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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
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(DOCUMENT - NO. 28) 



ANNUAL REPORT 

July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975 




Informational Services Division 



(DOCUMENT - IMO. 28) 



5®Qll0m [PoDOcEO 



Office of the Commissioner 

154 Berkeley Street 

Boston. Massachusetts 02116 



A Message from the Police Commissioner 



Quality police service in Boston depends upon police 
responsiveness to neighborhood concerns and priorities. 

Our relations with the community are primarily dependent 
upon the quality of the police response to calls for service. 
If Boston Police do our job well, if we respond quickly to all 
citizen calls for assistance, and if we perform efficiently 
when we do arrive, then we have performed the job for which 
we were hired. 

Our department is realistic about what it can achieve, 
we admit mistakes and problems, and attempt sincere efforts 
to keep the community informed about our activities. We must 
be responsible to the people since police improvement can only 
be achieved if the public understands and supports such change. 

The police role cannot be characterized by one or two 
simple tasks. Rather the role of the police in this country 
is far more varied and complex than is commonly recognized. 
Especially in the congested areas of our large cities public 
demands for police service are constantly increasing and 
involving many more tasks not formerly the responsibility of 
the police. 

Many officers have come to see much of their work as 
social work. Often they are called upon to intervene in 
situations that seem unrelated to law enforcement, but if 
not skillfully dealt with, can result in serious injury to 
the officers involved, and may eventually become a serious 
crime . 

Indeed, it is the wide range of non-crime related services 
which may well provide the major impact upon the livability 
of the city and the ability of the citizens to deal with the 
crisis of urban living. 



This booklet, then, is an attempt 
role of the Boston Police in your city 
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i 



POLICE COMMISSIONER'S STAFF 



n 



^ 



Special Investigation Unit 



Duties 

The Special Investigation Unit is responsible for providing 
the Commissioner with complete and accurate information on the 
maintenance of integrity in the Department. 

Its mission is to reduce, and when possible, eliminate police 
corruption and potential sources of corruption. 

The Unit's principal activities are directed at securing 
command accountability for reducing and controlling corruption. 
Basic to the functioning of the S.I.U. is the continuous 
collection and analysis of information. 

Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 

2 Sergeant Detectives 
2 Detectives 

1 Patrolman 

1 Civilian Clerk-Typist 

Activities 

Reports received and acted upon: 

Alcohol violations 

After hours 13 

Sundays and Holidays 3 

Sale to minors 3 

No license 4 

Vice Violations 

Booking 32 

Gaming , 4 

Prostitution 22 

Loan Sharking 4 

Narcotics 30 

Receiving 2 

Other 14 

General Complaints 

Routine 156 

Miscellaneous 93 

Other agencies 11 



11 



Letters received: 

Complimentary 33 

Critical 92 

Number of arrests made as a result of information from Box 911 
(includes telephone calls) : 

District 1 
2 
4 
6 

Letters from police personnel 12 



16 


District 7 


4 


6 


14 


1 


25 


V.C.U. 


4 


1 







12 



I 



I 



Labor Relations Office 



Duties 

Labor Relations represents the Commissioner at employee 
collective bargaining negotiations, conferences, and grievance 
discussions and assists in the development of policies regarding 
labor relations and negotiations. It advises command officers 
to ensure their compliance with the provisions of the various 
collective bargaining agreements and works to resolve grievances 
at the unit or district level when possible. 

Personnel 

1 Superintendent 

1 Civilian Secretary 

Activities 

The Superintendent disseminates grievance and arbitration 
decisions to prevent recurrence of contract violations; as well 
as all decision upholding managerial prerogatives which are 
protected by the Agreement. A close liaison is maintained with 
the Office of Labor Relations at City Hall. 

Grievances processed July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975: 



Settled at : 



Union 



Commissioner ' s 
Level 



State 
Labor 
City Level Arbitration Commission 



Boston Police 
Patrolman ' s 
Association 



140 



98 



82 



19 



Boston Police 
Superior Officers 
Federation 



18 



16 



American Federation 
of Superior County & 
Municipal Employees 







13 



Informational Services Division 



Duties 

This division is responsible for keeping members of the 
Department and the public informed of police activities and 
for maintaining an effective liaison with the news media by 
preparing and disseminating news releases, and coordinating 
news conferences and requests for interviews and coverage. 
The division prepares slide sho'.s, movies, brochures, displays 
and booklets and coordinates a speakers' bureau and tours 
of police facilities. To keep members of the Department in- 
formed of current activities, the division publishes a newsletter. 
The division is also responsible for corranunity affairs programs, 
crime prevention, recruiting and the Officer Friendly Program. 

Personnel 

2 Sergeants 

11 Patrolmen (8 temporary recruiting officers, 

3 Civilians 
1 Intern 

Activities 

During the past fiscal year July 1, 1974 through June 30, 
1975, the division handled 300 requests for tours of police 
facilities. It arranged 254 speaking engagements for department 
personnel. The staff prepared and released 55 press releases 
to 130 recipients; and 347 news items were called into the 
major radio and television stations and daily newspapers. The 
division handled an average of 501 phone inquiries per week. 

Informational Services arranged five badge presentation 
ceremonies for the widows of deceased members of the department 
and retired police officers; presentation of plaques by the 
Commissioner and 45 interviews and twenty appearances for the 
Police Commissioner. 

The News Media Liaison Officer responded to the scenes 
of major incidents where the news media was present and briefed 
them on the situation. This officer also prepared the Policeman 
of the Month award. 

Requests from all over the world for 750 Boston Police 
shoulder patches were handled. New brochures published this 
year include Stop Rape, Lady Be Safe, News Media Guide and a 
brochure on the minority recruitment program. 

The division produced 16 slide presentations on neighborhood 
crime prevention and maintained a crime prevention and slide show 
library. 



14 



Informational Services, Recruitment Section 

Late in March, 1975, in order to comply with a mandate from 
the federal courts to increase the minority component of the 
Boston Police Department to more accurately reflect the 23 per 
cent minority population of the city, a Minority Recruitment Pro- 
gram was initiated. 

As of the first of August, the ethnic analysis of firm 
applications filed with the Division of Civil Service are as 
follows: 



Black Males 599 

Spanish Males 298 

White Males 248 

Chinese Males 12 

Other Males 1 



Black Females 274 

Spanish Females 102 

White Females 187 

Chinese Females 3 

Other Females 1 



A total of 1,725 persons were recruited through this program 
during this time period. 

Informational Services, Crime Prevention Section 

The function of the Crime Prevention Section is to provide 
for the safety and security of the public, their businesses, 
households and possessions by concentrating on measures appro- 
priate for the prevention of crime in their homes, at work, 
and on the street. 

The primary objective of the Crime Prevention Section is 
to prevent commericial burglaries by making businessmen cognizant 
of the precautionary measures available for the prevention of 
burglary. 

The staff of this Section makes on-site surveys providing 
instructions and demonstrations on the types of devices and 
aids that can be used for a particular security need. A 
complete report of suggestions made to overcome security weak- 
nesses to prevent a recurrence of burglary is mailed to the 
person concerned. In the event of a recurrence, a follow-up 
investigation is made to determine if the suggestions were 
implemented or if further security measures are needed. 

During the period of time covered by this report, 239 
commercial surveys were made throughout the city by the Crime 
Prevention Section. 

Ident-I-Guard program is aimed at the reduction of local 
residential and commercial burglaries and the increase in the 
return of stolen property. 

Presently there are approximately 3,700 residents and 
businesses registered in this program which is operated in all 
police districts. 



15. 



Informational Services, Officer Friendly Section 

The Officer Friendly Program, in conjunction with the 
Boston School Department curriculum staff, develops a program 
each year to be used for presentation to children in Kindergar- 
ten 1 through Grade 2. 

The Officer Friendly Program reached 35,155 children in 
1,256 classrooms before 1,345 teachers in the Boston school 
system. More than 3,000 parents attended the programs. 

For the period of July 1, 1974 through June 30, 1975, the 
Officer Friendly program reached the following: 



Kindergarten 1 


6 


152 


Kindergarten 2 


6 


711 


Grade 1 


10 


478 


Grade 2 


10 


872 


Grade 3 




484 


Exceptional children 




458 



TOTAL 35,155 

Other Officer Friendly programs and people reached: 

Boston Parks and Recreation Playground Supervisor Seminar 220 
Boston Parks and Recreation Employees Seminar 100 

Boston Parks and Recreation programs at playgrounds, 

pools and beaches 3,500 

Boston Parks and Recreation exceptional children programs 367 
Boston Parks and Recreation Swimming Meet 300 

Boston Parks and Recreation Sailing Regatta 100 

Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs: Summerthing programs 2,500 
Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs: August Moon Festival 1,500 
American National Red Cross Programs 200 

American National Red Cross Convention 8,000 

American National Red Cross Awards 210 

Spanish Institute 105 

Boston Police Patrolman's Association Horizon for Youth 550 
Halloween Safety Program 25 

Massachusetts Safety Conference 5,000 

Boston Police Week 40,000 

District 13 Police Week Open House 3,000 

Boston Traffic Supervisor Association 150 

Bicycle Safety Programs 2 ,700 

TOTAL 68,527 

The officers were in contact or involved with 103,827 
individuals during the period of July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975. 

Informational Services, Stop Rape Program 

The Stop Rape Program demonstrates simple precautionary 
methods to be taken by persons to avoid rape. Two hundred and 
sixteen presentations of this program were made during the past 
year. 

16 



Legal Affairs Office 



Duties 

The Legal Affairs Office maintains liaison with the City 
Law Department, other criminal justice agencies, and local bar 
associations, encouraging their participation in the development 
of responses to the legal problems of the police. It formulates 
legislative programs and participates in the legislative process. 
It prepares and reviews contracts and agreements, prepares legal 
opinions and provides the Commissioner with a legal perspective 
on policy matters. Legal Affairs personnel assist in the 
development of law-related training programs and bulletins and 
provide legal advice and guidance to sworn members concerning 
arrests, warrants, searches, and other legal problems. The 
Legal Advisor is available for consultation after office hours. 
The Legal Advisor represents the Department in civil litigation, 
including suits brought against the police department, the 
police commissioner and other members of the department in state 
and federal courts. This office represents the Commissioner in 
appeals from the refusal of the department to issue permits to 
carry firearms and other licensing appeals, suits in state and 
federal courts brought by persons challenging department policies 
and cases alleging civil rights violations by department members. 

Personnel 

1 Special Assistant Corporation Counsel 

(Legal Advisor) 
1 Assistant Corporation Counsel 
1 Police Clerk Typist 
1 Law Student Intern 

Activities 

During the year covered by this report, legal affairs 
personnel represented the department in state District Courts, 
the Superior Court, the Appeals Court, the Supreme Judicial 
Court, Federal District Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals. 

The Legal Affairs Office represented the department in the 
prosecution of disciplinary cases against members of the department. 
This included the review of Internal Affairs Division investigations 
prosecution of cases which merit disciplinary hearings before 
the police commissioner and representing the department in the 
appeals process before the Civil Service Commission and the 
courts . 

The Legal Affairs Office spent considerable time during 



ist year, assisting in the drafting of new police department 
rules and regulations. Activity in this area includes reviewing 



proposed new rules for legal sufficiency and assisting in 
clarifying legal issues relating to the new rules. 

The Legal Advisor is the Police Commissioner's designee 
to the Criminal History Systems Board and the Advisory Committee 
of the Criminal History Systems Board. This Board was established 
by state statute in 1973 and has as its main function, the 
establishment of a computerized criminal offender record information 

17 



system and the regulation of all agencies in Massachusetts 
which maintain criminal offender record information. The 
Board also regulates the collection, maintenance, access to 
and dissemination of criminal offender record information. 



18 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER 



19 



I 



Planning and Research 



Duties 

This division is responsible for researching operational 
and administrative problems in the Department and assisting 
affected units in developing effective responses to such problems. 
It gathers relevaiit information, tabulates and interprets the 
data obtained, and presents the results in written form for the 
consideration of appropriate decision-makers. The Division works 
closely with field and administrative units in preparing con- 
tingency plans and responses to unusual situations. It is also 
responsible for the final preparation of Special Orders, 
Commissioner's Memoranda, Rules and Regulations, and departmental 
forms . 

Personnel 

7 Patrolmen 
7 Civilians 
1 Student Intern 

Act ivities 

During the reporting period, the Planning and Research 
Division worked on 40 projects and assisted in the implementation 
of several major programs undertaken by the Department. The 
following project reports or plans were produced by the Division 
during this time period: 

- Rewards in the Boston Police Department 

- The Handling of Rape Offenses by the Boston Police 

- Special Report on Retirement (Martin E. Segal Co.) 

- A Ride-Along Program for the Boston Police Department 

- Catalog of Staff Studies by Municipal Police Planning 
and Research Divisions 

- A Plan for Hostage Situations 

- Minority Recruitment Program 

- Central Filing Code Book 

- Improving the Police Response System(alternatives to 
immediate patrol car response) 

- Police Department Performance Evaluation 

- From Idea to Implementation (How to Construct a Plan) 

- Review of Internal Mail Systems and Procedures 

- Department Numbered Forms Booklet 

- Field Reporting System Manual 

In addition, the Division handled 1,560 pieces of incoming 
correspondence (including 283 questionnaires) and produced 126 
Special Orders, 145 Commissioner's Memoranda, 61 Circulars, 
70 departmental forms, seven new rules, and 60 pieces of art 
work. 



21 



Division of Training and Education 



Duties 

This Division is responsible for the operations of the 
Police Academy, and coordination of various departmental 
educational programs. The Division is divided into four 
sections. The Program Development Section is responsible 
for initiating and developing new training programs. It 
prepares course prospecti, selects instructors, gathers 
teaching materials, and coordinates course development with 
instructors, gathers teaching materials, and coordinates 
course development with affected units in the Department. 
The Program Coordination Section is responsible for ongoing 
in-service training programs and includes the Registrar, 
who is responsible for scheduling, attendance and testing. 

The Technical Training Section operates the police range, 
develops firearm standards, and coordinates a firearms 
qualification program. The Recruit Training Section is 
responsible for implementing and coordinating all recruit i 

training programs and for supervising recruits throughout 
the training year. ' 

The Division operates the Recruit Training Year, which is 
the extensive period of training and orientation for new police 
officers. It also provides a multitude of specialized training 
programs, both in-service and pre-service to department employees, 
as well as special purpose training programs for other agencies. 

The Audio-Visual Unit operates the department's video 
training facility, coordinating programming, developing training 
tapes, and provides the department with video classroom assistance. 

Personnel 

1 Director 

1 Captain, Commanding Officer/Academy 
1 Captain, Commanding Of ficer /Recruits 
1 Secretary 

Program Development Section Program Coordination Section 

1 Civilian Coordinator 1 Sergeant Registrar 

2 Sergeants 1 Detective 

1 Secretary 1 Patrolman Instructor 

1 Librarian 1 Clerk-Typist 

Technical Training Section Recruit Training Section 

2 Sergeants 1 Sergeant 

7 Patrolmen/Instructors 4 Patrolman/Instructors 

52 Recruits 

The Division also made use of over 50 other instructors from 
within and outside the Department to make specialized presentations 
as a part of on-going training programs. 



22 



1 



Activities 

During the period July 1, 1974 to June 30. 1975, the 
Division ran a wide variety of training programs, including 
the following major courses: 



Approximate 
Students 

1974 Recruit Training Year 67 

1975 Recruit Training Year 52 
1974 Lieutenants In-Service Training 35 

1974 Pre-Sergeant' s Study Course 900 
1974/75 In-Service/Patrol people 965 

1975 Sergeant's Pre-Service 78 
1975 Communications Clerks Skills 50 

1974 Housing Division Patrol Skills 60 

1975 Rape Prevention and Investigation 60 



Program Hours 

2080 
2080 

40 
224 

16 

80 

40 

40 

40 



Most of these courses were given in small group sessions 
of fewer than 20 participants. With the exception of the pre- 
sergeant's study course, no class had over 26 students. In 
total, over 25 individual course titles were offered and 
attended by 1,800 officers. Due to field activities, there 
was no training from September through November. 



23 



Personnel Division 



Duties 

The Personnel Division assists the Commissioner in the 
development and institution of personnel policies. The 
Division develops and coordinates processing, including 
background investigations and medical examinations of all 
new personnel. It prepares Personnel Orders, and maintains 
accurate personnel data on all members of the Department. 
The Division is also responsible for supervising the Medically 
Incapacitated Section which is composed of sv/orn members 
on sick, injured leave, or leave of absence. 

The Division is also responsible for administering the 
Comprehensive Employment and Tra_ning Act within the Department. 

The Division is divided into three sections: Medical, 
Processing, and Administrative. 

Personnel 

1 Director 

1 Administrative Supervisor 

5 Civilian Clerks 

1 Sergeant (Also assigned as Medically 

Incapacitated 
1 Deputy Superintendent 
1 Captain 
4 Sergeants 
4 Detectives 
48 Patrolmen 

Activities 



i 



The Medical Section is responsible for arranging physical 
examinations for all civilian and sworn personnel. These 
examinations include both pre-employment physical examinations 
and examinations because of illness or injury. 

During the period of this report 2400 sworn personnel were 
examined by the Department Physician. Approximately 150 civilians 
were examined at the employees clinic. 

The Medical Section is also responsible for maintaining 
Medical records and supplying these records to the Boston 
Retirement Board on request. 

The Processing Section processed 60 sworn employees and 
200 civilian employees who joined the Department during the 
past year. 

The processing included background investigations and 
completion of departmental personnel forms. The processing 
section was also responsible for most of the personnel actions 
that take place within the Department such as requests for 
reassignments , promotions, retirements, resignations and other 
actions which affect the allocation of department personnel. 
In addition, the processing section reviewed and iipdated job 
specifications to meet the changing needs of the department. 



BUREAU OF TRAFFIC SERVICES 



25 



Bureau of Traffic Services 



Duties 

The Bureau of Traffic Services is responsible for the 
direction and control of vehicular traffic and enforcement of 
traffic rules and regulations in the area covered by District 
One and the Back Bay area. This Bureau is also responsible 
for traffic planning for the entire city and for the overall 
supervision of traffic arrangements for major parades, public 
celebrations, and events of a similar nature, and for maintaining 
liaison with the City Traffic Commissioner. Also, included 
in the responsibilities of this Bureau is the towing of illegally 
parked vehicles in the entire city. A tow unit has been established 
within this Bureau for this purpose, which is responsible for the 
operation of four tow lots, one on Albany Street, one on Cambridge 
Street in Brighton, one on Atkinson Street in Roxbury, and one on 
Haverhill Street in the North End. The Traffic Analysis Section 
analyzes and classifies all traffic accident reports, identifies 
high-incidence locations, and advises its personnel and the 
Bureau of Field Services of those locations. 

Personnel 



Days 

1 Superintendent 

1 Lieutenant 

7 Sergeants 

72 Patrolmen 

1 Tow Lot Foreman 

18 Heavy Motor Equip. Operators 

2 Tow Lot Attendants 



Nights 

1 Lieutenant 

5 Sergeants 
27 Patrolmen 

1 Security Guard 

6 Tow Lot Foremen 

18 Heavy Motor Equip. 

5 Tow Lot Attendants 



Operators 



Activities 

The Bureau of Traffic Services issued a total of 308,033 
citations for parking violations during the period covered by this 
report. 

Parking fines paid at the Boston Municipal Court and Roxbury 
District Court during this period on citations issued by this 
Bureau amounted to $629,089.00. 

During this period, a total of 24,235 vehicles found in 
violation of parking regulations were towed by the tow unit of this 
Bureau. In addition, 4,177 vehicles were towed by this Bureau 
under the "Tow and Hold" Law, resulting in collection by the 
courts of $447,404.00 in overdue fines. The towing and storage 
fees for the towing of all cars towed, including those towed 
under the "Tow and Hold" Law, amounted to $300,959.00 during this 
period. 

Court prosecutions by personnel of this Bureau during this 
period amounted to 610,998. A total of 3,260 notices were issued 
for moving violations, 98 of which were warnings and 3,162 
offenders were summoned for court appearance. 

Officers of the Bureau of Traffic Services were responsible 
for 346 arrests for serious crimes during this period, including 



27 



handbag thefts, assaults, and robberies. 

During this period, a number of officers of this Bureau, 
and at times, practically the entire complement of officers, 
were detailed to schools in Hyde Park and South Boston in 
connection with the school desegregation crisis. 



I 



28 



BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



29 



I 



Bureau of Field Services 



Duties 

This bureau has the primary responsibility for delivery of 
police services to the community. These responsibilities are 
carried out by the bureau's districts and divisions. This 
includes local districts, the Criminal Investigation Division, 
and Tactical Patrol Force. 

Local district police are responsible for the preservation 
of the peace; the protection of life; the safeguard of property; 
the arrest and prosecution of violators of the law; the prevention 
of crime; and the enforcement of all laws and ordinances. 

Personnel 

1 Supt. -in-Chief 
9 Deputy Superintendents 
21 Captains 

4 Lieutenant Detectives 
40 Lieutenants 
21 Sergeant Detectives 
205 Sergeants 
186 Detectives 
78 Patrolmen-Specialists 
1,380 Patrolmen 
Total 1,945 

Activities 

The activities of the Bureau of Field Services are carried 
out by the seven area police commands . 



31 



Police Area A 



Duties 



Area A is responsible for police services in Districts 
7 and 15. This includes the neighborhoods of East Boston 
and Charlestown. 



District 7 

Population of Area 37,950 
Road Miles 39. 1 



District 15 

Population of Area 16,757 
Road Miles 22.6 



District 7 



Personnel Deployment 

District 15 



1 Captain 
1 Lieutenant 

1 Sergeant Detective 
4 Sergeants 

6 Detectives 
59 Patrolmen 
20 School Traffic Supervisors 

2 Custodians 

1 Civilian Clerk 



1 Captain 
13 Sergeants 
47 Patrolmen 
11 School Traffic Supervisors 

3 Custodians 

1 Civilian Clerk 

2 Lieutenants 



Activities 



District 7 

Part I Crimes 2,251 

Part II Crimes 1,027 

Part III Crimes 15,903 



District 15 



Part 
Part 



I Crimes 

II Crimes 



1,158 
895 



Part III Crimes 10,448 



32 



Police Area B 



Duties 

Area B includes the Criminal Investigation Division, 
and District 1. District 1 includes. Downtown, Chinatown, 
Beacon Hill and the North End. 



District 1 

Population of area 22,877 
Road Miles 78. 3 



Personnel Deployment 

1 Captain 

2 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 
10 Sergeants 
10 Detectives 
69 Patrolmen 

6 Security Guards 

5 Custodians 
14 School Traffic Supervisors 

4 Civilian Clerks 



Activities 

Part I Crimes 11,868 

Part II Crimes 4,620 

Part III Crimes 28,397 

Arrests 5,342 



33 



Police Area B Criminal Investigation Division 



i 



Duties 

The Criminal Investigation Division is responsible for 
follow up investigations of all crimes reported to the Police 
Department. Members of the Criminal Investigation Division 
investigate felonies, committed within this jurisdiction, and 
also process cases of fugitives from justice. In addition, 
this unit conducts investigations for various police depart- 
ments throughout the United States. 

This division is made up of special units to investigate 
homicides, robberies, worthless checks and frauds, lost and 
stolen property, pickpockets, shoplifters, stolen credit 
cards, flim-flams, and narcotics and rentition cases. 



Personnel Deployment 

1 Captain 

4 Lieutenant Detectives 
12 Sergeant Detectives 
80 Detectives 

5 Patrolmen 
7 Civilians 

Activities 



Investigations 

Begun 



Homicide Unit 187 

Drug Control Unit 1959 

Robbery Squad 620 

Bank Squad 60 

Auto Squad 1505 

Fugitive Squad 876 

General Invest. Unit 325 

Confidence Team Unit 70 



Investigations 


Felons 


Completed 


Prosecuted 


118 


139 


1959 


1428 


451 


178 


46 


23 


608 


-- 


743 


435 


299 


1472 


61 


32 



34 



I 



Police Area C 



Duties 

Area C includes Districts 4 and 14. District 4 covers 
the Back Bay and South End areas. District 14 covers Brighton 
and Allston. 



District 4 



District 14 



Population of area 55,334 
Road Miles 71. 8 



Population of area 52,515 
Road Miles 66.3 



District 4 



Personnel Deployment 

District 14 



2 Captains 

4 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 

18 Sergeants 

19 Detectives 
181 Patrolmen 

24 School Traffic Supervisors 
3 Custodians 



1 Captain 

3 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 

14 Sergeants 

5 Detectives 

104 Patrolmen 

25 School Traffic Supervisors 

1 Civilian Clerk 

2 Custodians 



Activities 



District 4 



District 14 



Part I crimes 14,948 
Part II crimes 4,148 
Part III crimes 45,385 



Part I crimes 5,730 
Part II crimes 1,874 
Part III crimes 21,811 
Arrests 1,033 



35 



Police Area D 



Duties 



Area D includes Districts 2 and 3. District 2 covers 
Roxbury and North Dorchester, and District 3 covers the 
Mattapan area. 



District 2 

Population of area 32,568 
Road miles 137.6 



District 3 

Population of area 62,868 
Road miles 100.00 



District 2 



Personnel Deployment 

District 3 



1 Deputy Superintendent 

1 Captain 

2 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 
13 Detectives 
78 Patrolmen 
38 School Traffic Supervisors 

4 Custodians 

3 Civilian Clerks 
1 Interpreter 



1 


Captain 


1 


Lieutenant 


1 


Sergeant Detective 


6 


Sergeants 


7 


Detectives 


40 


Patrolmen 


26 


School Traffic Supervisors 


2 


Civilian Clerks 



Activities 



District 2 

Part I crimes 12,572 

Part II crimes 8,233 

Part III crimes 63,394 

Arrests 3,322 



District 3 

Part I crimes 5,250 
Part II crimes 1,681 
Part III crimes 26,581 
Arrests 1,156 



36 



J 



Police Area E 



Duties 

Area E includes Districts 6 and 11. District 6 covers 
South Boston and District covers Dorchester. 



District 6 

Population of area 
Road miles 



28,285 
44.3 



District 11 

Population of area 87,872 
Road miles 87.2 



District 6 



Personnel Deployment 

District 11 



1 Captain 

3 Lieutenants 

2 Detectives 
16 Sergeants 

102 Patrolmen 

28 School Traffic Supervisors 

2 Civilian Clerks 

2 Custodians 



2 Captains 

3 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 

18 Sergeants 

10 Detectives 

136 Patrolmen 

45 School Traffic Supervisors 

3 Custodians 



Activities 



District 6 

Part I crimes 3,209 
Part II crimes 1,650 
Part III crimes 29,861 
Arrests 668 



District 11 

Part I crimes 6,852 
Part II crimes 3,050 
Part III crimes 40,392 
Arrests 1,589 



37 



Police Area F 



Duties 

Area F includes District 5 and 13. District 5 covers 
Roslindale, Hyde Park and West Roxbury. District 13 covers 
Jamaica Plain. 



District 5 



District 13 



Population of area 
Road miles 



101,755 Population of area 47,686 
185.0 Road miles 78.5 



District 5 



Personnel Deployment 

District 13 



1 


Captain 




1 


Lieutenant 




1 


Sergeant Detect 


,ive 


5 


Sergeants 




7 


Detectives 




49 


Patrolmen 




1 


Civilian Clerk 




45 


School Traffic 


Supervisors 


3 


Custodians 





1 Captain 

3 Lieutenants 

1 Sergeant Detective 
6 Sergeants 

2 Detectives 
37 Patrolmen 

1 Civilian Clerk 

2 Custodians 

22 School Traffic Supervisors 



Activities 



District 5 



Part I crimes 


5 


218 


Part II crimes 


3 


059 


Part III crimes 


28 


605 


Arrests 


1 


036 



District 13 

Part I crimes 3,103 

Part II crimes 1,441 

Part III crimes 16,070 

Arrests 833 



38 



Police Area G 



Duties 

Area G includes the Tactical Patrol Force and the Public 
Housing Unit. The Tactical Patrol Force consists of an Anti- 
Crime Unit that functions as a selective enforcement group 
concentrating on the reduction of street crimes and robberies 
throughout the city. The Tactical Patrol Force also includes 
the Canine Section, Mounted Unit, and Emergency Service Unit. 
The Housing Patrol Unit was formed for specialized patrol of 
housing projects. 

Personnel 



Anti-Crime Unit 



1 Deputy Superintendant 

2 Lieutenants 



12 Sergeants 
78 Patrolmen 



Mounted Unit 



1 Sergeant 
Canine Unit 



8 Patrolmen 



18 Patrolmen 





Activities 




Arrests: 


Accosting 


1 


Affray 


19 


Assault & Battery 


15 


A&B DW 


59 


A&B PO 


30 


Ass. Int. Murder 


8 


Ass. Int. Rape 


1 


Attempted Rape 


2 


Att. Res. Pris. 


2 


Auto Thefts 


159 


Auto Violation 


152 


Liquor Laws 


1 


Breach of Peace 


2 


Break & Entering 


48 


Common Nightwalker 


37 


Control Substance 


52 


Default Warranr 


35 


Disorderly 


137 



Firearms Violation 

Kidnapping 

Larceny from Person 

Larcenies, other 

Lewd person 

Malicious Destruction 

Property 

Violation Parking Rules 

Operating Under Influence 

Possible Burglary Tools 

Possible Continued Curren 

Possible Dangerous Weapon 

Possible Hypodermic Needl 

Prostitution 

Rape 

Receive Stolen Property 

Robberies 

Runaways 

Trespassing 

Throwing Missiles 



cy 



59 
2 

543 

37 

1 

3 

1 
38 
26 

3 
16 

1 
15 

1 

35 

160 

1 

8 

1 



39 



Emergency Service Unit 



Duties 

The Emergency Service Unit is a specialized section of 
the TPF which responds to multiple alarm of fires, bomb 
threats, major accidents, persons trapped, building searches for 
evidence, emergency mobile lighting, the recovery of bodies in 
water, all bank and holdup alarms, and armed suspects trapped 
in buildings. 

All officers are trained in the use of tools and equipment 
such as acetylene cutting torches, chain saws, hydraulic 
jacking gear, forced entry tools, lines, ladders, climbing 
equipment, mobile lighting plants, etc. 

The unit is responsible for all incidents involving bombs, 
explosives, incendiary devices and their electric or non- 
electric components, including searches, rendering-safe 
procedures, handling, storage, preservation of evidence, sub- 
mission for chemical analysis and presentation in court. 

The Emergency Service Unit personnel are also trained in 
the use of special weapons and tactics, such as 30-06 anti- 
sniper rifle, 30 cal. carbine, 12 gauge shotgun and various types 
of tear gas cannisters and projectiles issued by the department. 

Personnel 

3 Sergeants 23 Patrolmen 

1 Civilian 

Activities 

Alarms of fire responded to, multiple, schools, hospital, etc. 121 

Assist Ballistician 6 

Assist Drug Control Unit 3 

Assist Homocide Unit 16 

Assist various districts at scene of disturbances 94 

Assist various districts in effecting arrests 114 

Assist various districts in search for B & E suspects 35 

Assist various districts in search for holdup suspects 35 

Assist various districts with miscellaneous services 263 

Barriers used 10 

Bodies recovered 18 

Bomb threats 865 

Cars in water 17 

Crowd control 121 

Dangerous chemicals and radioactive materials disposed of 6 

Destruction of snake 1 

District cell doors jammed and unlocked 10 

Evidence recovered 30 

Explosives disposed of 31 

Gas leaks 9 

Handcuffs removed 2 



40 



Injured persons assisted 63 

Jumpers rescued from roofs, bridges, etc. 11 

Line used, dangerous buildings, fires, etc. 139 

Mobile and high intensity used 84 

Persons extricated trapped in autos involved in major motor 60 
vehicle accidents 

Persons rescued from drowning 2 

Persons rescued trapped in elevators, buildings, etc. 131 

Scene of audible and holdup alarms 6 

Scene of explosions 26 

Scene of major motor vehicle accidents 75 

Scene of mental patients with guns 3 

Scene of officers-in-trouble 41 

Scene of shootings 8 

Search for escaped prisoners, Deer Island House of Correction 7 

Search for evidence 60 

Search of Scarborough Pond for body 6 

Service and operation of Patrol Boats "Kennedy" and "Vigilant"36 

Sick persons assisted 28 

Stolen motor vehicle recovered 8 

Suspicious packages removed and examined 46 

Swat team deployed at Columbia Point 1 

Tear gas used, scene of armed person with hostages 1 

Traffic control 141 

Vicious dogs restrained 6 

Water main breaks 3 



41 



Public Housing Unit 



Personnel 

8 Sergeants 1 Captain 

57 Patrolmen 1 Lieutenant 



Patroled the following Housing projects: 



D Street Mission Hill 

Bromley Heath Cathedral Project 

Columbia Point Charlestown 

Franklin Field Orient Heights 

Franklin Hill Orchard Park 
Fidelia Way 



42 



BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



43 



Bureau of Administrative Services 



Duties 

The Administrative Services Bureau is responsible for 
providing services to support the field activities of the 
Department. Divisions and sections of a supportive nature 
are organized under the Bureau of Administrative Services, 
with a general mandate to arrange the availability of their 
resources to meet the needs of the Department and the public 
in the most effective manner possible. The divisions under 
this bureau are Communications Division, Records and Data 
Processing Division and Services Division. 

Personnel 

1 Superintendent 

4 Deputy Superintendents 

2 Captains 

5 Lieutenants 
21 Sergeants 

92 Patrolmen Specialists 
26 Patrolmen 
1 Sergeant Detective 
8 Detectives 
1 Student Intern 
309 Civilian Employees 
Total 570 

Activities 

The activities of the Bureau of Administrative Services 
are carried out by the Communications Division, Services 
Division, and Records and Data Processing Division. 



45 



Services Division 



Duties 

The Services Division prepares the Department budget and 
administers seven sections, each providing' specific support 
services to other Department units. 



Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 
134 Civilians 



Activities 

The activities of the division are carried out by the 
following seven sections: 

Services Division, Chief Clerk's Office 

This office is responsible for receiving, recording and 
transmitting to the City Treasurer all license fees collected 
by the Department. 

The Chief Clerk's Office collected a total of $409,355 in 
license fees during fiscal 1974. 

Services Division, Auditing and Finance Section 

The Auditing and Finance Section audits all vouchers paid 
by the Department. It initiates all non-orders and processes 
them for payment. In addition, it encumbers all accounts and 
appropriat ions . 

Involved in this section is the processing of vouchers 
totaling close to $5 million. 

Services Division, Automotive Maintenance Section 

The Automotive Maintenance Section is responsible for the 
maintenance and repairs to all Department vehicles (533) and 
is open twenty-four hours a day. The supervisor of Automotive 
Maintenance investigates all accidents in which Department 
vehicles are involved. Involved in purchase, servicing, supplies 
and materials is worth $2,500,000. 



46 



Records and Data Processing Division 



Duties 

This division is responsible for departmental processing of 
information through data processing systems; operating the computer 
and data processing equipment; preparing statistical analysis of 
data-, including criminal activity, service load and traffic acti- 
vity; developing along with other units, improved systems applica- 
tions; developing report formats and issuing reports for operational 
and management utilization; reviewing field reports for data 
accuracy and completeness; and coordinating field reporting proces- 
sing with the Planning and Research Division. It is reponsible 
for the maintenance and control of active warrants of arrest as 
well as incident, criminal, arrest and other department records, 
the microfilming and storage of all historical data. 

Personnel 



1 Director 

1 Secretary 

1 Lieutenant 

3 Sergeants 

1 Detective 

7 Patrolmen 

1 Sergeant 

1 Sergeant Programmer 

1 Patrolman Programmer 

2 Patrolman Planners 
39 Clerk Typists 



2 Patrolmen 

1 Senior Systems Analyst 

1 Systems Analyst 

1 Senior Computer Operator 

2 Computer Operators 

2 Principal Statistical 

Machine Operators 
4 Senior Statistical 

Machine Operators 
15 Statistical Machine Operators 
1 Tape Librarian 



Total: 88 



Activities 



Computer to computer contact between the Boston Police 
Department computer with the Massachusetts State Police LEAPS 
system has been completed and is operational. This allows 
immediate entry, inquiry, modification and deletion of records 
in the State Police LEAPS system. It also allows switching 
by LEAPS for inquiry into the Crime Information Center, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation files. 



47 



Services Division, Building Maintenance Section 

The Building Maintenance Section is responsible for the 
maintenance and repairs to all police buildings and property. 
All custodians and cleaners assigned to the twenty various 
police buildings are under this section and are responsible 
for the cleaning and maintenance of these buildings. 



Services Division, Central Licenses Section 

The Central Licenses Section is responsible for the investi- 
gation, processing and recording of all licenses and permits, 
new and renewal, issued by the Police Commissioner, except dog 
licenses.and bicycle registrations which are issued at the local 
district stations. In addition, the Central Licenses Section 
investigates or causes to be investigated and reported, essential 
elements of information required for applications for licenses 
or permits, new or renewal, forwarded to the police department by 
other governmental agencies such as the Boston Licensing Board, 
Licensing Division of the Mayor's Office, Public Works Depart- 
ment, the Secretary of State's Office and the Director of Stand- 
ards. This section is responsible for the on-site inspection of 
premises, if required, as part of the above investigation of 
license applicants. The section issued 41,694 licenses in fiscal 
1974. 



Services Division, Property Clerk Section 

The Property Clerk Section processes all requisitions 
and service orders. After the material has been received or 
the work performed, it authorizes payment for same. This office 
also handles the accounting system through the use of Data 
Processing. A high degree of current budget detail is provided 
through this office. The Property Clerk stockroom handles and 
distributes all office and custodial supplies and stores all lost, 
stolen and abandoned property turned in by the various claimed 
properties received by the office. 

Services Division, Payroll Section 

The Payroll Section prepares, audits and processes all 
payrolls, including special overtime payrolls and collective 
bargaining compensation amendments, C.E.T.A., LEAA and FEAA 
rolls, etc. Under existing contract agreements, there are 92 
different rates of pay. A total payroll processed in this 
section is in excess of $53 million. 



48 



Grant Management 



Duties 

The Grant Management Section of the Office of the Chief 
Clerk was formally inaugurated in September of 1974. Its 
purpose is to improve the administration of Federal Safe Streets 
grant expenditures. 

It is the responsibility of this unit to set up and maintain 
basic books of account for the Department's federal fund effort. 
In addition, this unit acts as a liaison with inter- and intra- 
departmental staffs concerned with federal funds. 

Personnel 

Grant Accountant 

Activities 

This section has managed the books of account for some 19 
federal grants amounting to more than one and a quarter million 
dollars as shown below: 



Grant Title 



Narcotics 
Enforcement 

Consolidated 
Improvements 

Citywide A.C.U. 

Citywide A.C.U. 

Police Community 
Relations 

Police Training 

Administrative 
Specialists 

Juvenile Liaison 

Investigative 

Equipment 

Crime Lab 



Grant Number 

74DF-01-0011 

73C-154.270 

73C-224.035 
74C-070.033 
74C-126.0332 

74C-136.043 
74C-137.0261 

74C-138.5334 
74C-145.025 

74C-146.025 



Planning 74C-155.0265 

Neighborhood Aides 74C-171.033 
Data Processing 74C-170.21 
Police Training 75C-187.0213 
Stress Counselling 75C-188.0169 



Amount 
Budgeted 

90,000.00 

400,000.00 

19,043.00 

128,628.00 

38,380.00 

106,651.00 
42,824.00 

33,000.00 
6,800.00 

18,380.00 

44,638.00 
23,640.00 
520,629.50 
85,007.00 
25,453.00 



Amount Active or 
Expended Inactive 
as of 7/29/75 



Inactive 

Inactive 

Inactive 

71,626.37 

32,011.24 

53,998.14 
35,921.30 

11,999.52 
316.81 

16,059.25 

13,188.42 
19,764.80 
145.182.50 
33,207.84 
Inactive 



Inactive 

Inactive 

Inactive 
Inactive 
Inactive 

Active 
Inactive 

Active 
Inactive 

Inactive 

Active 

Inactive 

Active 

Active 

Active 



49 



i 

Grant Title Grant Number Amount Amount Active or 

Budgeted Expended Inactive 
as of 7/29/75 ', 

Specialized Skills 75C-189.0211 74.021.00 40,059.59 Active 

Planning 75C-190.0212 126,274.00 58,337.76 Active 

Administrative 75C-191.0252 52.250.00 7,756.81 Active 
Services 

Data Processing 75C-202.2125 105,542.00 42,085.35 Active 

Police Community 75C-201.0371 35,178.31 Inactive Active 
Relations 

NOTE: This report does not include figures for in-kind match. 



50 



Communications Division 



Duties 

The Communications Division is responsible for instituting 
fast and efficient police response to telephoned calls for 
assistance. On an average day the division handles 4000 telephone 
calls over the emergency lines. These calls run the gamut from 
a simple request for directions to the electrifying report of a 
major disaster. Sixteen telephone positions are devoted to 
answering emergency lines. The Boston Fire Department, major 
hospitals and other municipal agencies have direct line telephone 
communications with the Operations Center. 

Calls for assistance received at the telephone positions 
are relayed by conveyor belt to the dispatch positions. Six 
dispatchers man individual radio consoles and relay the message 
by radio to the closest appropriate response unit. 

Six paired radio frequencies handle the normal police patrol 
and response operations. Additional frequencies are used for 
administrative, surveillance and specialized personnel. Local 
agencies, including the Boston Housing Authority, the School 
Department and the Deer Island House of Correction share a 
common frequency which is constantly monitored in the Operations 
Center. This assures instant response to emergency calls for 
assistance by any of these agencies. An intercity frequency 
provides instant communications with 51 city, town and state 
law enforcement agencies. 

The teletype section provides access to the department 
computer, the state computer (LEAPS) and a national computer 
(NLETS) . Almost instantaneous response to inquiries concerning 
wanted or missing persons, stolen vehicles, stolen firearms, 
stolen securities or other police-related information can be 
obtained through this nationwide network. One of the six 
radio dispatchers can make similar inquiries from a terminal 
located in the dispatcher's section. 

Manning the Operations Section are the following: 

Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 

1 Captain 

2 Lieutenants 
12 Sergeants 
47 Patrolmen 

76 Civilian Complaint Clerks 

Communications Division Radio Maintenance Section 

Duties 

Supervised by a civilian director, this section is responsible 
for the installation and maintenance of the electronic equipment 



51 



associated with the Boston Police radio and cable TV netv;orks . 

The Boston Police radio network has a total of 47 transmitters 
at strategic locations. This total includes main, stand-by 
and emergency transmitters. More than 80 satellite receivers 
interconnected to a repeater voting system, ensure maximum radio 
coverage on all frequencies. 

An elaborate recording system, serviced by the section, 
permits the simultaneous tape recording of 80 different radio 
and telephone positions in the Operations Center. All emergency 
telephone and radio communications are recorded and the recorded 
tapes retained for future reference. 

A paging system, used to page any administrative personnel, 
occupies a police-assigned frequency and is serviced by personnel 
assigned to radio maintenance. 

All radio, TV and associated equipment assigned to the Department 
is serviced and maintained by personnel assigned to the radio 
maintenance section. The maintenance section is responsible for 
more than 3200 separate pieces of equipment. All installations 
of new equipment are made by personnel assigned to this section. 

Personnel 

1 Civilian Director 
1 Sergeant Technician 

12 Patrolmen 
5 Civilians 
1 Custodian 

The Boston Police Radio Maintenance personnel are all FCC 
license holders, and are highly qualified to perform the daily 
functions or servicing and maintaining the elite radio communications 
system of the Boston Police Department. 

Activities 

Daily activities consist of repair of mobile radio and handy 
talkies all base stations , all satellite receivers and all police 
radio equipment throughout the city on a 24 hour basis and the 
continual scrutiny of all frequencies both receiving and transmitting 
according to the FCC Rules and Regulations. 



52 



Communications Division Signal Service Section 

Duties 

This section maintains and services all electrical wiring 
and equipment used by the Department. It is responsible for 
the installation and maintenance of more than 27 miles of coaxial 
cable used in the Department's TV network. 

The section services and maintains the generator which provides 
emergency power for the Communications Division in the event of 
electrical failure. 

Six trucks, one specifically designed for pulling and 
installing cable, are assigned to the section. 

Personnel 

1 Director 
13 Civilians 

Activities 

Installation, maintenance and repair of all electric lights, 
lines and equipment in all department facilities. Installation 
new department co-axial cable throughout the city. Removal of 
discontinued communication cable throughout the city. Installation 
and maintenance taxi signs, poles and sightseeing signs and poles. 
Servicing of teletype machines. Engineering required for electrical 
installations and outside plant. 



53 



BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 



55 



Bureau of Inspectional Services 



Duties 

The Bureau of Inspectional Services is responsible for 
providing the Police Commissioner with accurate information 
on the Department's performance in providing police services 
to the community, and also for providing the Commissioner with 
information on known criminal activities throughout the city. 
Included in this Bureau are the Internal Affairs Division. 
Intelligence Division, Staff Inspection Division and Organized 
Crime Division. 

Personnel Total 

1 Superintendent 

3 Deputy Superintendents 

2 Captains 

2 Lieutenants 
2 Sergeants 

6 Patrolmen Specialists 
1 Patrolman 

1 Lieutenant Detective 
8 Sergeant Detectives 
33 Detectives 

Total 59 

Activ i ties 

The activities of the Bureau of Inspectional Services are 
carried out by the divisions of the bureau, Internal Affairs, 
Staff Inspection and Intelligence. 



57 



Internal Affairs Division 



Duties 



This division conducts investigations of complaints made 
by persons, groups, and organizations who feel they have been 
unjustly offended, mistreated, or who feel the police have 
over-reacted or failed to act properly. 

Guidelines have been established so that persons desiring 
to avail themselves of the service offered by the Internal 
Affairs Division may do so with the knowledge they will be heard 
and treated in an impartial manner. In the process complaints 
are thoroughly evaluated with final recommendations sent to the 
Police Commissioner. 

Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 
3 Sergeant-Detectives 

2 Detectives 
1 Patrolman 

Activities 

Within the period of this report, Internal Affairs recorded 
and investigated 189 formal complaints. All but 20 have been 
resolved . 

Also recorded, but in a lesser category and classified as 
"Miscellaneous Complaints" were 136 investigations, all of which 
have been processed and resolved at the Internal Affairs Division 
level to the satisfaction of all concerned. 



58 



Intelligence Division 



Duties 

The Intelligence Division is responsible for developing 
information regarding organized criminal activity and for 
keeping abreast of the vice activity in the city. This division 
includes the Intelligence Section, Vice Control Section and 
the Organized Crime Section. 

Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 

2 Lieutenant-Detectives 
4 Sergeant Detectives 

1 Sergeant 
33 Detectives 

3 Patrolmen Intelligence Agents 
3 Patrolmen 

3 Civilian Clerks 

Activities 

The activities of this division are carried out by the 
various sections. 



Intelligence Section 



Duties 



This section is responsible for keeping the Police Commissioner 
informed of the activities of known criminals in Boston; coordinatin) 
the gathering and evaluation of information concerning persons or 
organizations engaged in illegal activity; examining officers in 
the field, for the purpose of accxjmulating the information thereon 
and notifying field units for further action if warranted on a 
subject named therein; maintaining sources of information, and 
informing units of the Police Force on suspected criminal activity; 
developing information concerning criminal activity within the 
City of Boston which directly or indirectly points to a unified 
pattern of control; maintaining liaison with federal and other 
governmental agencies . 

Personnel 

10 Detectives 
2 Patrolmen Intelligence Agents 



59 



Act i vi t ies 

F.I.O. reports evaluated and processed 15,797 

Investigations of subversive activities 589 

Meetings with state and federal authorities 496 

Assistance rendered state and federal agencies 739 

Assistance rendered other police departments 715 

Investigations of militant groups 136 

Special reports submitted 601 

Tabs forwarded 565 

Investigation of known criminals 2,097 

Narcotic investigations 116 

Arrests as a result of narcotic investigations 43 



V ice Control Section 

Put ies 

This section is responsible for providing supplemental and 
specialized assistance to area and district commanders throughout 
the city for the control of illegal gaining, liquor law violations, 
prostitution and related crimes and offenses; making observations 
and the reporting of any attempt by the criminal element to 
infiltrate any licensed premises. 

Personnel 

2 Lieutenant -Detectives 

3 Sergeant-Detectives 
15 Detectives 

Act ivit ies 

Vice Arrests 679 

Search warrants issued 25 
Summonses issued 115 

Arrest warrants issued 313 

Gaming Arrests 314 

Search warrants issued 56 
Arrest warrants issued 31 

Other Arrests 99 

Search warrants issued 6 
Arrest warrants issued 25 



Total arrests 1,092 

Total search warrants 87 

issued 

Total arrest warrants 369 

issued 

Total summonses issued 115 



60 



Organized Crime Section 

Duties 

Responsible for conducting investigations and compiling 
of evidence for prosecution in court; making surveillances and 
reporting the activities and locations of areas frequented by 
known criminals in Boston and surrounding areas, especially 
with regard to crimes committed, or contemplated, vjithin or 
without the City; making observation of certain businesses and 
service industries susceptible to organized crime penetration; 
and conducting such other confidential investigations as the 
Commissioner may, from time to time, direct with regard to 
criminality or other matters of interest to the Department. 

Personnel 

1 Sergeant 

1 Sergeant-Detective 

8 Detectives 

1 Patrolman Intelligence Agent 

Activ it ies 

Field Interrogation/Observation Reports submitted 2,862 

concerning organized crime members and other criminals 
Assistance rendered to the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 347 

tion 
Assistance rendered to United States Treasury Dept. 181 
Assistance rendered to the Attorney General's Office 103 
(Organized Crime Section) 
Assistance rendered to the Federal Internal Revenue 15 

Serv. 
Assistance rendered other Police Departments and Agencies 271 

Outside of Massachusetts 
Reports submitted by Officers concerning Organized Crime 822 

members and other criminals 
Hours spent in court 1,043 

Regular Overtime, Intelligence Division and Organized 1,803 

Crime Section 
School Safety Overtime', Intelligence Division and 5,450 

Organized Crime Section 



61 



Staff Inspection Division 



Duties 

The duties of the Staff Inspection Division are inspection 
and performance evaluation. It is the responsibility of the 
division to see that all uniformed personnel are properly equipped 
for duty, mentally alert and physically capable. 

This is a continuing process conducted by attending roll 
calls (day and night), including on-the-street inspections. The 
inspectional program also includes the Department's physical 
property and equipment, police motor vehicles, motorcycles, patrol 
wagons, horses and other related equipment, including the storage 
and keeping of same, garages, police buildings, all radio equip- 
ment, station house and Department records and files necessary to 
the daily administration of the Department. 

Performance evaluation includes promptness at roll calls and 
responding to police emergency calls, care and handling of equip- 
ment, assisting in the development of policy and training, also 
rules and regulations recommending changes where necessary, re- 
viewing complaint investigations, submitting recommendations, 
including disciplinary action based on conclusions reached in the 
course of the investigation. 

Personnel 

1 Deputy Superintendent 
1 Captain 

1 Lieutenant 

2 Sergeants 
1 Patrolman 

Activities 

During this period, the Staff Inspection Division was 
present during 642 roll calls. Staff Inspection made 1318 visits 
for the purpose of inspection to police buildings, garages, radio 
shop, gun lockers, walkie-talkies inventory and the general con- 
dition of police buildings and equipment. 

Staff Inspection made 107 formal investigations pertaining 
to police service and conduct. Staff Inspection also made 25 
investigations of an informal or miscellaneous nature. 

Staff Inspection also sent out 9,332 911 survey cards to 
measure police response time. 



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