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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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City of Boston 
Administrative Services Department 
Printing esUHfea Section 



FIFTY-NINTH 



ANNUAL 




REPORT 



OF THE 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 




CITY OF 




N 



1964 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 34—1965 



[DOCUMENT — NO. 34] 



Fifty-ninth Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1064 






fa 113 O '.5 T D N J A. Sy/ 

(CONDITAZD. 



STORY OF COVER 

"JOHN F. KENNEDY" 

The latest addition to the Boston Police Harbor Patrol is 
the Police Boat "John F. Kennedy." It maintains an around 
the clock patrol in the upper and lower harbors, Mystic River, 
Chelsea Creek, Fort Point Channel, Reserved Channel, Dor- 
chester Bay, and the Neponset River. The other police boats 
are the "William H. Pierce" and "Patrol Boat Protector." 

The John F. Kennedy, made of laminated fiberglass, is a 38- 
footer with a beam of 14 feet. It is equipped with radar, sonar 
depth finder, two 2-way police radios, marine radio, electronic 
direction finder, and has two high-powered diesel motors. If 
necessary, it can reach a speed of 30 knots, and has proven to be 
very economical to operate. 

Front [over by Patrolman Joseph P. Carr. 



SEP 1 4 1965 



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PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston Herald-Traveler 

The Boston Rccord-Amcriean-Sumlay Advertiser 

The Boston Police Department 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 





P. 


VGE 


Letter to the Mayor 




4 


Mayor's Letter . .... 




5 


Table of Organization 




6 


The Department: 




7 


The Police Force 




7 


Signal Service 




7 


Employees of the Department 




7 


Distribution and Changes 




7 


Recipients of Awards: . 4; 


-48- 


-49 


Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 




47 


Department Medals of Honor . 47 


-48- 


"49 


Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 




47 


Boston Police Department Roll of Honor . 




5° 


Work of the Department .... 




8 


Office of the Police Commissioner: 




9 


Administrative Assistant-Secretary 




9 


Planning Division 




9 


Data Processing Section 




9 


Bureau of Field Operations: 




10 


Patrol Division 




10 


Tactical Patrol Force 




1 1 


Harbor Police and Emergency Service Unit 




1 1 


Harbor Patrol Service 




1 1 


Harbor Service 




12 


Emergency Service Unit 




12 


Bomb Squad 




13 


Traffic Division 


14 


-15 


Auxiliary School Patrol 




15 


Criminal Investigation Division: 




16 


Crimes Against Persons Section : 




16 


Homicide Unit 


16- 


17 


Robbery Unit 




18 


Crimes Against Property Section: . 




19 


Automobile Unit 




19 


\V< irthless Checks and Fraud Unit 




20 


Lost and Stolen Property Unit 




20 


General Investigation Section : . 




21 


Night Investigators Unit 


21 


-22 


Ballistics Unit . 




23 


Crime Laboratory Unit 




24 


Rendition Squad 




25 


Domestic Relations Unit 


2 5 


-26 


Juvenile Aid Section 


26 


- 2 7 


Vice Control Section : 




28 


Narcotics and Vice Unit 


28 


-29 


Gaming Unit 




29 



Bureau of General Services: . 
Central Services Division . 
Property Clerk Unit 
Lost & Found Property . 
Superintendent of Buildings Unit 
Motor Vehicle Service Unit . 
Licenses Issued by the Police Commissioner 
Hackney Carriages 
Police Signal System 
City Prison .... 
House of Detention 

Records and Communications Division 
Central Complaint Section 
Central Records Section: 

Multilith and Mimeograph Unit 
Identification Section : 

Polygraph Unit .... 

Bureau of Inspectional Services: . 
Staff Inspection Division 
Internal Affairs Division . 
Intelligence Division . 
Bureau of Personnel and Training: 
Personnel Division .... 
Training Division .... 
Miscellaneous Business . 
Statistical Tables: 

Table I. Number of Arrests by Dis- 
tricts 

Table II. Major Offenses Reported to 

F.B.I. . 
Table III. Analysis of Property Con- 
nected with Offenses . 
Table IV. Breakdown of Offenses and 
Value of Property Stolen 
Table V. Additional Analysis of Lar- 

ceny and Auto Theft 
Table VI. Number of Individuals Ar- 
rested 
Table VII. Arrests . 
Table VIII. Age and Sex of Persons Ar- 
rested . 
Table IX. Report of Accidents 
Table X. Licenses of All Classes Issued 

Table XI. Financial Statement 
Table XII. Male and Female Residents 
Listed 

Missing Persons 
The Hundred Club 
Officers retired during 1Q64 
Officers died during 1964 



Page 
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33 
33 
34 
35 
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36 
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39 

39-40 
4i 
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45-46 

51 



54 
54 
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56 

57 

58 
59 
60 
61 

62-63 

37-38 
Si 
64 
64 



HEADQUARTERS 
154 BERKELEY STREET 




Edmund L. McNamara 

POLICE COMMISSIONER 



CITY OF BOSTON 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



January 1, 1965. 
Hon. John F. Collins, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1961, Chapter 5, Section 25, it is ray pleasure to submit the fol- 
lowing report of the activities of the Boston Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1964. 

During the year 1964, many changes took place within the 
department, much of it as a result of the extensive reorganization 
that took place in 1963. In the course of the year, police districts 
were consolidated so as to enable the closing of two district station 
houses, which made possible a more effective distribution of personnel 
and will result in significant savings to the City of Boston. The 
car-sector beats within each of the thirteen police districts were 
redrawn so as to give the city a more efficient patrol. Also put into 
operation was a new mobile communications van containing the latest 
radio and electronic equipment which is capable of serving as a com- 
mand post at any time and in any place, especially at the scene of 
serious incidents. A master plan has been devised which will operate 
to evacuate the city of its vehicular traffic in the event of a major 

congestion. In addition, this department has 
joined with other agencies, cities, and towns 
in designing and developing a major emergency 
and disaster program to afford the greatest 
amount of protection for the citizens of 
Boston. 

I wish to express my appreciation to 
the members of the Boston Police Department for 
their loyalty, dedication to duty, and effi- 
ciency in carrying out their assignments. 

The support and cooperation you have 
always extended to me and to the department is 
deeply appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

POLICE COMMISSIONER 





HN F. COLLINS 

MAYOR 



CITY OF BOSTO N 

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

CITY HALL. BOSTON 




We have in the City of Boston one of the finest police 
departments of any major city. As the program of the "New 
Boston" unfolds, our Police Department is keeping pace with 
modern, scientific equipment and personnel trained to the 
highest in crime prevention and law enforcement methods. 

In these days of advanced mobility, our equipment and 
communications media must be geared to cope with the cunning 
of the marauder and the emergency of disaster. We have this 
equipment . 

Highly trained and skilled personnel are required to 
implement an efficient police force. We have that type 
policeman. Through comprehensive in-service-training pro- 
grams each has the opportunity to contribute to the effi- 
ciency of, and the responsibility to exert the maximum 
effort, whether on foot, in patrol car, on traffic, or other 
performance of duty. 

The administrative program of our Police Department in 
consolidation of divisions and other economies, already 
begun, will result in increased effectiveness of the police 
officer and savings to the taxpayer. 

The Boston Police Department, I am sure, will continue 
to reflect great credit to the City of Boston by the perse- 
verance and alertness of each of its members. 




Mayor 



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§51 

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1? 



THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner 
Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Secretary 



Deputy Superintendents . 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives . 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives . 
Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 



The Police Force 



25 
86 

253 

'1S5 



Patrolmen 
Patrolwomen 

Total 



* Includes 2 patrolwomen 

t Includes 5 patrolmen in armed service 



U,C 



2-572 



Director ... 


1 


Director, Assistant 


1 


Electrical Equipment Repairman 


1 


Foreman of Signal Service 


1 


Linemen and Cable Splicers 


7 


Machinist 


1 



Signal Service 

Groundman, Laborer (Police) 
Motor Equipment Operators 

Painter and Groundman 

Signalmen-Electricians 

Total 



3 

1 

3 
19 



Employees 

Biological Chemist .... 

Clerk-Typists 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 

Elevator Operators 

Head Clerks 

Head Administrative Clerk 

Hearing Stenographers 

Hostlers 

Janitresses 

Junior Building Custodians 

Matron, Chief 

Matron, Assistant Chief 

Matrons, Police . 

Motor Equipment Repairmen 

Multilith Operator 

Multilith Operator and Cameraman 



of the Department (Xot Included in Above) 

1 Principal Clerk . 

6 Principal Clerk-Typists 

1 Principal Clerk-Stenographers 

6 Property Clerk 

15 Senior Building Custodian 

1 Senior Clerk-Typists . 

6 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

6 Senior Statistical Machine Operator 

6 Statistical Machine Operators . 

45 Steam Firemen .... 

1 Superintendent of Police Buildings 

1 Telephone Operators .... 

10 Working Foreman and Motor Equipment Re 

2I pairman .... 

School Traffic Supervisois 

1 Total .... 



1 

5 
2 

1 
1 

9 
1 
1 

10 
6 
1 

ij 

1 
io 3 

283 



Distribution and Changes 

During the year 75 patrolmen were appointed; 1 sergeant, 4 partolmen were reinstated; 1 lieutenant, 
1 sergeant, 12 patrolmen resigned; 1 patrolman was dismissed; 1 captain was appointed deputy superintendent; 
} lieutenant-detectives, 3 lieutenants were promoted to captains, 1 sergeant to lieutenant, 1 detective first-grade, 
17 patrolmen to sergeants; 2 detectives second-grade assigned as detectives first-grade, 1 detective third-grade 
assigned detective second-grade, 1 patrolman assigned detective third-grade; 2 deputy superintendents, 1 captain, 
1 lieutenant, 6 sergeants, 26 patrolmen were retired on pension; 1 deputy superintendent, 1 lieutenant, 1 sergeant, 
and 11 patrolmen died. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a separate person, was 89,262. 

There were 7,222 arrests on warrants and 28,039 without warrants; 54,001 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 76,717; of females 12,545. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 45,12,5. The amount of the fines totaled $201,964. 

The total number of days' attendance at court by officers was 28,212, and the witness fees earned amounted 
to $19,920. 

There were 20,630 persons arrested for drunkenness. 

There were 82 committed to the state prison; 798 to the House of Correction; 39 to the Concord Reform- 
atory; 1,165 to Bridgewater Reformatory; 58 to the Women's Reformatory; 260 to the Youth Service Board: 
and 1,584 to the County Jail. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was §187,808. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to §7,613,136, and the value recovered amounted to 
$4,854,497- 




NO TIME TO WASTE 




THANKS A MILLION 



OFFICE OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT=SECRETARV 

The office of the Administrative Assistant to the Police Commissioner is charged with the important 
task of processing all correspondence flowing into and out of the Chief Executive's office, whether of a departmental 
or extradepartmental nature. This sensitive post maintains smooth lines of communication flowing in both direc- 
tions, from the commissioner's level down to the patrolman and vice versa. The staff necessary to perform these 
functions comes under the direct supervision of this administrator. 



PLANNING DIVISION 

Operating in a staff capacity, reviews all phases of the administration and operation of the department 
for the development of new procedures and the refinement of existing ones. Assists other units of the department 
in formulating plans and programs and informs line units of significant crime trends revealed by analysis of reported 
offenses. Maintains charts, maps, and graphs indicating crime operations throughout the city, so as to advise 
the Bureau of Field Operations in the best deployment of field personnel and equipment. 



Data Processing Section 

This section of the Planning Division prepares departmental statistics in regard to the incidence of crime, 
arrests and clearances of such crimes, parking violations, violations of the motor vehicle laws and citations issued 
for such violations, and the number and type of services rendered to the public and other city, state, and federal 
agencies. 

In the case of out-of-state violators of the parking rules, this section, in cooperation with the Boston 
Municipal Court, has set up a system whereby such violators are contacted by the court at their out-of-state ad- 
dress, resulting in a significant increase in the amount of fines collected. 

Records of monies earned by departmental personnel on special details are maintained for the purpose 
of a more equitable distribution of these paid details, and a summary of such record is supplied each such officer 
for income tax purposes. 

A departmental personnel file is maintained in this section containing the education, skills, and clothing 
sizes of its employees. 

Annua!, quarterly, and monthly reports are prepared by personnel of this section for distribution through- 
out the department, detailing crime trends in regard to offenses committed, their location, and the time of day 
and flay of week of occurrence. This data is vital to departmental administrators for determining the proper de- 
ployment of its officers and equipment in the most efficient and effective manner. 

Accurate and detailed reports are prepared here for distribution to the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and various city and state agencies. 



10 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 

The duty of preventing crime, protecting life and property, and apprehending criminals best defines the 
work of the Bureau of Field Operations. The sum total of all line operations fall within the confines of this bureau. 

For the purpose of higher efficiency and a shorter span of administrative control, the bureau is divided 
into three divisions: the Patrol Division, the Traffic Division, and the Criminal Investigation Division. 

PATROL DIVISION 

This division provides 24-hour city-wide protection for all our citizens by the use of constant preventive 
patrol. Even- effort is made to suppress crime, apprehend offenders, and maintain emergency service to the com- 
munity. 




WE'RE IN A HURRY! 





A LIFE IS SAVED 




ir 



Tactical Patrol Force 

This versatile unit is made up of a highly selective 
and thoroughly trained group of officers, who saturate 
the high crime areas of the city and provide the de- 
partment with an ever ready, highly maneuverable 
striking force. The Tactical Patrol Force is comprised 
of mounted, canine, and patrol units. Their work 
hours are geared to the time of serious crime frequency. 

The workload of this unit has been increasing dav 
by day. Along with the routine work of daily patrols, 
the Tactical Patrol Force has been utilized for other 
assignments such as in the protection of , visiting digni- 
taries, assisting in the Boston Hospitals Mock Disaster 
Exercise, and for crowd control wherever needed. 



'DONNA" ON THE JOB 



HARBOR POLICE AND EMERGENCY SERVICE UNIT 

The office of the Harbor Master for the Port of Boston is located in District Eight. It is his responsibility 
to assign anchorage locations to all ships and yachts entering the harbor. He also has the duty of enforcing all 
the laws of navigation, plus the laws pertaining to loading and unloading cargoes and passengers. 

The Harbor Master is also the commanding officer of District Eight, which contains the Harbor Patrol 
Unit, the Emergency Service Unit, and the Bomb Squad. 

Duties performed by the Harbor Police and the Emergency Service Unit, both attached to District Eight, 
for the year 1964 were as follows: 



Harbor Patrol Service 

An around the clock patrol is maintained by the 
police boats "John F. Kennedy," "William H. Pierce," 
and the "Patrol Boat Protector" in the Upper and 
Lower Harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort 
Point Channel, Reserved Channel, Dorchester Bay, 
and on the Neponset River. 




HARBOR PATROL ON THE JOB 



12 



Harbor Service 

Number of vessels ordered from channel .... 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream 

Number of alarms of fire attended on waterfront 

Number of fires extinguished without, alarm 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted 

Number of cases investigated 

Number of dead bodies recovered 

Number rescued from drowning 

Number of rases where assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of dead bodies cared for . 

Number of hours grappling .... 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc 

Since January i, 1964, 534 vessels from domestic ports and 1,06 
the Port of Boston. 



13 

4 
282 

5 

10 

1,109 

12 

17 
7° 
37 
1,599 
12 
100 
96,000 
vessels from foreign ports arrived at 



Emergency Service Unit 

This unit is available on a 24-hour basis. The Emergency Service Unit truck is equipped with emergency 
weapons, firearms, bomb suits, bomb blast mat, bulletproof clothing, lighting generators, power saw, acetylene 
cutting torch, hydraulic rescue jacks, wheat lights, riot sticks, road blocking equipment, rope and rescue tools, 
gas masks, chemox units, life belts, life lines, ladders, and absestos clothing. 

The unit responds automatically to the scene of all fires in the city for which three or more alarms are 
sounded, all bomb and explosive reports, and to all requests for assistance from an}" district or unit requiring lighting, 
special tools, firearms, and equipment. 

The unit also operates the barrier truck located at District Four, placing large road-blocking barriers 
when and where they are required on an emergency basis. 





PROTECTION! BULLETPROOF VESTS 
TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT 



TACTICAL PATROL POLICE AND FIRE WORK TOGETHER 



13 

During the period commencing January i, 1964, and ending December 31, 1064. the Emergency Service 
Unit responded to and assisted at the following incidents : 

Accidents (elevator, M.B.T. A. train, auto, construction, electrical machinery, etc.) ..64 

Arrests assisted in, on roofs, bridges, etc 9 

Assistance at homicide investigations 15 

Bodies handled at crimes, accidents, suicides, etc 10 

Bomb and explosive reports, searches, etc . . 135 

Buildings and areas searched for armed persons, criminals, evidence, and weapons 48 

Drownings 1 

Evidence and weapons located in searches 

Fires for which three or more alarms were sounded 64 

Illuminating gas and ammonia leaks .... 7 

Injured persons assisted at accidents . . 27 

Injured persons transported to hospitals .10 

Large public gatherings .25 

Persons in the water . . 6 

Persons assisted from burning buildings 15 

Riots .3 

Services (manhole explosions, cave-ins, dangerous buildings, etc.) 37 

Suicide attempts 9 

Suicides 4 

Barrier runs 151 

Barriers put out and picked up 1 ,880 

The Bomb Squad 

The Bomb Squad personnel are trained for many emergency calls, but one of the most important, is when a 
citizen or police officer finds a device or powder suspected of being an explosive capable of injuring people or destroy- 
ing property. These men with their mobile equipment are capable of handling and disarming most of the known 
explosives and explosive devices. 

With the equipment of this unit, the department is better able to insure the personal safety of all citizens 
in our city whenever a danger presents itself in the form of an explosive material or device. 

Explosives or Dangerous Material Examined 109 

(a) Disposed of (by dumping or detonating) 72 

(b) Disarmed 9 

1 Turned over to department chemist (for analysis and preparation as e\ idernce, after 1 ieing disarmed ) ... .12 
d 1 I Ield as evidence for the several districts 16 





MOLOTOV COCKTAILS 



HOMEMADE BOMBS DISMANTLED 



H 



TRAFFIC DIVISION 



The Traffic Division is responsible for the control of traffic ami the enforcement of parking regulations in 
the area of the city within the boundaries of Districts One, Two, Four, ami the traffic po i at the intersection of 
Commonwealth Avenue and Boston University Bridge, District Fourteen. 11 is responsible for the prevention and 
investigation of traffic accidents throughout the city and for the overall supervision of traffic arrangements for major 
parades, public celebrations, and events of a similar nature. The Traffic Division also provides a safety patrol 
which functions on a city-wide basis. 

A continued, steady increase in the number of vehicles on our highways is reflected by the registration 
figures of the Commonwealth, which, as of December i, 1964, amounted to 2,077,440. and the total for the year 1963 
amounted to 2,023,069. These figures indicate that for eleven months of 1964 there is an increase of some 54.371 
registered cars. 

Notices of parking violations issued by the Boston Police Department for the year 1964 amounted to 503,- 

334. of which 334,640 citations were issued by the Traffic Division. The corresponding totals for the preceding 

year are 400.333 and 318,281, respectively. This is the second year in which the visible violation notice has been in 

effect . 

Vehicles towed by the Traffic Division amounted to 5,217. The towing program, previously suspended, 

was reactivated on February 12, 1964, and employed mechanical equipment of the Boston Police Department and 

storage facilities at the Boston Common Underground Garage. 

Court prosecutions by the Traffic Division for the year 1964 amounted to 31,088. A total of 1,490 notices 
were issued for moving violations, of which 4S3 were warnings and 1,007 were summoned for court appearances. 

Parking fines paid at the Central Municipal Court for the year 1964 amounted to Si. 121, 870. 82, which is 
an all-time high, surpassing the previous high of $1,008,009.61. of 1963. by S113.861.21. 




SPEED KILLS 



15 

The M-i Safety Squad of the Traffic Division continued its program of safety talks and demonstrations in 
the schools of the city. This program was also presented, during school vacation periods, in the various public 
playgrounds. The weekly radio program was again presented through the facilities of Station WEZE with the co- 
operation of the teachers and pupils of the participating schools. 

Arrangements were made and police details provided for the conduct of a complete schedule of parades as 
well as for many celebrations and events of a public nature occurring during the year. Special details were provided 
for emergencies, including several multiple alarms of fire, civil defense exercises, and many national conventions. 

Traffic arrangements and escort services were provided in connection with visits to our city by distinguished 
guests, including President Lyndon B. Johnson; Vice President-Elect Hubert H. Humphrey; the Secretaries of 
Defense, Interior, and Labor; the Honorable Richard M. Nixon; Senators Kennedy and Goldwater; and Governors 
Romney and Rockefeller; the Prime Ministers of New Brunswick and South Africa; the Ambassadors of Britain, 
Eire, Israel, and Mexico; the Police Commissioner of the Philippines; trade mission personnel from France and 
Japan; the Reverend Billy Graham; Jimmy Durante; the Beatles; and the National Commander of the Amvets. 




PRESIDENT JOHNSON IN BOSTON 



Our traffic problem was again complicated by the extensive changes taking place in the phvsical structure 
of our city. The Prudential Center and the Massachusetts Turnpike Extension are close to completion : and the 
resulting changes in our traffic pattern will soon be felt. Remaining with us are the problems incident to the construc- 
tion of the new Government Centers. 



Auxiliary School Patrol 

One of the modern trends in law enforcement is to release the uniformed and plain-clothes officer from those 
duties which can be performed both efficiently and economically by civilian personnel. So, to release the Boston 
policemen from the duty of school crossing patrol, and still provide excellent protection for the school children, 
this department now employs civilian female school ciossing supervisors. These w< >men have the authority, as special 
officers, to enforce those laws and regulations which specifically relate to the operation, parking, and use of motor 
vehicles, in the areas adjacent to schools and school crossings. At the present time, the department employs 103 
smartly uniformed female traffic supervisors. 



16 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION 

The Criminal Investigation Division is composed of several sections, namely, Crime Againsl Persons, 
Crimes Against Propert) . General Investigation, Juvenile Aid, and Vice Control. 

In addition, special units are assigned to cover the following phases of police work and investigations: 
Homicide, Robbery, Automobile, Worthless Cheeks and Frauds. Lost and Stolen Property, Hotels, Pawnbrokers, 
Junk Shops, Secondhand Dealers, Pickpockets, Shoplifters, Domestic Relations, Subversive Activities, Crime- 
Laboratory, Ballistics, Gaming Offenses, Narcotics and Vice, and Rendition. 

Members of this division investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of the City of Boston. 
They also process cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations during the course of a 
year for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. Further, they cooperate 
in every way possible with outside police departments in the investigation of crime and prosecution of criminals. 

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS SECTION 

Homicide Unit 

Personnel assigned to this unit investigate all homicide cases and interrogate persons involved in or who 
have knowledge of crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion, and other violent crimes. They prepare, supervise, 
and present evidence at inquests. Transcripts of statements received by these officers from witnesses and de- 
fendants are prepared for use as evidence in trials of capital cases. 

Investigated 

Homicide (justifiable) 
M. B. T. A. 
Machinery 
Motorcycle . 
Motor vehicle 
Natural causes 
Poison .... 
Railroad train 
Stillborn 
Suicide .... 



Abortion 




2 


Accidental .... 




4 


Accidental fatal shooting . 




i 


A coholism 




i 


Asphyxiation .... 




7 


Assault and battery (victims on da 


nger list) 


68 


Attempted suicide 




i 


Drowning 




IS 


Drug ingestion 




2 


Elevator . . . 




I 


Fall 




32 


Fire . . ... 




23 


Homicide 




52 



Total 



1 
2 
1 
2 

63 

1,27s 

2 

3 

9 

45 

1,615 




DEATH ON A LONELY ROAD 



17 
Cases Prosecuted in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 

Abortion ..... i 

Accessor}" after fact to murder i 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 54 

Homicide . . 42 

Kidnapping . 1 

Perjury . 2 

Robbery ...... 5 

Recapitulation of Homicides 

Forty-two cases were presented to the courts as criminal homicides and the following action taken: 

1 Defendant (juvenile-female) adjudicated delinquent child — murder — committed to Youth Service Board. 

1 Defendant (juvenile) adjudicated not delinquent child — murder — dismissed; adjudicated delinquent child — 
assault and battery — committed to Youth Service Board. 

r Defendant (juvenile) held for Grand Jury as juvenile offender — manslaughter. 

8 Defendants (juveniles) arrested for one murder — 4 defendants adjudicated not delinquent — murder — dis- 
missed; 1 defendant adjudicated delinquent child — murder — committed to Youth Service Board; 3 defend- 
ants indicted as juvenile offenders for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to manslaughter — sentenced to 
Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

1 Defendant (female) charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter — sen- 
tenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Framingham. 

1 Defendant (female) charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pleaded guilty to manslaugh- 
ter — sentenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Framingham. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — awaiting hearing in lower court. 

4 Defendants charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court — dismissed. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court — found guilt}' of assault and battery — 
sentenced to House of Correction. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court — found guilty of assault and battery with 
dangerous weapon — sentenced to House of Correction. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — no probable cause — lower court — dismissed — indicted for manslaughter. 

2 Defendants charged with murder — held for Grand Jury — murder. 
1 Defendant charged with murder — no bill — Grand Jury. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — while on bail, awaiting trial, committed suicide. 
14 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pending trial in Superior Court. 

2 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter — sentenced to 

Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

7 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pleaded guilt}' to manslaughter — 
sentenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

3 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, second degree — pending trial in Superior Court. 

1 Defendant charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — pleaded guilty to murder, second degree — 
sentenced to life imprisonment, Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

5 Defendants charged with murder — indicted for murder, first degree — pending trial in Superior Court. 

(Fifty-seven defendants for forty-two murders) 



i8 



Robbery Unit 

During the past year, officers of this unit have conducted 515 investigations resulting in 177 arrests for 
serious crimes committed in Boston. These officers have been commended by the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
and local police departments for their cooperation in aiding in the apprehension and convictions of criminals re- 
sponsible for bank robberies and thefts of interstate shipments. 

Members of this unit work in conjunction with and assist officers of the various police districts in the 
apprehension and conviction of criminals in all parts of the city. 

The daily line-up of all prisoners arrested for felonies is conducted by officers of this unit. 



Arrests Made by the Robbery Unit During 1964 



Armed robbery 

Suspicion armed robbery 

Unarmed robbery 

Larceny .... 

Suspicion larceny 

Breaking and entering — nighttime 

Receiving stolen goods 

Suspicion breaking and entering — nighttime . 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon . 

Suspicion assault and battery, dangerous weapon 

Possession of dangerous weapon 

Possession of burglarious tools .... 

Abuse of female child 

Assault and battery 

Attaching registration plates without being issued 
Begetting 



Delinquent to wit; using motor vehicle without 
authority 

Delinquent to wit ; larceny motor vehicle 

Default: assault — intent, to rob with dangerous 
weapon 

Default: violation of automobile law 

Default: sodomy 

Deriving support from a prostitute . 



28 

1 

27 
4 
7 
9 

10 

7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

7 
5 

1 
1 
1 

1 



Forgery ... 2 

Fugitive from justice . . 1 

Illegitimacy .... .1 

Kidnapping 1 

Larceny of motor vehicle ... .1 

.Suspicion larceny of motor vehicle .... 7 

Non support 2 

Operating motor vehicle under influence . . 1 

Operating motor vehicle so as to endanger . . 1 
Operating motor vehicle without license . 1 

Operating unregistered motor vehicle . . 1 

Operating uninsured motor vehicle . . . . 1 
Operating motor vehicle after revocation of license 1 
Operating motor vehicle after suspension of license 2 
Having a forged license in possession . . . 1 
Using motor vehicle without authority ... 5 

Uttering .2 

Wanton destruction of property 1 

Suspicion rape 1 

Violation of firearm law ... .4 

Violation of terms of parole 6 

Arrests made with federal authorities for them . 2 

Total Arrests 177 



19 



CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY SECTION 

Automobile Unit 

The essential responsibility of the Automobile Squad is to investigate all new car, used car, and motor 
vehicle junk dealers, licensed by the Police Commissioner, for the purpose of ascertaining their suitability for the 
issue and yearly renewal of their respective licenses. Frequent inspections are made to ascertain if used car dealers 
are complying with the conditions of their licenses. 

The second basic function of the Automobile Squad relates to stolen and abandoned vehicles. Daily 
reports listing all missing or stolen vehicles reported to units of this department and other law enforcement agencies 
are received at this office. Index cards for each vehicle are prepared from the reports and are then compared with 
similar cards prepared from daily reports from approximately 205 licensed dealers. A search for the stolen vehicles 
is initiated both individually and with the assistance of every officer of the department who is provided with a 
weekly list of all missing vehicles. 

This unit is in daily communication with police authorities of the United States and Canada. Many 
investigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post Office Department, Na- 
tional Auto Theft Bureau, Registry of Motor Vehicles, and immigration authorities of the United States. 



Records of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year Ending December 31, 1904 



Month Reported Stolen 

January 613 

February 620 

March 1,056 

April . 932 

May . . 739 

June 776 

July 738 

August 753 

September 866 

October i,°73 

November 1,050 

December 936 

Totals 10,202 



red in Boston 


Recovered Outside 
Boston 


493 


127 


61S 


108 


765 


119 


830 


147 


577 


i34 


705 


114 


660 


!3° 


629 


145 


655 


no 


927 


174 


846 


160 


696 


156 


8,401 


1,624 



Stolen Property Recovered 

Value 

1 2 stolen cars recovered (abandoned) $20,000 

14 stolen cars recovered in possession of individuals 37, 5°° 

Cash paid through courts by individuals arrested, in restitution for money obtained through sales of 

stolen cars 3,5°° 

Total Value . . . $61,000 



20 



Worthless Checks and Fraud Unit 

The Worthless Checks and Fraud Unit maintains records on all known check passers and check-passing 
rings. A file card index is maintained on all checks being passed, and on all check passers, listing their known 
associates and any alias being used by them. 

This unit is constantly in contact with law enforcement agencies throughout the state, the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, postal inspectors, and Secret Service. As a result of information that has been compiled, the Bank 
Squad is becoming a clearing house for check activities throughout New England. 

A large degree of the successful activities of this unit can be attributed to the cooperation of Regiscope 
Distributors and Protection Service, Inc. Positive identifications have been made of check passers and their asso- 
ciates from photographs provided by Regiscope, not only on request but on a voluntary basis as well. 

During the past year 114 persons have been arrested for cases originating in this unit. In addition, three 
persons have been arrested for law enforcement agencies outside of Boston. 

The following convictions have been obtained in all courts during the year 1964: 



Counterfeiting 

Forgery 

Uttering 

Accessory before the fact to forgery 
Accessory before the fact to uttering 

Larceny 

Larceny from a building 
Larceny by worthless check . 
Carrying a revolver without a permit 
Attempted larceny by worthless check 
Receiving stolen goods 

Conspiracy 

Violation of Chapter 90, Section 24B 
Violation of true name law 
Defrauding an innkeeper 

Total 



6 

3°i 

3°9 

17 

13 

7 
1 

597 
1 

23 
16 

4 
3 
5 
5 
1,308 



Lost and Stolen Property Unit 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Many cities 
and towns throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen in such places. All pawnbrokers and 
secondhand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of 
articles reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased by dealers resulted in the recovery 
of thousands of dollars' worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Files are maintained on all rifles, shotguns, machine guns, pistols, and revolvers that have been lost or 
stolen in the six New England states and New York. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purposes of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 

During the period from January 1 through December 31, 1964, the total value of stolen property recov- 
ered by this unit and returned to its rightful owners was in the total amount of $42,662. 



21 



GENERAL INVESTIGATION SECTION 



The General Investigation Section is composed of the Night Investigators Unit, Ballistics Unit, the Crime 
Laboratory, Domestic Relations Unit, and the Rendition Squad. 



Night Investigators Unit 

The personnel of this unit are assigned to patrol during the nighttime hours, and their principal duties 
are to investigate all crimes of street violence, robberies (both armed and unarmed), rapes, aggravated assaults, 
and other crimes occurring during those hours. 

During the year 1964 investigations were made resulting in the following prosecutions: 

Murder 

Assault with intent to murder, being armed 

Rape 

Armed robbery 

Assault with intent to rob, being armed 

Unarmed robbery 

Attempted unarmed robbery . 

Kidnapping 

Breaking and entering in the nighttime 

Attempted breaking and entering in the nighttime 

Assault with intent to rob, unarmed 

Assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon 

Larceny of motor vehicles 

Larceny over $100 . 

Larceny under Si 00 

Possession of burglarious tools 

Breaking and entering in the daytime 

Larceny by check .... 

Unlawful carrying of firearm . 

Conspiracy to commit larceny 

Larceny from parking meter . 

Forgery 

Uttering 

Larceny from unknown person 
Larceny in a building 
Receiving stolen property 
Tampering with parking meters 
Conspiracy to commit armed robbery 
Using without authority, motor vehicle 
Unlawful carrying of dangerous weapon 
Carnal abuse of female child under 16 years 

Drunkenness 

Contributing to delinquency of child . 
Violation true name law .... 
Unlawful possession hypodermic needle 
Unlawful possession hypodermic syringe 
Unlawful possession heroin .... 
Operating a motor vehicle without license . 

Assault and battery 

Operating a motor vehicle after license suspended 
Operating under the influence .... 
Leaving scene, personal injury .... 
Leaving scene, property damage .... 
Breaking and entering dwelling, daytime 
Wilful and malicious destruction of personal propert 
Lewd and lascivious cohabitation .... 



22 



I >eriving support from earnings of prostitute 
Being present where narcotics found 

Stubborn child 

Operating a motor vehicle so as to endanger 

Violations Boston traffic rules 

( (perating a motor vehicle after right suspended 

Attempted larceny 

Idle and disorderly 

Wilfully breaking glass in building 

Total 



Delinquent Child to Wit : 

Larceny from person 
Using motor vehicle without authority 
Attempt to commit larceny . 
Armed robbery .... 
Kidnapping 

Total 

Arrests made of persons found to be wanted in other districts and police departments on warrants 

Fugitive from justice, murder 

Violation terms of probation . 

Default, open and gross lewdness . 

Default, possession of harmful drugs 

Default, larceny of motor vehicles 

Default, possession of burglarious tools 

Default, breaking and entering in daytime 

Default, assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon 

Escapee, Lancaster . 

Violation of parole . 

Violation illegitimacy act 

Nonsupport 

Violation of automobile law 

Selling alcoholic beverage to minor, default 

Fugitive, child abandonment 

Default, drunkenness 

Contempt of court . 

Illegitimacy 

Dyer Act (federal warrant) 

Conspiracy to steal motor vehicle (federal warrant 

Total 



A grand total of 330 arrests and prosecutions were made by the Night Investigators Unit for the year 1064. 



23 



Ballistics Unit 

The essential function of the Ballistics Unit is the examination and identification of firearms, spent 
bullets, discharged cartridge cases, which come into the possession of and/or the attention of this department. 

On numerous occasions the ballistician, or one of his assistants, has reported to the scene of a crime to 
obtain this evidence. On off-duty hours, this is accomplished by the means of a call system, whereby the ballis- 
tician or one of his assistants may be contacted at his home, thereby giving the Ballistics Unit a 24-hour coverage 
every day. 

Upon completion of microscopic examinations and identifications of evidence a report is submitted, and 
said evidence is held in the care and custody of this unit until such time as the ballistician, or one of his assistants, 
presents the evidence and the results of the examination and his opinions to the various courts throughout the city 
and state. 

During the period from January 1, 1964, to December 31, 1964, the services of this unit were requested in 
571 cases, listed as follows: 



Accidental shooting, no deaths 

Armed robbery 

Assault and batter)', dangerous weapon 

Bullets recovered, no arrests 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, BB shot investigations, etc. 

Firearm Law, violation of 

Murder 

Suicide and/or accidental shooting, death resulting 

Suicide, attempt 

Weapons examined and held for safekeeping 

Weapons examined and returned to owners 

Weapons found, disposal, etc. 

Test specimens from other departments, examined 

Discharging firearm within city limits 

Total 



4 
3i 
61 

39 
73 

17 
11 

4 
46 
28 
67 
29 

6 

57i 





TEST FIRING 



COMPARISON MICROSCOPE 



Crime Laboratory 

In the modern -< lay police department, the Crime Laboratory, through chemistry and the microscope, 
has developed into a powerful weapon in the continuing fight against crime and the criminal'. 

With the addition of the Crime Laboratory on wheels, the scientific fight against crime has been carried 
into the field and into the backyard of the criminal himself. This mobile laboratory guarantees a more accurate 
search of the crime scene, and the greater likelihood of discovering and securing important evidence. 

Summary of Case Work, Boston Police Department Crime Laboratory Unit, 1964 



Material, 


Number 


Material, 


Number 


test or 


of tests 


test or 


of tests 


category 


or cases 


category 


or cases 


Acid phosphatase 


2 


Photographs: 




Alkalies (lye) . 


i 


Infra-Red .... 


2 


'Bloody footprints . ... 


i 


Black and white . 


34 


Blood Grouping 


i 


Gas Chromatography 


6 


Bloodstains (tests): 




Paper .... 


3 


Benzidine 


71 


Plaster 


9 


Takayama . 


57 


Putty 


1 


Precipitin 


9 


Physical matching . 


3 


Bombs and suspected bombs 


5 


Powder residue-cloth (C-Acids) . 


5 


Brick 


1 


Powder residue-paraffin 


5 


Casts: 




Reports on cases in progress: 


120 


Plaster . . . . 


9 
17 


Verbal report .... 


192 


Silicone rubber RTY . 


Written report 


138 


Charred materials 


4 


Restoration attempts with : 




Clothing .... . . 


149 


Impressions 

Obliterated serial numbers: 


1 


Chemical analysis : 




Vehicles 


7 
1 


Gunpowder 


1 


Rips and tears 


Chemical development of latent fmgerprin 


ts: 


Rope and cordage 


6 


Toner 


39 


Scene examinations 


2 47 


Ninhydrin .... 


57 


Shoeprints (footwear impressions) 


no 


Silver nitrate 


54 


Soil and minerals 


4 


Iodine fuming 


8 


Spermatazoa, microscopic identificatio 


n 2 


Detective dyes 


1 


Tissue, biological .... 


1 


Documents examined 


17 


Tape 


4 


Explosive residues 


9 


Tire tracks 


11 


Fabric ... ... 


1 


Tools 


9 1 


Fabric impressions . ... 


S 


Toolmarks .... 


34 


Fibers 


36 


Typewriter comparisons 


4 


Firebrick 


57 


UV Examinations (ultraviolet) 


14 


Glass 


16 


Vehicle dents and damage 


2 


Gloveprints . .... 


4 


Vehicles examined .... 


27 


Hair 


15 


Vehicle parts 


2 


Jewelry markings — Rest. 


1 


Woods and metals .... 


14 


Laundry marks 


5 


Weapons examined: 




Mortar" 


3 


Cutting instruments — knives . 


20 


Narcotics . 


3 


Blunt instruments 


2 


Paint samples, reference 


So 


Other types 


6 


Paint samples comparison 


6 


Miscellaneous 


. 163 



Medical 
Year Examiner 

1959 4iS 

i960 38S 

1961.. 329 

1962. 330 

1963 

1964 

( '"Figures unavailable) 



J ohce 




arxment 


Tota 


6b 


4S4 


So 


46S 


74 


403 


200 


539 


322 


322 


495 


495 




(24) 



SCIENCE VS. CRIME 



25 
Rendition Squad 

Fugitive from justice complaints were obtained, and sixty-six arrests made in the various courts of this 
city; two of said arrests were female defendants. These complaints and following continuances required 207 appear- 
ances in the Boston Municipal Court ; twenty-six appearances in the Roxbury District Court ; fourteen in the Dorchester 
District Court; nine in the Brighton District Court; six each in the West Roxbury and South Boston District Courts; 
and two appearances in the East Boston District Court. Fifteen appearances were also required in the Federal 
Building before the United States Commissioners. A grand total of 282 court appearances. 

Forty defendants have been returned to demanding states during the past year. Fifteen cases were dis- 
missed at request of demanding state or by the refusal of the Executive Department, Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, to rendite same. Twenty-five cases are still pending in our courts. 

Thirty-six out-of-state officers arriving in this city for the purpose of returning prisoners in our custody 
to their respective cities and states have been given full cooperation and furnished accommodation. 

Twenty-one out-of-state warrants have been returned without service after investigation. Twenty-nine 
investigations have been completed for out-of-state cities and towns. 



Domestic Relations Unit 

The following arrests have been made by this unit in the course of its regular duties from January 1, 1064, 
to December 31, 1964: 

Violation of terms of probation, violation of Illegitimate Child Act 122 

Violation of terms of probation , nonsupport of family 112 

Nonsupport of family 107 

Violation of the Illegitimate Child Act 43 

Default, nonsupport of family 14 

Larceny by fraud 6 

Threats to do bodily harm 3 

Default to commit larceny by fraud 3 

Violation of terms of probation, larceny by fraud 2 

Default, violation of the Illegitimate Child Act 3 

Default, neglect 

Neglect 

Default , larceny 

Abuse of female child 

Violation of terms of probation, threats to do bodily harm 

Total 420 

Additional arrests made by the members of this unit while in the investigation of and in conjunction with 
the course of their regular duties: 

Assault and battery 4 

Violation of terms of probation, assault and battery 4 

Default, violation of Motor Vehicle Law . . 4 

Violation of Motor Vehicle Law 2 

Breaking and entering in the nightrime to commit larcenj . . 1 

Default, breaking glass 1 

Drunkenness 1 

Default, drunkenness . . 1 

Violation of terms of probation, violation of Motor Vehicle Law. 1 

Default, carrying firearm without permit . . 1 

Nonpayment of wages . . . . 1 

Violation of terms of probation, injury to property . .1 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic needle 1 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic syringe ....... 1 

Unlawful possession of narcotic drug, heroin 1 

Arrests for outside police departments 6 

Total 31 

420 

Total Arrests 451 



26 

I )ays in court, prosecuting cases after arrests 399 

Suspended sentences ordered by courts (three to eighteen months) 218 

Sentences of commitment 29 

Orders of probation (from two weeks to six years) 233 

( Irders of restitution (larceny by fraud) 28 

Amount of orders of restitution $10,416 .00 

Recipients removed from welfare by courts 18 

Amount realized by eighteen removals from public aid $33,378 80 

Orders of full or partial support by defendants 288 

Amount of orders of full or partial support $200,496 .00 

Amount of fines ordered by courts $513 .00 

Amount potentially saved the City of Boston $244,803 .80 

Approximately 2,025 cases have been investigated by this unit through referrals by welfare authorities, 
courts, police districts, outside police departments, out-of-state agencies, and private citizens. Some of these 
cases are continuing to be investigated. 



JUVENILE AID SECTION 

The Juvenile Aid Section operates for the prevention of delinquency among juveniles and to maintain a 
program of constant cooperation with all agencies in the child welfare field for the rehabilitation of maladjusted 
children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate factors which induce criminal tendencies 
among children. 

2. Enlist the aid of the general public, child welfare agencies, districts and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship; develop a proper mental attitude of citizens toward law enforcement agencies; 
educate the public in the problems of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to delinquency of children; investigate and 
take necessary action to correct such conditions. 

5. Supervise and inspect places of public amusement, hotels, bus and railroad stations, and places where 
large numbers of juveniles congregate. 

6. Control existing problems by modern and efficient juvenile police methods. 

The juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,651 male and 392 female juveniles in the following age 
groups : 

Age 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Total 

Male 4 9 26 32 89 132 219 321 409 424 1,651 

Female o o o 4 12 24 60 96 106 90 392 

In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way involved in 
unlawful activities concerning juveniles, 193 male and 30 female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought to their respective districts for questioning in regard to criminal offences committed 
on each district 2,658 male and 482 female juveniles. As a result of the interrogation, together with personal 
interviews with the parents of these children, it was determined to be for the best interests of the children, parents, 
and the city to return them to their parents without bringing them before the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the City of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the child. It is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston, with the 
child being returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officer, in the case of first offenders, without 
having the stigma of a juvenile record attached to the child, who, after the proper disciplinary action by the parents, 
would not and does not appear in the over-all juvenile delinquency pattern again. 



There were 5,406 cases processed by the Juvenile Aid Section for this period, including the cases brought 
to court and the cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinary action. While there is a per- 
ceptible increase in the over-all number of cases handled during the year 1964, it is to be noted that there is 
an increase of 50.7 percent of female juveniles arrested for the commission of offenses referred to the courts for 
judicial review. Due to this fact, we have had several policewomen added to this unit to assist in eliminating this 
condition. 

This bureau presented lectures to many organizations in an effort to educate the public to the scope of 
juvenile delinquency, the elementary causes, the policies, plans, and procedures of the Juvenile Aid Section. The 
results of these lectures are reflected in many ways, such as the multitude of organizations which are now conducting 
campaigns against the sale of indecent literature and photographs to children, the organizations which are now 
offering athletic programs to children, and, most important of all, the supervisory interest that parents are now 
taking in their children. 

It cannot go without mention that the tremendous cooperation this bureau is receiving from the clergy, 
the schools, and the agencies of the City of Boston is directly related to this program of acquainting the public 
with the juvenile delinquency problem in this city. 

During the past year the juvenile officers personally contacted many people who are engaged in some 
phase of children's work in the City of Boston, including school teachers, librarians, court attaches, clergymen, 
boys' and girls' club workers, and those people who staff agencies working for the betterment of children. This 
phase of the program is to make all of these people more fully aware of the fact that the police are cognizant of 
their importance in the over-all battle against delinquency and realize that delinquency shall be defeated only by 
the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of 
attendance in the public schools which is worthy of special mention due to the fact that it is now officially recog- 
nized that truancy has decreased in Boston due to the work that has been done in this field. 

Also during the year, due to the fact that the officers through their contact with the various agencies have 
learned what each agency is specializing in, many hundreds of our unfortunate families have been assisted by the 
agencies after a referral had been made to them by juvenile officers who, because of their knowledge of the neighbor- 
hood of assignment, recognized the fact that these people were in dire need of assistance. 

To aid the juvenile officers in combating the problem of juvenile delinquency a program has been set in 
motion with Boston University where the officers are taking a series of lectures on youth development. 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report of 1963 shows that this bureau processed and 
handled more cases, with 30 less juveniles appearing before the courts. In the light of the reported upward trend on 
a national level, these facts should be regarded as encouraging. 




WEAPONS TAKEN FROM TEENAGERS 



28 



VICE CONTROL SECTION 

The Vice Control Section is subdhidcd into the Narcotics and Vice Unit and the Gaming Unit. 



Narcotics and Vice Unit 

The tremendous increase in the illegal use of narcotics, plus the resulting crime brought aboul through the 
use of these drugs, is rapidly becoming one of the chief problems lacing even- major police department. To this 
end, the Narcotics and Vice Unit is charged with the responsibility of investigating and prosecuting persons who 
have committed crimes against chastity, morality, and decency, and for those laws governing the sale and use of 
narcotics and harmful drugs. 

This unit works in close cooperation with other state, federal, and municipal agencies in the investigation 
of interstate prostitution and transportation of narcotics, drugs and obscene literature. 



Investigations 

Narcotic investigations 

Arrests .... 

Vice — prostitution and related offenses — investigations 

Arrests 

Gaming investigations 

Arrests .... . . 

Liquor investigations (does not include routine inspections of 

Arrests 

Arrests other than vice, narcotics, gaming, and liquor 
Total court and Hearing Board appearances 
Investigations with outside agencies 



licensed premises) 



Vice Arrests 



Idle and disorderly persons 

Prostitutes ... 

Obscene books, photographs, records, letters, etc. 

Deriving support from earnings of prostitute 

Fornication 

Unnatural act ... . . . 

Allowing premises to be used foi immoral purposes . 

Common nightwalkers 

Soliciting for a prostitute 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation . 

Adultery . 

Resorting to licensed premises for immoral solicitation 

Open and gross lewdness 

Conspiracy to commit adultery . ... 

Total .... 

Suspicious persons, signed waiver and released . 

Search warrants issued 

Investigations 



SS7 
208 
506 
43 6 
795 
412 
205 
1 20 
197 
1.497 
125 



132 
114 

20 

16 
3 
3 
3 

28 
1 

12 
5 
3 
1 
2 



343 

93 

9 

506 




LONG SURVEILLANCE NETS DRUG CACHE 



29 



Narcotic Arrests 

Unlawful possession of narcotic drugs .... 

Unlawful sale of narcotic drugs 

Unlawful possession of narcotic drugs with intent to sell 

Being present where narcotic drugs were found 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic needle . 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic syringe 

Conspiracy to violate the narcotic drug laws 

Inducing a minor to carry narcotic drugs 

Unlawful possession of harmful drugs . 

Failure to disclose that narcotic drugs are being prescribed by 

Larceny of narcotic drugs 

Attempt to utter forged prescription 

Violation chapter 94, Section 199 

Violation chapter 94, Section 199A 

Having narcotic drug in unauthorized container 

Total 



Suspicious persons, signed waivers and released 

Search warrants issued 

Investigations 



another physician 



59 

7 
8 

33 

16 

12 

8 

12 
1 
1 

1 
8 

1 
1 

169 

39 

45 

557 



Gaming Unit 

The enforcement of gaming laws by officers assigned to this unit has become increasingly more difficult 
due to recent court decisions affecting the arrest process and admissibility of evidence, as well as by the ingenious 
techniques resorted to by this type of offender in destroying evidence, such as the use of "flash paper" which bursts 
into flames when touched by a cigar or cigarette and the recording of bets on formica-treated boards and cards 
which can be readily erased with the palm of the hand. 

In one case, coded betting notations were submitted to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for decoding 
by a cryptographer while in another case the Federal Bureau of Investigation furnished the services of an agent to 
testify as an expert witness on handwriting and gaming. 

During the past year officers of this unit conducted 795 investigations resulting in 411 arrests. 



Gaming Arrests 

Being present where gaming implements were found 
Allowing premises to be used for illegal gaming 

Being concerned in a lottery ... 

Having books and apparatus for the purpose of registering bets on the speed of a beast. 
Using a telephone to register bets 
Transporting gaming apparatus 
Molesting telephone wires 
Gaming with cards 

Registering bets 

Conspiracy to violate the gaming laws 

Total ......... 

Suspicious persons, signed waivers and released 

Search warrants issued 

Investigations . . 



122 

73 
80 

7i 
12 

9 

2 

38 
2 

2 

411 

1 

153 

795 



Officers of this unit also investigated sixty-one locations relative to telephones being used for illegal gaming 
purposes and recommended to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company that forty-three telephones 
be removed. 



30 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 

This bureau has the responsibility of the administration ot all other auxiliary services which must be pro- 
vided to assure effective police operations, including maintenance of police buildings and equipment, requisition 
of supplies, laboratory examination of physical evidence, records and communications, and identification and 
custody of prisoners. 

The quality of police service and the success of many police operations are dependent on the suitability 
of equipment and the maintenance of police buildings. In order to provide an effective span of control, this bureau 
is separated into the Central Services Division and the Records and Communications Division. 



CENTRAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Central Services Division has direct responsibility for administrative supervision of the City Prison, 
House of Detention for Women, building and equipment maintenance, the processing, care, and custody of non- 
departmental property and inventory, the custody and distribution of departmental-owned supplies and equipment. 
This division is also responsible for the processing of all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner. 

Satisfactory maintenance and repair of property and equipment promote efficiency, morale, and prestige 
of the police service and have a direct bearing on good public relations. 



PROPERTY CLERK UNIT 

The Property Clerk Unit is charged with the care of lost, stolen, and abandoned property; money or other 
property alleged to have been illegally obtained; and all articles and property taken from persons arrested for any 
cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come into the possession of 
the department. 

All orders for supplies, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year, 172 motor vehicles came into custody of this office; twelve vehicles were released to 
legitimate claimants, and 142 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now seventy-eight motor vehicles 
in custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department automobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. 
During the year, on 7,262 occasions, department cars were repaired, and, on 2,915 occasions, cars were serviced. 
There were 342 department cars and 195 privately owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department 
operates a motorcycle shop where, on 855 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the year. 

This unit is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the various districts, 
and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



Lost and Found Property 

Articles on hand January i, it)t>4 

Articles received during the year to December 3 1 , 1964 



Total 



Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 

Worthless 

Sold at public auction 

Total number of articles disposed of ... . 

Total number of articles on hand December 31, 1964 



247 
223 



62 
112 



31 



470 



2 57 
213 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS UNIT 

The Superintendent of Buildings Unit is charged with the care, maintenance, supervision, and cleanliness 
of all police buildings. All requests for repairs or maintenance work are examined by members of this unit; then a 
service order, containing a cost estimate, is written up and processed through the Property Clerk so that the work 
can be done by an outside contractor. 

After the work has been completed, it is inspected by the Superintendent of Buildings, who approves or 
disapproves of the work done by signing the service order, which allows for payment. 

Any structural changes in a police building which is recommended by the Bureau of Inspectional Services 
must carry with it a cost estimate plus full specifications prepared by this unit. 



H H 



32 



MOTOR VEHICLE SERVICE 

There are 2Q3 motor vehicles in the service at the present time which are distributed as follows: 



Districts 



Combination 

Patrol and 

Ambulances 



Passenger 

Automobiles 


Trucks 


Motorcycles 


10 






49 


16 


— 


3 


— 


1 


s 


— 


1 


10 


— 


1 


12 


— 


6 


6 


— 


4 


6 


— 


4 


2 


4 


— 


15 





1 

2 
3 


7 
1 1 





5 





6 


7 
4 

5 





3 


— 


3 


9 


— 


20 


12 


— 


— 


*iS; 


*20 


*55 



Totals 



Tactical Patrol 
Headquarters 
District 1 
District 2 
District 4 
District 5 
District 
District 7 
District 8 
District 
District 10 
District 11 
District 13 
District 14 
District 15 
District iq 
Traffic Division 
Pool 



Totals 



3i 



I 1 

65 

6 
S 

25 
20 
12 
12 
6 
18 

I I 
16 

13 
12 

5 
10 

29 

14 



293 



* Included in the total of 187 passenger automobiles there are 29 station wagons. 
f Included in the total cf 20 trucks there is a car-crane and a fork-lift at District 8. 

The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Districts One, Two, 
Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Nine, Ten, Eleven, Thirteen, Fourteen, Fifteen, and Nineteen. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convex- sick and injured persons to the following places: 



Boston City Hospital . 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Services not required . 

Boston State Hospital 

Carney Hospital . 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Southern Mortuary 

East Boston Relief Station 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Children's Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Home 

United States Veterans Hospital' 

Beth Israel Hospital . 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Northern Mortuary 

United States Naval Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Roslindale General Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Floating Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital . 

Police Station Houses 

Physician's office . 

Brighton Marine Hospital . 

Longwood Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 

Shattuck Hospital .... 

Harley Hospital 

Brookline Hospital .... 



14.924 
34°3 
1,568 

1.497 
I.3I3 
1,254 
706 
689 
686 
499 
487 
413 
353 
341 
141 
114 

105 
84 
66 

50 
49 
4« 
46 
45 
35 
35 
29 
26 
22 
19 
17 
15 



Pratt Diagnostic Clinic 

Soldiers' Home 

Sullivan Square Medical Centre 

Kenmore Hospital 

Milton Hospital . 

New England Baptist Hospital 

Parker Hill Hospital . 

Somerville Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 

Boston Sanatorium 

Mount Auburn Hospital 

Hahnemann Hospital . 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

Chestnut Hill Nursing Home 

Columbus Nursing Home . 

Brookline Nursing Home 

Cambridge City Hospital . 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 

Commonwealth Nursing Home 

Grover Manor Nursing Home 

Glenside Hospital 

Industrial Clinic . 

Joslin Clinic . 

Lahey Clinic 

Maiden Hospital . 

Robert Brigham Hospital 

South End Health Clinic 

Washingtonian Hospital 

Women's Free Hospital 

Total . 



13 

12 

12 

1 1 

1 1 

10 

10 

10 

8 

6 

5 

3 

3 

2 



29,21 



33 

LICENSES ISSUED BY POLICE COMMISSIONER 

Auctioneer (Class I) Musician (collective and sound car) 

Auctioneer (other classes) Musician itinerant 

Bicycle registrations Pawnbroker 

Dog Public lodging house 

Diiver (hackney carriage) Secondhand articles 

Firearms, dealer in Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 

Firearms, license to carry Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 

Gunsmith Sightseeing automobile 

Hackney carriage Sightseeing driver 

Handcart (common carrier) Special police 

Junk collector Street railway conductor, motorman, and starter 

Junk shopkeeper 

HACKNEY CARRIAGES 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, limits the number of licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, January 1, 1964, to December 31, 1964, due to changes of ownership and regrants, 
a total of *2,ioq licenses were granted. 

There were 272 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Of these 164 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 108 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the 
same: 

Hackney Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage licenses received 2,109 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and ''changes of ownership") . . 1,659 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 450 

2,109 
Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") . .... 5S4 

Carriages licensed — "changes of ownership " . ... 134 

Carriage licenses in effect December 31, 1964 (at end of police year) — licensed since February 1, 1964 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 1,525 

Carriages inspected . 2,109 

*45o "regrants" 

Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on . . 6,851 

Applications for drivers Micenses rejected . . 215 

Drivers' licenses granted ... . . . . 6,636 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 25, of which revocations 9 were rescinded and the licenses restored, leaving the 

net figure shown of such revocations as . . . 16 

Drivers' licenses in effect December 31, 1964 (at end of police year)— licensed since February 1, 1964 (be- 
ginning of hackney carriage license year) 6,761 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated . • 702 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers ' . . . 272 



34 

POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM 

Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 557. Of these 526 arc connected with the underground system and 
thirty-one with the overhead. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to 1,615 trouble calls, inspected 557 signal boxes, 
fifteen signal desks, seventeen motor generator sets, 300 storage batteries. Repairs have been made on 198 box 
movements, eighteen registers, 227 locks, twenty-six time stamps, thirty-four vibrator bells, forty-two relays, 
twenty-seven electric fans, fifty-four motors, and fifteen generators. This unit is responsible for the installation and 
maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all police buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are sixty signal, 557 telephone, and seventy-nine Winker-light 
circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs 
throughout the department. It also maintains fifty headquarters to station house telephone circuits, sixteen tele- 
type-writer circuits, sixteen radio-wired broadcast circuits, a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank Station of 
the Metropolitan District Police, and the intercommunication units throughout the department. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending December 31, 1964 

(Included in Table XI) 

Payrolls $116,015.94 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 29,614.35 

Total $145,630.29 



35 



CITY PRISON 

The City Prison under the direction of the Bureau of General Services is located in the New Court House 
Building, Somerset Street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within jurisdiction of the Central Munici- 
pal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the keeper until the 
next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the in- 
stitution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 

During the year January i, 1964, to December 31, 1964, 10,498 men were committed to the City Prison, 
as follows: 



Assault and battery . 










7 


Automobile law 










5 


Breaking and entering 










1 


Default 










8 


Drunkenness 










10. 545 


Forgery 










1 


Larceny 










2 


Liquor law . 










3 



Nonsupport 

Violation of probation 

Safekeeping 

Suspicious persons 

Threats 

Vagrancy 

Miscellaneous 

Total . 



2 

6 

67 

4 
2 

3 
42 



10,498 



During the yearly period, a total of 201 male lodgers were received and cared for at this unit. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is directed by the Bureau of General Services and is located in the New 
Court House Building, Somerset Street. All women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention 
and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which 
they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the in- 
stitution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await such grand jury action. 



During the year 2,399 were committed as follows: 



Abandonment 

Abortion 

Adultery 

Assault and battery 

Delinquent children 

Drug law violation 

Drunkenness 

Forgery 

Fornication 

House of ill fame 

Idle and disorderly 

Larceny 

Lodgers 

M. C. Commitments 

Bails 



o 
o 

5 
21 

1 
10 

i,358 
o 
o 
o 

123 
125 



Liquor law violation 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Lewdness 

Neglect of children . 

Runaways . 

Safekeeping 

Stubborn child . 

Violation of probation and parole 

Miscellaneous 

Suspicious persons 



Total 



o 

5 
5 
5 
5 
2 

13 
26 

346 

339 

2,389 

9 
2 

381 



36 



RECORDS AND COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 



This division is charged with the administrative supervision of the Centra] Complainl Section, Central 
Records Section, Identification Section, and Printing Unit. 

The Central Records Section is the information center of the department and coordinates all police record 
requirements so as to form a fully integrated system. The section is open around the clock to provide assistance 
to other police activities. It contains all department administrative and operating records and exercises staff 
control over all reporting units to assure timely submission of reports that are both complete and accurate. All 
warrants are processed by this section. 

The Central Complaint Section receives complaints and reports of crime and other incidents from the 
public, and assigns radio car personnel to investigate the reports as received. It also generally controls the im- 
mediate deployment of field personnel, subject to appropriate authority in emergency situations. 

The Identification Section provides for photography and fingerprinting of arrested persons and maintains 
both criminal and civil files of fingerprints and photographs. 

CENTRAL COMPLAINT SECTION 

The Central Complaint Section has control over all communications consisting of telephone, teletype, 
radio, and telegraph. 

There were 579,3 r 5 outgoing telephone messages and 4,889 toll calls made by the department through 
our switchboard; 358,783 emergency messages were received and processed at the Complaint Desk through either 
DE 8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 500,000 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the Complaint Desk for processing; 217,908 teletype messages and 
536 telegrams were processed, 2,297 of these relating to missing persons; 10,202 automobiles were reported stolen, 
and 10,025 were reported recovered; r, 445, 000 radio messages were sent and received. 

On an average month some 120,416 radio messages are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. A tape recorder accurately records each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an important administrative record of same. 

The Central Complaint Room has control of all police communications and all essential equipment, in- 
cluding receiving all telephone calls and the receiving and sending of all radio, teletype, and telegram messages 
and the responsibility for the proper care and maintenance of these services and essential equipment. 

The primary function of the personnel is to give instant services when required to the public, courteously 
and efficiently. All Central Complaint card numbers are issued here for the entire department, and all department 
mobile radio-equipped units, both sending and receiving, are directed from this room. This includes patrol cars, 
ambulances, ambulets, boats, and motorcycles. All major disasters are directed from this unit. 

Responsibilities 

These services require that numerous files and records be kept to insure maximum efficiency. The fol- 
lowing files are kept: Daily Central Complaint Card File, Felony Report Sheet, Missing Persons File", Stolen and 
Recovered Automobile File, Towed Car File, Out of State Student Registration File, Daily Local and State Tele- 
type File, Telegram File, Police Department Roster File, Fire Box Location File with nearest sector car designated, 
file for F. B. I., Out of State Stolen Cars Recovered in Boston and Cars Stolen in Boston Recovered Outside. A 
daily telephone toll call record is kept for the Signal Service. 



i 

i 


wmm—mm m M 




^^-saaLLi Kfc 




BpB-3i 


<r 


^ r =* 


„^ 




DUAL DISPATCHING 



CONSTANTLY IN TOUCH WITH 
POLICE DEPARTMENTS IN COUNTRY 



CENTRAL RECORDS SECTION 

The Central Records Section is located on the third floor of Police Headquarters. 

Over $35,351 was collected for work permits and requests for records during the past year by this section. 

This section assigns all booking numbers for arrests to all districts, resulting in the making and filing of 
approximately 65,000 additional 3x5 cards annually in the main index files of this unit without the addition of 
extra personnel. This system now permits officers of the department to know at any time if a particular individual 
has or does not have an arrest record in this city for any offense. 

Recorded in the Main Index File 560,920 

Criminal records on file 18,300 

During the year there were 2,962 additional Bureau of Records Folders added in the files, a system started 
in January 1962 in an attempt to obtain separate folders for each individual arrested by this department. 



Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone and personal inquiries made over the counter . 

Requests received by correspondence 

Requests for certified records 

Requests for jury records 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 



Total . 



Requests received from various public agencies: 
Stragglers and deserters (armed forces) 



9.4S5 
*8,2o6 

i.3°4 

2,801 
12,968 

34,764 
1,245 



Grand Total 36,009 

* This includes requests from all branches of the armed forces and companies throughout the country engaged in defense work. 

During the year the following equipment was installed in this section, resulting in a greater capacity for 
storing records and a saving in time and expense in researching the files through the use of electrical rotary files. 
Two 8x8 rotary file cabinets (made by Diebold) thirty-eight open-shelf files. 



Missing Persons 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 

Total number still missing 



*i,286 

1,220 

66 



* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing who 
were found or returned within a few hours after the report was made. 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 



Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under L5 years 

liver 15 years — under 21 . . 

Over 21 years ... • 


247 
225 
231) 


131 
258 
186 


231 
212 
227 


12!) 
248 
173 


10 

14 
11 


4 

9 

12 


Totals 


711 


575 


670 


550 


41 


25 



Reported missing in Boston 1.28b 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 6,879 

Reported missing and returned the same day (locally) 827 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 2,213 

Total number of persons reported missing 1 1,205 



38 



District i (North End Section) 

District 2 (Downtown Section) 

District 4 (South End and Back Bay Sections) 

District 5 (Hyde Park and West Roxbury) 

District 6 (South Boston) .... 

District 7 (East Boston) 

District 8 (Harbor Police) .... 

District 9 (Dudley Street section of Roxbury) 

District 10 (Roxbury Crossing Section) 



Persons Reported Missing by Police Districts for 1964 

16 



District 11 (Adams Street sect 

District 13 (Jamaica Plain) 

District 14 (Brighton) 

District 15 (Charlestown) 

District 19 (Mattapan) 

Total .... 



on of Dorchester) 



Persons interviewed . 

Inquiries relating to location of friends and relatives 



96 
56 
96 

37 

1 

279 

190 

176 

81 

75 

46 

129 




1,286 

♦289 

506 



0OST 

p ouc 



'I WANNA LAWYER" 



* Does not include those interviewed at the various units and districts of the department. 

There were no reports of persons afflicted with amnesia. 

In 117 cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, 115 were identified through fingerprint impressions. 



Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 

Warrants received from other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston 
Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for service in Boston 



Total 



Warrants sent out for service to districts and units within the department 

Warrants sent out for service to other cities and towns in Massachusetts 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Warrants sent to institutions in Massachusetts as detainers for this department 

Total warrants processed 

Warrants returned without service to our districts and units 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 



Summonses 

Total number received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 
Total number served 



Total number not served 

Total number of summonses sent from Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns 
Total number served 



7>238 

i,543 
149 

8,930 

7,495 
904 
166 
365 

8,93° 

1,259 
1,710 
6,861 



10,486 
9,459 

1,027 
63,003 
57,i4i 

5,862 



Total number not served 

There was an increase of 50 percent in summonses handled by this department in 1964 over the 1963 
figure as shown in comparison : 

1963 total 4o,579 

1964 total 63,003 



39 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

The multilith machine was used to make 1,291,500 impressions, consisting of department forms, letters, 
police bulletins, and IBM cards. 

The mimeograph machine made 605,700 impressions, consisting of daily manifolds, bulletins, circular 
letters for the various units and districts including police school lessons. 

IDENTIFICATION SECTION 
Photography 

Number of photographs on file January 1, 1964 . 

Made and filed during the year 

Number of "Foreign" photographs on file .... 
Number of "Foreign" photographs received during the year 

Total 

Number on file in the "Local Segregated" file (gallery) 
Number on file in the "Foreign Segregated" file 
Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) . 
Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) 
Scenes of crime photographed 

This represents an increase of 100 crime scenes photographed over the 1963 figure. 

Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns 

Number of rectigraph photographs made 

Number of negatives of criminals made 

Number of prints made from same .... 



832,015 


16,542 


17,124 


1.17s 


866,856 


55,743 


17,124 


118 


32 


71S 



11,182 

4,051 
3,365 

5-591 
27,955 



The rogues' gallery is constantly being updated by removing from the files numerous photographs considered to be too old to 
be used for identification purposes. 

Color Photography 

Color "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1963 

Made and filed during che year 1964 



Total "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1964 



21,780 
5,59i 

27,37i 

483 

3,265 

6,730 

7,442 

64 

320 

55 
3,959 
6,791 

2o,373 

Members of the Identification Section worked in conjunction with the personnel of the Training Academy 
to produce a training film showing the proper procedure in the handling of persons arrested. 

The photographers of the Identification Section also made a 16 mm. sound movie entitled "Holdup and 
Arrest." This film was turned over to the Police Academy for showing, in an effort to improve the efficiency of the 
members of the department. 



Miscellaneous color photographs taken and processed (scenes of violence, homicides, assualt and battery, 

etc.) 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 
Number of prints made from same 
Number of reorders of criminal photographs 
Number of stand-up photographs made 
Number of prints made from same 
Number of photographs of police officers 
Number of scenes of crime visited 
Number of exposures (4x5 camera) 
Number of prints made from same 



4 o 



Fingerprint File 



Number on file December 31, 1963 

Taken and filed during 1964: 
Male .... 
Female 

Received from other authorities: 
Male .... 
Female 



Number on file December 31, 1964 



236,458 



4,187 
1,404 



2,226 

580 

244,855 



Fingerprints sent to: 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 
Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 
Other cities and towns 

Fingerprints taken other than criminals: 
Police officers .... 
vSpecial police officers 
Hackney carriage drivers 
Civilian employees . 
Firearms act (revolver licenses) 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1963 

Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1964 



5,59i 

5.591 

386 



55 

1,100 

12,968 

9 
1,184 

108,811 

124,127 



Fi\e=Finger System of Fingerprinting 

Number of five-finger cards on file December 31, 1964 

Number of Main Index cards cross-indexed to five-finger system December 31, 1964 

Number of latent prints found at crime scenes, on file in the Identification Section December 31, 

Number of connections made by latent prints since the system was established .... 



1904 



26,136 

13,068 

1,670 

53° 



There were fifty-seven identifications made through the viewing of the mug files (both black and white 
and colored mugs) of this department during the year 1964. There was also incorporated into the segregation 
system of the mug files a separate file of arrests by districts, which enables an officer or witness to view photos of 
persons arrested in any particular area or on any district. 

During the year there were 1,716 latent prints found at the scenes of crime in the city, and returned to 
this unit ; this is an increase of 27 1 over the same period in 1963. The Latent Print Unit made forty-six identifications 
from the prints found at crime scenes. 

There were 718 crime scenes photographed during the year 1964. 

The Photographic Unit has branched into more extensive use of 16 mm. movie equipment owned by this 
department in the area of surveillance work and with a view of practical application of this equipment in the field of 
training films. The results of this are not complete, but are very promising. 




MAKING A CONNECTION 



4i 



Polygraph 



Since its installation in June of 1963 the polygraph or lie detector machine has been in the hands of a trained 
operator who attended the Reid School in Chicago. This instrument has provided the department with a scientific 
method of interrogating persons suspected of having committed a crime. This machine has made it possible to 
reduce the number of hours previously spent in random interrogation of suspects. It has also proven its value in 
those instances wherein the machine was instrumental in determining a person's innocence. Perhaps, more cor- 
rectly, it should be called the "truth" detector. 

The following is a report of the activities of the Polygraph Unit from January 1, 1964, to December 31, 1964: 



Unit 


Number 


Under 








Crime 


Serviced 


Persons 


Arresc 


Sex 


Adults 


Minors 


Investigated 


Homicide 


42 


2 


Male 


41 


1 


Murder 


Hackney 


2 





Male 


2 





Larcenv 


Robbery 


I 


1 


Male 


1 





Larceny 


District Four 







Male 







."\ 1 urder 


District Six 








Male 


2 





Robbery 


District Ten 


5 





Male 


4 


1 


Larceny, Hit and Run 


District Eleven 


2 


1 


Male 


1 


1 


Breaking and Entering 
Arson, Murder 


District Thirteen 


2 


1 


Male 


2 





Rape — Larceny- 


District Five 


1 





Male 


1 





Hit and Run 


Shopping Squad 


1 





Male 


1 





Larceny- 


Outside Agency 


3 

64 





Female 


2 


1 


Arson 


Totals 


5 




60 


4 






POLYGRAPH MACHINE 



42 



BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

This bureau was established for the purpose of having an inspectional service that operates beyond the 
scope of the Bureaus of Field Operations, General Sendees, and Personnel and Training. 

The Bureau of Inspectional Services consists of three divisions, namely, Staff Inspection, Internal Affairs, 
and Intelligence. 

The reports of all its investigations, inspections, and recommendations are forwarded directly to the Police 
Commissioner. 

STAFF INSPECTION DIVISION 

This division is charged with the responsibility of conducting periodic inspections of the entire police 
operation, on a continuing basis. The purpose of these inspections is to determine whether: 

i. Personnel are sufficiently supervised, trained, and being deployed in the most effective manner. 

2. Plant and equipment are being maintained and efficiently utilized. 

3. Rules, regulations, general orders, and policies of the department are being complied with. 

4. Present rules, regulations, and policies are sufficient to meet the present day-to-day demands on the 
department. 

5. There are any deficiencies in such matters as integrity, morale, or supervision which should be cor- 
rected or improved. 

A program designed to insure that each of the several police districts and units will be inspected on an 
annual basis to determine adequacy of personnel-public relationships and the processing of prisoners by the police 
is now in operation. 

INTERNAL AFFAIRS DIVISION 

Personnel of this division conduct investigations of all police recruits prior to their appointment in order 
to insure the selection of the most qualified persons for appointment to the Police Department. All complaints 
against police officers or civilian employees of the department, both of an external or internal source, are investi- 
gated by division personnel or referred to the proper authority. Supervision of the departmental disciplinary 
process is also the responsibility of this division. 

The Internal Affairs Division has established amiable liaison with several minority and civil liberty groups 
for the purpose of exploring any problems in this area and to bring about improvements when the need is indicated. 

During 1964 seventy-five recruits were investigated prior to appointment. One hundred and sixty-two 
complaints were investigated and settled to the satisfaction of the complainants. Representatives of this division 
were present at all department Trial Boards and conducted ten investigations within the department that involved 
department personnel. 

During the year 770 hours of punishment duty were meted out by Trial Boards and fourteen other type 
disciplinary actions were taken. One dismissal and one six-month suspension were brought about as a result of 
personnel misconducts. 

As a result of recommendations made by this division, procedures were established that caused a reduction 
in personnel sick leave. 



43 

INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

This division is responsible for keeping the Police Commissioner informed on the status of organized crime 
and the activities of known criminals in the city. 

This division has compiled a comprehensive filing system of the activities of known criminals, organized 
crime, various groups which require police surveillance, and locations which have been used for criminal activity in 
the past or which are suspected of being used for criminal activity. This division receives field interrogation reports 
from officers in the several districts who observe and/or interrogate persons suspected of being involved in unlawful 
activity. These reports are evaluated before being filed, and the information is then forwarded to the proper unit or 
agency. In addition, information received from various sources must be evaluated, and in most cases the officers 
of this division must conduct an investigation to verify the information which was received. 

The officers assigned to the Intelligence Division are constantly conducting investigations and making 
surveillances in an effort to keep abreast of the activities and locations of known criminals in Boston and the sur- 
rounding areas. 

In addition to furnishing the various districts and units of this departmen t with information which has assisted 
in the solution of a large number ol crimes perpetrated in this city, this division is working constantly with other 
departments and agencies on local, state, and federal levels. In this way we have received infoimation valuable to 
officers of this department and also have furnished other agencies and departments with information which assisted 
them in solving crimes perpetrated in their jurisdiction. 



44 



BUREAU OF 
PERSONNEL AND TRAINING 

PERSONNEL DIVISION 

The Personnel Division, after a comprehensive survey of progressive police departments across the coun- 
try, inaugurated a program for reviewing and recording the performance and accomplishments of police officers 
by means of a semiannual Performance Evaluation Report. The objectives of this new program are to improve 
the total effectiveness of our police operation and to assist in determining our training needs and requirements 
for the future. The traits evaluated include appearance, quality of work, personal relations, leadership, attend- 
ance and promptness. The ultimate purpose of this performance evaluation program is to raise the level of pro- 
fessional competence of our police officers through intelligent supervisory observation and guidance. 

During the year the Personnel Division staff completed their program for the microfilming of inactive 
personnel files, which has resulted in a far more efficient method of assembling, processing, and filing all vital per- 
sonnel statistics, eliminating all previous duplication. All personnel files, payroll data, and other pertinent in- 
formation concerning present and former employees have now been centralized in this unit. 

A new program of maintaining a constant evaluation of requests for sick and injured leave in cooperation 
with the Department Medical Examiner has been continued, and significant improvements have been achieved in 
this area. 

The position of liaison officer has been created within the Personnel Division to contact and care for the 
needs of all officers injured in the line of duty. 




POLICE DONATION FOR VICTIMS OF BELL-FLOWER STREET FIRE 



45 



TRAINING DIVISION 



In keeping with our responsibility to provide all of our officers with the latest and best information and 
guidance in the rapidly changing field of law enforcement, the Training Division over the past year has continued 
its stepped-up program of in-service, specialization, and recruit training. 

In order to provide a well-rounded curriculum, guest instructors have been obtained from the public 
service, the judiciary, and the legal profession. Judge Felix Forte, Associate Justice, Massachusetts Superior Court; 
Judge Elijah Adlow, Chief Justice, Boston Municipal Court; and Judge Elwood S. McKenney of the Roxbury 
District Court have made invaluable contributions in this regard. 

Specialists from within our own department have assisted the Police Academy staff in presenting subjects 
which have a practical application to everyday police work. 

Particular emphasis has been devoted to the field of civil rights and community relations. Two mem- 
bers of the Police Academy staff attended the Annual National Institute on Police and Community Relations at 
Michigan State University with tuition fees paid by the Northeast Regional Office, National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews. Mr. Robert E. Segal, Executive Director of the Jewish Community Council, and Mr. Joseph 
Williams of the N.A.A.C.P. have both contributed their time and talents to our training program in human rights. 

A monthly Department Training Bulletin has been instituted to keep every officer informed of recently 
enacted laws and United States and Massachusetts Supreme Court decisions affecting their police responsibilities. 
Every officer is provided with a copy of "Training Key," a bimonthly publication of the International Association 
of Chiefs of Police, containing the latest information on modem police methods and techniques. 

All officers have spent a full day at the Outdoor Police Range on the new combat pistol course. This 
requires the officers to fire from various positions simulating conditions which they may be confronted with during 
actual police operations. A total of 150,000 rounds of special range ammunition were processed at the Reloading 
Unit of the Police Academy for use at the Police Revolver Range. 

In conjunction with the Greater Boston Hospital Council, a disaster drill was conducted in October at 
Columbus Park simulating a crash of a commercial air liner in a heavily populated urban area. This test drill 
involved more than one hundred Boston officers as well as officers from Cambridge, Somerville, Newton, Wellesley, 
and Brookline. Three hundred simulated victims were given first-aid treatment at the scene and then transported 
to twelve Boston and suburban hospitals. The staff of the Training Division coordinated this most successful 
field training exercise. 





DR. MATTHEW J. LAPPIN ADDRESSES CLASS AT 
POLICE ACADEMY 



TARGET PRACTICE 



4 6 

In addition to the regular training schedule at the Police Academy the following is a list of outside train- 
ing programs attended by members of the Boston Police Force during the current year: 
Police Management, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. 
Police Viewpoint on Sexual Offenses, Boston University Law-Medicine Institute. 

Training the Police Officer in Dealing with the Sexual Offender, Boston University Law-Medicine Institute. 
I'd!. I. Fingerprinting Seminar, Boston. 
Advanced Course in Forensic Pathology, Toxicology, and Medical Jurisprudence, Boston University Law-Medicine 

Institute. 
Specialized Training in Handling of Community Accidents and Disasters, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. 
National Conference on Law Enforcement and the Sexual Offender, Boston University Law-Medicine Institute. 
Course for Motor Vehicle Fleet Supervisors, Northeastern University. 

Institute on Police and Community Relations, Michigan State University, Lansing, Michigan. 
Police Training Course for Designated Auxiliary Police Heads, Topsfield. 
Pilot Course for Police Instructors, Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania. 
Telephone Answering Techniques by Service Advisor for New England Telephone Company. 
F.B.I. Firearms Instructors Training School, Wakefield. 
School on Police Administration, F.B.I., Boston. 

Data Processing and Law Enforcement, International Business Machines, Inc., Boston. 
Law Enforcement and Fleeing Felon, F.B.I. , Boston. 
Human Relations and Public Speaking, Dale Carnegie Institute, Boston. 
In-Service Training Program for Typists and Stenographers, City of Boston. 
Basic Practical Spanish, Cardinal Cushing Center, Boston. 
Forensic Medicine in Death Cases, Boston University Law-Medicine Institute. 
Trial of Criminal Cases, New England Law Institute, Inc. 
Hazards to Children, Boston University Law-Medicine Institute. 
Probation Problems, Boston University. 



H H 

[1 

u n 



47 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1Q64, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. 
Sullivan Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual Ball of the Boston 
Police Relief Association held at the Boston Garden, December 7, 1064, as follows: 



THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 

A DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

AND THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN 

AWARD TO 

PATROLMAN VICTOR STASHEWSKY 
DISTRICT SIX 

On July 14. IU04. Patrolman Victor Stashewsky 
responded to a call where a cafe owner pointed out a 
man who had left a gun in the cafe. As the officer 
approached the man, he ran to a railroad yard and was 
found attempting to hide under a railroad car. The 
officer pulled the man out. and a struggle ensued during 
which the officer was shot. Despite being shot, the 
officer subdued the culprit. 

Patrolman Stashewsky was removed to the hospital 
where his name was placed on the danger list. 

Complaints were issued against the criminal for 
assault and battery, being armed with intent to murder, 
unlawful possession of a firearm (two counts 1, using 
a motor vehicle without authority, and operating after 
right to operate was suspended. He is now awaiting 
trial. 




Richard Cardinal Ciishing Presents Walter 
Scott Medal for Valor, Department Medal 
of Honor, and Thomas F. Sullivan Award 
to Patrolman Victor Stashewsky. 




Attorney General Brooke awards 
Department Medal of Honor to 
Sergeant John F. Chenette, Pa= 
trolmen Myles Q. McQrail and 
James J. Hallissey. 



DEPARTMENT MEDALS OF HONOR AND 
THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARDS TO 

SERGEANT JOHN F. CHENETTE 

PATROLMAN MYLES G. McGRAIL 

PATROLMAN JAMES J. HALLISSEY 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

Sergeant John F. Chenette, Patrolman Myles G. 
McGrail, and Patrolman James J. Hallissey of the 
Traffic Division are hereby awarded a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious police duty performed 
on November 6, 1063. 

Patrolman McGrail, while directing traffic, had his 
attention directed to a jewelry store where a burglar 
alarm was sounding. The officer responded, revolver 
in hand, and was confronted by a culprit who grappled 
with the officer and knocked him to the ground. With- 
holding his fire because of pedestrian traffic, the officer 
gave chase and saw his assailant enter a taxicab. 

The officer was joined in the pursuit by Sergeant 
Chenette and Patrolman Hallissey and removed the 
culprit from the taxicab. A fierce struggle ensued 
during which a fully loaded pistol was wrested from 
his hand. 



4 8 



This culprit had mortally wounded a police officer 
with whom he struggled at the scene of the attempted 
holdup. He has since been sentenced to life imprison- 
ment. His accomplice was subsequently found dead, 
the apparent victim of ingestion of barbiturates. 

In effecting the arrest, Patrolmen McGrail and 
Hallisscv sustained injuries which necessitated hospital 
treatment. 



Patrolmen Luciano L. Bellanti and John M. Ciccolo 
of the Special Service Squad, Criminal Investigation 
Division, are hereby awarded a Department Medal of 
Honor for meritorious police duty performed on 
January 17, 1064. 

Shortly after midnight, Patrolmen Bellanti and 
Ciccolo, on cruising car duty, observed a male passenger 
in a taxicab in Roxbury who answered the description 
of a man wanted for taxicab holdups. The officers 
followed the cab to Hancock Street, Dorchester, where 
the taxicab stopped. 

The officers approached the vehicle on foot, and 
Patrolman Bellanti opened the rear door, displayed 
his badge, and identified himself. The passenger 
threatened the officer and started to reach into his 
right-hand pocket when the Patrolman grabbed his 
hand. The passenger fired one shot which struck 
Patrolman Bellanti in the right wrist. An exchange of 
shots followed, and the passenger was taken into 
custody. A .38 calibre revolver was taken from him 
and he was later identified as the perpetrator of four 
previous taxicab holdups. He is now serving a long 
sentence. 




Rabbi Joseph Shubow Awards De- 
partment Medal of Honor to 
Luciano L. Bellanti and John M. 
Ciccolo of the Special Service 
Squad. 




Bishop Ansen Phelps Stokes 
Awards Department Medal of 
Honor to Detective Emmet F. 
McNamara, Jr., and Patrolman 
Joseph C. Stanley. 



Detective Emmett F. McNamara, Jr., Detective 
Bureau, and detailed to District Sixteen, and Patrol- 
man Joseph C. Stanley of District Ten are hereby 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meri- 
torious police duty performed on January 2, 1064. 

On that afternoon, four men entered a credit union 
in Roxbury, one armed with a gun and another carrying 
a large knife. The treasurer stepped on the ADT 
alarm seconds before the man with the knife leaped 
over the counter, placed the weapon at his throat and 
threatened four female employees with death if they 
did not move to the rear office. 

Detective McNamara, enroute to court, heard the 
call and immediately proceeded to the location where 
he observed a man holding a gun leaving the scene and 
ordered him to drop his gun. Detective McNamara, 
using the suspect as a shield, entered the bank and 
ordered three men behind the teller's cage to surrender, 
and one of the robbers dropped to the floor. 

Patrolman Stanley, hearing the broadcast, im- 
mediately responded and ordered the robbers from 
behind the teller's cage. Upon arrival of additional 
officers, the premises were searched, and the fourth 
man was found under a desk in the rear office. A 
.25 calibre Browning automatic pistol fully loaded was 
found on the money counter, a large stiletto-style 
knife in the wastebasket, and $438 in currency and 
coins in the pocket of the man found in the rear office. 

Probable cause was found, and all were held for the 
Grand Jury. 



49 




Superintendent Herbert F. \\ul= 
loney Awards Department Medal 
of Honor to Patrolmen George E. 
Bolanes and Edward P. Duke of 
District Nine. 



Patrolmen George E. Bolanes and Edward P. Duke 
of District Nine are hereby awarded a Department 
Medal of Honor for meritorious police duty performed 
on May 7, 1Q64. 

Patrolmen Bolanes and Duke, while off duty and 
fishing at the mouth of the Merrimac River, were 
attracted to the sound of an emergency siren from a 
Coast Guard Patrol Boat to a Coast Guard Helicopter 
hovering overhead. These officers proceeded imme- 
diately to the scene and, under extremely hazardous 
surf conditions, made their way out on the jetty to 
the point where the overturned craft, with four persons 
underneath, had been caught up in the breakers and 
was being destroyed on the rocks of the breakwater. 
They were responsible for rescuing two of the women 
from the heavy surf. 

An official communication was received from 
Captain Smenton, Acting Commander, First Coast 
Guard District, commending these officers for their 
coolness, courage, initiative, and the indispensable 
aid they furnished the Coast Guard that day. 



U d 



50 



BOSTON 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

&oll of ©onor 

TO THOSE MEMBERS WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE 
PROTECTION OT THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS 



EZEKIAL W. HODSON 
ALFRED M. STURDIVANT 
JOHN T. LYNCH 
FREDERICK SCHLEHUBER 
RICHARD J. GALLIVAN 
ALBERT R. PETERSON 
THOMAS J. NORTON 
PATRICK J. CARR 
JOHN J. EARLE 
JOSEPH C. REISER 
CHARLES E. DEININGER 
ADOLPH F. BUTTERMAN 
WILLIAM G. CLANCY 
WARD M. BRAY 
ANDREW B. CUNEO 
DANIEL J. McSHANE 
PETER P. OGINSKIS 
JOSEPH E. GONYA 
ALBERT MOTRONI 
BENJAMIN ALEXANDER 
FRANK J. COMEAU 
HARRIS B. McINNES 
HERBERT D. ALLEN 
EDWARD Q. BUTTERS 
JAMES J. TROY 
FRANKLIN B. DREYER 



FREDERICK W. BARTLETT 
JOSEPH L. CAVAGNARO 
WILLIAM L. ABBOTT 
JOHN P. M. WOLFE 
GEORGE J. HANLEY 
JAMES T. MALLOY 
JAMES BRICKLEY 
DANIEL A. McCALLUM 
JAMES D. HUGHES 
JAMES B. ROCHE 
LAURENCE V. SHERIDAN- 
WALTER BAXTER 
EDWARD J. KELLEY 
JOHN H. MANNING 
THOMAS A. DAVIS 
PAUL J. MURNANE 
PATRICK C. GANNON 
JAMES G. McCANN, JR. 
STEPHEN P. HARRIGAN 
FRANK B. CALLAHAN- 
WILLIAM F. HEALY 
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY 
JOHN J. GALLAGHER 
JAMES B. O'LEARY 
GEORGE J. HOLMES 



5i 




THE HUNDRED CLUB 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the year 1959 a group of philanthropic businessmen formed an organization known as "The 
Hundred Club of Massachusetts." 

The prime function of this organization is to provide financial assistance to the widows and dependents 
of policemen and firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty. 

The Boston Police Department expresses its gratitude and appreciation to "The Hundred Club" for the 
invaluable assistance rendered to the families of police officers who have given their lives in the service of this 
community. 



Miscellaneous Business 





1962 


1003 


1964 


Abandoned children cared for 


(12 


44 


13b 


Buildings found open and made secure 










1,770 


1,250 


S25 


Dangerous buildings reported 










29 


43 


29 


Dangerous chimneys reported 










s 


8 


1 1 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 










1. 201 


1.379 


1 ,o33 


Defective drains and vaults repotted 










8 


2 


— 


Defective fire alarms and clocks reported 












4 


33 


4 


Defective gas pipes reported 












4 


14 


5 


Defective hydrants reported 












2 


3 


5 


Defective sewers reported 












14 


6 


7 


Defective street lights reported . 












04 


78 


73 


Defective streets and walks reported 












574 


325 


238 


Defective water pipes reported 












34 


14 


46 


Fire alarms given 












14. 522 


i5,43i 


14,306 


Fire extinguished 












3,248 


3,° 10 


2,616 


Insane persons taken in charge . 










1,585 


r,3 8 9 


1,296 


Lost children restored .... 










819 


828 


801 


Number of persons committed to bail 










2,721 


2,535 


2,354 


Persons rescued from drowning 










26 


37 


19 


Sick and injured persons assisted 








28,346 


24,970 


25>783 


Street obstructions removed 








27 


29 


40 


Water running to waste reported 








131 


163 


56 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1964 



54 



TABLE I — Total Number of Persons Arrested by Districts and Units for All Types of Offenses, Covering Both 
Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending December 31, 1964 



Districts 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


District One 


2,615 


285 


2,900 


District Two . 














3,5°2 


70S 


4,210 


District Four . 














18,664 


2,618 


21,282 


District Five . 














2,816 


437 


3,253 


District Six 














2,295 


95 


2,390 


District Seven 














1,084 


59 


1,143 


District Eight 














2 




2 


District Nine . 














7.149 


1,229 


8,378 


District Ten . 














2,773 


363 


3,136 


District Eleven 














2,681 


162 


2,843 


District Thirteen 














i,477 


186 


1,663 


District Fourteen 














1,707 


77 


1,784 


District Fifteen 














1,818 


107 


1,925 


District Nineteen 














1,645 


140 


1,785 


Traffic Division 














25> I 7° 


5,633 


30,803 


Headquarters* 














i,3!9 


446 


1,765 


Totals 


76,717 


12,545 


89,262 












at, t* 











TABLE II — Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B.I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the Year Ending December 31, 1964 











Number of Offenses 






Offenses 


Un- 


Actual 


Cleared by Arrests 




Classification of Offenses 


Total 


Bv Arrests 


Not 




Reported 


founded 


Offenses 


Offenses 
Cleared 


of Persons 
Under 18 


Cleared 


1. Criminal Homicide 














(a) Murder & Non-Negligent Manslaughter 


53 


1 


52 


4-' 


2 


10 


(b) Manslaughter by Negligence . 


54 


18 


36 


32 


1 


4 


2. Forcible Rape Total 


92 


8 


84 


69 


8 


iS 


(a) Rape by Force 


60 


5 


55 


42 


6 


13 


(6) Assault to Rape — Attempt 


32 


3 


29 


27 


2 


2 


3. Robbery Total 


876 


18 


S58 


304 


109 


554 


(a) Armed — Any Weapon . . . . 


408 


5 


403 


134 


34 


269 


(6) Strong Arm — No Weapon 


468 


13 


455 


170 


75 


285 


4. Assault Total 


3,594 


18 


3,576 


1,677 


210 


1,899 


(a) Gun 


104 


2 


102 


69 


3 


33 


(b) Knife or Cutting Instrument . 


417 


5 


412 


304 


37 


108 


(c) Other Dangerous Weapon 


325 


4 


321 


254 


52 


67 


(d) Hands, Fists, Feet — Aggravated 


49 





49 


39 


4 


10 


(e) Other Assaults — Not Aggravated 


2,699 


7 


2,692 


1,011 


114 


1,681 


5. Burglary Total 


4,643 


61 


4,582 


1,389 


472 


3,i93 


(a) Forcible Entry 


3,638 


3 1 


3,607 


i,i77 


413 


2,430 


(6) Unlawful Entr\— No Force 


883 


26 


857 


136 


35 


721 


(c) Attempt Forcible Entry . . . . 


122 


4 


118 


76 


24 


42 


6. Larceny— Theft (except Auto Theft) 














(a) $50 Over in Value 


2,401 


52 


2,349 


634 


105 


i,7i5 


(b) Under $50 in Value 


3,445 


91 


3,354 


i,5 10 


696 


1,844 


7. Auto Theft 


n,330 


1,128 


10,202 


2,8S4 


2,iS6 


7,3iS 


Totals 


26,488 


i,395 


2 5, 93 


8,54i 


3,789 


l6 ,552 



55 



TABLE III — Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1964 



Type of Property 



Value of Property Stolen in Boston 



Stolen 



Recovered 



Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals ... 

Furs 

Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous .... . . 


$621,107 °° 

480.640 00 

"4.373 O0 

190.641 00 
5,111,272 00 
1,095,103 00 


$34,5 8 5 00 

12,722 00 

682 00 

33,953 00 

4,611,779 00 

160,776 00 


Totals 


$7,615,136 00 


$4,854,497 00 



TABLE IV — Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table II and Value of Property Stolen by Type of Offense 

for the Year Ending December 31, 1904 



Classification of Offenses 



Number of Actual 
Offenses 



Value of Property 
Stolen 



Robbery: 



(a) 
<M 
(c) 
(d) 
(e) 
(/) 
(fl) 



Highway (streets, alleys, etc.) . 
Commercial house (not c, d, /) . 
Gas or service station . 

Chain store 

Residence (anywhere on premises) 

Bank 

Miscellaneous .... 



33 
38 
67 



$52,186 00 

17.979 00 

1.564 00 

502 00 

5.384 00 

75.3U 00 

50.516 00 



Total — robbery 



85S 



$203,442 00 



Burglary — breaking or entering:, 



(<■) 



(6) 



Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night 

(2) Day . 
Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night . . . . 

(2) Day 



509 
1.572 



2,282 
219 



Si 92,444 00 
495,423 00 



662,077 00 
37.541 00 



Total — burglary 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 
(a) S50 and over 
(6) So to S50 
(c) Under So .... 



4.S82 



S1.3S7.485 00 



2,349 
2,308 
1,046 



S624.198._QO- 
281,722 00 
5.017 00 



Total — larceny 



Auto theft 

(a) Jov-riding 
(6) All other 



7.890 
2.312 



S3. 957. 021 00 
1,154.251 00 



Total — auto theft 
Grand Total . 





TABLE V— Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Theft for the Year Ending Decern 


bcr 


31, 1964 




Number of Actual 
Offenses 




Val 


ue of Property 
Stolen 


Xatur 
(") 
CM 

1.) 

• 

</) 
(8) 
(A) 
(>) 


e of Larcenies: 

From autos (not accessories) . ... 

From buildings (not shoplifting) 

From any coin operated machines (not in a building) .... 

lobiles Recovered : 

Number stolen locally and recovered outside .... 

Total locally stolen autos recovered ... ... 

Number stolen out of town, recovered locally 


90 

40s 

578 

1.299 

784 

197 

921 

93 

1.243 


So, 059 00 
IS, 453 00 

S.7.750 00 

477.251 00 

41,346 00 

7.037 00 

160.434 00 

23S 00 

171.744 00 




5.703 


§910,937 00 








Actual Offenses 


Auton 

la) 

lb) 
U) 
Irf) 


8.401 

1.624 

10.025 

. 1.475 



56 



TABLE VI — Number of Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests — Not the Number of Charges — for the Year Ending 

December 31, I9(>4 







Persons Charged by 


Persons Found 








THE POLICF 




Git 


LTV 




Classification of Offenses 








Of Offense 


Of Lesser 






Charged 


Arrested 


Summoned 


Charged 


Offense 




Part I Classes 












I. 


Criminal homicide: 














(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 


55 


55 


— 


10 


3 




(b) Manslaughter by negligence 


27 


21 


6 


1 


2 


2. 


Forcible rape 


81 


81 


— 


17 


6 


3- 


Robberv 


354 


338 


16 


126 


9 


4- 


Aggravated assault ... . . 


555 


5i4 


41 


171 


23 


5- 


Burglary — breaking or entering .... 


832 


740 


92 


3i5 


34 


6. 


Laiceny — theft (except auto theft) . 


1-593 


1,312 


281 


S14 


25 


7- 


Auto theft 

Total, Part I Classes 

Part II Classes 


757 


660 


97 


243 


14 




4-254 


3,721 


5 33 


1.607 


116 














8. 


Other assaults 


QQ7 


881 


n6 


462 


23 


Q- 


Arson 


24 


23 


1 


14 


— 


IO. 


Forger}- and counterfeiting 


88 


86 


2 


i) 


1 


ii. 


Frauds 


247 


224 


23 


134 


2 


12. 


Embezzlement 


14 


12 


2 


9 


1 


i.V 


Stolen property ; buying, receiving, possessing 


127 


123 


4 


61 


3 


14. 


Vandalism 


233 


176 


57 


129 


5 


IS- 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 


11S 


113 


5 


5 2 


1 


16. 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


539 


537 


2 


326 


— 


17- 


Sex offenses (except 2 and 16) 


270 


254 


16 


i37 


5 


iS. 


Narcotic drug laws 


149 


144 


5 


70 


1 


IQ. 


Gambling 


3 5 5 


342 


13 


247 


4 


20. 


Offenses against family and children . 


1-033 


946 


' s 7 


OS 7 


2 


21. 


Driving while intoxicated 


161 


i5" 


2 


00 


15 


22. 


Liquor laws 


102 


38 


64 


2 


3 


2V 


Drunkenness 


20,630 


20,595 


35 


19,606 


— 


24. 


Disorderly conduct 


IQI 


i6q 


22 


113 


— 


2v 


Vagrancy 


53 


47 


6 


35 


— 


26. 


All other offenses 


1,663 


1,266 


397 


343 


6 


28. 


Parking violations 


47-320 


1.227 


46-OQ3 


45-579 


— 


29. 


Traffic & motor vehicle laws (except 2 1 & 28) 

Total, Part II Classes 

Grand Total 


7.647 


1,072 


6,575 


2.913 


2 




Si,q6i 


28.4.U 


53.5 2 7 


7I-57S 


74 




86,215 


32.1 5 5 


54.00c 


73-275 


100 



57 



TABLE VII — Arrests for the Year Ending December 31, 1964 











On 


Without 


Summoned 


Nature of Offexse 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Warrants 


Warrants 


by the 
Court 


Iurder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


48 


7 


55 


10 


45 





■egligent manslaughter 








25 


2 


27 


7 


14 


6 


.ape 








Si 


— 


81 


14 


67 


— 


.obbery 








340 


14 


354 


65 


273 


16 


ggravated assault .... 








490 


65 


555 


163 


35i 


41 


iurglary — breaking and entering 








808 


24 


«3 2 


107 


633 


92 


arceny — theft (except auto theft) . 








1,228 


365 


J.593 


304 


1,008 


281 


uto theft 








74o 


17 


757 


117 


543 


07 


'ther assaults 








qiq 


7S 


097 


604 


277 


116 


rson 








2 3 


1 


24 


5 


18 


1 


orgery and counterfeiting . 








7i 


17 


88 


37 


49 


2 


rauds 








207 


40 


247 


163 


61 


23 


mbezzlement 








13 


1 


14 


6 


6 


2 


tolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 








109 


18 


127 


33 


90 


4 


andalism 








219 


14 


233 


63 


nj 


57 


/eapons; carrying, possessing, etc. . 








115 


3 


118 


17 


96 


5 


rotsitution and commercialized vice 








75 


404 


539 


2 2 


515 


2 


ex offenses (except rape and prostitution 








226 


44 


270 


71 


183 


16 


farcotic drug laws .... 








1 2b 


23 


140 


46 


98 


5 


.ambling 










33^ 


19 


355 


284 


58 


13 


'ffenses against family and children 










999 


.u 


1,033 


852 


94 


87 


'hiving while intoxicated 










i54 


7 


161 


14 


145 


2 


iquor laws 










81 


21 


102 


14 


24 


64 


Jrunkenness 










19,420 


1,201 


20,630 


5 1 


20,544 


35 


Disorderly conduct 










178 


1,5 


191 


10 


159 


22 


agrancy 










46 


7 


53 


8 


39 


6 


11 other offenses .... 










r.346 


317 


1,663 


704 


562 


397 


arking violations 










38, 443 


8,877 


47.320 


1 ,301 


— 


40. 019 


raffle violations (except 21 and 28) 










7,297 


35° 


7.647 


460 


612 


6,575 


uspicion 










682 


282 


064 


— 


964 


— 


rrests for other departments 










1863 


220 


2,083 


1,670 


398 


15 


TOTALS 


76,717 


i2,S45 


89,262 


7,222 


28,089 


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59 



6o 



TABLE X 



Showing the Number of Licenses of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the Amount of Money Received fi 
All Sources and Paid to the City Collector- Treasurer During the Year Ending December 31, 1904 



CLASS OF LICENSE 



cn 



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Auctioneer (Class I) . 
Auctioneer (other classes) 
Bicycle registrations . 
Dog ... 
Driver (hackney carriage) 
Firearms, dealer in 
Firearms, license to carry 
Firearms, permit to purchase 
Gunsmith .... 
Hackney carriage (and regrants 
Hackney carriage (photos) 
Handcart (common canier) 
Junk collector 
Junk shopkeeper . 
Musician (collective and sound 
Musician (itinerant) . 
Pawnbroker .... 
Public lodging house . 
Secondhand articles 
Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 
Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 
Sightseeing automobile 
Sightseeing driver 
Special police 
Street railway, conductor, motorman 

starter 

Auto towing charges .... 

Auto storage fees 

Copies of licenses and replacement do, 

tags . . 

Copies of police reports 

Damage of police property 

Reimbursements .... 

Sale of condemned property 

Sale of lost, stolen, and abandoned prop 

erty 

Sale of pawnbroker and secondhan 

tides report blanks .... 

Sunday permits 

Use of police property 



nd 



Totals 



Credit by City Collector- Treasurer for 
money received for damage to police 
property and telephone commissions . 



Grand Total 



69 

6 

1,882 

14.254 

7.152 

15 



6 
2,109 

46 

38 

17 

3 

35 

4 

344 

228 

7 

23 

30 

1,140 

30 



28,822 



66 
6 

1,882 

14,240 

6,851 

15 
1-234 

7 

6 

2,109 



44 

38 

17 

3 

35 

327 



23 

30 

860 

30 



28,056 



14 



268 



297 



301 

140 



447 



24 



30 



26 
5 



33 



10 
377 
713 



142 



S600 
150 

47o 
32.236 
13.702 

3, 5 
6,170 

35 
30 

17.040 

7.342 

4 
1,1,0 

2,850 

152 

30 

1.725 



6i 



TABLE XI — Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1964 



EXPENDITURES 
Group i Personal Services: 

io Permanent employees $16,676,215 30 

1 1 Temporary employees 89,995 °° 

12 Overtime 643,238 25 

Group 2 Contractual Services: 

21 Communications $75 .906 36 

22 Light, heat and power 51.5-5 35 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings and structures 56,787 89 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment .... 70,966 58 

28 Transportation of persons 22,100 98 

29 Miscellaneous contractual service 47,984 75 



Si 7,409,448 55 



325,271 91 



Group 3 Supplies and Materials: 

30 Automotive §150,776 38 

32 Food . . 14,157 73 

33 Heating . . 34.635 74 

34 Household 9,501 45 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 1,620 80 

36 Office 37,286 66 

39 Miscellaneous 110,841 62 

Group 4 Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 

Group 5 Equipment: 

50 Automotive $29,806 19 

56 Office furniture and equipment 5.883 31 

59 Miscellaneous 13.850 00 

Total 

Special Items (not included in Police Department appropriation): 

1-33-74-728 Departmental Equipment 

6-63-7 1 -7 1 5 Departmental Equipment Loan 

6-63-85-723 Loan for Remodeling and Reconstruction on Making Repairs to Public- 
Buildings 



358.820 38 



74,706 24 



49.540 30 

S18.217.787 38 



$344,699 80 



$11,403 00 



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63 



6 4 

Table XIII Members of Department Retired During the Year Finding December 31, 1964, Giving Age at the 
Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each 



\ Ull 



Cause of 

Retirement 



Age at Time 


Yeai o( 


of Retirement 


Service 


64 


38 


65 


37 


63 


38 


65 


39 


65 


39 


64 


38 


63 


3» 


64 


38 


64 


36 


7o 


37 


65 


34 


65 


35 


65 


34 


44 


17 


56 


18 


31 


6 


41 


8 


55 


26 


65 


38 


65 


40 


63 


20 


63 


37 


50 


30 


65 


38 


63 


35 


62 


34 


39 


1 1 


65 


34 


64 


34 


36 


'4 


70 


37 


65 


36 


65 


36 


65 


37 


47 


16 


65 


15 


64 


34 


41 


11 


62 


34 


60 


34 



Adair, Eldred (3) 
Barrv, Thomas W. (3) . 
Caulfield, John F. (3) . 
Collins, Dennis F. (3) . 
Corrigan, John J. (3) 
Coyne, Thomas (3) 
Crickard, Edward W. (5) 
Dailey, Paul E. (3) 
Danehy, John J. (3) 
Donnelly, Peter M. (5) . 
Dyer, George F. (3) 
Farrell, Thomas F. (3) . 
Fleming, John P. (3) 
Flippin, Willis ]. (3) 
Foley, Martin L. (4) 
Glynn, Robert F. (3) . 
Gordon, Charles A. (3) . 
Horrigan, Richard M. (i) 
Hurley, William J. (3) . 
Laird, Earl L. (5) ■ 
Lee, Lillian E. (4) 
Leonard, Thomas M. (3) 
Lynch, Robert J. (6) 
Masuret, Charles J. (3) 
Mawn, Francis J. (3) 
McPhee, Joseph E. (3) . 
Mulvey, Thomas H. (3) 
Murphy, Edward V. (3) 
O'Donnell, John J. (3) . 
O'Toole, Robert E. (3) . 
Patterson, Richard (5) . 
Petitti, John F. (5) 
Powers, John J. (3) 
Rintoul, Archibald N. (5) 
Scanlon, Thomas A. (3) 
Tibbetts, Mildred E. (4) 
Tighe, Patrick (3) . 
Uvello, Robert C. (3) . 
Walsh, John F. (3) 
Whittaker, Fred W. (3) 



Age . 

Age . 

Age . 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

30 years' service 

Incapacitated 

Age 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Age . . 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

Age . 

Age . 

30 Years' Service 

Age . . 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Age . . 

Incapacitated 

30 Years' Service 

30 Years' Service 

Age . 

30 Years' Service 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Age . . 

Incapacitated 

Age . 

Age . 



( 1 ) Retired under Boston Retirement System. 

(3) Retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

(4) Civilians retired under State- Boston Retirement System. 

(5) Retired Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58. 

(6) Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58. 



6=5 



TABLE XIV - List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the Year Ending December 31, 1964. 



Rank 


Name 


Division 


Date of Death 


Deputy Superintendent 


Francis J. Hennessy 


Bureau of 
General Services 


September 15, 19O4 


Lieutenant 


Chester A. Henchey 


LS 


November 1, 1964 


Sergeant .... 


Owen J. Heaney, Jr. 


Records and Commu- 
nications Division 


October 11, 1964 


Patrolman 


George F. Lombard 


4 


December 2, 1964 


Patrolman 


Thomas J. Keaney 


6 


October 9, 1964 


Patrolman 


William G. Finney 


7 


May 1, 1964 


Patrolman 


Paul E. Hartnett 


9 


November 4, 1964 


Patrolman 


John F. Sullivan 


IO 


January 8, 1964 


Patrolman 


Edward C. Lynch 


n 


March 6, 1964 


Patrolman 


Charles R. Sullivan 


ii 


September 8, 1964 


Patrolman 


Anthony J. Stan- 


i7 


July 1, 1964 


Patrolman 


Frank P. Diorio 


19 


August 28, 1964 


Patrolman 


Edward J. Gibbons 


19 


April 7, 1964 


Patrolman 


John C. Malone 


Traffic 


December 16, 1964 



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