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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOM 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




BOSTON PUBUC LIBRARY 

GOVERNMENTOOCUMENrsOEMRTMENT 
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MAR 1 6 1995 



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City of Boston 
Administrative Services Department 
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1962 



■=""1 t-uwic Ul 



ANNUAL 




REPORT 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 



CITY OF 




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31 iRi ir- i-ir^^i iK^cKJT Mn lii- iQfi:^ 



[DOCUMENT — NO. 34] 



Fifty-seventh Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1962 




DSS^.^i N\^SCo 



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FRONT COVER 



FALL REVERE MALL 

Statue of Paul Revere with historic Old North Church in 
background, in the steeple of which were hung the lanterns, 
''One if bj' land and two if by sea . . ." perpetuated by 
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, "The Midnight Ride 
of Paul Revere. " 

Courtesy of the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston Herald and Traveler 

The Boston Record- American-Sunday Advertiser 



v^ 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Letter to the Mayor 4 

The Department: 

Police Force 7 

Signal Se^\^ce 7 

Employees of the Department .... 7 

Distribution and Changes .... 7 

Award of Medals 8 

Work of the Department 12 

Detective Bureau 13 

Automobile Unit 13 

Lost and Stolen Property Unit . . . 14 

Homicide 14 

Narcotics and Vice Unit 15 

Domestic Relations Unit 16 

Ballistics Unit 17 

Biological Chemist-Crime Laboratory . . 18 

Identification Unit 19 

Traffic Division 23 

Auxiliary School Patrol 24 

Central Complaint and Records Bureau . . 25 

Police Academy 25 

Crime Prevention Bureau 26 

Hackney Carriages: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses . . . . 28 

Hackne)' Carriage Drivers' Licenses . . 28 

City Prison 28 



Page 

House of Detention 29 

Police Signal System 29 

Tactical Patrol Force 30 

Harbor Police and Emergency Service Unit . 30 

Motor Vehicle Service 31 

Combination Ambulances . . . . 31 



Property Clerk: 

Lost and Found Property 



Miscellaneous Business 
Planning Board 
Medical Department 



Statistical Tables: 

Number of Arrests by Police Divisions 
Major Offenses Known to the Police 
Type and Value of Property Stolen 
Value of Property Stolen by Offense 
Analysis of Larceny and Auto Theft 
Arrests by Crime Classification 
Analysis of Arrest Process 
Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 

Accidents 

Licenses of All Classes Issued . 

Financial Statement . 

Male and Female Residents Listed 



32 

33 
33 
34 

38 
38 
39 
39 
39 
40 

41 

42 
43 
44 

45 
46 




EDMUND L. McNAMARA 
Coiiuiiissioner 



TH£ tiEV^ 




CI] 



BOSTON THE "ALL-AMERICA" CITY 



Without fanfare, with no advance notice, a 
rather serious group of men came to Boston 
one day last fall. They looked vis over pretty 
carefully. They inspected the Prudential 
lot. They went down to Scollay Square and 
elsewhere to watch the amazing skill of crane 
operators who give the facile dexterity of 
giant fingers to huge steel clam shells. 

They looked at blueprints and models. 
They studied plans and architects' drawings. 

They found their way, too, into areas of 
blight, areas all cities would like to hide from 
visitors and strangers. 

I was not privileged to attend their delibera- 
tions or even listen in on their comments. 

All I know was that a short time back we 
sent a flag to the top of a pole in front of City 
Hall. It told the world that the jury had de- 
cided that Boston, Massachusetts, well mer- 
ited rank in 1963 as one of the nation's great 
' ' All-America ' ' cities. 

You only have to look back a few _ 
years to a time when Boston could 
not seek to aspire to that ranking — 
at least with any reasonable expec- 
tation of success. There was no wa}' 
of hiding the blight. It was too 
prevalent. It had reached the very 
vitals of a truly great city. 

That flag we unfurled in Alarch is 
a big one. 

It means a lot to every citizen of Boston. 

It was put on the top of that pole by the 
efforts of many men and women. It was put 
there by men and women of hope and deter- 
mination. 

It was put there by humble men and women 
as well as by those who sat at the counsel 
tables of the city's business enterprises. It 
was put there by men of the cloth and by men 
and women who wanted to give their children 
and their children's children the pride of 
birthright. 

Truly, it's a big flag. 

Yet, I find myself comparing it with those 
sideline markers you see at a football game 



THE NEW 



ui 




. the marker which indicates the posi- 
tion of the ball on gridiron . . . where it 
will be lined up for the next play. 

The recent months have been tremendous 
in their import for Boston. Our skid to 
mediocrity or worse has been halted. We are 
moving at last to our proper position, not 
alone in the United States but in a modern 
world as well. 

Yet we have not achieved our goal. We are 
on the 40-yard line. We know where we are 
going. We know how we are going to get 
there. We have now generated the momen- 
tum of success, and nothing is going to pre- 
vent us from attaining that success. 

While Boston slept at four o'clock one 
morning last spring, fire — the most feared 
enemy of night — threatened to sweep one 
of our major hostelries. Alert members of 
your department set in motion the machinery 
which prevented that fire from becoming a 

holocaust — possibly one of the worst 

in our history. 

Our capacity to meet sudden pub- 
lic emergencies was demonstrated 
quickly. Men in uniform were in- 
side that hotel rousing guests and 
leading them to safety with no 
regard to the risk in which they 
placed their own lives. 

Quickly mobilized was a tremendous force 
of men dedicated to the protection of human 
life and property. 

Yours is a great department today. It will 
become greater in the months and years 
ahead. 

Worth-while goals are not easily attained. 
I am sure that every member of the Boston 
Police Department will be satisfied with noth- 
ing less than a worth-while city in which to 
live, in which to bring up the children of to- 
morrow, a city in which he has played a proud 
role, however humble it may seem. 

If we all work together we will not and 
cannot be denied that goal. 




i<T& 



Mayor. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 




I PI VISION 11 I I OIVISIOM 13 I I DIVISION 14 | | DIVISION IS | | DIVISION 1« | | DIVISION IT | | DIVISION 1S| | OIVISIOW 1» | 



THE DEPARTMENT 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner . 

Secretary 

Confidential Secretary . 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Secretaries 



Superintendent . . . _ . 
Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 

Director 

Director, Assistant .... 
Foreman of Signal Service 
Linemen and Cable Splicers ,. 
Machinist 



The Police Force 

I Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 

Patrolmen 

4 

Patrolwomen 



"igi 
3 



8i Total 2,595 

* Includes 2 patrolwomen 
238 t Includes 6 patrolmen in armed service 



Signal Service 

I Motor Equipment Operators and Laborers 

I 

I 

7 

I Total 



Painter and Groundman 
Signalmen-Electricians . 
Electrical Equipment Repairman 



Biological Chemist .... 
Biological Chemist, Assistant 

Clerk-Typists 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 
Elevator Operators 

Head Clerks 

Head Administrative Clerk . 
Hearing Stenographers 

Hostlers 

Janitresses 

Junior Building Custodians . 
Matron, Chief .... 

Matron, Assistant Chief 
Matrons, Police .... 
Medical Examiner .... 
Motor Equipment Repairmen 
Multilith Operator 
Multilith Operator and Cameraman 



Employees of the Department (Not Included in Above) 

Principal Clerks 



I 
I 

7 
I 

7 
18 

I 

6 
6 
6 

49 
I 

I 

9 

I 

17 

I 



Principal Clerk-Typists 

Principal Clerk-Stenographers .... 

Principal Statistical Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian 

Senior Clerk-Typists 

Senior Clerk-Stenographers 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator . 

Statistical Machine Operators .... 

Steam Firemen 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 

Telephone Operators 

Working Foreman and Motor Equipment 
Repairman 

School Traffic Supervisors 



3 
I 

4 

I 

20 



2 

5 
2 

I 

I 

I 

II 
2 
I 

10 

7 

I 

13 



57 



Total 249 



During the year 2 sergeants, 22 patrolmen resigned; i sergeant, 2 patrolmen were dismissed; i lieutenant- 
detective was promoted to deputy superintendent, 2 lieutenants to captains, 3 sergeants to lieutenants, and 17 
patrolmen to sergeants; i lieutenant assigned as lieutenant-detective, 7 sergeants assigned as sergeant-detectives, 
2 detectives second grade assigned as detectives first grade, i detective third grade assigned as detective second 
grade, 18 patrolmen assigned as detectives third grade, and i detective third grade assigned as patrolman; 3 deputy 
superintendents, 4 captains, 7 lieutenants, 19 sergeants, and 68 patrolmen were retired on pensions; 4 sergeants, and 
13 patrolmen died. 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1962, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual Ball of the Boston Police Relief 
Association held at the Boston Garden, December 4, 1962, as follows: 




Thf Wdlter Scoll Medal for Valor, a Department Medal of 
Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award to Patrolman 
Vincent D. Kelly of Division Xine 

On August I, 1962, Patrolman Vincent D. Kelly of 
Division 9, while off duty operating his own automobile 
near Thompson square in Charlestown, observed a parked 
car and a man standing nearby, both answering a teletype 
description issued in connection with an assault with intent 
to murder which had occurred less than an hour before in 
the Roxbury District. Keeping the man under observation, 
Patrolman Kelly parked his car and followed the suspect, 
whom he believed to be armed, into a nearby store. 

Taking every precaution for the safety of the public in 
this busy area, Patrolman Kelly confronted the suspect, 
identified himself as a police officer, and, at gunpoint, dis- 
anned the man and placed him under arrest. 

This dangerous felon, who was armed with a loaded 
revolver, was captured within a short time following the 
commission of his crime as the result of the keen observation, 
good judgment, and courage displayed by Patrolman 
Kelly. 

On September 25, 1962, in Suffolk Superior Court, this 
criminal was convicted and sentenced to the State Prison. 



RICHARD CARDINAL GUSHING PRESENTS 

WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR TO 

PATROLMAN VINCENT D. KELLY 




DEPUTY MAYOR HENRY A. SCAGNOLI PRESENTS MEDAL OF HONOR 
TO PATROLMAN GEORGE F. SHAMON 



Department Medals of Honor and Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 

Patrolmen George F. Shamon and Albert J. Hurst of Division 2 are hereb}' awarded a Department Medal 
of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious service performed on October 20, 1961. 

On October 20, 1961, Patrolmen George F. Shamon and Albert J. Hurst of Division 2, assigned to special 
duty as employees of the Beneficial Finance Company, 8 Winter street, Boston, due to recurrence of armed robberies 
at this location, observed a man enter the office, draw a pistol, and approach the assistant manager, asking, ''Where's 
the money?," at the same time brandishing the pistol in a threatening manner at employees within the office en- 
closure where these officers were secreted. 

Patrolman Shamon, his service revolver in his right hand and concealed by his body, lunged at the gunman, 
who whirled and jammed his pistol in the officer's stomach. During the struggle both men fell to the floor, and 
Patrolman Hurst rushed to the aid of Patrolman Shamon. Both officers quickly subdued the gunman, disarmed 
him, and placed him under arrest. 

The prisoner admitted having committed five previous armed robberies at the same location during a 
period of approximately three years and had obtained about $6,200 in the commission of these crimes. 

On December 7, 1961, this criminal was sentenced in Suftolk Superior Court to a long term in State Prison. 



lO 



Patrolmen Gregory Mazares and Patrick J. Spillane of Division 4 are hereby awarded a Department Medal 
of Honor and the Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious service performed on January 9, 1962. 

On Januar}- g, 1962, Patrolmen Gregory Mazares and Patrick J. Spillane of Division 4, performing plain- 
clothes dutv, received information that a man wanted in connection with an armed robVjery was in the vicinity 
of Washington street and Broadway. They immediately proceeded to that location and, while searching a parking 
lot, observed a man hiding between an automobile and a brick wall. 

Patrolman Spillane identified himself as a police officer, whereupon the man attempted to shoot, but his 
weapon failed to fire. The officer leaped to the side of the vehicle and called to Patrolman Mazares, in another 
section of the lot, for assistance. Patrolman Mazares responded on the run, and the man again attempted to 
shoot, but the weapon did not fire. 

After a struggle, the officers took the criminal into custody, seized his weapon and a box containing forty 
rounds of cartridges. 

The prisoner was sentenced in Superior Court on February 21, 1962, to the State Prison. 




COMMISSIONER EDMUND L. McNAMARA PRESENTS MEDAL OF 
HONOR TO PATROLMAN PATRICK J. SPILLANE 



Patrolman Wilbur Feyler, Jr., of Division 10 is hereby awarded a Department Medal of Honor and the 
Thomas F. Sullivan Award for meritorious duty performed on January 24, 1962. 

On January 24, 1962, Patrolman Wilbur Feyler, Jr., Division 10, while on patrol duty in the early morning, 
observed hea\^- smoke pouring from a three-story apartment building. Without regard for his personal safety, 
Patrolman Feyler ran into the building and, by knocking and calling loudly at each apartment door, he aroused 
all twelve occupants, who fled to safety in the street. While aiding in the rescue, Patrolman Feyler collapsed from 
smoke inhalation and was removed to the Boston City Hospital. 

As a result of a finding by the District Fire Chief that the fire was of suspicious origin, a subsequent in- 
vestigation culminated in the arrest of one of the rescued occupants on suspicion of arson. On April 12, 1962, in 
Superior Court, this man was convicted and sentenced to the State Prison. 

The courage and alertness of Patrolman Feyler on this occasion was responsible for the saving of many 
lives and prevented the destruction of this building and adjoining property. 



II 




3n iWemoriam 

Patrolman John J. Gallagher 

1929- 1962 

Appointed May II, 1955 



On May 25, 1962, Patrolman John J. Gallagher took his place among our departed 
heroic police officers who died while in performance of their duty when during 
the early moniing hours he suffered fatal gunshot wounds while apprehending 
a felon who was committing a bank burglary. 



Eequiegcat in ^ace 



12 

WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

ARRESTS 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a separate person, was 92,818. 

There were 15,819 arrests on warrants and 31,476 without warrants; 45,523 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 81,444; of females, 11,374. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 45,953. The amount of fines totaled $181,209. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 34,658, and the witness fees earned amounted 
to $29,913. 

There were 23,210 persons arrested for drunkenness. 

There were 242 committed to the State Prison; 1,348 to the House of Correction; 102 to Concord Reform- 
atory; 1,160 to Bridgewater Reformatory; 82 to the Women's Reformatory; 367 to the Youth Service Board; and 
2,188 to the County Jail. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was $139,254. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to 85,135,115, and the value recovered amounted to 
$3.o49>429- 




A FRIEND INDEED 



13 



DETECTIVE BUREAU 

The Detective Bureau is composed of several units, namely, Automobile, Ballistics, Chemical Laboratory, 
Homicide, Lost and Stolen Property, Identification, and Missing Persons. 

In addition, special squads are assigned to cover the following phases of police work and investigations: 
lianking, express thieves, general investigation, holdups, hotels, narcotics, vice and obscene literature, pawnbrokers, 
junk shops, second-hand dealers, pickpockets, shoplifters, domestic relations, and subversive activities. 

Members of this Bureau investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also handle cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a year 
for various police departments throughout the LInited States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate in 
every way possible with outside police departments in investigation of crime and prosecution of criminals. 



AUTOMOBILE UNIT 

This unit investigates all reports of automobiles stolen and is in daily communication with police au- 
thorities of the United States and Canada. Many investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, Post Ofifice Department, and immigration authorities of the United States. 

The Automobile Unit Index contains records of cars stolen in Boston, cars stolen in other places, cars 
reported purchased and sold, cars for which owners are wanted, cars used by missing persons, and cars whose opera- 
tors are wanted for various offenses. Many arrests are made by officers of the department and the Automobile 
Unit through information obtained from this index. 

All applications for used car dealers' licenses are investigated by officers of this unit. Frequent examina- 
tions are made to ascertain if used car dealers are conforming to the conditions of their licenses. 

Using mechanical appliances and chemicals, members of this unit during the j'ear identified a number of 
automobiles which were recovered or found abandoned on police divisions, restoring them to their owners, and have 
assisted in solving many crimes by means of their positive identifications. 



Record of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year 
Ending December 31, 1962 







Recovered 






Month 


Reported 


During 


Reco\-ered 


Not 




Stolen 


Month 


Later 


Recovered 


January 


597 


586 


7 


4 


February 










371 


349 


10 


12 


March 










522 


480 


17 


25 


April 










514 


475 


18 


21 


May 










467 


391 


35 


41 


June 










458 


386 


43 


29 


July . . 










457 


381 


65 


II 


August 










544 


491 


38 


IS 


September 










489 


451 


21 


17 


October . 










575 


527 


31 


17 


November 










526 


482 


26 


18 


December 










590 


503 





87 


Totals .... 


6,110 


5,502 


311 


297 



14 

HOMICIDE UNIT 

Personnel assigned to this unit supervise the investigation of homicide cases and deaths of a suspicious or 
violent nature. They are assigned to procure and present evidence at inquests. Transcripts of statements re- 
ceived by these officers from witnesses and defendants are prepared for use as evidence in trials of capital cases. 

Investigated 

Abortions 7 Falls 18 

Accidental i Homicides 



Stillborn i 

Suicides 23 



52 

Asphyxiation 9 M. T. A 2 

Burns 17 Motor vehicles 37 

Drowning 7 Natural causes 1,368 

Drugs (overdose) i 

Elevator 2 

Falling objects i Total i,S46 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 

Abortion 3 

Accessory before fact to abortion i 

Assault and battery 21 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 38 

Assault and battery with dangerous weapon 28 

Assault with intent to murder 14 

Conspiracy 4 

Homicide 38 

Robbery 13 

Violation of firearm law 22 

Recapitulation of Homicides 

I Defendant committed suicide after commission of murder 

1 Defendant — warrant issued at Roxbury Court for murder — not apprehended 

2 Defendants charged with murder — still pending in lower court 

7 Defendants charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court 

1 Defendant charged with murder — reduced to manslaughter in lower court — Grand Jury action pending 

2 Defendants charged with murder — still awaiting Grand Jury action 

I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for assault and battery — pleaded guilty to assault and battery 
I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for assault and battery — found guilty of assault and battery 

3 Defendants charged with murder — ''No Bill," Grand Jury 

I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pending trial in Superior Court 

6 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pleaded guilty to manslaughter 

3 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pending trial in Superior Court 

5 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to murder, second 

degree — sentenced to life imprisonment 
I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — not apprehended 
ID Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — pending trial in Superior Court 

( Fort3'-six defendants involved in thirty-eight homicides) 
14 Murder cases still under investigation 

3 Defendants indicted for murder, first degree, for seven arson deaths of previous years — pending trial in Su- 
perior Court 

LOST AND STOLEN PROPERTY 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities and 
towns throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen in such places. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of articles 
reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the recovery of 
thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



15 

NARCOTICS AND VICE UNIT 

The Narcotics and Vice Unit is charged wath the investigation and prosecution of persons who commit 
crimes against chastity, morality, decency, and good order, involving the unlawful sale, distribution, and use of 
narcotic drugs and derivatives and the importing, printing, publishing, selling, distributing, or exhibiting of obscene 
or impure literature, prints, pictures, etc. This unit also cooperates with federal agencies in the investigation of 
interstate prostitution and transportation of narcotic drugs and obscene literature. 

Investigations 

Narcotic Drug Law violations .... 429 Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. . 20 

Prostitution and related ofTenses 536 

Pretended fortunetelling 2 Total 987 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the Narcotics and Vice Unit Secured Evidence 

Illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs . . . 288 Pretended fortunetelling 2 

Prostitution and related offenses .... 368 

Obscene literature, prints, pictures, etc. . 20 Total 678 

Recapitulation 

Narcotic Drug Violations: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined . 128 Found not guilty 26 

Suspended sentence . . . . 103 Cases pending 8 

Placed on file 23 ' 

Total 288 

Prostitution and Related Offenses: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined . 141 Found not guilty 32 

Suspended sentence . . . . 117 Cases pending 41 

Placed on file 37 

Total 368 

Obscene Literature, Prints, Pictures, etc.: 

Sentenced to institutions or fined . 19 Suspended sentence .... o 

Placed on file i 

Found not guilty o Total 20 

Pretended Fortunetelling: 

Found guilty and fined .... 2 

Members of this unit have worked in close cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal 
Narcotic Bureau, Post Office Department, Alcohol Tax Unit of the Federal Government, the District Attorney's 
Office, as well as the state and local police departments. 

Officers of this unit have appeared at thirtj'-one engagements to speak before various civic, religious, and 
educational groups on narcotic problems. A complete exhibition of narcotic and harmful drugs is on display in 
this office. Visiting law enforcement officers as well as civilians on tour of PoHce Headquarters are shown this 
display as part of education in problems of narcotic law enforcement. 

"THE PROTECTION OF LIFE" 






i6 




THE HUNDRED CLUB 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the year 1959 a group of philanthropic businessmen fcirr.ed an organization known as '"The 
Hundred Chil) of Massachusetts." 

Tlie prime function of this organization is to provide financial assistance to the widows and dependents 
of policemen and firefighters who have lost their lives in the Hne of duty. 

The Boston Police Department expresses its gratitude and appreciation to ''The Hundred Club" for the 
in\'aluable assistance rendered to the families of police officers who have given their lives in the service of this 
community. 



DOMESTIC RELATIONS UNIT 

The following arrests were made by this unit in the course of their regular duties from January i, 1962, 
to December 31, 1962: 

Nonsupport of family 220 

Violation Illegitimate Child Act 188 

Violation terms of probation — nonsupport 127 

Violation terms of probation — Illegitimate Child Act 122 

Default — nonsupport 36 

Assault and battery 17 

Arrest outside police department 16 

Larceny by fraud 13 

Fugitive from justice 3 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 3 

Unarmed robbery 3 

Assault and battery with dangerous weapon 2 

Threats to do bodily harm 2 

Neglect of minor children 2 

Rape 

Abuse of female child 

Desertion of family 

Polygamy 

Drunkenness 

Altering checks (Secret Service, Federal) 

Defrauding Social Security (Federal) 

Total 76 

Of the total arrests by this unit, 218 persons were committed to the House of Correction ranging fron 
three months to four years; 216 were placed on suspended sentences, ranging from three months to one year and a 
half; and 307 were placed on probation ranging from one month to six years. 

Amount of money ordered by the various courts in restitution to the City of Boston Welfare Department, 
in cases prosecuted by members of this unit, amounted to $23,606.96. 

Amount of money ordered by the \'arious courts to be paid through the Probation Departments amounted 
to $336,392. 

Amount of money resulting from persons removed from the welfare rolls of the Citj- of Boston and orders 
of partial support and full support of families amounted to $359,998.96. 

Members of this unit have investigated 2,409 welfare cases in this past year that have been referred to 
this unit by the welfare authorities, where it was suspected there might be evidence of fraud or collusion. Investiga- 
tion in a number of these cases is still continuing. 



17 

BALLISTICS UNIT 

Personnel consists of members of the Detective Bureau expert in ballistics, explosives, and munitions. 
All evidence found at the scene of crime where fireanris or explosives were used is examined. Suspected weapons 
are catalogued, fired for test and comparison purposes, and spent bullets and discharged cases from these weapons 
are filed. Cases involving ballistic evidence are prepared and presented in the various courts. 

This unit responds to all calls where threats of bombing are received and makes a thorough examination 
of the premises to make certain that no bombs are planted thereon. 

All department firearms, accessories pertaining to same, and tear gas equipment have been inspected 
and serviced. 

All firearms held as evidence pending disposition by the courts are recorded. 

Stolen firearms are traced and whenever possible are returned to the rightful owners. A file is kept on 
stolen firearms, and checks are made against the file at the Lost and Stolen Property Unit and at the files of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Safety. 

When firearms property of the United States are found used in crime or recovered otherwise, such j)roperty 
is returned to the proper military or naval authorities after cases are disposed of by the courts. 

This unit works in cooperation with other ])olice departments, federal agencies, military and naval in- 
telligence units. 

Emergency Equipment 

All police divisions and several units have on hand a supply of emergency equipment consisting of 1 2-gauge 
riot shotguns, ammunition, belts with bayonets attached, bulletproof vests, tear gas gun kit and assembly, and gas 
masks which provide complete respiratory protection for the wearer in all oxygen-deficient or highly gaseous 
atmospheres. 

Harbor Police Division is equipped with line-throwing guns and rifles. 

Periodic inspections are made and equipment replaced whenever necessary. 

During the past year this unit assisted in 80S cases as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths 14 

Armed robbery 62 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 105 

Bomb scares 71 

Bombs, explosives, etc 18 

Bullets recovered, no other crime involved 15 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc. 74 

Firearms, discharging within city limits 6 

Firearms law, violation of 166 

Murder 15 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 5 

Suicide, attempt 2 

Test specimens from other departments, examined 102 

Weapons examined and held for safekeeping 16 

Weapons examined and returned to owners 42 

Weapons found, disposal, etc. 95 

Total 808 

DETROIT PUBLIC \Mf^ 



i8 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMIST— CRIME LABORATORY 

TIk' work performed in the laboratory is highly varied in its nature, the frequency of any particular type 
being governed by the circumstances of the cases. The following is a comjjilation of the various tests and ex- 



aminations performed jnirsuant to case investigations, and indicates the genera 

Material Number 

Sought of Tests 

Acetaldehyde i 

Acid phosphatase g 

Alcohol, ethyl 336 



scope of the laboratory. 



Alcohol, methy] 
Alkalies . ' . 
Barbiturates . . 
Blood typing .... 
Bloodstains .... 
Carbon monoxide . 
Casts, plaster .... 
Charred materials . 
Cloth patterns 

Clothing 

Density gradients . 
Dirt and debris 
E.xplosives and residues 

Fibres 

Fingernail scrapings 

Firebrick 

Glass 

Hair 

Hydrocyanic acid . 
Laundr}" marks 

Mercury 

Ninhydrin .... 

Paint 

Paraldehyde .... 
Photographs, black and white 
Photographs, color . 
Photographs, infrared 
Photographs, ultraviolet 



Year 

1958 

1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 



17 
21 

529 

20 

2 

3 
6 

99 
I 

5 
7 

ID 

2 

15 

5 

15 

I 

3 
2 



23 

18 



Material 
Sought 
Physical matching . 
Powder residue, cloth 
Powder residue, other 
Rectographs 
Restoration of: 

Impressions . 

Oblique lighting 

Obliterated serial numbers 

Iodine fuming 

Iodine solution 

Other . 
Rope and cordage 
Scene examinations 
Starch 
Shoe-prints 
vSilver nitrate . 
Spectrography 
Spermatazoa . 
Tire marks 
Tissue 

Tool marks and tools 
Tj-pewriter comparison 
Ultraviolet examination 
Vehicle examination 
Weapons : 

Cutting instruments 

Blunt instruments 

Other . 
Woods and metals . 
Miscellaneous . 



Number 
of Tests 
3 

S 
4 
3 

7 
6 

7 
6 

5 
I 
I 

71 
I 

28 
I 
I 

3 
6 

4 

28 

2 

15 

27 

19 
5 
7 
3 

91 



Cases 



Medical 
Examiners 



Department 
87 




Total 
442 
484 
468 

403 
539 



SPEED KILLS 



19 



^V^^^ 


Pi 




!■ 




Pv^ 


^^^^^^^^^^^-HR^^^^^^^I 







THE RESCUER BEING RESCUED 
IDENTIFICATION UNIT 



Records — Activities 

Recorded in the Main Index File 882,875 

Recorded in the Female Record File 23,417 

Recorded in the Male Record File 243.393 

Photography 

Number of photographs on file January i, 1962 776,876 

Made and filed during the year 1 8,45 5 

Number of '' foreign " photographs on file January i, 1962 18,398 

Number of ''foreign" photographs received during the year 1,680 

Total 815,409 

Number on file in the '' Local Segregated " file (gallery) *53>762 

Number on file in the ''Foreign Segregated" file *i5)2i9 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) nS 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 25 

Scenes of crime photographed 599 

Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 7!382 

Other cities and towns 2,950 

Number of rectigraph photographs 5)347 

Number of negatives of criminals 6,683 

Number of prints made from same 33)415 

Number of photographs of police officers (old photographs updated) 1)73^ 

Number of scenes of crime visited 2,480 

Number of exposures (4" x 5" camera) 2,995 

Number of prints of same 8,985 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 2,270 

Number of prints from same 4)540 

Number of reorders of criminal photographs 3)57° 

Number of standup photographs made 61 

Prints made from same 183 

* The HciKUcs Oallery is being constantly up iatcii hy removing from the Hies numerous photographs considered to be too old 
to be used f(jr identification purposes. 



20 

Color Photography 

Color ''mug" plioto<,'rai)hs on file December 31, 1 96 1 13,189 

Made and filed tluring the year 3,693 

Total "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1962 16,882 

Miscellaneous color ])hotographs taken and processed (scenes of violence, homicide, etc.) ... 472 

Fingerprint File 

Number on file December 3 1 , 1961 219,939 

Taken and filed during the year: 

Male 6,272 

Female 768 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 1,964 

Female 282 

Number on file December 3 1 , 1962 229,225 

Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 6,683 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 6,683 

Other cities and towns 73 

P'ingerprints taken other than of crmiinals: 

Police officers o 

Special police officers 1,084 

Hackney carriage drivers 2,062 

Civilian employees 69 

Firearms Act (revolver licenses) 1,269 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1 96 1 97,201 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1962 101,616 

Five-Finger System of Fingerprinting 

Number of 5-finger cards in file December 3 1 , 1962 22,002 

Number of main-index cards cross-indexed to 5-finger system, December 31, 1962 11,001 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in Identification Section, December 31, 1962 . i,i35 

Number of connections made by latent prints since system established 440 

Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone and personal inquiries made over the counter 9,472 

Requests received by correspondence *4,2 7o 

Requests for certified records 1,680 

Requests for jury records 2,546 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 10,943 

Total 28,911 

Requests received from various public agencies: 

Stragglers and deserters (armed forces) 730 

Auxiliary police applicants i 

Grand Total 29,642 

Missing Persons 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston ti,i32 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 1,052 

Total number still missing 80 

* Tliis inchidps requests Injm :ili hraiiches of tlie urmed services and cmnpaiiies throughout the country engage<l in deleiise work. 

t Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agoiici(;s and numerous cases of children reported missing who 
were found or returned within a few hours after report was made. 



21 





Age and Sex 


of Persons Reported 


Missing in 


Boston 






Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, under 21 years 

Over 21 years 


206 
207 
219 


125 
201 

174 


191 
196 


120 
194 
I5« 


15 
14 
23 


5 

7 

16 


Totals 


632 


500 


SSo 


472 


52 


28 



Reported missing in Boston 1,132 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 6,940 

Reported missing and returned same day (locally) 1,07 7 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 2,376 



Div 
Div 
Divi 
Divi 
Div; 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Div 
Divi 



Total number of persons reported missing 

Persons Reported Missing by Police Divisions for Past Year 

sion I (North End section) 

sion 2 (Downtown section) 

sion 3 (West End section) 

sion 4 (South End section) 

sion 6 (South Boston) 

sion 7 (East Boston) 

sion 8 (Harbor Police) 

sion q (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

sion 10 (Roxbury Crossing section) 

sion 1 1 (Adams Street section of Dorchester) 

sion 13 (Jamaica Plain) 

sion 14 (Brighton) 

sion 15 (Charlestown) 

sion 16 (Back Bay) 

sion 17 (West Roxbury) 

sion iS (Hyde Park) 

sion 19 (Mattapan) 

Total 




ii>52S 



5 
o 

14 

lOI 

99 

47 

o 

211 

13s 
153 
55 
87 
30 
30 
38 
50 
77 



1. 132 



EARLY MORNING RESCUE 



22 

Persons interviewed *3i9 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 550 

In no cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, So were identified through fingerprint impressions. 
There were no reports of persons afflicted with amnesia. 



Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 6,504 

Warrants received from other Massachusetts Departments for service in Boston i)339 

Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston .... 106 

Total warrants received for service in Boston 7.949 

Warrants sent out for service to divisions and units within the department 6,228 

Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts 1,038 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts . . 221 

Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this department 462 

Total warrants processed 7>949 

Warrants returned without service to our divisions and units 1,067 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 810 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 6,072 



Summonses 

Total number received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 7,i57 

Total number served 6,645 

Total number not served 512 

Total number of summonses sent from the Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 35,5 10 

Total number served 32,404 

Total number not served 3, 106 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

Two multilith machines under direct supervision of two experienced operators enable this department to 
prepare and complete printing of circulars containing photographs and fingerprints of persons either reported 
massing or wanted for criminal offenses. These multilith machines are also used to print department fonns. 

The multilith machine unit is completely equipped with camera, arc Hghts, and vacuum frame, which add to 
the varied output of this machine. Both machines are capable of printing in approximately two hours' time de- 
scriptive circulars of persons wanted. In some instances circulars are completed and mailed to outside cities before 
a fugitive arrives at his destination. One of these multilith machines has the capability of making impressions on 
both sides of a card or paper simultaneously. 

This unit also has a high-speed electric addressograph machine and two electric mimeograph machines 
which are used to make daily manifolds, warrant manifolds, bulletins, and circular letters for the various units and 
divisions, including Police School lessons. 

•Does not include those interviewed at the various units and divisions of the department. 



23 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The Traffic Division is responsible for the control of traffic and the enforcement of parking regulations in 
the area of the city within the boundaries of Divisions i, 2, 4, and 16, and the traffic post on Commonwealth 
avenue at Boston University Bridge, Division 14. It is responsible for the prevention and investigation of traffic 
accidents throughout the city and for the over-all supervision of traffic arrangements for major parades, public 
celebrations, and events of a similar nature. It pro\'ides a safety patrol which functions on a citv-wide basis. 

Total registrations in the Commonwealth reached a figure of 1,941,063 at October 31, 1962, reflecting an 
increase of 59,749 registrations (3.2 percent) over the corresponding figure at October 31, 1961, of 1,881,314. 

Notices of parking violations issued by the Boston Police Department during the year amounted to 
638,067, of which figure 318,281 were issued by the Traffic Di\-ision. Corresponding figures for the year of 1961 
are 626,477 ^"d 352,399, respectively. 

Vehicles towed by the Traffic Division during the year amounted to 44.432, an increase of 1,286 over the 
previous year. 

Court prosecutions by the Traffic Division for the year totaled 31,268, an increase of 4,958 over the cor- 
responding figure for 1961. 

Parking fines paid at the Central Municipal Court for the year amounted to $842,007. The total for the 
year 1961 was $498,832, reflecting an increase of $343,175, due, in part, to the increased schedule of fines which 
was in effect for the entire j-ear of 1962. 

Parking meter revenue also showed a substantial increase. The figures released by the Traffic and Parking 

Commission are as follows: 

Year Ending Year Ending 

Dec. 31, 1962 Dec. 31, 1961 Increase 

Area north and east of Massachusetts avenue . . . $633,165.11 $412,055.05 .$221,110.06 



Entire citv 



833>967-7i 






560,880.38 - -273,087.33 



In connection with the increase shown it is to be noted that the ten-cent meter was in effect during the 
entire year of 1962. 



IS3| 







M-i SAFETY EDUCATION 



24 



The M-i Safety Squad of the Traffic Division provided daily programs of safety talks and demonstrations 
in the city schools throughout the year. This program is augmented by appearances of the squad at the various 
playgrounds during school vacation periods. A weekly radio program of safety subjects and presentations on the 
general theme of safety was broadcast through the facilities of Station WORL. The casts are composed of school 
children and the skits prepared through the cooperation of school personnel. 

Special traffic details and escorts were provided for the following-named distinguished visitors to our city: 
President John F. Kennedy, ex-President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Kind Saud of Arabia, the President 
of the Ivory Coast Republic, Ambassadors of France, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, Mexico, and Norway, the 
Minister of Liberia, the Mayors of BerHn and Tokyo, National Commanders of the American Legion and the 
Marine Corps League, the Cardinal Archbishop of Boston, the Archbishop of Greece, the Patriarch of Lebanon, 
\-arious members of the Congress of the United States and representatives of federal bureaus, the governors of the 
States of New Hampshire and Washington, actors Danny Thomas, Van Johnson, Sammy Davis, Jack Bailey, 
Marv Griffin, Rex Trailer, plus numerous civic and student groups. 



AUXILIARY SCHOOL PATROL 

In September of this year there was established within the department an Auxiliary School Patrol con- 
sisting of fifty-eight uniformed female school traffic supervisors, who were appointed special police officers for that 
purpose. 




Although the prime responsibiHty of the school traffic 
supervisors is the protection of children going to and from 
school, they have been appointed special police officers for 
the sole purpose of enforcing in the areas adjacent to schools 
and school crossings those statutes, city ordinances, and 
traffic ndes and regulations which specifically relate to the 
operation, parking, and use of motor vehicles. 

School traffic supervisors are not members of the regular 
police force, nor does the position come within the purA'iew 
of the civil service laws and rules. The appointment is for 
the duration of the school year, the hours of duty are inter- 
mittent, and compensation is on a per diem basis. School 
traffic supervisors are under the direct supervision of dis- 
trict commanders. 

During the short period of time the Auxiliary School 
Patrol has been in existence it has proven to be highly effi- 
cient and useful and has made possible the use of more 
police officers for the prime police function of preventing 
crime and apprehending criminals. 



GUARDIAN OF THE CROSSING 



25 

CENTRAL COMPLAINT AND 
RECORDS BUREAU 

The Central Complaint Room has control over all communications consisting of telephone, teletype, 
radio, and telegraph. 

There were 571,787 outgoing telephone messages and 4,011 toll calls made by the department through 
our switchboard; 395,848 emergency messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through either 
DE 8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 553,714 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 271,463 teletype messages and 
6qi telegrams were processed, 14.540 of these relating to missing persons; 19,731 automobiles and registration 
plates were reported lost or stolen, and 17,836 were reported recovered; 667,556 radio messages were sent. 

On an average month some 56,000 radio messages are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. A soundscriber records accurately each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an inii5ortant administrative record of same. 

CENTRAL RECORDS 

The Central Records Section is located on the fourth floor of Police Headquarters. With its modem IBM 
data-processing machines, it prepares accurate and detailed reports and exerts control over all departmental re- 
porting procedures, which are forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

Valuable information concerning the incidence and frecjuency of various types of crime is prepared in 
delail by machine operation and forwarded to division commanders for their information and guidance. This 
information has resulted in increased efficiency in the field of crime detection. 

Over $25,602 was realized for work permits and requests for records during this period, and 634,376 park- 
ing violations mailed. 

The new Xerox copier machine installed at the statistical unit reproduced over 70,000 copies of various 
reports and documents. This machine has saved many man-hours in report writing and administrative tasks. 




POLICE ACADEMY 



The Police Academy is maintained for promoting the 
efficiency of the department through the indoctrination of 
recruits in basic routines and techniques. 

On appointment, new patrolmen pursue an intensive 
eight weeks' course of study under the direction of experi- 
enced superior officers. Regular courses in conduct, disci- 
pline, care of department equipment, use of revolvers and 
clubs, report writing, procedure with regard to violators of 
law and/or ordinances are supplemented by the appearance 
of qualified speakers, specialists in their fields, to acquaint 
the new officers with such subjects as radiation detection, 
first aid, judo, the i)roper handling of traffic, etc. 



BOSTON'S FINEST ON PARADE 



26 



CRIME PREVENTION BUREAU 

The Crime Pre\'eiUion Bureau operates for the prevention of dcHnquency among juveniles and maintains 
;i program of constant cooperation witli all other agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of malad- 
justed children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to climin;ite factors that induce criminal tendencies 
among children. 

2. In this program enlist the aid of the general jjuhlic, all child welfare agencies, divisions and units of 
this department. 

3. Teacli good citizenship, develop a proper mental attitude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies, 
and especially educate the public and the police in the problems of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile 
crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children, investigating 
and taking the necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotels, bus and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of people congregate. 

6. Promote welfare of children, the sick, the aged, and the needy, locating missing persons. 

7. Investigate cases concerning boys and girls and assist in the investigation of cases in which women are 
involved. 

Summary of Work Accomplished 

The juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,687 male and 28Q female juveniles in the following age 
groups : 

Age 7 



8 





10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


IS 


16 


Total 


8 


26 


49 


66 


125 


214 


338 


42S 


431 


1,687 











3 


16 


38 


79 


84 


69 


289 



Male 2 

Female o 

In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way involved in 
vmlawful acti\4ties concerning juveniles, 289 male and 42 female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought to their respective stations, for questioning in regard to criminal oft'enses committed 
on each division, 3,488 male and 583 female juveniles. As a result of interrogation, together with personal inter- 
views with the parents of these children, it was determined for the best interests of the children, parents, and the 
city to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the City of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child, which is dramatically borne out by the fact that the number of recidivists 
still remain below i per cent. It is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston, with the child being 
returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first oiTenders, without having 
the stigma of a juvenile record attached to that child who, after the proper discipHnary action by the parents, would 
not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delinquency pattern again. 



27 

There were 6,368 cases processed by the Juvenile Bureau for this period, including the cases brought to 
court and the cases turned over to tha parents of the children for disciplinary a^tioa. 

This Bureau presented lectures to many different organizations in an effort to educate the public to the 
scope of juvenile delinquency, the elemsntary causes, the policies, plans, and procedures of the Crime Prevention 
Bureau as established by the Police Commissioner. The results of these lectures are reflected in many ways, such 
as the multitude of organizations which are now conducting campaigns against the sale of indecent literature and 
photographs to children, the organizations which are now offering athletic programs to children, and, most important 
of all, the supervisory interest that parents are now taking in their children. It cannot go without mention that 
the tremendous cooperation this bureau is receiving from the clerg\', the schools, and the agencies of Boston is 
directlv related to this program of acquainting the public with the juvenile delinquency problem in Boston. 

During the fiscal year the juvenile officers have personally contacted 4,371 persons who were engaged in 
some phase of children's welfare work in the City of Boston, including school teachers, librarians, court attaches, 
clergymen, boys' club and girls' club workers, and those people who staff the many agencies working for the better- 
ment of children. This phase of the program is to make all of these people more fully aware of the fact that the 
police are cognizant of their importance in the over-all battle against delinquency and realize that delinquency 
shall be defeated only by the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supen^isors of at- 
tendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officially recognized 
that truancy has decreased in Boston because of the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers, through their contact with the different agencies, 
have learned what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted by 
the agencies after a referral had been made to them by the cfficers who, because of their knowledge of the 
neighborhood of assignment, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report submitted in the year ig6i shows that this 
bureau processed and handled approximately the same number of cases, which, in the light of the reported upward 
trend on a national level, should be regarded as encouraging. 




TRAINING AND PREPAREDNESS 



28 



HACKNEY CARRIAGES 



Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, Hmits the number of hcenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the poHce year, January i, 1962, to December 31, 1962, due to changes of ownership and regrants, 
a total of *i,98i hcenses were granted. 

There were 281 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages, Of these 105 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 176 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive 
the same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 



Applications for carriage licenses received 

Carriages licensed (''renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 
Carriages licensed ("regrants") 




Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 

Carriages licensed — " changes of ownership " 

Carriage hcenses in effect December 31, 1962 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1962 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 

Carriages inspected 



*356 ■■regrants" 
Hackney Carriage Drivers 



Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 
Applications for drivers' licenses rejected . 



Drivers' licenses granted 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 27, of which revocations 9 were rescinded and the licenses restored, leaving 

the net figure shown of such revocations as 

Drivers' licenses in effect December 31, 1962 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1962 

(beginning of hackney carriage license j-ear) 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 

Articles found in carriages reported liy drivers 



CITY PRISON 



1,981 



1,981 
457 

lOI 

1,524 
2,102 



6,477 
161 

6,316 



6,227 
630 
281 



The City Prison is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within jurisdiction of the Central 
Municipal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper 
until the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year, January i, 1962, to December 31, 1962, 12,783 men were committed to the City Prison, 
as follows: 



Abuse of child .... 

Adultery 

Assault and battery . 
Breaking and entering 
Carrying firearm without license 

Default 

Drunkenness .... 
Fugitives from justice 

Illegitimacy 

Larceny 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 
Nonsupport 



I 

I 

29 

5 

4 

24 

11,770 

13 
1 1 

35 
I 

35 



Rape 

Robbery 

Safekeeping . 

Suspicious persons 

Trespassing . 

Vagrancy 

Violation of liquor law 

Violation of motor vel 

Violation of probation 

Miscellaneous 



icle 



aw 



I 
3 

78 
580 

4 
6 
2 

24 

16 

140 



Total 12,783 



One hundred and seventv-one male lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



lO 

22 



29 

HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset street. All 
women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention and, unless otherwise released, are held in 
charge of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county autliorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year 2,524 were committed as follows: 

Abandonment 3 Lewd and lascivious cohabitation ... 10 

Abortion 2 Neglect of children 6 

Adultery 11 Probation and parole, violation of ... iq 

Assault and battery 27 Runaways 

Delinquent children 4 Safekeeping 

Drug law, violation of 8 Stubborn children 14 

Drunkenness 1,736 Suspicious persons 325 

Fornication i Miscellaneous 191 

Idle and disorderly 42 

Larceny 93 Total 2,524 

Eight women lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 

Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 5S2. Of these 547 are connected with the underground system and 
35 with the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,829 trouble calls; inspected 582 signal boxes, 
16 signal desks, iS motor generator sets, 440 storage batteries. Repairs have been made on 233 box movements, 
29 registers, 167 locks, 27 time stamps, 22 vibrator bells, 36 relays, 47 electric fans, 47 motors, 16 generators. This 
unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and cciui])ment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 64 signal, 5S2 telephone, and 83 blinker-hght circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs 
throughout the department. It also maintains 48 headquarters-to-station house telephone circuits, iS teletype- 
, writer circuits, iS radio-wired broadcast circuits, 5 radio-car response circuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the 
Charlesbank Station of the Metropolitan District Police, and the intercommunication units throughout the depart- 
ment. 

Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending December 31, 1962 

(Included in Table XI) 

Payrolls $118,543.45 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 42,207.69 

Total $160,751.14 



30 



TACTICAL PATROL FORCE 

Laic in ig62 a new Tactical Patrol Force was organized in the department. The purpose of the Tactical 
Patrol Force is to provide a highly maneuverable foot patrol of police officers that will be readily available to 
augment the personnel of the several districts and units when required as the result of an unusual and temporary 
situation or in a sudden emergency. 

After high crime incidence areas of the city are determined, the Tactical Patrol Force is deployed into those 
areas to prevent crime and to apprehend criminals. For this purpose members of the Tactical Patrol Force work a 
flexible schedule of days and hours to conform with those days and hours within which crime incidence is high. 

The commanding officer and personnel of the Tactical Patrol Force were carefully selected and have com- 
pleted an intensive training course in physical fitness and tactical procedures. The office of the Tactical Patrol 
Force is located at Police Division i, 154 North street, Boston. 

HARBOR POLICE AND EMERGENCY 

SERVICE UNIT 

Harbor Service 

The duties performed by the Harbor Police, Division S, comprising the harbor and the islands therein, 
were as follows: 



Number of vessels boarded from foreign ports 1,052 
Number of vessels ordered from the channel 13 
Number of vessels permitted to discharge car- 
goes in stream 12 

Number of alarms of fire attended on water 

front 33(> 

Number of fires extinguished without alarm . 7 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted . 1 7 

Number of cases investigated .... 1,064 



Number of dead bodies recovered ... 10 
Number rescued from drowning ... 22 
Number of cases where assistance was ren- 
dered 236 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 42 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage . 1,761 

Number of dead bodies cared for . . . 10 

Number of hours grappling .... 43 
Value of property recovered, consisting of 

boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc. . . $27,235 



vSince January i, 1962, 709 vessels from domestic ports and 1,052 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the 
Port of Boston. 

Harbor Patrol Service 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police boats "William H. McShane," "William H. 
Pierce," "Patrol Boat 45," "Patrol Boat Protector," and a Chris-Craft patrol craft in the upper and lower harbors. 
Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay, and Neponset River. 

Emergency Service Unit 

This Division operates, on a 24-hour basis, the Emergency Service Unit truck, fully manned and equipped 
with emergency weapons, firearms, bomb blast mat, bulletproof clothing, lighting generators, power saw, acetylene 
cutting torch, "hydraulic rescue jacks, wheat lights, riot sticks, road-blocking equipment, rope and rescue tools, 
gas masks, chem'ox units, life belts, life lines, ladders, asbestos clothing, etc. 

The unit responds automatically to the scene of all fires in the city for which three or more alarms are 
sounded, all bomb and explosives reports, and to all requests for assistance from any division or unit requiring 
special tools, firearms, and equipment. 

The unit also operates the barrier truck, placing wooden barriers when and where they are requested by 
the several divisions. 



During the period commencing April 25, 1962 
responded to and assisted at the following incidents: 

Accidents, including automobile, construction 
jobs, live wires, elevator, train, M.T.A., 
etc. 

Arrests assisted in, on roofs, bridge structures, 
etc. 

Bomb and explosive reports .... 

Buildings in dangerous condition, street cave- 
ins, etc. 

Buildings and areas searched for armed per- 
sons, criminals, evidence, and weapons . 

Drownings - 

Evidence and weapons located in searches . 3 



63 

6 

37 



25 



and ending December 31, 1962, the Emergency Unit 

Fires for which three, four, or five alarms were 

sounded 27 

Illuminating gas and an:monia leaks . . 8 
Injured persons assisted at accidents . . 53 
Injured persons transported to hospitals 2 
Large public aftairs, demonstrations, presi- 
dential visits, etc 17 

Persons in the water 5 

Riots 2 

Suicide attempts 4 

Unfounded calls 5 

Barrier truck runs 34 

Barriers placed and picked up . . . • 252 



31 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 



There are 234 motor vehicles in ll:e service at the present time which are distn 


buted as follows: 


Divisions 


Combination 

Patrol and 

Ambulances 


Passens,'er 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


Motorcycles 


Totals 


Headquarters 

Division i 

Division 2 

Division 4 

Division 6 

Dixnsion 7 

Division 8 

Division g 

Division 10 

Division 11 

Division 13 

Division 14 

Division 15 

Division 16 

Division 17 

Division 18 

Division 19 

Traffic Division 

Pool 


2 
2 

3 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
I 
2 
I 
I 
2 

3 


3S 
4 
4 
8 

5 

S 
2 

7 
5 
6 

4 
5 
4 
5 
4 
4 

5 
8 

9 


13 
3 


I 
I 
4 
4 

I 
2 

3 
6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

21 


SI 
6 

7 
12 
II 
1 1 

5 
10 

9 

1 1 

12 

10 

5 

7 

8 

8 

10 

29 

12 


Totals 


31 


*i3-' 


ti6 


55 


234 



* Included in tlic total of 132 pa.'s.'^cngci' automobile.s there arc 17 station wagon:^. 
t Included in the total of 16 trucks there i.« a car-crane and a fork-lift at Divi.sion 8. 



COMBINATION AMBULANCES 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Divisions i, 2, 3, 
4, 6, 7, 9, 10, II, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey sick and injured persons to the following places: 

Boston City Hospital 
Massachusetts General Hospital . 
Calls where services were not required 
Boston State Hospital 
Carney Hospital .... 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 
East Boston Relief Station . 
Beth Israel Hospital ... 
United States Veterans' Hospital 
Children's Hospital ... 

Faulkner Hospital .... 

Home 

Southern Mortuary ... 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospitals 
Northern Mortuary ... 

Chelsea Naval Hospital 
Police station houses 
Boston Lying-in Hospital 
New England Hospital . 
Physicians' offices .... 
Roslindale General Hospital . 
St. Margaret's Hospital . 
Brighton Marine Hospital 
Deaconess Hospital 
Floating Hospital .... 
Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 
Longwood Hospital 
Pratt Diagnostic Hospital 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Lemuel Shattuck Hospital 



13.834 


Sullivan Square Medical Center 








15 


3.387 


Harlev Hospital .... 








1 1 


2.477 


Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 








10 


1.334 


New England Baptist Hospital 








10 


1.084 


United States Public Health Hospital 








10 


931 


Winthrop Community Hospital . 








y 


742 


Milton Hospital .... 








8 


659 


Glenside Hospital . 












6 


518 


Kenmore Hospital 












6 


460 


Boston Sanatorium . 












4 


407 


Brodkline Hospital . 












4 


296 


Parker Hill Hospital 












4 


286 


Somerville Hospital 












4 


286 


Bournewood Hospital 












3 


167 


Chelsea Memorial Hospital 










3 


109 


Metropolitan State Hospital 










3 


88 


Sancta Maria Hospital 










3 


82 


Brooks Memorial Hospital 










2 


69 


Cambridge City Hospital 










2 


66 


Mt. Auburn Hospital 










2 


66 


Soldiers' Home 










2 


62 


Washingtonian Hospital 










2 


57 


Hahnemann Hospital 












41 


Joslin Clinic 












41 


Lahey Clinic 












40 

34 


Melrose-Wakefield Hospital 












Waltham State Hospital 












20 


Whidden Memorial Hospital .... 
Total 




17 
■5 


27,834 



2>2 

PROPERTY CLERK 

'l"hc Property Clerk's Office is charged with the care of all police ImildiiiKS, lost, stolen, and aljandoned 
property, money or other property alleged to have been illegally obtained, and all articles and jjroperty taken from 
persons arrested for any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liriuor and gaming implements which come 
into the possession of the department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year 2^:59 motor vehicles came into custody of this office; 30 vehicles were released to legitimate 
claimants and 192 vehicles were sold at puljlic auction. There are now 119 motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department automoljiles is in operation on a 24-hour Ijasis. 
During the year, on 7,275 occasions, department cars were repaired, and, on 1,945 occasions, cars were serviced. 
There were 360 department cars and 250 privateh' owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department 
operates a motorcycle repair shop where, on 861 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the year. 

It is responsible for the insj)ection of all department vehicles, all garages in the various divisions, and is 
required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 

Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand January i, 1962 137 

Articles received during the year to December 31, 1962 220 

Total 357 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 47 

AVorthless 32 

Sold at public auction 72 

Total number of articles disposed of 151 

Total number of articles on hand December ^i, 1962 206 



ASSISTING THE SICK AND INJURED 



33 



PLANNING BOARD 



The successful operation of a large police department, with its complex duties and responsibilities, is a 
direct result of thorough planning and preparation. The thoroughness of planning and preparation, covering as 
many situations as human conduct and experience provide, will remove the necessity of quick decisions, which, 
although necessary, are often unsatisfactory. 

The chief administrator of a large police department is required to make numerous daily decisions covering 
all areas of police operations and procedures. These decisions directly affect such various functions as crime pre- 
vention methods, traffic control, personnel training and deportment, budget planning, and procurement. His 
judgment will determine the type, use, and methods of developing department statistics and records. 

Although the chief executive cannot relieve himself of the responsibility of making the foregoing de- 
cisions, he can take steps to insure that such decisions are the result of reflective planning. 

To this end the Boston Police Department in 1962 selected a body of men designated as the Planning 
Board. It is comprised of various officers possessing extensive experience in the fields of police patrol, traffic 
management, records and communications, personnel and training, inspectional services, and data processing. 



Miscellaneous Business 



1959-60 



1960-61 



1962 



Abandoned children cared for 
Buildings found open and made secure 
Dangerous buildings reported 
Dangerous chimneys reported 
Dead bodies recovered and cared for 
Defective drains and vaults reported 
Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 
Defective gas pipes reported 
Defective hydrants reported 
Defective sewers reported 
Defective street lights reported . 
Defective streets and walks reported 
Defective water pipes reported . 

Fire alarms given 

Fires extinguished 

Insane persons taken in charge . 
Lost children restored .... 
Number of persons committed to bail 
Persons rescued from drowning . 
Sick and injured persons assisted 
Street obstructions removed 
Water nmning to waste reported 



50 
2,402 

45 

4 

1,022 

5 
30 
II 

2 

31 

2S1 

619 

33 

11,093 

2,250 

1,453 

804 

2,658 

18 

22,160 

37 

05 



39 

1-799 

24 

4 

870 

3 

3 

10 

4 
22 

145 

623 

26 

10,786 

2,174 

1,183 

709 

2,544 

7 

22,235 

31 
91 



I, 



62 
,770 
29 
8 
,201 
8 
4 
4 
2 

14 

94 

574 

34 

14,522 

3,248 

1,585 

819 

2,721 

26 

28,346 

27 

131 



34 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Joseph W. Devi'ne is the Medical Examiner for the PoUce Department. A suite is provided on the 
seA'enth floor of PoHce Headquarters, which consists of the doctor's office, a fully equipped and modernized exami- 
nation and treatment room, a waiting room, and secretary's office. 

Upon entrance into the department, all persons certified for appointment by the Division of Civil Serv'ice 
either for the uniformed force or in ci\'ilian capacity, as well as those employed for ci\'ilian dutj- on a temporary 
basis, are examined, and a phj'sical report on each is submitted to the Police Commissioner. 

All members of the uniformed force are examined for injuries incurred either in the performance of duty or 
when off duty. Those members whose injuries bring about a period of absence and those incapacitated by a pro- 
longed illness are given a periodic examination. The diagnosis and prognosis in each case as to availability to 
perform police duty are submitted to the Police Commissioner with recommendations. Permanent records are 
maintained which aid in decisions affecting continuance in the ser\'ice or retirement, as the case may be. 

Preventive inoculations are administered by the Medical Examiner to the members of the force to meet 
any exigencj', such as in the case of an epidemic of influenza, poliomyelitis, etc. These immunizations are given on 
a voluntary basis. Also on a voluntary basis, and at various intervals, members of the force report to the Medical 
Department for the purpose of donating their blood to the American Red Cross. 

At the close of the j'ear 1962, over 3,000 members of the department received medical examinations, and 
reports bearing upon each case were submitted for the attention of the Police Commissioner and for the personnel 
record of each officer concerned. 




ASSACHUSETTS SaFETY CoUNCIL 



COMMENDS THE 

CITY OF BOSTON 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR ACTIVE SUPPORT OF TRAFFIC SAFETY 

BY PARTICIPATION IN THE 

ANNUAL INVENTORY OF TRAFFIC SAFETY ACTIVITIES 

OF THE NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL 
FOR THE YEAR 

1962 




( ^- - ^ t ^^7 ^" ^^-^^^^ 



35 




-«4;:>aS 


/,/ 1.. 




7,. 1 !.«..,(■„., /'..(.„,.; J _ ii ; .- 




.=?„ >.,,»,, .7..,./ a.„ 


- 


1% 



Department Assist for Jimmy Fund 
Commissioner McNamara, Joe Cronin, Red Sox 



Raised — $12,317.71 



"JLMMY" FUND 

The members of the Boston Police Department enriched the ''Jimmy" Fund Treasury by $12,317.71. 
The money is being used by the Jimmy Fund Hospital in a research program to help children afflicted with cancer. 



PRCTEl!? FOU.\D.ATIO.\. INC. 
*■ 1.^■GR.4T£FULC0\1.\IEM0R.\T1G.\■ 
ACK^0WLEDGES THE DEDICAIEC SES'-iCE CF MES 
1.N the' 
BOSTON POLICE DEP.4RTMEM 
FOS P.iRTiCIP.WION !N k .^SOLOKEC .^IDMES 
. SERIES GF SIUCIES CK HUMAN BLCOBFIASMA. 

:. THESE STUDIES RECuiKEs' 7:;;: ;::: 

■ BHIICIPANT ALIGW HIMSELF i: II :.-l l^V 
f WEEK. WITH, BIS CELLULAR BLC3D CCMPONESTS 
BEING iiETUSNED TS HIS SYSTEM. AN: HiS 
PLASMA RETAISED:BY iKYESi:;AT:=; 
FOE STUDY .AND USE. 

THE SUCCESS OF THESE INVESTIGATIONS HAS SEE-N' 
WHOLLY DEPENDENT UPON THE FAITHFULNESS 
AND CONFIDENCE OF DONORS RECRUITED FEO« 
THE RANKS OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



CHARIESA.JANEWAV 

saimsK BUEOoi 



i.li.JORDA:* 
PKSlDtST 



37 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1962 



38 



TABLE I— Total Number of Persons Arrested by Divisions and Units for All Types of Offenses, Covering Both 
Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending December 31, 1962 



Divisions 




I'eniales 



Division One . . . , 










l,Uo.J 


123 


2,058 


Division Two .... 










1,208 


251 


1,459 


Division Three* 










1,461 


158 


1,619 


Division Four .... 










11,245 


1,172 


12,417 


Division Six .... 










3,414 


157 


3,571 


Division Seven 










1,854 


172 


2,026 


Division Eiglit . 










s 


■ — 


8 


Division Nine . 










11,214 


1 ,797 


13,011 


Division Ten 










4,286 


369 


4,655 


Division Eleven 










4,620 


485 


5,105 


Division Thirteen 










1,870 


270 


2,140 


Division Fourteen 










2,682 


288 


2,970 


Division Fifteen 










2,867 


154 


3,021 


Division Sixteen 










4,741 


619 


5,360 


Division Seventeen . 










2,131 


261 


2,392 


Division Eighteen 










1 ,608 


191 


1,799 


Division Nineteen 










2,167 


193 


2,360 


Detective Bureau 










1,783 


607 


2,390 


Traffic Division 










20,302 


4,106 


24,408 


Superintendent's Office . 










48 


1 


49 


Totals 


81,444 


11,374 


92,818 


* CoasjlidaljJ with Uivisuiis 


L ;iui 


2, D.vjai, 


jr 0, 


LJj 


) 







Total: 



TABLE II— Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B,I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the Year Ending December 31, 1962 



Classificatiox of Offenses 


Offenses 
Reported 


Un- 
founded 


Actual 
Offen.ses 


Cleared 

by 
Arrest 


Not 
Cleared 


Reported Not 
Cleared 

Other Yeats 

Cleared by 

Arrests 


1. L'riminal homicide; 

(a) Alurder ami nouneghgeut 

manslaughter 
(6) Manslaughter bj- negligence 

2. Forcible rape .... 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated assault 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto 

theft') : 
(a) S50 and over in \ alue . 
(6) Under S50 in \n\ue 

7. Auto theft 


52 

59 

113 

780 

848 

4,199 

3,056 
6,190 
6,901 


17 
9 

50 

31 

240 

120 
282 
934 


52 
42 

104 

73U 

817 

3.959 

2,936 
5,908 
5,967 


37 
36 

79 

283 

631 

1.137 

592 
3,387 
1,020 


15 

6 

25 

447 

186 
2.822 

2,344 
2,521 
4,947 


6 


Totals 


22,198 


1,683 


20,515 


7,202 


13,313 


6 



39 



TABLE III— Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table 11 for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1962 



Type of Property 



Value of Property Stolen in Boston 




Currency, notes, etc. . 
Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing .... 
Locally stolen automobiles 
Miscellaneous 



1445,343 00 

185,221 00 

250,345 00 

205,848 00 

2,993,315 00 

1,055,043 00 



$28,985 00 

10,369 00 

80,642 00 

17,362 00 

2,726,006 00 

186,065 GO 



Totals 



3,135,115 GO 



5,049,429 GG 



TABLE IV Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table 11 and Value of Propertj Stolen b\ Type of Offense 

for the Year Ending December 31, 19o2 



Classification of Offenses 


Number of Actual 
Offenses 


Value of Property 
Stolen 


Robbery : 

(a) Highway (streets, alleys, etc.) 

(6) Commercial house (not c, d.S) 

(c) Oil station 

(rf) Chain store 

(r) Residence (anywhere on premises) 

(/) Bank 

(tf) Miscellaneous 


425 

133 

12 

10 

37 

1 

112 


$44,876 

43,044 

980 

5.342 

5.4.59 

1.200 

14.633 


Total — robbery 


730 


$115,534 


Burglary — breaking or entering: 
(a) Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 

(6) Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day 


469 
1.202 

2.107 
181 


$101,615 
273,753 

713,830 
30,449 


Total — burglary 


:i,f|.'i!) 


Sl.ll9,04r 


Larceny — Theft (except auto, by value) 

(a) $50 and over 

(6) S5 to $50 

(c) Under $5 


2.930 
2.870 
3.032 


$833,206 

68,617 

4,796 


Total — larceny 


8.844 


$900,619 


Auto Theft: 

('/) Joy-riding 

((i) All other 


4,472 
1,500 


$2,266,860 
726.455 


Total — auto theft 


5,972 


S2.993.313 


(irund Total 




S5,i:;.i.ii.5 



TABLE V — Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Theft for the Year Ending December 31, 1063 



.luf i-'f I'lupcrLj' 
Stolen 




Nature of Larcenies: 

(a) Pocket-picking 

(6) Purse-snatching . 

(c) Shoplifting .... 

(d) Yronx autos (not accessories) 

(e) Auto accessories . 

(/} Bicycles 

(g) All other . . . , 

Total larcenies 



Automobiles Recovered: 

(a) Number stolen locally and recovered locally 
(&) Number stolen locally and recovered outside , 
(c) Number stolen out of town, recovered locally 



4.G89 

1.048 

783 



SS.SIO 
14.254 
16,757 

301,649 

65,580 

9.838 

489,701 



40 



TABLE VI Number of 



Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests - 

December 31, 1962 



Not the Number of Charges — for the Year Ending 



2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 



8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



Classification of Offenses 



Part I Classes 
Criminal homicide : 

(a) Murder and noiuiegligent manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 
Forcible rape .... 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 
Burglary breaking or entering 
Larceny theft (except auto theft) 
Auto theft 



Total, Part I Classes 

Part II Classes 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting .... 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property ;bu.ying, receiving, possessing 
Weapons; carrying, pos.scssing, etc. 
Prostitution and commercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except 2 and 13) 
Offen.ses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated 

Violation of road and driving laws . 

Parking violations 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws (except 22 and 24) 
All other offenses 



Total, Part II Classes 
Grand Total 



Persons Charged by 
the Police 



Charged 



68 

37 

98 

490 

717 

1 ,043 

2,104 

1,077 



5,634 



1,208 

102 

373 

152 

159 

436 

684 

1,256 

282 

136 

23,210 

185 

84 

687 

350 

10,066 

40,142 

1 ,389 

2,701 



Arrested 



Summoned 



83,603 



89,236 



68 

37 

98 

484 

694 

973 

1,773 

991 



.118 



1,096 
102 
349 
152 
156 
432 
674 

1,189 

282 

83 

23,190 

177 

83 

671 

340 

489 

5,981 
780 

2,385 



.38,612 



43,730 



Persons Found 
Gtiltv 



Of Offense 
Charged 



6 

23 

70 

331 

86 



516 



112 

24 

3 
4 

10 
67 

53 
20 



16 

10 

9,577 

34,161 

609 

316 



44,990 



45,506 



27 

8 
43 
218 
237 
543 
1 ,336 
522 



2,934 



612 

60 

183 

71 

99 

262 

365 

771 

1 5,S 

68 

22,899 

123 

58 

461 

197 

9,870 

39,.348 

1 ,062 

1,303 



Of Lesser 
Offense 



77,970 



80,904 



2 

8 
6 
12 
25 
19 
16 
7 



95 



10 
1 



2 
1 
12 
8 
4 

9 
4 



64 



159 



41 



TABLE VII— Arrests for the Vear Ending December 31, 1962 











On 


Without 


Sunnnoned 


Nature of Offence 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Warrants 


Warrants 


by the 
Court 


iMuider and nonnegligent manslaughter 


58 


10 


68 


43 


25 




Negligent manslaughter . 










33 


4 


37 


16 


21 


— 


Rape 












98 


— 


98 


40 


58 


— 


Robbery .... 












465 


25 


490 


241 


243 


6 


Aggravated assault . 












613 


104 


717 


345 


349 


23 


Burglary — breaking and entering 










1 ,033 


10 


1 ,043 


424 


549 


70 


Larcenj'' — theft (except auto theft) 










1.751 


353 


2.104 


816 


957 


331 


Auto theft 










1,044 


33 


1.077 


391 


600 


86 


Other assaults . 














1,122 


86 


1,208 


896 


200 


112 


Forger}^ and counterfeiting 














92 


10 


102 


79 


23 





Embezzlement and fraud 














339 


34 


373 


291 


58 


24 


Stolen property . 














140 


12 


152 


78 


74 




Weapons, possession of 
















156 


3 


159 


58 


98 


3 


Prostitution 
















78 


358 


436 


83 


349 


4 


Sex offenses 
















558 


126 


684 


289 


385 


10 


Family and children . 
















1,213 


43 


1 ,2.56 


1,168 


21 


67 


Narcotics laws . 
















221 


61 


282 


127 


155 




Liquor laws 
















95 


41 


136 


58 


25 


53 


Drunkenness 
















21.551 


1.659 


23,210 


77 


23,113 


20 


Disorderly conduct . 
















164 


21 


185 


32 


145 


8 


^'agrancy . 
















69 


15 


84 


24 


60 


— 


Gambling . 
















650 


37 


687 


463 


208 


16 


Driving while intoxicated 
















337 


13 


350 


60 


280 


10 


Road and driving laws 
















9,414 


652 


10,(166 


459 


30 


9,577 


Parking violations 
















33.237 


6,905 


40.142 


5,953 


28 


34,161 


Traffic violations 
















1,327 


62 


1 ,389 


477 


303 


609 


All other offenses 
















2,368 


333 


2.701 


1,161 


1,224 


316 


Suspicion 
















1 ,352 


213 


1,565 


— 


1,565 




Arrests for other departments 












1,866 


151 


2,017 


1,670 


330 


17 


Totals . 
















81,444 


11,374 


92.818 


15,819 


31,476 


45,523 



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Bicycles .... 
Carriages, licensed 
Coasting .... 
Dogs, bitten by . 
Electric wires, live . 
Excavations in street 
Falling objects . 
Falls, various causes 
Glass, cut by . . . 
Motorcycles 

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Motor vehicles, pleasure . 
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Trains, railroad . 
Vehicles, Fire Department 
Vehicles, horse-drawn 
Miscellaneous 


Total Killed 
Total Injured 



43 



44 



TABLE X - Showing the Number of Licenses of All Kinds Issued bv the Police Commissioner and the Amount of Money Received from 
All Sources and Paid to the City Collector- Treasurer During the \ car Hnduig December .51, 1902 



CLASS OF LICENSE 



Auctioneer (Cltiss 1) . 
Auctioneer (other classes) . 
Bicvcle registrations . . ■ 
Dog . . ... 
Driver (hackney carriage) . 
Fiiearms. dealer in . . . 

Gunsmith 

Hacknev carriage (and regrants) 
Hackney carriage (replacement ot drivers 

badges) 

Hackney carriage (photos) 
Handcart (common carrier) 
Junk collector .... 
Junk shopkeeper . . ■ ■ 
Musician (collective and sound car) 
Musician (itinerant) . 
Pawnbroker .'.... 
I'ubhc lodging house . 
Revolver (including machine gun) 
Revolver, permit to purchase 
Secondhand articles 
Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 
Shotguns and rifles, dealer in . 
Sightseeing automobile 
Sightseeing driver 
Special police 



Street railway, conductor, motorman 

starter 

Copies of licenses and replacement 

tags 

( 'opies of police reports 
Damage to police property 

Reimbursements 

Sale of condemned property 
Sale of lost, stolen, and 

property .... 
Sale of "pawnbroker and 

articles report blanks 
Sunday permits . 
Use of police property 



dog 



abandoned 
secondhand 



Totals 

Credit bv City Collector-Treasurer for 
money" received for damage to police 
property, telephone commissions and 
dog fines 



Grand Total 






28.123 



M 


(i3 


12 


10 


2.t)77 


2.077 


14.246 


14,238 


f).41ll) 


6.32! 1 


15 


15 


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2.025 


7 


7 


2 


2 


fi4 


60 


44 


43 


21 


20 


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37 


37 


4 


— 


1.2;»6 


1.178 


5 


1 


336 


321 


223 


218 






21 


21 


25 


25 


1 .075 


821 



27.545 



247 



268 



S-s^ii 



12 
2 



161 



102 



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281 



15 



15 



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18 



20 



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627 



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375 00 

25 00 

17.019 00 

7 00 
5,V)30 00 

4 00 
900 00 

3.225 00 

136 00 

50 00 

1,850 00 

5,890 00 

5 00 

9.630 00 

10.090 00 

175 00 

1,302 00 

50 00 

4,105 00 

19 00 

319 .50 

24,729 00 

973 41 

1,803 45 

253 05 

4,532 85 

418 00 
6,132 00 
1,800 00 



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11,912 99 
S161.2.52 00 



45 



TABLE XI — Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1962 



EXPENDITURES 
Group 1. Personal Services: 

10 Permanent employees $16,077,649 30 

1 1 Temporaiv employees 7,570 00 

12 Overtime " . . " 597,604 27 



$16,682,823 57 



Group 2. Contractual Services: 

21 Communications $68, o2] 71 

22 Light, heat and power 51,380 95 

26 Repairs and maintenance oi Imildings and 

structures 31,596 27 

27 Repairs and servicing of e(|uipment . . . 55,617 61 

28 Transportation of persons 27,648 83 

29 Miscellaneous contractual services . . . 139,787 97 



374,553 34 



Group 3. Supplies and ^Materials: 

30 Automotive $147,863 62 

32 Food 15,158 82 

33 Heating 41,723 02 

34 Household 13,331 52 

35 :\Iedical, dental and ho.spital 1,950 67 

36 Uffice 78.950 45 

39 Miscellaneous 172,879 22 



471,857 32 



Group 4. Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 55,894 55 

Group 5. Equipment: 

50 Automotive $99,858 00 

56 Office furniture and ecjuipment .... 3,762 28 

59 Miscellaneous 9,634 50 

113,254 78 

Total S^l 7.698.383 56 

Special Items (not included in Police Department appropriation) 
Down Pai-ment Loan: 

56 Office furniture and e(|uipmcnt .... $6,668 11 

59 Miscellaneous eciuipment 6,854 65 



13,522 76 



Departmental Equipment Loan: 

50 Automotive $33,1.">C) 45 

56 Office furniture and equipment .... 330 00 

59 Miscellaneous equipment 5,793 91 

RECEIPTS 

For licen.ses issued i)V the Police Commissioner 

For dog licenses (credited to the School Department) 

Refmids, miscellaneous 

Use of police property 

Sale of condemned, lost, strjlen and abandoned property 

For replacement dog tags, replacement hackney carriage drivers' badges, copies of 

licen.ses and records, sale of report blanks 

Reimbursement for lost and damaged uniforms and equipment 

For damage to police propert}' (paid at Headquarters) 

Total 

Credit bj- Cit\' Collector-Treasurer for monej^ received for damage to police property, 
commissions on telephones, and dog fines 

Grand Total 



$39,280 36 


$81,729 

32,773 

1,741 

1,800 

4,785 


25 
50 
87 
00 
90 


25,473 

61 

973 


50 
58 
41 


$149,339 01 


11,912 


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