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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY I 

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City of Boston 
Administrative Services Department 
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SIXTIETH 
ANNUAL mm REPORT 



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OF THE 

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CITY OF 




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1965 



Public document no. 28—1966 



[DOCUMENT- NO. 28] 



Sixtieth Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1965 




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STORY OF GOV ER 

"OLD AND NEW BOSTON" 

Shown on the left is the new John Fitzgerald Kennedy 
Federal Building and adjoining it the historic Park Street 
Church where the song "America" was first sung. In the 
center is the Prudential Tower, the tallest building in the 
United States outside of Manhattan. Next is the Old North 
Church, from whose belfry Robert Newman displa}-ed the lan- 
terns informing the citizens of the march of the British toward 
Lexington and Concord. Paul Revere with his famous horse 
"Brown Beauty" is in the foreground. On the right is the 
State Street Bank, an old banking institution now doing busi- 
ness in its new 34-story building. This composite picture 
symbolizes strength of character, proud heritage, and nobility 
of purpose for present and future generations, typified by the 
police officer with the two young students. 

h'ronl cover by Patrolman Joseph P. Carr. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston IIcrald-Traveler 

The Boston Record-Amcrican-Sunday Advertiser 

The Boston Police Department 







TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter to the iMaj-or .... 

Mayor's Letter 

Table of Organization . . 

The Department . . 

The Police Force .... 

Employees of the Department 
Distribution and Changes 
Work of the Dejjartment 
Office of the Police Commissioner 

Advisory Board 

Administrative Assistant-Secretary 
Bureau of Field Operations . 

Patrol Division 

Tactical Patrol Force 

Harbor Police and Emergency Service 

Bomb Squad 

City Prison 

House of Detention 

Traffic Division 

Auxiliary School Patrol 
Criminal Investigation Division 
Crimes Against Persons Section . 
Homicide Unit .... 
Robbery Unit .... 
Crimes Against Propertj^ Section . 
Automobile Unit ... 

Worthless Check and Frauds Unit 
Lost and Stolen Property Unit . 
General Investigation Section 
Night Investigators Unit 
Domestic Relations L^^nit 
Vice Control Section 

Narcotics and Vice Unit 
Gaming 

Liquor Violations 
Narcotic Seininar 
Youth Aid Section . 
Rendition Squad . 
Technical Service Section 
Ballistics Unit 
Polygraph 
Crime Laboratory 
Bureau of General Services . 
Central Services Division . 
Property Clerk Section 
Lost and Found Property 
Building Maintenance Section 
Automotive Maintenance Section 
Licensing Section .... 
Hackney Carriages 
Records and Communication Division 
Central Complaint Section . 
Central Records Section 

Multilith and Mimeograph Unit 



Unit 



Page 

4 

S 
6 

7 

7 
7 
7 
8 

9 
9 
9 

lO 

1 1 

1 2 
I 2 

14 

15 
15 
i6 
i8 

19 
19 
19 
21 

22 
22 
23 
23 
24 
24 
26 

27 
27 
28 

20 
30 

31 
32 

33 
33 
34 
34 
36 

37 
37 
3« 
38 

39 
40 
40 

41 
41 
42 
44 



Identification Section 

Signal Service Section 

Radio Maintenance Section . 
Personnel and Training Division 

Personnel Section 

Training Section 
Bureau of Inspectional Services . 
Internal Inspection Division 

Staff Inspection Section . 

Internal Affairs Section . 
Intelligence Division . 
Planning and Research Division 

Data Processing Section 
Recipients of Awards 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 
Department Medals of Honor . 
Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 

Boston Police Department Roll of Honor 
Miscellaneous Business .... 
Statistical Tables: 



Page 

45 
46 

47 
49 
40 
49 

51 

52 
52 
52 
53 
53 
53 
54 
54 
54-56 
54-56 

57 
59 



Table I. Number of Arrests by Dis- 

tricts .... 

Table II. Major Oflenses Reported to 
F.B.I 

Table III. Analysis of Property Con- 
nected with Offenses . 

Table I\'. Breakdown of Offenses and 
Value of Property Stolen 

Table V. Additional Analysis of Lar 

ceny and Auto Theft 

Table VI. Number of Individuals Ar- 
rested .... 

Table VII. Arrests .... 

Table \^II[. Age and Sex of Persons Ar 
rested .... 

Table IX. Report of Accidents 

Table X. Licenses of All Classes Issued 

Table XI. Financial Statement 

Table XII. Male and Female Residents 
Listed 

Table XIII. Members of Police Force Ap- 
pointed in the Year Indi- 
cated 

Table XIV. Members of Police Force Born 
in the Year Indicated 

Table XV. Members of the Department 

Retired in 1065 ... 74 

Table XVI. List of Police Officers in Ac- 
tive Service Who Died 
During the Year . . 75 



62 
62 
63 
63 
63 

64 
65 

66 
67 
68 
69 

70-71 

72 
73 



HEADQUARTERS 
154 BERKELEY STREET 




CITY OF BOSTON 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Edmund L. McNamara 
police commissioner 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



January 1, 1966. 
Hon. John F. Collins, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1961, Chapter 3, Section 25, it is my pleasure to submit the fol- 
lowing report of the activities of the Boston Police Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1965. 

In keeping pace with the "New Boston," our department has 
streamlined its administrative structure by abolishing the Bureau of 
Personnel and Training and transferring its function to the Bureau of 
General Services. In conjunction with the presently existing Bureau 
of Field Operations and the Bureau of Inspectional Services, this 
newly expanded bureau affords the department a more efficient span of 
supervision and control. 

To cope with the prevalence of crime between the hours of 
7 P.M. and 2 A.M., a fourth work shift was established. The new 
shift overlaps the existing 5:45 P.M. to 12:30 A.M. shift and con- 
sequently increases our patrol potential. 

The department has developed a new "Alert and Mobilization 
Manual" which provides a procedure for mobilizing all or any part 
of our off-duty personnel in the event of any emergency. 

During the mammoth electrical blackout of November 9, 1965, 
it was gratifying to note that Boston experienced almost a complete 

absence of crime during that critical four and 
one-half hour period. This is a tribute to 
the efforts of our police officers and the 
great spirit of public cooperation in time of 
need. 

I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to express my appreciation to the 
members of the Boston Police Department for 
their loyalty, dedication to duty, and the 
efficient m.anner in which they carried out 
their various assignments throughout the year. 

I am grateful for the support and 
cooperation that you and your office have 
extended to me and to the department during 
the past year. 

Respectfully submitted. 




^cUyi^<^^^' % C }f cUp^^I^^^z^ 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 




JOHN F. COLLINS 
MAYOR 



CITY OF BOSTON 

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

CITY HALL. BOSTON 




Greetings to the Members of the Boston Police Department: 

As we reach the mid-sixties in contemporary America, we find 
the police picture changing from day to day with new developments 
occurring in swift succession. In order to meet the needs and re- 
quirements of this new and dynamic society in which we live, our 
Police Department is exploring every modern technique and techno- 
logical advancement to keep pace with the highest standards of pro- 
fessional law enforcement. 

Preliminary steps have been taken to acquire an electronic 
computer to adequately store all essential police data and to re- 
trieve it instantly as needed. 

Plans are also under way to make Boston Police Headquarters 
the New England terminal for a national computerized police infor- 
mation system. The use of the helicopter in police patrol and 
traffic control is being carefully evaluated. 

A study is being made of the feasibility of closed circuit 
television for police training purposes. The police scooter patrol 
will soon become a familiar sight in Boston's streets and parks. 

Police-Community Relations Workshops will be instituted at 
the neighborhood level to seek a higher level of cooperation between 
the police and the public they serve. 

It has been said that the quality of a nation's civilization 
can be largely measured by the methods it uses in the enforcement of 
its criminal laws. I am certain that, as the resurgent "New Boston" 
moves ahead to meet the perplexing demands of the future, our Police 
Department and its members will be fully prepared to fulfill their 
obligation to protect the rights of all of our citizens to live to- 
gether in peace and security. 

Sincerely, 




Mayor 



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THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner 
Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Secretary 
Administratis E Secretaries 



Superintendents 

Deputy Superintendents 
Captains .... 
Lieutenants and Lieutenant Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant Detectives 



The Police Force 

3 Detectives (First, Second, and Third Grade) 

Patrolmen 

Patrolwomeii 



9 
24 

2,2 



Total 



*Includes 2 patrolwomen 

flncludes 2 patrolmen in armed forces 



*i76 

ti,043 

3 

2,495 



Biological Chemist 
Biological Chemist, Assistant 
Clerk and Typists .... 
Director, Signal Ser\ace 
Director, Signal Service, Assistant 
Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 
Electrical Eciuipment Repairman 
Foreman, Signal Service 



Groundman, Laborer (Police) and 
ment Operators . 

Elevator Operators 

Head Adininistrative Clerk 

Head Clerks 

Hearings Stenographers 

Hostlers .... 

Janitresses 

Junior Building Custodians 

Lineman and Cable Splicers 

Machinist 

Matron, Chief 

Matrons, Police 

Motor Equipment Repairmen 



Motor Equip- 



14 
6 
6 
6 

43 



/ 

I 

I 

10 

23 



Employees of the Department 

Alultilith Operator 

Multilith Operator and Cameraman . 

Painter and Groundman .... 

Principal Clerk 

Principal Clerk and Stenographers 

Principal Clerk and Typists 

Principal Statistical Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian 

Senior Clerk and Stenographers . 

Senior Clerk and Typists .... 

Signal Electricians 

Statistical Machine Operators 

Steam Firemen 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 

Superintendent of Police Buildings, Assistant 

Telephone Operators 

Working Foreman Motor Equipment Repair- 
man 



School Traffic Supervisors 
Total 



I 
I 
I 
I 
3 
S 
I 
I 
I 
2 
8 
3 
9 
4 
I 
I 
13 

I 
96 

292 



Distribution and Changes 

During the year 2 sergeants and 14 patrolmen resigned; 3 deputy superintendents were appointed superin- 
tendents; 3 sergeants were promoted to lieutenants; i second-grade detective and 14 patrolmen were promoted to 
sergeants; 2 third-grade detectives M-ere assigned as second-grade detectives; i deputy superintendent, i captain, 4 
lieutenants, 2 sergeant-detectives, S sergeants, 5 first-grade detectives, i second-grade detective, and 28 patrolmen 
were retired on pension; i sergeant, i first-grade detective, i third-grade detective, and S patrolmen died. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

ARRESTS 

The total number of arrests, counting each arrest as that of a separate person, was 102,698. 

There were 7,110 arrests on warrants and 2,8086 without warrants; 67,502 were summoned by the courts. 

The number of males arrested was 87,025; of females 14,773. 

The number of persons punished by fines was 47,808. The amount of fines totaled $261,588. 

The total number of days attendance at court by officers was 23,726 and the witness fees earned amounted 
to $28,030. 

There were 10,838 persons arrested for drunkenness. 

There were 212 committed to the MCI at Walpole; 005 to the House of Correction at Deer Island; 72 to 
the MCI at Concord; 1,250 to the MCI at Bridgewater; 72 to the MCI for women at Framingham; 436 to the 
Youth Service Board; and 1,462 to the County Jail. 

The value of property taken from prisoners and lodgers was §£30,858. 

The value of property stolen in the city amounted to $0,468,214, and the value recovered amounted to 
§6,122,746. 





POLICE AND FIREMEN WORK TOaETHER TO SA\ E A LIFE 



ARAN'S [iEST FRIEND HAS PAW 

CALCiHT IN ESCALATOR AND 

IS RELEASED BV POLICE 



9 



OFFICE OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 




Deputy Superintendent 

WILLIAM A. BRADLEY 

Administrative Assistant=Secretarv 



ADVISORY BOARD 

The successful operation of a large police department, with its complex duties and responsibilities, is the 
direct result of thorough preparation. The depth and thoroughness of this preparation, covering as many situations 
as human conduct and experience provide, will remo\'e the necessit}- of quick decisions which are sometimes neces- 
sary and very often unsatisfactory. 

The chief administrator of a large police department is required to make numerous daily decisions covering 
all areas of police operations and procedures. These decisions directly affect such functions as crime prevention 
methods, traffic control, personnel training and deportment, budget planning, and procurement. The adminis- 
trator's judgment will determine the t\'pe and use as well as methods of developing department statistics and 
records. 

Although the chief executive cannot relieve himself of the responsibility of making the foregoing decisions, 
he can take steps to insure that such decisions are the result of intensive investigations by those members of the 
department best suited to study the problems. 

To make certain that the subject matter requiring executive approval has been thoroughly researched and 
competently presented, a body of men was selected and designated as the "Advisory Board." This board is com- 
prised of various officers possessing extensive experience and training in the fields of police patrol, traffic manage- 
ment, records, communications, personnel, and training. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT=SECRETAR\ 

Supervision of the staff necessary to operate the office of the Police Commissioner is the responsibility of 
the Administrative Assistant. Upon him falls the duty of maintaining a smooth flow of information, correspon- 
dence, and communications from and to the Commissioner. This sensitive position maintains a liaison between the 
Commissioner's office and all branches of the department, as well as with other city agencies, civic organizations, 
and outside police departments. 



lO 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 




Superintendent 

HERBERT F. MULLONEY 

Chief, Bureau of Field Operations 




Deputy Superintendent 

JOSEPH V. SAIA 

Patrol Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

JAMES L. BUCHANAN 

Traffic Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

EDWARD \V. WANNIX, JR. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 



1 1 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 

Tlie administration and direction of personnel assigned to line functions — such as crime prevention, the 
protection of life and property, and apprehension of criminals — make up the objectives and purposes of the 
Bureau of Field Operations. 

For administrative purposes, this bureau is divided into three divisions: the Patrol Division, the Traffic 
Division, and the Criminal Investigation Division. 



PATROL DIVISION 

Fourteen police districts provide the City of Boston with a 24-hour patrol force designed to protect the lives 
and jDroperty of its citizens. The Patrol Division undertakes the preliminary investigation of incidents with the 
result of their investigations not only making up the permanent records of the department but also serving as the 
basis for follow-up investigations by the Criminal Investigation Division. For administrative purposes, the city is 
divided into two areas known as Patrol Division A and Patrol Division B. 





"I WANT MORE ICE CREAM' 



COUNTERFEIT MONEY CONFISCATED 



12 



TACTICAL PATROL FORCE 

Operating directly under the Chief of the Bureau of Field Operations, the Tactical Patrol Force is designed 
to pro\'ide a highly maneuverable patrol force, on foot and in cars, which can be deplo\'ed to any area at any time 
to assist in handling almost any type of incident. 

The Tactical Patrol Force is made up of a highly selective group of officers who undergo an intensive 
training course in physical fitness and police procedures. This force consists of walking units, mounted units, 
canine units, and mobile units. 

The Tactical Patrol Force undertakes a variety of assignments. It has been utilized to saturate high-crime 
areas, for crowd control, disaster programs, and to protect \-isiting dignitaries. 









MOLMLU POLICL AND CHILDREN 
QET ACQUAINTED 



BOSTON POLICE CANINE CORPS WAKLNQ 
FRIENDS WITH SCHOOL CHILDREN 



HARBOR POLICE AND EMERQENCN SER\ ICE LMT 

It is the responsibility of the Harbor Master for the Port of Boston to assign anchorage locations to all 
ships and yachts entering or staying in Boston Harbor. The Harbor Master is also in charge of other operations, 
such as regulating and governing the loading and unloading of cargoes and passengers. 

In Boston, the Harbor ^Master is also the commanding officer of Police District Eight and, as such, he is the 
supervisor of the Harbor Patrol Unit, the Emergency Ser\-ice Unit, and the Bomb Squad Detail. 



Harbor Patrol Ser\ice 

An around-the-clock patrol is niaintained by the 
police boats "John F. Kennedy," ''William H. Pierce," 
and ''Protector." They cover the Upper and Lower 
Harbors, Mystic River, Chelsea Creek, Fort Point 
Channel, Reserve Channel, Dorchester Bay, and the 
Neponset River. 




POLICE EMERGENCY SERVICE AND 
HARBOR PATROL ON THE JOB 



Harbor Service 



Number of vessels ordered from channel .... 

Number of vessels permitted to discharge cargoes in stream 

Number of alaims of fires attended on waterfront 

Number of fires extinguished without an alann 

Number of sick and injured persons assisted . 

Number of cases investigated .... 

Number of dead bodies recovered 

Number rescued from drowning 

Number of cases where assistance was rendered 

Number of obstructions removed from channel 

Number of vessels assigned to anchorage 

Number of dead bodies cared for 

Number of hours grappling .... 

Value of property recovered, consisting of boats, riggings, floats, stages, etc. 



9 
7 

4 
13 

1,189 

13 
10 
76 
21 
1,612 

13 
01 

$100,150 



Boston. 



During 1965, 620 vessels from domestic ports and 992 vessels from foreign ports arrived at the port of 



Emergency Service Unit 

Operating on a 24-hour basis, and equipped with the most modern emergency equipment, this unit lesponds 
automatically to all fires within the city for which three or more alarms are sounded. This Emergency Service 
Unit of the Harbor District also responds to all bomb and explosive reports, as well as requests for assistance from 
any district or unit in need of lighting, special tools, firearms, or equipment. Whenever barriers are required to 
close off or secure a large area, they are provided by the Emergency Service Unit. 

During the period commencing January i, 1965, and ending December 31, 1965, the Emergency Service 
Unit responded to and assisted at the foUomng: 

Accidents (elevator, IMBTA, train, auto, construction, electrical machinery, etc.) 49 

Arrests assisted in on roofs, bridges, etc 7 

Assistance at homicide investigations 12 

Bodies handled at crimes, accidents, suicides, etc 16 

Bomb and explosive reports, searches, etc 184 

Buildings arid areas searched for armed persons, criminals, e\'idence, and weapons 45 



14 

Drow'toings 5 

E\"iden.ce and weapons located in searches ... . iq 

Fires for which three or more alarms were sounded .74 

lOuminating gas and ammonia leaks 5 

Injured persons assisted at accidents 31 

Injured persons transported to hospitals .14 

Large public gatherings .21 

Persons in water .15 

Persons assisted from burning buildings .52 

Riots 5 

Services (manhole explosions, cave-ins, dangerous buildings, etc.) 32 

Suicide attempts 12 

Suicides ... 2 

Barrier runs . .30 

Barriers put out and picked up 361 



m m 



E a 



The Bomb Squad 

The responsibility of examining, transporting, or deactivating explosives and explosive devices rests with 
the Bomb Squad. This specially trained unit with its mobile equipment responds to any call wherein a sub- 
stance or device believed to be capable of injuring people or destroj'ing property is discovered or reported to be in 
a building, place, or area. 

Explosives or dangerous materials examined 289 

(a) Disposed of (by dumping or detonating) ... 260 

(b) Disarmed 3 

(c) Turned over to department chemist (for analysis and preparation as e\"idence after being 

disarmed) 11 



(d) Held as evidence for several districts . . i 



3 



15 



CITY PRISON 

The City Prison is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset Street, Boston. 

Males arrested in the city for offenses the prosecution of which is within the jurisdiction of the Central 
Municipal Court are conveyed to the City Prison and, unless otherwise released, are held until the next session of 
the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for a grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities to the 
institution to which they have been sentenced; or to the Charles Street Jail to await grand jurj^ action. 



During the year 1965, 11,333 persons were committed to the City Prison for the following; 



Assault and battery 
Automobile law 
Default warrants 
Drunkenness 
Fugitive 
Illegitimacy . 
Indecent exposure 
Larceny 




During this s 



7 

3 

12 

0,984 


Nonsupport . 
Violation of probation 
Safekeeping . 
Threats 


I 
2 


Vagrancy 
Miscellaneous 


3 
6 


Total . 



2 
4 

77 
I 
2 

29 



11.333 



ame period of time a total of i^c) male lodgers were also received and cared for at this unit. 



HOUSE OF DETENTION 

The House of Detention for Women is located in the New Court House Building, Somerset Street. Al! 
women arrested in the city are conveyed to the House of Detention and, unless otherwise released, are held in charge 
of the chief matron until the next session of the court before which they are to appear. 

If sentenced to imprisonment, or held for the grand jury, they are conveyed by county authorities either 
to the institution to which they have been sentenced, or to the Charles Street Jail to await grand jury action. 

During the year January, 1065, to December 31, 1065, 2,296 were committed to the House of Detention 
foi Women as follows: 



Adultery 

Assault and battery 
Delinquent children 
Drug law 
Drunkenness 








2 

47 
2 

14 

1,210 


Forgery 

Idle and disorderly 

Larceny 

Lewdness 








2 
197 
112 

4 


Liquor \-iolation . 








I 


Recommitments from Municijjal Court 




Lodgers 




Bails ... 











Lewd and lascivious cohabication 
Neglect of children 

Runaways 

Safekeeping 

Stubborn child 
Violation of probation 
Miscellaneous .... 
Suspicious persons 

Total 



10 

5 
10 

13 

9 

19 

437 
202 

2,296 

I 

4 

551 



i6 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

The jurisdiction of the Traffic Division extends throughout that area of the city comprised of Districts One, 
Two, Four, and the intersection of Commonwealth Avenue at Boston University Bridge in District Fourteen. 
The Traffic Division is responsible for the control of traffic and the enforcement of traffic and parking regulations 
throughout this area. In addition, its duties extend to the overall supervision of traffic arrangements for all major 
parades, public celebrations, and varied cixdc events. The Traffic Di\'ision provides a safety patrol and an Accident 
Investigation and Records Unit both of which service the entire city. 

The volume of traffic on our highways has continued to increase during the past year. Registry of Motor 
Vehicles statistics show a rate of increase in total registrations of 3.13 percent over that of 1964. 

In an effort to cope with the problems presented b\- this ever-increasing ^•olume of traffic, the Traffic 
Di^'ision has effected marked increases in all phases of its enforcement activities. 

Notices of parking \aolations issued by the entire Boston Police Department for the year 1065 amounted to 
672,047, of which 370,276 were issued by the Traffic Division. The corresponding totals for the preceding year were 
593,354 and 334,640, respectively. This is the third }.'ear the visible violation notice has been in effect. 

Vehicles towed for serious parking \'iolations by the Traffic Division reached 5,986, an increase of 769 over 
the number towed in 1964. This is the second year that the department has performed its own towing, using de- 
partment personnel and equipment. 

Court prosecutions for moving \nolations by the Traffic Division for the year 1965 amounted to 1,578. 
A total of 2,050 notices were issued for moving violations, of which 471 were warnings and 1,578 were summoned 
for court appearance. 

The increased enforcement effort in the prosecution of traffic and parking rules and regulations resulted in a 
marked increase in court revenue. Fines paid at the Boston Mimicipal Court in 1965 amounted to $1,565,999.82, 
an increase of $444,129 over the 1964 figure of $1,121,870.82. Parking meter revenue amounted to $488,705.89, 
which includes funds from meter maids tagging. 





EXAMINING BICYCLE BRAKES FOR SAFETY 



SPEED KILLS" 




HIS EMINENCE RICHARD CARDINAL CUSHINQ RETURNING FROM IRELAND 



In addition to its routine operations in traffic control, the division provided coverage for the many parades 
conducted during the year as well as for numerous demonstrations and marches of protest groups. Details were 
provided for several multiple alarms of fire both within the jurisdiction of the Traffic Division and in areas con- 
tingent thereto. Similarl}', attention was given to such civic functions as air raid drills, dedications of public build- 
ings, and the many conventions at both state and national levels. 

Escort service was provided for man}' distinguished visitors to our city, including: Vice-President Hubert 
H. Humphrey; the Honorable Richard ^I. Nixon; the late ambassador to the United Nations, Adiai Stevenson; 
the ambassadors of France, Ireland, Bulgaria, and Liberia; Consul-Generals of Canada and of Ireland; the Post- 
master General; the Secretary of Defense; the United States Civil Service Commissioner; Senator Wayne Morse, 
Senator George Murphy, and Senator Ralph Yarborough; Congressman Gerald Foid, Jr., and Congressman John 
Conyers; Madame Chiang Kai-shek; the National Commanders of the AM VETS and the DAV; Major General 
Wallace M. Greene, Jr., USMC; the Reverend Martin Luther King; Douglas McArthur, Jr.; business groups, 
including a delegation from Helsinki, Finland; members of the NASA program; Mechanical Contractors j\ssocia- 
tion; the Boston Redevelopment Authority; and figures from the world of entertainment, including Geoige Jessel, 
Pat O'Brien, Mike Douglas, Jayne Mansfield, the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, Miss Universe, Miss AMVET, 
Miss Massachusetts, and Nancy Dickerson of the National Broadcasting Company. 

Coverage was provided for weekly movement of funds to and from the Federal Reser\'e Bank. Protection 
was also given the many groups of children \'isiting our historical shrines, sport parks, and entertainment facilities. 



i8 

The M-i Safety Patrol appeared daily throughout the school year in the various schools of the city pro- 
\'iding talks and demonstrations on safety for the pupils. Additional appearances were made at major playgrounds 
in connection with the recreational program of the city's Park Department. Weekly radio programs were con- 
ducted throughout the entire year using the facilities of Station WEZE. 

The Accident Investigation and Records Unit processed approximately 20,000 collision reports. Diagrams 
and studies of the high-collision-frequency areas were made to determine accident prevention programs. This unit 
maintains cross-reference index files of all persons involved in collisions, alphabetical collision location files, and a 
detailed map of collision frequency. All accident reports are coded for I.B.M. processing. 

The purpose of the unit is to assimilate, analj'ze, and evaluate vehicular collisions reported by all districts 
with a view to recommending remedial selective enforcement areas and thus achieving a minimum of vehicular colli- 
sions and a reduction of deaths, injuries, and property losses attendant upon such occurrences. 

The Traffic Division has assumed a major role in the educational program designed to acquaint the public 
with the provisions of the pedestrian control law which was to become effective April i, 1966. This has been ac- 
complished by the extensive use of radio cars with public address systems being assigned on a daily basis to various 
intersections throughout the city. In conjunction with this program officers of the Traffic Division have given 
many lectures to schools and civic groups. 



AUXILIARY SCHOOL PATROL 

One of the modem trends in law enforcement is to release the imiformed officers from those duties which 
can be performed more efficiently and more economically by civilian personnel. Thus, to release the Boston police- 
man from duty of school crossing patrol, and still provide excellent protection for school children, this department 
has been employing civilian female school crossing super\dsors for the past several years. These women have the 
authority, as special officers, to enforce those laws and regulations which specifically relate to the operation, park- 
ing, and use of motor vehicles in the areas adjacent to schools and school crossings. At the present time, the de- 
partment employs ninety-six smartly unifonned traffic super\'isors. 



m m 



19 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION 

It is the responsibility of this division to perform follow-up investigations of criminal cases. For administra- 
tive purposes it functions with the following subdivisions : Crimes Against Persons Section , Crimes Against Property 
Section, General Investigation Section, Youth Aid Section, Vice Control Section, Technical Ser^.'ice Section, and 
District Detective Section. 

Special units within the dixasion are assigned to cover the following phases of police work: homicide, 
robbery, automobile cases, worthless checks and frauds, lost and stolen property, hotels, pawnbrokers, junk shops, 
secondhand dealers, pickpockets, shoplifters, domestic relations, subversive activities, gaming offenses, narcotics 
and vice, and rendition cases. 

Members of the Criminal Investigation Division investigate felonies committed within the jurisdiction of 
the Cit\- of Boston. They also process cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations 
during the course of a year for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. 



CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS SECTION 

Homicide Unit 

Officers of this luiit investigate all homicide cases and interrogate persons in, or who have knowledge of, 
crimes of murder, manslaughter, abortion, and other violent crimes. They prepare, supervise, and present evidence 
at inquests. Transcripts of statements received by these officers from witnesses and defendants are prepared for 
use as evidence in trials of capital cases. 



Investigations 



Aboition 

Accidental 

Alcohol 

Asphyxiation .... 
Assault (victims on danger list) 

Bums 

Crushed by auto 

Drowning 

Drug ingestion .... 

Fall 

Railroad train .... 
Shot by police officer 

Srillborn 

Suicide 



I 

2 
2 
6 

34 
I 
I 

14 

2 

20 

2 

3 

6 



FalHng object i 

File i8 

Helicopter i 

Hit and run i 

Homicide 57 

Homicide (justifiable) i 

Machinery i 

M.B.T.A. bus 3 

Motor vehicle 50 

Natural causes 1,22c 

Suspicious death (cause still under investiga- 
tion) 2 

Total ii477 



Assault . 
Homicide 



Cases Prosecuted in Which the Homicide Unit Secured Evidence 



28 

41 



20 

Recapitulation of Homicides 

Forty-one cases were presented to the courts as criminal homicides and the following action taken: 
Female defendants: 
2 defendants arrested for two murders — no probable cause — Lower Court — dismissed. 

1 defendant arrested for one murder — reduced to manslaughter — Lower Court — held for grand jury. 

2 defendants arrested for three murders — indicted for manslaughter — still pending — Superior Court. 

I defendant arrested for one murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to assault and battery by 
means of dangerous weapon. 

I defendant arrested for one murder — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter — com- 
mitted to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Framingham. 

I defendant arrested for one murder — indicted for murder, second degree — still pending — Superior Court. 

Male defendants: 

1 defendant arrested for manslaughter — nc probable cause — Lower Court — guilty of assault and battery. 

2 defendants arrested for two murders — no probable cause — Lower Court — dismissed. 

7 defendants arrested for two murders — no probable cause — Lower Court — found guilty of affray. 

1 defendant arrested for one murder — held for grand jury. 

2 defendants arrested for two murders — indicted for manslaughter — found not guilt}' b}- jur\-. 

4 defendants arrested for four murders — indicted for manslaughter — pleaded guilty to manslaughter — 
sentenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

3 defendants arrested for one murder — one defendant no bill, grand jury — two defendants indicted for man- 

slaughter — found guilty b}' juiy — sentenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

2 defendants arrested for two murders — indicted for murder, second degree — pleaded guiltj' to manslaughter 

— sentenced to Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

i8 defendants arrested for twelve murders — indicted for murder, second degree — still pending — Superior Court. 

4 defendants arrested for two murders — indicted for murder, second degree — found guiUy by jur}- — sentenced 

to life imprisonment, Massachusetts Correctional Institution, Walpole. 

3 defendants arrested for two murders — indicted for murder, first degree — still pending — Superior Court. 

4 defendants arrested for one murder — two defendants indicted for murder, first degree — two defendants 

(husband and wife) indicted for accessory before and after the fact to murder — still pending — Super- 
ior Court. 

I defendant (not apprehended) — warrant issued — Roxbury Court — for murder. 

I defendant committed suicide after killing his wife. 

14 cases still under investigation. 

(Fifty-nine defendants for forty-one murders). 



21 



Robbery Unit 



A tolal of 135 airests were made by the Robbery 
Unit during 1965. On ten occasions of serious crime 
they were called upon to make up Identi-Kit Compos- 
ites of suspects as an aid to the solution of cases. 

Personnel of the Robbery Unit also conducted the 
daily lineup which is attended by detectives from both 
Headquarters and district stations. 

A number of investigations for outside police depart- 
ments and other agencies were made by members of 
this unit. 

Several members of the Robbery Unit were cited in 
General Orders for outstanding police work in solving 
(hflicult and impoitant criminal cases. 

Officers of the Robbeiy Unit made 144 appearances 
before court and the grand jury. They also responded 
to 167 holdup alarms. In addition, they made the 
following arrests: 




THE WlTiNESS 



Armed robbery . 

Suspicion of anned robbery 

Assault with intent to rob 

Unarmed robbery 

Suspicion of unarmed robbery 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous 

weapon 

Accessory before the fact to armed robbery 
Accessory after the face to anned robbery 
Assault with intent to commit murder 
Accessory after the fact to murder . 
Breaking and entering in the nighttime 
Suspicion of breaking and entering in th 

nighttime 

Counterfeiting 

Default on Superior Court 
Delinquent: Receiving stolen goods. 



46 

8 

5 
I 
2 

4 
I 
I 
2 
I 
I 

3 
I 
I 
I 



Delinquent: Violation of motor vehicle law 

Escape . 

Fugitive 

Illegitimacy 

Kidnapping 

Larceny 

Attempted larceny 

Conspiracy to commit larceny 

Obscene pictures 

Possession of burglar tools 

Recei\'ing stolen goods 

Violation of firearm laws . 

Suspicion of violation of fireaim laws 

Unnatural act 



Total arrests 



33 
6 



135 



CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY SECTION 

Automobile Unit 

Before licenses are issued b\- the Police Commissioner, the Automobile Unit has the responsibility of 
determining the suitability of all applicants for new car, used car, and motor vehicle junk dealers' licenses. Each 
year additional in\-estigations are made before renewal of e>dsting licenses. Frequent inspections are made to 
ascertain if used car dealers are comph'ing with the conditions of their licenses. 

The second basic function of the Automobile Unit is concerned with stolen and abandoned vehicles. Daily 
reports listing all missing or stolen vehicles reported to units of this department and other law enforcement agencies 
are received at this office. Index cards for each vehicle are prepared from the reports and are then compared with 
similar cards prepared from daily reports from approximately 205 licensed dealers. A search for stolen vehicles is 
initiated both by the Automobile Unit and officers of the department who are prov-ided a weekly list of all missing 
vehicles. 

This unit is in daily communication with police authorities of the United States and Canada. Many in- 
vestigations are made in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Post Office Department, National 
Auto Theft Bureau, Registry of Motor Vehicles, and federal immigration authorities. 



Records of Automobiles Reported Stolen in Boston for the Year Ending December 31, 1965 

Recovered Outside 

Month Reported Stolen Recovered in Boston Boston 

January 947 760 153 

February 852 638 152 

March 1,056 816 163 

April 1,209 941 142 

May 1,095 822 139 

June 896 710 124 

July 943 725 141 

August 1,171 1,039 165 

September 1,151 912 i34 

October 1,322 1,117 192 

November 1,307 999 172 

December 964 73 1 140 

Totals 12,913 10,210 1,817 



Stolen Property Recovered 



20 stolen motor vehicles recovered (abandoned) 

51 stolen motor vehicles recovered in possession of individuals 

Cash restitution per court order by indi\'iduals arrested for sale of stolen motor veliicles 

Total Value 



Value 
$80,000 

300,000 

5,000 

§385,000 



Worthless Checks and Fraud Unit 



This unit maintains records on all known check passers and check-passing rings. A file card index is 
maintained on all checks being passed as well as on all check passers, listing their known associates and any alias 
being used by them. 

The Bank Squad is constantly in contact with law enforcement agencies throughout the state, the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, postal inspectors, and the Secret Ser\-ice. As a result of information that has been com- 
piled, the Bank Squad is becoming a clearing house for activities throughout New England. 

A large degree of the successful activities of this unit can be attributed to the cooperation of Regiscope 
Distributors, Protection Service, Inc., and National Check Protection Service. Posifive identifications have been 
made of check passers and their associates from photographs taken by Regiscope, which are provided not only 
upon request but on a voluntary basis as well. 

During the past year, ninety-two persons have been arrested on cases originating in this unit. In addition, 
two persons have been arrested for law enforcement agencies outside of Boston. 

The following convictions have been obtained in all courts during the year 1965: 



Possession of ten or more counterfeit bills 
Possession of one counterfeit bill 
Possession of counterfeit plates 
Unlawful possession of firearms 

Forgery 

Uttering 

Larceny 

Larceny by worthless check 
Attempted larceny 
Chapter 267, Section 9 
Possessioir of cormterfeit Massachusetts 
registration blanks 



10 

I 

2 

I 

254 

364 

12 

549 

10 

2 



Chapter 90, Section 24B . 
Chapter 90, Section 23 
Recei\4ng stolen goods 
Forging of American Express 

Cheques .... 
Chapter 149, Section r4S . 
Threats to do bodily harm 
Fugitive from justice . 
Defrauding an innkeeper 
Violation of true name law 



Travelers 



I 
12 

I 
I 
I 

I 
4 
4 



Total 



1,234 



Lost and Stolen Property LJnit 

A description of all articles reported lost, stolen, or found in this city is filed in this unit. Man}' cities 
and towns throughout the United States forward lists of property stolen in their area. All pawnbrokers and second- 
hand dealers submit daily reports of all articles pawned or purchased. A comparison of the description of articles 
reported lost or stolen and those articles which are pawned or purchased bj- dealers resulted in the recoverj^ of 
thousands of dollars worth of stolen property and the arrest of many thieves. 

Files are maintained on all rifles, shotguns, machine guns, pistols, and revolvers that have been lost or 
stolen in the six New England states and New York. 

Pawnshops and secondhand shops are inspected daily for the purpose of identifying property which may 
have been stolen. 



Licenses 


DlSTRJCTS 


' 


- 


:^ 


4 


5 





7 


9 


10 


1 1 


13 


14 


15 


Total 


Auctioneers 


— 


4 


8 


6 


23 


3 


— 


4 


5 





b 


7 


I 


73 


Junk 


— 


— 


— 


4 


I 


6 


4 


II 


3 


2 


3 


— 


4 


38 


Pawnbrokers 


— 


II 


— 


12 


I 


— 


I 


4 


2 





I 


I 


— 


33 


Secondhand 


2r 


126 


6 


So 


4 


2 


3 


31 


18 


4 


4 


10 


I 


319 


Total Licenses 




























463 



During the period from January i, 1965, through December 31, 1965, the total value of stolen property 
recovered by this unit and returned to its rightful owners amounted to $82,756. 



24 

GENERAL INVESTIGATION SECTION 

The General Investigation Section is composed of Night Investigators Unit, Ballistics Unit, the Crime 
Laboratory, Domestic Relations Unit, and the Rendition Squad. 

Night Investigators Unit 

The personnel of this unit are assigned to patrol during the nighttime hours, and their principal duties 
are to investigate all crimes of street violence, robberies (both armed and unarmed), rapes, aggravated assaults, 
and other crimes occurring during those hours. 

During the year 1965 investigations were made resulting in the following prosecutions: 

Murder i 

Assault with intent to murder , being armed 3 

Armed robber}' . . 13 

Assault with intent to rob, being armed . 6 

Unarmed robbery 12 

Kidnapping ■ • i 

Breaking and entering in the nighttime 9 

Assault with intent to rob, unarmed 3 

Assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon . . 4 

Larceny of motor vehicles 3 

Larceny over $100 19 

Larceny under $100 47 

Possession of burglarious tools i 

Larceny by check under $100 14 

Unlawful carrying of firearm 12 

Attempted breaking and entering in the nighttime 2 

Unlawful sale ol firearm i 

Unlawful possession of firearm i 

Forgery 8 

Uttering 8 

Using counterfeit money orders 4 

Larceny from an luilmown person 5 

Larceny in a building i 

Threats i 

Receiving stolen property 14 

Attempt to rescue prisoner i 

Violation of motor vehicle laws, refusal to give name and address of owner i 

Using without authority, motor vehicle 11 

Drunkenness 8 

Illegal possession of harmful drugs 4 

Illegal possession of narcotic drugs i 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic needle .... 5 

Unlawful possession of implements for subcutaneous injection i 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic syringe 3 

Operating a motor vehicle T^-ithout a hcense 5 

Escapes from House of Correction i 

Accessory after fact to murder 2 

Possession of metallic knuckles i 

Unlawful possession of marijuana i 

Unlawful sale of narcotics i 

Gaming i 

Manslaughter 1 

Assault and battery . S 

Assault and battery on police officers 3 



25 

Operating a motor vehicle after license suspended 2 

Operating under the influence . . i 

Leaving scene, personal injury ... i 

Lea\Tng scene, property damage 2 

Breaking and entering a dwelling, daytime i 

Extortion i 

Deri\'ing support from earnings of prostitute i 

Prostitution 3 

Stubborn child 2 

Operating a motor vehicle so as to endanger 3 

Violation of Boston traffic niles i 

Operating a motor vehicle after revocation i 

Attempted larcen}- from person 5 

Idle and disorderly 2 

Violation of Chapter 41, Section qS, unlawful design 2 

Violation of small loans i 

Total 278 

Delinquent child to wit: 

Recei\'ing stolen property i 

Using motor vehicle without authority 2 

Breaking and entering and larceny i 

Larceny of motor vehicle i 

Total 5 

Arrests made of persons found to be wanted in other districts and police departments on warrants: 

Fugitive from justice 5 

Violation terms of probation 9 

Nonsupport 17 

Violation of parole 5 

Default warrants 11 

Illegitimacy 10 

Anned robbery, indictment warrant, Superior Court i 

Total 58 

Suspicious persons, to wit: 

Possession of firearms without license i 

Unarmed robbery 8 

Anned robbery 13 

Unlawful carrying of fireanns 39 

Assault with intent to commit murder 2 

Receiving stolen property i 

Larceny over $100 5 

Accessory after fact, assault to murder 3 

Larceny of motor vehicle 8 

Unlawful possession of narcotics i 

Assault and battery by means of dangerous weapon i 

Forgery and uttering i 

Breaking and entering in the nighttinie 2 

Murder i 

Violation of narcotic drug law 4 

Carrying revolver without license i 

Larceny from person 3 

Total 94 

A grand total of 435 arrests and prosecutions were made by the Night Investigators Unit for the year 1965. 



26 

Domestic Relations Unit 

The following arrests were made by the Domestic Relations Unit in the course of its regular duties Vjetween 
January i, 1965, and December 31, 1965: 

Violation of terms of probation, \-iolation of illegitimate child act 178 

Violation of terms of probation , nonsupport of family 132 

Nonsupport of family 90 

Violation of illegitimate child act 56 

Default, nonsupport of family 27 

Assault and battery 11 

Default, violation of probation, violation of illegitimate child act 11 

Default, violation of illegitimate child act 7 

Default, violation of probation, nonsupport of family 4 

Larceny 4 

Default, threats to do bodily harm 3 

Default, malicious destruction of property 3 

Violation of probation, assault and battery 3 

Default, breaking glass 2 

Default, violation of probation, larceny 2 

Default, violation of the automobile law 3 

Violation of probation, assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon 

Drunkenness 

Malicious destruction of property 

Default, assault and batterj' 

Violation of probation, idle and disorderly 

Unarmed robbery 

Abuse of a female child 

Violation of automobile law 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation 

Concealing leased property 

Total 546 

Appearances in courts prosecuting cases subsequent to arrest 575 

Suspended sentences ordered by courts (up to two years) 278 

Orders of probation (up to six years) 261 

Sentences of commitment (up to twenty-four months) 83 

Orders of support and/or restitution 327 

Number of removals from rolls of welfare recipients 40 

Amount of monies ordered by courts to be paid by defendants $354,599 ,30 

Amount of monies realized by removals $81,398.40 

Amount of monies representing potential savings to City of Boston $435,997.70 

Amount of monies ordered paid by fines Si 10. 00 

Over 2,050 cases were investigated by this iniit through referrals from welfare authorities, courts, police 
districts, outside police departments, outside state agencies, and private individuals. 



27 



VICE CONTROL SECTION 

The Vice Control Section is subdivided into the Narcotics and Vice Unit and the Gaming Unit. 



Narcotics and Vice Unit 

One of the most important objeclives of the criminal investigator in any large city today is to combat 
the ever-increasing illegal use of narcotic drugs. To cope with this problem the Narcotics and Vice Unit is com- 
prised of highly trained personnel with a broad background of experience in the field of investigation and surveillance. 

This unit is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of persons who have committed crimes 
against chastity, morality, and decency, and those laws governing the sale and use of narcotics and harmful drugs. 



Investigations 

Narcotics — Investigations 

Arrests 

Vice, prostitution, and related offenses — Investigations 

Arresrs 

Gaming — Investigations 

Arrests 

Liquor — Investigations (does not include routine inspections of licensed premises) 

Arrests 

Arrests other than vice, narcotics, gaming, and liquor 

Total court and hearing board appearances 

Investigations with outside agencies 



Vice Arrests 

Idle and disorderly persons 

Prostitutes 

Common nighiwalkers 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation .... 

Soliciting to commit unnatural acts 

Possession of obscene books or photos 

Allowing premises to be used for immoral ])uri)oses 

Sale of obscene magazines 

Possession of obscene magazines 

Deriving support from the earnings of a jjrostitute 

Unnatural acts 

Presenting indecent motion picture .... 
Possession of indecent motion picture foi exhibition 
Detaining female in house of ill fame 
Sending female to practice prostitution . 

Soliciting for a prostitute 

Open and gross lewdness 

Lewd person in speech and behavior 

Sale of obscene books 

Participating in immoral show 

Presenting an immoral show 

Allowing female to resort to licensed premises for immoral purposes 
Resorting to licensed premises for immoral purposes 



Total 



Suspicious persons, to wit, open and gross lewdness, signed waiv 
Search warrants issued 



ers and released 



643 
307 
683 
580 
781 
414 
124 

44 

rg2 

1,663 

93 



20T 

119 

22 

8 

7 

4 

4 

22 

18 

7 

3 

I 

I 

2 

2 

5 
4 
2 

3 
I 

I 
5 
7 

449 



28 



Narcotic Arrests 

Unlawful possession of heroin .... 

Unlawful possession of heroin with intent to sell 

Unlawful possession of harmful drugs 

Being present where narcotic dnigs were found 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic needle 

Unlawful possession of hypodermic s^-ringe 

Unlawful possession of marijuana 

Unlawful possession of dolophene 

Unlawful possession of marijuana with intent to sell 

Unlawful sale of marijuana .... 

Unlawful sale of harmful drugs 

Uttering a false or forged prescription 

Attempting to utter a false or forged prescription 

Unlawful sale without a prescription 

Dispensing drugs without a label 

Conspiracy to violate the narcotic drug laws . 

Conspiracy to violate the harmful drug laws . 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section 200-2 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section 1S7-A 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section 210 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section iqq 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section 199-E 

Violation of Chapter 94, Section 217 

Unlawful possession of demerol . 

In company of one in possession of narcotic drugs 

Prescribing narcotic drugs not in good faith 

Administering harmful drugs not in good faith 

Not reporting drug addict to Department of Public Health 

Unlawful sale of exempt narcotics 

Dispensing narcotic drugs on prescription without a date 
Dispensing exempt narcotics without keeping accurate record 
Failing to keep records of narcotics dispensed or ]-eceived 
Unlawful possession of morphine .... 

Unlawful possession of dilaudid 

Unlawful delivery of marijuana 

Unlawful possession of marijuana with intent to deliver 
Unlawfrrl possession of Seconal 

Totals 

Suspicious persons, signed waiver and released 

Search warrants issued 



within seventv-tw 



hours of first treatment 



Gaming Arrests 

Allowing piemiser to be UFed for illegal gaming 83 

Being concerned in a lottery .... 58 

Having books and apparatus 83 

Gaming with cards or dice 55 

Using telephone to register or accept bets i? 

Being present where gaming implements were found 94 

Allowing telephone to be used to register bets 3 

Transporting gaming apparatus 7 

Registering bels (horses) 3 

Registering bets (dogs) • 4 

Conspiracy to violate the gaming laws • 2 



29 



Transmitting gaming infomiation 
Registering bets (sporting events) 

Total 

Suspicious persons, signed waivers and released 
Search warrants issued 



413 

I 
118 



Officers of this unit also investigated thirty-three locaiions relative uo telephones being used for illegal 
gaming purposes and recommended to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company that twenty tele- 
phones be removed. 



Liquor Violations 

Illegal keeping and exposing of alcoholic beverages 

Sale of alcoholic beverages to minors 

Falsifj'ing age to procure an alcoholic beverage 

Carrying false ID to procure alcoholic beverage 

Illegal sale of alcoholic beverages 

Delivering alcoholic beverages to minor . 

Allowing premises to be vised for the illegal sale of alcoholic beverages 

Employing minor in direct handling of alcoholic beverages 

Total 

Search warrants issued for alcoholic beverages 

Officers of this unit also made 192 arrests other than vice, narcotics, gaming, or liquor violations 



6 
7 
3 
I 

17 
6 
2 
I 

44 

I 



The following statistics are for the court appearances by officers of this unit in the various courts: 

Court appearances — Superior and District Courts 

Court appearances — order of notice 

Suffolk Grand Jury 

Federal Grand Jury 

Federal Court 

Waltham District Court 

The follo-ndng statistics are for the cases handled by officers of this unit before the various boards: 

City of Boston Licensing Board 

Board of Registration in Pharmacy 



1,527 

21 

24 

2 

I 

I 



81 
6 



Officers of this unit have also made ninety-three investigations with the Federal Narcotic Bureau, Massa- 
chusetts State Police, District Attorney's Office, United States Post Office, State Department of Pure Food and 
Drugs, Attorney General's Office, Internal Revenue Service, Naturalization and Immigration Department, Treasury 
Department, and various police departments within the Commonwealth. 

In addition, officers have lectured at the Boston Police Department Academy and private organizations; 
they have also attended meetings of various commissions including the Massachusetts Obscene Literature Com- 
mission. 



30 



Narcotic Seminar 



On March i6, 1965, the Boston Police Department, in conjunction with the deans of local colleges and 
universities, conducted an all-day Narcotic Seminar at the John Hancock Hall. 

The Honorable John F. Collins, Mayor of Boston, and Boston Police Commissioner Edmund L. McNamara 
greeted the participants representing: schools, colleges, universities, and courts; social, civac, fraternal, and religious 
organizations: local, state, and federal health units; and local and distant law enforcement agencies. 

Morning talks were given by outstanding experts in the field of narcotics. John A. Trainor, Supervisor, 
Federal Bureau of Narcotics, Boston Office, talked on the "Extent and Control of Drug Addiction." George A. 
Michael, Director, Di\'ision of Food and Drug, Department of Public Health, had the subject "State and Local 
Enforcement." Don Fletcher, Chief Law Enforcement Liaison of Smith, KUne, and French Laboratories, spoke 
on the "Abuse of Narcotic Drugs." 

A morning panel consisting of the above-mentioned Messrs. Tiainor, ISIichael, and Fletcher, together with 
David J. Myerson, Clinic Director, Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center, Edward F. Blake, Deputy Superintend- 
ent, Boston Police Department, and Joseph V. McBrine, Penal Commissioner of Suffolk County, discussed the 
illegal sale and use of narcotic drugs and the resulting dangers to both adults and teen-agers. An interesting high- 
light of the program was an interview with two drug addicts whose identity was concealed by a screen and who 
were questioned alternately by the panelists and members of the audience. After a luncheon in the Dorothy Quincy 
Suite, participants had a chance to view a displa\' of narcotic articles seized by the Boston Police \'ice Control Unit 
in recent raids. 

An afternoon session consisted of an address by Capt. Jertiniah P. Sullivan, Vice Control Section, Boston 
Police Department, on "What the Boston Police Department ]s Doing to Cope with the Drug Addict." Other 
speakers were Joseph I\L Hayman, Jr., Dean, Tufts Medical School, whose subject was "Work of the National 
Research Council Conimittee on Narcotic Drug Addiction"; Carl L. Perian, Staff Director, U. S. Senate Sub-Com- 
mittee to Livestigate Juvenile Delinquency, who spoke on "1965 Drug Control Act"; John A. Pino, Assistant 
District Attornev, Suffolk County, who covered the area of "Search and Seizure"; and Nicholas J. Fiumara, Director, 
Division of Communicable and Venereal Diseases, who spoke on "Sex and the Addict." 

The afternoon panel was made up of Captain SulHvan, Mr. Hayman, Mr. Perian, Mr. Pino, Mr. Fiumara, 
Mr. Albeit Shemian, Registered Pharmacist, and Mr. John J. Belizzi, Director, New York State Narcotic 
Bureau, and Executive Secretary of LN.E.O.A. The panel discussed the difference between the lawful use of 
narcotic drugs and the results obtained from the illegal use of narcotic drugs. Again, a behind-a-screen interview 
with two different drug addicts, questioned by the panelists and the audience alike, was a highlight in the after- 
noon program. 

Deputy Superintendent Arthur C. Cadegan, Jr., acted as panel moderator for both morning and afternoon 
sessions; each participant was given a brochure containing official educational materials. 




.ATTENDING THE NARCOTIC AND MCE Si;\\lNAR 
AT JOHN HANCOCK HALL WERE, LEFT TO RIGHT: 
ROBERT E. SLATER. PRESIDENT OF JOHN HANCOCK 
INSURANCE COWPANY: MAYOR JOHN F. COLLINS; 
KENNETH MacIVER, VICE PRESIDENT, JOHN HAN- 
COCK INSURANCE COMPANY; AND POLICE 
COMMISSIONER EDMUND L. A\cNAMARA 




NARCOTIC EXHIBIT AT JOHN HANCOCK HALL ON 
MARCH 16, I90.S, DISPLAMNG NARCOTICS CONFIS- 
CATED DURING THE YEAR BY ME\^BERS OF THE 
BOSTON POLICE NICE AND NARCOTIC SQUAD 



31 



YOUTH AID SECTION 

The purpose of the Youth Aid Section is to pre\'ent dehnquency among juveniles and to maintain a pro- 
gram of constant cooperation with all agencies in the child welfare field in order to effect the possible rehabilitation 
of maladjusted children. 

Duties in General 

1. Develop a program of crime prevention intended to eliminate 
factors which induce criminal tendencies among children. 

2. Enhst the aid of the general public, child welfare agencies, dis- 
tricts and units of this department. 

3. Teach good citizenship; develop a proper mental attitude of citi- 
zens toward law-enforcement agencies; educate the public in the prob- 
lems of crime prevention and suppression of juvenile crime. 

4. Determine persons and places which in any way contribute to 
delinquency of children ; investigate and take necessary action to correct 
such conditions. 

5. Super\ase and inspect places of public amusement, along with 
hocels, bus and railroad stations, and places where large numbers of 
juveniles tend to congregate. 

6. Control existing problems by modern and efficient juvenile 
police methods. 



1 




' 





THIS IS NO I'l.ACP. TO PLAY 



Dui-ing 1965 juvenile officers arrested and prosecuted 1,678 male and 410 female juveniles in the following 
age groups: 

Age 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 Total 



Alale 
Female 



9 


27 


34 


53 


122 


185 


332 


48s 


428 


1,678 








2 


14 


20 


63 


92 


118 


lOI 


410 



In accordance with the program of detecting and prosecuting all adults who are in any way in\-olved in 
unlawful activities concerning juveniles, 143 male and thirty female adults were prosecuted. 

The officers also brought 2,253 male and 506 female juveniles to their respective districts for questioning 
in regard to criminal offenses committed on each district. As a result of interrogation with these juveniles and 
personal interviews with their parents, it was determined to be in the best interests of all concerned that the city 
return them to their parents without bringing them Ijefore the court for delinquency proceedings. 

This part of the juvenile plan in the City of Boston is the contribution of the Boston Police Department 
towards the rehabilitation of the delinquent child. There is justification for the continuance of this policy in Boston 
■ — that is, the child being returned to the parents after an investigation by the juvenile officers. The classic example 
is set by first offenders who, after proper disciplinary action by the parents, would not and do not appear in the 
overall delinquency pattern again. Another beneficial aspect is the fact that the stigma of a juvenile record is not 
attached to the child. 



There were 5,000 cases processed by the Youth Aid Section for this period including those cases brought 
to court and those cases turned over to the parents of the children for disciplinary action. Admittedh', there has 
been a perceptible increase in the overall number of cases handled during the year. However, it should also be 
noted that much of the aforementioned is due to the slight increase in the percent of female juveniles arrested for 
the conunission of offenses that are referred to the courts for judicial re\-iew. Several policewomen have been 
added to this unit to assist in eliminating this condition. 



32 

This section presented lectures to many organizations in an efTort to educate the public as to the scope 
of juvenile delinquency — the elementary causes, the policies, jjlans, and procedures of the Youth Aid Section. 
The results of these lectures have been reflected in: (i) the multitude of organizations which are now conducting 
campaigns against the sale of indecent literature and photographs to children; (2) the organizations which are 
now offering athletic programs to children; (3) and, most important of all, the supervisory interest that parents 
are now taking in their children. 

It cannot go wdthout mention that the tremendous cooperation this section is receiving from the clerg)', 
the schools, and the agencies of the City of Boston is directly related to this program of acquainting the public 
with the juvenile delinquency problem in this city. 

During the past year, the juvenile officers personalh* contacted many people who are engaged in some 
phase of children's work in the City of Boston. Among these are schoolteachers, librarians, court attaches, clergy- 
men, boys and girls' club workers, and those people who staff agencies working for the betterment of children. 
This phase of the program is to make all of these people more fully aware of the fact that the police are cognizant 
of their importance in the overall battle against delinquency and realize that delinquency can be defeated only by 
the cooperation of all parties working for a common cause. 

During the year, the juvenile officers have carried on a program of cooperation with the supervisors of 
attendance in the public schools. This fact is worthy of mention because it is now officially recognized that the 
work done in this field is directly res])onsi1jlc for the decrease in Boston t^uanc3^ 

Juvenile officers have learned through close contact what each agency is specializing in. Hard work by 
these same juvenile officers provides them with a thorough knowledge of all neighborhood affairs and, conse- 
quently, of all people in dire need of assistance. As a result, officers are able to refer these impoverished families 
to the proper agency. Hundreds of these unfortunate families of Boston have been assisted in just such a manner. 

To aid the juvenile officers in combating the problem of juvenile delinquency, an educational program 
has been initiated with the cooperation of Boston University. Under this program, a group of officers are responsible 
for gi\'ing a series of lectures on youth development. 

It will be noted that a comparison with the annual report of 1964 shows that this section processed and 
handled more cases — and wdth less juveniles appearing before the courts. In the light of the reported upward 
trend on a national level, these facts should be regarded as encouraging. 



Rendition Squad 

The investigation and prosecution of fugitives arrested in the City of Boston is the responsibility of the 
personnel of this squad. This entails not only arrests by members of the Boston Police Department, but also arrests 
effected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and United States Marshals. The combined result was that 
eighty-three fugitives from justice complaints were obtained; se\'en of those arrested were female defendants. 
These complaints, and following continuances, required 227 appearances in the Boston Municipal Court; twenty- 
eight appearances in the Roxbury District Court; seventeen in the Dorchester District Court; six in the Charles- 
town District Court; one in the Brighton District Court; eleven in the West Roxbury District Court; nine in the 
South Boston District Court; five in the East Boston District Court; and four appearances in Suffolk Superior 
Court. Twent)''-two appearances were also required in the Federal Buildii:g before United States Commissioners. 
A grand total of 330 court appearances were made. 

Forty-nine defendants were returned to demanding states during the past year. Thirty-seven cases were 
dismissed at the request of the demanding state or by the refusal of the Executive Department, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, to rendite same. Twenty-nine cases are still pending in our courts. 

Out-of-state officers arriving in this city for the purpose of returning prisoners in our custody to their 
respective cities and states were given full cooperation and furnished accoirmiodations. 

Forty investigations were completed for out-of-state cities and towns, and twenty-nine warrants were 
returned without service, after it was ascertained the wanted parties were no longer in the city. 



33 

TECHNICAL SERVICE SECTION 
Ballistics Unit 

The personnel assigned to this unit are primarily concerned with the following functions: 
(a) Identification and examination of all fireanns coming into the possession of this department. 
(6) Identification and examination of all spent bullets and discharged cartridge cases coming into the pos- 
session of the department, 
(c) Microscopic examinations of test specimens fired from seized firearms and recovered spent bullets and 
dischaiged cartridge cases, against those spent bullets and discharged cartridge cases recovered in previous 
crimes of shooting, and on file at this unit. 

{d) Microscopic examinations of test specimens received from other police departments for possible con- 
nection with crimes within our jurisdiction. 

(f) The firing and forwarding of test specimens to other police departments for possible connection with 
crimes within their jurisdiction. 

(/) Checking for lost or stolen weapons and/or ownership of weapons recovered. 

(g) Submitting of a final report on all fireaims and evidence received by this unit. 
(//) Care and custody of all firearms and evidence pending final court disposition. 
(/) Court presentation of evidence and opinions. 

(_;') Issuing and maintaining of all department weapons and emergency equipment, such as ammunition, 
riot -machine-tear gas guns, tear gas, masks, bulletproof vests, lighting equipment, batteries, etc. 

On all crimes where a gun had been used, the ballistician or one of his assistants reports to the scene of 
the crime to obtain evidence. During oft-duty hours a telephone call system is used, whereby the ballistician or 
one of his staff members may be contacted at his home, giving the Police Department a 24-hour coverage. 

During the period from January i, 1965, to December 31, 1965, the personnel of this unit made 702 ap- 
pearances in various courts. 

During this same period of time the services of this unit were requested in 733 cases, as follows: 

Accidental shooting, no deaths 14 

Armed robbery 54 

Assault and battery, dangerous weapon 68 

Bullets and discharged cases recovered, no arrests 32 

Examination of police revolvers fired effecting arrests, etc. 103 

Firearm law, violation of 195 

Murder 18 

Suicide and/01 accidental shooting, death resulting 8 

Suicide attempt i 

Weapons examined and held for safekeeping 36 

Weapons examined and returned to owners , . 12 

Weapons found and/or disposal request 74 

Test specimens from other departments, examined 93 

Discharging firearm within city limits . 25 

Total 733 



34 

Polygraph 

The polygraph or He detector machine has proxnded the department with a scientific method of inter- 
rogating, on a voluntary basis, persons suspected of having committed a crime. This machine, operated by a trained 
officer who has attended the Reid Polygraph School in Chicago, has made it possible to reduce the number of hours 
previously spent in random interrogation of suspects. It has also proven its value in those instances wherein the 
machine was instnmiental in determining a person's innocence. Perhaps, more correctly, it should be called the 
"truth" detector. 

The following is a report of activities in the Polygraph Unit up to December 31, 1965: 



Unit 


Number 


Under 








Crime 


Serviced 


Persons 


Arrest 


Sex 


Adult'- 


Minur- 


Investigated 


Homicide 


, 





Male 


, 


I 


Murder 


Hackney 


2 





Male 


2 





Assault and battery 


Shopping Squad . 


2 





Male 


2 





Larcenv 


Robbery 


1 





Male 


I 





Robbery 


District Four , 


7 





Male 


-> 





Murder 


District Four 







Male- 2 














Female- 1 


3 





Larcenv 


District Ten ... 


-t 


u 


Male- 1 














Female- 1 





^ 


Sex offenses 


District Ten 


I 


" 


Male 


I 





Breaking and entering, 

larceny 
Larceny 


District Thirteen. . 


I 


u 


Male 


I 





Outside Agency 


-> 


(J 


Male-i 














Female- 1 


2 





Breaking and entering, 















larceny 


Totals 


19 




16 


3 









Crime Laboratory 

A modern weapon in the fight against crime and the criminal is the Crime Laboratory. Through the use 
of chemistry and the microscope, criminal investigation has taken a giant step towards police professionalism. 

The Boston PoUce Crime Laboraiory, possessing stationary laboratory facilities as well as a mobile unit 
which is transportable to the scene of a crime, guarantees a more accurate search of the crime scene and increases 
the possibilities of discovering and securing evidence. 



35 



Summary of Case Work, Boston Police Department Crime Laboratory Unit, 1964 

Material, 

test or 
category: 
Photographs: 

Infrared . 

Black and white 

Enlargements . 

Photomacrography 

Photomicrography . 
Paper .... 
Plaster — reference 
Plaster — comparison 
Physical matching 

Powder residue — clothing (C-acid tests) 
Powder residue — paraffin (dermal nitrate 

Radiation 

Reports on cases in progress: 

Verbal report . 

Written report 
Restoration of obliterated .serial numbers 

Firearms . . ... 

Vehicles 

Rips and tears 

Rope and cordage .... 
Scene examinations .... 
Shoeprints (footwear impressions) . 
Soil and minerals .... 

Spermatazoa, microscopic identification 
Tissue, biological .... 

Tape 

Tire tracks 

Tools 

Toolmarks — reference 
Toolmarks — comparison . 
Typewriter comparisons 
UV examinations (ultraviolet) 
Vehicle dents and damage 
Vehicles examined 
Woods and metals 
Weapons examined: 

Cutting — knives . 

Blunt instrument 
Miscellaneous 



Material, 


Number 


test or 


of tests 


category : 


or cases 


Acid phosphatase 


ro 


Alkahes (lye) 


3 


Blood grouping . 


7 


Bloodstains (tests): 




Benzidine 


■ . • 138 


Takayama 


152 


Precipitin 


. . . 89 


Bombs and suspected bombs 


13 


Brick 


6 


Castings : 




Plaster .... 


8 


Silicone rubber RTV (rocn 


1 temperature 


vulcanizer) . 


26 


Clothing .... 


175 


Chemical analysis: 




Gunpowder 


6 


Chemical development of latent 


fingerprints: 


Toner .... 


270 


Ninhydrin 


396 


Silver nitrate . 


145 


Iodine fuming . 


75 


Detective dyes 


S 


Documents examined 


42 


Explosive residues 


12 


Fabric .... 


4 


Fabric impressions 


6 


Fibers — reference 


10 


Fibers — comparison 


44 


Fingerprint examination . 


35 


Firebrick — reference 


. . . 8s 


Firebrick — comparison 


10 


Gas chromatography . 


6 


Glass — reference 


4Q 


Glass — comparison . 


6 


Hair — reference 


S 


Hair — comparison 


10 


Laundry marks . 


13 


Microscopic examination . 


208 


Narcotics .... 


S3 


Paint samples — refererrce 


74 


Paint samples — comparison 


23 



Number 
of tests 
or cases 

r2 
r6o 

97 
24 
53 

6 
12 

6 
ri 



295 
150 

5 

13 

9 

7 

237 

233 

II 

6 

7 

9 

17 

107 

109 
II 
22 
53 
5 
42 

37 

30 
13 
75 



Year 
1959... . 
i960. . . . 
1961. . . . 
1962. . . . 
1963... . 

1964 

1965... 



Medical 
Examiner 



418 
388 
329 



330 

* 



Police 
Department 

66 



80 

74 
209 
322 

* 495 

* 445 
(*Figures unavailable) 



Total 
484 
468 

403 
539 
322 

495 
445 



36 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 




Superintendent 
WILLIAM J. TAYLOR 
Chief, Bureau of General Ser\ices 




Deputy Superintendent 

ROBERT E. BRADLEY 

Records and Communications Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

ARTHUR C. CADEGAN, JR. 

Training Division 



Captain 

WALTER J. HANKARD 

Chief Clerk of Department 



37 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 

This bureau directs the activities of the many auxiUary services which must be pro\-ided to insure an 
effective poHce operation. The performance of these necessary functions has a direct effect on the quahty and 
efficiency of police service furnished to the pubhc. The work of this bureau is accomplished by the Central Services 
Division, the Records and Communications Division, and the Personnel and Training Division. 



CENTRAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Central Services Division has direct responsibility for administrative supervision of the City Prison; 
the House of Detention for Women; building and equipment maintenance; the processing, care, and custody ot 
nondepartmental property and inventory; and the custody and distribution of departmental-owned supplies and 
equipment. This division is also responsible for the processing of all licenses issued by the Police Commissioner. 

Satisfactory' maintenance and repair of property and equipment greatly affect the efficiency, morale, and 
prestige of the police service and have a direct bearing on good public relations. 



PROPERTY CLERK SECTION 

The Pioperty Clerk Section is charged with the care of lost, stolen, and abandoned property; money or 
other property alleged to have been illegally obtained; and all articles and property taken from persons arrested for 
any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come into the possession of 
the department. 

All orders for supplies, uniforms, and equipmeiU are issued by this office. 

During the year 236 moior vehicles came into the custody of this office; ten vehicles were released to 
legitimate claimants; and 247 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now sixty-three motor vehicles in 
custody. 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department autcmobilcs is in operation on a 24-hour basis. 
During the year, on 8,751 occasions, department cars were repaired, and, on 3,r64 occasions, cars were serviced. 
There were 437 department cars and 224 privately owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department 
operates a motorcycle shop where, on 967 occasions, motorcycles were repaired and ser\aced during the year. 

This unit is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the various districts, 
and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



38 



LOST AND FOUND PROPERT\ 

Articles on hand January i, 1965 213 

Articles received during the year to December 31, 1965 197 

Total 410 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 48 

Worthless 77 

Sold at public auction 126 

Total number of articles disposed of 251 

Total number of articles on hand December 31, 1965 159 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE SECTION 

The Building Maintenance Section is charged with the care, maintenance, super\Tision, and cleanliness of 
aU police buildings. All requests for repairs or maintenance work are examined by members of this unit ; then a 
service order, containing a cost estimate, is written up and processed through the Property Clerk so that the work 
can be done by an outside contractor. 

After the work has been completed, it is inspected by the Superintendent of Buildings, who either ap- 
proves or disapproves of the work done by signing the service order which, in turn, allows for payment. 

Any structural change in a police building which is recommended by the Bureau of Inspectional Ser\'ices 
must carry with it, a cost estimate plus full specifications prepared b}' this unit. 



39 



AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE SECTION 

There are 295 motor vehicles in service at the present time distributed as follows: 



Districts 


Combination 
Patrols 


Passenger 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


Cycles 


Totals 


Tactical Patrol 




2 


7 






9 
69 

7 


Headquarters 
District i . 
















I 


52 
4 


17 


2 


District 2 . 
















2 


5 





■; 


District 3 • 
















2 


5 





3 


10 


District 4 . 
















5 


19 





26 


District 5 . 
District 6 . 
















2 
2 


12 
6 


— 


5 
4 
4 


19 


Disirict 7 . 
















2 


6 







District 8 
















■ — 


2 


5 


7 
18 


District q . 
















2 


15 




District 10 . 
















2 


9 





I 




District 11 . 
















2 


II 





X 


T^ 


District 13 . 
















2 


4 





s 
3 


II 


District 14 . 
















2 


7 





District 15 . 
















I 


4 





5 
29 
II 


Traffic Division 
Pool 
















2 


10 
9 





19 


Totals 


31 


*iS7 


t22 


55 


295 


* Inckided 
t Included 


in the 
in the 


total 
total 


of 18 
of tw 


7 pas 
renty 


senge 
two t 


r aut( 
rucks 


:)rac 
an 


biles are twenty-nine station wagons. 

; a car-crane and a fork-lift at District 8 and a horse-van at the stables. 



The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Districts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Nine, Ten, Eleven, Thirteen, Fourteen, and Fifteen. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to convey sick and injured persons to the following places: 



Boston City Hospital . 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Services not required . 

Boston State Hospital 

Carney Hospital . 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Southern Mortuary 

East Boston ReUef Station 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 

Children's Hospital 

Faulkner Hospital 

Home 

United States V'eterans Hospital 

Beth Israel Hospital . 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Northern Mortuary 

United States Naval Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Roslindale General Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Floating Hospital 

New England Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital . 

Police Station Houses 

Physician's Office 

Brighton Marine Hospital . 

Longwood Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 

Shattuck Hospital .... 



16,468 

4.185 

1,288 

1,19-t 

1.31,5 

1.503 

336 

715 

614 

728 

558 

408 

443 

666 

266 

122 

76 

75 

71 

48 

36 

4^ 

37 

55 

32 

37 

22 

• 38 
21 
38 



Harley Hospital .... 
Brookline Hospital 
Pratt Diagnostic Clinic 
Soldiers' Home .... 
Sullivan Square Medical Center 
Kenmore Hospital 
Milton Hospital .... 
New England Baptist Hospital 
Parker Hill Hospital ... 
Somerville Hospital 
Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 
Boston Sanatorium ... 
Mount Auburn Hospital . 
Hahnemann Hospital . 
Winthrop Community Hospital 
Chestnut Hill Nursing Home 
Columbus Nursing Home . 
Cambridge City Hospital . 
Chelsea Memorial Hospital 
Commonwealth Nursing Home 
Glenside Hospital 
Industrial Clinic . 
Joslin Clinic 
Leahy Clinic 

Robert Brigham Hospital 
Washingtonian Hospital 
Women's Free Hospital 
Others .... 

Total 



14 
20 

35 

4 

21 

16 

10 

9 

9 

7 

18 

3 

7 
2 

8 
I 
I 

2 

I 
I 

5 
I 
2 

5 
I 

5 
I 

14 



31,658 



40 

LICENSING SECTION 

Hackney Carriages 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, limits the number of Hcenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, January i, 1965, to December 31, 1965, due to changes of ownership and regrants, 
a total of * 1,9 1 9 licenses were granted. 

There were 317 articles, consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carriages. Of these 201 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 116 placed in the custody of the Pioperty Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive the 
same : 



Hackney Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage licenses received IjQtQ 

Carriages licensed ("renewal" applications and "changes of ownership") 1,666 

Carriages licensed ("regrants") 253 

1,919 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") 295 

Caniages licensed — "changes in ownership" 141 

Carriage licenses in effect December 31, 1965 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1965 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) Ij525 

Carriages inspected ijQiQ 

* ^53 regrants 



Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 6,638 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected ... 157 

Drivers' licenses granted 6,795 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 30, of which revocations 5 were rescinded and the licenses restored, leaving the 

net figure shown of such revocations as 25 

Drivers' licenses in eft'ect December 31, 1965 (at end of police year) — licensed since Februan,' i, 1965 

(beginning of hackney carriage license year) 6,553 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated 736 

Articles found in carnages reported by drivers 317 



41 
RECORDS AND COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION 

This division is charged with the administrative supervision of the Central Complaint Section, Central 
Records Section, Identification Section, Printing Unit, and Signal Ser\'ice Unit. 

The Central Records, Central Complaint, and Identification Sections are the information centers of the 
department and coordinate all police record requirements so as to form a fully integrated system. These sections 
aie open around the clock to provide assistance to other police activities. They contain all department administra- 
tive and operating records and exercise staff control over all reporting units to assure timely submission of reports 
and to assure that they are both complete and accurate. All warrants are processed by these sections. 

The Central Complaint Section leceives complaints and reports of crimes and other incidents from the 
pulilic and assigns radio car personnel to investigate the reports as received. It also generally controls the immediate 
deployment of field personnel, subject to appropriate authority, in emergency situations. 

The Identification Section provides for photography and fingerprinting of arrested persons and maintains 
both criminal and civil files of fingerprints and photographs. 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT SECTION 

The Central Complaint Section has control over aU communications involving telephone, teletype, radio 
and telegraph. 

There were 589,610 outgoing telephone messages and 5,734 toll calls made by the department through our 
switchboard; 379,575 emergency messages were received and processed at the complaint desk through either 
DE8-1212 or the department intercommunication system; 550,000 telephone messages were received through our 
switchboard, many of which were transferred to the complaint desk for processing; 245,022 teletype messages and 
2,444 TWX messages plus 150 telegrams were handled; of these, 2,400 concerned missing persons; 12,913 were 
stolen car reports, of which 12,027 were reported recovered; 1,619,181 radio messages were sent and received. 

On an average month 120,417 radio messages are processed over our radio system to and from mobile 
equipment and police boats. A tape recorder accurately records each radio transmission and provides the depart- 
ment with an important record of same for administrative purposes. 

The Central Complaint Room has control of all pohce communications, including the receiving of all 
telephone calls and the receiving and sending of all radio, teletype, and telegrani messages. It also has the respon- 
sibility for the proper care and maintenance of all communications. 

The primary function of assigned personnel is to give instant service, when required, to the public at this 
point in a courteous and efficient manner. All radio-equipped imits of the department are directed from this room. 
This includes patrol cars, ambulances, ambulettes, boats, and motorcycles. Acti\'ities of police at all major disasters 
are directed from this unit. 



Responsibilities 

These services require that numerous files and records be kept to insure maximum efficiency. The follow- 
ing files aie kept: Daily Central Complaint Card File; Felony Report Sheet; Missing Persons File; Stolen and Re- 
covered Automobile File; Towed Car File; Out -of -State Student Registration File; Daily Local and State Teletype 
File; Telegram File; Police Department Roster File; Fire Box Location File (with nearest sector car designated); 
file for F.B.I. ; Out-of-State Stolen Cars Recovered in Boston; Cars Stolen in Boston and Recovered Outside; Alpha- 
betical Street File by Car Sector ; and a daily telephone toll call record (for the Signal Service) . 



42 



floor. 



CENTRAL RECORDS SECTION 

The Central Records Section utilizes the entire third floor of Police Headquarters and part of the fourth 

Over $36,424 was collected for work permits and requests for records during the past year by this section. 

This section assigned 34,310 booking numbers for arrests other than traffic to the various districts, resulting 
in the making up and filing of approximately 75,000 additional 3x5 cards in the main index files. This was ac- 
complished without the addition of extra personnel. 

This system permits officers of the department to know at any time if a particular individual does or does 
not have an arrest record in this city for an offense of any consequence. 

Recorded in the main index file 1,002,065 

Recorded in female record file 29,520 

Recorded in the male record file 239,961 



Criminal Records 

Requests received by telephone and personal inquiries made over the counter 

Requests received by correspondence 

Requests for certified records 

Requests for jury records 

Requests in connection with applicants for licenses 

Total 

Requests received fiom various public agencies (i.e., armed forces, deserters, stragglers) 

Grand Total 



12,864 
9-380 

979 
*i,8oo 

13.734 

38,757 
1,481 

40,238 



* Record search and investigation for prospective jurors was discontinued in September of 1965. 



Microfilm 

All police department journals fiom 1932 to 1964, inclusive, have been put on microfilm, as well as all crimi- 
nal records of persons over sixty-five years of age. Those record cards which have not had arrests recorded on them 
for a period of twenty-five years or more and personnel records of retired police and civilian personnel have also 
been microfilmed. 



Missing Persons 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 

Total number found, restored to relatives, etc 

Total number still missing .... ... 



43 



1,499 

1,430 

69 



* Does not include persons reported missing by various welfare agencies and numerous cases of children reported missing who 
were found or returned within a few hours after the report was made. 



Age and Se,\ of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 







Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 




Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 
Over 15 years — 
Over 21 years 


under 21 




.500 
226 
292 


187 

258 
236 


266 
247 
262 


164 

2«3 
20« 


16 

M 
II 


6 
10 

12 








Totals 


8t8 


681 


775 


655 


41 


28 







Reported missing in Boston 

Reported to this department from outside departments and agencies 

Reported missing and returned clie same day (locally) 

Reported missing and returned same day (outside cities and towns) 

Total number of persons reported missing 




1,409 
4,847 
1,020 
1,667 

9,033 



District 

District 

Distiict 

District 

Distiict 

District 

District 

District 

District 

District 

District 1 1 

Distiict 13 

District 14 

District 15 



I 

2 

»■> 

4 

5 
6 

7 
S 

Q 
10 



Persons Reported Missing by 

(North End Section) .... 

(.Downtown Section) .... 

(Mattapan) 

(South End and Back Bay Section) 

(Hyde Park and West Roxbury) 

(South Boston Section) .... 

(East Boston Section) .... 

(Haibor Pohce) 

(Dudley Street Section of Roxbury) 

(Ro.xbury Crossing Section) . 

(Adams Street Section of Dorchester) 

(Jamaica Plain) 

(Brighton) 

(Charlestown) 



Total reported . . ... 

Persons interviewed 

Inquiries relating to locating friends or relatives 



Police Districts for 1965 

19 

8 

182 

107 

71 

105 

47 

o 

3^3 
230 
187 

89 

84 

57 



1,499 

*302 

586 




'I WANNA LAWYER" 



Does not include those interviewed at the various districts of the department. 

There were two reports of persons afflicted with amnesia. 

In 102 cases of dead bodies fingerprinted, 95 were identified through fingerprint impressions. 



44 

Warrants 

Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 71646 

Warrants received fiom other Massachusetts departments for service in Boston i)893 

Warrants received from other departments outside Massachusetts for ser\'ice in Boston ... 212 

Total 

Warrants sent out for service lo districts and units within the department 

Warrants sent out for ser\'ice to other cities and towns in Massachusetts 

Warrants sent out for service to cities and towns outside the Commonwealth of Massachusetts . 
Warrants sent to institutions in Alassachusetts as detaineis for this department 

Total warrants processed 

Warrants returned without ser\ace to our districts and units 

Warrants returned without service to other departments 

Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 6,922 



Summonses 

Total numbei received from outside cities and towns for service in Boston 12,267 

Total numbei served 10,434 



9.751 


8,130 


1,074 


187 


360 


9,751 


1,413 


1,916 



Total number not served i>833 

Total number of svmmonses sent from Identification Section for service in outside cities and towns . 74,052 

Total number served 69,123 



Total number not served 4,929 

There wtre 11,000 mo:e summonses handled by this department in 1965 than in 1964. 



Multilith and Mimeograph 

The nuiltililh machine was used to make 1,365,000 impressions, consisting of department fomis, letters, 
police bulletins, and IBM cards. 

The mimeograph machine made 633,600 impressions, consisting of daily manifolds, bulletins, circular -t},-pe 
letteis for the various distiicts and units, including Police Academy lessons, and training bulletins. 

Two multilith machines under the supervision of experienced operators enabled the department to prepare 
and complete printing of circulars containing photographs and fingerprints of persons either reported missing or 
wanted for criminal offenses. These multilith machines are also used to print department forms. 

This unit has the following equipment: 

1 power paper cutter 

I hand cutter capable of cutting 500 sheets of 20-pound stock at one time 

I paper drill 

I strip printer 

I folding machine 

I high-speed electric addressograph machine 

I binding machine 

I comer rounder 



45 

IDENTIFICATION SECTION 

Photography 

Number of photographs on file January i, 1965 866,856 

Made and filed during the year 15,125 

Number of "foreign" photographs on file 16,580 

Number of ''foreign" photographs received during the year . 1,387 

Total 899,948 

Number on file in the ''local segregated" file (gallery) *45 690 

Number on file in the " foreign segregated " file *i6,586 

Identification of criminals arrested locally (gallery) i^x 

Identification of criminals arrested elsewhere (gallery) .... 4:; 

Scenes of crime photographed I814 

Photographs sent to: 

Massachusetts Stale Bureau of Identification 7,589 

Other cities and towns 5,087 

Number of photostat copies made . . 2,780 

Number of negatives of criminals made 5,489 

Nuinber of prints made from same 27,445 

Color Photography 

Color "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1964 27,371 

Made and filed during the year 1965 5,489 

Total ''mug" photographs on file December 31, 1965 . . 32,860 

Miscellaneous color photographs taken and processed (scenes of violence, homicides, assault and 

battery, etc 386 

Number of exposures of latent fingerprints 3,880 

Number of prints made from sanie 7,760 

Number of reorders of crhninal photographs 10,680 

Number of stand-up photographs made g^ 

Number of prints made from same ^25 

Number of police officers photographed o 

Number of crime scenes \nsited 4,487 

Number of exposures (4x5 camera) 8,340 

Number of prints made from same 2^,020 

Number of 8 x 10 enlargements for court and prosecuting officers 7,500 




POLICE PHOTOGRAPHER 

PHOTOGRAPHING FINGERPRINT AFTER 

MAKING A CONNECTION IN ONE OF THE 

MANY CASES THIS LNIT HELPS TO SOLVE 



46 



Fingerprint File 



Number on file December 31, 1964 
Taken and filed during 1065 

Male .... 

Female .... 
Received from other authorities: 

Male 

Female .... 



244,85s 

4,109 
1,380 

2,780 
1,107 

254,231 

5,489 

5,489 

865 

41 

1,206 

10,252 

10 

3,482 

124,127 

139,118 



27,602 
13,801 

1,940 
583 

3.673 



Number on fiile December 31, 1965 . 
Fingerprints sent to 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

Massachusetts State Bureau of Identification 

Other cities and towns .... 

Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officer applicants .... 

Special police officers . ... 

Haclcney carriage drivers .... 

Civilian employees 

Fireanns act (revolver applicants) 
Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1964 
Total number of fingerprints on file (civilian file) December 31, 1965 

Five-Finger System of Fingerprinting 

Number of five-finger cards on file December 31, 1965 

Number of main index cards cross indexed to five-finger system December 31, 1965 .... 
Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in the Identification Section December 31, 1965 
Number of connections made by latent prints since the system was established ... 
Number of fingerprint assignments Januar}' I, 1965, to December 31, 1965 

There were 131 identifications made through viewing of the mug files, both black and white and color, 
duiing the year 1965. 

During the year there were 1,906 latent prints found at the scenes of crimes and returned to this unit. 
The latent print unit made fifty-three identifications from the prints found at crime scenes. 

SIGNAL SERVICE SYSTEM 

Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 557. Of these, 526 are connected with an underground system and 
thirty-one with an o\-erhead system. 

Miscellaneous Work 

In Ihe past year employees of this service responded to 1,507 trouble calls; inspected 557 signal boxes; 15 
signal desks; 17 motor generator sets; and 300 storage batteries. Repairs were made on 227 box movements; 22 
registers; 168 locks; 26 time stamps; 43 \ibrator bells; 63 relays; 39 electric fans; 46 motors; and 15 generators. 
This unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electiic wiring and equipment at all police build- 
ings. 

Connected v.ith the police signal boxes are 60 signal circuits, 557 telephone circuits, and 79 blinker-light 
circuits. 

The Signal Service Unit supervises all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs 

throughout the department. It also maintains 55 headquarters-to-station house telephone circuits; 14 teletype 
writer circuits; 14 radio-wired broadcast circuits; a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank Station of the 
Metropolitan District Police; and the intercommunication units throughout the department. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending December 31, 1965 

(Included in Table XI) 

Payrolls $128,538 97 

Signal and traffic upkeep, repairs and supplies therefor 49,689 35 

Total S178 22S 32 



47 



RADIO MAINTENANCE SECTION 

The Boston Police Department Radio Maintenance Section consists of one sergeant and eleven radio 
technician policemen. It is responsible for the repair and maintenance of al! radio communications equipment 
used for the function of the Boston Police Department. 

Within the last two and one-half years this entire radio communications complex has been completely 
modernized with the latest type of equipment available. This change has been accomplished wdthout any disruption 
of radio service; furthermore, the major part of this transition has been accomplished by naembers of this unit. 
This change had to be made while keeping two radio systems in operation. During this period the technicians had 
to be trained in the techniques of transistor ser\acing. 

During this year specifications were drawn and bids awarded for the addition of a micro-wave system and a 
selective calling system to augment our new radio communications. The original radio system has been upgraded 
by the addition of more frequencies and an administrative frequency for special security functions. It is expected 
that by March i, ig66, these systems will be completely installed and operating. 

It has been proved by the utilization of police personnel for this communication work that the Boston 
Police Department has realized a greater efficiency and a higher caliber of ser\'ice. With policemen so employed 
the department demands a greater degree of discipHne and dedication. These men are available twenty-four hours a 
day and so are subject to call at any time. 

The Boston Police Radio Maintenance Section operates seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day. It 
maintains a radio shop containing facilities and equipment for repair and maintenance of all department communica- 
tions equipment. This shop also installs and repairs all mobile units used by the department. As part of the Radio 
Shop, a completely equipped mobile communications van is garaged here for immediate activation in case of a 
major disaster or disoider. This van is manned by department technicians. The communications van has been 
completeh' equipped with walkie-talkie, mobile telephone, public address system, and all radio equipment necessary 
to replace, if necessary, the headquarters dispatching facilities. This van can be moved to any location and assume 
the dut}' of controlling all mobile units. 

As a result of the power blackout on November 9, r965, the value of this van was established. The com- 
munications van was dispatched to the outer perimeter of the city when it became apparent there was a possibility 
of ccmmunications failure. By means of radio relay to Police Headquarters, the communications van prevented 
such a failure for a period of six hours, after which full power was restored. 

From the lessons learned with this power failure, the Radio Communications Section started to revamp 
the radio system by a change in a receiving site. Also included was the addition of new receivers for station houses, 
equipped with emergency battery supply. 



Following is a list of radio equipment, serviced and maintained by the Radio Maintena 
Remote control consoles .... 
Base station transmitters .... 
Wire broadcast amplifiers .... 
Public address systems .... 
Eight -channel dictaphone tape recorders 
Electronic sirens and public address systems 
Motorcycle transceivers .... 
Mobile transceivers, i so-megacycle band 
Mobile transceivers, 30-megacycle band . 



ace Section: 



10 

2S 

60 

4 

3 

55 

32 

260 



48 

Patrol boat transceivers, 30-megacycle band 

I.M.T.S. mobile radios 

Equipment racks .... 

Base station receivers . 

Microwave transmitters, receivers, a 

Intercom systems 

Dictaphone time recorder . 

Walkie-talkies ... 

Selective calling system for 200 mobile units 

Mobile transceivers, 450-megacycle band 

Patrol boat transceivers, 1 50-megacycle band 

Maiine radio telephone .... 

Radio repair van 



id Multiplex equipment 



3 
3 
2 
60 
8 

3 
I 

40 

I 

16 

3 

I 
I 



In conjunction with this equipment, the unit maintains about a 10 percent spare unit stock. 

Due to the complexities of communications and the advent of new technology, the Communications Sec- 
tion is constantly improving and searching for better and more complete communication methods. This section is 
continually engaged in research for greater citizen protection b}- a fuller use of radio communications. 




J. EDOAR HOOVER, F.B.I. DIRECTOR. 

OFFERS HIS CONGRATULATIONS TO 

COMMISSIONER EDMUND L. McNAMARA ON 

HIS APPOINTMENT AS CHAIRMAN OF 
COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 



49 
PERSONNEL AND TRAINING SECTION 

PERSONNEL SECTION 

The Personnel Section has continued it? program of microfihning inactive personnel files and eliminating 
duplication. This unit also processes the semiannual personnel peiformance evaluation program which determines 
our training requirements for the future. 

In August the Boston Police Clinic was established under the direction of Dr. Robert O'Neill Blackburn, 
who has been designated as police physician for the City of Boston. These new health facilities at the Boston City 
Hos]3ital replace the functions formerly provided by the Department Medical Examiner. 

A complete examination is made of all officers injured in line of duty to deteimine the diagnosis and prog- 
nosis in each case. A thorough examination is made of all officers absent for prolonged periods due to nonservice- 
connected disabilities, to determine their prospects for returning to duty. A careful and comprehensive examination 
is made of all police candidates prior to appointment, including an emotional stability test, to determine their fitness 
for the position of patrolman. The creation of the Boston Police Clinic is a major step towards the eventual goal of 
providing an occupational health control program for every member of the Police Department. 



TRAINING SECTION 

In keeping with our responsibility to provide all of our officers witli the best information and guidance in 
the rapidly changing field of law enforcement, the PoHce Academy over the past year has continued its stepped-up 
program of in-service, specialization, and recruit training. 

In ordei to provide a well-rounded curriculum, guest instructors have been obtained from the public service, 
the judiciar}', and the legal profession. Specialists from within our own department have assisted the Academy 
staff in presenting subjects which have a practical application to everyday police work. Particular emphasis has 
been devoted to the field of ci\'il rights and community relations. 




POLICE OFFICERS DONATE BLOOD 



50 

A monthly Department Training Bulletin is published to keep everj' officer informed of recently enacted 
laws and United States and Massachusetts Supreme Court decisions affecting their police responsibilities. Every 
officer is also provided with a copy of "Training Key," a bimonthly publication of the International Association of 
Chiefs of Police, containing the lastest information on modem police methods and techniques. 

All officers have spent a full day at the outdoor Police Revolver Range on the new combat pistol course. 
This course requires the officers to fire froni various positions simulating conditions which they may be confronted 
with during actual police operations. A total of 150,000 rounds of special range ammunition were processed at the 
Reloading Unit of the Police Academy for use at the Police Revolver Range. All officers have also received special 
training on the subject of civil disturbances and crowd control and on the latest techniques in first aid. 

During the year a total of 904 officers attended a one-week refresher training course at the Police Academy. 
This course was also attended by police officers from surrounding communities, the U. S. Armed Forces Police, the 
State Capitol PoHce, the Boston City Security Force, and City of Boston sanitation officers. Specialized training 
was provided for selected officers under the auspices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Har\'ard University, 
Boston University, Northwestern University, and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Officers were also assigned 
to attend seminars on community relations, narcotics control, modern police methods, and related subjects. 



Licenses Issued by Police Commissioner 



Auctioneer (Class i) 
Auctioneer (other classes) 
Bicycle registrations 
Dog 

Driver (hackney carriage) 
Firearms, dealer in 
Firearms, license to carry 
Gunsmith 
Hackney carriage 
Handcart (common carrier) 
Junk collector 
Junk shopkeeper 



Musician (collective and sound car) 

IMusician itinerant 

Pawnbroker 

Public lodging house 

Secondhand articles 

Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 

Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 

Sightseeing automobile 

Sightseeing driver 

Special police 

Street railway conductor, motorman, and starter 




PRACTICE BRINGS PERFECTION 



INSTRlCTINCi NEW RECRLITS IN USE OF GAS GLN 



51 



BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 




Superintendent 

JOHN T. HOVVLAND 

Chief, Bureau of Inspectional Services 




Deputy Superintendent 
CHARLES J. DEIGNAN 
Internal Affairs Division 



Deputy Superintendent 
EDWARD F. BLAKE 
Intelligence Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

JOHN J. BONNER 

Planning and Research Division 



52 



BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

The responsibility of keeping the executive officer of any large police department as well informed as 
possible in matters dealing with personnel, recruits, organized crime, civic groups, and the updating of all depait- 
ment methods and proceduies belongs to the Bureau of Inspectional Services. 

This bureau is divided into three divisions designed to accomplish specific objectives — the Internal In- 
spection Di\'ision, the Intelligence Division, and the Planning and Research Division. 

INTERNAL INSPECTION DIVISION 

STAFF INSPECTION SECTION 

The Staff Inspection Section is responsible for inspecting the appearance, conduct, and duty performance 
of department personnel and the physical condition of equipment and facilities; the manner in which supervisory 
personnel discharge their supervisory and command responsibilities; the degree of compliance by personnel with 
departmental rules, regulations, orders, and procedures; the making of such other types of field inspections as will 
enable the division to determine the uniformity and efficiency of the department's field operations; and is also 
responsible for conducting the annual department inspection. 

The annual inspection conducted by the Staff Inspection Section coordinates an intensive check on per- 
sonnel, equipment, procedures, physical facilities, and records of each organizational division, section, or unit. In 
addition, the annual inventory of all departmental property is conducted during the inspection. 

All officers are inspected for cleanliness, neatness, general appearance of unifomis, and the possession and 
condition of proper equipment. 

An inspection of all department buildings, facilities, and offices is conducted by the commander in charge 
of the StatT Inspection Section — for cleanliness, neatness, serviceability, and general physical condition. 

Evaluations are made of the inspection results, and an appraisal of the plant and its facilities, to determine 
the feasibility of making some organizational and/or architectural changes, in an effort to update the building and 
to facilitate its operations. 

Inspections of all unit records are conducted to determine completeness, accuiacy, filing, storage, and 
accessibility. An evaluation is made of the department's operating procedures, oiders, and methods, and their 
practical effects in order to secure and assess the reaction to existing or proposed procedures, orders, and methods — 
and to recommend the desirability of changes therein. 



INTERNAL AFFAIRS SECTION 

The Internal Affairs Section investigates all complaints involving conduct of personnel. Department 
policy requires that every complaint, no matter of what importance or justification, be investigated, because only 
by ascertaining the facts can correction, protection, or vindication properly be given the officer. 

This section is charged with making investigations that are thorough, accurate, and fair to the public, to 
the depaitment, and to the persons involved. Facts and fairness are the two points of policj' upon which the In- 
ternal Affairs Section functions. 

When a citizen wshes to make a complaint, he is personally interviewed. If the complaint is of a serious 
nature, an affidavit is taken, then the person or persons complained of are interviewed, and the entire case is reviewed 
by the commanding officer of this section. 

When a complete investigation requires a recommendation, it is sent to the commanding officer of the unit 
involved for his review and recommendations. It is then returned to the Internal Affairs Section for a final review 
and sent through the Chief of the Bureau of Inspectional Services to the Police Commissioner. 

The Internal Affairs Section is also responsible for pre-employment inter\-iewing, background checking, 
and screening of new applicants for the position of recruit patrolman in this department. 



53 



INTELLIGENCE DIVISION 

This division is responsible for keeping the Police Commissioner informed on the status of organized crime 
and the activities of known criminals in the city. 

This division has compiled a comprehensive filing system of the activities of known criminals; organized 
crime; various groups which require police surveillance; and locations which have been used for criminal activity 
in the past, or which are suspected of being used presently for criminal activity. This division receives field inter- 
rogation reports from officers in the several districts who observe and/or who interrogate persons suspected of being 
involved in unlawful activity. These reports are evaluated before being filed, and the information is then forwarded 
to the proper unit or agency. In addition, information received from various sources must be evaluated, and in 
most cases the officers of this division must conduct an investigation to verify the information received. 

The officers assigned to the Intelligence Division are constantly conducting investigations and making 
surveillances in an effort to keep abreasc of the activities and locations of known criminals in Boston and surrounding 
areas. 

In addition to furnishing the various districts and units of this department with information which has 
assisted in the solution of a large number of crimes perpetrated in this city, this division is working constantly with 
other departments and agencies on local, state, and federal levels. In this way we have received information not only 
valuable to officers of this department but also to other agencies, as it assisted them in solving crimes perpetrated in 
their jurisdiction. 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH DIVISION 

Operating in a staff capacity, this division reviews all phases of the administration and operation of the de- 
partment for the possible development of new procedures and the refinement of existing ones. It assists other units 
of the department in formulating plans and programs, and informs Hne units of significant crime trends revealed by 
analysis of reported offenses. The division also maintains charts, maps, and graphs indicating crime operations 
throughout the city, so as to be able to advise the Bureau of Field Operations in the most effective deployment of 
field personnel and equipment. 



DATA PROCESSING SECTION 

This section of the Planning Division prepares departmental statistics on the incidence of crime; arrests; 
clearance of crimes; parking violations; violations of the motor vehicle laws; citations issued for such violations; and 
on the number and type of services rendered both to the public and to other cit}-, state, and federal agencies. 

In the case of out-of-state violators of the parking rules, the Data Processing Section, in cooperation with 
the Boston Mrmicipal Court, has set up a system whereby such \'iolators are contacted by the court at their out-of- 
state addresses, resulting in a significanr increase in the amount of fines collected. 

Records of monies earned by departmental personnel on special details are maintained for the purpose of a 
more equitable distribution of paid details, and a sunmiary of such record is supplied each such officer for income tax 
purposes. 

A departmental personnel file is maintained in this section containing the education, skills, and clothing 
siiies of members of the department. 

Annual, quarterly, and monthly reports are prepared by personnel of this section for distribution throughout 
the department — detailing crime trends in regard to offenses committed, their location, and the time of day and day 
of week of occurrence. This data is vital to departmental administrators for determining the proper deployment of 
officers and equipment in the most efficient and effective manner. 

Accurate and detailed reports are prepared here for distribut ion to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and 
various city and state agencies. 



54 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1965, the Department Medals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded at the annual Ball of the Boston Police Associ- 
ation held at the Boston Gaiden, December 6, 1965, as follows: 

THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 

A DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

AND THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN 

AWARD TO 

DETECTIVE JOHN J. DENNEHY 

OF DETECTIVE BUREAU 

AND DETAILED TO DISTRICT TWO 

On Wednesday, July 7, 1965, an ADT holdup alarm 
was sounded from the Warren Institution for Savings 
branch office located on the concourse of the South 
Station Tenrunal. 

Detective Dennehy, assigned to "bank patrol" 
duty and in the area at the time, observed a group of 
persons who appeared to be pursuing as unidentified 
man in the direction of Kneeland Street. He immedi- 
ately joined in the pursuit to Hudson Stieet, where the 
man suddenly stopped, fired one shot in the direction of 
his pursuers, and then ran into Hudson Street with 
Detective Dennehy in close pursuit. Detective Den- 
nehy drew his service revolver and approached within 
ten feet of the holdup man, announced his office, dis- 
played his badge, and oidered him to halt. When the 
man failed to do so. Detective Dennehy fired a warn- 
ing shot iiito the air. The subject came to an abrupt 
stop and attempted to withdraw what appeared to be 
a nickel-plated revolver from his trouser pocket. 
Detective Dennehy grappled with the man, success- 
fully gained possession of the revolver, and restrained 
the prisoner until the arrival of other officers. 





THE REVEREND ARCHDEACON McCLOSKE^' 

AWARDS DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR TO 

PATROLMEN DANIEL ^\. DOYLE AND 

JOSEPH PAZZANESE 



GOVERNOR JOHN A. \OLPE PRESENTS 

WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR \ ALOR, 

DEPARTMENT AlEDAL OF HONOR, AND 

THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD TO DETECTIVE 

PATROLMAN JOHN J. DENEHY 

The crinoinal was arraigned in Boston Mimicipal 
Court before Judge Elijah Adlow the following morn- 
ing for armed robbery, assault by means of a dangerous 
weapon, milawful possession of a firearm, and was held 
for the Grand Jury. Judge Adlow, in court, com- 
mended Detective Dennehy for his courageous and 
decisive action in bringing about the apprehension of 
this individual. 



DEPARTMENT MEDALS OF HONOR AND 

THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARDS TO 

PATROLMAN DANIEL M. BOYLE 

PATROLMAN JOSEPH PAZZANESE 

DISTRICT TWO 

Patrolman Daniel M. Boyle and Patrolman Joseph 
Pazzanese of District Two were each awarded a De- 
partment IMedal of Honor for meritorious police duty 
performed on March 8, 1965. 

Patrolmen Boyle and Pazzanese, while engaged in 
establishing and maintaining fire lines at a fire at 11 
Revere Street, Boston, observed two persons gesturing 
with flashlights from the fourth floor rear of 57 M\Ttle 
Street, which faced the scene of the fire. In order to 
determine what information these persons were at- 
tempting to conve}^ they both responded to 57 Alyrtle 
Street, a five-story brick dwelling house. Upon enter- 
ing the front door, they found the inner hallway and 
stairs leading to the upper floors on fire and burning 
fiercely. There was no sign of any of the occupants. 



55 



Patrolman Pazzanese, unable to arouse the occu- 
pants of the first floor apartment, broke the apartment 
door and, searching through smoke-filled rooms, found 
and led to safety a woman and a child. In the mean- 
time, Patrolman Boyle alerted the Fiie Department, 
returned to the building and aroused other occupants 
of the building, leading several women down the 
stairway to safety. 

As a result of their exertion and exposure. Patrol- 
men Boyle and Pazzanese collapsed and were removed 
to the Massachusetts General Hospital where, upon 
examination, they were found to be suffering from 
smoke inhalation. 

• ■*■*• ■*• 

Patrolman John V. Keough and Patrolman John P. 
Mullan of District Four were each awarded a Depart- 
ment Aledal of Honor for meritorious police duty 
performed on October 26, 1964. 

Patrolmen Keough and ^Nlullan, assigned to radio 
patrol car duty, observed a woman fall out of a station 
wagon on Washington Street, with the station wagon 
continuing along Wasliington Street at a high rate of 
speed, narrowly missing pedestrians. 

The officers took up pursuit of the car, overtook it at 
West and Tremont Streets, and, as they approached 
the vehicle, the operator menaced the officers with 
drawm revolver. After a brief struggle the officers 
were able co disarm the operator. 





MONSIQNOR JOSEPH LYONS AWARDS 
DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR TO 
PATROLA\AN JOSEPH C. McCARTHV 



RABBI JOSEPH SHUBOW 

AWARDS DEPARTMENT MEDAL 

OF HONOR TO PATROLMEN 

JOHN V. KEOUGH AND 

JOHN P. AtLLLAN 



Investigation revealed that the culprit had entered a 
car on Beach Street in which two women were sitting. 
He stole a handbag from one and forced the other into 
his car. As they drove along Beach Street and were 
about to make a turn into Waslungton Street, the 
woman observed the police car and suddenly leaped 
from the car. 

• * * * • 

Patrolman Joseph C. McCarthy , Jr., District Eleven, 
was awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meri- 
torious police duty performed on July 22, 1965. 

Patrolman McCarthy, while in uniform and en route 
\^a M.B.T.A. for a tour of duty and while in the lower 
level of the Park Street Station, heard a woman 
scream and observed a man lying in the center of the 
train pit with an approaching train about 200 feet 
distant. 

Patrolman McCarthy immediately jumped into the 
train pit and assisted the man to the platform. After 
caring for the man and being assured that he was not 
injured, Officer McCarthy continued on to District 
Eleven for duty. 

It wasn't until a later date, and only through letters 
received from local citizenry, that the department be- 
came aware of the heroic act performed by Pacrolman 
McCarthy. 



56 



Sergeant John V. Dow, Patrolman Matthew J. 
Cotugno, and Patrohnan James M. Pitts, District Six, 
were each awarded a Department Medal of Honor for 
meritorious police duty performed on January i6, 1965. 

About 2:20 p.m., Saturday, January 16, 1965, a 
liquor store ' located at 226 West Broadway, South 
Boston, was held up by an unknown male. Sergeant 
Dow and Patrolmen Cotugno and Pitts were assigned 
to the case and after a thorough investigation ascer- 
tained the identity of the perpetrator. They visited 
many of the known hangouts in the area and finally 
observed him enter a local cafe. Entering the premises 
they observed the culprit standing at the end of the 
hnv. As they approached him, he removed a .32- 
calibre revolver and pointed the gun toward the officers. 
The officers struggled with the robber and finally 
subdued him and placed him undei arrest. 

About 10 p.m. that same date, a U.S. postal mail 
collector visited District Six and reported that two 
unknown inales had aj^proached his mail truck, pointed 
a .45-caIibre revolver at his head, and ordered him to 
turn over the money and ke3's to the mail truck. 
The postal collector struggled with Ihem and managed 
to slam shut the sliding door of the truck. The cul- 
prits immediately fled on foot. 

Sergeant Dow and Patrolmen Cotugno and Pitts, 
informed of the attempted holdup, observed two males 
acting suspiciously in the area. They were taken into 
custody and were later identified by the postal col- 
lector as the two males who had attempted to rob him. 
At the time of the arrest, one of the culprits had a 
.4S-calibre automatic pistol in his possession which 
had been stolen in a previous holdup on that district. 





QEORQE SWARTZ, PRESIDENT OP HUN = 
DRED CLLB, AWARDS DEPARTMENT 
MEDAL OF HONOR TO SERGEANT JOHN 
V. DOW AND PATROLMEN MATTHEW J. 
COTUGNO AND JAMES M. PITTS 



AlETROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMIS= 
SIONER ROBERT MLRPHV AWARDS 
DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR TO 
PATROLMEN WALTER F. WARREN AND 
VINCENT J. O'NEIL 



Patrolman Walter F. Warren and Patrolman Vin- 
cent J. O'Neil of District Nine were each awarded a 
Department Medal of Honor for meritorious police 
duty performed on April 14, 1965. 

While patrolling in their district, Patrolman Warren 
and O'Neil observed smoke and flames leaping from 
the basement of a three-storj^ brick apartment house 
at 109 Elm Hill Avenue. The officers iinmediately 
notified the Police Department dispatcher, then entered 
the building, arousing the occupants, and led thirty 
persons to the safety of the street. 

One of the occupants of the third-floor apartment, a 
65-year-old blind woman, was carried to the street 
by Patrolman Warren, assisted b}- Patrolman O'Neil, 
On reaching the street and making certain the woman 
was being cared for. Patrolman Warren collapsed. 
He was taken to the hospital, treated for smoke in- 
halation, and held for treatment. 



57 



BOSTON 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

aaoll of Jlonor 

ro THOSE MEMBERS WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE 
PROTECTION OF THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS 



EZEKIAL W. HODSON 
ALFRED M. STURDIVANT 
JOHN T. LYNCH 
FREDERICK SCHLEHUBER 
RICHARD J. GALLIVAN 
ALBERT R. PETERSON 
THOMAS J. NORTON 
PATRICK J. CARR 
JOHN J. EARLE 
JOSEPH C. REISER 
CHARLES E. DEININGER 
ADOLPH F. BUTTERMAN 
WILLIAM G. CLANCY 
WARD M. BRAY 
ANDREW B. CUNEO 
DANIEL J. McSHANE 
PETER P. OGINSKIS 
JOSEPH E. GONYA 
ALBERT MOTRONI 
BENJAMIN ALEXANDER 
FRANK J. COMEAU 
HARRIS B. McINNES 
HERBERT D. ALLEN 
EDWARD 0. BUTTERS 
JAMES J. TROY 
FRANKLIN B. DREYER 



FREDERICK W. BARTLETT 
JOSEPH L. CAVAGNARO 
WILLIAM L. ABBOTT 
JOHN P. M. WOLFE 
GEORGE J. HANLEY 
JAMES T. MALLOY 
JAMES BRICKLEY 
DANIEL A. McCALLUM 
JAMES D. HUGHES 
JAMES B. ROCHE 
LAURENCE V. SHERIDAN 
WALTER BAXTER 
EDWARD J. KELLEY 
JOHN H. MANNING 
THOMAS A. DAVIS 
PAUL J. MURNANE 
PATRICK C. GANNON 
JAMES G. McCANN, JR. 
STEPHEN P. HARRIGAN 
FRANK B. CALLAHAN 
WILLIAM F. HEALY 
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY 
JOHN J. GALLAGHER 
JAMES B. O'LEARY 
GEORGE J. HOLMES 



58 



196S 



y. 



1966 



AVNA 



CHAPTER PLAN 

OF IVIERIT 




CONFERRED VPON THE EMPLOYEES OF 



FOR INCREASED AND A^VE AVERAGE SUPPORT OF THE 
1965 -B6 MASSACHUSETTS BAY UNITED FUND CAMPAIGN 



CHrj. 




<2±.J6?fi^ 



afi..-! 



Qbio.; 



MASSACHUSETTS BAY 



vw.t.uw* *\ ca-Anj<A ■ 




'^'mf^ 



UNITED FUND AWARD 









LJiiidren i l^ancer I'^eiearcn Jounaalii 
i^erliticate of i fieri t 

awaraea to 

'6oston PoUcc T\2pa3:rm»?nt 

-jror vJulsttmAing f-^artUipation anj ^^trnirmtwnt i 




JIA\MV FLND AWARD 



59 




THE HUNDRED CLUB 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the year 1959 a group of philanthropic businessmen formed an organization known as "The 
Hundred Club of Massachusetts. " 

The prime function of this organization is to provide financial assistance to the widows and dependents 
of policemen and firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty. 

The Boston Police Department expresses its gratitude and appreciation to ''The Hundred Club" for the 
invaluable assistance rendered to the families of police officers who have given their lives in the service of this 
communitv. 



Miscellaneous Business 





1963 


1964 


1965 


Abandoned children cared for . . 


44 


13'^ 


112 


Buildings found open and made secure 












1,250 


82s 


851 


Dangerous buildings reported 














43 


29 


43 


Dangerous chimneys reported 














8 


n 


5 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 














1,370 


1,033 


1,053 


Defective drains and vaults reported 














2 


— 


• — 


Defective fire alarms and clocks repoited 














33 


4 


I 


Defective gas pipes reported 














14 


5 


16 


Defective hydrants reported 














3 


5 


6 


Defective sewers reported 














6 


7 


17 


Defective street lights reported 














78 


73 


116 


Defective streets and walks reported 














325 


238 


357 


Defective water pipes reported . 














14 


46 


25 


Fire alarms given 












15,431 


14,306 


14,282 


Fire extinguished 










3,010 


2,616 


3,245 


Insane persons taken in charge . 










1,389 


1,296 


1,217 


Lost children restored 










828 


801 


672 


Number of persons committed to bail 












2,535 


2,354 


2,565 


Persons rescued from drowning . 














37 


19 


II 


Sick and injured persons assisted 














24,970 


25,783 


26,632 


Street obstructions removed 














29 


49 


40 


Water running to waste reported 














163 


56 


144 


Barrier truck runs .... 
















— 


30 


Emergency service runs 














— 


— 


543 


Fire alarms attended by patrol boats 














~ 


~ 


291 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1965 



62 



TABLE I — Total Numbe.- of Persons Arrested by Districts and Units for AM Types of Offenses, Covering Both 
Pending and Completed Cases, for the Year Ending December .51, 1965 



Districts 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


District One 


2,S49 


330 


2,879 


District Two 


















3-581 


682 


4,263 


District Three 


















1,886 


153 


2,039 


District Four 


















19.S39 


2,662 


22,501 


District Five 


















3,812 


694 


4,506 


District Six . 


















4,379 


285 


4,664 


District Seven 


















1,156 


46 


1,202 


District Eight 


















3 




3 


District Nine 


















7,481 


1,529 


9,010 


District Ten 


















2,248 


240 


2,48s 


District Eleven 


















2,480 


250 


2,730 


District Thirteen 
















1,386 


205 


1,591 


District Fourteen 
















1,294 


67 


1,361 


District Fifteen . 
















2,226 


147 


2,373 


Traffic Division . 
















31,777 


6,911 


38,688 


Headquarters 
















1,087 


511 


1,598 


Tactical Patrol Force 














741 


61 


802 


Totals 


87,925 


14,773 


102,698 



Does not iiirludf other arrests registered at the sevenil poUce districts. 



TABLE II — Major Offenses (Not Arrests), Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B.I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the Year Ending December 31, 1965 











Numl:>er of Offenses 






Offenses 
Reported 


Un- 
founded 


Actual 
Offenses 


Cleared 1 


y Arrests 


Not 
Cleared 


Classification of Offenses 


Total 
Offenses 


By Arrests 
of Persons 










C'lenred 


Under 18 




I. Criminal homicide 














(0) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 


58 


I 


57 


45 


2 


12 


(6) Manslaughter by negligence 


59 


16 


43 


33 


4 


10 


2. Forcible rape total 


84 


7 


77 


55 


7 


22 


(a) Rape by force 


60 


6 


54 


39 


4 


15 


(6) Assault to rape — attempt 


24 


I 


23 


16 


3 


7 


3. Robbery total 


1,131 


22 


I,IOQ 


3 So 


74 


729 


(a) Armed — any weapon . . . . 


558 


12 


540 


184 


26 


362 


(6) Strong arm — no weapon . . , . 


573 


10 


56.? 


iq6 


48 


367 


4. Assault total 


3,858 


22 


3,836 


1,620 


232 


2,2l6 


(a) Gun 


105 


I 


104 


72 


I 


32 


(6) Knife or cutting instrument 


396 


4 


392 


282 


35 


lie 


(c) Other dangerous weapon . . . . 


333 


3 


330 


254 


56 


76 


(d) Hands, fists, feet — aggravated 


105 


I 


104 


75 


10 


20 


(e) Other assaults — not aggravated 


2,910 


13 


2,Qo6 


937 


130 


1,969 


5. Burglary total 


4,7iS 


37 


4,681 


i,2og 


424 


3,472 


(a) Forcible entry 


3,865 


21 


3,844 


1,033 


368 


2,811 


(6) Unlawful entry — no force . . . . 


732 


II 


721 


no 


28 


611 


(c) Attempt forcible entry . . . , 


121 


5 


116 


66 


2S 


50 


6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 














(a) $50 over in value 


2,832 


57 


2,775 


502 


154 


2,183 


(6) Under $50 in value .... 


3,525 


75 


3,450 


1,348 


707 


2,102 


7. Auto theft 


14,130 


1,226 


12,913 


3,172 


2,561 


9,741 


Totals 


30,404 


1,463 


28,941 


8,454 


4,165 


20,487 



63 



TABLE III — Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1965 



Type of Property 



Value of Property Stolen in Boston 



Stolen 



Reeo\ere(l 



Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous 


$586,040 00 

367,694 00 

407,818 00 

140,718 00 

6,504>o5o 00 

1,461,894 00 


-^39,746 00 
4,So6 00 

75.550 00 

16,342 00 

5,868,435 00 

117,867 00 


Totals 


$9,468,214 00 


$6,122,746 00 



TABLE IV — Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table II and Value of Property Stolen by Type of Offense 

for the Year Ending December 31, 1065 



Classification of Offenses 



Number of Actual 
Offenses 



\"alue of Property 
Stolen 



Robber?' 

(a) Highway (streets. aUey. etc.) 

(6) Commercial house (not c, d, f) . 

(e) Gas or service station . 

(.d) Chain store . . . . _ . 

(e) Residence (anywhere on premises) 

(/) Bank 

(g) Miscellaneous .... 

Total — robbery . 

Burglary — breaking or entering:, 
(a) Residence (dwelling) 

(1) Night .... 

(2) Day 

(&) Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(1) Night .... 

(2) Day 

Total — burglary 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 
(a) $50 and over .... 

(6) $5 to S50 

(c) Under $5 

Total — larceny . 

Auto theft: 

(a) Jov-riding 

(6) AU other 

Total — auto theft 

Grand Total .... 



656 
219 
25 
24 
59 
23 
103 



SS7 
1.673 



2.303 
148 



4,681 



2,-75 

2,577 

873 



6,225 



10.005 
2.908 



544.666 00 

144.5 II 00 

2,483 00 

2,019 00 

17.084 00 

16.487 00 

15,582 00 



?242.762 00 



i'2ls.lS4 00 
658,286 00 



866.761 00 

40,52s 00 



S1.7S0.726 00 



$874,512 00 

62,236 00 
3,928 00 



?040,676 00 



$5,043,234 00 
1,461,316 00 



S6. 504. 550 00 



^9.468. 714 00 



TABLE V — Additional Anal\sis of Larcen\ and .Auto Theft for the Year Ending December 31, 1965 



-N'umber of Actual 
Offeuse-s 



nf Prnpi-rtx' 



Nature of Larcenies: 



(a) 
lb) 
ic) 
id) 
ie) 
if) 
(S) 
(ft) 
(i) 



Pocket picking 

Purse snatching ....... 

Shoplifting . 

From autos (not accessories) .... 

Auto accessories 

Bicycles 

From buildings (not shoplifting) 

From any coin-operated machines (not in a building) 

Ail Other 



Total — larcenies 



Automobiles Recovered: 

(a) Number stolen locally and recovered locally 
(6) Number stolen locally and recovered outside 
{c) Total locally stolen autos recovered 
(d) Number stolen out of town, recovered locally 



136 
751 
727 

1.371 
693 
272 

1. 014 

is 

1,226 



6.225 



516,870 00 
23.174 00 
25.209 00 

363.594 00 
64,477 00 
10,083 00 

220,414 00 
631 00 

216,224 00 



5940,676 00 



Actual Offense^ 



10.210 

I.817 
12.027 

I.S96 



64 



TABLE VI Number of Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests Not the Number of Charges — for the Year Ending 

December .51, lOd.S 



Classification of Offenses 



Persons Charged by 
THE Police 



Charged 



Arrested 



Summoned 



Persons Found 
Guilty 



Of Offense 
Charged 



Of Lesser 
Offense 



8. 

0. 
lo. 
II. 

12. 

I.v 
14. 

15- 
16. 

17- 
iS. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23- 
24. 

25- 

26. 
28. 
29. 



Part I Classes 
Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 
Burglary breaking or entering 
Larceny - theft (except auto cheft) 
Auto theft 



Total, Part I Classes 

Part II Classes 
Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting . 

Fiauds 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, recei\ang, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons: carr\dng, possessing, etc. 
Prostitution and commercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except 2 and 16) 
Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness . 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses . 

Parking violations . 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws (except 21 and 28) 

Total, Part II Classes 

CiRAXn TOTAI 



65 

25 

50 

392 

616 

874 

1,647 

956 



4. '12:; 



995 

22 

92 

216 

8 

119 

202 

158 

643 

245 

210 

414 

993 
169 

78 
19,838 

113 
48 

1,582 
52,914 
16,221 



05.2S0 



65 

23 

49 

370 

576 

793 
,422 
861 



4.1511 



875 
19 
90 



171 
152 
64? 
222 
200 
400 
922 
166 

45 
19,827 

98 
45 

1,253 

I -3 27 
1,495 



28.2: 



2 
I 

22 
40 
81 
225 
95 



466 



120 

3 

2 

28 

M 

31 
6 
I 

23 
10 

14 
71 
3 
33 
II 

15 



51,587 
14,726 



67,030 



09,(105 



32,409 



07,490 



31 
3 

15 
180 
264 

395 
809 

319 



2,016 



517 

7 

73 

138 

5 

67 

100 

no 

505 
150 
145 
321 
756 
108 

54 

19,463 

67 

36 
756 

50,905 

15,605 



80. 888 



i)i,i)04 



12 

13 

3 

60 

54 
61 
21 
28 



252 



42 

2 

4 



4 

IC 
2 

3 
7 
2 

9 

9 

22 

2 



145 



65 



TABLE VII— Arrests for the Year Ending December 31, 1965 











On 


Without 


Summoned 


Nature of Offense 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


Warrants 


Warrants 


by the 
Court 


Murder and iionnegligent manslaughter . . . . 


54 


II 


65 


25 


40 


_ 


Negligent manslaughter 








23 


2 


25 


5 


18 


2 


Rape 








SO 


— 


50 


II 


38 


I 


Robbery 








365 


27 


392 


63 


307 


22 


Aggravated assault .... 








535 


81 


616 


194 


382 


40 


Burglary — breaking and entering 








859 


15 


874 


107 


686 


81 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) . 








1,179 


468 


1,647 


262 


1,160 


225 


Auto theft 








943 


13 


956 


79 


782 


95 


Other assaults 








QIC 


S5 


995 


548 


327 


120 


Arson 








19 


3 


22 


4 


IS 


3 


Forgery and counterfeiting . 








6q 


23 


92 


26 


64 


2 


Frauds 








178 


38 


216 


139 


49 


28 


Embezzlement 








6 


2 


8 


I 


7 


— 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 








1 12 


7 


iig 


32 


73 


14 


Vandalism 








188 


14 


202 


52 


119 


31 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. . 








152 


6 


158 


25 


127 


6 


Protsitution and commercialized vice 








82 


561 


643 


55 


587 


I 


Se.x offenses (except rape and prostitution' 








20S 


37 


245 


69 


153 


23 


Narcotic drug laws .... 








182 


28 


210 


62 


138 


10 


Gambling 










381 


33 


414 


294 


106 


14 


Offenses against family and children 










954 


39 


993 


802 


120 


71 


Dri\'ing while intoxicated 










162 


7 


160 


II 


155 


3 












66 


12 




13 


32 


33 


Drunkenness 










18,755 


1,083 


19,838 


54 


19,773 


II 


Disorderly conduct 










85 


28 


113 





89 


15 


Vagrancy 










36 


12 


48 


4 


41 


3 


All other offenses .... 










1,269 


313 


1,582 


674 


579 


329 


Parking violations 










42,672 


10,242 


52-914 


1,195 


132 


51,587 


Traffic violations (except 21 and 28) 










15,097 


1,124 


16,221 


657 


838 


14,726 


Suspicion 










537 


275 


S12 


— 


812 


— 


Arrests for other departments 


1,797 


184 


1,981 


1,638 


337 


6 


Totals 










87,925 


14.773 


102,698 


7,110 


28,086 


67,502 






•5 

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67 



68 



TABLE X — Showing the Number of Licenses of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the Amount of Money Received from 
All Sources and Paid to the City Collector = Treasurer During the Year F.nding December 31, l9ft.S 



CLASS OF LICENSE 






"13 C 



X C 



2 & 5 

c ''■■- 
-.- — i o 



■X 3 



X 3; 



Amount 



Auctioneer (Class I) . 
Auctioneer (other classes) 
Bicycle registrations . 
Dog . . ... 
Driver (hackney carnage) 
Firearms, dealer in 
Firearms, license to carry 
Firearms, permit to purchase . 

Gunsmith 

Hackney carriage (and regrants) 
Hackney carriage (photos) 
Handcart (common carrier) 
Junk collector .... 
Junk shopkeeper .... 
Musician (collective and sound car) 
Musician (itinerant) . 

Pawnbroker 

Public lodging house . 
Secondhand articles 
Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 
Shotguns and rifles, dealer in . 
Sightseeing automobile 
Sightseeing driver 
Special police .... 
Street railway, conductor, motorman 

starter 
Auto towing charges . 
Auto storage fees 
Copies of licenses and replacement 

tags 

Copies of police reports 
Damage to police property 
Identification cards . 
Reimbursements .... 
Sale of lost, stolen, and abandoned 



erty 



Sale of pawnbroker and secondhand 

tides report blanks . 
Sunday permits .... 
Use of police property 



and 



prop 
ar 



Totals 

Credit by City Collector- Treasurer for 
money received for damage to police 
property and telephone commissions . 



Grand Total , 



66 



1,417 


1.417 


3.542 


13.521 


6.795 


6,638 


14 


14 


1,604 


1,422 


23 


21 


6 


6 


i.Qig 


1.919 


■> 


2 


4.=i 


43 


3« 


38 


3 


3 


2 


2 


34 


34 


4 


— 


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321 


210 


20S 


/ 


7 


17 


17 


24 


24 


1,201 


932 



27.321 



64 



13 



26,673 



157 
167 



8 



261 



26 



302 



335 



31 



— 


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— 


175 00 


-15 


354 25 


34.^ 


30,996 00 


701 


13,276 00 


— 


350 00 


^ 


7.105 00 


— 


105 00 


— 


30 00 


38 


16.913 00 




7,016 00 


— 


4 00 


— 


648 00 


— 


2,875 00 


— 


26 00 


— 


20 00 


I 


1.700 00 


— 


9,830 00 


— 


10,400 00 


— 


175 00 


— 


1,292 00 


— 


50 00 


— 


5.070 00 


— 


13 00 


— 


47,312 00 


— 


7.243 IS 


— 


343 25 


— 


36,270 00 


— 


1.729 74 


— 


4.454 00 


— 


778 62 


— 


3.350 70 


— 


342 00 


— 


5.392 00 


— 


1,655 00 


1. 1 33 


»2I7,933 71 



16,684 35 



5234,618 06 



TABLE XI —Financial Statement for the Near Ending December 31, 1965 



69 



EXPENDITURES 
Group i Personal Services: 

10 Permanent employees §18,997,517 63 

11 Temporary employees 85,706 00 

12 Overtime 642,401 80 

Group 2 Contractual Services: 

21 Communications $76,121 29 

22 Light, heat and power 66,083 48 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings and structures 53,088 03 

27 Repairs and ser\-icing of equipment .... 87,324 46 

28 Transportation of persons 25,632 96 

29 Miscellaneous contractual service I73t883 98 

Group 3 Supplies and Materials: 

30 Automotive §175,511 18 

32 Food 12,767 97 

33 Heating 34.454 42 

34 Household 10,542 26 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 738 27 

36 Office 52.464 71 

39 Miscellaneous 174,118 18 

Group 4 Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 

Group 5 Equipment 

Total 

Special Items (not included in Police Department appropriation): 

6-63-85-723 Loan for Remodeling and Reconstruction on Making Repairs to Public 
Buildings 



$19,725,625 43 



482,134 20 



460,596 99 

91.833 48 

337,800 40 

■097-990 5" 

S47.547 57 



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71 



72 

TABLE XIII Members of Police Force on December. ?l, IQftS, Who Were Appointed in the Year Indicated 















<U 








•n 


w 
















C 


C 




•0 
c 




■ht 


":! 






<u 


<D 






'O 




S "^ 




Date of 
Appointment 


•0 
c 
1) 


•a 
c 


■r. 


S 5 P 


1^ P 


Secoi 
ives 


r3 <i> 






c 




C 


n c-^ 


c c-- 




ii 




2- 




C 


<" «J 

"2 "^ OJ 
OJ OJ OJ 


2So 


'irst-, 
nd Tl 








■r. 


— -r. 





■ — ■ ^-. "^ 


cc x — 


— -: -^ 


' ' ' ' 




1922 





— 





2 


I 


I 





4 


1924 












— 


— 


I 


I 


— 


— 





2 


1925 












— 


— 





— 


— 


— 


I 


I 


1926 












— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


I 


4 


7 


1927 












— ■ 


— 


— 


2 


I 


— 


5 


8 


1928 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


6 


1929 












— 


I 


— 


5 


II 


3 


17 


37 


1930 












— 


— 


I 


2 


I 


— 


2 


6 


1931 












— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


I 


3 


19.57 












■ - 


2 


4 


12 


3.^ 


13 


4.T 


109 


1940 












3 


3 


5 


13 


2 lis 


5 


7,2 


89 


1941 












— 


— 


— 


5 


7 


.5 


25 


42 


1942 












— 


3 


2 


10 


34 


16 


51 


116 


1943 












— 


— 


2 


.5 


8 


8 


23 


46 


1944 












— 


— 


2 


3 


9 


14 


54 


82 


1945 












— 


— 


I 


I 


I 


4 


23 


30 


1946 












— 


— 


4 


II 


23 


22 


"7 


177 


1947 












— 


— 


— 


4 


23 


14 


103 


144 


1948 












— 


— 


— 


7 


17 


I 


89 


114 


1949 












— 


— 


— 


— 


1 1 


6 


94 


III 


1950 












— 


— 


— 


2 


15 


10 


119 


146 


1951 












— 


— 


— 


— 


23 


■7 


213 


253 


1952 












— 


— 


— 


— 


I 


7 


63 


71 


1953 












— 


— 


— 


— ■ 


3 


7 


86 


96 


1954 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


II 


84 


95 


1955 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


/ 


88 


95 


I95f> 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


no 


112 


1957 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


109 


III 


195S 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


■\=i 


85 


1959 












— • 


— 


— 


— • 


— 


— 


34 


34 


i960 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


50 


1961 















— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


75 


75 


1963 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


65 


65 


1964 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


73 


73 


1 


"OTALS 


3 


9 


24 


8.S 


252 


176 


1.946 


2.495 



73 



TABLE XIV — Members of Police Force on December 31, 1965. Who Were Bom in the Year Indicated 





<f: 


yi 








0) 








^ 






■g 




,- 


— 




Date of Birth 


c 


s 

0* 






c 


y QJ 














to rt > 


*j *j > 


aj.b ■> 


<a p 






c 
5 

5* 

'Si 







Lieuten 
Lieuten 
Detecti 


Sergean 
Sergean 
Detecti 


First, S 
and Th 
Detecti 


3 

1^ 





189(1 














1 


i 


1897 


— 


— 


I 


I 


— 


— 


I 


3 


1898 












— 


— 


I 


I 


I 


— 


4 


7 


1899 












— 


— 


— 


I 


I 


I 


I 


4 


1900 












— 


— 


— 


I 


— ■ 


— 


4 


5 


1901 












— 


— 


I 


— 


5 


4 


18 


29 


1902 












— 


— 


— 


2 


5 




10 


17 


1903 












— 


I 


I 


4 


6 


— 


4 


16 


1904 












— 


I 


— 


2 


4 


I 


10 


18 


1905 












— 


— 


I 


5 


6 


5 


6 


23 


1906 












— 


— 


I 




6 


4 


10 


21 


1907 












— 


I 


2 


I 


6 


3 


16 


29 


1908 












— 


— 


— 


2 


13 


4 


17 


36 


1909 












— 


— 


— 


6 


6 


6 


26 


44 


1910 












— 


— 


1 


4 


U 


6 


19 


44 


1911 












— 


— 


— 


2 


9 


I 


23 


35 


1912 












2 


— 


— 


3 


10 


9 


28 


52 


1913 












— 


I 


2 


6 


12 


4 


22 


47 


1914 












I 


I 


-> 


2 


4 


6 


34 


50 


1915 












— 


I 


I 


6 


II 


8 


34 


61 


1916 












— 


2 


4 


6 


12 


7 


51 


82 


1917 












— 


— 


2 


6 


7 


12 


59 


86 


1918 












— 


— 


I 


3 


8 


6 


82 


100 


1919 












— 


I 


I 


I 


10 


10 


73 


96 


1920 












— 


— 


I 


2 


10 


1 


75 


95 


192 1 












— 


— 


— 


3 


12 


8 


69 


92 


1922 












— 


— 


I 


2 


10 


s 


106 


127 


1923 












— 


— 


— 


4 


II 


7 


97 


119 


1924 












— 


— 


— 


I 


9 


9 


96 


115 


1925 












— 


— 


— 


2 


II 


10 


92 


115 


1926 












— 


— 


— 


3 


12 


10 


112 


137 


1927 












— 


— 


— 


I 


12 


7 


128 


1 48 


1928 












— 


— ■ 


— 


2 


5 




108 


122 


1929 












— 


— 


— 


— 


3 




69 


73 


1930 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




81 


82 


1931 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




73 


74 


1932 . 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




6<, 


70 


1933 










— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




53 


54 


1934 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


48 


48 


1935 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


I 


35 


36 


1936 












— 


— 


-^ 


— 


— 


— 


29 


29 


1937 ■ 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


25 


25 


1938 . 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


13 


1939 • 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


11 


II 


1940 . 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


4 


4 


TOTAL'; 


', 


9 


24 


85 


-5- 


176 


1 .1146 


2,495 



Average Age 



43 29 



74 



TABLE XIII — Members of Department Retired During the Year Ending December 31, 1965, Olving Age at 
the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each 





Cause of 


Age at Time 


Years of 


Name 


Retirement 


^'f Rc-irement 


Service 


Beringer, Franci*; C. (3) .... 


Incapacitated 


64 


39 


Butler, Marguerite J. (4) 










Age . _ . 












70 


17 


Coe, Arthur B. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












58 


- / 


Cohen, William A. (5) . 










30 Years' Service 












69 


40 


Condrick, Charle? R. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












69 


39 


Cortin, William H. (3) . 










Age . 












65 


38 


Creedon. William ]. (3) 










Age . . . 












65 


37 


Cronin, Daniel C. (4) ■ 










Incapacitated 












63 


15 


Cummings, Martin C. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












69 


41 


Devlin, Leo V. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












65 


39 


Downed, John J. (3) 










Age . 












65 


35 


Dovle, John J. (3) . 










Age . _ . . 












65 


37 


Fav, Mark A. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












65 


37 


Fitzpatrick. Edward J. (3) 










Age . 












65 


39 


Fraher, Arthur V. (5) . 










30 Years' Service 












64 


39 


Fullerton, WiUiam F. (3) 










Age . 












65 


38 


Hackett, William D. (3) 










Age . . . 












61 


35 


Hallisey, James J. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












47 


15 


Harnden, George J- (3) • 










Age . 












64 


38 


Kelley, Thomas j! (3) . 










Incapacitated 












38 


14 


Kennedy, Thomas F. (3) 










Age . 












65 


39 


Kenney, George L. (3) . 










Age . . . 












65 


38 


Logan,' Edward P. (3) • 










Age . 












65 


39 


Lundv, Joseph (3) . 










Age . . . 












65 


39 


Lvdon, William F. (3) . 










Age . . . 












63 


34 


MacKinnon, Donald F. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












65 


38 


Magner, Leo F. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












69 


39 


McCarthy, John F. (3) . 










Age . 












64 


36 


Mclnnis, William D. (7) 










20 Y'ears' Service 












69 


25 


McLaughUn, Russell J. (3) 










Incapacitated 












43 


19 


McStravick, Charles A. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












64 


39 


Miller, John V. (3) 










Age . . . 












65 


41 


Morrison, Hugh R. (5) . 










30 Years' Service 












64 


38 


Mullen, Francis P. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












54 


25 


Mundy, Thomas J. (3) . 










Age. . . 












70 


40 


Nevins, Maitin J. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












64 


38 


O'Brien, WiUiam L. {3) 










Age . . . 












62 


35 


O'Rourke, Joseph J. (3) 










Incapacitated 












40 


14 


Pineau, Joseph E. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












42 


14 


Quinlan, Francis E. (3) . 










Age . . . 












64 


38 


Ouinn, Tames J. (3) 










Age . . . 












65 


38 


Ridge, John M. (3) 










Incapacitated 












38 


14 


Riordan, Denis J. (3) 










Incapacitated 












65 


39 


Shea, Charles J. (3) 










Age . . . 












65 


37 


Shea, William A. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












69 


39 


Slattery, John J., Jr. (5) 










30 Years' Service 












54 


27 


Strittmatter, Philip X. (3) 










Incapacitated 












30 


4 


Sullivan, Francis A. (3) 










Incapacitated 












38 


16 


Sullivan, John X. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












48 


22 


Vettori, Alfred C. (3) . 










Incapacitated 












51 


18 


Whalen, Henrj- (5) 










30 Years' Service 












68 


39 


White, John J. (3) . 










Age . . . 












65 


38 


Winters, William (3) 


Age 


65 


35 



(,3) Retireil under .State-Boston Retirement System. 

(4) Civilians retired under State-Boston Retirement System. 

(5) Retired Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58. 

(7) Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 490, Acts of 1961. 



75 



TABLE XVI — List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the Year Ending Dceember 31, 1965 



Rank 


Name 


District, Division, 
or Unit 


Date of Death 


Sergeant .... 
First-Grade Detective 


Richard T- Barrett 
Edward T. Weiler 


2 

Criminal Investiga- 
tion Division de- 
tailed to District 5 


December 3, 1965 
August I, 1965 


Third-Grade Detective . 


Robert Murphy 


Criminal Investiga- 
tion Division de- 
tailed to District 
Attorney's Office 


April 14, 1965 


Patrolman 


George F. Adams 


Traffic Division 


April 15, 1965 


Patrolman 


James F. Curran 


Traffic Division 


August 10, 1965 


Patrolman 


Philip G. Cusack 


14 


February 11, 1965 


Patrolman 


Joseph F. Hourihan 


13 


January 2, 1965 


Patrolman 


Terence A. Koen 


Traffic Division 


August 29, 1965 


Patrolman 


Lawrence M. Scale 


II 


November 14, 1965 


Patrolman 


John R. Sheedy 


14 


August 6, 1965 


Patrolman 


Ralph E. Sullivan 


Property Clerk's 
Office 


February 7, 1965 



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