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the re- 
covery of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



15 



Record of Purchases and Sales of Used Cars Reported to This Department 
for the Year Ending November 30, 1961 



Month 


Bought by 
Dealers 


Sold by 
Dealers 


December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 












ig6{ 
ig6 


I 
















2,347 

2,335 
1,998 

3,335 
3,155 
3,376 
3,469 
3,948 
2,405 
2,087 

2,389 
1,634 


2,248 

2,353 
3,171 
3,087 
3,440 
3,910 
3,910 
2,506 
2,837 
2,034 
2,363 
1,928 


Totals 


32.478 


33.787 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston 
for the Year Ending November 30, ig6i 







Recovered 






Month 


Reported 


During 


Recovered 


Not 




Stolen 


Month 


Later 


Recovered 


December .... 


437 


419 


16 


2 


ig6i 










January .... 


364 


351 


9 


4 


Februarv 










393 


361 


22 


ID 


March . 










459 


444 


8 


7 


Apnl 










512 


485 


17 


ID 


May 










536 


497 


26 


13 


[une 










467 


425 


21 


21 


Juh- 










500 


453 


33 


14 


August . 










482 


454 


12 


16 


September 










537 


520 


8 


19 


October 










608 


578 


17 


23 


November 










597 


462 





"^35 


Totals .... 


5,892 


5,449 


180 


274 



i6 



HOMICIDE UNIT 

Personnel assigned to this unit supervise the investigation of homicide cases and deaths of a suspicious 
or ^-iolent nature. They are assigned to procure and present evidence at inquests. Transcripts of statements re- 
ceived by these officers from witnesses and defendants are prepared for use as evidence in trials of capital cases. 



Investigated 



Abortions 

Accidental shooting 
Asph\-xiation 
Bicycle . 
Burns 
Drowning 
Drugs (overdose) 
Elevator 
Explosion 
Falling objects 

Abortion . 



Cases Prosecuted 



lO 
2 
2 
I 

17 
14 



Falls 

Homicides 

Machinery 

Motor vehicles 

Natural cau.ses 

Railroad train 

Shot by police officer 

Stillborn 

Suicides 



4 

I Total 

n Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 



Assault and battery 

Assault and batter}^ by means of dangerous weapon 
Assault and battery with dangerous weapon 

Assault with intent to murder 

Conspiracy 

Homicide 



Rape . . . . 

Robbery . . . . 
Violation of firearm law 



28 

30 
3 

35 

1-333 

I 

I 

6 

31 
1,523 



17 
35 
23 
10 

3 

28 
I 
5 
9 



Recapitulation of Homicides 

2 Defendants charged with manslaughter — "No Probable Cause" in lower court 

1 Defendant charged with manslaughter — "No Bill" returned by Grand Jury 

2 Defendants indicted for manslaughter — found "Not Guilty" of manslaughter after trial — guilty of assault 

and battery 

I Defendant indicted for manslaughter — found guihy of manslaughter 

I Defendant indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

5 Defendants indicted for manslaughter — still pending in court 

I Defendant charged with murder — "No Bill" returned by Grand Jury 

5 Defendants indicted for murder (second degree) — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

I Defendant indicted for murder (second degree) — found guilt}- of manslaughter 

I Defendant indicted for murder (second degree) — still pending in court 

4 Defendants charged with murder — held for the Grand Jury 

3 Defendants indicted for murder (first degree) — still pending in court 

I Defendant indicted for murder (first degree) — two murders — ruled insane — committed to Bridgewater 
(Twentj'-eight defendants involved in twenty-six homicides) 

4 Murder cases still under investigation 



17 




POLICE AND FIRE FIGHTERS COMBINE TO SAVE CHILD 



DOMESTIC RELATIONS UNIT 

The Domestic Relations Unit was organized on July ii, 195S, and charged with the following responsi- 
bilities : 

(a) To work with and assist the City of Boston Public Welfare authorities and the directors and supervisors of the Division 
of Aid to Dependent Children in the investigation and prosecution of all frauds and larcenies perpetrated upon these agencies by those 
not legally or properly entitled to assistance. 

(fe) To cooperate with and assist the police officers in the various divisions whenever required in the service of warrants in 
nonsupport cases. 

(c) To cooperate with the clerks of the municipal and district courts in Boston in the execution and service of nonsupport 
warrants which are outstanding. 

(d) To examine the so-called "dead warrant files" of the Police Department in a.11 cases where the dependents of the accused 
are receiving city aid of any type and to further investigate and apprehend the named oflfenders. 

(e) With the cooperation and permission of the clerks of the several mirnicipal and district courts in Boston, to examine all 
nonsupport cases where warrants have been "returned without service" and where the named defendant's dependents are receivmg 
aid, with a view to further investigate, arrest, and prosecute wherever possible. 

The members of this unit do not in any way embarrass or interfere with those who are rightly and 
justifiably receiving aid and enter into the cases onl}' where there are reasonable grounds which lead the court 
authorities or Public Welfare officials to believe that fraud exists. 



Investigations Involving Welfare Cases 

Cases referred to the Domestic Relations Unit by the City of Boston Welfare Department 2,295 

Cases referred by other sources (nonsupport warrants returned without service, anonymous letters, and police reports) . 321 

Total 2,616 



i8 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Domestic Relations Unit Secured Evidence 

{(') Arrests for larceny by reason of fraudulently receiving welfare aid to atotal amount of S45, 427. 82 80 

80 were convicted of larceny 

In these cases the com I ordered the defendants to make restitution to the City of Boston of a total amount of 
S4S,42-.82. 

(b) Arrests for nonsupport and illegitimacy 481 

128 were committed to penal institutions 

606 were ordered to pay supjjort through the Court 

Cases investigated involving fraud or collusion where no evidence was uncovered S15 

Cases involving nonsupport where investigation is continuing 190 

Cases involving illegal receipt of welfare aid which were settled without court action l>y the Legal Division of the City of 

Boston Welfare Department 91 

As the result of investigations made by this unit of 2,295 recipients, the City of Boston Welfare Depart- 
ment discontinued aid in 465 cases and reduced aid in 7S5 cases. 

Amount of money ordered by the various courts to be paid through the Probation Departments in cases 
of arrests for nonsupport of family and illegitimate children during the past year amounted to 8221,709. In addition 
to this amount, $132,558.82, made up of reimbursements in cases of larceny by fraud, totals $354,267, which has 
been saved the City of Boston. 




POLICE RESCUE AT HEIGHT OF SOUTH END FIRE 



19 



NARCOTICS AND VICE UNIT 



The Narcotics and Vice Unit is charged with the investigation and prosecution of persons who commit 
crimes against chastity, moraHty, decency, and good order, invoh^ng the unlawful sale, distribution, and use of 
narcotic drugs and derivatives and the importing, printing, publishing, selling, distributing, or exhibiting of obscene 
or impure literature, prints, pictures, etc. This unit also cooperates with federal agencies in the investigation of 
interstate prostitution and transportation of narcotic drugs and obscene literature. 



Narcotic Drug Law \nolations 
Prostitution and related offenses 
Pretended fortunetelling 



Investigations 

422 Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. 

403 

^ Total 



154 



982 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Narcotics and Vice Unit Secured Evidence 

Illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs . . . 298 Pretended fortunetelling 

Prostitution and related offenses .... 340 

Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. . . 153 Total 



794 



Recapitulation 

Narcotic Drug Violations: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined 135 

Suspended sentence loi 

Placed on file 11 

Found not guilty 37 

Cases pending 14 

Total 298 

Prostitution and Related Offenses: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined 116 

Suspended sentence 115 

Placed on file 28 

Found not guilty 44 

Cases pending 37 

Total 340 

Obscene Literature, Prints, Pictures, etc.: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined 146 

Placed on file 2 

Found not guilty i 

Suspended sentence 4 

Total 153 

Pretended FortunetelHng : 

Found guilty and probation 3 

Members of this unit have worked in close cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal 
Narcotic Bureau, Post Office Department, Alcohol Tax Unit of the Federal Government, the District Attorney's 
Office, as well as the state and local police departments. 

Officers of this unit have appeared at thirty-six engagements to speak before various civic, religious, and 
educational groups on narcotic problems. A complete exhibition of narcotic and harmful drugs is on display in 
this office. Visiting law enforcement officers as well as civilians on tour of Police Headquarters are shown this dis- 
play as part of education in problems of narcotic law enforcement. 



20 



IDENTIFICATION UNIT 

Records — Activities 

Recorded in the jNIain Index File 857,244 

Recorded in the Female Record File 22,649 

Recorded in the Male Record File 237,121 

Photography 

Number of photographs on file November 30, 1960 737,753 

Made and filed during the year 18,865 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file November 30, i960 16,325 

Nimiber of ''foreign" photographs received during the year 1,648 

Total 774,591 

Number on file in the " Local Segregated " file (gallery) *52,593 

Number on file in the ''Foreign Segregated" file *i6,7i8 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) no 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 10 

Scenes of crime photographed 478 

Photographs sent to: 

Alassachusetts State Bureau of Identification 7,546 

Other cities and to-^Tis 2,874 

Number of rectigraph photographs 4,088 

Number of negatives of criminals 3,773 

Number of prints made from same 18,865 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints i.475 

Number of prints from same 2,950 

Number of recorders of criminal photographs 2,860 

Number of stand-up photographs made 24 

Prints made from same 172 

Number of photographs of police officers Si 

Ntunber of scenes of crime \isited 1,813 

Number of exposures (4" by 5" camera) 2,927 

Number of prints of same 8,781 

Color photograph}- : 

Color "mug" photographs on file November 30, i960 9,000 

Made and filed during the year 3,773 

Total ''mug" photographs on file November 30, 1961 12,773 

Miscellaneous color photographs taken and processed (scenes of violence, homicide, etc.) . 3S0 

Fingerprint File 

Number on file November 30, i960 214,953 

Taken and filed during the }-ear: 

Male 3,029 

Female 300 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 767 

Female 365 

Number on file November 30, 1961 219,414 

* The Local and Foreign Segregated files have been brought up to date, removing from the files numerous photographs con- 
sidered to be too old to be used for identification purposes. 



21 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 3,329 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 3,329 

Other cities and towns 49 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officers 81 

Special police officers 1,050 

Hackney carriage drivers 1,71 5 

Civilian employees 22 

Firearms Act (revolver licenses) 200 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) November 30, 1961 95,3 n 

Total number of fingeqDnnts on file (civilian file) 97,026 

Five-finger System of Fingerprinting 

(Established May 27, 1952J 

Number of 5-finger cards in file November 30, 1961 20,690 

Number of main-index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system November 30, 1 96 1 10,345 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in Identification Section November 30, 1961 . 893 

Number of connections made by latent prints since s^'stem established 399 

Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone 1,327 

Requests received by correspondence *8,346 

Requests for certified records 1,222 

Requests for jury records 2,233 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 10,406 

Total 23,534 

Requests received from various public agencies: 

Stragglers and deserters (armed forces) 1,472 

Auxiliary police applicants 5 

Grand Total 25,011 

Missing Persons 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston f 1,106 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,061 

Total number still missing 45 

* This includes requests from all branches of the armed services, civil service agencies, and companies throughout the country 
engaged in defense work. 

t Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing who 
were found or returned within a few hours after report was made. 



22 





Age and Sex 


of Persons 


Reported Missing in 


Boston 






Age 


MissiN<; 


I'.IIM, 


Still Missini, 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Male- 


l-\-males 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, under 21 years 

Over 21 years 


251 


13S 


i«7 
160 
231 


218 
133 


4 

9 

20 


2 
5 
5 


Totals 


611 


V)S 


57« 


4^^^ 


33 


I 2 







Rf])ortL'(l missinj,' in Boston 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 

Reported missing by the Division of Child Guardianship of the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Welfare and the Girls' and Boys' Parole Division of the Massachusetts Training Schools 

Total number of persons reported missing 

Persons Reported Missing by Police Divisions for Past Year 

Division i (North End section) 

Division 2 (Downtown section) 

Division 3 (West End section) 

Division 4 (South End section) 

Division 6 (South Boston district) 

Division 7 (East Boston district) 

Division 8 (Harbor Police) 

Division (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

Division 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

Division 11 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

Division 13 (Jamaica Plain district) 

Division 14 (Brighton district) 

Division 15 (Charlestown district) 

Division 16 (Back Bay district) 

Division 17 (West Roxbur\' district) 

Division 18 (HN'de Park district) 

Division 19 (Mattapan district) 

Total 

Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 

In 121 cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, 112 were identified through fingerprint impressions. 
'Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the department 



I 


lOO 


7 


,,59« 


I 


,121 


2 


,519 




269 


12 


,413 



4 

o 

6 

123 

lOI 

41 

I 

231 

1 68 

133 

67 

59 

28 

27 
29 

31 

57 

1,106 



*53i 



2,979 



23 



Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 

Warrants recei^-ed from other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston 

Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston .... 

Total warrants recei\"ed for ser^'ice in Boston 

Warrants sent out for service to divisions and units within the department 

Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this department 

Total warrants processed 

Warrants returned without service to our divisions and units 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 

Summonses 

Total number recei\'ed from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 

Total number served 

Total number not ser\'ed 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 
Total number served 

Total number not ser\'ed 



6,285 

i>34S 
154 

7,784 

5-894 

1,236 

212 

442 

7,784 

1,308 

878 

S,6oi 



8,023 
7,436 

587 

28,196 
26,155 

2,041 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

.\ nuihililh machine under direct super\ ision of an ex- 
perienced operator enables this department to prepare and 
complete printing of circulars containing photographs and 
fingerprints of persons either reported missing or wanted 
for criminal offenses. This multilith machine is also used 
to print department forms. 

The multilith machine is completelv equipped with 
camera, arc lights, vacuum frame, which add to the varied 
output of this machine. This machine is cajiable of jirint- 
ing in approxiniateh- two hours' time descriptive circulars 
uf persons wanted. In some instances circulars are com- 
pleted and mailed to outside cities before a fugitive arrives 
at his destination. 

This luiit also has a high-speed electric addressograph 
machine and two electric mimeograph machines which are 
used to make dail\- manifolds, warrant manifolds, InUletin.--, 
and circular letters for the vari(jus imits and dixisions, in- 
cluding I'olice School lessons. 




NOCTURNAL STROLL COMES CROPPER AS 
OFFICER TAKES OVER IN CHARLESTOWN 



24 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST 



The work carried out in the laboratory is highly varied in its nature, the frequency of any particular type 
being governed bv the circumstances of the cases. The following is a compilation of the various tests and 
examinations performed pursuant to case investigations and indicates the general scope of the laboratory. 



Material 
Sought 

Acetaldehvde . 



Number 
of Tests 



Alcohol, ethyl .... 
Alcohol, methyl 

Arsenic 

Barbiturates .... 
Carbon monoxide . 
Dexedrine .... 

Ethylene glycol 
Ferrous sulfate 

Lead 

Paraldehyde .... 
Salicylates .... 
Spectrophotometry, ultraviolet 
Spectrophotometry, visual 
Toxicolog}-, alkaloids 
Toxicolog}', general 
Miscellaneous .... 



309 



29 



40 



Material 
Sought 

Acid phosphatase . 

Auto, examination of 

Bloodstains 

Bloodstains, typing 

Cloth patterns 

Clothing . . . . 

Dents and scratches 

Fibers . . . . 

Gasoline residue 

Glass .... 

Hair 

Laundry marks 

Paint . . . . 

Photographs, color . 

Photographs 

Photographs, infrared . 

Powder residue, cloth 

Powder residue, hands . 

Rectographs 

Scene, examination of . 

Spermatozoa . 

Tire marks 

Tissue . . . . 

Ultra\iolet examination 

A\'eapons, examinations : 
Knives and cutting 
Blunt instruments 
Other . . . . 

Miscellaneous . 



Number 
of Tests 

4 

16 

21 1 

4 
2 
60 
4 
4 
I 

3 
3 
I 
6 



J 

10 
8 
I 
19 
4 
2 

3 
2 

7 

I 
I 

14 



Cases 



Year 
1957 
1958 

1959 
i960 
1961 



Medical 
Examiners 

314 


Department 
74 


Total 
388 


355 


87 


442 


418 


66 


484 


. 3S8 


80 


468 


329 


74 


403 



The Criminal Investigation Laboratory- provides reference standards of tire and tread designs, ropes and 
cordage, and automobile paints. In order to promote better understanding of the ser^dces of the Crime Laboratory, 
lectures to newly assigned police officers at the Police Academy were initiated this year. 

Another project relative to a chemical testing program for testing persons charged with driving under the 
influence of intoxicating liquor is presently under stud}-. 



25 

BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Bureau of Criminal In\-estigation expert in ballistics, explosives, 
and munitions. All evidence found at the scene of crime where firearms or explosives were used is examined. 
Suspected weapons are catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent bullets and discharged cases 
from these weapons are filed. Cases invoh'ing ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the various courts. 

This unit responds to all calls where threats of bombing are received and makes a thorough examination 
of the premises to make certain that no bombs are planted thereon. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to same, and tear gas equipment have been inspected and 
ser\'iced. 

All fireamis held as e's-idence pending disposition by the courts are recorded. 

Stolen fireamis are traced and whene^'er possible are returned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on 
stolen firearms and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen Propert}' Unit and at the files of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Safet\-. 

When firearms propert}" of the United States are found used in crime or recovered othenvise, such property 
is returned to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other police departments, federal agencies, militar}^ and naval 
intelligence units. 

Emergency Equipment 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supply of emergency equipment consisting of 
i2-gauge riot shotguns, ammunition, belts with bayonets attached, bulletproof vests, tear gas gun kit and assembly, 
and gas masks which pro\-ide complete respirator}- protection for the wearer in all oxygen-deficient or highly 
gaseous atmospheres. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced whenever necessarj'. 

During the past j-ear this unit assisted in 489 cases as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths 20 

Armed robbery 31 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 26 

Bomb scares 43 

Bombs, explosives, etc 27 

Bullets recovered, no other crime involved 12 

Examination of police re\'olvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc. 30 

Firearms law, violation of 153 

Murder 12 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 5 

Suicide, attempt i 

Weapons examined and held for safekeeping 37 

Weapons examined and returned to owners 22 

Weapons found, disposal, etc 70 

Total 489 



26 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The jurisdiction of the Traffic Division extends over that section of the city composed of Divisions i, 2, 3, 
4, and 16. It is charged with the enforcement of parking regulations and the control of traffic therein between 
the hours of 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. daily, except Sundays, and provides a safety patrol for duty throughout the entire 
city. In the control of traffic, its work is supplemented by the local divisions which provide coverage for school 
crossings and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. posts. 



Parking 

During that portion of the past fiscal year ending August 31, 1961, the Traffic Division processed the 
parking violation notices for the entire department and prepared them for typing and mailing at the Chief Clerk's 
Office. On September i, iq6i, a new system of processing was inaugurated, and this work, formerly performed 
bv officers of the Traffic Division, was undertaken by the Chief Clerk's staff. 

During the past year 592,034 parking violation notices were issued by the Boston Police Department. 

Vehicles towed from the public ways by the Traffic Division during the year amounted to 41,722. The 
corresponding figure for the previous year was 21,029, reflecting an increase of 20,693. 

Court prosecutions by the Traffic Division for the year totaled 26,318, up 2,846 over the previous year. 

Parking fines paid at the Municipal Court of Boston for the year ending November 30, 1961, amounted 
to $451,927.24, For the previous year they amounted to $367,245.56. The increase noted is $84,681.68. This 
reflects, in part, increased enforcement on the part of the Police Department as well as the increase in parking 
fines provided by the new schedule which became effective on September i, 1961. 

Parking meter revenue also showed an increase over the previous year. Figures released by the Boston 

Traffic Department are as follows: 

Year ending Year ending Increase 

Nov. 30, 1961 Nov. 30, i960 
Area north and east of Massachusetts avenue . . . $385,115-50 S-TSoiS ■ 75 8109,599 75 

Entire city 528,94501 430,900.79 98,044.22 

In connection with the increase noted, the Traffic Department began a changeover to lo-cent meters on 
Julv I, 1 96 1, and this project is presently 90 per cent complete. The entire conversion will be accomplished by 
January i, 1962. 



The Traffic Problem 

The volume of traffic continued its steady rise, and statistics compiled by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles 
indicate an increase of 3 per cent. Total registrations as of October 31, 1961, were 1,881,314. On October 31, 1960, 
total registrations were 1,825,148. 



M-i Safety Squad 

The M-i Safety Squad of the Traffic Division continued^its activities in the schools throughout the entire 
city. Daily talks and demonstrations on safety subjects were provided for the children each day of the school year. 
A weekly radio presentation featuring casts composed of school children was broadcast through the facilities of 
Radio Station "WORL. The squad continued its program of participation with the Parks and Recreation Depart- 
ment at the various playgrounds during \-acation jjeriods. The Safety Car was a familiar sight to the millions of 
parade spectators whiere it was employed as a "pilot" car for the purpose of detouring traffic. It is used also in 
the shopping district during holiday seasons as an aid in our efforts to provide for the safety of the shoppers. 



Other Activities 

In addition to the handling of the traffic problems ]:)resented by a complete schedule of parades, necessary 
traffic details were provided for conventions and other functions of a public nature, multiple alarms of fire, emer- 
gency snow removal operations, and conditions resulting from work stoppages of public transportation groups. 

Escorts were provided for President John F. Kennedy on the occasions of his visits to our cit\-. Escort 
service was provided also for the Prime Minister of Great Britain, Ambassadors from Israel, Sweden, and the 
Philippines, the Secretaries of Navy and Agriculture, the Cardinal of Tanganyika, the Bishop of Lebanon, the 
Mayor of Palermo, Italy, the personal representative of the President of Tiniisia, the Governor of Nevada, high- 
ranking officers of the armed services and veterans' organizations, and police officials from Italy, Japan, and Iran. 




TIGHT-KNIT SECURITY FOR PRESIDENT KENNEDY 



28 



POLICE ACADEMY 



The Police Academy was established November i6, 1931, for the purpose of promoting the efficiency of 
the department through the indoctrination of recruits in basic routines and techniques. 

On appointment, new patrolmen pursue an intensive eight weeks' course of study under the direction of 
experienced superior officers. Regular courses in conduct, discipline, care of department equipment, use of revolvers 
and clubs, report writing, procedure with regard to violators of law and/or ordinances are supplemented by the 
appearance of qualified speakers, specialists in their fields, to acquaint the new officers with such subjects as radia- 
tion detection, first aid, judo, the proper handling of traffic, etc. 

At the completion of the course a formal graduation is held, which the families and friends of the gradu- 
ates attend. That evening the patrolman receives his assignment and the following day commences his regular 
tours of duty. 

The academy constitutes a regular unit of the department throughout the year. The instructors are 
responsible for the revision of the courses of study to keep abreast of developments of the law and police and safety 
procedures. As required, classes are conducted for personnel of all ranks for orientation in significant develop- 
ments which contribute to efficienc}- and public safety, including the recruiting and training of a newly formed 
"Disaster Squad." The supervision of firing sessions at the revolver range at Moon Island and the maintenance 
and operation of the newly created ammunition reloading facility are also the responsibility of the academy facult}-. 

The drillmaster, with his assistants, is responsible for the Police Academy and its activities and maintaining 
at high efficiency the Police Department Band and Drill Team. 




WILLING HANDS AID DISABLED FIRE FIGHTER 



29 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT AND 
RECORDS BUREAU 

The Central Complaint Room is located on the seventh floor of Police Headquarters and is equipped with 
the most modem police communication facilities available. The basic function of this room, its personnel, and 
equipment is to register every comjjlaint, incident, or request for police service as well as to dispatch police vehicles 
to process an}' complaint or incident requiring police action. 

The Central Complaint Room has control over all communications consisting of telephone, teletype, 
radio, and telegraph. 

There were 569,176 outgoing telephone messages and 2,947 toll calls made by the department through 
our switchboard: 370,157 emergency messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through either 
DE 8-1212 or the department interconnnunication system; 552,871 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 272,312 teletype messages 
and 576 telegrams were processed, 12,897 of these teletype messages relating to missing persons; 18,921 automo- 
biles and registration plates were reported lost or stolen, and 15,761 were reported recovered; and 629,780 radio 
messages were sent. 

Five main transmitters (Station KCA-860, 2 at Police Headquarters and 3 at Suffolk Court House); 2 
emergency transmitters at White Stadium, Jamaica Plain, for civilian defense; two-way radio equipment in 126 
automobiles; 33 combination patrol wagon-ambulances and boat transmitters and receivers; 36 wired broadcast 
amplifiers; 8 pickup receivers; and 10 receivers on motorcycles were maintained by members of this unit. 

An intercity and interdepartmental radio receiver and transmitter which is tuned into a frequency with 
the Arlington, Barnstable, Brookline, Cambridge, Lynnfield, Metropohtan, Milton, Newton, Quincy, Reading, 
Revere, State, Watertown, Weymouth, and Worcester Police Departments is in operation in this unit and is used 
for emergency messages with these departments. 

On an average day some 2,084 radio transmissions are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. A vSoundscriber records accurately each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an important administrative record of same. 

This Bureau maintains 7 up-to-date rotary master street files, 5 of which are located at the Central Com- 
plaint Room and 2 at the Central Records Section. These files provide quick information on over 7,000 streets, 
radio car sectors, public buildings, parks, places of interest, etc. An important new feature is the establishment of 
a police disaster program which enables the department to quicklj' mobilize its facilities to handle any emergency. 

The Statistical Section of the Central Complaint and Records Bureau is located on the fourth floor of 
Police Headquarters. This section, with its modern IBM data-processing equipment, prepares accurate and de- 
tailed reports and exerts control over all departmental reporting procedures, particularly those involving statistics 
for imiform crime reporting procedures, which are forwarded to the F.B.I. 

Valuable information concerning the incidence and frequency of various types of crime is prepared in 
detail b\' machine operation and forwarded to dixnsion commanders for their information and guidance. This 
information has resulted in increased efficiency in the field of crime detection. 



."^o 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU 

The Crime Pre\-eiition Bureau operates for the prevention of delinquency amon^ juveniles and maintains 
a program of constant cooperation with all other agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of mal- 
adjusted children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate factors that induce criminal tendencies 
among children. 

2. In this program enlist the aid of the general public, all child welfare agencies, divisions and units of 
this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies 
and especially educate the public and the police in the problem of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile 
crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children, investigating 
and taking the necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotels, bus and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of jseople congregate. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged, and the needy, locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist in the investigation of cases in which women 
are involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 

The juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,657 male and 392 female juveniles in the following age 
groups : 

Age 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 

Male 3 14 39 53 82 iiS 204 299 398 447 

Female i o 5 o 13 27 50 100 102 94 

In accordance with the prcgram of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any wa\- involved 
in unlawful activities concerning juveniles, 335 male and 56 female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought to their respective stations, for questioning in regard to criininal offenses com- 
mitted on each division, 3,082 male and 611 female juveniles. As a result of interrogation, together with personal 
interviews with the parents of these children, it was determined for the best interests of the children, parents, and 
the cit}- to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the Cit>- of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child, which is dramatically borne out by the fact that the number of recidivists 
still remains below i per cent. It is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston, with the child being 
returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first offenders, without having 
the stigma of a juvenile record attached to that child who, after the proper disciplinary action by the parents, 
would not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delinquency pattern again. 



31 

There were 6,133 cases processed by the Juvenile Bureau for this period, including the cases brought to 
court and the cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinary action. 

This Bureau presented 117 lectures to as many different organizations in an effort to educate the public 
to the scope of juvenile delinquency, the elementary causes of it, the policies, plans, and procedures of the Crime 
Prevention Bureau as established by the Police Commissioner. The results of these lectures are reflected in many 
wavs, such as the multitude of organizations which are now conducting campaigns against the sale of indecent 
literature and photographs to childrei:, the organizations which are now offering athletic programs to children 
and, most important of all, the supervisory interest that parents are now taking in their children. It cannot go 
without mention that the tremendous cooperation this bureau is receiving from the clergy, the schools, and the 
agencies of Boston is dirccth- related to this program of acquainting the public with the juvenile delinquency 
problem in Boston. 

During the fiscal year the juvenile officers have personally contacted 0,072 persons who are engaged in 
some phase of children's welfare work in the City of Boston, including school teachers, librarians, court attaehfe, 
clergymen, boys' cIuIj and girls' club workers, and those people who staff the many agencies working for the better- 
ment of children. This phase of the program is to make all of these people full\- aware of the fact that the police 
are cognizant of their importance in the over-all battle against delinquency and realize that it shall be defeated 
only by the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of 
attendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officially recognized 
that truancy has decreased in Boston because of the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers, through their contact with the different agencies, 
liave found what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted 
by the agencies after a referral had been made to them by the officer who, because of his knowledge of the 
neighborhood to which he is assigned, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report submitted in the year igOo shows that the 
juvenile jxittern has taken a downward trend in the City of Boston, when it is public knowledge that the trend 
is upward in the greater part of the country today. 




HEROIC OFFICER AIDED AFTER RESCUING THREE 



2>2 

CITY PRISON 

The City Prison is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset street, Boston. 
Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within jurisdiction of the Central Munic- 
ipal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper until 
the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the 
institution to which they ha\'e been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the }'ear, December i, i960, to November 30, 1961, 12,359 men were committed to the City Prison, 
as follows: 

Adultery i 

Assault and battery 29 

Breaking and entering 2 

Carr\'ing firearm without license 2 

Default 8 

Drunkenness 11,148 

Fornication i 

Fugitives from justice S 

Illegitimacy 12 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 4 

Nonsupport 28 

Rape I 

Robbery i 

Safekeeping 122 

Soliciting alms i 

Suspicious persons 573 

Violation of Hquor law 3 

Violation of motor vehicle law 15 

Violation of Park Department rules 2 

Violation of probation 13 

Miscellaneous 385 

Total 12,359 

One hundred and fifti'-four male lodgers were recei\x'd and cared for during the year. 

HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset street. All 
women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, and, unless otherwise released, are held in 
charge of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by count}' authorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 2,860 were committed as follows: 

Abandonment 6 

Adultery 6 

Assault and battery 21 

Delinquent children 3 

Drug law, violation of 5 

Drunkenness 2,015 

Fornication i 

Idle and disorderly 28 

Keeping house of ill fame i 

Larceny 70 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 11 

Neglect of children 10 

Probation and parole, violation of 30 

Rvmaways 20 

Safekeeping 25 

Stubborn children 7 

Suspicious persons 435 

Miscellaneous 166 

Total 2,860 

Fifteen women lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



33 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 



Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 582. Of these 547 are connected with the underground system and 35 
with the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,850 trouble calls; inspected 582 signal boxes, 16 
signal desks, 18 motor generator sets, 440 storage batteries. Repairs have been made on 211 box movements, 26 
registers, 133 locks, 25 time stamps, 18 vibrator bells, 61 relays, 21 electric fans, 28 motors, 16 generators. This 
unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 582 telephone, and 83 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and irdnor teletype repairs 
throughout the department. It also maintains 48 headquarters-to-station house telephone circuits, 18 teletype- 
writer circuits, 18 radio-wired broadcast circuits, 5 radio-car response circuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the 
Charlesbank Station of the MetropoHtan District Police, and the intercommunication units throughout the depart- 
ment. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending November 30, 1961 

(Inxluded in T.\ble XVj 

Payrolls $121,668.63 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 34i387-59 



Total 



$156,056. 22 



HARBOR POLICE AND EMERGENCY 

SERVICE UNIT 

Harbor Service 

The duties performed by the Harljor Police, Di\'ision 8, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows: 

Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports 1,294 

Number of vessels ordered from the channel 15 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream 13 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water front 202 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm 3 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 6 

Number of cases investigated .... 129 

Number of dead bodies recovered 7 

Number rescued from drowning 17 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 85 

Number of obstructions removed from channel s^ 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 2,524 

Number of dead bodies cared for 7 

Number of hours grappling 155 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc. . . $31,200 

Since December i, i960, 1,130 vessels from domestic ports and 1,294 vessels from foreign ports arrived at 
the Port of Boston. 

Harbor Patrol Service 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police boats ''William H. McShane," ''William H. 
Pierce, " " Patrol Boat 45, " " Patrol Boat 63, " and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the upper and lower harbors. Mystic 
River, Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay, and Neponset River. 



34 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 



There are 2,:;o rnntrir vehicles ii 


the 


serx'ice at the pre 


^ent time which 


are dislril 


)Uted as follows 




Dr'isions 


Combniation 

Patrol and 

Aml)ulances 


Passenger 

Alltnmo1)iles 


Trucks 


Motorcycle;; 


Totals 


Headquarters 


— 


37 


12 





49 


Division i . - ^ 






2 


3 


— 


— 


5 


Division 2 








I 


3 


— 


— 


4 


Division 3 








I 


-1 



— 


— 


4 


Division 4 








vS 


7 


— 


1 


1 1 


Division 6 








2 


5 


— 


4 


1 1 


Division 7 








2 


5 


— 


4 


II 


Division 8 






— 


3 


2 


— 


5 


Division 9 






2 


6 


— 


I 


9 


Division 10 






2 


5 


— 


2 


9 


Division 1 1 









6 


— 


2 


10 


Division 13 






2 


4 


— 


6 


12 


Division 14 






2 


_^ 


— 


2 


9 


Di\-ision 15 






I 


4 


— 


— 


5 


Division 16 






2 


4 


— 


— 


6 


Division 17 






I 


4 


— 


3 


8 


Division 18 






I 


4 


— 


3 


8 


Division iq 






2 


5 


— 


3 


10 


Traffic Division . . . - 




— 


8 


— 


21 


29 


Unassigned 




3 


9 


— 


3 


IS 


Totals 


31 


*i3° 


ti4 


SS 


230 



* Included in the total of 130 passenger automobiles there are 5 station wagons: 2 at Division 8; i a: Division 9: i 
Division 17; and I at Division i8. 

t Included in the total of 14 trucks there is a car-crane and a fork-lift at Division 8. 




EMERGENCY SERVICE UNIT — "ON THE WAY" 



35 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 



The ik'partment is equippe*! with coiiiljinalion autnnioljilts (patrol and amlnilancc) in Divisions i, 
:;, 4, (), 7, 0, 10, II, I,?, 14, 15, i(), 17, 18, and iq. 

Durini; the >'ear ambulances responded 

Boston City Hospital 
Massachusetts General Hospital 
Calls where services were not required 
Boston State Hospital 

Carney Hospital 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

East Boston Relief Station 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital . 

United States Veterans' Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Southern Alortuary 

Home 

Children's Hospital 

Physicians' offices 

Northern Mortuary 

Chelsea Naval Hospit;: 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Police station houses .... 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Roslindale General Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital .... 

Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 

Longwood Hospital .... 

Floating Hospital .... 

United States Public Health Hospital 

Massachusetts Eve and Ear Infirmar\' 



;il 



to calls 


to conve}- sick and injured persons 


to I 


ic I'o 


[lowing places: 


10,868 


Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital . , 16 


.v40-^ 


Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 




16 


i-Q,^,^ 


New England Baptist Hospital 






14 


1.09,1 


Harley Hospital .... 






12 


74') 


Lemuel Shattuck Hospital 








12 


.S70 


Soldiers' Home 








1 1 


510 


Kenmore Hospital 








10 


445 


Milton Hospital . 








10 


.^iQo 


Parker Hill Hospital . 








10 


3S5 


Boston Sanatorium 








9 


.352 


Washingtonian Hospital . 








8 


322 


Brighton Marine Hospital 








7 


313 


Winthrop Community Hospita 








7 


259 


Chelsea Memorial Hospital 








6 


113 


Brookline Hospital 








5 


97 


Brighton Memorial Hospital 








4 


96 


Hahnemann Hospital 








4 


80 


Mt. Auburn Hospital 








4 


66 


Ps\'chopathic Hospital 








4 


63 


Joslin Clinic 








2 


5S 


Metropolitan State Hospital 








2 


44 


Boumewood Hospital 










43 


Cambridge City Hospital . 










30 


Copley Hospital . 










30 


Lahev Clinic 










34 


Sancta Maria Hospital 










^ — 

- 1 


Somerville Central Hospital 










1/ 
16 


Total 


22,604 



Automobile Maintenance 

General repairs, replacement of parts, supplies and accessories $103,668.50 

Storage 242.00 

Gasoline 107,350.60 

Oil and grease 4,464.98 

Total $215,726.08 



Horses 

On December i, i960, there were 12 saddle horses in the service, attached to Di'vision 16. During the year 
2 horses were donated to the department. Two horses were retired to the M.S.P.C.A. At the present time there 
are 1 2 horses in service. 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, limits tlie nuinl)er of Hcenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, December i, i960, to NovemVjer 30, 1961, due to changes of ownership and regrants, 
a total of *i,9t>5 licenses were granted. 

There were 246 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Of these 139 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 107 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney (:arriages, as well as licenses to drive the 
same : 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage Hcenses received 11965 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 1,645 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 320 

1-965 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 440 

Carriages licensed — " change of ownership " 120 

Carriage licenses in efTect November 30, 1961 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1961 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) I7S25 

Carriages inspected 2,085 



J 



20 regrants 



Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 6,075 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected 127 

Drivers' licenses granted 5,948 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 29, of which revocations 13 were rescinded and the licenses restored leaving 

the net figure shown of such revocations as 16 

Drivers' licenses in effect November 30, 1961 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1961 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) *5,7i7 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 595 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 246 

*Includes S female hackney carriage drivers 

Public Taxicab Stands 

There are 380 established public taxicab stands, with capacity for 974 cabs at the present time. 

Private Hackney Stands 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930 provides for the occupation of private hackney stands (that is, upon 
private propert}') by licensed hackney carriage owners. 

During the year 28 applications (capacity, 377 carriages) for such private hackney stands were granted. 

Sight-Seeing Automobiles 

During the year ending November 30, 19(51, licenses for 22 sight-seeing automobiles were granted. 
There were 25 sight-seeing drivers' licenses granted. 

Hackney Carriage Violations 

During the past year 595 tags were issued to taxicab drivers for various violations. There were 42 penalties 
imposed, which included 29 revocations. This system of discipline has continued to result in relieving courts of 
many minor cases which would tend to congest their dockets. 



37 



LISTING WORK IN BOSTON 



Vlak 


(\\N\ ASS 


1903* 


I Si, 045 


1904 












193-195 


1905 












194,547 


1906 












195-446 


1907 












195,900 


1908 












201,552 


1909 












201,391 


19101 












203,603 


1911 












206,825 


1912 












214,178 


1913 












215,388 


1914 












219,364 


1915 












220,883 


1916; 












— 


1917 












221,207 


1918 












224,012 


1919 












227,466 


1920 












235,248 


1921§ 












480,783 


1922 












480,106 


1923 












477,547 


1924 












485,677 


1925 












489,478 


1926 












493,415 


1927 












495,767 


1928 












491,277 


1929 












493,250 


1930 










t02,I0I 


1931 






SOo,qS6 



Yeak 


Canvass 


1932 


499,758 


1933 












501,175 


1934 












502,936 


19351 












509,703 


1936 












514,312 


1937 












520,838 


1938 












529,905 


1939 












534,230 


1940 












531,010 


1941 












541,335 


1942 












539,408 


1943 












540,517 


1944 












543,051 


1945 












549,899 


1946 












545,506 


1947 












551,145 


1948 












548,111 


1949 












544,898 


1950 












541,762 


1951 












534,418 


1952 












526,396 


1953 












526,927 


1954 












506,072 


1955 












513,230 


1956 












501,671 


1957 












486,421 


1958 












474,032 


1959 






465,467 


1960 




47o,So2 



* 1903 to 1909, both inclusive, listing was on May i. 

f 1910 listing changed to April i. 

J 1916 listing done by Board of Assessors. 

§ 1921 law changed to include women in listing. 

II 1935 first year of listing as of January i, instead of April i. 



The following shows the total number of persons listed in Januan* of the present year: 

Male 209,336 

Female 247,256 

Total 456,592 



Listing Expenses 

The expenses of listing residents, both male and female, twenty years of age or more, not including the serv- 
ices rendered by members of the police force, were as follows : 

Printing police list 850,000.00 

Newspaper notices 1,492.88 

Stationery 191.00 

Directory 80.00 

Total §51,763.88 



3S 



Number of Policemen Employed in Listing 



January 3 












302 


January 26 












192 


January 4 












303 


January 27 












178 


January 5 












299 


January 28 












47 


Januar},- 6 












293 


January 29 












8 


January 7 












97 


January 30 












"5 


Januar}- 8 












26 


January 31 












131 


January 9 












233 


Februar\' i 












96 


January 10 












298 


Febniary 2 












80 


January 1 1 












297 




























7 / 


February 3 












69 


January 12 












300 


■ 




























February 4 












12 


January 13 












300 
















January 14 














Februar}- 6 












5° 












99 














January 15 












29 


February 7 












5° 


January 16 












214 


February 8 












47 


January 17 












279 


February 9 












44 


January iS 












278 


February 10 












28 


January 19 












273 


Februarj' 11 












4 


January 20 












221 


February 12 












4 


January 21 












90 


February 13 












17 


January 22 












29 


February 14 












15 


January 23 












192 


February 15 












12 


January 24 












232 


February 16 












13 


January 25 












217 


Februar}' 17 












9 



Police Work on Jury Lists 

The Police Department, under the provisions of Chapter 348, Acts of 1907, assisted the Election Commis- 
sioners in ascertaining the qualifications of persons proposed for jury service. 

The police findings in 1961 may be summarized as follows: 

Dead or could not be found in Boston 2,498 

Physically incapacitated 411 

Convicted of crime 171 

Unfit for various reasons i,449 

Apparently fit iij23S 

Total 15,764 



The Election Commissioners sent to the Police Department for delivery 11,235 summonses to persons 
for jury service. 



39 



SPECIAL POLICE 



Special police are appointed to serve without pay from the city, on a written application of any officer 
or board in charge of a department of the City of Boston, or on the application of any responsible corporation 
or person, to be liable for the official misconduct of the person appointed. 

"New" applicants for appointment as special policemen for the year commencing as of April i, ig6i, were 
fingerprinted b}' the department, as has been the ctistom, and their records, if any, searched for by the Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation. 

During the year ending November 30, iq6i, there were 1,047 special police officers appointed; 5 applica- 
tions for appointment were refused for cause; 2 appointments were canceled for nonpayment of license fee; and 19 
appointments were canceled for other reasons. 



Appointments were made on applications received as follow 
From corporations and associations .... 
From theaters and other places of amusement 

From city departments 

From churches 

From private institutions 



Total 



617 

150 

245 

30 

S 

1.047 



4() 



Pistols, Revolvers, and Machine Guns 



The following table shows the number of applications made to the Police Commissioner for licenses to 
carry pistols or revolvers and to possess machine guns in the Commonwealth during the past five years, the number 
of such a])]5lications granted, and the number rejected: 



Year 



Applications 



Granted 



Rejected 



1957 
195S 
J 959 
ig6o 
ig6i 



2,476 
2,163 
1,089 

1,193 
1,208 



2,419 
2,046 
1,017 
1,102 
*i>i34 



117 

72 

91 

74 



* Includes 3 no fee, 4 withdrawn, and 13 licenses to possess niacliine guns. 



Dealers in Firearms, Shotguns, and Rifles — Gunsmiths 



Applications 



Gunsmiths 
Fireanns dealers 
Shotguns and rifles 
Permits to purchase 



6 
12 

8 

4 



Granted 
1961 



6 
12 



Rejected 



o 

Q 



Public Lodging Houses 

Public lodging houses licensed by the Police Commissioner under provisions of Chapter 140, Sections 
3^-36, G. L. (Ter. Ed.), showing locations and number of lodgers accommodated: 



Location 



Number 
Lodged 



61 Brookline avenue 
1-3 Dover street 
2S7 Hanover street 
8 Pine street . 
Total 



2,613 

1,025 

69,121 

108,536 



4' 



PROPERTY CLERK 



The Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all lost, stolen, and abandoned property, money, or 
other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and property taken from persons arrested for 
any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come into the possession of 
the department. 

All orders for supjDlies, uniforms, and ecjuipment are issued by this office. 

During the year 167 motor vehicles came into custody of this office; 18 vehicles were returned to legitimate 
claimants and 131 vehicles were sold at public auction. There arc now 72 motor \'ehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department automobiles is in operation on a J4-hour basis. 
During the year, on 7,922 occasions, department cars were repaired and, on 2,05.^ occasions, cars were serviced. 
There were 266 department cars and 170 privately owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department 
operates a motorcycle repair shop where, on 802 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the }-ear. 

The Supervisor of Automotive Equipment is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all 
garages in the \'arious divisions, and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand December i, 1960 173 

Articles received during the year to November 30, 196 1 164 

Total 337 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 71 

Worthless 37 

Sold at public auction 92 

Total number of articles disposed of 200 

Total nmTiber of articles on hand November 30,1901 137 




MOUTH-TO-MOUTH RESUSCITATION SAVES YOUNGSTER 



42 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



The following is a list of the special events which occurred during the year, giving the number of police 
detailed for dutv at each: 



19 


60 


Dec. 


.S 


Dec. 


4 


Dec. 


7 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


24 


Dec. 


31 


iq6i 


Jan. 


9 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


25 


Jan. 


29 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


12 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


25 


Feb. 


26 


Feb. 


26 


Mar. 


3 


Mar. 


u 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


15 


Mar. 


17 


Mar. 


17 


Mar. 


20 


Mar. 


25 


Mar. 


28 


■Mar. 


29 


April 


I 


April 


2 


April 


3 


April 


4 


April 


7 


April 


7 


April 


/ 


.April 


8 


April 


8 


April 


10 


April 


12 


April 


15 


Apiil 


15 


April 


16 


April 


16 


April 


iS 


April 


19 


April 


19 


April 


22 


April 


23 


April 


24 


April 


25 


April 


25 


April 


27 


April 


29 


April 


30 


April 


30 


April 


30 


April 


30 


April 


30 


May 


6 


May 


6 


May 


6 



Boston Garden, Celebrities Night, benefit of Jewish Memorial Hospital 

AMVETS parade "... 

Funeral of Patrolman Martin W. Courage 

Funeral of Patrolman John J. Foley 

Christmas Eve carol singers, etc., on Beacon Hill 

New Year's Eve celebrations 



\'isit of President-elect John F. Kennedy 

Picketing in front of the Saxon Theatre . 

Funeral of Detective Michael F. Powers 

Mothers' March on Polio, collections by volunteers 

Funeral of Patrolman Frederick McGonigle . 

Public Integration Committee demonstration 

Public Integration Committee demonstration 

African Student Union of Greater Boston demonstration 

State House, reception of His Excellency Governor John A. Volpc 

Public Integration Committee demonstration 

Heart Fund collections by volunteers 

Public Integration Committee demonstration 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboys ba.sketball games 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboys basketball games 

Funeral of Detective Peter E. Eldridge 

Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen parade .... 

South Boston, Evacuation Day parade 

Boston Garden, New England schoolboys basketball games 

Boston Common, parachute jump in front of State House . 

Boston English High School, civil service examination 

State House, Metropolitan Transit Authority hearing . 

Boston Garden, World Figure Skating Memorial Fund driv( 

Fellowship of Reconciliation "Walk of Peace" 

Easter parade 

Dorchester Citizens Association motorcade 

.Special State Primaries in Ward 14 

Fourth annual music demonstration Ijy the sisters and pupils of 

Visit of the Right Honorable Harold MacMillan, Prime Minister 

\'isit of the Honorable Dean Rusk, Secretary of State 

Young Men's Catholic Association annual road race 

Fourth annual music demonstration by the sisters and pupils of the Catholic 

Boston Red Sox and American Tobacco Company motorcade 

State- wide test of public attack warning signals 

N.A.A.C.P. motorcade 

Symphony Hall, Filene's Foundation concert for children . 

Massachusetts Civil War Centennial Commission parade . 

C.Y.O. services and parade .... 

North End, Patriots' Day celebration 

Boston Athletic Association Marathon 

Patriots' Day celebrations and parade 

Anti-Commimist Organization parade 

South Boston, Stephen Darius Post, American Legion parade 

Boston Firemen's Relief Fund annual concert and ball 

Special State Electron in Ward 14 

American Cancer Association house collections 

Boston University parade 

West Roxbury, Parkway Little League parade 

South End, B.P.O.E. Bunker Attucks, Elks Lodge No. 1275 parade 

Hyde Park Junior Athletic Association parade 

Dorchester, St. Peter's Holy Child Baseball League parade 

Mattapan Little League parade 

South End, Boston Fire Department parade .... 

Boston Common, Boston Parks Department annual children's May Festival 

Mission Little League parade .... 

East Boston Little League parade 



the Catholic schools of the 
>f Great Britain 



schools of the 



Archdiocese 



.Ai chdiocese 



Men 

15 
10 
40 

40 
70 

985 

32.S 
70 
40 
14 
40 

45 
3" 
30 

140 
20 
30 
15 
'5 
15 
40 
25 

465 
12 

4" 

5 

30 



15 

26 

2,=; 

10 
45 
25 
5 
30 
10 
12 

75 
20 
10 

275 
40 
10 
10 

25 
26 

35 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
10 
10 
10 



A^ 



iq6i 


May 


II 


May 


13 


May 


U 


May 


16 


May 


19 


May 


20 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


21 


May 


27 


May 


28 


May 


28 


May 


28 


May 


29 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


30 


May 


3" 


May 


30 


May 


31 


June 


3 


June 


4 


June 


4 


June 


4 


June 


3 


June 


7 


June 


8 


June 


10 


June 


II 


June 


12 


June 


13 


June 


13 


June 


14 


June 


15 


June 


\h 


J inie 


16 


June 


17 


June 


17 


June 


17 


June 


18 


June 


18 


June 


20 


June 


20 


June 


24 


June 


25 


June 


25 


June 


25 


June 


27 


June 


27 


June 


3" 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


July 


4 


Julv 


5 


July 


22 


July 


23 


July 


26 


July 


28 


July 


29 


July 


3" 



Boston University, R.O.T.C. parade 

AUston South, Little League parade 

Cecil Fogg Post, American Legion road race . 

Funeral of Patrolman Michael J. Crowley 

Aleppo Shrine Temple parade .... 

South Boston Naval Base, "Open House" aboard the U.S.S. Il'a.s/; 

Armed Forces Day parade 

Ringley Brothers Circus parade 

South Boston Naval Base, "Open House" aboard the U.S.S. U'asp 

Brighton, Annual Memorial Services of Boston Police Post No. 1018 and Post N 

Back Bay, Protestant Laymen's Communion Breakfast Committee parade 

Roxbury, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People parade 

Back Bay, Salvation Army parade . 

Cemeteries and vicinity 

Cemeteries and vicinity 

Patrick E. Troy Post, V.F.W., parade . 

Suffolk County Council, American Legion parade 

Visit of President John F. Kennedy 

Cemeteries and vicinity 

Dorchester, William G. Walsh Post No. 369, Ameiican Legion parade 

Committee on Racial Equality parade 

Brighton, Allied War Veterans of Brighton and Allston para le 

Hyde Park, Cecil W. Fogg, Ameiican Legion parade . 

Back Bay, AMVETS parade 

Mayor's Charity Field Day activities 

Dorchester, Robert F. Ryan Post, V.F.W., parade 

Mount Hope Cemetery, policemen's memorial exercises 

.Society Santa Maria DiAnzano parade 

South End, Truck Drivers and Helpers, Local 25, parade . 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company parade 

Mayor's Charity Field Day activities 

Lawrence Welk Committee, Dodge Corporation, motorcade 
Mayor's Chai ity Field Day cookout on Boston Common . 
Potest Hills Cemetery, Boston Firemen's Memoiial Sunday 
Boston College, Commencement exercises .... 
Boston College Stadium, Holy Name Societies rally 
Symphony Hall, Harvard Class of 1936 reunion . 

Mayor's Charity Field Day activities 

State House, National Lancers escort of His Excellency John A. Volpe to H, 
Funeral of Patrolman George L. Fitzgerald .... 
Charlestown, "Niglit Before" Bunker Hill Day celebrations 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day parade 

Charlestown, Bunker Hill Day block dances, street duty and historical pagean 
Upper Roxbury, Little League parade .... 

Prince Hall Masons parade 

Massachusetts National Guard, 1st Battle Group, parade 

Mayor's Charity Field Day 

Boston Public Garden, Boston Arts Festival "Jazz Night" 

San Rocco Society parade 

St. Maigaret of Scotland Guild, Inc., parade 

San Rocco Society parade 

South End, International Longshoremen's AFL-CIO Association parade 
Cecil Fogg Post, American Legion, parade .... 
Warren Street, Roxbury, protest parade against the M.T.A. 
Hyde Park, V.F.W. Post No. 722, parade .... 

Independence Day parade 

Boston Common, Independence Day band concert and fireworks display 

East Boston, Independence Day celebrations 

Columbia Park, Independence Day celeb: ations . 

Franklin Field, Independence Day celebi ations 

Smith Field, Allston, Independence Day celebrations . 

Funeral of Sergeant Norman J. Boyd 

Funeral of Patrolman Joseph E. Abban 

North End, San Lucy Society parade 

Columbia Stadium, annual track meet and Junior Olympics 

North End, St. Joseph's Society parade 

North End, St. Joseph's Society parade 

North End, St. Joseph's Society parade 



■ 25: 



of 



the 



.■\meric 



Legion 



University 



44 



JQOl 


July 


30 


Aug. 


4 


Aug. 


5 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


9 


Aug. 


II 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


12 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


13 


Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


16 


Aug. 


17 


Aug. 


18 


Aug. 


19 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


20 


Aug. 


21 


Aug. 


23 


Aug. 


26 


Aug. 


27 


Aug. 


30 


Sept. 


3 


Sept. 


3 


Sept. 


3 


Sept. 


4 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


7 


Sept. 


9 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


20 


Sept. 


21 


Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


23 


Sept. 


24 


Sept. 


24 


Sept. 


24 


Sept. 


26 


Sept. 


26 


Sept. 


30 


Oct. 


I 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


9 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 


II 


Oct. 


II 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


12 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


27 


Oct. 


31 


Oct. 


31 


Nov. 


5 



Men 



Fenway Park, visit of Connecticut Chiefs of Police 

North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade 

North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade 

North End, Societa Santa Agrippina of Mineo parade 

International Convention, Order of Alhambra, Knights of Columbus 

Jamaica Pond, Boston Park Department fishing derby 

North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade 

North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade 

Funeral of Detective John J. O'Brien .... 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

North End, Santa Maria S.S. Delia Cava Society parade 

Funeral of Sergeant Joseph P. Donahue .... 

Funeral of Patrolman Richard J. Sexton 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccor.so Di Sciacca parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso Di Sciacca parade 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso Di Sciacca parade 

North End, San Rocco Di Anzano Society parade 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

North End, Societa Marittima Madonna Del Soccorso Di Sciacca parade 
Fenway Park, baseball game for the benefit of the "Jimmy Fund" 

WBZ Operation Survival parade 

Fenway Park, baseball game for the benefit of the "Jimm\- Fund" . 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

Funeral of Patrolman Leo P. Travers 

Funeral of Sergeant Milton A. Goldberg 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

South End, United American \'eterans. Department of Massachusetts, parade 

Catholic Labor Guild parade 

United Fund rally at Filene's 

Dilboy Stadium, Boston Police Department Band and Drill Company participated in activities 

"Jimmy Fund" 

South Boston, launching of new atomic cruiser, t'.5.5. Long Beach 

Jewish cemeteries and vicinity 

East Boston Stadium, "Operation Recovery" sponsored by the Boston Civil Defense Department 
Kelly Field, Hyde Park, Knights of Columbus procession and rosary crusade 

Hurricane "Esther" 

Hurricane "Esther" 

Northeastern University, "The Husky Key" parade 

East Boston, Sons of Italy parade 

\'isit of His Holiness Patriarch Benedicto of the Greek Orthodox Church 
Logan Airport, crash landing of American Airline jet in Winthrop Bay 
North End, New England Conference of the Methodist Church 

Preliminary Election Day 

Visit of President Don Manuel Prado of the Republic of Peru . 
Crippled and retarded children "Prairie Schooner" parade . 

Air National Guard parade 

Boston Public Works Department "Clean-up Month" parade 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" parade . 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games . 

Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill in Brighton 

Boston Herald-Traveler fallout shelter display 

Boston Common, United States helicoptors landing in front of State House . 
Roxbury, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill . 

Aleppo Shrine Temple parade 

Columbus Stadium, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill 
South Boston, Olivia James House road race 

Columbus Day parade 

Dorchester Town Field, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill . 

Fallon Field, Roslindale, Boston Fire Department "Fire Prevention Week" exhibition and drill 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 

White Stadium, high school football games . 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 

Fifth anniversary of the Hungarian revolt 

Northeastern University, "The Husky Key" parade . 

United Fund luncheon 

Halloween celebrations 

Cathedral of the Holy Cross, Girl Scouts Sunday 



for 



benefit of 



45 



igO 


I 


Nov. 


.=) 


Nov. 


7 


Nov. 


ID 


Nov. 


II 


Nov. 


II 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


l6 


Nov. 


i8 


Nov. 


l8 


Nov. 


i8 


Nov. 


19 


Nov. 


21 


Nov. 


22 


Nov. 


2,^ 



games 



Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 

City Elections 

Ford Motor Company motorcade 

American Legion Veterans' Day paiade . 

South Boston, Olivia James House road race 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football 

Boston Technical High School parade 

Boston University "Homecoming Day" parade 

Fimeral of Captain Bernard P. Slattery . 

Funeral of Sergeant Joseph F. Waldron . 

Boston Parks and Recreation Department football games 

Funeral of Patrolman Francis J. Marszalek . 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts parade 

White Stadium, South Boston and East Boston High Schools football game 



"Men 

25 
1,185 
10 
■WO 
•5 
25 
15 
10 
90 
45 

20 

35 
10 
40 



Note 

December i, i960, to Januar}- 5, 1961, inclusive, 8 officers performed a total of 288 duties for that period 
in connection with the City of Boston decorations in the vicinity of the Boston Public Garden. 

December i, i960, to January 5, 1961, inclusive, 30 officers perfonned a total of i,oSo duties for that period 
in connection with the City of Boston Christmas decorations on the Boston Common. 

April 4, 1 96 1, to April 8, 1961, inclusive, 5 men performed a total of 25 duties for that period in connection 
with the Mncent Club Annual Show at the New England Mutual Hall. 

April II, 1961, and April 12, 1961, 30 men performed a total of 60 duties for that period in connection 
with the Police Communit}' Relations Institute at Boston College Law School. 

April 17, 1961, to April 23, 1961, inclusive, 8 men performed a total of 56 duties for that period in connection 
with the 196 1 Metropolitan Opera season at the Metropolitan Theatre. 

April 28, 1961, and April 29, 1961, 8 men performed a total of 16 duties for that period m connection with 
a state-wide test of the public attack warning signals. 

May 5, 1961, through May 7, 1961, 8 men perfonned a total of 24 duties for that period in connection with 
the Youth Fitness Days sponsored by the United Ftmd. 

May 31, 1961, through June 28, 1961, 6 men performed a total of 174 duties for that period in connection 
with the Boston Arts Festival in the Public Garden. 

Jtme 8, 1961, to June 28, 1961, inclusive, 31 men perfonned a total of 651 duties for that period in connection 
with the Boston Arts Festival in the Public Garden. 

June 26, 1961, to July 7, 1961, inclusive, 10 men perfonned a total of 120 duties for that period in connection 
with the protest of the removal of the Warren vStreet bus line by the Metropolitan Transit Authority. 

September 15, 1961, and September 16, 1961, 30 men perfonned a total of 60 duties for that period in 
connection with the labor dispute at the H. P. Hood plant in Charlestown. 

November 29, 1961, and November 30, 1961, 30 men performed a total of 60 dtities for that period in con- 
nection with the City of Boston Christmas decorations on the Boston Common. 



46 



Miscellaneous Business 





lO.sS- ,S<) 


10 SO" ^10 


1060 (-.1 


Abandoned children cared for 


?,2 


.^0 


.59 


Buildini^s found oj^en and made secure 
















2,q,S6 


2.4c 2 


1,799 


Danj:;erous liuildings reported 
















7' 


■'? 


24 


Dangerous chimneys rejjorted 
















17 


4 


4 


Dead bodies reco^•ered and cared for 
















9 -'5 


I ,022 


S70 


Defective drains and vaults reported 
















2 


5 


.1 


Defective fire alanns and clocks reported 
















7 


.^0 


,3 


Defective gas pipes reported 
















() 


1 1 


10 


Defective hydrants reported 
















10 


-> 


4 


Defective sewers reported 
















; 1 


.31 


22 


Defective street lights reported . 
















1 .01 4 


281 


145 


Defective streets and walks reported 
















i.o.Si 


619 


623 


Defective water pipes reported . 
















4S 


.■).■) 


26 


Fire alarms given 
















10,150 


1 1 ,ogs 


10,786 


Fires extinguished 
















fi.^'i 


-^250 


-M74 


Insane ]3ersons taken in charge . 
















I ,oo.S 


1.45.1 


1. 183 


Lost children restored .... 
















77.S 


804 


709 


Number of persons committed to bail 
















2,681 


2,6s8 


2,544 


Persons rescued from drowning . 
















17 


1 8 


7 


Sick and injured persons assisted 
















21,167 


22,160 


22,23s 


Street obstructions removed 
















,U 


37 


31 


Water running to waste reported 


-:>' 


o.S 


91 



Pensions and Benefits 



On December i, 1960, there were 844 persons on the pension roll. During the year 40 died, viz., 2 deputy 
superintendents, 2 captains, 3 lieutenants, 5 sergeants, 25 patrolmen, i civilian, and 2 annuitants. Forty-seven 
were added, viz., i captain, 3 lieutenants, 5 sergeants, 26 patrolmen, i civilian, and 11 annuitants, leaving 851 on 
roll at date, 712 pensioners and 139 annuitants. 

The payments on account of pensions and annuities during the year amounted to $1,989,526.96. 

The invested fund of the Police Charitable Fund amounted to ,$207,550. There are 23 beneficiaries of the 
fund at the present time, and there has been ]3aid to them the sum of .'53,712 during the year. 



47 




NEW ARRIVAL — COURTESY BOSTON POLICE DEPT. 



49 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1961 







^H 


— 1 


„H 


C-) 


,— 1 


_H 


-^ 


-f 


— 


-- 


— ' 


-r 


-^ 


C-i 


-*. 


cr 


cc 


— 


— 


'^ 


— 


~- 


^> 


I- 


_ 


















(M 






o 










:7i 










































M 




—4 


























■3 


























N 


























o 




















































~ 




















































■"H'-\l 


















" 




- 




?'l 















































-- 




— 




-- 




























C- 






















— 




~. 


















































































X 
















— 


:t 




— 




y 




























'~ 







































































-- 








— 






















































>: 




























"" 










































































































^ 






















— 




-~ 




























"■ 


























_ 




























ir. 
















— 






~ 




~ 




























^ 










































































































T 






















— 




ri 




























_ 


























_ 










































.^ 


V] 




.— 




■/' 




























f^ 






















— 




^ 




























~" 


























_ 




























_ 
















— 


rt 




n 




,? 




























"~ 


























~ 
















































































— 






















— 




i~ 


























A 






















































o 






































































, 


— 






1 


«^ 


1 
























/. 


e^ 






















~~ 




»c 


' 
























X 
































































































































































" 


















' 










-* 






































1 


1 


1— i 


CC 


1 


o 




— 






















































































































































— 


-,- 


1 


o 


1 


-t 


1 


1 


1 










































1 






o 


1 


1 


1 






























































































— 




■ - 




— 




























"T 


























-f 




1 






































— 


-- 




J. 




— 




























'■* 


























" 
















































Tl 
































ri 




































































_ 


— 




— 




•J^ 






































































































































suiniiAiJ A.ni.ioduK^x 




aoiAJag paiu.i\- 


1 :^ 


>(,ia]3 A"i.ifldo.i,i 






















Ol 






















1 




i^ 
























































.I.IIA.l.lv^ I''"^!S 


1 


1 
























1 


' 






















uoijiiaidfj JO osini]! 


1 1 1 1 ' ' ; 
























"M 




-^ 


1 
























UOSI.I.l A)l,) 


























fM 


1 


' 






















niM.niii 


' 














_ 


— 




'^^ 


' 


5i 








r-t 






1 












lIoplWA,).!,} OUU.l,) 
















































































C-l 




A 




















inM.mg oaijo,3}0( | 




















" 
































UdlUlSlJ^'OAlIJ 














— 


— 


-". 




re 




lT 










— 


— 










1 




pMiiuu.i^ JO iu:a.ni;[ 




















































niJo.ing sp.ioorijj 
















D 


-M 




~. 




-r 


























pin; puiiifluio,) |i:.mi,ij 
































































^ 


— 












1 


























.).iLyo s juapudjiu.iadnt; 
















1 


' 






' 


^ 


' 




















' 












^1 












































s.iei,n;iil)pi;dii 


























~ 














































































Z 

O 






































3 




-*^ 








3 


h—( 














-2 

1 

X 

1 
























OQ 
















O 

< 


6 


9 


3 

ID 

-a 

S 
O 


V2 

*c 

C 

< 


C 
— 

ii. 

)— 1 


X 






> 

;3 


X 

1 

CO 


1 

J. 


1 
1 


■a 

w 
tn 

> 


c 
c 

X 

_> 

1 


o 

> 


^ 


X 

o 

_o 


< 

s 

'Sb 
_o 

c 

5 


-2 
.2 


O 

-3 

1 
r-H 


9 
3b 


"i 

< 

o 

q 


a 
C 

O 

> 


-J 

"3 



50 



—I CO 00 t-H 



« (M- rf lO 1^ CO rf — ( 



I I 



I I I 



I I 



I I I 



t I I 



I ! I 



I t I I 



I I I I 



I I 



I I I 



I I I I 



I t 



i ! I 



i I i 
in r 



I I 



I I 1 I 



! 1 



I I I I 



CO -< -H 



I ! I I 



I I I 



I i I 



i I 



I I I 



^ 


hf) 


CO 


O 






s 


■r 






< 








■a 


■= 


a 





o 



O -3 



«?■=„- 



~ ~ K K 





t: 


X 


.^ 


s 


c £ S 


















X 




X 




-iJ 


o 


< 


' ' 




~-S S- 








X 






2 


— 


C 




c3 




j:3 


g 




p 




O ;i C 














c:! 


03 


c3 


zi 


O 


O =! O 






S 








^ 


<=i 


<. 


<=i 


p« «5 



O .C S O CJ 



C^ Oh 






— f 




^ 




;- 


i; 


;j 


X 


o 


r^ .= 


B ^ 


5? 


^ 


5 


.i! ^ 


1^ -^ 


'^ 


^ 


..a; 


w ^ 


y^ 


"3 




3 


Stat 

or. 

meii- 


3?<a 










o 


o 


o 


O C3 si 














^ 


c 


c 








0) 






p^ Pi 


CO 


cc 


C/J 


CC CB 





O o 






o 


















o -^ 






o . 


















'^ -^ 






•^ ^ 






"3 o 






-3 ? 


















^. T' z> 




o 


«-3 












c C 












•:3 aj 






















(1) 






O 








=" *^ 




J2 


K ="5 


• 


O 


S c 




iL 


P S 5 


1 


o 


!:^ 


s 




= — s 










S 




-i 




^■l 


H 




sa g-S 




oH 




ai 


m M 




H 


^ 





51 



52 



TABLE II 

CliaiKjcs ill Aidliiiri'.i'(l tnid Actual SirciKjfh nf I'olici l)i partnii nt 















ArTllORIZED 

Strength 


Actual STREXc.Tir 


Ranks .vnd Grades 


Nov. 30 
1961 


Nov. 30 
l!)(il 


Xet Gain 
or Loss 
(Plus or 
Minus) 


Police Commissioner 
Secretary .... 
Confidential Secretary . 
Assistant Secretaries 
Legal Advisor . 
Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents 
Captains .... 
Lieutenants and Lieutenant-. 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Dete 
Patrolmen 
Patrolwomen . 


Dete 
ctive 


ctive 
s 


s 






1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

7 

32 

88 

255 

*2,400 

tl2 


I 
] 
1 
2 

1 

1 

6 

24 

83 

243 

2,385 

5 


]\Iinus 1 
Minus 8 
Minus 5 
Minus 12 
Alinus 15 
^linus 7 


Totals 






2,801 


2,7.53 


IMinus 48 



* Ini-ludes 192 Detective-Patrolmen 
f Includes 2 Detective-Patrohvomen 



53 



TABLE III 

List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the Year Ending 

November 30, 1961 



Rank 


Name 


Di\-ision 


Date of Death 


Cause of Death 


Patrolman 


George L. Fitzgerald 


3 


June 13, 1961 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


Joseph E. Abl)an 


4 


July 19, 19C.1 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


John J. O'Brien 


7 


Aug. 9, 19G1 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


Richard J. Sexton 


7 


Aug. 13, 19(11 


Heart troul>le 


Patrolman 


John J. Foley 


8 


Dec. 7, 19(10 


Gunshot wound 


Patrolman 


Daniel L. Crowley 


10 


Apr. 2-4, 19(11 


Heart trouble 


Sergeant . 


Norman J. Boyd 


11 


July 1, 19(11 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


Charles L. Coughhui 


13 


Apr. 29, 1961 


Pneumonia 


Patrolman 


Martin \\ . Courage 


13 


Dec. 5, 1960 


Kidney troulJe 


Patrolman 


Jospjjh P. McLean 


U 


Feb. 26, 1961 


Carcinoma 


Sergeant . 


Joseph P. Donahue 


15 


Aug. 12, 1961 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


Leo P. Travers 


17 


Aug. 26, 1961 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


Michael J. Crowley 


18 


May 12, 1961 


Accident 


Sergeant . 


Milton A. Goldberg 


19 


Sept. 1, 1961 


Lymphoma 


Patrolman 


Peter E. Eldridgc 


19 


Mar. 9, 1961 


Heart trouble 


Patrolman 


Francis J. Marszalek 


19 


Nov. 18, 1961 


Carcinoma 


Patrolman 


Frederick W. McGonigle 


19 


Jan. 25, 1961 


Heart trouble 


Captain . 


Bernard P. Slattery 


Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation 


Nov. 15, 1961 


Gunshot wound 


Sergeant . 


Joseph F. Waldron 


Bureau of Criminal 
In\-estigation 


Nov. 15, 1961 


Carcinoma 


Detective-Patrolman 


Michael F. Powers 


Central Complaint 
and Records Biura.u 


,Jau. 22, 1961 


Heart trouble 



54 



TAJiLE IV 



Mi'Dihcvs (if I)('/)<i)ini('iit Retired l)uri)i(i the Year End lug N^ovember 30, 1961 , Giving Age 
(it llie Time of f\'eiiremenl and (he Xin»l)er of )'enr.H' Service of Each 







.\ge at Time 


Years of 


Name 


Cause of Retirement 


of Retirement 


Service 


AUfii. John K. (5) 


3U 'i ears' Service .... 


li.") 


32 


Bannister. Alfred F. 












Incapacitated 










I'l.") 


41 


Bean, Harold L. (3) 












Age 










(i(( 


31 


Bowes, Robert E. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










(it 


41 


Carev, John J. 












Incapacitated 










lie. 


41 


Conriell, John E. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










(iS 


34 


Conroy, Martin J. (5) . 












30 Years' Service 










(i5 


41 


Conway. Michael J. 












Incapacitated 










70 


40 


Counihan. John J. {'A) . 












Incapacitated 










r,2 


20 


Crooks, William L. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










(11 


30 


Daw, John L. (.3) . 












Incapacitated 










(il 


32 


Dennehv, Philip F.. Jr. { 


3) 










Age 










( ;; ; 


36 


Dolan, ilerliert A. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










.')( ; 


30 


Dolan, Hugh E. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










G(i 


34 


Dw\-er. John J. 












Incapacitated 










m 


42 


Egan, Timothy F. (3) 












Incapacitated 










40 


7 


Farlev, George F. . 












Incapacitated 










(i.-i 


40 


Fay, Bernard W. (3) 












Age 










Ci.'i 


34 


Fennessy, James J. (3) 












Age 










(il 


33 


Fiore, Andrew C. (3) 












Age 










(id 


33 


Flannery, Patrick J. 












Incapacitated 










(i.") 


40 


Foley, John J. 












Incapacitated 










(i3 


40 


Goodman, Benjamin 












Incapacitated 










(i.5 


40 


Hailer, Francis J. (3) 












Age 










59 


31 


Hanlev, James F. (3) 












Age 










()5 


35 


Healy', David J. (2) 












Incapacitated 










(i7 


25 


Hickev, Harold C. . 












Incapacitated 










li4 


41 


Hooley, Marie G. (4) 












Age 










(■>.■) 


12 


Keegan, Edward J. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










( i.'i 


41 


Kellv, Edward F. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










04 


38 


Lewev, Howard R. (3) 












Incapacitated 










39 


13 


Lindahl, William A. (5) 












30 Years' Service 










64 


32 


Lombard, Leo R. . 












Incapacitated 










66 


41 


Lucey, Daniel J. (3) 












Incapacitated 












50 


18 


MacCormack, Frederick J. 










Incapacitated 












65 


41 


Maguire, Andrew J. (3) 










Age 












60 


34 


Martin, Harold J. . 










Incapacitated 












67 


41 


McCarthv, Thomas J. (3) 










Age 












59 


32 


McDermott, John J. (3) 










Age 












60 


34 


McGeorge, .\lliert L. 










Incapacitated 












68 


41 


Miles, William H. (3) 












Age 












65 


34 


Mitten, Harold G. . 












Incapacitated 












66 


41 


Morrison, Mark 












Incapacitated 












63 


41 


Mulhern. James F. (3) 












Age 












65 


34 


Norton, Joseph F. (3) 












Incapacitated 












49 


18 


O'Brien, John J. (4) 












Age 












67 


18 


O'Reilly, Francis 












Incapacitated 












66 


39 


Power, John F. 












Incapacitated 












65 


41 


Sempiana. Mctor J. (3) 












Age 












60 


31 


Sloan, John A. (3) . 












Incapacitated 












59 


31 


Small, Herbert J. (.5) 












30 Years' Service 












65 


30 


Snell, George F. 












Incapacitated 












63 


41 


Spence, Andrew 












Incapacitated 












66 


41 


Stapleton, Michael J. 












Incapacitated 












66 


40 


Sweeny, John F. (3) 












Age 












60 


32 


Swift. "Albert E. 












Incapacitated 












65 


41 


Tesorero. John J. . 












Incapacitated 












65 


41 


Welseh. Paul J. (3) 












Incapacitated 












34 


10 


Whittaker, Everett L. 












Incapacitated 










65 


41 


Willard, Francis I. 


Iiica|)acitatfil 


(il 


41 



(1) Retired under Boston Retirement S.ystem 

(2) Retired under General Laws, Chapter 32. Section 57 

(3) Retired untler State-Boston Retirement System 

(4) Civilians retired under State-Boston Retirement System 

(5) Retired ^'eterans under General Laws, Chapter 32. Section 58 

(6) Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58 



55 



TABLE V 

OJficers Wfw Were Promoted During the Year Ending November SO, 1961 



Date 



Rank and Name 



1961 

OftoherSl 
October 31 



Captain Arthur' C. Cadegan, Jr., to rank of Drputy SupcM-intendent 
Captain Denni.s F. Dalton to rank of Deputy Superintendent 



.S6 



TABLE Vr 

Mciiihcrs iif Police Force on Norcinhcr .HI, JfJf!], ]\ ho Were Appointed l)i the Yedc I tidieitled 



Date of 
Appointment 




-2 

O 

I'm 


■I. 

"•J 


-a 


III 


1 " ^ 


= 3 


Totals 


1916 








1 








1 


1919 . 










— 


1 


2 


— 


9 


1 


6 


111 


1920 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


2 


4 


11 


1921 . 










— 


— 


-- 


1 


3 


— 


3 


i 


1922 . 










— 


— 


1 


• t 


1 


•) 


— 


11 


1923 . 










— 


1 


■ ) 


1 


3 


:3 


1 


1 1 


1924 . 










— 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


o 


( 


1925 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


5 


3 


7 


17 


1920 . 










— 


— 


3 


8 





(i 


23 


41 i 


1927 . 










1 


1 




-1 




4 


13 


24 


1928 














1 




■ > 


■> 


11 


Hi 


1929 . 










— 


— 


1 


s 


22 


8 


48 


87 


1930 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


o 


— 


5 


11 


1931 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


.__-. 


4 


t 


1937 . 










— 


1 


5 


11 


39 


14 


55 


J 25 


1940 










— 


— 


6 


13 


32 


7 


40 


98 


1941 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


(i 


G 


2G 


42 


1942 . 










-- 


1 


1 


4 


38 


19 


64 


127 


1943 . 










— 


— 


— 


2 


12 


8 


27 


49 


1944 . 










— 


— 


— 


4 


7 


17 


(J7 


95 


1945 . 










— 


— 


— 


•) 


— 


4 


30 


36 


1940 . 










— 


— 


1 


Ci 


19 


18 


153 


197 


1947 . 










— 


— 


— 


'J 


11 


13 


129 


156 


1948 . 










— 


— 


— 


I 


13 


3 


109 


126 


1949 . 










— 


— 


— 


-- 


1 


4 


116 


121 


1950 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


o 


(i 


145 


153 


1951 












— 


-- 




•) 


11 


2()0 


273 


1952 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


75 


80 


1953 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


96 


101 


1954 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


91 


1 00 


1955 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


95 


103 


1956 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


ik; 


117 


1957 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


117 


118 


1958 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


92 


93 


1959 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


35 


35 


1900 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


50 


1961 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


81 


81 


Totals 


1 


fi 


24 


S3 


243 


194 


2.196 


2.747 



57 



TABLE VII 

Mcinhers of Police Force cm November SO. 1961. Who Were Born in ]'c(ir Indicated 



Date ok 
Birth 


-7i 


Si 


•r. 










Totals 


1888 








1 








1 


1889 












— 








— 








1 


1 


1892 












— 








— 


2 


— 


•) 


4 


1893 












— 








— 


1 


— 


1 


2 


1894 












— 








— 


1 


2 


3 


(J 


1895 












— 








1 


3 


2 


■) 


8 


1890 












— 


1 


3 


1 


() 


3 


4 


18 


1897 












— 


1 


O 


4 


10 


— 


l(i 


33 


1898 












— 


1 


1 


6 


4 


3 


18 


33 


1899 












— 


1 


1 


3 


fi 


9 


13 


33 


1900 












1 





■:> 


.") 


11 


7 


23 


49 


1901 












— 





1 


1 


10 


6 


2() 


44 


1902 












— 





— 


3 


(i 


— 


13 


24 


1903 












— 





1 


(i 


8 


— 


10 


25 


1904 












— 





1 


1 


3 


1 


12 


20 


1905 












— 





1 





() 





8 


25 


1906 












— 





— 


1 


(i 


6 


12 


25 


1907 












— 





2 


2 


/ 


3 


20 


34 


1908 












— 





— 


2 


9 


4 


22 


37 


1909 












— 





— 


5 


8 


(i 


32 


51 


1910 












— 


1 


1 


1 


14 


11 


21 


49 


1911 












— 





— 


— 


10 


2 


29 


41 


1912 












— 





1 


3 


10 


8 


33 


55 


1913 












— 





2 


o 


l(i 


4 


29 


53 


1914 












— 





4 


1 


6 


•") 


39 


55 


1915 












— 





— 


o 


11 


10 


40 


66 


1916 












— 





— 


10 


12 


i 


57 


86 


1917 












— 





— 


4 


8 


10 


74 


96 


1918 












— 





— 


2 


5 


G 


93 


106 


1919 












— 


1 


— 


2 


3 


9 


86 


101 


1920 












— 





— 


2 


8 


(i 


90 


106 


1921 












— 





— 


1 


4 


8 


91 


104 


1922 












— 





1 


— 


3 


5 


128 


137 


1923 












— 





— 


1 


6 


5 


114 


126 


1924 












— 





— 


— 


3 


7 


110 


120 


1925 












— 





— 


1 


5 


8 


113 


127 


1926 


















— 


1 


5 


8 


136 


150 


1927 


















— 


— 


2 


8 


137 


147 


1928 












— 





— 


— 


3 


4 


115 


122 


1929 
1930 












— 





— 


— 


— 


1 


74 
77 


74 

78 


1931 












— 





— 


— 


— 


2 


71 


73 


1932 












— 





— 


— 


— 


1 


65 


66 


1933 












— 





— 


— 


— 


1 


46 


47 


1934 












— 





— 


— 


— 


— 


42 


42 


1935 












— 





— 


— 


— 


1 


29 


30 


1936 












— 





— 


— 


— 


-^ 


10 


10 


1937 












— 





— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


7 


Totals 




1 


() 


24 


83 


243 


194 


2,196 


2,747 



The average age of the memtiers of the force on November 30, 1900, was 41.69 years. 



TABLE VIII 

Number of Days' Absence from Duty by Reason of Disabilily DuriiKj the Year Ending 



Xovemhcr ■¥), /.%7 



December, 1960 
Jamiaiy, 1961 
February, llJCil 
March, 1961 
April, 1961 . 
May, 1961 . 
June, 1961 . 



4,046 


July. 1961 . 


4,63.5 


AuKU.st, 1961 


4,101 


September, 1961 


4,211) 


October, 1961 


4,097 


No^•ember, 1961 


3,778 


Total . 


3,436 





A\'era,ii;i' number of men on the force 
Average nuniber of men sick daily 



2,73S 
130 or 4.7.5 jjer cent 



3,426 
3,889 
3,708 
4,221 
3,926 
47,476 



TABLE IX 

Ecport (f Accidents for the Year Ending Norember ■!(). IUCI 





Un'I)ER 4 Ykar 


-; 


.5 TO 14 Ye.^rs 


15 TO 54 Ye.\r.s 


.55 Ve.\r.s .\.vu () 


ER 


T 


Cause of Accident 


Killed 


Injuri'il 


Killed 


Injurc',1 


Kill.'d 


Injured 


Killed 


Injured 


Kill 


Cil 


InjuieJ 




M 


!■' 


M 


]•■ 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


l- 


.\1 


V 


M 


1' 


.M 


1' 


.M 


V 


.M 


1" 
1 


Bic\'cles .... 






1 1 


:; 




- 


84 


1( 






li 


1 






1 


- 


-- 


— 


102 


1 

2 ; 


Carriages, Licensed 














1 
















1 


1 






.> 


' 


Coasting .... 






.) 


1 


1 




I'.l 










— 


— 


— 


-- 


-- 


1 


— 


24 


^1 


Dogs, Bitten by . 






Utj 


( i 


— 


— 


531 


17( 


- 




235 


03 


— 


— 


45 


33 


— 


— 


007 


37.^ ' 


Electric Wires, Live 






— 


— 


— 


— 


-^ 




- 




1 




- 


- 




— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


E.xcavations in Street 
















- 








1 






1 


:i 


— 


— 


1 


4 


Falling Objects . 






o 


■1 






12 








IS 


IS 






14 


■ 






70 


31 


Falls, Various Causes 






2:i!i 


172 




1 


478 


20. 


) '.t 


2 


1,285 


484 


11 




701 


474 


20 


3 


2.763 


1,33.1 


C;iass, Cut by 






23 


ll 


— 


— 


r.7 


4 


- 




115 


47 


— 


- 


211 


5 






225 


102 


^lotorc.vcles .... 














1 




'> 




17 


1 






O 




2 




2( 


4 


^lotor Vehicles, Commcicial 




1 


7 


12 


1 


— 


4ti 


1 


5 4 




1.5',1 


30 


1 




24 


22 


6 


1 


23(i 


88 


Motor Vehicles, I'leasiuc 


1 


1 


i:','.) 


7;i 


1 




34il 


It) 


) !) 


■> 


1.121 


1)05 





4 


2]r, 


143 


2(; 


i 


1,825 


OW. 


(Streetcars .... 


— 


— 


1 


— 




— 


4 


- 






k; 


I 






1 


8 


— 


— 


22 


i: 


Streets, Defects in 


— 


- 


- 






— 


— 


- 


- 




;• 


12 






'7 


13 






5 


25 


Trains, Railroad . 






1 








— 


- 


- 




i' 


1 


') 




■7 


2 


2 




6 


■i 


Vehicles, Fire Department 


— 


- 


— 
















1 










— 


— 


— 


1 




Miscellaneous 


1 




i;:-) 


141 


2 


1 


348 


18 


9 , b 


4 


1,036 


37S 


5 


G 


276 


151 


14 


U 


1,833 


8C4 


Total Killed 


2 


2 


— 


- 


; 


1 


— 


- 


:i( 


f 


— 


— 


28 


K 


- 


— 


65 


22 


— 


Total Injured 




(i'.lT 


.■l()l 






- 1,04C 


81 


t) 




4,04'. 


1.0!!,' 






l,3tit 


862 




— 


.8,0.52 


3,874 



59 



TABLE X 

Total Number of Persons Arrested by Divisions and Units for All Types of Offenses, 
Corerivg Roth Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending N(n'ember 30, 1961 



Divisioxs 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Division 1 


1,975 


213 


2,188 


Division 2 


1,064 


238 


1,302 


Di\'i.sion 3 


1,692 


182 


1,874 


Di\-i.sion 4 


8,363 


1,021 


9,384 


Di\'isi(iii (■) 


3,091 


122 


3,213 


Division 7 


1,444 


113 


1 ,557 


Division 8 


2 


•) 


4 


Di^•i.sion 9 


8,088 


1,340 


9,428 


Division 10 


5,141 


530 


5,671 


Division 11 


3,578 


265 


3.843 


Division 13 


1,694 


142 


1.836 


Division 14 


1,902 


22(i 


2,128 


Di\'isii)n 15 


2,527 


183 


2,710 


Di\-isi(iii Ki 


3,543 


3()9 


3,912 


Di\ision 17 


1,731 


171 


1,902 


Di\'isiun 18 


1,154 


90 


1,244 


Division 19 


1,584 


95 


1,679 


Bureau of Criminal Investigation .... 


1,201 


377 


1,578 


Traffic Division 


10.301 


3,227 


19.528 


Superintendent's Office 


224 


9 


233 


Totals 


66,299 


8,915 


75,214 



6o 



TABLE XI — GROUP A 

Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known lo the Police and Reported In the F.B.I. Under 

I'lu'fortn ('rime Rcporl/iif/ Procedure fur llic )'c(rr Kiidiiiij Xorcinltcr ■10, IHOI 



Classification of Offenses 


Offenses 
Reported 


rnfoundcd 


Actual 
Offenses 


( 'leared 
by Ai-rcst 


Not 
Cleared 


1. 


Criminal homicide: 














(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 


■■M) 


— 


.30 


2(; 


4 




(6) Manslaughter by negligence 


4(; 


9 


37 


32 


5 


2. 


Forcible rape 


lO.J 


9 


96 


78 


18 


3. 


Robbery 


G4G 


38 


608 


287 


321 


4. 


Aggravated assault .... 


774 


25 


749 


()43 


106 


5. 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


3,972 


96 


3,876 


1.214 


2,662 


6. 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft): 














(a) $50 and over in value . 


2,646 


75 


2,.571 


712 


1,859 




(b) Under S50 in value 


4,741 


88 


4,653 


2,543 


2,110 


7. 


Auto theft 


6,369 


756 


5,613 


937 


4,676 


Totals 


19,329 


1,096 


18,233 


6,472 


11,761 



TABLE XI — GROUP B 

Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table XI — Group A for 

the Year Ending November SO. 1961 



Type of Property 


Value of Property Stolen in Bo.ston 


Stolen 


Reco\^ered 


Curreucj', notes, etc 

Jewehy and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing 

Localh^ stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous 


$402,668 00 

239,4.53 00 

65,996 00 

225,905 00 

2,799,224 00 
896,564 00 


$53,237 00 

17,724 00 

10,814 00 

24,673 00 

2,637,901 00 

187,133 00 


Totals 


$4,629,810 00 


$2,931,482 GO 



6i 



TABLE XI — GROUP C 

Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table XI — Group A and Value of Property Stolen 

hi/ Type of Offense, for Year Ending November SO, 1.961 



Classification of Offenses 



Number of 
Actual Offenses 



Value of 
Pi'oijerty Stolen 



Robbery: 

(a) Highway (streets, alleys, etc.) 
(6) Commercial house (not c, d, /) 



(c) 
(d) 
ie) 
(/) 
(?) 



Oil station 

Chain store 

Residence (anywhere on jiremises) 

Bank 

Miscellaneous 



Total — robljery 



Burglary — breaking or entering : 
Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night .... 

(2) Day .... 
Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night .... 

(2) Day .... 



(«) 



Total — burglary . 

Larceny — theft (except auto, by \"alue) 

(a) $50 and over 

(6) $5 to $50 

(c) Under $5 



Total — larceny 



Auto theft: 

(a) Joj'-ridmg 

(b) Another . 

Total - 
Grand Total 



auto theft 



325 

115 

9 

10 

49 

7 

93 



608 



489 
1,302 

1,919 
1G6 



3.S7(; 



2,571 
2,843 
1,810 



r.224 



4,258 
1,355 



5.613 



.125.258 

38,777 

723 

2,968 

7,082 

8,118 

10,862 



$93,788 



$107,926 
270,540 

551,233 
28,963 



^'■.9.")S,(;C,2 



$708,424 

65,140 

4,572 



^77S.13ti 



$2,145,835 
653.389 



$2,799,224 



.'<4.(;29.S10 



62 



TABLE XI ^ GROUP D 

Number of Indiriduals ArrextcfL Induding Traffic ArresL'i—Not thr Xumhrr nf Charges- 
far (III- Yior EiiditHi Xnroiilwr -'O. U)'>1 



Ci^ssiFicATioN ov Offenses 



C'l'iniinal lioiniridc: 

[a] Ahirdor and iioimoslisf'iit manslaiijiliti'i' 
{})) .Manslaughter by negligence . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault . . ■ 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) . 

Auto theft 

Total, Part I Classes 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting . 
Embezzlement and fraud 
Stolen property, buying, receiving, posses; 
Weapons, carrying, possessing, etc. . 
Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex Offenses 

Offenses against family and chiklr(>n . 
Narcotic clrug laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct . . . ■ 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated 
Molation of road and driving laws 
Parking violations . . . ■ 
Traffic and motor vehicle laws . 
All other offenses 

Total, Part II Classes . 
Grand Total 



Persons 
Released 
bv Police 



Persons Chai.'ced bv the Poi.ke 



la 
■) 

19 

isr, 

(i2 
297 
159 

43 



7S3 



4 
15 
10 

216 

1 

58 



99 
1 



65 



Charged 



477 



1,260 



An-ested 



3(1 
9() 
337 
471 
851 
1,612 
816 



4,235 



•123 

59 

279 

97 

142 

263 

525 

1,064 

170 

65 

19,976 

193 

57 

706 

259 

9,696 

30,553 

1,071 

1,991 



6S.()S',t 



r2,324 



Suiiinioned 



30 
96 
327 
452 
757 
,243 
742 



3,669 



S14 

58 
264 

92 
136 
21)2 
507 
995 
169 

40 

19,966 

182 

56 
69(i 
255 
467 
5,199 
437 
1,681 



35,945 



Persons Found Giii.ty 



Of (tlfen.-^e 
Charged 



10 
19 
94 
369 
74 



')66 



109 
1 



18 
69 
1 
25 
10 



10 

4 

9,229 

25,354 

634 

310 



5,813 



36,379 



4 
15 
160 
137 
398 
1,069 
473 



2.263 



501 

36 

170 

44 

74 

183 

307 

664 

102 

4() 

19,804 

120 

33 

457 

150 

9,186 

30,212 

942 

1,025 



64.056 



66,319 



( )f Le.s.^er 
Offense 



o 
6 
14 
29 
44 
40 
24 
28 



190 



8 
2 

2 

•> 

3 

15 
1 
1 
1 



12 

21 
4 

15 
2 



89 



279 



63 



TABLE XI — GROUP E 

Arrests for the Year Ending November 30, 1061 



Nature of Offense 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


On 


Without 


Siniimoned 
by the 
Covu-t 










Warrants 


Warrants 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


21 


1 


22 


8 


14 


_ 


Negligent manslaughter 










28 


2 


30 


13 


17 


— 


Ra]ie 












95 


1 


96 


30 


66 


-- 


Rol)bery .... 












324 


13 


337 


121 


206 


10 


Aggravated assault . 












391 


80 


471 


173 


279 


19 


Burglary — breaking and entering 










842 


9 


851 


269 


488 


94 


Larc<'ny — theft (except auto theft) 










1,295 


317 


1,612 


482 


761 


369 


Auto theft 










785 


31 


816 


218 


524 


74 


Other assaults 














845 


78 


923 


656 


158 


109 


Forgery and counterfeiting 














53 


6 


59 


35 


23 


1 


Embezzlement and fraud 














235 


44 


279 


210 


54 


15 


Stolen property . 














90 


7 


'.17 


-> i 


55 


5 


Weapons, jjossession of 
















138 


4 


142 


39 


97 


6 


Prostitution 
















50 


213 


263 


24 


238 


1 


Sex offenses 
















407 


118 


525 


191 


316 


18 


Family and children . 
















1 ,007 


57 


1 ,064 


982 


13 


69 


Narcotics laws . 
















128 


42 


170 


4() 


123 


1 


Liquor laws . 
















44 


21 


65 


31 


9 


25 


Drunkenness 
















IS, 4 58 


1,518 


19,976 


37 


19,929 


10 


Disorderly conduct . 
















158 


35 


193 


24 


158 


11 


Vagrancy 
















49 


8 


57 


( 


49 


1 


Gaml)ling 
















668 


38 


706 


449 


247 


10 


Driving while intoxicated 
















246 


13 


259 


33 


222 


4 


Road and driving laws 
















9,301 


395 


9,696 


423 


44 


9,229 


Parking A'iolations 
















25,360 


5,193 


30,553 


5,196 


3 


25,354 


Traffic violations 
















1 ,028 


43 


1,071 


201 


236 


634 


All other offenses 
















1,647 


344 


1,991 


891 


790 


310 


Suspicion 
















1,096 


164 


1,260 


6 


1 ,250 


4 


Arrests for other departments 












1,510 


120 


1,630 


1,349 


277 


4 


Totals 


66,299 


8,915 


75,214 


12,181 


26,646 


36,387 



« 64 


































!' 


TABLE XII 














Ayr iuhI Sex vj All Persons Arrested for OJj'enses Shown I nder Table XI — ( 


irouj) 


E, Covering Both Pciidliti, 


and Completed Cases, I'ut Excluding Traffic Arrests, j 


or the Yea 


' Eno 


111(1 ^ 


^ovemher 3 


n, 1901 


1 


Natt're of Offexse 


rndiT 15 


15 


If) 


17 


18 


1 
19 


M 


1-' 


.M 


V 


:\i 


V 


AI 


V 


AI 


V 


A I 


F 


]\Iurilei';iii(l iioiiiic.i;liiiciit ni;iii,s|;iu,nlilrr 














1 




1 




1 




Maii8l;ui!i,liter hy iiei;ligciice . 










— 


— 


— 




















Forcil)k' rape 










— - 


--■ 


1 




') 




■ 1 




s 




,s 




Robbery 










32 


.") 


ji; 




1 1 




13 


1 


21 i 




2S 


Aggravated assault 










17 


2 


22 


1 


20 


■ ) 


17 


1 


17 


4 


13 




Burglary — breaking or (>ntering 










197 


1 


60 


4 


1 1 




44 


■) 


5( ; 




:;2 




Larceny — thel't (except auto theft) 










291 


83 


90 


:il 


71 


21 


."iS 


10 


■ >i 


',» 


29 


ii; 


Auto theft 










82 





101 


s 


142 


■ > 


98 


'> 


1 i 


I 


50 




Other assaults . 












14 


7 


10 


4 


■)•) 


• ) 


31 


1 


16 


1 


15 


1 


I''orger.v and counterfeiting 












— 


— 


1 




1 




• > 


o 




1 


, } 




Eml)ezzlement and fraud 












— 


■•> 


- 








4 


1 


1 




! 




Stolen property 












.") 


— 


1 




1 








'.) 




• ) 




Weapons, possession of . 












1 


— 


•J 




'.', 




- 




s 




s 





Prostitution 














] 












. ) 




13 


I 


1) 


Sex offenses 












1.-. 


4 


/ 


■) 


t 


-> 


I'.i 


•> 


16 


.) 


10 


t 


Family and children 












— 


— 


— 






_ 




3 


' > 


4 


4 


2 


Narcotics laws 












— 


— 


— 


1 




— - 


1 


1 


4 


5 


■ ) 


. . 


Liquor laws 












— 


— 


— 




1 






1 


•) 


1 


3 


2 


])i'unkeiuiess . 












1 


— 


8 


• ) 


29 


') 


S9 


1 


122 


8 


146 


7 


Disorderly conduct 












7 


5 


1 


. > 


9 


2 


10 


3 


20 


5 


17 


3 


Vagrancy .... 












— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


1 





3 




1 




Gambling .... 












— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


- 


o 





4 









Driving while intoxicated 












— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


1 










1 


1 


Suspicion .... 












— 


— 


1 




4 


— 


63 


8 


80 


19 


78 


9 


All other (except traffic) 












122 


62 


47 


42 


62 


41 


56 


26 


66 


16 


58 


14 


Arrests for other department 


s and agencies 






19 


12 


16 


10 


16 


.) 


22 


11 


51 


6 


37 


6 


Totals:— Males 








809 





386 


__ 


481 


__. 


544 




649 




552 




Females . 











189 


— 


no 


-- 


81 




81 




98 




77 




































1 



65 



TABLE XII — Continued 

Af/f and Sex of All Persons Arrested for Offenses Shown Under Table '\ I — (rroup E, Covering Both Pending 

and Completed Cases. But Exchidincj Traffic Arrests, for the Year Ending Xi:rcn)her SO, IDOl 





20 


- 


1 


22 


23 


24 


25 


29 


NATrKK OF Offense 




















































.M 


!■■ 


-M 


I' 


M 


I- 


.M 


V 


.M 


I- 


.M 


I- 


Munlt'i- ;iih1 iKiiiiu'gligeiit maiislaugliter 


1 


1 










■ ) 




•) 




A 




Maiih^huiglilcr l)y nosiigence . 








1 




— 




1 




1 


— 


■} 




■ i 


1 


Forcihlc ra|)L' 








.) 




(i 




•) 




(1 




1 , 




1(1 


— 


Rolihery 








L'.-i 


1 


28 


1 


20 


1 


i; 


1 


15 




•55 


2 


Asgra\-atecl assault .... 








•_M 


■ 1 


18 


t 


23 


3 


15 


3 


19 


3 


02 


21 


Burftiary — breaking or entering 








?A 




28 




•)•) 




23 




19 


— 


97 


— 


Larceny — theft (except autn thel't) . 








45 


9 


32 


12 


27 


(i 


■)(; 


l( 


23 


1 


141 


18 


Auto theft 








49 


— 


29 




18 


2 


15 


" 


13 




43 


•) 


Other assaults . 










20 


— 


47 


2 


37 


1 


32 


3 


31 


• ) 


Kid 


12 


Forgery and counterfeiting 










4 


-- 


— 


— 


•7 




o 




1 




13 


1 


Embezzlement and fraud 










4 


1 


•J 


1 


1' 


1 


-1 


2 


o 


1 


4(1 


3 


1^'tolen property 










•) 


1 


2 




" 




.'1 


1 


4 


— 


14 


1 


Weapons, po.ssession of 












9 


— 


8 




(i 




11 




. ) 


1 


24 


— 


Prostitution 












4 


/ 




14 


') 


23 





15 


2 


15 


14 


52 


?e.\ offenses 












k; 


4 


19 


1 1 


13 


l(i 


18 


9 


17 


(1 


54 


14 


Family and chikh-en 












14 


•y 


2G 


• ) 


25 


•1 


34 


3 


42 


1 


221 


13 


Narcotics \&\\s 












i 


•> 


10 




11 


1 


(1 


4 


(1 


1 


25 


8 


Li(|Uor laws 












•") 


4 


— 


- 


1 








1 


— 


3 


3 


Drunkenness 












79 


3 


038 


50 


4(1(1 


3(} 


33(1 


3( 


3(17 


10 


1,003 


148 


Disorderly conduct 












12 


— 


15 


■ ) 


13 


1 


.) 


1 


(i 


1 


20 


2 


Vagrancy . 












1 


I 


4 


— 


— 


- 


• ) 




I 




3 


— 


Gambling 












4 


— 


7 


2 


9 


— 


■ )•) 


■_ 


■)•) 


1 


107 


9 


Driving while intoxicated 










9 


-- 


5 


— 


13 


— 


.5 




l(j 


1 


42 


1 


Suspicion .... 










(i4 


8 


67 


14 


OG 


10 


47 


17 


39 


9 


173 


33 


All other (except traffic) 










(i7 


8 


73 


e 


(Ui 


12 


05 





54 


() 


2(iG 


17 


Arrests for other departments and agencies 






57 


3 


(i3 


4 


()0 


5 


5() 


3 


5C 


1 


301 


9 


Totals:— Males 






559 


— 


1,124 





854 





755 


_- 


703 




3,577 


— 


Females 








58 


" 


137 




123 




1 15 




72 


^ 


370 



66 



TABLE XII — Concluded 

Age and Sex of AH Persons Arrested for Offenses Shoirti I nder Table 'SI — Graup E. Covering I'otli Pending 

and ('(implclcd Cases. I' id Excbid'nig Trajlic Arrests, for thr ]'('ar Ending Xomnhcr ■'<>. Uliil 



















.SO 






Natuue of Offense 


3(» 


,U 


.?5 


39 


40 


44 


4.S 49 


Am, 


OVKI! 


Wwv. 




























M 


F 


.M 


!•■ 


A I 


V 


M 


F 


A I 


F 


White 


All 
Other 


JMurdcr and iKinnegligeiit manslaughter 


• > 




• y 








■ ) 




1 




1.3 


/ 


AlaiLslaiighter by negligence . 






1) 




3 


1 


."I 




-3 




•i 




23 


7 


I'orcihle rape 








U; 


— 


4 




li 


— 


•} 




3 


- 


.36 


40 


Uobiiery 








23 


— 


14 




3 




.3 


1 


1 




203 


134 


Aggravated assault 








4.3 


C; 


:;i 


1(. 


1." 


,•.» 


r_ 


1 


•>-. 


■:> 


203 


268 


Burglary — breaking or entering 








:)Li 


1 


44 


— 


21 




13 




It; 


1 


(117 


234 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 








IIG 


17 


94 


13 


64 


1.3 


62 


17 


( _ 


2(, 


1.114 


498 


Auto theft 








■23 


•1 


17 


o 


10 




1.3 




3 


- 


640 


176 


Other assaults . 










127 


■) 


111 


Hi 


SI 


( 


42 


9 


43 


g 


619 


304 


Forgery and counterfeiting 










7 


— 


9 





1 




3 




4 


— 


48 


11 


I'^mliezzlement and fraud 










:)2 


<j 


4.3 


11 


2(i 


4 


• )■; 


^^ 


13 


.5 


237 


42 


Stolen property 










8 


— 


1(, 


■ ) 


( 




.) 


"_ 


8 


— 


81 


16 


Weapons, possession of 












13 


— 


l.'i 


1 


/ 


1 


6 


1 


3 


— 


90 


52 


Prostitution 












8 


2(i 


3 


10 


4 


1.3 


o 


i 


4 


3 


78 


185 


Sex offenses 












(15 


11 


43 


14 


3.5 


7 


19 


•) 


34 


1 


34.5 


180 


Family and children 












201 


12 


is.-j 


7 


128 


.3 


62 




66 


— 


710 


3.54 


Narcotics la\vs 












23 


I 


Ci 


9 


.1 


— 





•) 


10 


1 


60 


110 


Liciuor laws 












1 




1 


1 


4 


3 


4 




13 


•) 


.56 


9 


Drunkenness . 












1,799 


212 


2,124 


234 


2.30(i 


189 


2,4.50 


203 


.5,9.5.3 


376 


16,865 


3.111 


Disorderly conduct 












7 


1 


3 


3 


(•) 


1 


3 


— 


4 


— 


1.52 


41 


\'agrancy . 












3 


■1 





2 


2 


1 


4 


-- 


22 


■7 


50 


7 


Clambling . 












101 


I 


99 


fi 


81 


3 


70 


4 


139 


4 


491 


215 


Driving while intoxicated 










41 


4 


29 


1 


24 


3 


2.5 


1 


41 


1 


192 


67 


Suspicion .... 










149 


IG 


KM, 


i 


7.3 


2 


43 


•) 


.52 


.3 


803 


4.57 


All other (except traffic) 










18.5 


26 


1.34 


13 


97 


12 


77 


10 


1.53 


24 


1..321 


670 


Arrests for other departments and agencies 




279 


17 


184 


11 


141 


9 


72 


2 


80 


6 


1,172 


458 


Totals: — Males 




3,348 


— 


3,318 





3,1.32 


— 


3,032 


— 


6,768 


. 


26,241 


— 


Females 




~ 


384 


■ 


37(1 




283 




267 


~~ 


462 


" 


7,6.53 



67 



TABLE XIII 

Showing the Number of Licensee of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the Amount of Money 
Received frnw All Sources and Paid to the City Cr)Uect(rr-Trc<tsiirer Durincj the Year Endinq Noremher ■!(). 1961 



CLASS OF LICENSE 


ft 


3 

2 




pplieations 
Withdrawn or 
No Action 


-a 

o 




I. 


ll 


f. 




.Amount 




< 


"kJ 


3 


-rr^ 


^ 


■^' 


O 


r 


f- 


- 




Auctioneer (Class 1) 


lid 


5,S 


1 






1 


, 








•S.>,SO 1)0 


Anctioneer (other elasses) 


1.) 


1) 




-' 














ISO 00 


iiicycle registrations 


2,1(35 


2,105 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


.541 25 


Dog 


15,156 


15,151 


5 


— 






— 


-- 


,s 


2(1', 1 


35.(134 00 


Driver (huekney carriage) 


(),075 


5.94S 


— 


- 


127 






ICi 




5 '.IN 


1 1 .80(1 00 


Firearms, dealer in 


12 


11 






— 


1 


— 


~ 


— 




275 00 


(Innsmilh 








— 










-- 






30 00 


Ihiekney carriage (and regiants) 


l.'.K'io 


l.!)(i5 


--- 


— 


— 


— 


4411 


— 




1 


10.770 00 


Hackney carriage (icplacenienl of drivers' 
























hiidges) 


58 


58 


— 


— 














58 00 


Handcart (common <'arrier) 


4 


4 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




8 00 


.Innk collector 


7(i 


71 






O 


2 


~ 


— 


— 


1 


l.OCio 00 


.Junk shopkeeper 


41 


41 






— 


-- 




— 


— 


— 


3,075 00 


Musician (eoUeetive and sound ear) 


4 


4 




— 


- 




-- 




— 


— 


18 00 


Musieian (itinerant) 


8 


8 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 






80 00 


Pawnbroker 


43 


43 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 




1 


2,100 00 


Public lodging house 


4 


-- 


4 


-- 






- - 






5 


— 


Revolver (including machine gun) . 


1.208 


1.127 


3 


4 


74 


— 


2 


1 


- 


1 


5,035 00 


Revolver, i)ermit to iiurchase . 


4 


■'' 




-- 


1 






-- 


— 


— 


15 00 



68 



TABM-: XIII Concluded , 

SliotriiKj llic Niniihcr aj Licensee of Ml Kind^ Issued hij the J^olice Connniaiiioner (tiid Uic Aniouiil (if M(ii,ci\ 
h'cccircd from All Sources (Did Fdid to llie Cili/ CollcrUrr-Trcdsurcr Duriiif/ the Year Endiuf/ Noveiiiher JO, l'.li;i 



CLASS OF I.ICIONSK 




It 

c :- 


■J. O 


■J^ > — 

.2 J-f 




1.°^ 


1. 


-Si" 


X 




.\rnonnl 


SccoiKlhaiid ailicirs 


:i27 


:i22 


3 




1 


1 


2 




2 


:; 


Si.l.liliO (1(1 


S<M'oii(lliMH(l [Moliir vi'liiclr dealer 


2:ii 


22 li 






1 


- 






1 


1(. 


1 i.:;ii() no 


SluilKiiiis and rillcs, dealer in . 


8 


8 


— 
















2IMI III) 


Si^lit-seeinn aiilomoliile .... 


22 


22 


— 
















i.:;7i. on 


Sight-seeing driver 


25 


25 


— 






— 


— 








.")0 III) 


Special i)olice 


1,052 


80(1 


245 




.5 


2 


Ill 






17 


4,111)11 DO 


Street railway, conduchir. motorman, and 
























starter 


2 


2 


— 
















2 DO 


C'Oj)ies of licensi'S and repl.-icenient do^ 
























tags 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 








1(14 25 


Copies of police rei)orls .... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


-- 






-- 


' 


— 


22,002 DO 


Damage to police property 




— 


— 
















842 li'.i 


Keinihnrsemenis 


— 


— 


— 
















1,5! 1:5 :il 


Sale of auctioneer record boolcs 


— 


— 


— 
















25 .50 . 


Sale of condennied properly 


— 


— 


— 
















4!)4 20 1 


Sale of lost, stolen, and abandoned prop- 
























erty 




















— 


;i,(iii() :{ii 


Sale of pawnliroker and secondhand arti- 
























cles report lihiid<s 






— 




— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


382 00 


Sunda\' permits 


— 


— 


— 






- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5,010 00 


Use of police propert\' .... 


— 


— 


— 








- 








2,077 tiO 


Totals 


28,568 


28,077 


261 


4 


212 


14 


466 


17 


14 


912 


8141,700 10 


Credit by City Collector-Treasurer for 
























mone.\- received for damage to police 
























property, lelephone commissions, and 
dog fines 






— 








— 


" 




— 


13,824 81 


(Irand Total 






— 






— 


— 






— 


.«155,524 91 1 



69 



TAB LI-: XR' 

Xiimlxv cf I)()(/ Licci/scx Issiictl DiiriiKj the Yfiir KihI/iu/ Nnvonhcr .'>(), l.'IHl 



JJivi.sioxs 


-Males 


Females 


!Spa\-ed 


Kennels 


Transfers 


With 
Fee 


Without 
Fee 


Totals 


1 . . . 


49 


15 


12 






7(1 




7(j 


2 . . . 


1 


1 




1 


— 


3 


— 


3 


3 . . . 


124 


45 


40 


— 


- 


215 


— 


215 


4 . . . 


408 


1 12 


1 19 


4 


1 


(Vl-1 


1 


045 


() . . . 


.174 


120 


230 


— 


— 


930 


— 


930 


7 . . . 

8 . . . 

9 . . . 


4-12 


51 


192 


— 


— 


085 


— 


085 


1,353 


292 


382 


2 


— 


2,029 


— 


2,029 


10 . . . 


648 


34 


272 


— 


— 


954 


— 


954 


11 . . . 


1,340 


193 


75,s 


•1 


■) 


2,295 


2 


2,297 


13 . . . 


591 


99 


2(i9 


— 


— 


959 


— 


959 


14 . . . 


719 


84 


359 


3 


1 


1,1 (iO 


1 


1,107 


15 . . . 


253 


49 


108 


O 




112 


1 


413 


IG . . . 


281 


90 


1 10 


4 


-- 


497 


1 


498 


17 . . . 


998 


121 


509 


5 


— 


1,093 


2 


1,095 


18 . . . 


901 


100 


53 1 


1 


• > 


1,535 


1 


1,530 


19 . . . 


032 


00 


351 


— 


2 


1,054 


— 


1 ,054 


Totals . 


9,314 


1,478 


4,323 


24 


8 


15,147 


*9 


15,156 



* Totiil of 9 dog licenses issued without lee, in accoidiuicc with I 
corporation, incorporated exclusively for purposes of protecting animals f 
dogs "spcciallx- trained to lead or serve a blind person" (from Ilivisiorjs 



iw, includes: J Uciniei for a "domestic charitable 
rom cruelty," etc, (located on Division 4): and 8 
II, 14, 1.5, Itl, 17, and IS). 



70 



TABLE XX 

Fi)ui)ici(il SidlcnirnI for llic )'r(ir EikHikj \'orcitil)cr ■'><>. HlfiJ 



EXPENDITURES 



GliOT'P 



Gnorp 2. 



Pehsonai- Services: 

1 Pciinanoiit. rmployees 

12 Overtime 



Contractual Services: 

21 Communipatioii.s 

22 Li^lit, licat and power 

2() Repairs and maintenance cf Luildint 
structures 

27 Re])airs and serx-ieini; of equipment 

28 Transportation of persons 

29 INIiscellaiieous contractual services 



Group 3. Supplies and Materials: 

30 Automotive .... 

32 Food 

33 Heatinii' 

34 Household .... 

35 Medical, dental and hosjiital . 

3(3 Office 

39 Miscellaneous . . . . 



j,801,650 92 
521,716 67 



861,111 44 
50,865 29 

20,132 44 

62,729 38 

21,802 25 

125,648 33 



$172,297 70 
15,855 83 
41,444 14 
20,422 54 
1,732 (17 
92,402 12 
159,702 25 



$17,323,367 59 



342,289 13 



503,857 31 



Group 4. Current Charges and Obligations: 
49 Miscellaneous .... 

Group 5. Equipment: 

56 Office furniture and equipment 
59 Miscellaneous 



Total 



$4,657 20 
13,446 71 



Special Items (not included in Police Department approi)riation) 
Down Payment Loan: 
59 ^Miscellaneous Equii)ment 



Departmental Equipment Loan: 
50 Automotive .... 
56 Office furniture and ec|uipment 



RECEIPTS 

P'or licenses issued l>y the Police Commissioner 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 

Refunds, miscellaneous 

Use of police property 

Sale of condemned, lost, stolen and abantloued property . 

For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage dii\('rs' 

licenses and records, sale of report blanks 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and e(|uipmeid 
For damage to police property (paid at Headc|uarters) 



$101,405 05 
10,230 88 



iidges, copies of 



Total 

Credit by City Collector-Treasurer for money received for damage to police property, 
commissions on telephones, and dog fines 

Grand Total 



33,790 15 



18,103 91 



|;18,221,40S ()(t 



$6,147 57 



Lll,()35 93 



$73,891 75 

35,634 00 

1,508 78 

2,977 ()0 

4,154 50 

22,6t)6 25 

84 53 

842 69 

$141,700 10 

13,824 81 

$155,524 91 



71 



TABLE XVI 

SliDiriiu/ till' Xinnhcr a/ Male itiid Fciiude Persons Twenty Years of Aijc <ir M(n-c Who Were Residents of the City of 
Boston on the First Day of J on nary. 1061, Listed by the Listing Board in the Severed Wards and Precincts 
of Si: id City 



Wards 


I'lri', 1 


I'r.r, 2 


I'irc. :; 


Vvrr. 1 


I'r.T. 5 


I'r.T. 


I'nT. 7 


I'rrr. S 


I'ht. !) 


Tlrr, Id 


I'r.T. 11 


Free. 12 


Wiirtl 1 . 


2.0S',I 


2.0.').") 


2,s:! 1 


1.X2!) 


2,333 


2,2 l(i 


2,175 


1,!)52 


1 ,884 


2,142 


2.102 


1.901 


Ward 2 , 


1.7.V,l 


1..-.2.-1 


1,040 


l.!)01 


l.OIll) 


1,816 


1,54!) 








— 


— 


Ward 3 . 


2.21!) 


2,110 


2.072 


2,1 l.S 


734 


2,3S6 


1,!)08 


2,625 


3,725 




— 


— 


Ward 4 . 


2,088 


2,222 


1,<.I50 


2,000 


2,383 


2,014 


2,221 


2,223 


2,101 


2,051 




— 


Ward 5 . 


2..') ID 


1,812 


2,057 


1 ,;)!)5 


2,<I46 


2,0.55 


2,07S 


2,763 


2,!)77 


2,3!)3 


1 ,565 


l.,531 


Ward G - 


1,708 


1,741 


1.701 


1,607 


1.570 


1.603 


1,614 


1 ,55!) 


1,5! 10 




— 


— 


Ward 7 . 


1,070 


l,!MtO 


l..s:;i 


1 .sss 


1.72S 


1.S33 


1,741 


1,711 


1,718 


l,7!»ri 


— 


— 


Ward 8 . 


1,224 


2,:-;04 


74!) 


1,3,S!) 


1.308 


064 


1,471 


1,630 


!)6U 




— 


— 


Ward '.1 . 


2, OHO 


2:xv.\ 


1,025 


1,540 


1 .578 


733 


1,016 


!)!)5 


1,408 






— 


Ward 10 - 


1 , i:;2 


l,.'):io 


l,70,S 


1,S32 


1 .58,S 


1,7.55 


2,420 


1 .934 


2,000 


- 


— 


— 


Ward 11 


1 ,7'.l'.i 


i,4;i:; 


1. !.■">!) 


1,!)17 


l.SI!5 


1 .3,87 


1,5!)1 


l.!)51 


1,21!) 


1,655 


-- 


— 


Ward 12 , 


1,.').")1 


1.427 


1.020 


1,717 


1.351 


1.6S7 


1,747 


1.1! )5 


1 ,544 


1,411 


1 ,622 


1,593 


Ward lo , 


i,2(;8 


i,;;'.)4 


l.:!i:i 


1,700 


1.344 


l.(i48 


1,736 


1 ,804 


1,751 


2,027 


2,477 


— 


Ward 14 . 


1,S0.T 


l.ti07 


1,!)27 


2,105 


2.00!) 


1 ,770 


1,88!) 


1 ,529 


2,154 


2,114 


1,7 IS 


1.576 


Ward 15 . 


2,:i2.5 


1 .078 


1,13:; 


1,144 


!)70 


1 , 1 78 


1,457 


1,303 


1,403 


1,157 


1,10!) 


— 


Ward U) . 


1,.")70 


1 , 1 SO 


1,0.52 


l,S17 


2.215 


2,240 


1,661 


1,456 


2,006 


1,613 


1,73!) 


1,2.56 


Ward 17 . 


1 ,820 


1.057 


1,375 


1,083 


1,326 


1,000 


1,143 


1,803 


l,09(i 


2,116 


1,172 


1,116 


Ward 18 . 


2,060 


2,356 


1,813 


1,03!) 


1,300 


1 ,652 


1,260 


1 ,7!)0 


2,502 


1.133 


2,051 


1,637 


Ward 19 . 


1,010 


1,565 


1,1117 


1,001 


1,515 


1.076 


1,107 


1,025 


014 


1.033 


1,218 


1,339 


Ward 20 


1,000 


',ir.4 


!)0!) 


1,511 


1 ,660 


1 .555 


1,2,86 


1 ,404 


1,714 


1,.521 


1 ,024 


1.1.52 


Ward 21 


2,000 


1,402 


2,015 


1 ,8-14 


2,050 


1 .383 


2,021 


2,0! )S 


2,2.55 


1 ,!t25 


2,017 


1 ..598 


Ward 22 . 


OOil 


1,105 


1.002 


!)!)2 


1,107 


1.0! 15 


!)7(i 


1,132 


1,750 


2,73!) 


1,301 


1.641 



12 



TAHL?: XVI — ('oiuludcd 

Shoiriiuj the N iiiiihvr of Malv (intl Fcinale l^crsons Tirinli/ ]'c<ir.'< of Age or Marc Wha \\'< re Residents aj the Citij of 
Hdstou on the First Da// of ./(uiiKiri/, UKU. Lislcil liij Ihc Listing liaiird in llic Several Wards and Preeinets 
of Said Cit/t 



Wards 


Picf. 13 


Prec. 14 


Pree. 15 


I'n'c. 16 


Pn-c. 17 


Vn;:. IS 


IVcc. 19 


Prcc. 211 


IVcc. 21 


Pin-. 22 


Totals 


War.l 1 . . . 


2.(ll'.i 


i,:;::. 


















28,936 


Wanl 2 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12.180 


Wanl -A 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


19.903 


\\'mi<1 4 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


21.859 


Wai-a 5 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


27,882 


Ward (i 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


14.702 


Ward 7 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


17,936 


Wani 8 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


12,089 


Wanl '.) 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13,258 


W anl 10 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16,265 


\\:ud 1 1 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


16,306 


Wanl 12 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,801 


Wanl i:i 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


18,462 


Wanl 11 






i.ipiK) 


I.ii2s 


l.S'.C) 


1 ,364 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29,170 


Wanl 15 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


15,223 


Wanl l(i 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,420 


Wanl 17 






1,005 


1,176 


989 


880 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,763 


Wanl 18 






1,080 


1,127 


1,371 


1,463 


1,743 


2,034 


1,829 


1,638 


1,533 


— 


34,489 


Ward 19 






1,163 


844 


1,029 


1,.540 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,046 


Wanl 20 






1,150 


1,167 


1 ,926 


1.846 


1.S88 


1,142 


1,275 


1,774 


— 


— 


28,540 


Wanl 21 






1,.547 


1 ,278 


1,691 


1,514 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


28.704 


^\•aI■d 22 






1,052 


1,340 


1,125 


1,242 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


20,658 


( irand Tot 


il 






















456.592 































BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Illlllllllllllllilll 

3 9999 06313 941 2 



Be, ' ■ 

RELCASEO ev . ' 

PUW-IC LIBHAI^) n5^ 

DETROIT. MIGH ^