(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOTSl 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Boetom [PoDQc^d 



i BOSrONPUSLiC LIBRARY 
GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 



MAY 2 7 1986 



^nnu^i 



l^pOt' 






Attftttst 



^5.^ 



'3 




ievin H. White 
Mayor 

«eph M, Jordan 
Commissioner 




mix* 



B«"!r4,^ 







Ma*^.„« 



Index 



City of Boston 2 

Commissioner's Message 4 

Command Staff * 6 

Organizational Chart 8 

Office of the Commissioner 9 

Bureau of Administrative Services 11 

Bureau of Investigational Services 12 

Bureau of Field Services 14 

Part I and Part II Offenses 17 

Area A Statistics 18 

Area B Statistics 20 

Area C Statistics 22 

Area D Statistics 24 

Area E Statistics 26 

Response Times by Month 28 

Calls for Services/Units Dispatched 29 

Arrests-Adults 30 

Arrests-Juveniles 32 

Budget 33 

Awards 34 

In Memoriam 36 



[BoQtom 

City of Boston Population 
Metropolitan Population 
Land Area 

Metropolitan Land Area 
City Parks 
Paved Roadways 



9. 



■ 662, 994 

50.1 Square Miles 

1237 Square Miles 

2500 Acres 

91 7 Miles 



; 











^ *'^ ^ ^'^' 



,. ' ,v. « 



■£2C-*5^.wi«i^^-,^^^- -J* *" '^•^ * "y — . "'„' 



'*at-j£;-- 



Mayor Kevin H. White 



City Council 

Members at Large 

Bruce C. Boiling 

Raymond L. Flynn 

Maura A. Hennigan 

Christopher A. lannella 

Frederick Langone 

Michael J. McCormack 

Terrence P. McDermott 

Albert L.O'Neil 

Joseph M. Tierney 



A Message From 

The Police Commissioner 

To: His Honor the Mayor, the City Council and the Residents of the 
City of Boston: 

In many respects, Fiscal Year 1982-1983 was a year of notable gains 
by the Boston Police Department. Laid off police officers were 
recalled, new police officers and cadets were hired, much needed 
equipment was purchased and the crime rate dropped for the first 
time in ten years. 

The year started with the recall of the last one hundred and 
sixty-three officers who had been laid off as a result of the budget 
deficits caused by the so-called Tregor rebates, school overspending 
and Proposition IVi. This improvement in the patrol force was aug- 
mented l)y the hiring of more than two hundred new police officers. 
Additional personnel were added to the department rolls by hiring 
sixty new cadets during August. 

The promotion of Superintendent Francis J. Coleman to Superintend- 
ent-in-Chief was the first of a series of promotions which included 
nineteen Sergeants to the grade of Lieutenant and twenty-three police 
officers to the grade of Sergeant. 

An increase in the department budget of almost 10 million dollars 
over the previous fiscal year made it possible to replace the depart- 
ment's obsolete motor vehicles and radios. 

Shortly after the new year, plans were announce for a major reorgan- 
ization of the Department that involved a fundamental shift in the 
basic patrol strategy. The plans attempted to maximize the visability 
and effectiveness of the patrol force by rationalizing the use of 
existing resources and by shifting those resources to the areas of the 
greatest need. 

The cornerstone of the new plan was the assignment of priorities to 
calls according to their urgency, and the allotment of personnel to the 
calls according to their priority. This new system necessitated the use 
of one officer units for non-emergency service calls and the assign- 
ment of two officers to every call for a crime in progress or for a life 
threatening situation. 

As a result of the changes implemented under the Reorganization 
Plan, the Department more than doubled the number of beats that it 
fields on a daily basis. There were increases in the number of walking 
officers and motorcycle units working on a daily basis. 

The effect of these changes had was almost instantaneous and unmis- 
takeable. Response time to all categories of calls dropped and by the 
end of the fiscal year had gone from a response time average of nine 
minutes to one of five minutes. 




Perhaps most important of all, the crime rate began to drop for the 
first time in more than ten years. By the end of June, the Department 
had recorded almost eleven percent fewer crimes than it had for the 
corresponding previous year. 

However the Department and the city are still faced with the fact that 
the local recidivism rate is more than seventy percent. The bulk of 
suspects that the department deals with have been processed before 
and can be classified as career criminals. Until the judiciary in this 
city realize the full extent of the problem and begin to act more 
aggresively, we can look for little change. Without a change in the 
recidivism rate, the department will have to continue to put its major 
effort into visibility and rapid response to act as a deterrent. 

As we enter the new fiscal year, these trends appear to be intensify- 
ing. The crime rate continues to drop and the visibility of the Depart- 
ment's personnel is providing better service for all residents of the 
City of Boston. As the Reorganization Plan is further refined and a 
number of newly created units, such as the Auto Task Force and 
Burglary Task Force, begin their work in earnest, conditions can be 
expected to improve even more. 

Joseph M. Jordan 
Police Commissioner 



?ven more. 





Command Staff 

Francis /. Coleman ( 1) 
Superintendent-In-Chief 
Office of the Commissioner 

lohn F. Ceagan (2) 
Executive Officer 
Superintendent 
Bureau of Field Services 

Fdward I. Walsh (3) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Investigative Services 
Intelligence Division 

Stephen C. Delosh (4) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Investigative Services 
Internal Affairs Division 




Herbert H. Stone (5) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Field Services 
Housing Patrol 

William I. OBnen (6) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Field Services 
Field Inspection Unit 

Ronald X. Conway (7) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Field Services 
Special Operations Division 



lohn E. Barry (8) 
Deputy Superintendent 
Bureau of Investigative Services 
Homicide Unit 

Martin F. Mulkern (9) 
Superintendent 
Bureau of Field Services 
Special Operations Division 

James I. MacDonald(W) 
Superintendent 
Chief, South District 



Anthony I. Leone (1 1) 
Superintendent 
Chief, North District 

William K. CelesterdZ) 

Superintendent 

Bureau of Field Services (nights) 

Edward F. Connolly (13) 

Superintendent 

Bureau of Administrative Services 

Anthony I. DiNatale(14) 

Superintendent 

Bureau of Investigative Services 



[Bostom [PoDOcce 



Commissior*! 



Executive 
Office 



PiTMintn-l 



( rimin.ll 

Investigation 

Division 








Audi IF. 
Burx T.f 








Horn. Unit 
IMirU. 
Rjpi'U. 








General 
lrm-.l. V. 



Infurmatiun.ll 
Services 



Lt-nal 
Affairs 



Bureau of 
Invc'slinativf 

S«T\i( I'S 



Inlfliinenic 
Division 



Inlernjl 
Affairs 
Division 



Inldlififntt* 
()r)4ani/cd 
( rimt' L.nil 



(fKTimuni- 
( j(ir>ns & 
Computer 



IVtMlivos 
Ari'aA.t ,0 



Staff 

Inspixtion 

l>ivision 








Tw h Ser. 
Idi-nl S«1 
Rc< Vtt. 








IX-twIives 
Anas B& I 



[ 



Bureau of 

Administrative 

Sen i( cv 



Scrv it es 



Training & 
Education 



The Functions 

of the Boston Police Department 

In March 1983, the Boston Police Department's organizational structure 
was changed to increase the Department's efficiency in meeting the 
changing needs of the Boston Community. 

The new organizational structure (above) is organized into four majoB 
entities: the Office of the Commissioner, the Bureau of Administrative 
Services, the Bureau of Investigative Services, and the Bureau of Field; 
Services. 

The most evident changes of the Reorganization are the introduction ol 
the one officer patrol cars, the two officer Rapid Response Units, and 
the greatly increased number of walking patrols in the city neiglv 
borhoods. As a result, there is a ninety-one percent increase in the 
number of patrols fielded by the Department. 



Special 
/estigation 
Unit 



Organization 



I 



staff 



Labor 
Relations 



Bureau of 
Field Services 



¥ 



planning 

& Research 

Division 



1 


h 
ct 


South 
District 






ea 


Area 

~ B 






ea 


Area 

- c 






pid 
onse 


Area 

- E 








_ Rapid 
Response 



Division F 

Team 
Housing 



Division G 

Special 
Operations 



Division H 

Operations 

Center 



The Office of the Commissioner 

The Executive Office is responsible for ensuring that all orders, instruc- 
tions and policies of the Police Commissioner are implemented. This 
Office also evaluates police services and insures successful service 
delivery by various Department Bureaus. 

The Administrative Section manages and coordinates the activities of 
the Police Commissioner's Office. This Section also reviews and 
develops programs to improve the quality of police service. 

Informational Services is responsible for keeping members of the 
Department and the public informed of police activities through in- 
terdepartmental literature, the Speakers Bureau and the news media. 



10 



The Office of the Commissioner continued... 

The Labor Relations Section represents the Police Commissioner at 
employee collective bargaining negotiations, labor conferences and 
grievance discussions. This Section also assists the Police Com- 
missioner in developing labor relations policies and advises the 
Command Staff in instituting compliance procedures. 

The Legal Affairs Office maintains liaison with other criminal justice 
and judicial offices and agencies in order to develop responses to 
legal problems that are germane to police departments. This Office 
also handles all legal matters that transact in the Department. 

The Management and Budget Section budgets, audits and analyzes 
all Department programs. The Section's Data Processing Unit 
provides the Department with statistical reports and improved 
management systems. Management and Budget also records, 
processes and administers the Department payroll. 

The Personnel Division develops standards and policies for all per- 
sonnel action, including establishment of job specifications, recruit- 
ment, selection and promotion, transfers, discipline, leaves, 
retirement and the monitoring of personnel activities. This Division 
also supervises the Department Medical Program and conducts 
various personnel service activities. 

The Special Investigations Unit provides the Commissioner with 
information and recommendations concerning the integrity of the 
Department. This Unit also investigates all criminal activity within the 
Department and monitors the Department's actions to fight corrup- 
tion. 



Personnel 








Superintendent 


1 


Lieutenant Detective 


1 


Lieutenant 


4 


Sergeant Detective 


6 


Sergeant 


11 


Detective 


15 


Police Officer, SPC 


30 


Civilian 


104 


Police Officer 


104 










Total Personnel 


276 



11 



:& 




The Bureau of Administrative Services 

The Bureau of Administrative Services provides support services to 
the Department's field activities. The Bureau is divided into the 
Services Division and the Training and Education Division. 

The Services Division receives, records, and transmits to the City 
Treasurer all license fees collected by the Department. The Services 
Division also includes: 

The Maintenance Section is responsible for the servicing of 
automobiles, buildings and communication equipment. 

The Central Licensing Section regulates pawn shop operations, 
gun licensing and the City's Hackney Carriage Industry. 

The Warrants Section serves as a clearinghouse for all warrants 
and summonses. 

The Private Detail Section is responsible for the coordination of 
all off-duty police services rendered by members of the Depar- 
tment to private employers. 

The Printing and Mailing Section prints and distributes all official 
Department documents necessary for the administration of the 
Department. This Section also is responsible for the handling 
and distribution of all U.S. and Department mail. 



The Training and Education Division develops the Department 
Training Standards and administers all training and education 
programs. 



Personnel 








Superintendent 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Sergeant 


1 
1 
2 
9 


Police Officer, SPC 
Police Officer 
Detective 
Civilian 


23 

206 

1 

75 






Total Personnel 


318 



12 



The Bureau of Investigative Services 

The Bureau of Investigative Services oversees the activity of the 
various units that comprise the Criminal Investigation Division to 
assure that the best possible investigatory practices and procedures 
are maintained on a continuous basis. The Bureau is also responsible 
for the maintenance of proper liaison with Federal, state, and local 
departments and agencies which are concerned with all aspects of 
the criminal investigation process. 

In March, the Department was reorganized to include the old 
Bureau of Inspectional Serices, giving the Bureau the responsibility 
of overseeing the evaluation of police performance and investigation 
of complaints made against Department personnel. 

The Bureau of Investigative Services is divided into four divisions: 
the Criminal Investigation Division, the Intelligence Division, the In- 
ternal Affairs Division and the Staff Inspection Division. 

The Criminal Investigation Division consists of the following: 

The Vice Control Section is responsible for investigating 
prostitution, gaming. Liquor Law Violations, pornography and 
drug trafficking. This Unit investigates reported attempts by 
criminal organizations to gain control of licensed establishments 
and businesses. 

The Drug Control Unit is responsible for city-wide enforcement 
of the Massachusetts Controlled Substance Act, development 
and implementation of drug-related public education programs 
and liaison with public and private organizations involved in the 
prevention and control of drug abuse. 

The Homicide Unit investigates and prepares for the Grand Jury 
cases of homicide, suspicious deaths, serious assaults and bat- 
tered child cases. 

The General Investigative Unit is responsible for city-wide in- 
vestigations of crime against persons and property. This Unit will 
supplement other criminal investigation units by conducting sur- 
veillances, investigation and related activities. 

The Rape Investigation Unit coordinates and supervises all 
Department investigations concerning rape and sex crimes. This 
Unit also maintains a continuous Liaisonwith agencies involved 
in aiding these victims. 

The Technical Services Section maintains the Crime Laboratory, 
the Identification and Photography Unit and the Ballistics Unit. 



13 



Bureau of Investigative Services continued . . . 

The Intelligence Division keeps the Police Commissioner informed of 
all the operational responses of the Department to planned crim- 
inal occurrences. The Organized Crime Section of this Division con- 
ducts investigations of organized criminal activity for the purpose of 
court prosecutions. This Section also maintains liaison with other 
criminal justice agencies and maintains its own confidential records 
and files. 

The Internal Affairs Division reviews complaint investigations and 
investigates allegations of police misconduct. While responsible for 
Department discipline, the Internal Affairs Division also advises the 
Police Commissioner as to where additional training and/or changes 
may be needed in order to reduce complaint frequency. 

The Staff Inspection Division is responsible for the evaluation of 
Department performance towards primary goals. This includes 
assessing rules and regulations, making recommendations for im- 
provement, assisting in policy and training development, and per- 
forming periodic inspections of units and districts to assess staffing 
needs and their level of performance. This Division also supervises 
the operations and performance of private towing companies 
working with the Police Department. 



Personnel 








Superintendent 


2 


Police Officer 


13 


Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Lieutenant Detective 


4 


Captain 


2 


Sergeant Detective 


18 


Lieutenant 


4 


Detective 


98 


Sergeant 


6 


Civilian 


24 


Police Officer, SPC 


12 










Total Personnel 


185 




The Bureau of Field Services 

The Bureau of Field Services is responsible for the delivery of effec- 
tive and efficient police services to the community. 

On March 14, 1983, the new Reorganization and Deployment Plan 
was put into effect, restructuring the Bureau to include two districts, 
five areas, and four divisions. 

The North and South Districts 

The two District Commanders are responsible for the delivery of 
rapid response services in their respective districts. 

Areas A-B-C-D-E 

Each Area Commander is responsible for meeting the needs of the 
citizens by providing complete administrative and field supervision in 
the Area under his control. Area personnel are responsible for 
providing the best possible police services to their communities. 
These patrol forces also provide full cooperation with specialized 
units in seeking ways to improve the overall effectiveness of police 
operations within each area. 

Each Area maintains a patrol force sufficient in size to provide con- 
tinuous coverage and each maintains its own detective, ad- 
ministrative, supervisory and command personnel. 

The Field Inspection Unit insures prompt and efficient police respon- 
se to calls to the Department's emergency number "91 1" and the ef- 
fectiveness of police enforcement activities. 




15 







The Bureau of Field Services continued... 

The Planning and Research Division is responsible for researching 
operational and administrative problems in the Department and 
assisting units in developing effective responses to these problems. 
This Division works with other units in preparing long-range and con- 
tingency plans and is responsible for forms control, written directives, 
graphic arts, and the analysis of crime patterns and trends. 

The Housing Patrol provides specialized coverage for the citizens in 
the various public housing developments throughout the city. 

The Special Operations Division provides the Department with an 
array of highly specialized units that are utilized in situations where 
orthodox methods are insufficient. The Division consists of the 
following: 

The Mobile Operations Patrol is the Department's motorcycle 
unit, which provides traffic enforcement, patrol and selective 
tactical operations. 

The Canine Unit provides highly trained German Shepard dogs 
for patrol duty, drug searches, building searches and crowd con- 
trol. 

The Emergency Service Unit provides expertise in threat crisis 
situations that require special tools, lights, or equipment. These 
situations include bomb threats, hostage situations and snipers. 

The Threat Management Teams are available for all life threat 
crisis situations. 

The House of Detention is responsible for the care and custody 
of all women prisoners until the Court has disposed of their 
cases. 




The Bureau of Field Services continued... 

The Harbor Patrol Unit enforces the "Harbor Regulations" laws 
of the Commonwealth and the ordinances of the City of Boston 
in those areas of Boston Harbor that fall under the City's jurisdic- 
tion. 

The Operations Division receives calls through the "91 1" Emergen- 
cy Telephone System and assigns police resources to handle these 
calls. An Operations Center dispatches units in accordance with 
Department directives and plans developed by the Bureau of Field 
Services. The Operations Message Center contains communications 
facilities with LEAPS and NCIC computers as well as the Department 
Stolen Car Unit. 



Personnel 








Superintendent 


6 


Police Officer 


863 


Deputy Superintendent 


14 


Lieutenant Detective 


1 


Captain 


7 


Sergeant Detective 


9 


Lieutenant 


44 


Detective 


90 


Sergeant 


111 


Civilian 


319 


Police Officer, SPC 


166 










Total Personnel 


1630 



July 1982 through June 1983 

Statistical Data 



17 



Offenses Reported by Month 



Parti 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


)an. 


Feb. March 


April 


May 


June 


Total 


1 . Murder 


5 


6 


9 


4 


1 1 


9 


5 


10 


7 





4 


6 


77 


la. Mnslghter. 


7 


3 


3 


2 





2 








1 


1 


2 


2 


22 


2. Rape 


36 


34 


21 


38 


35 


34 


28 


34 


37 


35 


17 


30 


379 


3. Robbery 


435 


506 


486 


557 


606 


726 


629 


537 


498 


507 


499 


561 


6547 


4. Aggr. Assault 


345 


386 


335 


421 


334 


297 


323 


245 


318 


367 


366 


410 


4147 


5. Burglary 


1096 


1012 


1005 


1016 


951 


1089 


1125 


867 


973 


895 


895 


854 


11,778 


6. Larceny 


2179 


2457 


2397 


2640 


2367 


2378 


2119 


1905 


2259 


2365 


2363 


2113 


27,542 


7. Auto Theft 


1902 


1920 


1720 


1925 


1958 


2048 


1848 


1807 


2150 


1773 


1865 


1374 


22,290 


Part II 




























8. Other Assault 


303 


301 


273 


295 


266 


254 


246 


205 


261 


320 


345 


318 


3387 


9. Arson 


14 


19 


17 


14 


17 


26 


20 


17 


20 


10 


18 


14 


206 


10. Forg./Cntttg. 


21 


28 


22 


37 


25 


34 


10 


10 


10 


20 


13 


26 


256 


1 1 . Frauds 


63 


54 


77 


59 


79 


67 


54 


58 


74 


63 


64 


82 


794 


12. Embezzel. 


2 


1 








1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


11 


13.Stol. Prop. 


34 


46 


57 


51 


38 


36 


38 


36 


35 


33 


44 


49 


497 


14. Vandalism 


837 


835 


840 


1045 


942 


885 


830 


713 


949 


1039 


939 


832 


10,686 


IS.Weap. Viol. 


17 


18 


22 


39 


20 


21 


30 


16 


20 


15 


24 


24 


266 


16. Pros. /C. Vice 


94 


121 


119 


108 


93 


85 


80 


89 


121 


110 


129 


109 


1258 


1 7. Sex Off. 


21 


25 


31 


31 


24 


15 


11 


20 


21 


22 


23 


41 


285 


18. Drug Laws 


113 


145 


139 


187 


111 


84 


108 


136 


151 


166 


157 


157 


1654 


19. Gambling 


32 


17 


13 


15 


10 


6 


7 


8 


13 


15 


12 


10 


158 


20. Fam.& Child 


31 


30 


39 


21 


17 


24 


20 


8 


11 


12 


20 


17 


250 


21 . Driv. Intox. 


54 


57 


69 


61 


83 


69 


54 


57 


76 


92 


102 


84 


858 


22. Liq. Viol. 


1 1 


23 


9 


12 


4 


10 


14 


2 


6 


7 


9 


1 1 


118 


23. Dis. Cndct. 


241 


206 


166 


196 


115 


83 


100 


81 


123 


131 


138 


175 


1749 


24. Vagrancy 
































I 





1 


25. AllOthrOft. 


322 


304 


312 


323 


262 


255 


252 


259 


250 


355 


283 


315 


3492 


26. Traffic Viol. 


871 


950 


934 


1253 


1226 


1138 


1134 


1160 


1251 


1306 


1288 


I 1 40 


13,651 



Department Totals - Part 1 

Offense /Clearance Comparison 1982 & 1983 





Incidents 


Clearances 


Incidents 


Clearances 


Percentage 


Percentage 


Offense 


1981-82 


1981-82 


1982-83 


1982-83 


Cleared 81-82 


Cleared 82-83 


Murder 


101 


58 


n 


54 


57.4% 


70. 1 % 


Manslaughter 


26 


24 


22 


14 


92.3% 


63.6% 


Rape 


448 


198 


379 


175 


44.2% 


46.2% 


Robbery 


9326 


1451 


6547 


1572 


15.5% 


24.0% 


Agg. Assault 


3997 


1752 


4147 


1978 


43.8% 


47.7% 


Burglary 


17280 


1781 


11778 


2173 


10.3% 


18.4% 


Larceny 


27163 


3407 


27452 


4084 


12.5% 


14.8% 


Auto Theft 


21820 


688 


22290 


1037 


3.2% 


4.7% 


Total Part 1 


80161 


9358 


72782 


11087 


11.7% 


15.2% 



The following pages contain these figures broken down into areas. 



18 





Deputy Joseph V. Saia 
Area A (Days) 



Deputy Norman J. Ebsary 
Area A (Nights) 



Area A 
North District 



Part I - Offense /Clearance Comparison 



Offense 


Area A 


Area A 


Percentage Cleared 


Percentage Cleared 




1981-82 


1982-83 


1981-82 


1982-83 


Murder 


20 


13 






CIvciriince 


11 


10 


55% 


77% 


Manslaughter 


3 


1 






Clearance 


3 


1 


100% 


100% 


Rape 


46 


49 






Clearance 


19 


23 


41.3% 


46.9% 


Robbery 


1673 


1132 






Clearance 


277 


255 


16.6% 


22.5% 


Aggravated Assault 


607 


565 






Clearance 


301 


268 


49.6% 


47% 


Burglary 


2698 


1479 






Clearance 


203 


201 


7.5% 


13.6% 


Larceny 


9642 


8662 






Clearance 


1458 


N2'-) 


15.1% 


16.5% 


Auto Theft 


5152 


4662 






Clearance 


171 


366 


3.3% 


7.8% 


Total 


19841 


16563 






Clearance 


2443 


2553 


12.3% 


15.4% 



19 




Station House 




-^ 



Area "A" consists of Charlestown, East Boston, 
Downtown and the North End. 



Personnel 




Superintendent 


1 


Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Captain 


1 


Lieutenant 


4 


Sergeant 


17 


Police Officer, SPC 


10 


Police Officer 


174 


Sergeant Detective 


3 


Detective 


16 


Civilian 


37 


Total Personnel 


265 



20 





Deputy Paul E. Johnson 

Arm B (Days) 



Deputy Maurice C. Flaherty 
Area B (Nights) 



Area B 
South District 



Part I - Offense /Clearance Comparison 





Area B 


Area B 


Offense 


1981-82 


1982-83 


Murder 


41 


30 


Clearance 


25 


23 


Manslaughter 


5 


4 


Clearance 


6 


2 


Rape 


182 


161 


Clearance 


67 


77 


Robbery 


3385 


2397 


Clearance 


304 


357 


Aggravated Assault 


1753 


1859 


Clearance 


701 


9/7 


Burglary 


4326 


3123 


Clearance 


246 


258 


Larceny 


4268 


4365 


Clearance 


343 


442 


Auto Theft 


4607 


5065 


Clearance 


135 


;93 


Total 


18567 


17004 


Clearance 


1827 


2269 



Percentage Cleared Percentage Cleared 
1981-82 1982-83 



61% 


76.7% 


120% 


50% 


36.8% 


47.8% 


9% 


14.8% 


40% 


49.3% 


5.7% 


8.3% 


8% 


10.1 


2.9% 


3.8% 


9.8% 


13.3% 



21 




Station House 




Area "B" consists of Roxbury and Mattapan 



Personnel 




Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Captain 


2 


Lieutenant 


4 


Sergeant 


14 


Police Officer, SPC 


3 


Police Officer 


172 


Sergeant Detective 


1 


Detective 


17 


Civilian 


35 


Total Personnel 


250 



22 





Deputy Daniel Flynn 
Area C (Days) 



Deputy John P. Boyle 
Area C (Nights) 



Area C 
South District 



Part I - Offense /Clearance Comparison 





Area C 


Area C 


Percentage Cleared 


Percentage Cleared 


Offense 


1981-82 


1982-83 


1981-82 


1982-83 


Murder 


21 


17 






Clearance 


14 


7 


66.7% 


41.1% 


Manslaughter 


9 


5 






Clearance 


7 


4 


77.8% 


80% 


Rape 


57 


50 






Clearance 


25 


22 


43.9% 


44% 


Robbery 


1082 


872 






Clearance 


215 


190 


19.9% 


21.8% 


Aggravated Assault 


577 


598 






Clearance 


302 


269 


52.3% 


45% 


Burglary 


2793 


1838 






Clearance 


345 


306 


12.4% 


16.6% 


Larceny 


3228 


3677 






Clearance 


403 


526 


12.5% 


14.3% 


Auto Theft 


3142 


3534 






Clearance 


85 


105 


2.7% 


3% 


Total 


10909 


10591 






Clearance 


1396 


1429 


12.8% 


13.5% 



23 




Station House 



Personnel 




Superintendent 


1 


Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Captain 


1 


Lieutenant 


6 


Sergeant 


18 


Police Officer, SPC 


4 


Police Officer 


145 


Sergeant Detective 


1 


Detective 


15 


Civilian 


36 


Total Personnel 


229 



Area "C" consists of South Boston and Dorchester. 



24 





Deputy James j. Feeney 
Area D (Days) 



Deputy Paul F. Evans 
Area D (Nights) 



Area D 
North District 



Part I - Offense /Clearance Comparison 





Area D 


AreaD 


Percentage Cleared 


Percentage Cleared 


Offense 


1981-82 


1982-83 




1981-82 


1982-83 


Murder 


14 


8 








Clearance 


7 


8 




50% 


100% 


Manslaughter 


1 


4 








Clearance 




1 




0% 


25% 


Rape 


106 


69 








Clearance 


62 


3? 




58.5% 


45% 


Robbery 


2328 


1611 








Clearance 


472 


63/ 




20.3% 


39.2% 


Aggravated Assault 


624 


609 








Clearance 


262 


281 




42% 


46.1% 


Burglary 


4700 


3542 








Clearance 


630 


970 




13.4% 


27.4% 


Larceny 


7455 


7957 








Clearance 


mil 


7339 




13.6% 


16.8% 


Auto Theft 


6401 


5903 








Clearance 


220 


208 




3.4% 


3.5% 


Total 


21629 


19703 








Clearance 


2664 


3469 




12.3% 


17.6% 



25 




Station House 



Area ''D" consists of the Back Bay, South End and 
Brighton. 



Personnel 




Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Captain 


1 


Lieutenant 


5 


Sergeant 


20 


Police Officer, SPC 


5 


Police Officer 


164 


Sergeant Detective 


2 


Detective 


25 


Civilian 


34 


Total Personnel 


258 



26 





Deputy John E. Gifford 
Area E (Days) 



Deputy Phillip M.Vitti 
Area E (Nights) 



Area E 
South District 



Part I - Offense /Clearance Comparison 





Area E 


Area E 


Percentage Cleared 


Percentage Cleared 


Offense 


1981-82 


1982-83 


1981-82 


1982-83 


Murder 


5 


9 






Clearance 


/ 


6 


20% 


67% 


Manslaughter 


8 


8 






Clearance 


8 


6 


100% 


75% 


Rape 


57 


50 






Clearance 


25 


22 


43.9% 


44% 


Robbery 


858 


535 






Clearance 


182 


139 


21.2% 


26% 


Aggravated Assault 


436 


516 






Clearance 


186 


243 


42.7% 


47.1% 


Burglary 


2763 


1796 






Clearance 


357 


438 


12.9% 


24.4% 


Larceny 


2570 


2881 






Clearance 


192 


348 


7.5% 


12.1% 


Auto Theft 


2518 


3126 






Clearance 


77 


165 


3.1% 


5.3% 


Total 


9215 


8921 






Clearance 


1028 


1367 


11.2% 


15.3% 




station House 




27 



Area "E" consists of Hyde Park 
and Jamaica Plain. 



Personnel 




Deputy Superintendent 


2 


Captain 


1 


Lieutenant 


8 


Sergeant 


15 


Police Officer, SPC 


6 


Police Officer 


121 


Sergeant Detective 


1 


Detective 


13 


Civilian 


37 



Total Personnel 



204 



28 



Part I /Part II Crimes by Month 

7000 
5000 




9nnn 


innn 






Parti 



Part II 



Months July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June 



Manpower Comparison 



1,884 < 
1,652 < 





lune 
(1982) 



June 
(1983) 



29 



Calls For Service (911) by Month 

July 1982 to June 1983 







' 71 








aJ 
















J 






X 


/ 






^ 


-\ 


^J 






1 


/ 


Jun. 


/ 






/ 




p' 




— 


/ 






Ju 


1. 


Ai 


ig- 


Sep 


. 


Oc 


I. 


Nov. 


De< 




Jar 


. 


r 

Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 



Units Dispatched by Month 



TOTAL 320,296 



Month 


Foot 


M.O.P. 


Mounted 


Canine 


Rpd. Rsp. 


Car 


Wagon 


Gang 


July 


2294 


1168 


217 


256 




25,775 


4870 


3523 


August 


2573 


1381 


201 


279 




26,730 


4760 


3641 


September 


2186 


1406 


215 


178 




24,999 


4328 


2814 


October 


2427 


1484 


177 


150 




25,311 


4213 


2214 


November 


2024 


974 


143 


98 




22,703 


3807 


1580 


December 


1877 


771 


152 


120 




22,907 


3455 


1250 


January 


2142 


701 


250 


99 




22,241 


3273 


1020 


February 


2044 


649 


293 


97 




19,068 


3184 


1000 


March 


3999 


8487 


295 


157 


14,867 * 


14,867 


4822 


1318 


April 


7114 


1467 


369 


189 


8864 


14,295 


5534 


2171 


May 


6367 


1191 


300 


124 


9421 


15,009 


5775 


2522 


June 


6983 


1596 


304 


210 


10,011 


16,040 


6192 


4361 


Total 


42,030 


21,275 


2916 


1957 


43,163 


249,945 


54,213 


27,414 



*Note: The reorganization in March resulted in the introduction of one-man cruisers and two-man rapid 
response units. 



30 



Adult Arrests 

Classification 

Class I 18 19 20 21 22 

1. Murder 1 

Manslaughter 

2. Rape (forcible) 14 

3. Robbery 144 

4. Aggravated Assault 122 

5. Burglary 119 

6. Larceny 239 

7. Motor Vehicle Theft 151 

Class II 

8. Other Assault 53 

9. Arson 4 

10. Forgery and Counterfeiting 6 

11. Fraud 2 

1 2. Embezzlement 

1 3. Stolen Property 75 

14. Vandalism 34 

1 5. Weapons 19 

16. Prostitution and Commercialized Vice. . . . 105 

17. Sex Offenses H 

18. Drug Abuse Violations 127 

19. Gambling 5 

20. Offenses Against Family & Children 3 

21 . Driving Under Influence 17 

22. Liquor Laws 18 

23. Drunkenness 

24. Disorderly Conduct 204 260 266 252 241 

25. Vagrancy 

26. All Other Offenses 156 307 137 116 104 



3 


r- 


3 


4 








1 





11 


11 


13 


10 


131 


78 


85 


85 


102 


102 


99 


82 


11 


69 


57 


59 


199 


183 


149 


132 


122 


81 


71 


68 


53 


64 


49 


61 


2 


3 


3 


5 


2 


3 


9 


5 


1 





2 


1 


52 


44 


36 


46 


20 


23 


28 


22 


27 


29 


16 


15 


135 


183 


133 


136 


9 


11 


8 


7 


143 


146 


114 


124 


12 


14 


14 


16 


4 


11 


8 


8 


22 


38 


52 


56 


13 


4 


4 


3 



31 



Total from July 1982 through June 1983 

25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65 + Total 



21 


4 


5 


1 


2 





1 





3 


55 


2 


2 























5 


35 


27 


17 


8 


5 


1 


3 








176 


165 


94 


33 


14 


6 


4 


2 








955 


317 


117 


110 


75 


33 


39 


9 


12 


7 


1489 


187 


73 


39 


26 


2 


5 


1 








808 


552 


347 


155 


81 


58 


42 


27 


13 


9 


2440 


174 


82 


37 


19 


7 


4 


2 


1 





925 


164 


77 


57 


34 


11 


6 


6 


2 


3 


743 


11 


8 


3 


5 


3 


2 





1 


1 


55 


43 


22 


10 


2 


5 








1 





122 


6 


3 


1 


3 


1 


1 











28 


148 


82 


46 


21 


8 


8 


7 


1 


1 



639 


64 


31 


21 


15 


7 


7 


3 


2 





315 


34 


37 


27 


16 


11 


5 


6 


2 





265 


328 


127 


36 


6 


10 


1 


1 


4 


1 


1449 


28 


20 


12 


10 


6 


5 


4 


1 


2 


149 


634 


396 


165 


69 


29 


18 


10 


3 


2 


2226 


76 


79 


68 


44 


50 


50 


34 


22 


42 


547 


6 


36 


15 


8 


6 


2 











121 


187 


152 


91 


63 


46 


33 


24 


16 


9 


895 


18 


19 


21 


13 


13 


4 


10 


7 


6 


158 



495 


213 


90 


52 


20 


15 


9 


6 


4 


2456 






























303 


155 


86 


43 


21 


6 


12 


4 


4 


1629 



32 

Juvenile Arrests Total from July 1982 through June 198:' 

Classification 

Class I lO/under 

1 . Murder 

Manslaughter 

2. Rape (forcible) 1 

3. Rcjbbery 4 

4. Aggravated Assault 2 

5. Burglary 

6. Larceny 4 

7. Motor Vehicle Theft 1 

Class II 

8. Other Assault 

9. Arson 

10. Forgery and Counterfeiting 

11. Fraud 

12. Embezzlement 

1 3. Stolen Property 1 

14. Vandalism 

15. Weapons 

16. Prostitution and Commercialized Vice 

1 7. Sex Offenses 1 

18. Drug Abuse Violations 

19. Gambling 

20. Offenses Against Family & Children 

21 . Driving Under Influence 

22. Liquor Law Violation 

23. Drunkenness 

24. Disorderly Conduct 2 20 45 68 161 

25. Vagrancy 

26. All Other Offenses 6 43 52 131 152 

27. Suspicion 

28. Curfew/Loitering Law Violations 8 14 17 31 

29. Run-Aways 1 8 5 5 



1-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


Tota 




1 


2 


3 


3 


s 




2 


3 


4 


4 


14 


12 


54 


78 


115 


163 


426 


3 


31 


39 


49 


87 


211 


9 


55 


54 


63 


93 


274 


38 


192 


144 


179 


235 


79: 


11 


54 


86 


138 


195 


48: 


2 


11 


23 


28 


35 


9' 


1 


2 


3 


3 


6 


1, 




1 


1 




1 
1 




2 


11 


27 


45 


64 


15( 






10 


12 


15 


3- 




4 


7 


14 


30 


5 




4 


7 


14 


31 


1 


1 


1 


4 








1 


16 


39 


54 


124 


2}. 




1 




1 


1 

1 










3 


8 


1 


1 


4 


7 


6 


13 


3 



33 




76% SWORN PERSONNEL 



%NON PERSONNEL 
EXPENDITURES 



12%CIVILIAN PERSONNEL 



1982 - 1983 Budget 



Personnel Services 

Permanent Employees 53,557,595.14 

Overtime 2,'287,075.27 

■^OTAL 55,844,670.41 

Contractual Services 

lommunications 640,681 .78 

-ight, Heat & Power 466,062.39 

JIdgs Maintenance/Repair 141,001.19 

Equipment Repairs/Service 451 ,81 7.37 

"ransportation 9,878 74 

A\sc. Contractual Services 416,002.04 

^TAL 2,125,443.51 



Supplies / Materials 

Auto Eng. Supplies 961 ,486.95 

Food Supplies 51,107.54 

Heating Supplies 1 16,109.27 

Household Supplies 21,091.05 

Medical, Dental 37.09 

Office Supplies 97,859.34 

Clothing Allowance 841,005.85 

Misc. Supplies 433,807.26 

TOTAL 2,522,504.35 

Other Current Charges 952,379.83 

Equipment 

Auto Equipment 1,578,370.90 

Office Furniture 24,679.01 

Misc. Equipment 376,254.00 

TOTAL 1,929,945.89 

TOTAL $63,374,943.99 



34 



The Department Awards 



The Boston Police Department Awards Board has selected the following named Department 
personnel as being worthy recipients of the Medals and Awards designated: 





Officer Raynoldo C. Vialpando, District B, 

was selected to receive tlie following: 

The Schroeder Brothers Memorial Medal 

The Department Medal ot Honor 

The Boston Police Relief Association Memorial Award 

The Thomas F. Sullivan Award 

The Boston Bank Award 



The Department Medal of Honor, The Boston Police Relief Association Memorial Award, The Thomas 
F. Sullivan Award, and the Boston Bank Award were received by the following: 



Officer Eugene 1. Corbett, Dist. E 

Officer )ohn Foote, Team Police 

Detective Vincent Hayes, Drug Control Unit 

Officer Kenneth A. Lamb, Dist. C 

Officer )ohn A. Martel, Dist. D 

Officer Paul Martin, Team Police 



Detective Myles G. McGrail, Dist. A 

Officer Francis M. McHowell, )r. Data Processing Sect. 

Officer Joseph McLean, Personnel Div. 

Officer John ]. Megnia, Dist. B 

Officer Paul Varley, Dist. A 



The William I. Taylor Meritorious Service Award, and The Boston Bank Award were received by the 
following: 

Officer Thomas L. Traylor, Dist. E 
Officer Paul H. Williams, Team Police 



Officer Charles M. Horsley, Team Police 
Officer William Ingersoll, Dist. B 



35 





Officer Joseph L. Olszowy, (Right) District A, 
and Officer Thomas P. Traynor, (Left) District A, 
were chosen to receive the following: 

The Walter Scott Medal 

The Department Medal of Honor 

The Boston Police Relief Association Memorial Award 

The Thomas T. Sullivan Award 

The Boston Bank Award 



Special Citations were received by the following: 

Detective Kenneth Acerra, G.I.U. 
Officer William T. Broderick, Dist. C 
Officer Gerald Fabiano, Dist. A 
Officer James M. Fong, Dist. A 
Officer Richard M. Keefe, Dist. B 
Officer Peter T. Lydon, District B 
Detective William P. Lydon, Dist. C 



Sergeant Thomas P. Maloney, Jr. Dist. D 

Officer John A. Martel, Dist. D 

Detective Emmett McNamara, Dist. A 

Detective John D. Messia, Jr. Dist. C 

Detective Kenneth Nave, Dist. A 

Officer Joseph F. Supitkowsky, Dist. B 

Officer Thomas H. Walsh, Dist. D 



Board Members: 

Supt. Anthony J. Leone 

Dep. Supt. John A. Gifford 

Dep. Supt. Paul E. Johnson 

Lt. Joseph P. Sheridan 

Sherwin B. Wexler 

Supt. Francis J. Coleman (Chairman) 




Police Officer's P/ayer 

Oh Almighty Qod, 

Whose great^Wer an^JBernal 

Wisihm embraces'^he uni^'erse. 

Watch o^er all'Police and 

CaW enjorcement officers. 

'Protect themjrom harm 

In the perjonnance oj their ihty 

Do stop crime, robberies, , 

!Kiots an\}fiolence. } 

We praij. help them keep out streets 

Am) homiji saje dag and night. 

We recompiend them to ifour losing care 

"Because their duty is dangerqus- 

Qrant them your unending strength and 

Courage ^ then daily assignmenls. 

'Dear Qod, protect Miese bra\'e men, 

Qrant them your almighty protection, 

Unite them sajely nfith their families 

Afier duty has ended. 

AMEN 



I U 



-> 



i ^ 






L 




:^A"^>^^A' 



I 




MMtMotmm 

oUcE d^ffictr ^paulbing J^. ^antien 

7-13-21 to 4-1 1-83 Appointed 9-8-48 L^ 



police (Officer Ct)arles M. J^ubtxt 

8-24-42 to 5-9-83 Appointed 5-29-67 

jmoEiff^L^uf 
(tBTamesJp. Ctjaisson*! 

'^i%^^*2b\^^^)3-83 Appointed *8-'23;5Q 

Betectilje William 3. 5o|'cc , 

1 2-7-29 to 9- 1 -82 Appdintet^g-SS 54> 



Acknowledgements: 



Editor: 


Susan K. Locke 


Assistant Editor: 


James L. Burke, Jr. 


Graphics: 


Robert G. Neville 




Martha J. Healy 


Photography: 


Robert E. Stanton 




Susan K. Locke 




The Boston Globe 




The Boston Herald 



.Sa-