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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
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POLICE 



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City of Boston 
Administrative Services Department 
Printing c^^^d Section 



D352.2 M4B6 



SIXTY-FIRST 



[)etioit P«W«t »■*••'» 



ANNUAL 




REPORT 



OF THE 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 




CITY OF 




BOSTON 



1966 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT NO. 28—1967 



©ETROJT PU8LIC LiBPARY 



[DOCUMENT — NO. 28] 



Sixty-first Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1966 




FRONT COVER 

The front-cover montage symbolizes the protection afforded 
the citizens of our cit\-. Whether on land or water, the Boston 
Police Department has a vehicle \Yhich can reach the scene of 
a crime or render assistance to the sick or injured in a very 
short time. 

The police boats cruise the harbor: cars are on constant 
district patrol; motorcycles are busy with road-law violators; 
scooters reach sections of the city which are inaccessible to 
other vehicles: and police horses patrol parks and wooded areas. 

The little boy in the center is printing a message of "im- 
portance'' to the people in our city. 

Front cover by Patrolman Joseph P. Carr. 



PHOTO CREDITS 

The Boston Globe 

The Boston Herald-Traveler 

The Boston Record-American-Sunday Advertiser 

The Boston Police Department 



9 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter to the Mayor .... 
Mayor's Letter . . . . 

Table of Organisation 
The Department 

The Police Force ... 

Employees of the Department 
Distribution and Changes 
Office of the Police Commissioner 

Advisory Board 

Administrative Assistant-Secretary 
Bureau of Field Operations . 
Tactical Patrol Force 
Patrol Divisions (and Harbor Police) 
City Prison .... 

Night Tour of Duty .... 

Traffic Division 

Auxiliary School Patrol 
Criminal Investigation Division 
Crime Laboratory ... 
Youth Aid Section . 
" Operation Sixteen " 
Bureau of General Services . 
Central Services Division . 
Building Maintenance Section 
Property Clerk Section . 

Lost and Found Property 
Automotive Miantenance Section 
Licenses Issued by the Police Commissioner 
Licensing Section .... 
Hackney Carriages 
Records and Communications Division 
Central Complaint Section . 
Central Records Section 

Missing Persons .... 
Multilith and Mimeograph Unit 
Identification Section 
Radio Maintenance Section . 
Signal Service Section 
Personnel and Training Division 
Personnel Section .... 
Training Section .... 
Bureau of Inspectional Services 

Staff and Community Affairs Division 
Staff Inspection Section 



Page 
4 

5 
6 

7 
7 
7 
7 

8 
8 

Q 
lO 

II 
II 

12 

13 
14 
14 

15 
i6 

17 
17 
18 
19 
19 
19 
20 
20 
21 
21 
21 
22 
22 

23 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
28 
28-29 
30 
31 
31 



Community and Internal Affairs Section 
Criminal Intelligence Section 
Planning and Research Di\asion 
Data Processing Section 
Planning and Research Section 
Map of Boston Divided Into Police Districts 

Recipients of Awards 

Walter Scott Medal for Valor . 
Department Medals of Honor . 
Thomas F. Sullivan Awards 

Boston Police Department Roll of Honor . 

The Hundred Club 

^Miscellaneous Business .... 

Ambulance Services for 1066 

Statistical Tables 



Table I. 

Table II. 

Table III. 

Table IV. 

Table V. 

Table VI. 

Table VII. 
Table VIII. 

Table IX. 
Table X. 
Table XI. 
Table XII. 

Table XIII. 



Table XIV. 



Table XV. 



Number of Arrests by Dis- 
tricts .... 

Major Offenses Reported to 
FBI ... . 

Analysis of Property Con 
nected With Offenses . 

Breakdown of Offenses and 
Value of Property Stolen 

Additional Analysis of Lar- 
ceny and Auto Theft . 

Number of Individuals Ar- 
rested 

Arrests .... 

Age and Sex of Persons Ar 
rested .... 

Report of Accidents 

Licenses of All Classes Issued 

Financial Statement 

Male and Female Residents 
Listed .... 

Members of Police Force Ap- 
pointed in the Year Indi- 
cated 

Members of the Department 
Retired in iq66 

List of Police Ofiicers in Ac- 
tive Service who Died Dur- 
ing the Year . . . . 



Page 

32 
32 
32 
32 
33 
34 
35 
35 
35-37 
35-37 

3S 
39 
39 

40 

41 
42 
42 

43 

43 

43 

44 
45 

46 

47 
48 

49 

50-51 

52 
53 

54 



HEADQUARTERS 

154 BERKELEY STREET 




CITY OF BOSTON 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Edmund U. McNamara 
police commissioner 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



January 1, 1967. 
Hon. John F. Collins, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1961, Chapter 3, Section 25, I am submitting herewith the annual 
report of the Boston Police Department for the year ending December 
31. 1966. 

This report outlines the activities of the department and 
its members during the period and reflects the changes and improve- 
ments made in our methods and procedures in a continuing effort to 
provide the highest level of safety, security, and service for the 
citizens of this community. 

In our constant effort to combat those crimes which occur 
during the nighttime hours, we have added more men and equipment to 
our Tactical Patrol Force. This mobile, flexible force is assigned 
for duty during periods of highest crime incidence, and now has a 
plainclothes and detective squad, in addition to the uniformed, 
canine, and mounted units. 

During 1966 this department inaugurated a city-wide com- 
munity relations program under the Community and Internal Affairs 

Division. Its primary purpose is to develop 
immediate and long-range plans for police- 
community relations programs on a neighborhood 
basis. The program has been designed to set 
up individual workshops on each of the thir- 
teen police districts, with the district 
commander acting as chairman of his district 
workshop. Each district commander will there- 
by be in touch with civic, religious, 
educational, and social community leaders who 
wish to discuss local problems. 

I take this opportunity to express 
my appreciation to the members of the Boston 
Police Department for their loyalty, dedi- 
cation to duty, and the efficient manner in 
which they have carried out their various 
assignments. 

I also wish to thank you and your 
office for the excellent assistance and co- 
operation extended to me and the department 
during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted. 




POLICE COMMISSIONER 




JOHN F. COLLINS 

MAYOR 



CITY OF BOSTON 

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

CITY HALL. BOSTON 




To the Members of the Boston Police Department: 

In this era of great social upheaval and increasing public 
awareness of the problems of personal safety and security, the role of 
the police and their duty performance is being subjected to a most 
critical study, evaluation, and review. Never before in history has 
the field of law enforcement been surveyed in so many ways, from so 
many directions, by so many people. All of these conclusions reveal 
one dominant theme: Crime in America is closely associated with 
poverty, unemployment, and slums. 

It is in the large core cities that these social ills are 
the most acute. The decay of the inner cities has brought in its 
wake a disproportionate amount of crime, delinquency, and disorder. 
This challenge can be met only by massive federal funds, drastic 
social reforms, and a total public commitment. Federal assistance to 
municipal law enforcement is an absolute necessity to most efficiently 
combat crime in these changing times. 

The task of providing the quality of law enforcement and 
community services expected of the police has become one of the most 
difficult and sensitive responsibilities of modern city government. 
The fabric of contemporary city living cannot endure without effective 
law enforcement to hold it together. As we come to the close of 1966 
the members of the Boston Police Department are to be again commended 
for carrying out their assignments with a high level of dedication and 
competence . 

Sincerely, 




Mayor of Boston 



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THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner . 
Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Assistant Secretary 
Administratu'E Secretaries 



Superintendents 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant Detectives 



The Police Force 

3 First-, Second-, and Third-Grade Detectives 



30 
80 

257 



Patrolmen 
Patrolwomen 

Total 



*Includes 2 patrolwomen 

flncludes 3 patrolmen in armed forces 



*l66 

tl,066 

3 

2,513 



Assistant Biological Chemist 

Clerks and Typists 

Director, Signal Service 

Director, Signal Service, Assistant 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 

Electrical Equipment Kepairman 

Foreman, Signal Service 

Groundmen, Laborers (Police), an 
Equipment Operators 

Elevator Operators 

Head Administrative Clerk 

Head Clerks 

Hearing Stenographers . 

Hostlers 

Tanitresses 

funior Building Custodians . 

Linemen and Cable Splicers . 

Machinist .... 

Matron, Chief 

Matron. Assistant Chief 

Matrons. Police ... 

Motor Equipment Repair Foreman 



d Motor 



Employees of the Department 

I Motor Equipment Repairmen 

6 Multilith Operator 

iMultilith Operator and Cameraman . 

Principal Clerk 

Principal Clerks and Stenographers 

Principal Clerks and Typists 

Principal Statistical ^Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian .... 

Senior Clerks and Typists .... 

Senior Statistical iMachine Operator . 

Signalmen Electricians 

Statistical Machine C'perators 

Steam Firemen 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 

Superintendent of Police Buildings, Assistant 

Telephone Operators 

School Traiiic Supervisors .... 



3 
3 
I 

13 
6 

6 
6 

40 

7 
I 
I 
I 
10 
I 



Total 



3 
4 

I 



9 
I 
2 
9 
3 
I 
I 
13 

I4T 

326 



Distribution and Changes 

During the year 114 patrolmen were appointed; 3 patrolmen were reinstated; 3 patrolmen were dismissed; 
2 sergeants, 2 second-grade detectives, i first-grade detective, and ig patrolmen resigned; i captain was appointed 
deputy superintendent; i lieutenant-detective and 8 lieutenants were promoted to captains, 8 sergeants to lieuten- 
ants, 24 patrolmen to sergeants; 36 third-grade detectives were assigned as second-grade detectives, 10 second-grade 
detectives as first-grade detectives; 2 deputy superintendents, 2 captains, 3 lieutenants, 2 sergeant-detectives, 
6 sergeants, 4 first-grade detectives, 2 second-grade detectives, and 41 patrolmen were retired on pension; i lieuten- 
ant, I sergeant-detective, i first-grade detective, i patrolman-headquarters dispatcher, and 6 patrolmen died. 



OFFICE OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Like many city police departments throughout the world, the Boston Police Department has been under- 
going significant changes in both personnel and organization. Changes have come about only after intensive re- 
search and long deliberation which necessarily involve many different branches and di\'isions of the department. 

The men who make recommendations to the Police Commissioner must possess extensive experience in 
the fields of police patrol, traffic management, records, communications, personnel, and training. 

Below are the officers who serve as the Police Cormnissioner's Advisory Board. 



m m 




Meeting ot the Advisory Board 



OFFICE OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 




Deputy Superintendent 

WILLIAM A. BRADLEY 

Administrative Assistant=Secretary 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASS1STANT=SECRETARY 

Supervision of the staff necessary to operate the Office of the Police Commissioner is the responsibility of 
the Administrative Assistant. Upon him falls the duty of maintaining a smooth flow of information, correspond- 
ence, and communications from and to the Commissioner. This sensitive position maintains a liaison between the 
Commissioner's office and all branches of the department, as well as with other city agencies, civic organizations, 
the news media, and outside police departments. 




J. Edgar Hoover, Director of F.B.I., Center, and Boston Police Superintendent John T. 
How land, right, are shown with Boston Police Lieutenant John F. Kreckler upon 
his graduation from the 78th Session of the F.B.I. National Academy on November 2, 
1966. Lieutenant Kreckler is presently assigned to the Police Commissioner's Oflice. 



lO 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 




Superintendent 

HERBERT F. MULLONEY 

Chief, Bureau of Field Operations 




Deput.\ Superintendent 

JOSEPH V. SAIA 

Patrol Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

JAMES L. BUCHANAN 

Traffic Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

EDWARD \V. A\ANNIX, JR. 

Bureau of Criminal Investigation 



II 



BUREAU OF FIELD OPERATIONS 

The administration and direction of all personnel assigned to line functions such as crime prevention, pro- 
tection of life and property, and the apprehension of those who violate the law best describe the objectives and 
purposes of the Bureau of Field Operations. 



TACTICAL PATROL FORCE 

During ig66 the Boston Pohce Deparment increased the size of its Tactical Patrol Force in an effort to 
combat the ever-increasing number of crimes that occur during the nighttime hours. A plainclothes and detective 
unit has now been added to the canine, mounted, and street-patrol sections. 

This increase in strength has been utilized almost exclusivelj' at night, with the entire Tactical Patrol 
Force normally working between the hours of 7 p.m. and 3 a.m. The increased surveillance has been concentrated 
mostly in the high-crime areas. These areas are determined by statistical reports and analyses, prepared and dis- 
tributed by the Planning and Research Division of the department. 

During iq66 the canine units were called 141 times to make searches of buildings or to look for lost persons. 
This activity constituted a minor portion of their routine patrol work throughout the city. The tactical force com- 
piled a record of 720 arrests during 1966. Twenty-four of its members were commended for meritorious work, and 
five of its members were awarded departmental medals of honor and valor. 



PATROL DIVISIONS 

Fourteen police districts provide the City of Boston with a 24-hour patrol force designed to protect the 
lives and property of its citizens. The Patiol Division undertakes the preliminary investigation of incidents, with 
the result of their investigations not only making up the permanent records of the department, but also serving as 
the basis for follow-up investigations by the Criminal Investigation Division. For administrative purposes, the city 
is divided into two areas designated as Patrol Division ''A" and Patrol Division "B.'' Patrol Division "A" in- 
cludes Districts I, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 15. Patrol Division "B" includes Districts 3, 5, q, 10, 11, 13, and 14. 





Helping Victim at Fire 



I'm in a Hurry! 



T2 



District Eight is responsible for patrolling Boston Harbor, which is 58.7 square miles. The commanding 
officer of this district also serves as Harbor Master for the Port of Boston. He assigns anchorage locations for all 
ships and yachts ertering or remaining in the harbor. The harbor itself is patrolled on a 24-hour basis by three 
police boats. During 1966 there were 699 domestic and 911 foreign vessels that arrived at Boston Harbor. 




Three Bo\s Sa>ed from Drifting Raft b\ Harbor Police 



This district also contains the Emergency Service Unit and the Bomb Squad. These units carry all of the 
necessar}' equipment needed to cope with anj- type of emergency that might arise. They can handle all explosives 
in an\- situation, whether it be da}- or night, on land or on water. In addition to being able to do this, the Bomb 
Squad is qualified to detonate explosives where demolition is required to protect the lives and safety of the general 
public. 



CITY PRISON 



City Prison is located on the ground floor of the new Courthouse Building on Somerset Street, Boston. 
It has separate facilities for male and female prisoners. The Male Section is staffed by Boston policemen and is a 
place for the temporar\- detention of all persons, other than juveniles, under arrest. 

All female prisoners are brought to the "Women's Section, which is under the supervision of a chief matron 
and assistant matrons, all of whom are ci\'ilians. All prisoners at City Prison, unless they are otherwise released, 
are detained there until the next session of the court. 

If the person is sentenced to prison or is to be held for the grand jury, he or she is taken from City Prison 
to the proper detention facility or to the county jail at Charles Street. 

During the year 1966 there were 12,418 persons detained at City Prison, of whom 10,392 were males and 
2,026 were females. During the same period 172 lodgers were received and cared for by the personnel of the prison. 



13 





"So Long for No«" 



A 




'Take It Easv and Rest" 



"Hope The\ Don't Hear A\e' 




Auto Accident Victim Being 
Helped by Police 



TOUR 



OF 




'You're Under Arrest' 




DUTY 




"I Wonder How Many Are 
in There?" 



"Good to See You, Son" 



14 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

The jurisdiction of the Traffic Division encompasses Districts One, Two, Four, and the intersection of 
Commonwealth Avenue and Boston University Bridge on District Fourteen. It is responsible for the regulation 
and control of traffic and the enforcement of traffic, pedestrian, and parking regulations within this area. This 
division pro\-ides a safety patrol and a traffic analysis unit, both of which operate on a city-wide basis. 

Notices of parking \dolations issued by this division during the year 1966 amounted to 368,1 16. The city- 
w'ide total issue by the entire Police Department reached 695,081. 

Vehicles towed by this division for reasons of traffic obstruction or serious violation of parking regulations 
tallied 4,699. 

Citations for m.o\'ing \aolations numbered 3,485. Of this figure, 845 warnings were given and 2,640 court 
citations were issued. Officers of this di\-ision also checked a total of 1,717 operators under the " Operation Sixteen" 
program, i.e., a license check of operators of motor vehicles who appeared to be under sixteen years of age. 

Pedestrian-law citations issued by this di\'ision during the period from April i, 1966 (the date the pedestrian 
program became effective), until December 31, iq66, amounted to 7,074. 

The Safety Patrol Unit pro\'ided a two-school-per-da\- schedule of safety talks and demonstrations. This 
operation was extended to outdoor recreational facilities during school vacation periods. The patrol also super\dsed 
a weekly program on safet}^ subjects broadcast through the facilities of Station WEZE in Boston. 

The Accident Analysis Unit assimilated, analyzed, and evaluated both collisions reported to the police by 
operators and collisions reported by police personnel who investigated at the scene. About 20,000 such reports are 
processed annualh', and from the information obtained, remedial recommendations are made which, through selec- 
tive enforcement, eft'ecti\'ely control the accident problem throughout the city. 




Instructing Deaf Children on Street=Crossing Safety with the Use of Colored Cartoons 



AUXILIARY SCHOOL PATROL 

To release policemen from school-crossing patrol, and still provide protection for schoolchildren, female 
school-crossing supervisors have been employed for several years. They have authority as special officers to enforce 
laws and regulations relating to the operation, parking, and use of motor vehicles in areas adjacent to schools and 
school crossings. At the present time the department employs 141 smartly uniformed traffic super^dsors. 



15 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DIVISION 



It is the responsibility of this division to perform follow-up investigations of criminal cases. For adminis- 
trative purposes it functions with the following subdi\-isions : Crimes Against Persons Section ; Crimes Against Prop- 
erty Section; General Investigation Section; Youth Aid Section; Vice Control Section; Technical Service Section; 
and District Detective Section. 

Special units are assigned to cover the following phases of police work: homicide, robbery, automobile 
cases, worthless checks and frauds, lost and stolen property, hotels, pawnbrokers, junkshops, secondhand dealers, 
pickpockets, shoplifters, domestic relations, subversive activities, gaming offenses, narcotics and \'ice, and rendi- 
tion cases. 




Chemist Checking Liquid Found at Recent Crime 



Members of the Criminal Investigation Division investigate felonies committed within the juiisdiction 
of the City of Boston. They also process cases of fugitives from justice and conduct hundreds of investigations 
during the course of a year for various police departments throughout the United States and foreign countries. 

Personnel attached to this division and assigned onlj- to Headquarters participated in over ,^5,000 exami- 
nations and investigations of crimes, crime scenes, evidence, weapons, explosives, as well as reports of noncriminal 
incidents. As a result of these investigations some 1,470 arrests were made. These statistics do not include the 
work performed bj- detectives assigned to the fourteen police districts; their work is tabulated on the district of 
assignment. 

The officers of this di\Tsion were responsible for the recovery of many thousands of dollars worth of missing 
or stolen properties including cars, furs, jewelry, clothing, etc. Officers attached to the Domestic Relations Unit 
were responsible for a potential saving of over §312,000 to the City of Boston as a result of their investigation and 
prosecution of cases involving welfare recipients resulting from court orders to pay for the support of children. 

To better imderstand the comjDlex nature of the investigations which came within the purview of this divi- 
sion, the following is a recital of the types of examinations and tests performed b}- members of the Crime Laboratory, 
a unit of the Criminal Investigation Division. The Laboratorj- becomes more and more important to the policeman 
in the area of discovering and securing e\ndence. 



i6 



Summary of Case 

Material, 

test or 
category: 

Acid phosphatase 
Alkalies (lye) 
Blood grouping . 
Bloodstains (tests) : 

Benzidine 

Takayania 

Precipitin 
Bombs and suspected bombs 
Casts: 

Plaster 

Silicone rubber RTV 
Chemical analysis: 

Gunpowder 
Chemical development of latent fingerprints: 

Toner 

Ninhydiin 

Silver nitrate . 

Iodine fuming . 
Clothing 

Court appearances 
Detective dyes 
Documents examined 
Explosive residues 
Fabric .... 
Fabric impressions 
Fibers — reference 
Fibers — comparison . 
Fingerprint examination 
Firebrick — reference 
Firebrick — comparison 
Glass — reference 
Glass — comparison . 
Hair — reference 
Hair — comparison 
Laundry marks . 
Lectures 

Microscopic examination 
Miscellaneous 
Narcotics 
Overtime (hours) 
On call (hours) 
Paint samples — reference 
Paint samples — comparison 



Work, Boston Police 

Number 
of tests 
or cases 

49 
II 

12 

463 

339 
320 

24 

2 
1x7 



382 
721 

431 
142 

320 
232 

13 
69 

19 
61 

42 
89 
80 

311 
36 
40 

39 
26 
40 
81 
21 

57 
8S3 

64 
57 
346 
5,680 
62 
33 



Department Crime Laboratory Unit, 1966 

Material, 

test or 
category : 

Photographs: 

Infrared 

Black and white 

Enlargements . 

Polaroid P.N./5S . 

Polaroid — color 

Polaroid 52 

35mm color slides . 

2j X 3j fingerprint photos 
Photomacrography 
Photomicrography 
Paper .... 
Physical matching 
Poison .... 
Powder residue — paraffin 
Powder residue — cloth (C-Acids) 

Radiation 

Reports on cases in progress: 

Verbal report .... 

Written report 

Restoration attempts with obliterated serial 
numbers: .... 

Firearms 

Vehicles 

Rope and cordage 

Scene examinations 

Shoeprints (footwear impressions) 

Soil and minerals .... 

Sperm otazoa, microscopic identification 

Tape .... 

Tire tracks . 

Tissue, biological 

Tools .... 

Toolmarks — reference 

Toolmarks — comparison 

Typewriter comparisons 

TJltraviolet examinations 

Vehicle dents and damage 

Vehicles examined 

Woods and metals 

Weapons examined : 

Cuttings — knives, etc. 

Blunt instruments . 



Number 
of tests 
or cases 

75 
522 

430 
85 
60 

30 
360 

50 
180 

156 

7 

209 

2 

29 
28 
10 

243 
91 



24 

33 

4 

274 
284 

42 
14 
17 
85 
12 

300 

126 
78 
31 

409 
49 
87 

109 

68 
36 





Narcotic Drugs and Implements Confiscated During 
Vice Raids 



Checking a Thompson Sub=machine Gun 



I? 



YOUTH AID SECTION 



Youth aid officers, although officially attached to the Youth Aid Section (a Headquarters unit), are as- 
signed to specific police districts and are generally considered to be members of the district to which they are as- 
signed. At the present time at least one youth aid officer is attached to each of the existing police districts. 

During ig66, youth aid officers arrested and prosecuted i.ySi male and 440 female juveniles. The officers 
also brought 2,225 niale and 550 female juveniles to their district stations for questionirg in regard to criminal 
offences, and then released them to their parents for discipline, without court action. 




Getting Acquainted 



OPERATION SIXTEEN 

In recent years this department has been beset by a persistent increase in the number of auto thefts. For 
the year 1965 we experienced 12,913 of these thefts, contrasted with 3,502 back in iq6o. Although about 92 percent 
of the vehicles are taken for joyrides and most arc recovered within seventy-two hours after theft, this type of crime 
still presents serious problems to the pubHc and the police. 

Because of the magnitude of these problems, the department developed a program entitled "Operation 
Sixteen." This program consists of license and registration checks of all motor vehicle operators appearing to be 
under sixteen years of age. The prime purpose of this program was to bring about a prevention of auto thefts rather 
than to effect increased arrests of young persons for this offense. 

During its first year of implementation there were 121,744 motor vehicle operators, who appeared to be 
under sixteen years of age, stopped for a license and registration check, and Boston consequentl}' showed a reduction 
of 998 auto t'hefts for the year 1966. 



i8 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 




Superintendent 
WILLIAM J. TAYLOR 
Chief, Bureau of General Senices 




Deputy Superintendent 

ROBERT E. BRADLEY 

Records and Communications Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

ARTHUR C. CADEQAN, JR. 

Training Division 



Deputy Superintendent 
WALTER J. HANKARD 
Central Services Division 



19 



BUREAU OF GENERAL SERVICES 

The administration, management, and operation of a large complicated organization that deals chiefly in 
ser\-ices to a tax-pa\-ing, budget-conscious citizenr}-, requires a modem centralized system to direct and control the 
myriad problems created by the need for records; communications to be maintained; personnel to be trained; and 
the constant effort to maintain a high degree of efficienc\- in all areas of police work. This is the responsibility of 
the Bureau of General Ser^^ces, which is di\-ided into the Central Services Division, the Records and Communica- 
tions Division, and the Personnel and Training Division. 



CENTRAL SERVICES DIVISION 

The Central Ser\nces Division has the direct responsibility of all building and equipment maintenance; 
the care, custodj-, and processing of nondepartmental property and inventory; and the custody and distribution 
of all departmental suppHes and equipment. This di\asion is also responsible for the processing of all licenses that 
are issued by the PoHce Cominissioner. 

Satisfactory maintenance and repair of pioperty and equipment greatly affect the efficiency, morale, and 
prestige of the police service and have a direct bearing on good public relations. 



BUILDING MAINTENANCE SECTION 

The Building Maintenance Section is charged with the care, maintenance, supervision, and cleanHness 
of all police btiildings. Requests for repairs or maintenance work are examined by members of this tmit ; then a 
service order, containing a cost estimate, is written up and processed through the Property Clerk so that the work 
can be done by an outside contractor. After the work has been completed, it is inspected by the Superintendent of 
Buildings, who approves or disapproves of the work done by signing the service order, which allows for payment. 

At the present time the Boston Police Department is constructing two new district stationhouses which 
will consolidate four existing districts. These buildings are due for occupancy late in 1967 or early 196S. 



PROPERTY CLERK SECTION 

The Property Clerk Section is charged with the care of lost, stolen, and abandoned property; money or 
other property alleged to have been illegally obtained; and all articles and propeity taken from persons arrested for 
any cause. In its custody are also placed all seized liquor and gaming implements which come to the attention of 
the department. 

All orders for supplies, uniforms, and equipment are issued by this office. 

During the year iSi motor vehicles came into the custody of this office; twenty-six vehicles were released 
to legitimate claimants; and 252 vehicles were sold at public auction. There are now seventeen motor vehicles in 
custody. 



20 



Lost And Found Property 



Articles on hand January i, ig66 igg 

Articles received during the year to December 31, 1966 148 

Total 

Disposed of: 

Delivered to owners 37 

Worthless 82 

Sold at public auction 152 

Total number of articles disposed of 

Total number of articles on hand December 31, 1966 



307 



271 
36 



AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE SECTION 

A maintenance shop for the servicing of the department automobiles is in operation on a 24-hour basis. 
During the year, 9,205 department cars were repaired, and 1,929 cars were serviced. There were 546 department 
cars and forty-nine privately owned cars towed by the department wrecker. The department operates a motor- 
cycle shop where, on ySq occasions, motorcycles were repaired and serviced during the vear. 

This unit is responsible for the inspection of all department vehicles, all garages in the various districts, 
and is required to investigate and report on all accidents involving department vehicles. 



There are 307 motor vehicles in service at the present time distributed as follows: 



Districts 


Combination 
Patrols 


Passenger 
Automobiles 


Trucks 


Motor 

Cycles Scooters 


Totals 


Tactical Patrol 
Headquarters 
District: 
District 2 . 
District 3 
District 4 
District 5 
District 6 . 
District 7 
District 8 
District 9 
District 10 
District 11 
District 13 
District 14 
District 15 . 
Traffic Division 
Pool 










2 

I 
2 
2 

5 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 

I 




7 

52 

4 

5 

5 

19 

12 

6 

6 

2 

15 
9 

II 
4 
7 
4 

10 

9 


I 
16 

5 


2 
3 
3 
2 

5 
4 
4 

I 
I 
3 
5 
3 

19 


2 

I 
2 

I 

I 
2 

1 

2 


10 
68 

7 
12 
10 
27 
21 
12 
12 

7 
iS 

13 
17 
13 
13 
S 
31 
II 


Totals 


31 


*i87 


t22 


55 


12 


307 



* Included in the total of 1S7 passenger automobiles are twenty-nine station wagons. 

f Included in the total of twent^'-two trucks is a car-crane and fork-lift at District 8, and a horse-van at the 



stables. 



21 



LICENSING SECTION 



Auctioneer (Class I) 

Auctioneer (other classes) 

Bicycle registrations 

Dog 

Driver (hackney carriage) 

Firearms, dealer in 

Firearms, license to carr\' 

Gunsmith 

Hackne\' carriage 

Handcart (common carrier) 

Junk collector 



LICENSES ISSUED BY POLICE COMMISSIONER 

Junk shopkeeper 

Musician (collective and sound car) 

Musician (itinerant) 

Pawnbroker 

Public lodging house 

Secondhand articles 

Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 

Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 

Sightseeing automobile 

Sightseeing driver 

Special police 



Hackney Carriage Unit 

Chapter 392 of the Acts of 1930, as amended, Hmits the number of licenses to set up and use hackney 
carriages in the City of Boston to 1,525. 

During the police year, January i, ig66 to December 31, 1966, due to changes of ownership and regrants, a 
total of *i,S8o licenses were granted. 

There were 402 articles consisting of umbrellas, coats, handbags, etc., found in carriages during the year, 
which were turned over to the office of Inspector of Carnages. Of these, 235 were restored to the owners, and the 
balance of 167 placed in the custody of the Property Clerk. 

The following statement gives details concerning public hackney carriages, as well as licenses to drive 
the same: 



Hacknej Carriage Licenses 

Applications for carriage licenses received 

Carriages licensed ('"renewal" applications and ''changes of ownership") ... 
Carriages licensed ("regrants") 

Carriage licenses canceled (in favor of "regrants" and "changes of ownership") ... 

Carriages licensed — "changes in ownership" ... 

Carriages licenses in effect December 31, 1966 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1966 

(beginning of hackney-carriage license year) 

Carriages inspected 

* 2t)8 regrants 



i,.S8o 



I,0l2 




268 







1,880 




35.5 




87 


1966 






1.525 




1,880 



Hackney Carriage Drivers 

Applications for drivers' licenses reported on 6;869 

Applications for drivers' licenses rejected 189 

Drivers' licenses granted 6,680 

Drivers' licenses revoked, 42, of which revocations, 3, were rescinded and the licenses restored, leaving the 

net figure shown of such revocations as 39 

Drivers' licenses in effect December 31, 1966 (at end of police year) — licensed since February i, 1966 (be- 
ginning of hackney-carriage license year) 6,736 

Complaints against owners, drivers, and "setups" investigated . 7S4 

Articles found in carriages reported by drivers 402 



22 

RECORDS AND COMAIUNICATIONS DIVISION 

This division is comprised of the Central Complaint Section, Central Records Section, Identification 
Section, Signal Sendee Section, and Radio ^Maintenance Section. 

The Central Records, Central Complaint, and Identification Sections are open day and night, enabling 
other police units to a-vail themselves of their facilities. The di\'ision exercises stafi" control over all reporting unit s 
to guarantee complete, accurate, and timely reports. 

The Central Complaint Section assigns radio-car personnel to respond to and investigate complaints, 
reports of crimes, and other incidents. It is the center of control and communication, subject to appropriate author- 
ity in emergencies. 

The Identification Section photographs and fingerprints arrested persons, and maintains both criminal and 
civil files of fingerprints and photographs. All warrants are processed by this section. 



CENTRAL COMPLAINT SECTION 

During 1966, there were 610,187 outgoing telephone messages and 7,222 toll calls made by the department 
through its switchboard; 504,448 emergency messages were received and processed at the complaint desk through 
either DE8-1212 or the departmental intercommunication system; 586,000 telephone messages were received 
through the switchboaid, many of which were transferred to the complaint desk for processing; 254,493 teletype 
messages and 312 TWX messages plus 235 telegrams were handled — 1,661 concerned missing persons; 11,920 were 
cars reported stolen, of which 11,187 w'ere later reported recovered. 

A total of 2,104,935 radio messages were sent and received. In an average month 204,203 radio messages 
are processed over our radio system to and from mobile equipment and to and from police boats. A tape recordin g 
is made of each of these radio messages to prov-ide the department with a permanent record of calls. 




Car A\ailahilil\ lioard 



CENTRAL RECORDS SECTION 

During 1966 this section assigned 33,207 booking numbers for arrests, other than traffic, to the various 
districts. There are 1,521,546 cards recorded in the main index files. This includes male and female records, which 
were combined in 1065 to better enable officers to locate information by making a search in but one file. There 
were 34,669 requests for criminal records. Receipts for work pennits and requests for records totaled ^'53 7,098. 

Missing Persons Unit 

Total number of persons reported missing 9)^43 

Total number reported to this department from outside departments 7,236 

Total number of persons reported missing in Boston 2,607 

Total number found or returned home 2,534 

Total number still missing in Boston 73 





A Call for Help When Boy Falls Into Pond 



Mt Was Worth IC 



Age and Sex of Persons Reported Missing in Boston 



Age 


Missing 


Found 


Still Missing 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Males 


Females 


Under 15 years 

Over 15 years — under 21 . . 

Over 21 years 


.53^ 
251 
322 


212 

2.«3 
261 


2v)2 

273 
288 


1 1)0 

311 
234 


9 
17 
19 


3 
10 

15 


Tot;ds 


905 


7.56 


853 


735 


45 


28 



Warrant Unit 



Warrants received from the Boston Police Department 
Warrants received from other departments for service in Boston 



Total warrants received and processed 

Warrants returned without service to our districts and units 
Warrants returned without service to other departments 
Total arrests on warrants processed in this department 



7-283 
2,166 



9,449 
1,424 
1,871 
6,154 



24 



Summonses 



Total number received from outside Boston for Fcrvice in Boston 

Total number served 

Total number sent fiom this section for service outside Boston . 

Total number served 

Total number of summonses processed .... 



14,372 
12,069 
89,144 

84,123 
io3:5i6 



Multilith and Mimeograph Unit 

The multilith machine was used to make 1,340,000 impressions, consisting of departmental foims, letters, 
police bulletins, and IBM cards. (Two multilith machines are used to print circulars with photo<;raphs and finger- 
prints of persons either reported missing or wanted for criminal cftenses.) 

The mimeograijh machine made 010,600 impressions, consisting of daily manifolds, bulletins, circular- 
type letters for the various districts and units, including Police Academ^y lessons and training bulletins. 




.\Uiltiiith Machine and Operator 



Dk: 



25 

IDENTIFICATION SECTION 
Photography 

Number of photographs on file January i, iq66 899,948 

Made and filed during the year 16,080 

Number of foreign photographs on file 10,090 

Number of foreign photographs received during the year 1,425 

Total 927,543 

Scenes of crime photographed S47 



P^^ 




'■la 







Victims Checking Rogues' Gallery 



Color Photography 

Color "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1965 . . . , 

Made and filed during the year 1966 

Total "mug" photographs on file December 31, 1966 . . . , 



32,860 

4,270 

37,130 



Fingerprint File 

Number on file December 31, 1965 . 

Taken and filed during 1966 

Received from other authorities 
Number on file December 31, 1966 . . 
Fingerprints taken other than of criminals: 

Police officer applicants . . ^ 

Special police officers . . 

Hackney carriage drivers 

Civilian employees . . 

FirearmiS act (revolver applicants) .... 
Total number of civilian fingerprints on file December 31, 1966 



254,221 

9,427 

4,910 

268,558 

114 
1,285 
6,885 

7 

6,327 

153,712 



2() 

Five=Finger System of f-ingerprinting 

Number of five-finger cards on file December 31, 1966 

Number of main-index cards cross indexed to five-finger system December 31, 1966 . . . . 
Number of latent prints found at crime scenes on file in the Identification Section December 31, 19O6 
Number of connections made by latent prints since the system was established 



29>342 
14,671 

494 
688 



RADIO MAINTENANCE SECTION 

The Boston Police Department's Radio Maintenance Section consists of one sergeant and eleven radio- 
technician policemen. It is responsible for the repair, maintenance, and operation of all radio-communication 
equipment used by the Boston Police Department. 

The continued advances in the radio-communications field demands that this unit keep abreast of all the 
latest techniques available, to pro\'ide the Boston Police Department with as modern and complete a communica- 
tions system as is attainable. Because of the continuing change of equipment-design these technicians have man- 
aged, by a program of self-training, to keep ahead of the problems in radio maintenance. By the utilization of 
police personnel for this communications work area, the department has realized a greater efficiency and higher 
calibre of service, and these men are subject to call at any time. 

During 1966 the members of the unit have converted the major portion of the existing mobile radio-units 
into a two-frequency system. The result is a reduction of the workload on the existing emergency channel. This 
system is functional and can be placed into operation as needed. At the present time this unit is engaged in plan- 
ning the addition of equipment for providing routemen and mobile units with equipment for personal communica- 
tions both with their respective districts and with Headquarters. 

The Radio Maintenance Section operates, around the clock, a radio shop containing facilities and equip- 
ment for repair and maintenance of all department communications equipment. Personnel of this shop also install 
the mobile units used by the department. 




Mobile Turret, Used in Case ot Emergency 



27 

A completely equipped mobile communications van is garaged at the radio shop for immediate activation 
in case of a disaster or other protracted incident. This van is manned by department technicians. The communi- 
cations van contains walkie-talkies, mobile telephones, a public address system, and all radio equipment necessary 
to replace Headquarters dispatching facilities when necessari^ 

Because of the complexities associated with communications and with the advent of new technology, this 
section is constantly searching for better and more complete communications methods, so as to provide better pro- 
tection for our citizens. 



w 



SIGNAL SERVICE SECTION 



Signal Boxes 

The total number of boxes in use is 553- Of these, 522 are connected with an underground system and 31 
ith an overhead system. 



Miscellaneous Work 

In the past year employees of this service responded to i,6q6 trouble calls and inspected: 553 signal boxes; 
I, sic^nal desks; 15 motor-generator sets; and 300 storage batteries. Repairs were made on 253 box movements; 
X2 reisters; 107 locks; a. time-stamps; 72 vibrator bells; 7S relays; 5: electiic fans; 48 motors; and 17 generators. 
This unit is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all electric wiring and equipment at all police 
buildings. 

Connected with the police signal boxes are 52 signal, 553 telephone, and 79 bhnker-light circuits. 

The Si-nal Service Unit super^dses all telephone and teletype installations and minor teletype repairs 
throuc^hout the department. It also maintains 57 Headquarters-to-stationhouse telephone circuits; 13 teletype- 
write^ circuits ; 13 radio-wired broadcast circuits; and a circuit, with equipment, at the Charlesbank Station of the 
Metropolitan District Police; also the intercommunication units throughout the department. 



Payments on Account of the Signal Service During the Year Ending December 31, 1966 

•^ (Included in Table XI) 

$120,444 05 

Payrolls 

Signal and traBic upkeep, repairs and supplies theiefor _Jll^l^_ '1 

?i75-C77 i« 

Total 



28 



PERSONNEL AND TRAINING DIVISION 



PERSONNEL SECTION 

During the year 1966 the Personnel Section of the Bureau of General Services continued its program of 
microfilming inactive personnel files. This unit also processed the semiannual personnel performance-evaluation 
reports which are used by this department to detennine training requirements for the future. 

Three recruit-patrolmen classes, totaling 114 officers, 30 permanent and 25 pro^^isional meter-maids, 44 
permanent and 25 provisional .school traffic-crossing guards all were processed .luring the course of the year. 

From Januarx- i, 1066, to Dccemljer 31, 1066, i,oSi police officers were examined hv Dr. Robert O'Xeil 
Blackburn, department police physician, at the Boston Police Clinic, S18 Harrison Avenue, Boston. Included in 
this number were the prospective police-recruit candidates, as well as police personnel who, as the result of an 
accident or injury on or off duty, an illness, or other physical disability which resulted in their absence from duty 
were referred to the clinic by the Personnel Section. 

In the caje of prccpective rcciuit officers a careful and comprehensive examination is made, including an 
emotional-stability test to determine their fitness for the position of patrolman. 

TRAINING SECTION 

Police Academy personnel continued in their drive to enlighten department personnel with up-to-date 
knowledge of all recent Massachusetts and United States Supreme Court decisions which afTect the proper per- 
formance of dut>- by a police officer. All officers having attended the required course of instruction at the Academy 
were furnished copies of these important decisions. 

The practice of inviting guest lecturers has been continued throughout the past vear. This has proved 
to be most beneficial to both the recruit and seasoned police officer. It has given them a dearer insight into their 
powers, i-esponsibilities, and duties with relation to their fellow law enforcement officers and agencies. Specialists 
within the Boston Police Department have willingly assisted Academ>- personnel by making themselves available 
to appear before the assembled students and present their particular facet of work which reflects the practical 
ever\-da\- police procedures consonant with current law. 




'/ Refuse to Talk Till I See A\y La«\er- 



Printed hand-out materials used in the course of lectures were checked, and reprinted after revision where 
necessar}', to bring this information up to date prior to its being distributed. 

The monthly Department Training Bulletin, published b\' the staff of the Academy, was prepared to 
inform each officer of recently enacted changes in Massachusetts and United States laws and decisions. The bulle- 
tin, coupled with the "Training Key," a bimonthly publication of the lACP, containing the latest information on 
modern police methods and techniques, is distributed to each officer of this department for his information and 
guidance. 

The Boston Police Reloading Unit, an intricate subdivision of the Police Academy, in its annual report 
submitted relative to ammunition used for training purposes b}- our police personnel, stated that officers using the 
Police Academy's indoor range used 5,200 rounds, and officers attending the lequired two sessions at the Moon 
Island revolver range used 256,850 rounds. 

An intensive course of instruction in the care, use, and handling of all types of weapons is given to all 
persons of this department and other law enforcement agencies which requested the use of our range under the 
guidance of our qualified instructors. 

During this past 3'ear 5,146 persons attended the range, 146 of whom were members of law enforcement 
departments and agencies other than the Boston Police Department. 





Drill Team on Review 



.^\emOI•ia! L)a\ hxercises 



30 



BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 




Superintendent 

JOHN T. HOWLAND 

Chief, Bureau of Inspectional Services 




Deputy Superintendent 

CHARLES J. DEIGNAN 

Staff and Community Affairs Division 



Deputy Superintendent 
EDWARD F. BLAKE 
Intelligence Division 



Deputy Superintendent 

JOHN J. BONNER 

Planning and Research Division 



31 

BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

The responsibility of keeping the executive officer of any large police department as well informed as 
possible in matters dealing with personnel, recruits, organized crime, civic groups, and the updating of all depart- 
mental methods and procedures, belongs to the Bureau of Inspectional Services. 

This bureau is divided into two di\asions designed to accomplish specific objectives: the Staff and Com- 
munity Affairs Division and the Planning and Research Division. 



STAFF AND COMMUNITY AFFAIRS DIVISION 

STAFF INSPECTION SECTION 

The Staff" Inspection Section is generally responsible for inspecting the appearance, conduct, and duty 
performance of department personnel and the physical condition of equipment and facilities; the manner in which 
supervisory personnel discharge their command responsibilities; the degree of compliance by personnel with depart- 
mental rules, regulations, orders, and procedures; the making of such other types of field inspections as will enable 
the division to determine the unifonnity and efficiency of the department's field operations; and is responsible for 
conducting the annual department survey. 

Inspections of all department records are conducted to determine completeness, accuracy, filing, storage, 
and accessibility. An evaluation is made of the department's operating procedures, orders, and methods, and their 
practical effects, in order to secure and assess the reaction to existing or proposed procedures, orders, and methods; 
and to recommend the desirabilitv of changes therein. 




Community Relations Staff 



32 

COMMUNITY AND INTERNAL AFFAIRS SECTION 

On July I, i()()6, the Boston Policc-Coniiinniity Relations Program was established in the department 
under a central coordinator. The program is designed to create a channel of communication between the public 
and the police that is both accessible and flexible. The program's structure consists of a police-community steering 
committee functioning in each of the police districts under the chairmanship of the local district commander. These 
steering committees aie centrally connected through the police-community relations coordinator to the Staff and 
Community Affairs Division at Police Headquarters. 

Thus far, steering committee meetings have been very successful. Preliminary discussions at steering 
committee meetings have included a wide range of subjects, such as handbag thefts, car thefts, teen-age drinking, 
youth programs, senior citizenship participation, and development of recruitment programs for law enforcement. 

The internal affairs officers of this section investigate all complaints involving conduct of personnel. De- 
partment polic\- requires that every complaint, no matter of what importance or justification, be investigated. 
A\'hen a citizen wishes to make a complaint, he is personall>- inter\-iewed. If the complaint is of a serious nature, 
an affidavit is taken; then the person or jjersons complained of are interviewed, and the entire case is reviewed by 
the commanding officer of the section. 

This section is also responsible for pre-employment interviewing, background checking, and the screening 
of new applicants for the position of recruit-patrolman in this department. 



CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SECTION 

This section is responsible for keeping the Police Commissioner informed about organized crime and ths 
activities of known criminals in the city. 

The personnel of this section have compiled a compreiiensive file on the activities of known criminals, 
organi/;ed crime, and various groups which require police surveillance. A file is also kept on locations which have 
been used for criminal activity in the past, or which are suspected of being used presently for any criminal activity. 
This information is made available to all members of the department. 

In addition to furnishing the various districts and units of the department with information— much of 
which has been instrumental in the solution of a large number of crimes committed within this cit\'— this section 
maintains close liaison with other departments and agencies at local, state, and federal levels. 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH DIVISION 



DATA PROCESSING SECTION 

During 1966 the Boston Police Department was chosen as one of fifteen law enforcement agencies to 
join with the National Crime Information Center at the Federal Bureau of Invescigation Headquarters located in 
Washington, D.C. The initial connecting link will be a ro5o IBAI terminal device which \\'ill be transmitting 
selective information on stolen cars, stolen guns, identifiable stolen property of substantial value, and renditable 
wanted felons. It is expected that interconnecting agencies will multiply greatly in the immediate years ahead. 

Boston's Planning and Research Division spent a great part of iq66 laying the groundwork for a computer 
installation that is expected in the middle of igOy. It is hopeful that within the next >-ear Boston's computer will 
be interfaced with the national computer in Washington. 



33 



Boston's Police Department was privileged to have its Commissioner Edmund L. McNamara selected as 
the 1966 chairman of the Committee on Uniform Crime Reports Section of the International Association of Chiefs 
of Police. 



\M IM) 
[si 




Checking Figures on IBM Accounting Machine 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH SECTION 

Police planning is a staff operation which continually analyzes the operations of the department with a 
view towards improving procedures and developing new methods. It maintains constant communications with 
other units of the department both in formulating new programs and in infoiming line units of crime trends through 
evaluation of reported offenses. This section also provides assistance to the Bureau of Field Operations relative to the 
deployment of men and equipment in the form of statistics, charts, and maps which help to pinpoint problem areas. 



34 



MAP OF CITY OF BOSTON 
DIVIDED INTO POLICE DISTRICTS 




25 



r 



B 



4 



Jo 






'3 



9 



r 



7 






3 ' 



/; 



# 




BOSTON POLICE DISTRICTS 



DISTRICT 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

e 

9 
10 
I I 
13 
14 
•*.- 15 



WAP or TNI 



North End . . , .. 

Boston Proper 

Mottopon - Oorch«ter 

South End 

West Rctwry-HydePork CITY PLANNING BOARD 

South Boston 

EosI Boston 

Harbor Police 

Roxtury 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Jomoico PWin 

Brighton 

Charlesio»r' 



CITY OF BOSTON 



n 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 



35 



The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 1966, the Department Aledals of Honor, and the Thomas F. Sullivan 
Awards, as recommended by a Police Board of Merit, were awarded ac the annual Ball of the Boston Police Associa- 
tion held at the Boston C arden, December 6, iq66, as follows: 



THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL FOR VALOR 

A DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

and THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD to 

PATROLMAN SAl.VATORE F. SPIN ALE 

OF DISTRICT THIRTEEN 

On Friday, March 11, 1966, Patrolman Spinale was 
dispatched to a lake within Forest Hills Cemetery on a 
report of a drowning child. On arrival he observed 
several persons hurrN-ing for emergenc}- rescue equip- 
m.ent stored on the shore of the lake and a male child in 
the water, which was partially ice-covered. The child 
was about fifty feet from shore, holding on to a thin 
accumulation of ice, and appeared to be near exhaus- 
tion and in immediate danger of drowning. 

Patrolman Spinale ran to the shore where he dis- 
robed to his underclothing and, in complete disregard 
for his own safety, entered the water and began 
swimming with great difficulty to the assistance of the 
child, breaking the ice-covered surface with his hands. 
He reached the child and took him back to shore. 
Upon reaching the shore Patrolman Spinale was ex- 
hausted and unable to remove himself from the w-ater. 
He passed the child to two other officers who were 
successful in re\'iving him and removed him to Boston 
City Hospital. 

Patrolman Spinale was assisted from the water and 
was administered oxygen prior to his being removed 
to the Boston City Hospital, where he was found to be 
suftering from exposure, treated, and was released. 





George Swartz, President of the Hundred Club, awards 

Department Medals of Honor to Patrolmen Roland W. 

Bird, Jr., Robert E. Federico, and Thomas P. Travnor 



Attorney General Elliot Richardson presents Walter 
Scott Medal for Valor, Department Medal of Honor, 
and Thomas F. Sullivan Award to Patrolman Salvatore 
F. Spinale while Commissioner McNamara looks on. 



DEPARTMENT MEDALS OF HONOR AND 
THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWAI^DS 

Patrolman Roland ^\'. Bird, Jr., Patrolman Robert 
E. Federico, and Patrolman Thomas P. Traynor of the 
Tactical Patrol Force were awarded Department 
Medals of Honor for meritorious police duty per- 
formed on July 24, 1066. 

At about 10 p.m., at Massachusetts and Columbus 
Avenues, where Patrolman Bird was assigned and when 
he was receiving instructions from Patrolman Federico 
and Patrolman Traynor who were in T.P.F.4 -8 car, 
he observed a male passenger in a 1966 Chevelle con- 
vertible, which was in motion, stand up and shoot the 
operator of the car. The operator lost control of the 
convertible, which struck the police car, forcing it onto 
the sidewalk, resulting in Patrolman Bird's striking 
his head on the roof of the police car. The man with 
the gun ran across Massachusetts Avenue down 
Columbus Avenue towards Northhampton Street, with 
Patrolmen Bird and Tra>-nor in pursuit on foot, while 
Patrolman Federico followed in the police car, at the 
same'time notifying the Central Complaint Room of 
the shooting. 

Patrolman Bird drew his service revolver, ordered 
the man to halt, and when he failed to do so fired a 
warning shot into the air. The subject turned, pointed 
a pistol at the officers, and turned into an alley. 



36 



Patrolman Bird fired four sliots at the culprit and saw 
him drop to the ground. The officers entered the alley 
and found the subject lying face down and a .32- 
calibre semiautomatic German-make steel pistol on 
the ground near the subject. He was placed under 
arrest, removed to the Boston City Hospital, treated 
for a puncture wound, and placed on the Danger List. 
The victim of the initial shooting was taken to the 
Boston City Hospital from che scene, suffering from a 
bullet wound of the right chest, and placed on the 
Danger List. 



Patrolman Francis R. Walsh, now assigned to the 
Planning and Research Division, and Patrolman Remi 
C. Kennedy of District 14 were awarded Department 
Medals of Honor for meritorious police dut\- per- 
formed on March 31, 1966. 

Patrolmen Walsh and Kennedy, assigned to the 
14-1 sector car, while passing a market on Cambridge 
Street, Allston, at about 10:25 p.m., noted the clerk 
was not behind the counter in the liquor store section 
and stopped to investigate. Patrolman Walsh en- 
tered the store on North Harvard Street, and Patrol- 
man Kennedy covered the market side located on 
Cambridge Street. As Patrolman Walsh entered the 
store, he was met by the owner who stated he had 
just been held up by two men who were then trying 
to escape through the other section of the store. 
Patrolman "Walsh heard the sound of the glass breaking 
and observed two men attempting to climb through a 
broken window. Patrolman K ennedy , from his position, 
saw the holdup men, and ordered them to stop. One 
of them turned and had what appeared to be a gun in 
his hand. The officer fired three shots from his service 
revolver, and one of the men fell to the ground; the 
second man escaped. 




Chief James Murphy, Norwood Police Department. 

awards Department Medals of Honor to Patrolmen 

Francis R. Walsh and Remi C. Kennedy 

The wounded man was taken to St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital, was found to be suffering from a gunshot 
wound, and placed on the Danger List. The owner of 
the market, having been struck on the head during the 
progress of the holdup, was taken to St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital for treatment and while there identified the 
wounded man as one of the men who had held him up. 

The second man in the holdup was taken into cus- 
tody on October 14, 1966, and at the present time is 
awaiting trial. 




Chief Joseph B. O'Kane, Weymouth Police Depart- 
ment, awards Department Medal of Honor to Patrol = 
man John H. MacDonald 



Patrolman John H. MacDonald of District 4 was 
awarded a Department Medal of Honor for meritorious 
police duty performed on October 28, 1965. 

The officer, while in a radio patrol car, entered the 
alley in the rear of 353 Commonwealth Avenue in 
response to a disturbance report and heard a man 
being beaten and calling for help. Upon the approach 
of the officer the assailant fled from the scene. The 
victim stated he had been robbed, and the assailant 
was armed with a knife. 

Patrolman MacDonald gave immediate pursuit and 
momentarily lost sight of the assailant, only to be 
confronted by him in a darkened section of the alley. 
After a firce struggle the officer disarmed the assailant 
and placed him under arrest for robbery. 

The assailant was taken to District Four, where a 
search of his person disclosed a brown leather wallet 
containing an amount of currency and two endorsed 
checks as well as personal papers of the ^^ctim. The 
victim identified his property and the prisoner as the 
man who had assulted and robbed him. 

The assailant was arraigned in Boston Municipal 
Court where he was found guilty of robbery while 
armed and sentenced to Concord Reformatory'. 



.^/ 



Detective Frederick J. Friel, Criminal Investigation 
Division, detailed to District lo, was awarded a De- 
partment Medal of Honor for meritorious police duty 
performed on iXovember 5, igoo. 

About 5 p.m. Detective Friel, assigned to special 
dut}- on Washington Street, Roxbury, and when in the 
area of Ball Street, observed three men acting in a 
suspicious manner. Detective Friel kept these men 
under surveillance and saw them enter the premises 
at 2043 Washington Street. Within a few minutes 
he proceeded to the front of the store, looked in, and 
observed an elderly woman lying on the floor with a 
coat wrapped about her head and heard her calling 
for help and pleading, "Stop beating me." 

Drawing his service revolver. Detective Friel 
entered the store and surprised the men, who were 
in the act of committing an assault and unarmed 
robbery. Still unaided, he held the three men at 
gunpoint, summoned aid from a passerby, and when 
assistance arrived had the victim conveyed to the 
hospital for medical treatment. 

The three men, all with criminal records and all 
parolees from correctional institutions, were arraigned 
in the Roxbury Court and held in bail of Sio,ooo each. 



Patrolmen Francis M. Graham and William E. 
Charbonnier of the Tactical Patrol Force were awarded 
Department Medals of Honor for meritorious police 
duty performed on April 7, 1966. 





Superintendent Herbert F. Mulloney awards Depart- 
ment Medals of Honor to Patrolmen Francis M. Ora= 
ham and William E. Charbonnier 



Superintendent John T. Howland a«ards Department 
Medal of Honor to Detective Frederick J. Friel 

While assigned to radio patrol duty on District 
Four, the ofiicers responded to an audible alarm 
sounded from a store on Washington Street. The 
officers went to the rear of the building where they 
observed dense smoke coming from the fourth floor 
of a four-story brick tenement and business building. 
The officers immediately requested fire apparatus via 
the dispatcher and then entered the building to arouse 
and assist the tenants. 

Patrolman Graham went up the rear fire escape 
and entered the third floor through a window. He 
came upon an unidentified male and assisted him 
through the smoke to the window leading to the fire 
escape. He returned to the hallway, aroused a man 
and a woman, guided them to the window, and called 
to the firefighters. A ladder was raised, and the 
officer assisted the couple into the arms of the fire- 
fighters. 

By this time the flames and smoke had increased 
in density, but the onicer went back into the hallway 
and came upon a woman with an infant in her arms 
and a small boy clutching her clothing. He guided 
them to the window and helped them to escape over 
ladders with the firefighters. Once more the officer 
returned to the hallway, heard a male voice calling, 
and assisted a man to a window and onto the ladder. 
The officer left the building by climbing down a ladder 
after ascertaining that all occupants had been removed 
from that part of the Ijuilding. 

In the meantime. Patrolman Charbonnier had 
entered the front of the Ijuilding to alert the tenants. 
He assisted two women with children down the stairs, 
then re-entered the building where he found an elderly 
man, with one leg, in a semicoUapsed condition. He 
carried him to the street and once more entered the 
building, only to be driven out by the unbearable heat. 



38 



BOSTON 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 

laoU of ^onor 

TO THOSE MEMBERS WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE 
PROTECTION OF THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS 



EZEKIAL W. HODSON 
ALFRED M. STURDIVANT 
JOHN T. LYNCH 
FREDERICK SCHLEHUBER 
RICHARD J. GALLIVAN 
ALBERT R. PETERSON 
THOMAS J. NORTON 
PATRICK J. CARR 
JOHN J. EARLE 
JOSEPH C. REISER 
CHARLES E. DEININGER 
ADOLPH F. BUTTERMAN 
WILLIAM G. CLANCY 
WARD ]\I. BRAY 
ANDREW B. CUNEO 
DANIEL J. McSHANE 
PETER P. OGINSKIS 
JOSEPH E. GONYA 
ALBERT MOTRONI 
BENJAMIN ALEXANDER 
FRANK J. COMEAU 
HARRIS B. McINNES 
HERBERT D. ALLEN 
EDWARD Q. BUTTERS 
JAMES J. TROY 
FRANKLIN B. DREYER 



FREDERICK W. BARTLETT 
JOSEPH L. CAVAGNARO 
WILLIAM L. ABBOTT 
JOHN P. M. WOLFE 
GEORGE J. HANLEY 
JAMES T. MALLOY 
JAMES BRICKLEY 
DANIEL A. McCALLUM 
JAMES D. HUGHES 
JAMES B. ROCHE 
LAURENCE V. SHERIDAN 
WALTER BAXTER 
EDWARD J. KELLEY 
JOHN H. MANNING 
THOMAS A. DAVIS 
PAUL J. MURNANE 
PATRICK C. GANNON 
JAMES G. McCANN, JR. 
STEPHEN P. HARRIGAN 
FRANK B. CALLAHAN 
WILLIAM F. HEALY 
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY 
JOHN J. GALLAGHER 
JAMES B. O'LEARY 
GEORGE J. HOLMES 



39 




THE HUNDRED CLUB 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the year 1959 a group of philanthropic businessmen formed an organization known as ''The 
Hundred Chib of Massachusetts. " 

The prime function of this organization is to provide financial assistance to the widows and dependents 
of policemen and firefighters who have lost their lives in the line of duty. 

The Boston Police Department again expresses its gratitude and appreciation to '■ The Hundred Club" 
for the invaluable assistance rendered the families of police officers who have given their lives in the service of our 
community. 



Miscellaneous Business 





10O4 


10O5 


i()66 


Abandoned children cared for . . 


i3tJ 


112 


05 


Buildings found open and made secure 












S25 


85^ 


680 


Dangerous buildings reported 














20 


43 


42 


Dangerous chimneys reported 














II 


5 


15 


Dead bodies recovered and cared for 














^,033 


I '053 


1,057 


Defective drains and vaults reported 














— 


— 


21 


Defective fire alarms and clocks repoited 














4 


I 


3 


Defective gas pipes reported 














5 


16 


25 


Defective hydrants reported 














5 


6 


5 


Defective sewers reported 














7 


17 


23 


Defective street lights reported 














73 


116 


115 


Defective streets and walks reponed 












238 


357 


347 


Defective water pipes reported . 












46 


25 


16 


Fire alarms given .... 












14,306 


14,282 


15,006 


Fire.s extinguished . . . 












2,616 


3.245 


4,174 


Insane persons taken ir. charge . 












1,206 


1,217 


1,207 


Lost children restored .... 












So I 


672 


594 


Number of persons committed to bail 














2,354 


2,565 


2,797 


Persons rescued from drowning . 














10 


II 


24 


Sick and injured persons assisted 














25wS,3 


26,632 


31,291 


Street obstructions removed 














40 


40 


17 


Water running to waste reported 














56 


144 


lOI 


Barrier truck runs .... 














— 


30 


16 


Emergency service runs 














— 


543 


432 


Fire alarms attended by patrol boats 
















201 


354 



4u 



AMBULANCE SERVICES FOR 1966 



The department is equipped with combination automobiles (patrol and ambulance) in Districts One, 
Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Nine, Ten, Eleven, Thirteen, Fourteen, and Fifteen. 

During the year ambulances responded to calls to conve}- sick and injured persons to the following places: 



Boston City Hospital . 

Massachusetts General Hospital 

Carney Hospital .... 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Boston State Hospital 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital . 

Children's Hospital 

Services Refused .... 

Beth Israel Hospital 

East Boston Relief vStation 

Faulkner Hospital 

United States Veterans Hospital 

Home 

Massachusetts Memorial Hospital 

Other 

United States Naval Hospital . 

Southern Mortuary 

Northern Mortuary 

New England Hospital 

Deaconess Hospital 

Roslindale General Hospital 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 

St. Margaret's Hospital 

Boston Floating Hospital . 

Parker Hill Hospital . 

Massachusetts Mental Health Hospital 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

Boston Sanatorium .... 

Longwood Hospital .... 



I7..U4 

I .<)y2 
1449 
i.n.S 
1.059 

953 
«,S9 
70,S 
699 
64.S 
5«3 
579 
41,5 
305 
124 
ii.S 
100 
98 
77 
77 
68 

65 
60 

51 

49 
46 

42 
4" 



Brighton Marine Hospital 

Chelsea Memorial Hospital 

Pratt Diagnostic Clinic 

Physicians Offices 

Sullivan Square Medical Center 

Women's Free Hospital 

Maiden Hospital .... 

Brookline Hospital 

Massachusetts Osteopathic Hospital 

New England Baptist Hospital 

Shattuck Hospital 

Kenmore Hospital 

Washingtonian Hospital 

Harley Hospital . 

Glenside Hospital 

Police Station Houses 

Mount Auburn Hospital 

Somerville Hospital 

Winthrop Community Hospital 

Milton Hospital . 

Cambridge City Hospital . 

Joslin Clinic 

Soldiers' Home 

Hahnemann Hospital . 

Industrial Clinic . 

Lahey Clinic 

Robert Brigham Hospital . 

South End Clinic 

Total .... 



83 
38 
34 
32 
24 
23 
21 

19 
19 
19 
17 
15 
13 
1 2 
10 
10 
9 



4 
4 

3 

3 

3 
34. "35 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1966 



42 



TABLE I— Total Numbef of Persons Arrested by Districts and Units for All Types of Offenses, Covering Both 
PcfulliiK and Coniplclcd Cases, for the Year I ndiri« DfLcoibcr .51, l<)ti(i 



Districts 


Males 


Females 


Totals 


District One 
District Two 
District Three . 
District Four 
District I'ive 
District: Six . 
District Seven 
District Eight 
District Nine 
District Ten 
District Eleven . 
District Thirteen 
District Fourteen 
District Fifteen . 
Traffic Division . 
Headquarters 
Tactical Patrol Force 
















3.324 
3,361 
1,189 

19,842 
3,520 
3.279 
2,787 
2 
5,828 
1,942 
2,482 
1,897 
1.585 
1.039 

40,046 

1,196 

659 


444 

640 

82 

2,888 

549 
162 
486 

950 
186 
214 
226 
105 

67 

10,730 

464 

61 

18,272 


3.768 
4,001 
1,271 
22,730 
4.069 
3,441 
3,273 

6,787 
2,128 
2,696 
2,123 
1,690 
1,106 

59,785 

r,66o 

720 


Totals ... ... 


102,078 


121,250 



The loial muniicr <>i arrcsis, oouniniK cacli arrest a.< thai of a separale person, was 34,255, of wliieh 
7,558 were arrests on warrants and 20,697 were without warrants. There were also 86,995 persons sum- 
niDiK'd li\- the courts. 



TABLE II-^Major Offenses (Not Arrests), Known to the Police and Reported to the P.B.I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the Vear Ending Decenilier .51, I'Xifi 



Classification of Offenses 


Offeii.scs 
Heporteil 


Un- 
founded 


Actual 
Offenses 


Xiinilicr of Offeii.sfs 
( 'Icared ii\' .Vire.^is 


Not 
Cleared 


Total 
Offenses 

Clr.nred 


\',y .\rn.'.sts 
of Persons 
Under 18 


1. Criminal homicide 

(a) Murder and non-negligent manslaughter 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence . 

2. Forcible rape total 

(a) Rape by force .... 

(6) Assault to rape — attempt 

3. Robbery total 

(a) Armed — any weajion . . . . 

(b) Strong arm no weapon 

4. Assault total .... 
(a) Gun . , , . 

(6) Knife or cutting iustrumeut 

(c) Other dangerous weapon . 

(d) Hands, fists, feet— aggravated 

(e) Other a.ssaults — not aggravated 

5. Burglary total 

(a) Forcible entry 

(6) Unlawful entry — no force . 

(c) Attempted forcible entry . . . . 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 

(a) Over $50 in value 

(6) Under $50 in value 

7. Auto theft 


*>03 
58 
45 

*I06 

83 

23 

*i.i37 

488 

640 

*4,3oo 

i()i 

416 

345 
90 

3.252 

*S.-ii5 
4,222 

784 
100 

*6,S05 

3.064 

3,441 

*i3.i79 


*>7 
17 

7 

*i6 

6 

10 

*27 
3 
7 
/ 
2 
8 

*42 

28 



5 

*>3i 

50 

8 1 

*i.259 


*8<, 

58 
28 

*oo 
70 

23 

*I,I2I 
482 
630 

*4,2 73 

188 

400 

338 

04 

3-244 

* 5,0 7 3 

4,104 

775 
104 

*('-374 
3.014 
3,360 

*II,920 


07 

42 

25 

*07 

5' 
i() 

*448 
201 

247 

*i,563 

135 

2 go 

257 
69 

8X2 

*..23I 

I ,03 2 

I2C) 

70 

*i,087 

730 

1,248 

*2,6S7 


*8 
3 

*8 

7 
I 

*IOI 

23 

78 

*237 

<) 

48 

53 

II 

116 

*47o 

387 

55 
28 

*78o 

177 

612 

* 1,885 


*I9 
16 

•J 

25 

7 

*073 

281 

302 

*2,710 

53 

119 

81 

25 

2,432 

*3,842 

3,162 

646 

34 

*4.387 

2.275 

2,112 

*9.233 


Totals 


30,445 


1,400 


28,040 


8,050 


3.40S 


20,896 



* Sill 1 1 Ml. lis ^ Ciraiiil Ti.tiil .it 111 ill.. Ill ..f ra.h c 4 11 111 11. 



43 



TABLE III — Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1966 



Type of Property 


Value of Property 


Stolen in Boston 


Stolen 


Recovered 


Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles 

Miscellaneous 


§670,566 
455, 181 

113.695 
232,726 

6,068,915 
1,580,873 


§22,744 

8,293 
3,689 

9,907 

5,313,025 

272,698 


Totals . 


80.121,050 


85,630,356 



TABLE IV — Breakdown of Offenses Sho«n Under Table II and Value of Property Stolen by Type of Offense 

for the Near Ending December 31, 1966 



Classification of Offenses 



Number of Actual 
Offenses 


Value of Property 
Stolen 


712 
170 
17 
22 
89 
13 
98 


$132,382 00 
84,081 00 
1,469 00 
7.143 00 
23.507 00 
76.005 00 
11.614 00 


I , I -' I 


5336.201 00 


767 
2,049 

2,062 
195 


$327,356 00 
699.356 00 

597.S35 00 
30.418 00 


5.073 


Ji. 655.36s 00 


3.014 
2.333 

1,027 


S 1.006.523 00 

52.058 00 

2,894 00 


6,374 


Si. 061. 475 00 


8,S2S 
3,092 


S4.457.46S .jo 
1. 611. 447 00 


11.920 


56. 068,915 00 


J4.4,SS 


.•^u,ij;.us6 00 



Robbery 

(a) Highway (streets, alley, etc.) 

(6) Commercial house (not c. d,f) . 

le) Gas or service station . 

(rf) Chain store . . . . 

(«) Residence (anywhere on premises) 

CO Bank 

(g) Miscellaneous .... 

Total — robbery . 

Burglary — breaking or entering:, 
(a) Residence (dwelling) 

U) Night .... 

(2) Day 

(6) Nonreaidence (store, otEce, etc.) 

(1) Nisht .... 

(2) Day 

Total — burglary 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 
(a) S50 and over .... 

(6) So to S50 

(c) Under S5 . ... 

Total — larceny 

.\uto theft: 

(a) Joy-riding 

(6) All other 

Total — auto theft 

Gran'd Total 



TABLE V— Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Thefts for the \ ear Ending December 31, 1960 



.\umber of Actual 




Value of Properl\- 




Offenses 




Stolen 






159 




$8,350 


00 




789 




33.I2.S 


00 




575 




21.866 


00 




1.470 




369.829 


00 




856 




31.4S7 


00 




214 




6.990 


00 




1.025 




200.503 


00 




15 




361 


00 




1. 271 




3S.S.964 


00 




6.3-4 


5i. 061. 475 


00 


= 


Actu 


i\ (nier.ses 




= 




9.11,2 








1.680 








10.7S2 










1.789 







Nature of Larcenies: 

(a) Pocket picking 

(6) Purse snatching 

(c) Shoplifting . , 

(d) From autos (not accessories) 

(e) Auto accessories 

(/) Bicycles 

(g) From buildings (not shoplifting) 

(h) From any coin-operated machines (not m a buildingj 

(») All other 

Total — larcenies 

Automobiles Recovered: 

(a) Number stolen locally and recovered locally 
(6) Number stolen locally and recovered outside 
(c) Total locally stolen autos recovered 
{d) Number stolen out of town, recovered locally 



44 



TABLE VI — Number of Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests — Not the Number of Charges — for the Year Rnding 

December .?!, \')(,<> 







Persons Charged by 


Persons Found 








THE Police 




Guilty 




Classification of Offenses 








Of Offense 


Of Lesser 






Charged 


Arrested 


Suminoned 


Charged 


Offense 




Part I Classes 












I. 


Criminal homicide: 














(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


51 


51 


— 


7 


2 




(6) Manslaughter bv negligence '. 


21 


1 8 


3 


2 


8 


2. 


Forcible rape 


52 


51 


I 


10 


6 


V 


Robbery ■ 


417 


401 


16 


118 


45 


4- 


Aggravated assault 


OlQ 


585 


34 


152 


55 


S- 


Burglary breaking or entering 


837 


765 


72 


237 


40 


6. 


Larceny - theft (except auto dieft) 


1-437 


1,341 


06 


639 


24 


7- 


Auto theft 

Total, Part I Classes . . . . 
Part II Classes 


SoS 


747 


61 


282 


20 




4.-M-^ 


.i.'iyi 


j,S :; 


1.447 


200 














8. 


Other assaults 


1,012 


8S3 


120 


425 


26 


0. 


Arson 


1(3 


I 2 


4 


6 


I 


lO. 


Forgery and cotmterfeiting . . . . 


55 


52 


3 


20 


I 


II. 


Fiauds 


215 


IQO 


25 


112 


— 


12. 


Embezzlement .... 


5 


5 




5 


— 


13- 


Stolen property; buying, recei\dng, possessing . 


lOQ 


183 


16 


84 


8 


14. 


Vandalism 


lOI 


160 


31 


93 


9 


IS- 


Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc. 


174 


168 


6 


90 


4 


16. 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


40-' 


4S0 


3 


342 


2 


17 


Sex offenses (except 2 and 16) . 


200 


184 


25 


03 


II 


18. 


Narcotic drug laws 


237 


235 


2 


114 


5 


IQ. 


Gambling - . 


527 


501 


26 


397 


9 


20. 


Offenses against family and children 


S80 


814 


66 


553 


4 


21. 


Driving while intoxicated 


105 


188 


7 


04 


29 


22. 


Liquor laws .... ... 


87 


60 


1 8 


47 


— 


2V 


Drunkenness 


10,387 


10.367 


20 


18,604 


— 


24. 


Disorderly conduct 


1S6 


171 


15 


03 


I 


2S- 


Vagrancv 


35 


35 


— 


24 


I 


26. 


All other offenses 


1,467 


i.iSS 


270 


648 


6 


28. 


Parking violations . .... 


75.515 


1,01 I 


73,604 


70,870 


— 


29. 


Traffic and motor vehicle laws (.except 2 1 and 28) 

Total, Part II Classes 

Grand Total 


13-330 


006 


12.433 


12,733 


20 




iT4,4_^; 


27.711 


S(),7 I r 


10;.^ I,; 


137 




118,665 


31.670 


86,QQ5 


100,96c 


346 



45 



TABLE VII— Arrests for the Year Ending December ,11, 1966 



Nature of Offense 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Negligent manslaughter 

Rape 

Robbery ... 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary ^ breaking and entering 

Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Arson - _ _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Frauds 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carr>-ing, possessing, etc. . 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

3ex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling . . 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Dnmkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses . 

Parking violations 

Traffic violations (except 21 and 28) . 

Suspicion 

Arrests for other departments 

Totals 



.Males 



48 

20 

52 

387 

551 

817 

i,o6S 

778 

943 
16 

SO 

177 

3 

188 

174 
168 

95 
189 
20s 
476 
856 
180 

76 

I 8,2 00 

151 
25 

1,202 
61,126 

12,452 

378 

1,828 

102,978 



Females 



68 
20 
360 
30 
6q 



38 



II 

17 
6 

397 
20 



24 

15 

II 

i,o8S 

35 
10 

265 

14,380 
887 
177 
202 



Totals 



18, 



51 

21 

52 

417 

61Q 

837 

1,437 

SoS 

1,012 

lb 

55 

215 

5 

199 

IQI 
174 

402 

200 
237 
527 
880 

195 

87 

10,387 

186 

35 
1,407 

75'5i5 

13.330 

555 

2,030 

121. 2SO 



On 
Warrants 



Without 
Warrants 



Summoned 
by the 
Court 



10 
4 

24 

52 
184 
117 

225 
68 

I 

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133 

5 

48 

61 

16 

41 

56 

57 

429- 

724 

6 

25 

42 

7 

5 
700 

1,911 

375 

i,6Si 



41 

14 
27 

349 
401 
648 
1,116 
679 

350 
II 

34 

57 

135 

99 

152 

448 

128 

178 

72 

90 

182 

44 

10,325 

164 

30 
488 

531 
555 
349 



26,607 



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16 

34 
72 

96 

61 

129 

4 

3 

25 

16 

31 
6 

3 
25 

2 
26 
66 

7 
18 
20 
IS 

279 
73,604 
12,433 



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47 



48 



TABLE X — Shouiiig the Number of Licenses of All Kinds Issued by the Police Commissioner and the Amount of Money Received fioi 
All Sources ;ind Paid to the City Collector- Treasurer During the V'ear Ending December 31, 1966 I 

















1 










CL.\SS OF LiriONSE 


O o 

•.3 > 




CO c 


ill 


-u 


- 5 


'J. 

y 2 


, y 


^ 




Amount 




Ml 

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Auclioneer (Class I; . 


'\S 


63 


I 






I 










S945 o<i 


.\u«li<)iu'er (ofiei' classes) 




7 


7 


— 


— 


— 


— 










220 00 


Bicycle registrations . 




1,229 


1,229 


— 


— 


— 


-- 








16 


307 25 


Dog .... 




13.471 


13.451 


20 


— 


— 








4 


346 


30,682 00 


Driver (hackney carriage) 




6,942 


6.753 


— 


— 


189 






-,s 




674 


13.506 00 


Firearms, dealer in 




13 


13 


— 


— 


— 












455 00 
7,500 CO 


Firearms, license to carry 




I,66S 


1,500 


4 


14 


150 




4 


,S 




^ 


Firearms, permit to purchase . 


7 


5 


— 


— 


2 




— 





— 




25 0(J 


Gunsmith 


5 


5 


- — 


— 


— 




— 





— 




75 ocj 
16.388 00 


Hackney carriage (and regrants) 


i,S8o 


1,880 




— 


— 








--- 


J- 


Hackney carriage (photos) 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 










- 


7,070 00 


Handcart (common car.ier) 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 










_ 


4 00 

576 00 

3.700 00 


Junk collector 


33 


32 


— 


— 


I 






I 


_ 





Junk shopkeeper 


37 


37 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


— 




.^ 


Musician (collective and sound car) 


II 


II 


— 


— 














. 


62 00 


Musician (itinerant) ... 


2 


2 


— 










_ . 


_ 




, 


20 00 


Pawnbroker ... 


33 


33 


— 


— 







I 










1 .625 00 


Public lodging house . 


4 




4 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 









Secondhand articles .... 


314 


305 


6 




I 


2 


o 




I 




15.150 00 


Secondhand motor vehicle dealer 


203 


200 


— 


I 





, 


5 




I 




9.901) 00 

245 0" 

2,319 00 

120 00 


Shotguns and rifles, dealer in 


7 


7 


— 




— 












Sightseeing automobile 


20 


20 


— 


^ - 





— 


- 




--_ 




Sightseeing driver .... 


30 


30 




~ 


















Special police 


1. 133 


798 


296 


- - 


4 


4 


31 


I 






7,940 00 


Auto towing charges .... 


— 




— 


- 















37,264 00 

5.857 80 


Auto storage fees .... 


— 


— 


— 





















Copies of licenses and replacement doj 






















tags 

Copies of police reports 




— 


- ^ 


— 


— 












378 25 

37,098 00 

1,640 87 

3,706 00 
1,110 80 


Damage to police property 


-- 
















_ 







Liquor purchase identification cards 


— 


— 


















Reimbursements 


— 





_- 


_. 














Sale of lost, stolen, and abandoned prop 






















erty 

Sale of pawnbroker and secondhand ar 


— 


— 


-- 


— 


— 












5,535 06 


tides report blanks .... 


— 


— 



















270 00 


Sunday permits 


— 


— 


-- 


















4.472 00 

1,940 00 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Totals 


27,116 


26,383 


331 


15 


.347 


9 


43 


ss 


6 


1 ,068 


S2i8,i07 03 


Credit by City Collector- Treasurer fo 
























money received for damage to police 
























property ^nd for telephone commission 


; — 


— 




















15..590 II 


Money received from the Massachusett 






















Bay Transportation Company for po 
























lice services rendered 
Money received from Massachusett 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




226,623 24 


Port Authority for police service 
























rendered 













































— 


27,731 00 


Grand Total .... 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


$487,851 38 



TABLE XI —Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1966 



49 



EXPENDITURES 

Group i Personal Services: 

10 Permanent employees . $19,058,064 12 

11 Temporary employees 113.428 80 

12 Overtime 986,753 12 

Group 2 Contractual Services: 

21 Communications $83,888 II 

22 Light, heat and power 66,167 49 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings and structures 70,11592 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment .... 99.844 03 

28 Transportation of persons 27,639 70 

29 Miscellaneous contractual service 67,692 02 

Group 3 Supplies and Materials: 

30 Automotive $178,134 89 

32 Food 12,181 50 

33 Heating . - 30.99' 94 

34 Household 7.227 69 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 1.535 23 

36 Office 46,515 60 

39 Miscellaneous 250,130 62 

Group 4 Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 

Group 5 Equipment 

Total 



$20,158,246 04 



415.347 27 



526.717 A7 



97,944 20 



295,062 62 
$21 493.317 50 



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51 



52 

TABLE XIII — Members of Police Force on December .51 , 19(p6, Who Were Appointed in the Year Indicated 





-n 


y"; 




-d 




_3J 








g 






c 


s 




5 c 




Date or 
Appointment 




C 

>. c 


■r: 


nants 
nant- 
ives 




Secoi 
lird-C 
ives 


a Z 

c S 

OJ p 


1/1 




CD 


Ox 


0. 




Lieute 
Lieute 
Detect 


2 S ij 

X X C 


First-, 
and Tl 
Detect 


II 

G-O. 




ly-M 


— 


— 


— 


I 











I 


1925 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


I 


I 


1926 












— 


— 


X 


— 


— 


— 


2 


3 


1927 












— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


2 


1928 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


3 


1929 












— 


— 


— 


4 


8 


I 


8 


21 


1930 












— 


— 


I 


2 


— 


— 


— 


3 


1931 












— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


I 


3 


1937 












— 


3 


4 


10 


30 


12 


36 


95 


1940 












3 


2 


5 


13 


28 


3 


3" 


«4 


1941 












— 


— 


I 


4 


7 


5 


25 


42 


1942 












— 


3 


5 


10 


33 


16 


51 


116 


1943 












— 


— 


2 


5 


9 


8 


22 


46 


1944 












— 


— 


2 


3 


10 


14 


51 


80 


1945 














-- 


I 


I 


I 


4 


2\ 


28 


1946 














— 


6 


9 


27 


22 


I I I 


175 


1947 














— 


3 


I 


24 


14 


103 


145 


1948 














— 


I 


7 


20 


I 


83 


112 


1949 
















— 


2 


10 


6 


88 


106 


1950 












■ 




— 


3 


17 


10 


113 


143 


1951 












— 




— 


2 


27 


15 


202 


246 


1952 












— 


— 


— 


— 


I 


/ 


63 


71 


1953 












— 


— 


— 


I 


2 


7 


85 


95 


1954 












— 


— 


— 


— 


I 


II 


82 


94 


1955 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


6 


85 


91 


1956 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


no 


112 


1957 














— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


109 


III 


195S 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


85 


85 


1959 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


34 


34 


i960 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


50 


50 


1961 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


73 


73 


1963 












— - 


- - 


— 


— 


— 


— 


63 


63 


1964 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


68 


68 


1966 












— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


III 


III 


1 


'OTAI 


.S 








3 


8 


30 


80 


257 


166 


1,969 


2,513 



53 



TABLE XI V — Members of Department (Retired During the Year Ending December 31, 1966, Giving Age at 
the Time of Retirement and the Number of Years' Service of Each 





Cause of 


Age at Time 


Years of 


Name 


Retirement 


of Retirement 


Service 


Adley, Michael J. (5) 


30 Years Service 


66 


43 


Anderson, Norman (3) . - , 


Incapacitated 






45 


21 


Ball, Albert W. (3) 


Age . 






5« 


28 


Barry, John J. (3) • • 


Age . . 






64 


36 


Bellino, John V. (3) 


Incapacitated 






37 


13 


Bradley, Robert E. (5) . 


30 Years Ser\'ice 






53 


30 


BrambiUa, George (3) . 


Age . 






65 


36 


Burke, John F. (3) 


Age , . . 






65 


36 


Burns, Harry P., Jr. (3) 


Incapacitated 






65 


39 


Carney, James E. (3) 


Age . . 






65 


36 


Coleman, Martin (5) 


30 Years Service 






69 


39 


Connors, Joseph L. (3) . 


Incapacitated 






65 


36 


Crossley, Robert H. (3) 


Incapacitated 






46 


15 


Crowe, Daniel J. (3) 


Age . . . 






65 


38 


Crowley, Jerome A. (3) 


Age . . 






65 


35 


Davenport, Francis S. (2) 


Incapacitated 






5-' 


-'4 


Deignan, Charles J. (3) 


Incapacitated 






63 


37 


Dewan, John J. (4) 


Incapacitated 






59 


16 


DiFranco, John T. (3) ■ 


Incapacitated 






39 


18 


Donnelly, Thomas A. (3) 


Incapacitated 






45 


16 


Doris, John E. (3) . 


Age . 






60 


28 


Doucette, CaHxte O. (3) 


Age . . 






64 


37 


Ducey. John P. (6) 


30 \ ears Service 






70 


46 


Enbinder, David (3) 


Age . 






65 


36 


Evansen, Kathryn G. (3) 


Age . 






70 


16 


Fiore, Maurice (4) . . 


Age , . . 






65 


18 


Flood, Daniel F. (3) 


Age . 






65 


39 


Foynes, Jolin T.. Jr. (6) 


30 Years Service 






7" 


33 


Gaffney, Joseph A. J. . 


Incapacitated 






67 


43 


Gariboldi, Edward J. (3) 


Age . . 






65 


39 


Goodman, Walter R. (3) 


Incapacitated 






39 


10 


Hagerty, William V. (3) 


Age . . . 






65 


3« 


Hartford, William G. (3) 


Incapacitated 






46 


15 


Hayes, James H. (3) 


Age . . . 






62 


37 


HiUier, William H. (5) . 


30 Years Service 






68 


38 


Hourihan, John F. (5) 


30 Years Service 






65 


38 


Howard, John E. (3) 


Age . . . 






65 


38 


Hurley, Jeremiah J. (3) 


Incapacitated 






64 


28 


Keefe, Margaret M. (4) 


Age , 






66 


9 


Kelly, John J. (3) ■ 


Age . 






65 


28 


Lang, George J. (3) 


Incapacitated 






59 


26 


Langlois, Herbert J. (5) 


30 Years Service 






67 


43 


Lindsay, Waltei J. . . 


Incapacitated 






66 


43 


Lomax, Vincent A. (3) . 


Incapacitated 






38 


II 


Maglio, Joseph J. (3) 


Incapacitated 






34 


10 


McCarten, Edward J. (2 ) 


Incapacitated 






58 


->"t 


McCartliy, Daniel F. (5) 


30 Years Ser-vice 






62 


36 


McCarthy, James D. (3) 


Age . 






65 


37 


McCarthy, John J. (3) . 


Age . . . 






65 


38 


McDermott, Stephen J. (5) 


30 Years Service 






57 


30 


McDonough, Harrv M. (3) 


Incapacitated 






40 


15 


McFadden, Stephen J. (3) 


Age . 






65 


29 


Mcintosh. William H. . 


Incapacitated 






67 


44 


Mooney, Hugh B. (3) 


Incapacitated 






65 


28 


Murphy, Francis J. (3) . 


Age . . . 




65 


36 


Norman, Harr\- (3) 


Age . . . 




65 


36 


O'Brien, Cornelius F. (5) 


30 Years Ser\nce 




67 


41 


O'Donnell, Joseph N. (3) 


Incapacitated 




64 


28 


O'Rielly, Patrick J. (3) . 


Age ... 




65 


39 


Powers, Thomas F. (6) . 


30 Years Service 




70 


31 


Regan, John F. (3) 


Age . . . 




65 


37 


Shea, Edward H. (3) 


Age . 




65 


29 


Skane, Edward D. (3) . 


Incapacitated 




44 


17 


SulUvan, Hugh J. (3) 


Incapacitated 




62 


29 


Sweeney, Joseph F., Jr. (3) 


Age . 






65 


38 


Sylvia, Charles M. (3) . 


Age . _ . . 






70 


22 


Walsh, George jNL (3) • 


Incapacitated 






65 


35 


Walsh, John R. (3) 


Incapacitated 






45 


15 


Walsh, Lawrence T. (3) 


Age . . . 




63 


28 


Winmill, Ivers E. (3) 


Incapacitated 


59 


2Q 



(2J Retired under General Laws. Chapter 32, Section 57. 

(3) Retired under State- Boston Retirement System. 

(4) Civilians retired tmder State- Boston Retirement System. 

(5) Retired Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32. Section 58. 

(6) Retired Civilian Veterans under General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 58. 



54 



TABI E XV — List of Police Officers in Active Service Who Died During the Year Ending December 31, 1966 



Rank 


Name 


District, Di\'ision, or I'nit 


Date of Death 


Lieutenant 


Frederick J. Williams 


II 


September 7, 1966 


Sergeant-Detective 


Joseph L. Barrett 


Criminal Investigation Di- 
vision 


August 15, 1966 


First-Grade Detective . 


Edwin P. Cashman 


Criminal Investigation Di- 
vision 


March 22, 1966 


Patrolman-Headquarters 
Dispatcher 


Edward J. Burdge 


Records and Communica- 
tions Division 


April iS, 1966 


Patrolman 


Charles "W. Conway 


Records and Communica- 
tions Division 


June 25, 1966 


Patrolman 


William M. Hennessey 


8 


September 3, 1966 


Patrolman 


William F. Hussey 


Records and Communica- 
tions Di\-ision 


August 8, 1966 


Patrolman 


George J. Roche 


1 


June 21, 1966 


Patrolman 


Alichael D. Scannell 


2 (P. C.) 


January 25, 1966 


Patrolman 


Joseph A. Sullivan 


4 


February 27, 1066 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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RELEASEo ey ' ■.:^.•,• ,. ■> 

OFTROIT. M'GH ^"^