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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOM 
PUBLIC 
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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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ANNUAL REPORT 




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CITY OF BOSTON 
POLICE DEPARTMENT 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 28-1968 



[DOCUMENT — NO. 28] 



Sixty-second Annual Report 



OF THE 



POLICE COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



CITY OF BOSTON 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 




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THE COVER: "NEW BOSTON'S CITY HALL" 

The upper portion of the montage is a photograph of one of the prize-winning 
renderings submitted in a nationwide contest to select the best design for Boston's 
new city hall. This view shows that side of the building that faces Pemberton 
Square and the Court House.* 

The lower portion of the montage is a photograph of the "New Boston's City 
Hall" under construction. This view, taken by Jim McDevitt of the Boston Rede- 
velopment Authority in January of 1968, shows the southern face of the building. 
Dock Square and the statue of Samuel Adams are in the foreground. 

The Mayor of Boston will occupy offices in the floating cubes directly over 
the southern entrance to the "New Boston's City Hall." 



PHOTO CREDITS 



Kallmann, McKinnell & Knowles 

Campbell & Aldrich 

Wm. J. LeMessurier & Assoc, Inc. 

Architects and Engineers for the Boston City Hall 



Boston Record-American-Sunday Advertiser 
Boston Redevelopment Authority 
Boston Police Department 
Prendiville Photographer 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Page 

3 Table of Contents 

4 Commissioner's Letter to the Mayor 

5 Mayor's Letter to the Police Department 

6 Table of Organization 

7 The Department 

8 Financial Statement 

9 Synopsis 

10 "Wanted" 

11 "The Police and the Community" 

12 "Would You Tempt the Kid Next Door to Become a Car Thief!?!" 

13 "A Weekend in June" 

14 "Communications" 

15 "Will the Police Officer Ever Achieve True Professional Status?" 

17 Statistical Tables 

18 Ambulance Service by Police District 

19 TABLE 1. Workload — Population — Square Miles — Road Miles by Police Districts 
20 TABLE II. Major Offenses (Not Arrests) Known to the Police 

20 TABLE III. Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II 

21 TABLE IV. Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table 111 and Value of Property 

22 TABLE V. Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Thefts 

23 TABLE VI. Number of Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests 

24 TABLE VI 1. Arrests for the Year 

25 TABLE VIIL Age and Sex of All Persons Arrested 

26 Recipients of Awards 

28 Police Officers on Active Duty Who Died During the Year 



HEADQUARTERS 
154 BERKELEY STREET 




CITY OF BOSTON 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Edmund L. McNamara 
police commissioner 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



January 1, 1968. 

Hon. Kevin H. White, 
Mayor of the City of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of the Revised Ordinances of 1961, Chapter 3, Section 25, 
the annual report of the Boston Police Department for the year ending December 31 , 1967, is here- 
with submitted. 

The year 1967 witnessed a continuing series of incidents amid a climate of social unrest In 
cities across our nation. Boston was not spared in this national trend of spiraling crime rates and 
civil disturbances. Cognizant of its obligation to our citizens against this escalating challenge of 
crime and disorder, the Boston Police Department stood firm of purpose in its determination to pro- 
vide the community with the highest degree of security, safety, and service. This report presents, 
in capsule form, some of the activities and accomplishments incidental to that effort. 

Responsive to the ever-changing patterns of criminal behavior and increased policing demands, 
the department reacted with organizational changes, modified patrol procedures. Innovative com- 
munity relations projects, expanded training programs, new operational techniques, and added 
sophisticated equipment, all with the ultimate aim of establishing higher standards of proficiency and 
performance. 

A significant achievement was the department's participation 
In the National Crime Information Center— a computerized Infor- 
mation network designed for the more efficient handling and ex- 
change of documented police information. 

Another highlight was the ground-breaking for construction 
of the new Government Center Police Station with an estimated 
date of occupancy in mid-1968, the initial step In the department's 
projected ultramodern building program. 

In the final analysis, however, the quality of police service 
is dependent In large measure upon the individual performance and 
integrity of members of the police organization, I am pleased at 
this time to commend the diligence, competence, and loyalty of 
the members of the Boston Police Department In carrying out their 
assignments in a responsible manner. 

Respectfully submitted. 




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Police Commissioner. 




CITY OF BOSTON 

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

CITY HALL. BOSTON 



KEVIN H. WHITE 




To t-he Members of the Boston Police Deportment: 

In this era of great social flux and increasing public awareness of personal safety 
and security, the role of police and their duty performance is being subjected to the close 
scrutiny of an awakened citizenry. At no time in our history has the field of law enforce- 
ment been so vital to our national interests. President Johnson has recognized that officials 
"at every government level in this nation know that the American people have hod enough 
of rising crime and violence." It is clear that crime in the streets is closely correlated with 
poverty, unemployment, and slums — all urban ills. 

The urbanologist's glossary includes the terms polis, metropolis, megalopolis, and 
technopolis. Each is a refinement and enlargement of community culture and magnitude. 
The increasing complexities of urban life ore accompanied by a social blight of staggering 
proportions; the decay of the inner core cities has brought in its wake a disproportionate 
amount of crime, delinquency, and disorder. This challenge must be met by a total public 
commitment spearheaded by a dedicated police force. 

The task of providing the quality of low enforcement necessary to this commitment 
has become one of the most difficult and sensitive responsibilities of contemporary munici- 
pal administration. The fabric of city life cannot endure without an effective and efficient 
law enforcement agency to service its needs. 

At the outset of my administration I commend the members of the Police Department 
for carrying out their assignments with a high level of dedication and competence in the 
post year. In the years that lie ahead I welcome a partnership whose cooperative efforts 
will enhance the horizons of a dynamic Boston. 

Very truly yours. 

Mayor of Boston. 







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THE DEPARTMENT 

The Police Department is at present constituted as follows: 



Police Commissioner 
Confidential Secretary 
Assistant Corporation Counsel 
Administrative Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 



Superintendents 

Deputy Superintendents 

Captains 

Lieutenants and Lieutenant-Detectives 
Sergeants and Sergeant-Detectives 



The Police Force 

4 First-, Second-, and Third-Grade Detectives 
9 Patrolmen 



31 

79 

253 



Patrolwomen 
Total 



*202 

ti,9i3 
3 

2,494 



*Includes 2 patrolwomen 

flncludes 3 patrolmen in armed forces 



Assistant Biological Chemist .... 

Clerks and Typists 

Diesel and Gasoline Engine Operator 

Director, Signal Service 

Director, Signal Service Assistant 

Electrical Equipment Repairman 

Elevator Operator 

Foreman, Signal Service 

Groundmen, Laborers (Police), and Motor 

Equipment Operators 3 

Head Administrative Clerk i 

Head Clerks 13 

Hearing Stenographers 6 

Hostlers (i Temporary) 5 

Janitresses 3 

Junior Building Custodians 43 

Linemen and Cable Splicers .... 7 

Machinist i 

Matron, Chief i 

Matron, Assistant Chief i 

Matrons, Police 10 

Motor Equipment Repair Foreman ... i 



Motor Equipment Repairmen 
Multilith Operator .... 
Multilith Operator and Cameraman 
Principal Clerk and Stenographer 
Principal Clerks and Typists 
Principal Statistical Machine Operator 

Property Clerk 

Senior Building Custodian 

Senior Clerks and Typists 

Senior Statistical Machine Operator . 

Signalmen-Electricians (i Temporary) 

Statistical Machine Operators (2 Temporary) 

Steam Firemen 

Superintendent of Police Buildings 
Superintendent of Police Buildings, Assistant 
Telephone Operators 

Working Foreman Motor Equipment Repair 
man 

School Traffic Supervisors 

Total 



3 
10 

3 

I 

I 

14 

I 
166 

353 



Distribution and Changes 

During the year 55 patrolmen were appointed; 2 patrolmen were reinstated; 6 patrolmen were dismissed; 

1 first-grade detective and 20 patrolmen resigned ; i deputy superintendent was appointed superintendent ; i captain 
was appointed deputy superintendent; 2 lieutenants were appointed deputy superintendents; 3 lieutenants were 
promoted to captains, 6 sergeants to lieutenants, 8 patrolmen to sergeants; i lieutenant assigned as lieutenant- 
detective, 3 sergeants as sergeant-detectives, 39 patrolmen as detectives third-grade, 16 detectives third-grade as 
detectives second-grade, 8 detectives second-grade as detectives first-grade; i deputy superintendent, i captain, 

2 lieutenants, 2 sergeant-detectives, 3 sergeants, 2 first-grade detectives, and 26 patrolmen were retired on pension ; 
I sergeant and 1 1 patrolmen died. 

7 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 



EXPENDITURES 
Group i Personal Services: 

10 Permanent employees $19,799,906 86 

11 Temporary employees 192,345 30 

12 Overtime 1.445.47802 

Group 2 Contractual Services: 

21 Communications $94,064 05 

22 Light, heat and power 68,895 55 

26 Repairs and maintenance of buildings and structures 46,614 33 

27 Repairs and servicing of equipment .... 124,933 21 

28 Transportation of persons 34,276 71 

29 Miscellaneous contractual services .... 105,003 75 

Group 3 Supplies and Materials: 

30 Automotive $192,651 85 

32 Food 11^143 ,3 

33 Heating 32,431 27 

34 Household g_4og 23 

35 Medical, dental and hospital 246 04 

36 Office 5g_483 07 

39 Miscellaneous 290,741 19 

Group 4 Current Charges and Obligations: 

49 Miscellaneous 

Group 5 Equipment 

Total 



feM37.730 18 



473.787 60 



596,105 78 



86,800 55 



188,812 56 
$22,783,236 67 




SYNOPSIS 

Total Number Of: 

Arrests made for all offenses 143,086 

Parking violation citations issued by Boston Police 710,465 

Moving violation citations issued by Boston Police 27,793 

Automobiles stolen in Boston 14,467 

Automobiles stolen in Boston and recovered in Boston . . . '. . . . 12,857 

Arrests for drunkenness 18,009 

Arrests for driving under the influence or drunken driving 209 

Ambulance runs (sick or injured persons assisted) 37,065 

Persons reported missing 1,919 

Persons reported missing and located 1,838 

Telephone messages 1,697,184 

Radio calls 2,005,835 

Teletype messages 118,975 

Warrants processed 9,663 

Fingerprints processed 15,361 

Cases investigated by ballistics 1,080 

Crimes and/or other incidents investigated 236,386 

Total income from issuance of licenses, permits, records, etc. . . » . $209,849 36 




"WANTED" 

"WANTED" by most any police department today could mean: young men with strength of character, 
patience, intelligence, and physical stamina — to protect life and property, and to insure for every citizen 
those inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. 

This advertisement, of course, refers to the current shortage of police applicants, and although it 
may not show up in the help wanted section of every newspaper, nevertheless it hangs invisibly on the 
front door of almost every police department in the country. The demand for law enforcement officers has 
never been greater, and the supply never more limited. Where once the "Route Cop" was a product of the 
community he served, today most police forces recruit countrywide. Larger police departments regularly 
send representatives to other cities and colleges, to compete on the labor market for promising prospects. 
Many departments circulate informative brochures, describing the advantages and opportunities available 
to the police candidate. 

A career in law enforcement holds a very high promise of reward to the recent school graduate. The 
variety of assignments offers a challenge that can give lasting satisfaction. Opportunities for promotion 
are only limited by the individual's initiative. If ever a time and opportunity presented itself for a young 
man to make a success of a livelihood in law enforcement, that "time and opportunity" is now. 



10 




"THE POLICE AND THE COMMUNITY" 

A community is essentially a body of people having common organizations or interests, or living in 
the same place under the same law. The modern community is an outgrowth of the old village, which, by 
its very nature, created an interdependency between members of the village. Each family and occupation 
contributed some essential ingredient that was necessary for the continued existence of the village. Un- 
der these conditions and circumstances the individual found an excellent chance to fulfill his desire to 
belong and to feel wanted. 

As time went by the village became a community, and the community itself became larger and larger. 
The larger the community became, the more impersonal became the methods of society. In the present- 
day community, our very mode of life tends to isolate us from our fellow man. Community standards have 
changed to such a degree that men live side by side, yet remain indifferent to the personal needs of the 
other. "Things" and "corporations" now take precedence over the individual and his dignity. Such cir- 
cumstances call for developing more vital community-oriented programs. 

To create an atmosphere of true community relations, there must be a constant, sincere method of 
interchange that will improve human understanding. Members of a community must meet and discuss 
their problems. 

Police-community relations programs that exist in so many police departments today are typical of 
the success that can be achieved. 



11 




WOULD YOU TEMPT THE KID NEXT DOOR TO BECOME A CAR THIEF!?! 

The dictionary defines the word "tempt" as: to put to trial, to test, to 
endeavor to persuade, to lead into evil, or to entice to what is wrong. 

The average person would quickly answer the above title question in the negative. He might even 
take offense that you asked him this question. But we might very well be tempting our sons and our neigh- 
bors' sons whenever we park our cars with the doors unlocked, or the windows open, especially when we 
leave the keys in the ignition. The Federal Bureau of Investigation has established that some 45 percent 
of cars stolen had keys left in the ignition, or a door unlocked, or a window open. 

It is interesting to note the age group that becomes involved in car thefts. A "professional car- 
thief" usually has all the necessary tools to accomplish his theft so he does not depend so much upon the 
carelessness of the car owner. But the youngster who is just "borrowing" the car for a "joyride" to im- 
press the ganger his girl friend, not only depends upon the owner-operator's "carelessness," but has al- 
most come to expect it. 

Statistics indicate that during 1967 there were 1,044 arrests made for some form of auto theft in Bos- 
ton. Of that total, 767 were persons under twenty-one years of age. Of these 767 minors, 446 were sixteen 
years of age and under. Thus,of all persons arrested in 1967 for auto theft in Boston, 77.7 percent were 
minors, and over 58 percent of these were minors sixteen years of age and under. 

Research studies indicate these youngsters come from every economic level; yet most feel that car 
theft is not a very serious offense. They seem unaware that such an act can incur a criminal record which 
will hurt them later on. There is little concern on their part that car stealing can very often lead to physical 
injury and even death. Nor do they realize that such actions can bring shame and disgrace. Above all, they 
seldom consider the great financial burden and inconvenience placed upon the owner of a car when it is taken 
unlawfully. 

So , let us all stop and think for a moment every time we park our car. Make sure it is locked up and 
all bundles are out of sight, in the trunk. 



12 




"A WEEKEND IN JUNE" 

On June 2, 1967, at approximately 5:00 p.m., an incident occurred in a public building in the City of 
Boston, the echo of which has not yet died out. Although society persistently fails in its attempt to de- 
fine the cause and effect of such incidents, most will agree that it was a classic example of mass hyste- 
ria in the form of an emotional human volcano, the ashes from which still lie at the feet of every citizen. 

It is unimportant at this time to discuss how many persons were involved, or how the Boston police 
controlled the incident, or whether other forces should have been used, or how much damage and misery 
was caused. Nor is it important now to determine who cast the first stone. However, it is important that 
we ask each other why it did happen! 

Sociologists and analysts only take the cold facts as reported, and attempt to sift out the underlying 
causes. The results of these investigations never satisfactorily explain either side of the problem. To 
lay the blame at the feet of government is to say our government is not the end result of all the people. 
To lay the blame at the feet of a single group is to say our government does not owe an obligation to all 
society. 

Such city problems are not the exclusive domain of its Chief Executive, nor are they the exclusive 
responsibility of its police department. They certainly are not the exclusive problems of a single group 
or race of people. These problems belong to us all. A search of our individual conscience might tell 
us why certain incidents ever happened in the tirst place. 



13 



IBM 1050 
TERMINAL 




"COMMUNICATIONS" 

Since the beginning of time, man has been constantly seeking different ways of communicating with 
his fellow man. The need for speed and accuracy in communications has caused man to design and con- 
struct the most sophisticated machinery to supplement the human voice. The high degree of engineering 
efficiency that man has achieved makes one wonder if our human voice may one day be completely replaced. 

In the remote past, when signals were flashed from hilltop by fire, smoke, shiny objects, flags, etc., 
the sending and receiving parties were forced to stay within physical range of each other. These tech- 
niques were the forerunner to the use of wire for voice transmission, and this in turn led to the wireless 
communication. 

A modern police department is a prime user of complex machinery to transmit the voice or a written 
message. The lone policeman with his walkie-talkie, the mobile units with sophisticated equipment, and 
now the computer — all portray the technical advances made in law enforcement. 

The Boston Police Department, as one of many, has just recently modernized its radio communications 
complex. Studies to further improve the system are constantly being made, especially in the area of ma- 
chine compatibility. As an example, Boston, along with a score or more of other police agencies, is pres- 
ently a participant in the National Crime Information Center program. Our department connects directly 
by terminal with a central computer at the Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters in Washington and 
participates in the entry and retrieval of data concerning stolen cars, guns, wanted persons, and property. 

The ultimate in police communications is limited only by the imagination. The policeman of the future 
can be expected to attend at the scene of an incident and successively communicate with his department 
over a viewer phone, report his findings, query a computer, make scientific diagnoses, and develop stra- 
tegic alternatives — all within a matter of minutes. 

14 




"WILL THE POLICE OFFICER EVER ACHIEVE TRUE PROFESSIONAL STATUS?" 

There is no quick and easy way to answer the above question. Some skeptics will say "Never" and 
immediately dismiss the subject, since they view the policeman as a day-to-day plodder, performing tasks 
that require little or no talent. 

Others might honestly admit they do not know how the policeman can attain "professional status," 
but they do show a willingness to encourage the policeman's drive towards that goal. Police departments 
thus have an obligation to keep the public informed of any progress in this direction. 

The pattern of police work has always appeared as being unchanged from generation to generation, 
much like apprenticeships; however, today a number of colleges and universities offer an opportunity for a 
bachelor's or an associate's degree in the field of law enforcement. Other universities offer the chance of 
a master's degree or a doctor's degree in either police science or police administration. In addition to 
formal programs, there are varied lectures, seminars, symposiums, and conferences which policemen may 
attend on a daily, weekly, monthly, or even annual basis. Many of these offerings become a joint effort of 
both the police department and an institution of higher learning. There are also a number of colleges that 
have invited qualified police officers into the faculty as part-time lecturers in degree programs. 

This educational effort in the area of law enforcement has placed today's policeman at least on the 
starting rungs of the academic ladder, and has put the upper rungs of achievement more clearly in focus. 
With the demand by police departments for more education, and with the desire of more police officers for 
more and more training, the resulting adoption of uniform standards will make the "Professional Policeman 
an attainable reality 



15 



STATISTICAL TABLES 

OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1967 



AMBULANCE SERVICE BY POLICE DISTRICT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1967 



Hospital 


• 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


ID 


1 1 


■3 


14 


15 


Total 


Beth Israel .... 


47 


,55 


156 


220 


59 


14 


6 


_ 


81 


103 


14 


34 


74 


6 


869 


Boston City 






206 


508 


1.520 


5.641 


346 


2,072 


447 


I 


3.147 


1 .405 


1,637 


702 


113 


287 


18,032 


Boston Floating 






— 


3 


9 


3 


7 


26 


5 


— 


6 


4 


5 


3 




2 


73 


Bo-ston Lying-in 






5 


I 


24 


7 


II 


6 


6 


— 


— 


37 


7 


6 


4 


3 


117 


Boston Sanatorium 








I 






— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


7 


I 


I 




I 


14 


Boston State . 






7° 


73 


181 


250 


65 


no 


48 


— 


140 


98 


99 


81 


32 


67 


1.314 


Brighton Marine 






6 


3 


— 


I 


7 


6 


3 


— 


— 


I 


I 


I 


4 


6 


39 


Brookline Hospital 






4 


I 


4 


I 


7 


— 




— 


— 


— 


2 


6 


I 


— 


26 


Cambridge City 






I 


— 


5 


I 


2 


— 


6 


— 


— 


I 


— 


— 


I 


2 


19 


Carney 






2 


18 


856 


3 


246 


211 


2 


— 


3 


7 


1,078 


42 


— 


I 


2,469 


Chelsea Memorial . 






2 


I 


3 






I 


2 


— 


19 




I 


3 


I 


I 


35 


Children's 






8 


4 


221 


39 


148 


49 


40 


— 


145 


519 


82 


230 


18 


13 


1. 516 


Deaconess 






2 


I 


II 


13 


13 


4 


I 


— 




3 


4 


4 


5 




61 


East Boston Relief 






2 


— 


2 


I 


2 




674 


— 


— 




I 






— 


682 


Faulkner . 






I 


— 


II 


I 


516 


— 




— 


— 


4 


5 


157 


I 


— 


696 


Glenside . 









— 


I 


I 


I 


— 













I 


I 





— 


5 


Hahnemann 














I 


3 


I 
















I 


3 





9 


Harley 






— 


— 


4 


— 


2 


2 


— 


— 


— 


I 


4 






— 


13 


Home 






10 


2 




— 


52 


— 


,s 


— 


59 


24 


I 


20 


97 


— 


270 


Industrial Clinic 






— 


I 


— 


— 




— 




— 






206 


— 




— 


207 


Joslin Clinic 






— 


— 


2 


2 


I 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


I 


I 


7 


Kenmore . 






4 


— 


3 


2 


I 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


I 


9 


2 


24 


Lahey Clinic 






I 


I 




2 


— 


— 








— 


2 





I 




— 


7 


Longwood 






2 


I 


2 


I 


13 


2 


I 


— 





5 


2 


12 


5 


I 


47 


Maiden Hospital 






— 


I 


— 


— 




— 





— 


— 


I 





— 




— 


2 


Mass. Eye and Ear 






8 


5 


7 


I 


I 


4 


I 


— 


3 


3 


3 


2 


7 


5 


50 


Mass. General 






902 


1.354 


94 


450 


45 


162 


20.? 


3 


88 


63 


54 


28 


58 


644 


4,148 


Mass. Memorial 






I 


1 


5 


119 


17 


I 


10 




66 


— 


10 


2 


7 


55 


300 


Mass. Mental Health 






I 


3 


I 


9 


I 


I 


I 


— 


— 


22 


2 


21 


14 


2 


78 


Mass. Osteopathic . 






— 




4 




I 


2 





— 


— 


II 


10 


9 




— 


37 


Milton Hospital 






— 


— 


2 


— 


5 


— 


— 





— 


— 







I 


— 


8 


Mt. Auburn Hospital 






— 


I 


— 


r 




— 


I 














I 


8 


— 


12 


N. E. Baptist . 






— 


I 


— 


4 


— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


7 


3 


4 


I 


— 


22 


N. E. Hospital 






— 


— 


13 


3 


3 


2 


I 


— 


— 


10 


10 


I 


10 


2 


55 


Northern Mortuary 






26 


47 


I 






— 


— 


— 


10 


II 


— 


3 


77 


10 


185 


Parker Hill 






— 


I 


I 


14 





— 





— 


7 


6 


3 


4 


7 


— 


43 


Peter Bent Brigham 






2 


12 


82 


87 


68 


4 


12 





60 


684 


35 


261 


25 


I 


1.333 


Physician's Office 






— 


2 


— 




3 




— 


— 


5 


— 


2 


8 


17 


— 


37 


Pohce Station House 






— 


I 


— 


— 




— 


— 


— 


I 


— 


I 


— 


9 


— 


12 


Pratt Diagnostic 






— 


4 


4 


13 


12 


2 


3 


— 


— 


— 


4 


— 


3 


— 


45 


Robert Brigham 






— 






I 


— 


— 




— 


2 





2 


— 




— 


5 


Roslindale General 






— 


— 


II 


— 


39 


I 


— 


— 


— 


I 


13 


10 


I 


— 


76 


Shattuck . 






I 





2 


I 


2 


I 













3 


2 


I 


— 


13 


Soldiers' Home 














I 







2 











I 








2 


6 


Somerville Hospital 






2 


— 





— 
























— 


4 


6 


South End Clinic . 






— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 











I 





— 


— 




I 


Southern Mortuary 






— 


II 


4 


— 


16 


— 


14 


— 


91 


25 


47 


6 


— 


I 


215 


St. Elizabeth's 






— 


6 




25 


24 


5 


I 


— 


6 


8 


9 


13 


1.497 


— 


1.595 


St. Margaret's 






I 


— 


16 


4 


11 


8 


— 


— 


7 


I 


32 


6 




I 


87 


Sullivan Square Medical 




— 


I 


— 




4 


I 








5 







— 


— 


13 


24 


U. S. Naval Hospital 




2 


8 


3 


10 


4 


19 


s 


— 


2 


4 


6 


3 


4 


26 


96 


tJ. S. Veterans Hospital 




12 


32 


50 


64 


82 


24 


IS 


— 


47 


80 


60 


53 


43 


18 


583 


Washingtonian Hospital 




— 


— 


— 


I 


3 




I 


— 




— 


— 


2 


I 


— 


8 


Winthrop Community . 




— 


— 


— 


— 




— 


1,=; 


— 


— 





— 


— 


— 


— 


15 


Women's Free Hospital 




— 


I 


2 


— 


3 


— 


I 


— 


9 


I 


I 


I 


— 


— 


19 


Service Refused 




96 


141 


155 


— 


2 


— 


9 


— 


112 


147 


274 


54 


59 


— 


1.049 


Other .... 




8 


39 


59 


3 


10 


51 


6 


— 


— 


33 


85 


19 


20 


16 


349 


Totals .... 


1.435 




2.352 


3.533 


7,001 


1.858 


2,794 


1.552 


4 


4. 121 


3.343 


3.819 


1,821 


2.239 


1. 193 


37.065 



18 



TABLE I — Workload — Population — Square Miles — Road Miles— Police Districts — for the Year Ending December 31, 1967 



Police District 


Custody 
Arrests 


Part I 
Offenses 


Part II 
Offenses 


Part III 
Services 


Population 
1965 Census 


Square 
Miles 


Road 
Miles 


District One 
North End 














794 

2.6Tf 


751 
2.7% 


594 
1.3% 


3.556 
2 . 4% 


12,551 
2.0-^ 


.689 
1.1% 


274 
3-0% 


District Two 
Downtown 














2,I08 

7-0% 


2.329 

8.3% 


1,167 

2.6% 


7.017 

, 4 8'7 


9.240 

15% 


.676 
1.1% 


31.2 

3-2% 


District Three 
Mattapan 














1.17,^ 


2,027 
7.2^; 


3.502 

7.9% 


12,756 

8,7% 


67.974 

11.0% 


3.808 
8.6%, 


100. 

11.2% 


District Four 
South End 
Back Bay 














11.927 
39 6^, 


5.014 

17.8^; 


8,623 
19 5% 


28,143 
19 2% 


50,334 
8.1% 


2.438 
5.6% 


915 
10.3% 


District Five 

Roslindale-West Roxbury 
Hyde Park-Readville 










889 

2.9^f 


2.004 

7.1"; 


2,544 
5-8% 


10,777 

7.4'; 


96,208 

15 6'V 


12.492 

28.2';:c 


185. 
20.8% 


District Six. . 
South Boston . 










1,802 

6.0% 


1.346 

4.8^; 


3,820 

' 8.7% 


12,514 

8.6'; 


42,445 
6.9%- 


2 369 

5.4.0 


44-3 

4-9% 


District Seven . 
East Boston 










1,118 
3.7T0 


1.394 

4 9% 


2,065 
4-7% 


5.728 

3 9';. 


39,792 
6.4% 


2.871 

6.5% 


39 I 

4-4% 


District Eight . 
Harbor Police . 










.?-, 


12 

.04% 


50 

.1% 


220 

■15% 


— 


— 


— 


District Nine . 
Roxbury- N. Dorchester 










3.562 

ii.8':-f 


4.399 

15 6'-; 


8,047 

18,2^7 


19,007 
13 0'; 


55.594 

9 0-^; 


2.375 

5 5% 


72.6 

8.2% 


District Ten . 
Roxbury .... 










1.997 


2.747 
98'; 


4.585 
10,4'^; 


14,898 
10 2'; 


40,948 
6,6'; 


I 974 
46'^;, 


65 

7.4% 


District Eleven 
Dorchester 










1.938 


2,^80 
8 5'; 


4.318 

9 8'-; 


11.958 
8 2'; 


87.872 
14 2''; 


4.638 
10.6% 


87.2 
9-8% 


District Thirteen . 
Jamaica Plain . 










870 

2-9^f 


1 .335 
4 7'; 


1.875 

4 3"'; 


6,=i8l 
4.5'7 


38.654 

6 3''; 


4 238 
9.7% 


7.1% 


District Fourteen . 
Brighton- Allston 










1,068 
3 5^7 


1.979 
7.o^- 


1.844 
42',; 


9,009 
6.2'-; 


58.515 

9 5'; 


4 446 

10, I' ; 


66 3 

7.4% 


District Fifteen 
Charlestown 










867 
2.9^r 


409 

1.5"; 


1,070 

2.4'-; 


4.045 

2.8.'-; 


17.589 
28'; 


I .323 
3.0% 


22.6 

2.5% 


Total 






30,118 


28,126 


44.104 


146,209 


617,716 


44 347 


758.5 


Headquarters 
Tactical Patrol Force 
Traffic .... 






4^4 

384 
32 


- 












Total Custody Arrests 


31.4.^8 





19 



TABLE II— Major Offenses (Not Arrests), Known to the Police and Reported to the F.B.I. Under Uniform 
Crime Reporting Procedure, for the Year Rnding December 31, 1967 











Number of Offenses 






Offenses 
Reported 


Un- 
founded 


Actual 
Offenses 


Cleared by Arrests 


Not 
Cleared 


Classification of Offenses 


Total 
Offenses 


By Arrests 
of Persons 










Cleared 


Under 18 




I. Criminal homicide 














(o) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugh- 














ter 


72 


I 


71 


46 


2 


25 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence . 






30 


10 


20 


17 


I 


3 


2. Forcible rape total 








129 


3 


126 


93 


10 


33 


(a) Rape by force . 








Q7 


3 


94 


68 


7 


26 


(6) Assault to rape— attempt 








32 


— 


32 


25 


3 


7 


3. Robbery total 








1,482 


IQ 


1-463 


502 


176 


961 


(a) Armed — any weapon 








679 


7 


672 


223 


60 


449 


(J) Strong arm — no weapon 








803 


12 


791 


279 


1x6 


512 


4. Assault total .... 








4,570 


32 


4-547 


1,667 


226 


2,880 


(c) Gun 








268 


4 


264 


169 


II 


95 


(b) Knife or cutting instrument 








402 


8 


484 


323 


46 


161 


(c) Other dangerous weapon 








434 


I 


433 


300 


59 


124 


(d) Hands, fists, feet — aggravated 






18 


I 


17 


13 


3 


4 


(e) Other assaults — not aggravated 






3-367 


18 


3,340 


853 


107 


2,496 


5. Burglary total .... 






5-095 


48 


5-047 


1-305 


482 


3,742 


(a) Forcible entry .... 






4,266 


27 


4-230 


1,096 


412 


3-143 


(b) Unlawful entry — no force 






679 


13 


666 


139 


50 


527 


(c) Attempted forcible entry 






150 


•8 


142 


70 


20 


72 








S-805 


71 


5-734 


2,025 


806 


3-709 


(a) Over $50 in value . 






2,640 


i^ 


2,607 


704 


152 


1-903 


(6) Under $50 in value 






3-165 


38 


3-127 


1,321 


654 


1,806 


7. Auto theft 






15-655 


1,188 


14,467 


3,659 


2,704 


10,808 


Grand Total 


32,847 


1,372 


31-475 


0,314 


4,407 


22,161 



TABLE III— Analysis of Property Connected with Offenses Shown Under Table II for the Year Ending 

December 31, 1967 



Type of Property 



Value of Property Stolen in Boston 




Currency, notes, etc. . 
Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing .... 
Locally stolen automobiles 
Miscellaneous 

Totals .... 



$792,747 

381,902 

111,179 

191,140 

7,227,683 

1,781,710 



$10,486,361 



$37,674 
9.722 
4,623 

15,247 

6,422,289 
166,900 



$6,656,455 



20 



TABLE IV — Breakdown of Offenses Shown Under Table II and Value of Property Stolen by Type of Offense 

for the Year Ending December 31, 1967 



Classification 


Number of Actual 
Offenses 


Value of Property 
Stolen 


Robbery : 

(c) Highway (streets, alley, etc.) .... 

(b) Commercial house (not d, c,f) . 

(c) Gas or service station 

(d) Chain store 

(e) Residence (anywhere on premises) 

(/) Bank 

(g) Miscellaneous 


922 

215 

25 

49 

82 

31 
139 


$95,489 
72,332 
2,075 
23,488 
19,199 
65,296 
17,746 


Total — robbery 


1,463 


$295,625 


Burglary — breaking or entering: 

(o) Residence (dwelling) 

(i) Night 

(2) Day 

(b) Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) 

(i) Night 

(2) Day 


657 
2,049 

2,162 
179 


$264,347 
667,568 

864,551 
26,898 


Total — burglary 


5,047 


$1,823,366 


Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 

(a) $50 and over 

(J) $5 to $50 

(c) Under $5 


2,607 

2,246 

880 


$1,090,892 

46,258 

2,539 


Total — larceny 


5,733 


$1,139,689 


Auto theft' 

(a) Joyriding 

{b) All other 


10,705 
3,762 


15,364,718 
1,862,965 


Total — auto theft 


14,467 


$7,227,683 


Grand Total 


26,710 


$10,486,361 









21 



TABLE V — Additional Analysis of Larceny and Auto Thefts for the Year Ending December 31, 1967 





Number of Actual 
Offenses 


Value of Property 
Stolen 


Nature of larcenies: 

(o) Pocket picking 

(b) Purse snatching 

(c) Shoplifting 

(d) From autos (not accessories) .... 

(e) Auto accessories 

(/) Bicycles 

(g) From buildings (not shoplifting) .... 
(h) From any coin-operated machines not in a 

building 

(i) All other 


141 
967 
591 
1,037 
749 
189 
866 

14 
1,179 


$8,674 
38,224 

24,539 
257,910 

25,515 
7,010 

277,305 

I 
500,511 


Total — larcenies 


5.7,33 


$1,139,689 










Automobiles recovered: 

(a) Number stolen locally and recovered locally 

(b) Number stolen locally and recovered outside 

(c) Total locally stolen autos recovered 

(d) Number stolen out of town, recovered locally . 


10,934 
1,923 

12,857 
2,276 




22 



TABLE VI — Number of Individuals Arrested Including Traffic Arrests- 
December 31, 1967 



-Not the Number of Charges — for the Year Ending 





Persons Charged by Police 


Disposition 


Classification of Offenses 


Arrested 

(Held for 

prosecu- 

rion) 


Sum- 
moned, 
Notified 
or 

Cited 


Total 

Persons 

Charged 

(Columns 

2 and 3) 


Adults Guilty 


Acquitted 

or 
Otherwise 
Dismissed 


Referred 

to 
Juvenile 
Court 
Juris- 
diction 


Other 
(Include 
pending, 
prosecuted 
elsewhere 
in lieu 
of your 




of 
offense 
charged 


of 
lesser 
offense 


juris- 
diction, 
etc.) 


Part I Classes 

1. Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugher 
(ft) Manslaughter by negligence 

2. Forcible rape 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated assault (Return B-4a-d) 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft) , 

7. Auto theft 


56 
10 
102 
461 
709 
876 
1.516 
976 


5 
I 
22 
32 
50 
81 
68 


56 
15 
103 
483 
741 
926 

1 .597 
1,044 


4 

9 
91 
202 
265 
640 
283 


I 

5 
II 

45 
49 
43 
38 
12 


8 

6 

38 

86 

193 
98 

259 
149 


I 
I 

7 
112 

79 

278 

403 
446 


43 
5 

48 
246 
300 
407 
469 
407 


Total, Part I Classes .... 


4.706 


259 


4.965 


1.494 


204 


837 


1.327 


1.925 


Part II Classes 

8. Other assaults (Return B-4e) 

9. Arson 

10. Forgery and counterfeiting 

11. Fraud 

12. Embezzlement 

13. Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 
sessing 

14. Vandalism 

15. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. . 

16. Prostitution and commercialized vice 

17. Sex offenses (except 2 and 16) 

18. Narcotic drug laws 

19. Gambling 

20. Offenses against the family and children 

21. Driving under the influence 

22. Liquor laws 

23. Drunkenness 

24. Disorderly conduct 

25. Vagrancy 

26. All other offenses (except traffic) 


847 
26 

79 

182 

269 
163 

184 

509 
172 
436 
328 
620 
202 
38 
17.999 
2iq 

39 
1.374 


96 

8 

I 

15 

6 

48 

3 
2 

15 

7 

15 
52 

7 

19 
10 
1 1 

147 


943 
34 
80 

197 

275 
211 

187 
511 
182 

443 
343 
672 
209 

57 

18,009 

230 

40 

1. 52 1 


338 

5 

33 

93 

87 

72 

92 

288 

78 

165 

220 

403 
106 

33 
17.229 

85 
18 

567 


35 

I 

4 

I 

10 

10 

4 

I 
2 

2 

2 

25 

7 
5 


281 
2 

13 
47 

34 
45 
45 
39 
36 
85 
63 
117 
31 
18 

159 
59 
12 

296 


80 

15 

I 

7 

27 
71 
10 

9 
19 
16 

2 

4 

113 

24 

2 

541 


282 
16 

33 
62 

141 
66 

55 
192 

66 
196 

59 

172 

60 

II 

684 

73 

12 

429 


Total, Part II Classes 


23.686 


463 


24.149 


19.912 


no 


1.382 


941 


2,609 


Grand Total 


28,392 


7-2 


29,114 


21,406 


314 


2,219 


2,26.S 


4.534 



Traffic arrests: 

Physical custody and warrants served 874 

Citations issued 110,906 

Total traffic arrests Ill .780 



23 



TABLE VII— Arrests for the Year Ending December 31, 1967 



Nature of Offense 



On 
Warrants 



Without 
Warrants 



Summoned 
by the 
Court 



Total 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter . 
Negligent manslaughter .... 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking and entering 
Larceny — theft (except auto theft) 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting .... 

Frauds 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. . 
Prostitution and comniercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children . 
Driving while intoxicated .... 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses 

Parking violations 

Traffic violations 

Suspicion 

Arrests for other departments 

Totals 



21 
2 

35 
105 
227 
127 

293 

81 

566 

13 

20 

136 

73 
64 
18 

23 
68 

151 
216 

571 
II 
21 
40 

17 
2 

763 
2 

438 
1.433 



5.537 



35 
8 

67 

356 

482 

749 
1,223 

895 
281 

13 
59 
46 

1,196 

99 
166 

486 
104 

285 
112 

49 

191 

17 

17,959 

202 

37 
611 

434 
385 
374 



5 

I 

22 

32 

SO 
81 
68 
96 
8 
I 
15 

6 

48 

3 

2 

IS 

7 

15 

52 

7 

19 

10 

II 

I 

147 
98.532 
12,374 



56 

15 
103 

483 
741 
926 

1,597 
1,044 

943 
34 
80 

197 

275 
211 

187 

5" 
187 

443 
343 
672 
209 

57 

18,009 

230 

40 

1,521 

98,534 

13,246 

38s 
1,807 



25,021 



111,628 



143,086 



24 



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25 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 





Parade of invited guests, police officials, and the recipi= 

ents of the awards, led by Mayor Kevin H. White and 

Superintendent William A. Bradley 



Mayor Kevin H. White presents Walter Scott Medal 

for Valor, Department Medal of Honor, Thomas F. 

Sullivan Award, and Boston Police Relief Association 

Award to Patrolman Edward J. Phelan 



**¥■¥■¥ 



■¥■**¥* 



Superintendent Herbert F. Mulloney presents Departs 

ment Medal of Honor, Thomas F. Sullivan Award, 

and Boston Police Relief Association Award to Patrol= 

man Emilio P. Puopolo 



Thomas Q. Feenan, Director of Physical Fitness for 

H. P. Hood & Sons Company, presents Department 

Medal of Honor to Patrolman Lawrence M. O'Keefe 





26 



RECIPIENTS OF AWARDS 





Superintendent William J. Taylor presents De= 

partment Medal of Honor to Detective Robert L. 

Cunningham 



Superintendent William A. Bradley presents Depart- 
ment Medal of Honor to Patrolman Frederick J. 
Bostrom 



¥* -^ ♦■¥ 



¥ * * ¥♦ 



Fire Commissioner William J. Fitzgerald presents 

Department Medals of Honor to Patrolmen John F. 

Dwyer and Clifford F. Stronach 



Superintendent John T. Howland presents Depart- 
ment Medals of Honor to Patrolmen Robert E. Senier, 
William P. Lydon, and John Necco, III 





27 



POLICE OFFICERS ON ACTIVE DUTY WHO DIED DURINO THE YEAR 1967 



Name 


Rank 


Assignment 


Date 


Maguire, Thomas J. 


Patrolman 


District 6 


January 29, 1967 


Hickey, Joseph F. . 


Patrolman 


District 15 


February 9, 1967 


Campbell, Edward F. 


Patrolman 


District 2 


March 4, 1967 


Walden, Edward A. 


Patrolman 


Traffic Division 


March 6, 1967 


Genzale, Ralph 


Patrolman 


District 15 


March 17, 1967 


Maguire, Frederick E. . 


Patrolman 


District i 


March 22, 1967 


Campbell, Thomas J. 


Patrolman 


District 5 


April 27, 1967 


Pazzanese, Joseph . 


Patrolman 


District 2 


May 8, 1967 


Chisea, Andrew J. . 


Patrolman 


Records and Commu- 
nications Division 


July 27, 1967 


Feeney, John F. 


Patrolmari 


District s 


August 10, 1967 


Lukosi, Theodore J. 


Sergeant 


District 14 


August 25, 1967 


Brophy, Charles G. 


Patrolman 


Traffic Division 


December S, 1967 



28 




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Administrative Services Department 
Printing c^^^d Section 



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