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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




BOSTON PUBUC LIBRARY I 
GQVBflVMENTOOCUMENrsOEmRTMENT 

MAR 1 6 1935 



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City of Boston 
Admixistrative Services Department 
Printing c^^fes Section 



Sociology & Economics 
Detroit Public Library 



1963 



ANNUAL 




REPORT 




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POLICE DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 



CITY OF 




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PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 34 — 1964 



DETPriiT 
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[DOCUMENT — NO. 34] 



Fifty-eighth Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 81, 1963 







FRONT COVER 



U.S.S. "Constiiution" 

The United States frigate U. S. S. "Constitution," more famil- 
iarly known as "Old Ironsides," launched in 1797, presently 
berthed at the First Naval District facility in Boston, shown 
being turned around, an annual event made necessary to 
preserve her masts and spars from the warping effect of the 
wind and weather. Tradition has it that during a victorious 
engagement with the British frigate "Guerriere" the American 
sailors on seeing British shot failing to penetrate the staunch 
oak sides of their ship dubbed her "Old Ironsides." Public 
sentiment for her preservation was aroused by the poem "Old 
Ironsides" written by Oliver Wendell Holmes in 1828. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston Herald and Traveler 

The Boston Record-American-Sunday Advertiser 



I 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 







Page 




Page 


Letter from the Mayor 


5 


House of Detention .... 


35 






Hackney Carriages .... 


36 


Table of Organization 


6 










Records and Communications Division : 


36 


The Department: 


7 


Central Complaint Section 


37 


Police Force 


7 


Central Records Section: 


38 


Signal Service 


7 


Printing Unit 


43 


Employees of the Department 


7 


Data Processing Unit 


40 






Identification Section .... 


40 


Bureau Chiefs 


8 










Bureau of Inspectional Services: . 


43 


Office of the Police Commissioner: 


9 


Staff Inspection Division .... 


43 


Administrative Assistant-Secretary 


9 


Internal Affairs Division .... 


43 


Planning Division 


9 


Intelligence Division 


44 


Bureau of Field Operations: 


10 


Bureau of Personnel and Training: 


45 


Patrol Di\dsion 


10 


Personnel Division: 


45 


Harbor Police and Emergency Service Uni1 


; II 


Medical Unit 


45 


Bomb Squad 


12 


Training Division: 


46 


Tactical Patrol Force .... 


13 






Traffic Division: 


14 


Recipients of Awards : 


47 


Auxiliary- School Patrol 


16 


Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 


47 


Criminal Investigation Division: 


17 


Department Medals of Honor . 


47 


Crimes Against Persons Section : 


17 


Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 


47 


Homicide Unit 


17 


In Memoriam 


50 


Robbery Unit 


IQ 




J 


Crimes Against Property Section : 


19 


Roll of Honor 


51 


Automobile Unit .... 


19 


The Hundred Club 


52 


Worthless Checks and Fraud Unit 


20 




Lost and Stolen Property Unit 


21 


Miscellaneous Business 


52 


General Investigation Section: 


22 


Statistical Tables: 


53 


Ballistics Unit 


22 


I. Number of Arrests by Districts . 


54 


Crime Laboratory Unit 
Domestic Relations Unit 




23 
25 


II. Major Offenses Reported to F.B.I. 


54 


Rendition Unit 




III. Analysis of Property Connected with 
Offenses 




Special Service Unit 




26 


IV. Breakdown of Offenses and Value ol 


55 


Juvenile Aid Section 




27 


Property Stolen 


55 


Vice Control Section: 




29 


V. Additional Analysis of Larcenv anc 




Narcotics and Vice Unit 




29 


Auto Theft . " . 


55 


Gaming Unit 




30 


VI. Number of Individuals Arrested 


56 


Bureau of General Services: 




31 


VII. Arrests 


57 


Central Services Division : 




31 


\'III. Age and Sex of Persons Arrested 


58 


Property Clerk 




ll 


IX. Report of Accidents 


59 


Motor Vehicle Service Unit 






33, 


X. Licenses of All Classes Issued 


60 


Police Signal System 




34 


XI. Financial Statement 


61 


City Prison 




35 


XII. Male and Female Residents Listed 


62 






EDMUND L. McNAMARA 

Coiniiiissioiier 










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THE MEV^ 




BEHIND THE BADGE YOU MUST HAVE A MAN 



I was intrigued a short time ago when I 
came across some old reports concerned with 
the operations of the "Watch" in the town 
of Boston. 

The reports were for a post-Revohitionary 
period when many httle communities were 
achieving their corporate growth and pre- 
paring to become cities in their own right. 
In their own way they had their share of 
crime and law violation. Crime wasn't 
organized the way we know it today, unless 
you consider the running of a rum boat 
from somewhere in the Caribbean to the 
port of Boston a gangster operation. 

In those days everyone seemed to know 
everyone else. Each one knew the weakness 
of his neighbor, whether that weakness ran 
to gambling with cards or a tendency to 
look upon the grape when it was overripe. 

Justice, it seems, was more or less 
a matter of community dispensation, 
and the "Watch'" pretty much con- 
fined its duties to accurate broadcasts 
of the time, conditions of the weather, 
and the arrival of the latest cargoes 
in the harbor. 

The world, we must admit, was 
less complicated, less exciting, and 
less pressurized than it is today. 

Whether it's a better world is not for our 
jtidgment. Such comparisons must await the 
examination of future generations. 

Certainly, the "Watch" would have no 
place in the field of law enforcement today. 
Its functions are carried out more accurately 
by regular broadcasts which detail weather 
conditions down to the smallest dot on the 
map. And for the time of the night, how 
could the most faithful member of the 
"Watch" beat the TV's use of time right out 
of Greenwich itself? 



THE NEW 



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The evolution of the old ' ' Watch ' ' from its 
early status of a much earlier generation to 
its place as a police organization today is 
difficult to trace. 

Indeed, only the most gifted novelist can 
hold forth the suggestion that there is any 
relation. 

Not many years back the field of chemistry 
was limited to the apothecaries' shops. If 
you told the most learned scientist in the 
world that one man could be identified from 
all the millions of men in the world by his 
fingerprints, he would question your sanity. 

Today almost every field of science is used 
by our police in the enforcement of laws, 
in the detection and prevention of crime. 

From the laboratory we have gained weap- 
ons for our police that were undreamed of 
not too many decades back — weapons just 

as necessary and just as important as 

firearms. 

Yet, without the intelligence of the 
men who form our first line of secur- 
ity, these new weapons would be use- 
less. Without the courage, without 
the dedication to duty, without the 
talent to make use of all these weap- 
ons — our modern police would be as 
the "Watch" members of old. 

It has been truly said that the man behind 
the badge is the first guarantee of domestic 
peace and safety. 

Without him all the gifts of science, all the 
modern advances in criminology, would be 
useless. 

Without him we would be back in the days 
of the "Watch," when life was more simple 
and crime was under the close control of the 
neighborhood. 




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THE DEPARTMENT 



The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner . 
Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Secretary . 



The Police Force 



Deputy Superintendents — 

Deputy Superintendents 
manders 



Bureau Chiefs 

— Division Com- 



Captains — District and Section Commanders 
Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 



Director .... 
Director, Assi.stant 
Foreman of Signal Service 
Linemen and Cable Splicers 
Machinist 



II 

21 

94 
243 



Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomen 



Total 



193 
1 1,988 



2,557 



* Includes 2 patrolwomen 

t Includes 6 patrolmen in armed service 



Signal Service 



Motor Equipment Operators and Laborers 
Painter and Groundman .... 

Signalmen-Electricians 

Electrical Equipment Repaimian 



Total 



Employees of the Department 

Biological Chemist i 

Biological Chemist, Assistant .... i 

Clerk-Typists 7 

Diesel and GasoHne Engine Operator . . i 

Elevator Operators 6 

Head Clerks 15 

Head Administrative Clerk i 

Hearing Stenographers 6 

Hostlers 6 

Janitresses 6 

Junior Building Custodians 47 

Matron, Chief i 

Matron, Assistant Chief 1 

Matrons, Police 

Medical Examiner 

Motor Equipment Repairmen 

Multilith Operator 

Multilith Operator and Cameraman . 



10 
I 

19 
I 



(Not Included in Above) 

Principal Clerk 

Principal Clerk-Typists 

Principal Clerk-Stenographers .... 

Principal Statistical Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Clerk-Typists 

Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator . 

Statistical Machine Operators .... 

Steam Firemen 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 

Telephone Operators 

Working Foreman and Motor Equipment 
Repairman 

School Traffic Supervisors 

Total 



5 
2 

I 

I 

9 
I 
I 

10 
6 
I 

13 



109 
292 



During the year 71 patrolmen were appointed; 2 sergeants, 30 patrolmen resigned; i patrolman was dis- 
missed; I superintendent, 8 captains, 2 lieutenant-detectives, i lieutenant were appointed deputy superintendents; 
8 lieutenants were promoted to captains, 5 sergeant-detectives, 24 sergeants to lieutenants, 2 detectives first-grade, 
2 detectives second-grade, 3 detectives third-grade, 45 patrolmen to sergeants; 2 heutenants assigned as lieutenant- 
detectives, 2 sergeants assigned as sergeant-detectives, 22 detectives second-grade, 2 detectives third-grade assigned 
as detectives first-grade, 45 detectives third-grade assigned as detectives second-grade, 19 patrolmen assigned as 
detectives third-grade, and i detective third-grade assigned as patrolman; i deputy superintendent, i captain, 
5 lieutenants, 13 sergeants, 45 patrolmen were retired on pension; 3 sergeants, 9 patrolmen died. 




^^ 



HERBERT F. MULLONEY 

C7i/i7 — I-iiiii-aii (if Field Ot'cralions 



FRANCIS J. HENNESSY 

Cliicf — Bureau of General 
Ser','iees 




EDMUND L. McNAMARA 

Foliee Ctiuimissioiier 






JOHN T. HOWLAND 

Cliiej — Bureau of 1 iistieclional 
Services 



WILLIAM J. TAYLOR 

Chief — Bureau of Personnel 
and Training 




OFFICE OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT=SECRETARY 

The Administrative Assistant to the PoHce Commissioner is responsible for dissemination of police informa- 
tion regarding departmental programs, general crime, and other conditions in the community within the purview 
of the police. He develops and maintains proper relations with the public b}- arranging for: speaking engagements; 
demonstrations; departmental tours; special events; and handling of projects of a public relations nature. He is 
also charged with the supervision of personnel assigned to the correspondence section of the Police Commissioner's 
office. 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The Planning Division of this department was created by the reorganization in 1903. The principal 
function of this new division is to work in conjunction with the Advisory Board, the Bureau Chiefs, and the various 
sections or units of all bureaus, in researching, analyzing, developing, and implementing new methods, procedures, 
and programs. 

Some of the more notable projects directed to this division for research were: a Field Interrogation Re- 
port; the establishment of a Department Canine Corps; the organization of a biweekly staff meeting of all district 
captains; the operation of a program known as the Stolen Car Survey, designed to cut down stolen cars throughout 
the city ; the development of a department towing program ; the programing of surve\-s in conjunction with twenty 
other cities' police forces; and exchanging information gathered by the surveys. 

Presently, this division is engaged in rewriting the Rules and Regulations of the department. When this 
project is completed, the department will have a Book of Rules and a Book of Procedures designed to handle any 
and all police operations. 



10 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 

This bureau is charged with the responsibiHt\' for the administration of the prime function of any police 
organization, i.e., the prevention of crime, protection of Hfe and property', and the apprehension of those who have 
committed crime. All other bureaus of the department serve as auxiliaries to the Bureau of Field Operations to 
assure every assistance that might be necessary for carrying out the prime police function. 

For purposes of efficient administration in super\'ision, this bureau is subdi\-ided into three divisions, the 
Patrol Division, Traffic Division, and Criminal Investigation Division. 



PATROL DIVISION 

This division consists of the sixteen police districts which provide a city-wide uniform patrol force operat- 
ing around the clock every day of the year for the purpose of preventing crime. Personnel of this division conduct 
the preliminar\- investigations of crimes and incidents reported to the police and prepare appropriate reports which 
provide a permanent record of the incidents and the action taken. In this manner, the investigative units of the 
deiiartment are furnished with the information needed to perform the continuing investigation. 





AN ARMED MURDERER APPREHENDED 



STOLEN CAR— FATAL ACCIDENT 



II 

HARBOR POLICE AND EMERGENCY SERVICE UNIT 

Duties performed by the Harbor Police and Emergency Service Unit, District 8, were as follows: 

Harbor Patrol Service 

A day and night patrol service was maintained by the police boats "William H. McShane, " "William H. 
Pierce," "Patrol Boat 45," and the "Patrol Boat Protector, " in the Upper and Lower Harbors, Mystic River, 
Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserved Channel, Dorchester Bay, and Neponset River. 




HARBOR PATROL 



Emergency Service Unit 

This unit is available on a 24-hour basis. The Emergency Service Unit truck is equijjped with emergency 
weapons, firearms, bomb suits, bomb blast mat, bulletproof clothing, lighting generators, power saw, acetylene 
cutting torch, hydraulic rescue jacks, wheat lights, riot sticks, road blocking equipment, rope and rescue tools, gas 
masks, chemox units, life belts, life lines, ladders, and asbestos clothing. 

The unit responds automatical!}' to the scene of all fires in the city for which three or more alarms are 
sounded, to all bomb and explosive reports, and to all requests for assistance from any district or unit requiring 
lighting, special tools, firearms, and equipment. 

The unit also operates the barrier truck located at District 4, for placing large road-blocking barriers 
when and where they are required on an emergency basis. 



12 

The Bomb Squad 

After due consideration, in January, iy6,5,a Bomb Squad was established within the deijarcincnt. This 
was brought about by the increasing number of incidents wherein explosives and dangerous materials of one kind or 
another were involved and the coexistent threat of danger to the lives and safety of the public and to members 
of the department assigned to investigate such cases. 

Subsequently nine members of the department, one sergeant and eight patrolmen, were selected to comprise 
the squad, all of whom are regularly assigned to the department's Emergency Service Unit at District S. Under 
the auspices of the Massachusetts State Police, various government military organizations, and the manufacturers 
of explosives, these men were given extensive training in all phases of bomb handling and disposal. After complet- 
ing this course of instructions, these officers were awarded certificates and were issued licenses to handle all kinds of 
explosives by the Department of Public Safety. These men are available for duty on a 24-hour basis. 

With the implementation of this unit, the department is better able to insure the personal safety of all 
citizens in our city whenever a danger presents itself in the form of an explosive material or device. 

The department has assigned to District 8 a bomb truck that is designed and equipped to handle and 
transport explosives. 

During the period commencing April 17, 1963, and ending December 31, 1963, the Bomb Squad handled 
the following articles: 

Explosives or Dangerous Material 

Examined 30 

■ (a) Disposed of (by dumping or detonating) 26 

(b) Disarmed .7 

(c) Turned over to department chemist for analysis and preparation as e\'idence, after being disarmed . 4 




PROTECTION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY 



13 



TACTICAL PATROL FORCE 

Since it was organized late in ig62, the Tactical Patrol Force has proven the backbone to patrol operations. 
The purpose of the Tactical Force is to provide a highly maneuverable foot patrol of police officers that will be readily 
available to augment the personnel of the several districts and units when required. 

After high crime incidence areas are determined by the Central Records Section of the Department, the 
Tactical Patrol Force is deployed into those designated areas to prevent crime and apprehend criminals. Officers 
attached to the Tactical Force must work a flexible schedule of hours — when serious crime is most likely to happen. 
The greatest areas of concentration in past months have been in Roxbury, South End, Back Bay, Dorchester, Mat- 
tapan, and Downtown Boston. 

The Tactical Patrol Force is made up of a highly selective group of officers who undergo an intensive 
training course in physical fatness and tactical procedures. They maintain quarters at District One, located at 
154 North Street, Boston. 

Cases ranging from '^ Operating Under the Influence" to "Armed Robbery" have been successfully 
prosecuted by members of the Tactical Force in practically every court in the city. They operate in complete 
harmony with all police districts. Commendations have been given to several members of the unit for outstanding 
arrests for rapes, robberies, and taxicab holdups. 

The Canine Corps is also part of the Tactical Patrol Force, and that unit has been instrumental in effecting 
several good arrests. Not only can the trained instincts of these animals track down wanted criminals, but their 
keen sense of smell has been used successful!}- in finding lost persons, especially children, in the wooded areas of 
the city. 

The Tactical Patrol Force engaged in a variety of assigranents such as: attending to dignitaries and 
offering security during presidential visits; standing by on an alert basis during the recent school demonstrations; 
participation in the mock disaster program held during the year at Franklin Park; and routine assignments such 
as aiding the trafific and parking situation, etc. 




ON THE TRAIL 



14 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The Traffic Division is responsible for the control of traffic and the enforcement of jjarking regulations 
in the area ot the city within the boundaries of Districts i, 2, 4, and 16, and the traffic post at the intersection of 
Commonwealth Avenue and Boston University bridge, District 14. It is responsible for the prevention and in- 
vestigation of traffic accidents throughout the city and for the overall supervision of traffic arrangements for 
major parades, public celebrations, and events of a similiar nature. The Traffic Division also provides a safety 
patrol which functioiis on a cit\'-wide basis. 

The number of vehicles on our highways continues to increase steadily. The total registration figure for 
the Commonwealth amounted to 2,028,254 for 1963. The comparable figure in 1962 was 1,958,633, reflecting an 
increase of 69,621 or 3.5 percent. 

Notices of parking violations issued In- the Boston Police Department for the year 1963 MTiounted to 
490,333, of which 280,911 were issued by the Traffic Division. Corresponding totals for the preceding year are 
638,067 and 318,281, respectively. It is to be noted that this is the first year in which the violation tag is prepared 
by the officer at the scene of the violation and attached to the vehicle, which involves a greater amount of time 
as compared to the previous procedure. 

Vehicles towed by the Traffic Division amounted to 9,751. Towing activity, in relation to parking en- 
forcement, was suspended indefinitely on March 19, 1963, and was not resumed during the balance of the year. 

Court prosecutions by the Traffic Division for the year 1963 amounted to 38,312. The corresponding 
figure for the preceding year is 31,268. 

A total of 2,024 notices for moving violations were issued by the Traffic Division during the year 1963. 
Of this figure 750 warnings were given and 1,274 summonses were issued. 

Parking fines paid at the Central Municipal Court for the year 1963 amounted to §1,008,009.61. The 
corresponding figure for the preceding year is $842,007.00. 

Parking meter revenue for the year 1963 amounted to $476,906.76. In the area north and east of Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, the revenue amounted to S3 10,343.85. Corresponding figures for the preceding year are $833,967.71 

and $633,165.11, respectively. 

The M-i Safety Squad of the Traffic Di\-ision pro\-ided a complete program of safety talks and demon- 
strations in the city's schools throughout the year, including a full schedule of playground appearances during 
school vacation periods. The week!}- radio prograjn was again presented through the facilities of Station WEZE. 
The casts for the programs are composed of school children, and programing was prepared with the cooperation of 
school personnel. 




M-i STUDENT SAFETY INSTRUCTION 



15 



Arrangements were made and police details provided in connection with the conduct of fourteen parades 
throughout the year 1963, as well as for many other civic celebrations and events of a public nature. Details were 
also provided for multiple-alarm fires and other types of emergencies. 

Special traffic details and escorts were provided for our late President, John F. Kennedy, on the occasions 
of his several visits to Boston during the year 1,963. 

Special details and escort service were also provided for the following named visitors to our city: 

President Lyndon B. Johnson, as Vice-President; Senators Kennedy, Saltonstall, Tower, and Goldwater; the 
Governor of Pennsylvania; the President of Tanganyika; the Prime Minister of Nyasaland; the Prince of Ethiopia; 
the Prince and Princess of Thailand; the former King of Italy; the Ambassadors from India, Israel, Norway, and 
the Phihppines; the Mayors of Berlin, Germany; Genoa, Italy; and Sligo, Eire; TV and motion picture personalities 
Hugh Downs, Dennis Weaver, Helen Hayes, Danny Kaye, Patti Page, Ed Sullivan, Richard Chamberlain, Frank 
Fontaine, and the cast of ''Route 66," among others. 

During the year 1963, Boston's traffic problem was greatly increased by the extensive demolition and 
construction activity occasioned by the erection of the new government centers, the Prudential Center, and the 
extension of the Massachusetts Turnpike, which resulted in the closing of many of our bridges and public ways 
and required the improvisation of many intricate traffic detour patterns. This problem will remain with us until 
the completion of these undertakings. 




REMINDER TO LOCK YOUR CAR 



I6 



AUXILIARY SCHOOL PATROL 



There is established within the department an Auxiliar\- School Patrol consisting of 109 uniformed female 
school traffic suiJcrvisors. 

Although the primary responsibility of school traffic supervisors is the protection of children going to and 
from school, they have been appointed special police officers for the purpose of enforcing in the areas adjacent to 
schools and school crossings, those statutes, city ordinances, and traffic rules and regulations which specifically 
relate to the operation, parking, and use of motor vehicles. 

School traffic supervisors are not members of the regular police force. The hours of duty are intermit- 
tent, and their compensation is on a per diem basis. School traffic supervisors ser\-e under the direct supervision 
of district commanders. 

During the period of time the Auxiliary School Patrol has been in existence it has proven to be a highly 
efficient unit and has made possible the redeployment of our regular police officers for more specialized police duties. 




SCHOOL SAFETY 



17 

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION 

The Criminal Investigation Division is composed of several sections, namely, Crimes Against Persons, 
Crimes Against Property, General Investigation, Juvenile Aid, and Vice Control. 

In addition, special units are assigned to cover the following phases of police work and investigations: 
Homicide, Robbery, Automobile, Worthless Checks and Frauds, Lost and Stolen Property, Hotels, Pawnbrokers, 
Junk vShops, Secondhand Dealers, Pickpockets, Shoplifters, Domestic Relations, Subversive Activities, Crime 
Laboratory, Ballistics, Gaming Offenses, Narcotics and Vice, and Rendition. 

Members of this division investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also process cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a 
year for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate 
in every way possible with outside police departments in the investigation of crime and prosecution of criminals. 

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS SECTION 

Hamicide Unit 

Personnel assigned to this unit investigate all homicide cases and interrogate persons involved in or who 
liave knowledge of crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion, and other violent crimes. They prepare, supervise, 
and present evidence at inquests. Transcripts of statements received by these officers from witnesses and de- 
fendants are prepared for use as evidence in trials of capital cases. 



Abortions 

Accidental 

Accidental shooting 

Alcoholism . 

Asphyxiation 

Assaults 

Attempted strangulation 

Burns . 

Drowning 

Drug ingestion 

Electricity . 

Exposure 

Falls . . 



Investigated 






9 


Homicides 


5 


Machinery . 






2 


M.T.A. 






I 


Motorcycle 






6 


Motor vehicle 






43 


Natural causes 






2 


Poison 






35 


Rape 






9 


Shooting of police officer 


I 


Shot by police officer 


I 


Stillborn 


1 


Suicides 


41 


Total 







45 

2 

5 
I 

33 
1,254 
I 
2 
I 
I 
4 

43 

1,548 



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1500 INTERROGATIONS 



i8 

Cases Prosecuted in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 

Abortion 

Accessory before fact to abortion .... 

Assault and batter\- 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous \veai)on 
Assault and battery with dangerous weapon . 

Assault with intent to murder 

Conspiracy 
Homicide 



Rape .... 
Robbery 

Violation of firearm law 

Members of the Homicide Unit also questioned approximately fiftee 
and female, in their investigations of the strangulation murders. 



4 
I 

i.S 

25 
10 

4 
36 



1 hundred (1500) persons, both male 



Recapitulation of Homicides 

Thirty-six cases were presented to the courts as criminal homicides and the following action taken: 

I Defendant (juvenile) adjudicated delinquent child — manslaughter — released in custody of probation officer — 
disposition March 24, 1964. 

I Defendant (juvenile) adjudicated dehnquent child — manslaughter — committed to Youth Service Board. 

1 Defendant (juvenile) juvenile delinquency complaint dismissed — criminal complaint issued — probable cause 

found — held for Grand Jury on charge of murder. 

2 Defendants (juvenile) juvenile delinquency complaints dismissed — criminal complaints issued — probable 

cause found — indicted for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to manslaughter. 

1 Defendant (female) charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court. 

2 Defendants (female) charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilt}- to manslaughter. 
Male defendants: 

1 Defendant complaint issued for murder — committed to Boston .State Hospital — transferred to Bridgewater 

before hearing in lower court. 

4 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter. 

2 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter. 

3 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — found guilty of manslaughter. 

I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for inurder, second degree — committed to Bridgewater. 

6 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pending trial in Superior Court. 
3 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pleaded guilty to manslaughter. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — found not guilty. 

2 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — found guilt\' of manslaughter. 

I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — found guilt}' of murder, second degree. 
I Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — committed suicide before apprehension. 

3 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — pending trial in Superior Court. 

7 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — found guilty of murder, first degree — 

jury recommended death penalty not be imposed. 
(Forty-three defendants in thirty-six homicides) 

9 Murder cases still under investigation. 



19 



Robbery Unit 



During the past year, officers of this unit have conducted 397 investigations resulting in 249 arrests for 
serious crimes committed in Boston. These officers have been commended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and local police departments for their cooperation in aiding in the apprehension and convictions of criminals re- 
sponsible for bank robberies and thefts of interstate shipments. 

Members of this unit work in conjunction with and assist officers of the various police districts in the 
apprehension and conviction of criminals in all parts of the city. 

The dail}' linc-ui) of all prisoners arrested for felonies is conducted by officers of this unit. 



CRrMES AGAINST PROPERTY SECTION 

Automobile Unit 

The essenlial rcsponsihilitx' nf llic Aut()mol)il(.' S(|viad is to investigate all new car, used car, and motor 
vehicle junk dealers, licensed by the Police Commissioner, for the purpose of ascertaining tlieir suitability for the 
issue and yearly renewal of their respective licenses. Frequent inspections are made to ascertain if used car dealers 
are complying with the conditions of their licenses. 

The second basic function of the Automobile Squad relates to stolen and abandoned vehicles. Daily 
reports listing all missing or stolen vehicles reported to units of this department and other law enforcement agencies 
are received at this office. Index cards for each vehicle are prepared from the reports and are then compared with 
similar cards prepared from daily reports from approximately 205 licensed dealers. A search for the stolen vehicles 
is initiated both individually and with the assistance of every officer of the department who is provided with a weekly 
list of all missing vehicles. 

This unit is in daily communication with police authorities of the United vStates and Canada. Many 
investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post Office Department, National 
Auto Theft Bureau, Registry of Motor \'ehicles, and immigration authorities of the United States. 



Records of 


Aiit 


omobiles Reported Stolen 


in Boston for the Year Ending December 31, 1963 






Recovered 






Month 


Reported 


During 


Recovered 


Not 




Stolen 


Month 


Later 


Recovered 


January 


540 


506 


19 


15 


"Februar\- 










5 go 


551 


12 


27 


March 










S06 


744 


23 


39 


April . 










765 


688 


44 


33 


May . 










653 


573 


23 


57 


June 










672 


589 


37 


46 


July . 










669 


603 


29 


37 


August 










702 


644 


22 


36 


September 










681 


624 


26 


30 


October 










659 


605 


33 


21 


November 










590 


544 


19 


27 


December 










594 


499 





96 


Totals 


7,021 


7,170 


287 


464 



20 

Stolen Property Reco\ered 

Value 

1 ,^ stolen cars recovered (abandoned) $19,950 

19 stolen cars recovered in possession of individuals 79,000 

Cash paid through courts, by individuals an-estcd,in restitution for tnoney obtained through sales of 

stolen cars: Hijoo 



Total $113,250 

Officers of this unit made several arrests of individuals involved in auto theft ''rings" resulting in the 
recovery of the above-mentioned property. 



Worthless Checks and Fraud Unit 

This unit maintains records on all known check passers and check-passing rings. A file card inde.x is 
maintained on all checks being passed, and on all check passers, listing their known associates and any alias being 
used by them. 

This unit is constantly in contact with law enforcement agencies throughout the state, the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, Postal Inspectors, and Secret Service. As a result of information that has been compiled, the 
Bank Unit is gradually becoming a clearing house for check activities throughout New England. 

A large degree of the successful activities of the Bank Unit can be attributed to the complete cooperation 
of Regiscope Distributors and Protection Service, Inc. Positive identifications have been made of check passers 
and their associates from photographs provided by Regiscope, not only on request but on a voluntary- basis as well. 

During the past year 103 persons have been arrested for cases originating in this unit. In addition, 
nine persons have been arrested for law enforcement agencies outside Boston. 

The following convictions have been obtained in all courts during the year 1963 

Forgery 

Uttering 

Larceny by means of worthless check 
Accessory before or after the fact . 
Receiving stolen goods 
Attempted larceny by worthless check 

Conspiracy 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 
Chapter 90 — Altering motor vehicle license 

Total 1,022 



314 

313 
282 

72 

25 
6 
6 
2 



21 

Lost and Stolen Property Unit 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities and 
towns throughout the United States forward lists of i^ropertj- stolen in such places. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of articles 
reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the recovery of 
thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of man\- thieves. 

Files are maintained on all rifles, shott,'uns, machine guns, ])istols, and revolvers that have been lost or 
stolen in the six New England states and New York. 

Pawnshops antl secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



m. 



m 



22 

GENERAL INVESTIGATION SECTION 

Ballistics Unit 

The essential function of the BalHstic Unit is the examination and identification of firearms, spent bullets, 
and discharged cartridge cases, which come into the possession of and/or the attention of this deijartment. 

On numerous occasions the ballistician or one of his assistants has reported to the scene of a crime to 
obtain this evidence. On off duty hours, this is accomplished by the means of a call system, whereby the bal- 
listician or one of his assistants may be contacted at his home, thereby giving the Ballistics Unit a 24-hour cover- 
age every day. 

Upon completion of microscopic examinations and identifications of evidence, a report is submitted and 
said evidence is held in the care and custody of this unit until such time as the ballistician or one of his assistants 
presents the evidence and the results of the examination and his opinions to the various courts throughout the city 
and state. 

During the period from January i, 1963, to December 31, 1963, the services of this unit were requested 
in six hundred and fourty-two (642) cases, listed as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths 5 

Armed robbery 45 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 78 

Bomb scares 39 

Bombs, explosives, etc 4 

Bullets recovered, no other crime involved 11 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc 52 

Firearm Law, violation of 121 

Murder 16 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 7 

vSuicide, attempt 5 

Weapons examined and held for safekeeping 18 

Weapons examined and returned to owners 18 

Weapons found, disposal, etc 166 

Test specimens from other departments, examined 50 

Discharging firearm within city limits 7 

Total 642 




CONFISCATED ARSENAL FOR CRIME 



23 



Crime Laboratory 



The services of the Crime Laboratory are being utihzed at an increased pace in the several districts as a 
result of the in-service training program at the Police Academy. The lectures at the academy by the department 
chemist before Supervisory Personnel have alerted them to the importance of procedures to be followed at the 
crime scene and a definite understanding of preserving intact the crime scene area. The lectures have enabled the 
biochemist to explain the latest techniques of obtaining and preserving evidence which has increased the use of the 
facilities at the several districts. 

During 1963 the Crime Laboratory Unit has more than doubled its case load. In an attempt to com- 
pensate for the increased demands placed upon this unit, a laboraton- technician was assigned in May. His work 
has been exemplary and his background and experience in police work and in chemical technology' are invaluable 
to the unit. 

A working relationship has been effected between the Emergency Service Unit and the Crime Laboratory 
Unit, resulting in more efficient preservation, collection, and handling of physical evidence at bomb and explosion 
scenes. 

A letter of commendation from the U. S. Attorney's Office in Boston was received for work done b}- this 
unit in conjunction with the Robbery L'nit. 

An important step fonvard was the assignment of a station wagon to be outfitted as a mobile crime labora- 
tory. This has already resulted in more expeditious and efficient crime scene and vehicle searches. 



Summar\ of Case Work, Boston Police Department Crime Laboratory Unit, 1963 



Material, Number 

test or of tests 

category or cases 

Asbestos I 

Acid Phosphatase 11 

Alkalies (lye) i 

Bloodstains: (tests) 

Benzidine iig 

Luminol i 

Takayama 69 

Precipitin 29 

Bombs and Suspected Bombs .... 4 
Casts: 

Plaster lo 

SiHcone Rubber RTV 3 

Charred Materials 12 

Clothing loS 

Chemical Analysis: Volatile Fluid 

Gunpowder i 

Qualitative Analysis 2 

Chemical Development of 

Latent Fingerprints: Toner 9 

Ninhydrin 68 



Material, 










Number 


test or of tests 


category or cases 


Silver Nitrate 8 


Iodine Fuming 










14 


Detective Dyes 










2 


Document Examinations 










3 


Explosive Residues 










3 


Fabric 












3 


Fibres 












21 


Fingernail Scrapings 












I 


Firebrick . 












28 


Fabric Prints . 












2 


Glass 












23 


Glass Fractures 












I 


Gloveprints 












I 


Hair .... 












4 


Laundry Marks 












2 


Mortar 












3 


Paint Samples, Reference 










27 


Paint Samples, Compari 


son 










7 



24 



Summary of Case Work, Boston Police Department Crime Laboratory Unit, 1963 Continued 



Material, 




Number 


test or of tests 


categor\- or cases 


Paper i 


Photographs: Infra-Red 






13 


Uhraviolet ..... 






I 


Black and White 






Q 


Color 






8 


Putty .... 






3 


Plaster 






4 


Physical Matching 






2 


Powder Residue — Cloth (C-Acids) 






28 


Powder Residue — Other (Paraffin) 






S 


Reports on Cases: in Progress 






184 


Verbal Reports .... 






Ql 


Written Reports 






41 


Rectographs 






-) 


Restoration Attempts With : 








Impressions 






I 


Oblique Lighting 






I 


Obliterated Serial Numbers: 








W'hicles 






3 


Firearms 






2 


Obliterated Writing 






5 


Iodine Solution .... 






2 



Material, Number 

test or of tests 

category or cases 

Rope and Cordage i 

Scene Examinations .141 

Shoeprints (Footwear Impressions) ... 56 

Soil and Minerals 3 

Spectrograph}- i 

Spermatazoa, Microscopic Identification of Tissue, 

Biological i 

Tape 5 

Tire Tracks 3 

Tools 7,7, 

Toolmarks 40 

LHtraviolet Examinations 18 

Vehicles Examined 48 

Woods and Metals 9 

Wire 6 

Weapons Examined : 

Cutting Instruments: Knives, etc. ... 19 

Blunt Instruments 3 

Other Types 3 

Miscellaneous 43 



Year 

1959 • 
i960 
1961 
1962 
1963 . 
* (Figures unavailable) 



Medical 


Police 


Sxaminer 


Department 


418 


66 


38S 


80 


329 


74 


330 


209 


* 


322 



Total 

484 
468 

403 
539 
322 




SCIENCE VS. CRIME 



Domestic Relations Unit 

The loUowing arrests have been made by this unit in the course of its rej^ular duties from January i, ig63 
to December 31, 1963: 

Nonsupport of famih' 

Violation terms of probation — nonsupport 

Violation terms of probation — Illegitimate Child Act 

Default — nonsupport 

Violation Illegitimate Child Act 

Assault and battery 

Larceny by fraud .... 

Default — \'iolation of Automobile Law 

Default — violation Illegitimate Child Act . 

Threats to do bodily harm 

Violation terms of probation, assault and battery 

Neglect 

Violation Automobile Law 

Assault and battery with a dangerous weapon 
Violation terms of probation — concealing leased property 
Violation tenns of probation — stubborn child . 
Violation terms of probation — breajdng and entering 
Default — terms of probation — larcenj^ 

Default — neglect 

Default — assault and battery ... 
Default — drunkenness . 

Desertion of family 

Malicious destruction of property 



Total 

Court appearances 

Arrests for outside Police Departments 



141 
119 
72 
30 
24 
13 
44 
I I 

4 
.S 
14 
3 
4 
2 
2 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



496 

434 
23 



As a result of the arrests made by this unit there w-ere 186 court orders of suspended sentences and fines 
ranging from Sio to Sioo and from three months to two years House of Correction ; 92 court orders of fines and com- 
mitments to the House of Correction for terms of three months to eight years; 240 court orders of probation ranging 
from two weeks to six years. 

Amount of money involved in 44 counts of larceny by fraud was $54,774.15. 

There were 45 orders of restitution to be made to the Welfare Department of the City of Boston amounting 
to 822,922.32. 

Xinet}.'-seven cases were removed from the rolls of the City of Boston Welfare Department, amount- 
ing to $98,994.40. 

There were 210 court orders of support of families amounting to $225,322.00. 

Amount of mone},' resulting from persons removed from the welfare rolls of the Cit\' of Boston and court 
orders of partial support and full support of families and restitution amounted to $347,238.72. 

Members of this unit have investigated 1,649 cases in the past year that have been referred to this unit 
by local and out-of-state authorities. Investigation in a number of these cases is still being pursued. 



Rendition Squad 

Fugitive from justice complaints were obtained and sixty-three arrests made in the various courts of this 
city. These complaints and following continuances required 107 appearances in the Boston Municipal Court 
76 appearances in the Roxbury District Ccurt, eleven appearances in the Dorchester District Court, three each 
in the East Boston, Charlestown, and West Roxbury Discrict Courts and two each in the Brighton and South Boston 
District Courts. Seventeen appearances were also required in the Federal Building before the United States Com- 
missioners. A grand total of 224 court appearances. 

Forty-nine defendants have been returned to demanding states during the past year. Thirty-two de- 
fendants were not returned due to warrants being dismissed b}- demanding states or refusal of the Commonwealth 
to rendite same. Seventeen cases are now pending, ten of these old cases where the defendants are in custody. 

Eleven out-of-state w^arrants have been returned without service after investigation. Forty-three in- 
vestigations have been completed for out-of-state cities and towns. 



26 



Special Service Unit 

Officers are assigned to unmarked police vehicles to patrol all sections of the cit\- and designated districts. 
Their principal duties are to investigate all crimes of street violence, armed robberies, rapes, aggravated assaults, and 
other crimes. 



During the year 1963, 804 investigations were made resulting in the following prosecutions: 

Crime 

Armed robbery 

Unarmed robber}' 

Attempted armed robber\" 

Breaking and entering nighttim.e 

Attempted breaking and entering nighttime 

Breaking and entering in daytime 

Unlawful possession of machine gun 

Possession of burglarious tools 

Larceny over $100 

Larceny under §100 

Conspiracy to commit larcen}- 

Conspiracy to cominit breaking and entering 

Larceny from the person 

Larceny by check 

Larceny from parking meters 

Forgery 

Uttering 

Receiving stolen goods 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 

Malicious destruction of parking meters 

Violation of Firearm Law 

Using without authority motor vehicle 

Open and gross lewdness 

Assault and battery on a police officer 

Assault and battery 

Being abroad in the nighttime 

Operating after suspension of license 

Operating unregistered motor vehicle 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle 

Attaching plates to a motor vehicle 

Unlawful gaming — being present 

Drunkenness 



Total 



Delinquent Child to Wit 

Larcen}" from parking meters 

Damage to parking meters .... 

Attempted breaking and entering nighttime 

Violation of firearm law .... 

Larcen}' from the person .... 

Violation of parole 



Number 
of Cases 



17 
8 
6 

15 

10 

3 

2 

II 

26 

47 

23 

I 

4 

32 
128 

50 
41 
12 

7 
33 
14 

17 
I 

4 
5 
35 
3 
2 
2 

5 
24 

3 
591 



Number 

of Cases 

27 

18 



Total 



27 



Arrests made of persons found to he wanted in otlier districts and police departments on warrants: 



Uttering 6 

Fugitive from justice 4 

Violation of parole 3 

Violation of probation 2 

Escapee 5 

Default warrants 11 

Nonsupport 5 

Prostitution 3 

Begetting 2 

Total 41 



JUVENILE AID SECTION 

The Juvenile Aid Section operates for the prevention of delinquency among juveniles and to maintain a 
program of constant cooperation with all agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of maladjusted 
children. 



Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate factors which induce criminal tendencies 
among children. 

2. Enlist the aid of the general jniblic, child welfare agencies, districts and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship; develop a proper mental attitude of citizens toward law-enforcement agencies; 
educate the public in the problems of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children; investigate 
and take necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotel, bus, and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of juveniles congregate. 

6. Control existing problems by modem and efficient juvenile police methods. 



Summary of Work Accomplished 

The juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,813 male and 260 female juveniles in the following age 



groups : 
























Age 


/ 


S 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


Total 


Male 


7 


17 


41 


81 


100 


147 


218 


301 


441 


460 


1,813 


Female 








I 





6 


16 


30 


66 


75 


66 


260 



In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way involved in 
unlawful acti^•ities concerning juveniles, i8q male and 16 female adults were prosecuted. 



28 

Thf officers also l)roui,'lit to their rcsjjcctive districts for questioning in regard to criminal offences com- 
mitted on each district 2,663 male and 444 female juveniles. As a result of the interrogation, together with per- 
sonal interviews with the parents of these children, it was determined to be for the best interests of the children, 
parents, and the city to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency pro- 
ceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the Cit>- of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child, which is dramatically bourne out by the fact that the number of reciflivists 
still remains below i per cent. It is justification for the continuance of this ])olicy in Boston with the child being 
returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first oft'enders, without having the 
stigma of a juvenile record attached to the child, who, after the proper disciplinary action by the parents, would 
not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delinquency pattern again. 

There were 5,385 cases processed by the Juvenile Aid Section for this period, including the cases brought 
to court and the cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinary action. 

This bureavi presented lectures to many different organizations in an effort to educate the public to the 
scope of juvenile delinquency, the elementary causes, the jiolicies, plans, and procedures of the Juvenile Aid Section. 
The results of these lectures are reflected in many ways, such as the multitude of organizations which are now 
conducting campaigns against the sale of indecent literature and photographs to children, the organizations which 
are now offering athletic programs to children, and, most important of all, the supervisory interest that parents are 
now taking in their children. It cannot go without mention that the tremendous cooperation this bureau is receiving 
from the clergy, the schools, and the agencies of the City of Boston is directly related to this program of acquainting 
the public with the juvenile delinquency problem in this city. 

During the past year the juvenile officers personally contacted many people who were engaged in some 
phase of children's work in the City of Boston, including school teachers, librarians, court attaches, clergymen, 
bovs' club and girls' club workers, and those people who staff the many agencies working for the betterment of 
children. This phase of the program is to make all of these people more fully aware of the fact that the police are 
cognizant of their importance in the overall battle against delinquencj' and realize that delinquency shall be de- 
feated onlv l)^" the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of 
attendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officially recog- 
nized that truancy has decreased in Boston because of the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers through their contact with the various agencies 
have learned what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted 
by the agencies after a referral had been made to them by the officers who, because of their knowledge of the neigh- 
borhood of assignment, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report of the year 1962 shows that this bureau proc- 
essed and handled approximately 1,000 less cases even though it is noted that 162 more juveniles were placed before 
the courts. In the light of the reported upward trend on a national level, these facts should be regarded as encour- 
aging. 



VICE CONTROL SECTION 



Narcotics and Vice Unit 



The Narcotics and Vice Unit is charj;cd with the investigation and prosecution of persons who commit 
crimes against chastity, morahty, decency, and good order, involving the unlawful sale, distribution, and use of 
narcotic drugs and derivatives and the importing, printing, jniblishing, selling, distributing, or exhibiting of ob- 
scene or impure literature, prints, pictures, etc. This unit also cooperates with federal agencies in the investiga- 
tion of interstate prostitution and transportation of narcotic drugs and obscene literature. 

Members of this unit have worked in close cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Federal 
Narcotic Bureau, Post Office Department, Alcoholic Tax Unit of the Federal Government, the District Attorney's 
Office, as well as the state and local police departments. 

Officers of this unit have appeared at twenty engagements to speak before various ci\'ic, religious, and 
educational groups on narcotic problems. A complete exhibition of narcotic and harmful drugs is on display in this 
office. Visiting law enforcement officers as well as civilians on tour of Police Headquarters are shown this displa,y 
as part of education in problems of narcotic law enforcement. 



f 


s 


t 

ii 


■1 




^^m 






mmm. 


^^.^m .^k 






msim 


^ ^Hk 2m 






^^^kSi^'- HUH 


_ ' -iK-iiiJr ■v:#«'^^B 






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'•=* " 


■^ ^ 




M. |>f=«l 




^ 
.--^' 


xSp^ ^* • 


EmKClS^^^S 


^#'*- 


1 ■"•- 





Investigations 

Narcotic Drug Law violations 
Prostitution and related offenses . 
Pretended fortune telling 
Obscene literature, jjrints, pictures, etc. 

Total 



512 

523 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Narcotics 
and Vice Unit .Secured Evidence 

illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs . 
Prostitution and related offences .... 
Obscene literature, jjrints, i:)ictures, etc. 
Pretended fortune telling 

Total 



.599 
388 

1,1 

2 

802 



LONG SURVEILLANCE UNCOVERS 
DRUG CACHE 



30 

Gaming Unit 

The enforcement of gaming laws b\- officers assigned to this unit has become increasingly more difficult 
due to recent court decisions affecting the arrest process and admissibility of evidence, as well as by the ingenious 
techniques resorted to by this type of offender in destroying evidence, such as the use of "flash paper" which bursts 
into flames when touched by a cigar or cigarette and the recording of bets on formica-treated boards and cards 
which can be readily erased with the palm of the hand. 

In one case, coded betting notations were submitted to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for decoding 
by a crxptographer while in another case the Federal Bureau of Investigation furnished the services of an agent 

to testify as an expert witness on handwriting and gaming. 

During the past }-ear officers of this unit conducted 920 investigations resulting in 511 arrests. 



m m 



31 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 

This bureau has the responsibility of the administration of all other auxiliary services which must be 
provided to assure eiTective police operations, including maintenance of police buildings and equipment, requisition 
of supplies, laboratory examination of physical evidence, records and communications, identification and custody 
of prisoners. 

The quality of police service and the success of many police operations are dependent on the suitabilit}' 
of equipment and the maintenance of police buildings. In order to provide an effective span of control, this bureau 
is separated into the Central Services Division and the Records and Communications Division. 



CENTRAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Central Services Division has direct responsibility for administrative supervision of the City Prison, 
House of Detention for Women, building and equipment maintenance, the processing, care, and custody of non-depart- 
mental property and inventory, and the custody and distribution of departmental-owned supplies and equipment. 
This division is also responsible for the processing of all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner. 

Satisfactory maintenance and repair of property and equipment promote efficiency, morale, and prestige 
of the police service and have a direct bearing on good public relations. 



PROPERTY CLERK UNIT 

The Property Clerk Unit is charged with the care of all police buildings; lost, stolen, and abandoned prop- 
erty; money or other property alleged to have been illegally obtained; and all articles and property taken from 
persons arrested for an}' cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come 
into the possession of the department. 

All orders for supplies, building maintenance, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year, 218 motor vehicles cajnc into custody of this office; sixteen vehicles were released to legiti- 
mate claimants, and 268 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now fifty-four motor vehicles in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department automobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. 
During the year, on 7,688 occasions, department cars were repaired, and, on 2,045 occasions, cars were serviced. 
There were 371 department cars and 220 privately owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department 
operates a motorcycle shop where, on S30 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the 3'ear. 

This unit is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the various districts, 
and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



32 

Lost and Found Propertv 

Articles on hand January i. IQ63 20O 

Articles received during tlie year to December 31, 1963 252 

Total 45S 



Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners ^3 

Wortlilcss 65 

Sold at public auction g3 

Total iiumljcr of articles disposed of 211 

Total number of articles on hand December 31, 1963 247 



33 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 

There are 262 motor vehicles in the service at the present time which ar.e distributed as follows: 



Districts 


Combination 

Patrol and 

Ambulances 


Passenger 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


Motorcycles 


Totals 


Tactical Patrol 
Headquarters 
District i 
District 2 
District 4 
District 6 
District 7 
District 8 
District 9 
District 10 
District 11 
District 13 . 
District 14 
District 15 . 
District 16 
District 17 . 
District iS . 
District 19 
Traffic Division 
Pool 














I 

2 
2 

3 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
I 

2 
I 
I 
2 

2 



46 
3 
3 
9 
6 

5 

10 

7 
8 

5 
t) 

4 

5 
5 
5 
5 
8 

12 


12 

4 


1 

I 
I 
4 
4 

I 
2 

3 
6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

20 


7 

58 

6 

6 

13 

12 

II 

6 

13 
1 1 

13 
13 
II 

5 

7 

9 

9 

10 

28 

14 


Totals 


U 


*i6o 


ti6 




262 



* Iiicluclt'd in the total of 100 passenger automoljiles there are 28 station wagons. 
t Inrliided in the total of 16 trucks there is a car-crane and a fork-lift at District 8. 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Districts 1, 2, 4, 
6. 7, 9, 10. 11. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, and 19. 

During the year ainliulaiiccs responded to calls to convey sick and injured persons to the following places: 

New England Baptist Hospital 18 

Kenmore Hospital 15 

Harley Hospital 10 

Glenside Hospital 9 

Brookline Hospital 8 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 
Milton Hospital 

Chelsea Soldiers Home 6 

Somerville Hospital 6 

Boston Sanatorium 4 

Parker Hill Hospital 4 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 3 

Joslin Clinic 3 

Metropolitan State Hospital 2 

Sancta Maria Hospital 2 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

Bournewood Hospital 2 

Brooks Hospital 2 

Mt. Auburn Hospital 2 

Cambridge City Hospital 

Halmemann Hospital 

Hardiman Hospital 

Jewish Nursing Home, Chelsea 

Lahey Clinic 

Norwood Hospital 

Cahill Hospital 

Fenwood Hospital 

Employees Clinic 

Boston University Infirmary 

Women's Free Hospital . 



Boston City Hospital 












15.845 


Massachusetts General Hospital . 






3.094 


Services not required .... 








2.340 


Boston State Hospital .... 








1.343 


Carney Hospital .... 








1.055 


St. Elizabeth's Hospital . 








1,010 


East Boston Relief Station 








762 


Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 








662 


Children's Hospital .... 








489 


Faulkner Hospital . 












441 


Beth Israel Hospital 












386 


Southern Mortuary 












306 


Home 












291 


Northern Mortuary 












159 


St. Margaret's Hospital 












102 


Massachusetts Memoiial Hospital 








91 


United States Naval Hospital 








77 


United States Veterans' Hospital 








73 


Police Station Houses 








72 


Massachusetts Mental Health Hospita 


I 






69 


Boston Lying-in Hospital 








66 


Roshndale General Hospital 










65 


New England Hospital . 










60 


Deaconess Hospital 










53 


Brighton Marine Hospital 










41 


Physician's OfBce 










38 


Longwood Hospital 










32 


Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 








30 


Floating Hospital .... 








28 


Shattuck Hospital .... 








25 


SuUivan Square Medical Center . 








23 


Pratt Diagnostic Hospit 


il 










21 



Total . 



29,274 



34 

POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 

Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 562. Of these 530 are connected with the underground system and 



o 



2 with the overhead. 



Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,595 trouble calls, inspected 5O2 signal boxes, 
15 signal desks, 17 motor generator sets, 500 storage batteries. Repairs have been made on 218 box movements, 
23 registers, 147 locks, 26 time stamps, 27 vibrator bells, 28 relays, 35 electric fans, 45 motors, and 15 generators. This 
unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 60 signal, 562 telephone, and 79 blinker-light circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs 
throughout the department. It also maintains 50 headquarters-to-station house telephone circuits, 17 teletype- 
writer circuits, 17 radio-wired broadcast circuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank Station of the 
Metropolitan District Police, and the intercommunication units throughout the department. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending December 31, 1963 

(.Included in Table XI) 

Payrolls $113,980 70 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 36,885 22 

Total $150,865 92 



35 



CITY PRISON 

The City Prison under the direction of the Bureau of General Services is Tocated in the New Court House 
Building, Somerset Street, Boston. 



Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within jurisdiction of the Centra! Munici- 
pal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper until the 
next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury actoin. 

During the year, January i, 1963, to December 31, 1963, 10,575 ""le" were committed to the City Prison, 
as follows: 

Assault and battery 

Automobile law 

Breaking and entering 

Dangerous weapo: 

Default 

Drunkenness 

Fugitive 

Illegitimacy . 

Indecent exposure 

Larceny 

Lewdness 



41 


Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 






I 


q 
I 


Nonsupport . 
Violation probation 










17 

7 


2 
14 


Suspicious person 
Threats 










71 
1 


0,221 
5 


Vagrancy 
Miscellaneous 










6 

78 


S 

I 


Safekeeping . 
Trespassing 










77 
2 


I 


Total 


10,57.'; 



Two hundred and twelve male lodgers were received and cared for during the year. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is directed by the Bureau of General Services and is located in the New 
Court House Building, Somerset Street. All women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention, 
and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. 

If sentenced, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the institution to which 
the}- have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such jury action. 



During the year 2,364 were committed as follows: 



Abandonment 
Abortion 
Adultery 

Assault and battery 
Delinquent children 
Dmg law violation 
Drunkenness 
l^'orgery 
Fornication . 
House of ill fame 
Idle and disorderly 
Larceny 



I 

o 
8 

14 

o 

9 
1,469 
o 
o 
o 

96 

m 



Liquor law violation . 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Lewdness 

Neglect of children 

Runaways 

Safekeeping 

Stubborn child .... 
Violation of probation and parole 
Suspicious persons 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total 



Lodgers 

M. C. Recommitments 

Bails .... 



I 

4 
6 

7 
7 

10 

iS 

23 

357 

223 



2,364 

9 
10 

330 



36 

HACKNEY CARRIAGES 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, Hmits the number of licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the poHce year, January i, 1963, to December 31, 1963, due to changes of ownership and regrants, 
a total of * 2, 18 5 licenses M^ere granted. 

There were 285 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Of these 145 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 140 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive 

the same: 

HackneN Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,185 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 1,679 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 506 

2,18s 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 659 

Carriages licensed — "changes of ownership" 153 

Carriage licenses in effect December 31, 1963 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1963 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 1.525 

Carriages inspected 2,031 

*Sot) "regrants" 



Licenses Issued by Police Commissioner 

Auctioneer (Class i) Alusician (collective and sound car) 

Auctioneer (other classes) Musician itinerant 

Bicycle registrations Pawnbroker 

Dog PuVjHc lodging house 

Driver (hackney carriage) Secondhand articles 

Firearms, dealer in Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 

Firearms, license to carry Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 

Gunsmith ' Sightseeing automobile 

Hackney carriage Sightseeing driver 

Handcart (common carrier) Special police 

Junk collector Street railway conductor, motorman, and starter 

Junk shopkeeper 

Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 6,761 

Applications for drivers' hcenses rejected 214 

Drivers' licenses granted 6,547 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 51, of which revocations 14 were rescinded and the licenses restored, leaving 

the net figure shown of sucli revocations as 37 

Drivers' licenses in effect December 31, 1963 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1963 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 6,639 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 695 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 285 

RECORDS AND COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 

This Division is charged with the administrative supervision of the Central Complaint Section, Central 
Records Section, Identification Section, Printing Unit, and Data Processing Unit. 

The Central Records Section is the information center of the department and coordinates all police record 
requirements so as to form a fully integrated system. The section is open around the clock to provide assistance 
to other police activities. It contains all department administrative and operating records and exercises staff 
control over all reporting units to assure timely submission of reports that are both complete and accurate. AH 
warrants are processed by this section. 



37 

The Central Complaint Section receives complaints and reports of crime and other incidents from the 
I)ublic, and assigns radio car personnel to investigate the reports as received. It also generally controls the imme- 
diate deployment of field personnel, subject to appropriate authority in emergency situations. 

The Identification Section provides for photography and fingerprinting of arrested persons and maintains 
both criminal and civil files of fingerprints and photographs. 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT SECTION 

The Central Complaint Section has control over all communications consisting of telephone, teletype, 
radio, and telegraph. 

There were 585,201 outgoing telephone messages and 4,574 toll calls made by the department through our 
switchboard; 558,419 emergency messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through either 
DE 8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 610,201 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 272,360 teletype messages and 
553 telegrams were processed, 15,446 of these relating to missing persons; 20,725 automobiles and registration plates 
were reported lost or stolen, and 18,396 were reported recovered; 900,000 radio messages were sent. 

On an average month some 75,000 radio messages are processed over our radio sj'stem to and from mobile 
equipment and jjolice boats. A soundscriber records accurateh- each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an important administrative record of same. 

In June of 1963, a contract was entered into with Motorola Corporation to convert the department's 
radio communication system from a low-band broadcasting frequency to a high-band frequenc}- ; to change from a 
radio tube system to a highly transistorized one ; to set up a new base station ; to supply the latest in walkie-talkie 
equipment ; and provide new radio equipment for both the Harbor Police Boats and the department motorcycles. 
Most of the installation work was performed by personnel of the Radio Maintenance Unit, while at the same time 
it carried on regular maintenance operations so that no breakdown occurred during the transition period. 




DUAL DISPATCHING WITH LATEST 
EQUIPMENT 




EMERGENCY — DEvonshire 8-1212 



38 



CENTRAL RECORDS SECTION 

The Central Records Section is located on the third floor of Police Headquarters. 

Over $28,992 was collected for work permits and requests for records during the past year by this section. 

This section now assigns all booking numbers for arrests for all districts, which resulted in the making 
and filing of approximately 75,000 additional 3x5 cards in the main index files of this unit without the addition of 
extra personnel. This system now permits officers of the department to know at any time if a particular individual 
has or does not have an arrest record in this city for any offense. 

During the year there were 3,685 additional Bureau of Records folders added in the files, a system started 
in January, 1962, in an attempt to obtain separate folders for each individual arrested by this department. 



Recorded in the Main Index File 
Recorded in Female Record File 
Recorded in Male Record File 



967.755 

25.049 

246,659 



Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone and personal inquiries made over the counter 

Requests received by correspondence 

Requests for certified records 

Requests for jury records 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 



Total 



Requests received from various public agencies : 
Stragglers and deserters (armed forces) . 
Auxiliary police applicants . . . . 

Grand Total 



9,860 

*7.65S 

1,235 

3,218 

11,837 

33,805 



840 

5 

34.650 



* This includes requests from all Ijranches of the armed forces and companies throughout the country engaged in defense work. 

Missing Persons 

Total nimiber of persons reported missing in Boston * 1,245 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc i,i74 

Total number still missing 71 

* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing 
who were found or returned within a few hours after the report was made. 





Age and Sex of Persons 


Reported 


Missing in 


Boston 






Age 


Mis 


SING 


Found 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years, under 21 

Over 21 years 


225 
226 

238 


150 
222 

184 


214 
213 
217 


175 
177 
177 


12 
10 
22 


4 

8 

15 


Totals 


6S9 


556 


644 


5-^9 


44 


- / 



Reported missing in Boston 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 

Reported missing and returned the same day (locally) 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 

Total number of persons reported missing 



1,245 


7,132 


918 


2,304 



11,599 



39 



District 


I (North End section) 


District 


2 (Downtown section) 


District 


4 (South End section) 


District 


6 (South Boston) 


District 


7 (East Boston) 


District 


8 (Harbor Police) . 


District 


9 (Dudley Street sectio 




of Roxbury) 


District 


lo (Roxbury Crossing 




section) 


District 


1 1 (Adams Street section 




of Dorchester) 


District 


13 (Jamaica Plain) 


District 


14 (Brighton) 




District 


15 (Charlestown) 




District 


16 (Back Bav) . 




District 


17 (West Roxbury) 




District 


18 (Hyde Park) 




District 


19 (Mattapan) . 





Persons Reported Missing by Police Districts for 1963 



14 

8 

lOI 

128 

I 

225 

173 

i2g 
98 
Oc) 
41 
30 
39 
32 

126 



Total 

Persons interviewed 
Inquiries relating to location of 
friends and relatives 



1,245 



'^410 



586 




THANKS FOR TAKING ME HOME 



There were no reports of persons afflicted with amnesia. 



Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 

Warrants received from other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston 
Wan-ants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston 



Total 



Warrants sent out for service to Districts and Units within the department .... 
Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts ... 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this department 

Total warrants processed . . .. 

Warrants returned without service to our districts and units 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 



7,314 

1,343 

91 

8,748 

7,276 

1,002 

129 

341 

8,748 

1,468 
1,215 
6,065 



Summonses 

Total number received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 

Total number served 

Total number not served 

Total number of summonses sent from Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 
Total number ser\'ed 

Total number not served 



9,136 
8,311 

825 

40,579 
3t>,409 

4,170 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

The multilith machine was used to make 1,275,600 impressions consisting of department forms, letters, 
police bulletins, and IBM cards. 

The mimeograph machine made 625,900 impressions consisting of daily manifolds, bulletins, circular 
letters for the various units and districts including police school lessons. 



' Does not include those interviewed at the various units and districts of the department. 



40 

DATA PROCESSING UNIT 

During the past year members of this unit collaborated with the Administrative Services Department of 
the City of Boston in converting police lists of residents of this city from an expensive complicated printing pro- 
cedure to a less expensive, more efficient data processing SN'stem. Through the use of data processing equipment, 
voting lists and ward and precinct books are now produced at substantial savings to the city. 

Starting in 1962, preparation of notices of parking violations to be mailed to offenders were processed by 
this unit, through use of data processing equipment. This particular function required the renting of additional 
expensive equipment and made serious inroads on time needed for performance of existing operations because of 
detail involved by this process. As a result of these inefficiences, the department actively sponsored and submitted 
for legislative approval the tag-on-vehicle procedure which is now law. 

During 1963, due to this new law and a streamlining of our data processing procedures, many of those 
machines were eliminated, resulting in future savings of 811,760 annually 

This unit prepares crime statistics on a district basis so as to insure the deployment of officers and equip- 
ment in the most efficient and effective manner. Annual, quarterly, and monthly reports and analysis of crime and 
services rendered are compiled by personnel of this unit, and high crime incidence areas are determined by the use 
of a "statistical reporting area" sj-stem. 

Accurate and detailed reports are prepared here and are forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. 



IDENTIFICATION SECTION 
Photography 

Number of photographs on file January I, 1963 795i33i 

Made and filed during the year iQjS^o 

Number of "Foreign" photographs on file . i5>764 

Number of "Foreign" photographs received during the year 1,360 

Total 832,015 

Number on file in the "Local Segregated" file (gallery) 52,986 

Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file 15,764 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) 127 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 22 

Scenes of crime photographed 621 

Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 9,796 

Other cities and towns 3>76o 

Number of rectigraph photographs made 4>44o 

Number of negatives of criminals made 4,898 

Number of prints made from same 24,490 



The rogues' gallery is constantly being updated by removing from the hies numerous photographs considered to be too old to 
be used for identification purposes. 



Color Photography 



Color "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1962 
Made and filed during the year 1963 .... 

Total "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1963 

jMiscellaneous color photographs taken and processed 
battery, etc.) 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 
Number of prints made from same 
Number of reorders of criminal photographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made 
Number of prints made from same 
Number of photographs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime ^■isited 
Number of exposures (4x5 camera) 
Ntimber of prints made from same 



(scenes 



ot V 



iolence, homicides 



assault 



and 



41 



16,882 
4,898 

21,780 

564 

2,890 

S>78o 

4,686 

124 

620 

473 
2,886 

4,347 
13,041 



Polygraph 

In June of 1963 the department acquired a poh'graph or lie detector machine. Inasmuch as the examiner or 
machine operator and the questions he asks are of prime importance, a carefully selected member of the department 
was sent to Chicago to attend a six-month course at the Reid Polygraph Institute on a scholarship provided by a local 
business organization. The use of this machine will reduce substantially the countless number of man-hours spent 
interrogating persons suspected of homicides and other serious crimes and aid immeasurably in the apprehension of 
criminals. Conversely, this machine will be even more useful in determining a person's innocence and prevent in- 
convenience to the public. 

The following is a report of activities in the Polygraph Unit up to December 31, 1063. 



Unit 
Serviced 


Number 
Pers.ms 


Under 
Arrest 


Sex 


Adults 


Minors 


Crime 
Investigated 


Homicide 

District 4 

District 6 

District 11 . . 

District 18 - 

District 19 . ... 


9 

I 

2 

3 
I 

I 


3 




3 
I 



Male 

Male 

I Male 1 

I Female; 

Male 

Male 

Male 


8 


2 


I 
I 


I 
I 



3 




Murder 
Larceny 

Paternity 

Breaking and entering 

Murder 

Lewd person 


Totals 


17 


/ 




12 


.T 






SEARCH FOR TRUTH 



42 



Fingerprint File 

Number on file December 31, 1962 

Taken and filed during 1963: 

Male ■ . , . . 

Female 

Received from other authorities: 

Male 

Female 

Number on file December 3 1 , 19 03 

Fingerprints sent to : 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and towns 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 

Police oflicers 

Special police officers 

Hackney carriage drivers 

Civilian employees 

Firearms act (revolver licensesj 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civiHan file) December 31, 19O2 
Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1963 



229,225 

3,266 
1,632 

1,870 
465 

236,458 

4,898 

4,898 

165 

80 
i,ioS 

4,6So 

58 
1,269 

101,616 
108,811 



Five-Finger System of Fingerprinting 

Number of five-finger cards on file December 31, 1963 

Number of Main Index cards cross-indexed to five finger system December 31, 1963 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes, on file in the Identification Section December 31, 

Number of connections made by latent prints since the system was established 



iq6j 



24,680 

12,340 

1,445 

484 



There were 45 identifications made through the viewing of the mug files (both black and white and colored 
mugs) of this department during the year 1963. There was also incorporated into the segregation s}-stem of the 
mu'' files a separate file of arrests by districts, which enables an officer or witness to A-iew photos of persons arrested 
in any particular area or on any district. 

During the year there were 1,445 latent prints found at the scenes of crime in the city, and returned to 
this unit; this is an increase of 310 over the same period in 1962. The Latent Print Unit made 44 identifications 
from the prints fomad at crime scenes. 

There were 622 crime scenes photographed during the year 1963. 

The Photographic Unit has branched into more extensive use of 16 mm. mo\-ie equipment owned by this 
department in the area of surveillance work and with a view of practical application of this equipment in the field 
of training films. The results of this are not complete, but are very promising. 




DID HE LEAVE A PRINT? 



43 

BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

This bureau was established for the purpose of having an inspectional ser\'ice that operates bej-ond the 
scope of the Bureaus of Field Operations, General Ser\dces, and Personnel and Training. 

The Bureau of Inspectional Services consists of three divisions, namely, Staff Inspection, Internal Affairs, 
and Intelligence. 

The reports of all its investigations, inspections, and recommendations are forwarded directlj' to the Police 
Commissioner 

STAFF INSPECTION DIVISION 

This division is charged with the responsibility of conducting periodic inspections of the entire police 
operation, on a continuing basis. The purpose of these inspections is to determine whether: 

1. Personnel are sufficiently supervised, trained, and being deployed in the most effective manner. 

2. Plant and equipment are being maintained and efficiently utilized. 

3. Rules, regulations, general orders, and policies of the department are being complied with. 

4. Present n.iles, regulations, and policies are sufficient to meet the present day-to-day demands on the 
department. 

5. There are any deficiencies in such matters as integrity, morale, or supervision which should be corrected 
or improved. 

During the first six months of 1963, personnel of the division aided in coordinating the implementation of 
recommendations made by the Field Service Division of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. 

A program is presently under way that is designed to insure that each of the several police districts and 
units will be inspected on an annual basis to determine adequacy of personnel-public relationships, and the processing 
of prisoners by the police. 

During the month of August, personnel of this division conducted a comprehensive survey and inspection 
of the Property Clerk Section. All clothing and equipment was carefully inventoried to determine the material 
on hand that can be utilized. 

Late in 1963, a field trial of a proposed arrest record and procedure was conducted by officers of this division. 

INTERNAL AFFAIRS DIVISION 

Personnel of this division conduct investigations of all police recruits prior to their appointment in order 
to insure the selection of the most qualified persons for appointment to the Police Department. All complaints 
against police officers or civilian emplo\-ees of the department, both of an external or internal source, are in\-estigated 
by division personnel or referred to the proper authorit}-. Supervision of the departmental disciplinary process 
is also the responsibility of this division. 

The Internal Affairs Division has established amiable liaison with several minority and civil libert}- groups 
for the purpose of exploring any problems in this area and to bring about improvements w^hen the need is indicated. 

During 1963, seventy recruits were investigated prior to appointment. One hundred and fifteen complaints 
were investigated and settled to the satisfaction of the complainants. Representatives of this division were present 
at all department Trial Boards and conducted fifteen investigations within the department that involved depart- 
ment personnel. 

During the year, 87 5 hours of punishment duty were meted out by Trial Boards, and fifteen other type 
disciplinary actions were taken. One resignation and one dismissal were brought about as a result of personnel 
misconducts. 

As a result of recommendations made by this division, procedures were established that caused a reduction 
in personnel sick leave. 



44 

INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

This division is responsible for keeping the Police Commissioner informed on the status of orj,'anized 
crime and the activities of known criminals in the city. 

During the past year officers of this division have compiled a comprehensive filing system of the activities 
of known criminals, organized crime, various groups which require police surveillance, and locations which have 
been used for criminal activity in the past or which are suspected of being used for criminal activity. This division 
initiated field interrogation reports which are now being received from officers in the se\'eral districts who obser\'e 
and/or interrogate persons suspected of being involved in unlawful activity. These reports are evaluated before 
being filed, and the information is then forwarded to the proper unit or agency. In addition, infonnation received 
from various sources must be evaluated, and in most cases the officers of this division must conduct an investigation 
to verify the information which was received. 

The officers assigned to the Intelligence Division are constantly conducting investigations and making 
surveillances in an effort to keep abreast of the activities and locations of known criminals in Boston and the sur- 
rounding areas. 

In addition to furnishing the various districts and units of this department with information which has 
assisted in the solution of a large number of crimes perpetrated in this city, this division is working constantly with 
other departments and agencies, on local, state, and federal levels. In this way we have received information 
valuable to officers of this department and also have furnished other agencies and departments with information 
which assisted them in solving crimes perpetrated in their jurisdiction. 



45 



BUREAU OF 
PERSONNEL AND TRAINING 

This bureau is perhaps the most important auxiliary' to the main police function. Without proper selection 
and training procedures, the police function would be serioush- imperilled. 

The task of recruiting, training, evaluating, and assigning personnel becomes a considerable and responsible 
undertaking. 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

This division is responsible for the maintenance of departmental personnel files and for the assembling and 
recording of the background and abilities of all dejiartment members. It administers the personnel evaluation 
program and encourages department members to impro\'e their educational and technical competence. The 
Personnel Di\'ision is also responsible for the preparation of payrolls and the maintenance of payroll records. It 
also handles the acquisition and processing of new personnel and arranges for the medical examination of all per- 
sonnel. 

During the past year, old personnel files have been purged and selected material captured on microfilm. 
New filing systems have been introduced to accommodate badge numbers, payroll indexes, blood types of employees, 
sick leave information, and absentee statistics. 



MEDICAL UNIT 

The office of the Department Medical Examiner is located on the seventh floor of Police Headquarters and 
consists of the doctor's office, a fully equipped and modernized examination and treatment room, a waiting room, 
and secretary's office. 

Upon entrance into the department, all persons certified for appointment by the Division of Civil Service 
either for the uniformed fcrce or in civilian capacity, as well as those employed for civilian duty on a temporary 
basis, are examined, and a phj-sical report on each is submitted to the Police Commissioner. 

All members of the unifomied force are examined for injuries incurred either in the performance of duty 
or when off duty. Those members whose injuries bring about a period of absence and those incapacitated by a 
prolonged illness are given a periodic examination. The diagnosis and prognosis in each case as to availabilit}- to 
perform police duty are submitted to the Police Commissioner with recommendations. Permanent records are 
maintained which aid in decisions affecting continuance in the service or retirement, as the case may be. 

Preventive inoculations are administered by the Medical Examiner to the members of the force to meet 
any exigenc}-, such as in the case of an epidemic of influenza, poliomyelitis, etc. These immunizations are given 
on a voluntary basis. Also on a voluntary basis, and at various inter\-als, members of the force report to the Medi- 
cal Unit for the purpose of donating their blood to the American Red Cross. 

Reports bearing upon each case of members of the department receiving medical examinations are sub- 
mitted to the attention of the Police Commissioner and for the personnel record of each officer concerned. 



46 



TRAINING DIVISION 



This division administers and ojK'rates the Police Academy. It is mainly responsible for the development 
of a progressive prograin for recruit, in-ser\"ice, specialization, supervisory, prepromotional, and command training. 
The immediate goal is to establish a continuous in-service training program for all grades within the department. 

During the past year, over 130 training lectures were developed for the guidance of personnel attending 
the Academy. All personnel who were processed through the Training Academy were exposed to mock court 
sessions. 

The recruit program was extended from eight to thirteen weeks, with greater stress placed on civil rights, 
public relations, public speaking, case preparation, and court presentations. Outstanding personalities, such as 
jurists, doctors, defense counselors, psychiatrists, sociologists, etc., supplemented our regular police instructors in 
offering a well-rounded training program. 

The Training Division is also responsible for the proper functioning of the Drillmaster and Firearms 
Training Units. Officers assigned to the Firearms Training Unit developed a new type "Practical Pistol Course" 
that now provides instruction in combat firing under city conditions. 

The Training Academy also proudly boasts of a museum that links the past with the present, with its 
many outstanding displays. 








EFFICIENCY THROUGH TRAINING 



ON PARADE 



47 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 




THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL TOR VALOR 

DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE THOMAS F. SLLLIVAX AWARD 

TO 

PATROLMAN ROBERT S. SKEHAN 

DISTRICT FIFTEEN 

On August 31, 1903, Patrolman Robert S. Skehan 
apprehended a Charlestown resident wanted for the 
\'icious murder of a young girl. At the time this man 
was apprehended he was armed with a large carving 
knife and submitted to arrest only after being wounded 
by Patrolman Skehan. 



RICHARD CARDINAL CUSHING 

PRESENTS WALTER SCOTT MEDAL 

FOR VALOR TO PATROLMAN 

ROBERT S. SKEHAN 



DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE THOAIAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD 

TO 

PATROLMAN THOMAS H. SCOTT 

PATROLMAN MICHAEL A. BOCCUZZI 

DISTRICT TEN 

On the afternoon of January 2, 1963, Patrolmen 
Thomas H. Scott and jNIichael A. Boccuzzi arrested 
three men at gunpoint, one of whom was armed with 
a fully loaded .45 calibre U. S. Army automatic 
pistol, for robberj' of a market in Jamaica Plain. 
At time of their apprehension these men were still in 
possession of the proceeds of the robbery. They 
are now serving sentences in Walpole State Prison. 




48 




DRPARTMi:\T MKDM. OF IIOXOR 

TO 

PATROLMAN FRANCIS V, CONNOLLY 

DISTRICT FOUR 

Patrolman Connolly, while off duty and en route to 
his home, observed a man acting suspiciously, trj'ing 
to secrete a revolver in the waistband of his trousers. 
The officer approached the man and identified him- 
self as a police officer. The suspect drew a fully loaded 
.32 calibre revolver and aimed it at the officer. Patrol- 
man Connolly after a struggle was able to disarm the 
man and placed him under arrest. After an inves- 
tigation, it was revealed the prisoner had just bur- 
glarized a tavern in the vicinity. 



DEPARTMEXT MEDAL OF IIOXOR 
TO 
PATROLMAN JOHN A. SACCO 
DISTRICT NINE 
Responding to an emergency radio call to the inter- 
section of Southampton Street and Massachusetts 
Avenue, Patrolman Sacco on the night ot September 7, 
1963, observed a man perched on top of the metal 
framework of a gas storage tank more than 200 feet 
above the street, threatening to jump to his death. 
The officer climbed the framework to where the man 
was balanced and while Rev. Kenneth Murphy of 
Rescue, Inc., and personnel of the Boston Fire De- 
partment kept the man's attention, Officer Sacco came 
from the rear of the framework and grasped the man 
securely until Fire Department personnel could carry 
him to safetv. 




49 



DEPARTMENT MEDAE OE IJO.XOR 

TO 

PATROLMAN JOHN C. COLLINS 
DISTRICT TEN 

On the afternoon of April o, igOj, Patrolman John C. 
Collins observed a small boy, fully clothed, fall ofE a 
pier into the frigid waters of the South Boston Lagoon. 
Patrolman Collins, with complete disregard for his 
own safet}', plunged into the water and rescued the 
bo}'. In the course of the rescue Patrolman Collins 
sustained a severe laceration of his right leg which 
necessitated hospital treatment. 






DEPARTMENT MEDAL OE HONOR 
TO 
PATROLMAN VINCENT B. GIANNUSA. JR. 
TRAFFIC DIVISION 

On the afternoon of August 26, 1963, Patrolman 
Vincent B. Giannusa, Jr., while directing traffic at 
the busy intersection of Summer and Washington 
Streets, was notified of an armed robbery which had 
just been committed in a finance company office on 
Winter Street. Patrolman Giannusa, being familiar 
with the pattern of recent holdups in the area, went 
immediately to Winter Street Subwa}" Station, where 
he observed a man answering to the description given 
and, with drawn service revolver, approached the 
suspect, disarmed him of a pistol, and placed him 
under arrest. Investigation revealed that his prisoner 
was the much wanted ''lunch hour bandit" who had 
perpetrated nine recent armed robberies in the Boston 
area. 



3n iMemoriam 




On August 2, 1963, Patrolman James B. O'Leary, 
assigned to District 16, died as a result of gunshot 
wounds sustained while in pursuit of a dangerous 
felon who had committed a robberv. 



PATROLMAN JAMES B. O'LEARY 

1917 - 1963 

Appointed March 5, 1947 



On November 6, 1963, Detective George J. Holmes, 
of the Criminal Investigation Division (detailed to 
District 9) died as a result of gunshot wounds sustained 
while attempting to effect the arrest of two dangerous, 
heavily armed criminals, who had just committed a 
robberv. 




DETECTIVE GEORGE J. HOLMES 

1922 - 1963 

Appointed July 27, 1949 



In the highest traditions of the police service both Patrolman James B. 
O'Leary and Detective George J. Holmes gave up their lives in the 
service of their comm unity. 



B^equiesicat in ^ace 



52 




THE HUNDRED CLUB 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the year 1959 a group of philanthropic businessmen formed an organization known as '"The 
Hundred Club of Massachusetts. " 

The prime function of this organization is to provide financial assistance to the widows and dependents 
of policemen and firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty. 

The Boston PoHce Department expresses its gratitude and appreciation to '"The Hundred Club" for the 
invaluable assistance rendered to the families of police officers who have given their lives in the ser\'ice of this 
community. 



Miscellaneous Business 





iQbo-Oi 


1QO2 


19(33 


Abandoned children cared for 


0*^' 


OJ 


44 


Buildings found open and made secure 
















1,799 


1.770 


1,250 


Dangerous buildings reported 
















2A 


2Q 


43 


Dangerous chininevs reported 
















4 


8 


8 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 
















870 


1,201 


1-37') 


Defective drains and vaults reported 
















3 


8 


■) 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 
















3 


4 


33 


Defective gas pipes reported 
















10 


4 


14 


Defective h\-drants reported 
















4 


2 


.•) 


Defective sewers reported 
















22 


14 


6 


Defective street lights reported . 
















145 


04 


78 


Defective streets and walks reported 
















623 


574 


325 


Defective water pipes reported 
















26 


34 


14 


Fire alarms given 
















10,786 


14,522 


1 5 '43 1 


Fires extinguished .... 
















-M74 


3 --'48 


3,010 


Insane persons taken in charge 
















1,183 


1,585 


1,389 


Lost children restored .... 
















709 


S19 


828 


Number of persons committed to bail 
















2,544 


2,721 


2,535 


Persons rescued from drowning . 
















7 


26 


37 


Sick and injured persons assisted 
















-^-',-'35 


28,346 


24,970 


Street obstructions removed 
















31 


-'7 


29 


Water rtmning to waste reported 
















01 


131 


163 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1963 



54 

TABLE I 



Total Number of Persons Arrested by Districts and I'nits for All Types of Offenses, Covering Both 
Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Hnding December .51, 1903 



DlSTRlCTl^ 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Distrift One 


2,367 


19'J 


2,566 


Di.stiict Two . 










2,443 


271 


2,714 


District Four . 










13,378 


1 ,574 


14,9.52 


District Six 










2,833 


159 


2,992 


District Seven 










1 ,675 


144 


1,819 


District Eight 










16 


1 


17 


District Nine . 










7,536 


1,268 


8,804 


District Ten . 










3,856 


337 


4,193 


District Eleven 










3,136 


165 


3,301 


District Thirteen . 










2,141 


360 


2,501 


District Fourteen . 










2.128 


166 


2,294 


District Fifteen 










2,083 


143 


2,226 


District Sixteen 










4,313 


665 


4,978 


District Seventeen 










1,81)8 


269 


2,167 


District Eighteen . 










1,621 


169 


1,790 


District Nineteen . 










1,629 


142 


1,771 


Traffic Division 










28,568 


5,884 


34,452 


Headciuarters* 






479 


301 


780 


Totals 


82,100 


12,217 


94,317 


" Does not include n 


her : 


rro.sts regii'tcriM. 


:it t 


le st'V 


■lal |ii)Ucr ilislrii-t.s 







TABLE II— Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B.I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the ^ ear Ending December 31, l')03 













Cleared 






Classification of Offenses 


Offenses 


Un- 


Actual 


by 


Not 






Reported 


founded 


Offenses 


Arrest 


Cleared 


1. 


Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 














slaughter 


44 





44 


35 


9 




(b) Manslaughter l\v negligence 


46 


20 


26 


23 


3 


?. 


Forcible rape 


91 


6 


85 


1 i 


8 


3 


Robber V 


784 


39 


745 


282 


463 


4 


Aggra^-ated assault 


805 


25 


780 


6.5S 


122 


5, 


Burglarv — breaking or entering . 


4,200 


1.50 


4,050 


1.063 


2.987 


6. 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) : 














(a) $50 and o\-er in ^'alue .... 


2,566 


6S 


2,498 


609 


1,889 




(6) "Under $50 in vahie .... 


4,625 


162 


4,463 


2,460 


2,003 


7. 


Auto theft 


8,844 


923 


7,921 


1,629 


6,292 


Totals . . 


22.005 


1 ,393 


20.612 


6.836 


13,776 



55 



TABLE III — Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1903 





Value of PROPERT'i 


■ Stolen in Boston 


Type of Property 


Stolen 


Recovered 


Currency, imtes, etc 

Jewelry and preciou.s metals 

Furs 

Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous 


.$728,491 00 

195,058 00 

72,992 00 

182,139 00 

3,937,166 00 

1,285,022 00 


.$58,624 00 

10,803 00 

2,348 00 

14,235 00 

3,616,009 00 

475,0.52 00 


Totals 


$6,400,868 00 


.$4,177,071 00 



TABLE IV— Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table II and Value of Property Stolen by Type of Offense 

for the Near Ending December 31, I90.^ 



Classification of Offenses 




Robbeij - 

(a) Highway (streets, alleys, etc.j . 

(6) Commercial house (not r, rf, /) . 

(c) Oil station 

(d) Chain store 

(e) Residence (anyuliere on premises) 

(/) Bank 

(a) Miscellaneous .... 

Totals — robbeo' . 

Burglary — breaking or entering:, 
{(j) Residence (dwelling) 

U) Night .... 

(2) Day 

(6) Nonresidence (store, oirite, etc.j 

(1) Night .... 

(2) Day 



Total — burglary 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 
(a) $50 and over 
(6) $5 to $50 
(r) Under S5 .... 

Total — larceny 



Auto theft: 

(a) Joy-riding 
(6) All other 



Total — auto theft 



TABLE V — Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Theft for the Year Ending December 31, 1903 



Number of Actual 
OfTenBes 


\'alue of Property 
Stolea 


75 
314 
490 

1,389 
839 
255 

3,599 


85,598 

9,841 

20,100 

254,330 

38,133 

7.533 

730,690 


6.901 


81,066,225 




Ai TIAL 


3l 1 h:Nsics 


I 
1 

1 


,048 
,254 
,108 



Nature of Larcenies: 

(<0 Pocket-jiicking 

(6) Purse-snatching 

(c) Shoplifting .... 

id) From autos (not accessories) 

(e) Auto accessories 

(/) Bicycles 

(g) AU other. ... 

Total — larcenies . 



Automobiles Recovered : 

(a) Number stolen locally and recovered locally 

(b) Number stolen locally and recovered outside 

(c) Number stolen out of town, recovered locally 



56 



TABLE VI Number of Inclivkluals Arrcsteil Including Traffic Arrests Not the Numhcr of Charges for the \ ear l.niling 

December 31, 1963 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



8. 

9. 
lU. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



Classific.m'iox of Offenses 



J'ersoxs Charged by 
THE Police 



Charged 



Part I Classes 
Criminal homicide: 

(a) JMurder and nonnegligent mausiaughtei 

(b) Iklanslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Roblaery 

Aggravated assault .... 
Burglary breaking or entering 
Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 
Auto theft 



Total, Part 1 Clasises 

Part II Classes 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud . . . . • 
Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 
Weapons; carrying, posses.sing, etc. 
Prostitution and commerciahzed vice 
Sex offen.ses (except 2 and 13) . . . . 

Offen.ses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Licjuor laws 

Drunkcrniess 

Di.sorderly coniluct 

Vagrancy 

Gaml)ling 

Driving while intoxicated 

Violation of road and driving laws . 

Parking violations 

Traffic and motor \ehicle laws (except 22 and 24 
All other offenses 

Total, Pait II Classes .... 

Grand Total 



50 

31 

74 

323 

537 

838 

2,156 

985 



Ari-csti'd 



5.000 



92! 

73 

329 

129 

130 

424 

461 

1.134 

210 

89 

21,359 

169 

59 

542 

215 

9,644 

46.906 

1,163 

2,044 



86,001 



91,001 



nuiinioned 



56 

31 
— ■"> 

318 
510 
762 

,849 
819 



4,418 



813 

69 

297 

120 

122 

421 

382 

999 

207 

59 

!1,167 

138 

59 

537 

205 

504 

5,S3C 

525 

1,620 



34,080 



38,498 



1 

5 

27 

76 

307 

166 



Persons Iou.nd 

G I" I LTV 



Of Offcn.-c 
( 'hai'Sicd 



582 



108 

4 

32 

9 

8 

o 
O 

79 

135 

3 

30 

192 
31 

5 
10 

9,140 

41,070 

638 

424 



51,921 



52,503 



18 
4 

16 
132 
180 
373 
.218 
531 



2.472 



528 

37 

188 

61 

79 

311 

267 

803 

98 

53 

20,838 

86 

50 

310 

118 

9.347 

45.736 

997 

1,012 



(.)f Lesser 
( )ffVns(' 



80,919 



83.391 



12 
21 
26 
19 
23 
30 



142 



12 
3 
2 



2 
6 
4 



3 
1 
7 

16 
26 

2 
14 



9S 



240 



57 



TABLE VII Arrests for the Year Ending December 31, 1963 











On 


Without 


Summoned 


Nature of Offense 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Warrants 


Warrants 


by the 
Court 


]MurckT ami iKiiinegligent manslaughter 


52 


4 


56 


28 


28 




XegUgent manslaughter .... 








31 


— 


31 


17 


14 


— 


Rape 








74 


— 


74 


30 


43 


1 


Robbery 








307 


16 


323 


87 


231 


5 


Aggra\'ated assault 








476 


61 


537 


189 


321 


27 


Burglary— breaking and entering . 








823 


15 


838 


245 


517 


76 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 








1,852 


304 


2,156 


633 


1,216 


307 


Auto theft 








945 


40 


985 


230 


589 


166 


Other assauhs 








851 


70 


921 


649 


164 


108 


Forgery antl counterfeiting 








58 


15 


73 


31 


38 


4 


Embezzlement and fravid 








279 


50 


329 


256 


41 


32 


Stolen property 








124 


5 


129 


49 


71 


9 


Weapons, possession of . 








124 


6 


130 


29 


93 


8 


Pro.stitution and commerciahzed vice 








54 


370 


424 


28 


393 


3 


Se.\ offenses (except rape and prostitution) 








383 


78 


461 


124 


258 


79 


Family and children .... 








1.087 


47 


1,134 


981 


18 


135 


Narcotics laws 








150 


60 


210 


59 


148 


3 


Liquor laws 








66 


23 


89 


40 


19 


30 


Drunkenness 








20,026 


1,333 


21,359 


85 


21,082 


192 


Disorderly conduct 








152 


17 


169 


20 


118 


31 


Vagrancy 








55 


4 


59 


6 


53 


— 


Gambling 








515 


27 


542 


378 


159 


5 


Driving while intoxicated 








204 


11 


215 


28 


177 


10 


Road and driving laws .... 








9,117 


527 


9,644 


484 


20 


9,140 


Parking violations 








38,613 


8,293 


46,906 


5,727 


109 


41,070 


Traffic violations (except 22 and 24) 








1,094 


69 


1,163 


245 


280 


638 


All other offenses 








1,714 


330 


2,044 


944 


676 


424 


Suspicion 








984 


268 


1,252 


— 


1,252 


— 


Arrests for other departments 








1,890 


174 


2,064 


1,591 


424 


49 


Totals 


82,100 


12,217 


94,317 


13,213 


28,552 


52,552 



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6o 
























I 


TABLE X Showing the Number of L 


icenses of All Kind 


s Issued 


b\ the 1' 


olice Commissioner and the Amount of Mone\ 


Received fron 


All Sources and F'aid to the 


City Col 


ector - T 


reasurer 


During the Near Rnding December ,51, 190.} 




CLASS OF LICEXSE 


.2 ^ 




m C 

S5 


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lifi 


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1 
















.s(i.")0 00 


Auctioneer (other classes) . 




10 


10 


— 
















205 00 


Bicycle registrations . 




1,810 


1,810 


- - 














12 


452 .50 


Dog 




14,:544 


14,332 


12 














;;it!) 


3i,(;30 on 


Driver (hackney carriage) . 




7,078 


0,761 


— 


Id 


:i()L' 










701 


i:),522 on 


Firearms, dealer in . . 




20 


10 


— 




4 




1 






— 


400 00 


Firearms, license to carry 




1,423 


1,295 


6 


!l 


113 


- 


— 


3 


— 


3 


6,475 00 


Gunsmith 




C 


5 


— 




1 








— 


— 


25 00 


Hackney carriage (and regrants) 




2,185 


2,185 


— 








O.'i'.l 


'■'< 




:'..'i 


17,290 00 


Hackney carriage (photos) 




— 


— 


— 
















7,089 on 


Handcart (common carrier) 




2 


2 


— 
















4 on 


Junk collector .... 




58 


57 


— 




1 






1 






855 0(1 


Junk shopkee xr ... 


42 


42 
















1 


3,1.50 no 


Musician (collective and sound car) 


17 


17 


















70 on 


Musician (itinerant) 


i 


5 


— 


— 


1 


1 


— 








50 00 


Pawnbroker 


38 


37 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 








1,800 00 


Public lodging house 


4 


— 


4 


- 


— 




— 










Secondhand articles 


319 


300 


i 




4 


.J 


3 




,S 


3 


9,180 00 


Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 


225 


221 


— 




1 


:; 


7 







— 


11,0.50 00 


Shotguns and rifies, dealer in . . . 


9 


9 


— 




— 




— 


— 


— 


— 


225 00 


Sightseeing automobile .... 


26 


20 


— 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 




— 


— 


1,888 00 


Sightseeing driver .... 


22 


22 


















44 00 


Special police 


i,os:; 


,S29 


247 




4 


3 


'^o 






•"i 


4,145 00 


Street railway, conductor, motorman, and 
























starter 


93 


93 


— 
















180 00 


Copies of licenses and replacement dog 
























tags 








- 


— 












396 25 


Copies of police reports 








- 






— 








28,820 64 


Damage to police property- 








— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


.SI, 329 09 


Reimbursements 








— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


531 75 


Sale of condemned property 






— 




-- 




— 


— 


— 


— 


20 00 


Sale of lost, stolen, and abandonetl 
























property 














— 




— 


-— 


5,364 30 


Sa e of "pawnbroker and secondhand 
























articles report blanks 






















326 00 


Sunday permits 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 








5,010 00 1 
1,478 00 1 


Use of police property 


- 




— 


— 














Totals 


28,882 


28,145 


277 


19 


432 


9 


693 


7 


14 


1,159 


.•5153,673 53 


Credit by City Collector-Treasurer for 
























money" received for damage to police 
























property and telephone commissions . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


■ 


— 


— 


13,352 91 


Grand Total 


— 


— 


— 








— 


- 






SI 07,026 44 





























TABLE XI — Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 196,5 



6i 



EXPENDITURES 

(liiorp 1. I'khsoxal Servicks: 

10 Pcrnianent employees 

1 1 Temporary employees 

12 Overtime 

Group 2. Coxtractual Services: 

21 Communications 

22 Light, heat and power 

26 Repairs and maintenaiiee of buildings and 
structures 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment . 

28 Transportation of persons 

29 ^Miscellaneous contractual service 



Group 3. Supplies and M.^vterials: 

30 Automotive .... 

32 Food 

33 Heating 

34 Household .... 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 

36 Office 

39 Miscellaneous 



Group 4. Current Charges and Obligations: 
49 Miscellaneous .... 

Group 5. Equipment: 

.50 Automoti^'c 

56 Office furniture and ecjuipment . 
59 Miscellaneous .... 

Total 



$16,424,170 21 

85,400 00 

644,154 74 



•171,450 49 
48,941 16 

56,374 36 
70,692 68 
30,219 03 
88,488 10 



$148,510 68 

14,679 51 

38,236 05 

8,594 46 

902 59 

51,242 59 

143,402 67 



$170,786 05 

1,487 15 

12,899 98 



(17,153,724 95 



366,165 82 



405,568 55 



52,790 88 



185,173 18 



$18,163,423 .'iS 



Special Items (not included in Police Dejiartment appropriation): 

Down Payment Loan: 

56 Office furniture and equipment 



$7,252 41 



Departmental Equipment Loan: 
59 Miscellaneous equipment 



$133,048 00 



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