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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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GOVDOC 
6455 
.62 

2000 




2000 Annual Report 



We dedicate ourselves 

to ivork in partxiersliip 

ivitli tlie commuiiity 

to flglit crime, reduce 

fea.r and improve 

tlie quality of life 

in. our neigliborlioods. 





I^HBORHOPD POLICING 



^ /Z 



i 



Produced by: 

The OlTice of the Police 
Commissioner: 
Bruce Blake. Editor 
Sgt. Brendan D. Flynn, 
Project Manager 

Editorial Staff: 

Bruce Blake 
Sgt. Brendan D. Flynn 
Robert G. Neville 
Gregory Mahoney 

Cover Design: 

Gregory' Mahoney 

Graphic Design: 

Robert G. Neville 
Gregory Mahoney 
Elizabeth Clairwood 
Holly Wheeler 

Photography: 

Gregory Mahoney 
Elizabeth Clairwood 
HoUy Wheeler 
Jason Ezekiel 
Identification Unit 
City Hall Photography 

Statistical Data: 

Office of Research & Evaluation 

Special Thanks To: 

HNTB Architects Engineers Planners 

- Becky Bozadjian 

Dep. Supt. William Bradley 

Dep. Supt. William Casey 

Lt. Det. Patricia Eagar 

Sgt. Joseph Dashner 

Sgt. Det. Jay Devlin 

Det. Mary Mclnness 

P.O. Cecil Jones 

P.O. Denise Watson 

Laura Dickerson 

Edward P. Callahan 

Elaine O 'Sullivan 

Susan Gillis 

Boston Municipal Research Bureau 

Donald McGough 

Boston Transportation Department 

- James Gillooly 
Kevin J. Foley 
Massachusetts State Police 

- Lt. William Coulter 
Fleet Center 

- Jim Delaney 

- Courtney Mclllhenny 
Kathy Clancy 

Mark Hickey and Family 
P.O. Kermey Gaines 
P.O. Eddie Rodriguez 
P.O. Stephen Hofferty 
CA/T Authority 

- Matt Peel 

- Sean OTMeil 

- Phil De Joseph 
Blake Norton 
James Jordan 



At a Glance 1 

Message from the Mayor 2 

Message from the Police Commissioner 3 

Office of the Police Commissioner 4 

Department Initiatives: Re-entry Program 6 

Department Initiatives: Community Grants 7 

Bureau of Investigative Services 8 

Department Initiatives: Domestic Violence Court 10 

Department Initiatives: "Crime Show" 11 

Part One Crime Statistics 12 

Bureau of Professional Development 14 

Community Disorders Unit 16 

Community Involvement 17 

Bureau of Administrative Services 18 

Department Initiatives: New Technology 20 

Department Initiatives: Youth Programs 21 

History of the Boston Police Department 24 

Tall Ships Come to Boston 26 

Bureau of Field Services 28 

Operations 29 

Area A - District 1 30, 

Area A - District 7 31 

Area B - District 2 32 

Area B - District 3 33 

Area C - District 6 34 

Area C - District 11 35 

Area D - District 4 36 

Area D - District 14 37 

Area E - District 5 38 

Area E - District 13 39 

Area E - District 18 40 

Special Police 41 

Special Operations 42 

Department Initiatives: Special Events 43 

Bureau of Internal Investigations 44 

Department Initiatives: Fairness & Professionalism 50 

Awards 51 

Boston Police Department Retirees ; 54 

Superintendent-In-Chief Robert Faherty 55 

In Memoriam 56 

Directory 57 

Boston Police Department Organization 58 



Boston Police Department 

Organized 1854 

Sworn Officers 2169 

Student Officers 50 

Civilian Personnel 850 

Budget 213.5 Mil 

Mean Age 42 

Mean Years of Service ... 1 7 

Facilities 26 

Patrol Vehicles 877 

Specialty Vehicles 93 

Motorcycles 72 

Bicycles 45 

Water Craft 5 

Horses 19 

Canines 15 

Total E-911 Calls 599,133 

Non-Emergency 

E-911 Calls 68,930 

Total Calls Received . . . .668,063 




City of Boston 

Founded 1630 

Government Mayor /City Council 

City Budget $1,769 Billion 

Area .48.9 Sq. Miles 

Resident Population 589,141 

Daytime Population 2 Million 

Police Officer to Population Ratio . . 1 per 272 Residents 
Population Density per sq. mile . . .12,048 

Registered Voters 141,826 

Average Median Selling Price: 

Homes $272,904.00 

Residential Property Tax per IK . . .$10.58 
Commercial Property Tax per IK . . .$30.17 

Public School Population 63,500 

Public Schools 130 

Charter Schools 9 

Non-Public Schools 72 

Colleges & Universities 20 

Hospitals 24 

Major Newspapers 2 

Television Outlets 8 



^ 




BOSTONIA^. J^j 





Dear Fellow Bostonians 

Crime has continued to remain at a low level in Boston in 
2000, due in large part to the efforts of the Boston Police 
Department and concerned community members throughout our City. 

We all have important parts to play in making Boston's streets safer. 
Thanks to neighborhood policing and the rise in neighborhood crime 
watches, Bostonians no longer rate crime as their number one concern. 
An impressive eight out of ten Bostonians now feel safe walking outside in 
their neighborhoods at night. Increasingly our residents have also come to 
know their neighborhood police officers, and in 2000, 35 new crime watch 
groups were formed. 

There is no doubt that the Boston Police Department is among the finest in 
the nation and shines as a beacon for police departments across America. 
Boston also continues to share its successful neighborhood policing strate- 
gies with other law enforcement agencies throughout New England as the 
host of the region's Regional Community Policing Institute. 

I look to the people of Boston to continue to work with each other, and 
with the Police Department, to make Boston the safest city in America. 
I salute Commissioner Evans and the Boston Police Department for their 
daily professionalism and courage on behalf of all of us, and encourage 
everyone involved with these successful efforts to keep up the good work. 



Sincerely, 




Thomas M. Menino 
Mayor of Boston 





Dear Citizens of Boston: 

Our Department and our City experienced a unique 
combination of unprecedented events during the Year 
2000. We saw Y2K concerns quickly come and go. 
During numerous major special events, like the 
international BIOTECH 2000 Conference and the first 
Presidential Debate, our personnel acted in an exemplary 
fashion. Boston again successfully hosted a huge armada 
of Tall Ships from around the world, and then welcomed 
thousands of local government officials from across the country, 
who visited to see for themselves "how Boston does it" at the annual 
National League of Cities Conference. 

These events focused the attention of millions of people on Boston and on our 
Department. They saw many of the reasons why our Department's "First in the Nation" 
status is more than just a motto. They saw a steady increase in the quality of our 
equipment and facilities. They saw the depth and caliber of our training, reflected in 
the professionalism of our officers. They also saw the growing levels of cooperation 
among our community partners and other law enforcement agencies throughout Boston, 
Massachusetts, New England, and beyond. 

None of these things happened by accident. They are a result of long hours of planning 
and hard work by our personnel across the City. Each of these major successes — as 
well as innumerable smaller ones — are a credit to the diligence and commitment of our 
personnel. That's why this report highlights the many ways that our personnel continue 
to demonstrate the excellence of our Department,' around the clock — in neighborhoods 
throughout Boston — every day of the year. 

As you read through it, 1 hope that youll take special note of the steps we've taken to 
broaden and deepen these improvements in the coming years. Youll see it in the impor- 
tant work of our internal Fairness and Professionalism Committee, and in our focus on 
implementing new techniques and technologies to save lives, reduce costs, and improve 
the services we provide to all of Boston's residents, guests, and visitors each day. Our 
reason for doing so is simple: our mission is to work in partnership with you to continue 
to fight crime, to continue to reduce fear, and to improve the quality of life in all our 
neighborhoods throughout Boston. We appreciate your participation in these efforts 
thus far, and look forward to working with you, both now and in the years to come, to 
make Boston the safest city it can be. 



Sincerely, 




Paul F. Evans 
Police Commissioner 



r 




Police 
Commissioner 

Paul F. Evans, Commissioner of Pouce 
Superintendent-In-Chief Robert P. Faherty 




he Office of Che Police Commissioner includes: 

Community Disorders Unit 

Graphic Arts Unit 

Office of Administrative Hearings 

Office of Communications 

Offlce of Labor Relations 

Office of Media Relations 

Office of Research and Evaluation 

Office of Strategic Planning and Resource Development 

Office of the Night Superintendent 

Office of the Legal Advisor 

OPC personnel again led or facilitated a variety of innovative projects and initiatives with 
positive impacts both within the Department, and in the neighborhoods that it serves 
throughout the City. These efforts continue to span areas as diverse as labor negotia- 
tions and legal proceedings, to diversity training, and youth violence prevention pro- 
grams. They also include daily interaction with local and national media outlets, and 
liaisons with other government agencies, civic leaders, and the community as a whole. 

In several key areas, OPC personnel have proposed, developed, and implemented new 
policies and procedures that are building on the Department's recent success, while also 
planning for its needs in the years to come. Among these improvements in 2000 were: 

• Major changes within the Command Staff designed to capitalize on the excellence of 
our Department's personnel and programs; 

• Improvements in how the Office of Research and Evaluation collects, analyzes and 
distributes timely and accurate crime data and mapping information for use by field 
personnel; 





• Coordinating the implementation of localized 
Strategic Plans created during 1999; 

• Commissioning the Fairness and Professionalism 
Committee, responding to its findings, and 
implementing many of its recommendations as 
part of the continual improvement in the 
Department's provision of public safety services; 

• Hosting, along with numerous partners, visits by both Attorney General Reno 
and President Clinton; 

• Generating over $6.5 million in grants and other external funding; 

• Re-distributing $600,000 in grant money to 41 community-based programs via 
Violence Prevention Grants; 

• Hosting numerous site visits for delegations from Europe, Asia, Africa, 
Australia, and throughout the Americas. 





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• 



New Community 
Re-Entry Program 

Offering Opportunity to Vk>rnier Prisoners 

What happens when former prisoners are released into the community? In many 
places, their limited options and lack of support or training can help to make their 
eventual return to prison a statistical probability. However here in Boston a 
unique collection of law enforcement and community resources have been gathered 
to try to prevent this theme from continuing in local neighborhoods. 

Together, the Boston Police Department's Youth Violence Strike Force, the Suffolk 
County Sheriffs Department, and a variety of additional non-profit, government, 
and faith-based partners have embarked on a new program designed to deter 
high-risk inmates from re-offending when they return to their neighborhoods. The 
primary goals of what is now known as the Boston Re-Entry Initiative are to 
provide pre-release discharge planning at the Suffolk County House of Correction, 
to continue this process with transition support, and then to follow up with 
additional counseling and services within the community after their release. 
Ultimately, the goal is to lessen recidivism by providing the positive alternatives 
necessary to prevent their return to a life of crime. 

Since its beginnings in September of 2000, the Re-Entry program has already 
identified nearly 40 high-risk offenders for participation in the program, and 
successfully attracted nearly $150,000 in Department of Justice grant funding. 
It has also benefited from the input of numerous partners such as the Ten Point 
Coalition, the Boston Private Industry Council, the Mayor's Office of Jobs and 
Community Services, the Boston Youth Opportunity Center, the Boston Public 
Health Commission, and many others. 




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^^iBrant mnding Strengthens Community 

t»artnerships uwith Over $2.5 Million 
or the fourth year in a row, the Boston Police 
"^Department awarded over half a millior|P \ >^' 
dollars in federal grant money to support 
police-community partnerships. An out- 
growth of the Boston Police Department's 
Strategic Planning Project, the grants 
program is designed to encourage 
community based organizations to 

Cwork in collaboration with their local 
police districts. 

The program also seeks to bring together 
police officers, community residents, 
businesses, and non-profit organizations 
in innovative partnerships. Together their 
combined goal is to prevent crime and 
reduce violence in support of the 

f apartment's citywide Neighborhood Policing 
lailosophy. As Commissioner Evans has 
oted, the grants program is "our way of putting 
ulf /jpur money where our mouth is... We repeatedly ask 

^J^the community to work with us, and we want to make sure that we support 
'^ that work with real resources. The contributions that community groups offe 
to the city's overall crime reduction efforts cannot be overstated. We want 
these partnerships to grow and thrive." |,«T ^^t | A\ ,, IL. 

In 1997 over $1 million was awarded to 37 community based organizations. 
In 1998 nearly $500,000 was awarded to 31 community based organizations. 
Then, in both 1999 and again in 2000, $600,000 in grant money was 
awarded — this year to over 40 agencies selected from over 100 applicants 

The 41 programs which received this grant money reflect the particular 
concerns facing each corner of our city. Most of these programs address 
youth violence, however many also address problems such as domestic 
violence, sexual assault and substance abuse. Services supported include 
outreach, mentoring, recreational activities, artistic activities, educational 
attainment, counseling, skills development, and anger management/ conflict 
resolution. \^^^r>^ q,^ 







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Bureau of 
■I " Investicatiue 





Superintendent John F. Gallagher, Jr. 



he Bureau of litvesCigative Services includes: 

• Drug Control Division 

• Forensic Technology Division 

• Homicide Unit 

• Investigative Planning Division 

• Major Investigations Division 

As its name implies, the Bureau of Investigative Services uses a broad range of 
investigative tools, tactics, and techniques to track suspects and gather evidence. 
Together, BIS detectives, Forensics, ID, and other specialized personnel are all 
charged with finding, processing, and documenting evidence that can tie suspects 
to their crimes. BIS personnel also provide investigative support to each of 
Boston's eleven police districts. 

During 2000, BIS added a useful new tool to its already impressive battery of 
existing forensics examination capabilities in the form of the Combined DNA 
Index System, or CODIS. A computer database that contains DNA profiles from 
unsolved crimes as well as convicted offenders, CODIS links the BPD, 
Massachusetts State Police, and other investigative agencies throughout the 
country. CODIS is useful in cases where no suspect has yet been identified, but 
where there is biological evidence that can be analyzed and then compared to 
other samples using its data. As more records are added in the years to come and 
the database grows, CODIS will become even more useful as the number of 
possible matches increases. 

Whenever DNA evidence from sexual assaults and other crimes needs to be 
processed and reviewed, the impressive capabilities of the Department's DNA 
Laboratory are now more than equal to the task. They are able to establish or 
rule out the identities of possible suspects, review evidence from "cold cases", and 
discover the identities of deceased victims by examining DNA samples. This 
powerful and extremely useful tool is gaining recognition and utility as time 
passes. In 2000, the Department's Crime Lab was again recognized for the quality 






of its personnel, procedures, and testing protocols 
during a review of the DNA section by a national auditor. 
The lab received an outstanding evaluation, and was 
praised by the conducting inspector for the many 
proactive measures it employs in its DNA casework. 

At the same time, the Sexual Assault Unit continues to 
move forward in its efforts to prevent and prosecute 
sexual assault crimes, and particularly those against 
children. Several new and emerging tactics are being 
employed to accomplish this important goal. One of the 
most important of these is the creation of a new Internet 
Crimes Investigative Section, which makes constructive use of computers — both 
inside and outside the Department — to find and remove predatory criminals from 
the community. 

Being located in a local hospital, and conducting numerous educational and 
personal safety seminars at local schools and colleges helps SAU personnel to 
achieve another important goal: increased awareness. Similar cooperative efforts 
among law enforcement and healthcare providers, and ongoing efforts with victim 
advocacy groups are also producing results. Additional comprehensive training 
efforts, and a renewed focus on Boston's Public Schools, have all helped to create 
an interactive, multi-disciplinary approach that is working to prevent and 
prosecute these crimes. 




I 




New DoMEi 
Violence Court 

Boston Selected as National Leader 

During 2000, the complex issues surrounding domestic violence— and the 
Department's ongoing efforts to address them with its many community and law 
enforcement partners— continued to play a major role in violence prevention 
efforts throughout Boston. With the help of several grants, and district detectives 
assigned as Domestic Violence Investigators, BPD's Domestic Violence Unit has 
worked to develop a comprehensive response to domestic violence incidents which 
mirrors previous successful collaborations in youth violence prevention. In 
several districts, law enforcement amd community partnerships have created a 
renewed commitment to tougher prosecution of repeat offenders, improved 
reporting and case tracking, and have aided in the apprehension of serious 
domestic violence offenders. 

In September, Attorney General Janet Reno visited Boston to open the Judicial 
Oversight Demonstration Project in the Dorchester District Court. One of the 
busiest courts in the Commonwealth, Dorchester Court hears the most domestic 
violence cases in Boston. There are only three of these sites nationwide, and the 
Justice Department's award of $2 million in funding over the next 18 months for 
this Domestic Violence-only court will 
aid the Department tremendously in 
prosecuting these cases and preventing 
repeat offenses. 

Additional federal grant money has been 
allocated to bring enhanced responses to 
domestic violence calls anywhere in the 
city. This includes the formation of 
close partnerships with organizations 
devoted to women's and family services, 
such as shelters, and healthcare and 
counseling providers. This kind of fund- 
ing also helps to pay for civilian "Peace 
Advocates" who provide victim outreach 
and referrals to a variety of support 
services. The Advocates facilitate coop- 
eration among the Unit's detectives, 
prosecutors, probation officers, batterer 
intervention specialists, and the courts. 

"Peace Advocates" provide victim outreach 




Improved Grime 
Data & Mapping 

New Technology Aids Analysis 

Over the past several years, crime mapping technology has emerged as an 
important tool in the Boston Police Department's problem solving and crime 
prevention efforts. The use of a sophisticated Geographic Information System 
(GIS) allows analysts to precisely plot each incident on a detailed map of the 
city. These maps can then be compiled to visually depict specific types of 
crime, geographic areas, or time frames, and have become extremely useful to 
field personnel in documenting and analyzing crime patterns and trends. As 
a result, the Department has gained a well-deserved reputation as one of the 
most advanced law enforcement agencies in the nation in using this crime 
mapping technology. 

During the past year, representa 
tives from the Department's 
Office of Research and 
Evaluation have worked on the 
development and testing of 
crime mapping applications for 
the U.S. Department of 
Justice, provided expert 
courtroom testimony using 
GIS technology, and presented 
at various crime mapping 
training seminars and confer- 
ences throughout the country. 

The most notable advancement during 2000 was the development of 
"CrimeShow" - the Department's customized crime mapping application. 
CrimeShow was primarily designed as a presentation tool for use during the 
Department's bi-monthly Crime Analysis Meeting (CAM), but also includes a 
great number of analytical functions available at the touch-of-a-mouse. 
CrimeShow includes basic mapping and charting functionality, as well as 
links to on-line incident reports, booking sheets, and mug shots through the 
Department's Incident Tracking System (ITS). 

CrimeShow and other crime mapping technology have proven to be invaluable 
in the support of problem solving efforts and informed decision-making by 
police officers and managers throughout the Department. 



Wh'- 




11 



Part 1 Crime 



Pare One Crimes include: 

• Homicide 

• Rape and Attempted Rape 

• Robbery and Attempted Robbery 

• Aggravated Assault 

• Burglary and Attempted Burglary 

• Larceny and Attempted Larceny 

• Vehicle Theft and Attempted Vehicle Theft 




I 



In 2000, Boston's violent crime rate continued to be well below the average 
recorded in the City during the past decade: 



10 YEAR TREND IN VIOLENT CRIME 
WITHIN THE CITY OF BOSTON 



15,000- 



10,000- 



5,000- 



0- 



^W3[^_©,,^S_ 




=30% 



1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 



** Around the country and suddenly around the world, 
it seems law enforcement authorities are still cupping 
their ears to hear just how the Boston Police 
Department does it." 

- The Boston Globe 
January 1, 2000 




Boston Outpaces National Crime Reduction 



PART ONE CRIME FOR THE CITY OF BOSTON 
BY DISTRICT 1990 - 2000 



During the past 
decade, significant 
drops in serious 
crime have occurred 
in every 
neighborhood 
across the City. 
The decreases 
range from 20% 
(District C-6) to 56% 
(District D-14.) 




■izPolice District El 3 
was created 
in October 1 996. 
Prior to that E-5 
was responsible for 
the area. 



Boston's crime reductions over 
the past decade have significantly 
outpaced the national trend. 



NATIONAL vs. LOCAL 
CRIME REDUCTION RATES SINCE 1990 




-40% 
-50% 



United States New England Massachusetts Boston 



NOTE: Statistics shown are from 1999, the most current year for which 
national statistics are available. 




13 



lUREAU OP 




Development 

Superintendent Ann Marie Doherty 





he Bureau off Professional Development includes: 

• Training & Education Division (Boston Police Academy) 

• Regional Roundtables on Ethics and Integrity (RRT) 

• Regional Community Policing Institute of New England (RCPI/NE) 

The depth, breadth, and quality of the instruction provided by the Boston Police 
Academy staff for their fellow BPD personnel is truly impressive. "Training," they note, 
"is influenced by an ongoing, and never-ending attitude. It is accomplished daily by all 
members of the Academy staff to ensure that the Department has the opportunity to 
excel, and continues to be seen as a national model in law enforcement." 

With goals like these it is hardly surprising that many of the Academy's training efforts 
are unique. Often they've been developed as "first of their kind" instruction programs, to 
meet the new and emerging challenges faced by law enforcement agencies in large urban 
centers like Boston. Throughout the year, literally thousands of BPD officers have been 
trained by Academy staff members in over 70 different courses of instruction. Many law 
enforcement colleagues from other agencies and jurisdictions, and numerous civilians 
have also been trained. Included among these have been intense short-term promo- 
tional training programs for new sergeants, lieutenants, and detectives, as well as a 
steady stream of required courses in Breathalyzer re-certification and nearly 5,000 
separate bi-annual firearms re-qualifications. 

The Boston Police Academy also provides instruction in topics as far ranging as interro- 
gation techniques, school safety training, and crowd management. They teach or host 
classes on detection methods and appropriate responses to complex issues such as 
domestic violence, child pornography, white-collar crime and dangerously toxic clandes- 
tine drug laboratories. Similarly, the Bureau's staff played key roles in the Department's 
overall preparation and training for the public demonstrations and potential violence 
that were anticipated at various sites throughout downtown Boston prior to the interna- 
tional BIOTECH 2000 conference and the first of three nationally-televised presidential 
debates. Thankfully — and due in no small part to the excellence of these preparations — 
neither of these events experienced any major problems. The Department's efforts in 
both instances have already been studied and used to great effect in other cities as well. 




Also this year, under the Bureau's direction, the 
Regional Community Policing Institute for New England 
(RCPI-NE) hosted the Search Forum Series on Ethics 
and Integrity. Part of a national program begun by 
Attorney General Janet Reno in 1996, RCPI-NE pulled 
together a diverse gathering of police chiefs and 
personnel of all ranks, as well as educators, 
administrators, and community leaders from across 
New England. All of the participants in the Regional 
Roundtables on Ethics and Integrity were included in 
this initiative. Their goal was, and remains, to facilitate 
discussion of new strategies to encourage high stan- 
dards of ethical conduct in law enforcement throughout 
New England. Additionally, the RCPI-NE continues to host an ongoing 12-week 
"Mid-Management Development" seminar, a 16-week "Moral Decision Making" 
seminar, and a one-day session entitled "Key Elements of Community Policing" 
throughout New England. 

Academy staff members also continued their annual in-service training, including 
this year's well received "Back to Basics" course. In it officers were encouraged to 
redefine some of their thought processes regarding activities they routinely 
encounter during a typical tour of duty. Part of the success of this instruction 
was attributed to the expanded use of Simunitions firearms and the Firearms 
Training Simulator. Our personnel indicated both were helpful in creating a more 
realistic training environment. 

The Bureau of Professional Development has also been represented on national 
panels and forums focusing on numerous subject areas, including Use of Force, 
Traffic Stops, and Improving Police and Community Relations. 




New Less Lethal 
"Super Sock" shotgun 





I 



Community 

Unit 




Outreacli Brings Diverse Communities Together 

"...our clients, people of all races and ethnic backgrounds and from all neighbor- 
hoods of Boston, consistently tell us that the (Community Disorders) Unit shatters 
all stereotypes that they have of law enforcement." 

Dave Shannon, Coordinator of the Fenway Community Health Violence Recovery Program, 
Boston Globe, June 16, 2000 

The Boston Police Department's Community Disorders Unit (CDU) coordinates the 
identification, classification, and investigation of reported Hate or Bias-motivated 
criminal incidents throughout Boston. Reporting directly to the Police 
Commissioner, CDU's staff of 16 investigators also supervises the Department's 
response to possible civil rights violations, and develops community-based strategies 
to prevent future acts of violence and harassment. During 2000, CDU staff investi- 
gated 383 of these cases, including 199 that were eventually deemed to have been 
true hate or bias-motivated incidents. 

These efforts have been a key contributing factor in the overall pattern of crime 
reduction that has been seen in Boston since CDU's inception in 1978. Part of this 
success owes to the fact that CDU's responsibilities have grown substantially in 
these intervening years, as an important part of the Department's implementation of 
Neighborhood Policing throughout Boston. Today, CDU's ongoing efforts include 
innovative and preventive measures such as award-winning educational programs, 
and where appropriate, opportunities for mediation in addition to traditional investi- 
gation and prosecution. 

The CDU has also improved how it collects, evaluates, catalogs, and then responds 
to each suspected hate or bias-motivated incident. These measures have often 
added to the Unit's case-load in recent years, as have organization-wide training 
efforts which have increased all of our officers' awareness and sensitivity to poten- 
tial bias indicators. At the same time, the Commonwealth has also amended its 
laws regarding civil rights and bias, but through it all the Community Disorders 
Unit has continued to do a difficult job in an exemplary fashion. 

Total incitilents investigated by the Community 

Disorders Unit by iriear 

1997 1990 1999 2000 

CDU*: 155 203 212 199 

CASELOAD**: 563 a49 433 393 

* "CDU": = Incidents deemed to be Hate or Bias-motivated incidents 

** "CASELOAD": = Total of all cases investigated by CDU, including: those where hate or bias 
indicators were deemed to be present, those with an undetermined motivation, and those 
that were returned to their originating district for further investigation. 



Community 
Involvement 

BPD Voluntreers Lead the Vfay 

For many BPD personnel, working with the 

community is more than just a job. Numerous 

community-based and charitable organizations 

throughout Boston are pleased to receive their time, 

talents, and other donations throughout the year. 

Many take a particular pride in knowing that their 

efforts will help a friend, a neighbor, or a child they may 

never meet to get through an illness or a difficult time. Often 

these praise-worthy efforts are conducted with little expectation of any 

recognition or reward beyond a smile, a thank you, the knowledge that they have 

brightened someone's day, or helped to "foster a stronger relationship with 

the... Communities that we also protect each and every day." 





In 2000 the 
Boston Police Runners 
Club raised $82,000 to 
support several charities, 
including the $10,000 
sponsorship of multiple 
Pacer Gait Trainers for 
special needs children. 



BPD personnel plan, host, 

attend and volunteer their 

time at numerous educational, 

cultural, and charitable 

special events in 

neighborhoods throughout 

Boston on a regular basis. 




17 




Administrative 




William J. Good III, Bureau Chief 




he Bureau off Jtclnninistrative Services includ^fi: 

Central Supply Division 
Evidence Management Division 
Facilities Management Division 
Finance Division 
Fleet Management Division 
Human Resources Division 
Information Technology Division 
Licensing Division 

In managing the business and support functions for the entire Boston Police 
Department, the Bureau of Administrative Services [BAS] is routinely called upon to 
I)erform a broad variety of tasks. For example, BAS's Finance Division performs all 
of the tremsactions, accounting procedures, and documentation associated with 
administering the Department's $214 million annual budget. The Human Resources 
Division supervises hiring and record keeping for over 2,700 employees, including 
incoming classes of cadets and recruit officers. The Fleet Management Division 
keeps over 900 vehicles in road-worthy condition, while the Bureau's Evidence 
Management Division collects, processes, secures and keeps records on each piece of 
evidence associated with over 26,000 cases. 

These diverse organizational, systems, financial and human resource responsibilities 
are all part of the Bureau's role as the support services arm for the Department. 
Bureau steiff provide and maintain the infrastructure required to keep the 
Department's personnel and equipment operating efficiently throughout the city, 
24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Their knowledge and experience is instrumental in 
assuring that Department's business processes, both internal and public, are 
managed with the same level of professionalism with which police services £ire 
delivered throughout the city. 



# 




The Human Resources Division coordinated and 
delivered training for a first time annual performance 
reviews for all employees in 2000. Established through 
collective bargaining, the Employee Performance Review 
System will provide employees and their supervisors 
with performance benchmarks and direction for both 
improved performance and career advancement as 
opportunities become available. 

In another major initiative, the Human Resources 
Division worked together with the Finance Division to 
implement the terms of current collective bargaining 
agreements which authorized educational benefits for 
sworn personnel. Personnel collected, reviewed, 
catalogued and processed more than 7,000 documents 
in a five month period to enable 1,230 Police Officers of 
all ranks to receive in additional compensation. The 
Human Resources Division also began preparations for a promotional examina- 
tion for the ranks of Sergeant, Lieutenant and Captain to be administered in the 
spring of 2002. 

The Department was pleased to announce during the summer of 2000 that the 
Roxbury YMCA of Greater Boston had been selected as the contractor designated 
to open and run a new headquarters Child Care Center at One Schroeder Plaza. 
This Center is now available to all BPD employees as well as families in the 
surrounding neighborhoods and is providing valuable professional child care 
services for children ranging from infants 
through toddlers and pre-schoolers up 
to 4 years old. 




Public Service Unit at One Schroeder Plaza 



19 



EiMf Technologies 




I 



Using Science to Fight crime 

Since moving to its new headquarters at One Schroeder Plaza in 1997, the 
Boston Police Department can boast of state of the art communications, 
ID-imaging, and ballistics technology. The Department is also one of a small 
but growing number of metropolitan police agencies around the country to 
possess its own in-house DNA laboratory — which was the first accredited 
public lab of its kind in the New England region. The implementation of many 
of these new technologies has resulted from innovative partnerships with 
federal agencies such as the FBI, ATF, and DEA. 

In 2000 the FBI went live with a new $680 million computer system called 
lAFIS, which is short for Integrated Automatic Fingerprint Identification 
System. Boston soon became the first city to enter the FBI's pilot program 
using this technology, along with state police agencies in New York, Texas and 
Illinois. Since then, BPD investigators in the Department's Booking areas and 
its Identification Unit have been using the lAFIS system to compare arrestees' 
electronically submitted fingerprints against the 38 million fingerprint cards 
the FBI currently has on file. 

Together, BPD and FBI personnel can now use the system to find out if a 
suspect is using an alias, or is wanted in another state for a serious offense. 
Often this information can be retrieved in as little as 20 minutes. In fact, the 
FBI also recently named the Department as its most successful partner in its 
Latent Print Pilot Program thus far. Where other pilot sites have had a 
respectable rate of 1 hit for every 163 submissions, 
Boston has already achieved a remarkable rate of 1 
hit for every 35 submissions. 



lAFlS Print 
SourceSubmissions*Hlts 


New York 


7.350 45 


Texas 


185 1 


Illinois 


180 1 


Boston 


350 10 


*from inception through 12/00 




Livescan station in use. 



Youth Programs 



A iBocus on Boston's PuCure Leaders 

The Department's youth initiatives seek to encourage young people to make positive 
choices on their way to adulthood. These programs depend on strong partnerships with 
local businesses, non-profit agencies, and faith and community-based organizations 
whose commitment to Boston's youth matches our own. 

We believe that Boston's future depends a great deal on our ability to provide young peo- 
ple with the constructive channels of activity they need today, so that they can become 
productive citizens tomorrow. That's why we remain committed to doing everything we 
can to create safe, healthy, and positive environments for our young people to realize 
their dreams, and begin to build dynamic futures for themselves, for their families, and 
for our City. These are just some of the efforts that are currently underway to achieve 
these goals: 



Junior Police Academy 

In 1997 the Boston Police Department inaugurated an innovative 
program called the Junior Police Academy. This unique, day-camp 
style program targets youngsters aged 9-12, and exposes them to 
a variety of areas within the Department, as well as enrichment 
activities and daily field trips. The young "recruits" share valu- 
able social and educational experiences with each other and their 
district's Youth Service Officers. By the conclusion of their ses- 
sions, the JPA recruits are well versed in the daily themes of 
Friendship, Respect, Trust, Authority and Assistance. 



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Victory Program 

The Victory Program seeks to build understanding among the 
diverse communities that make Boston so unique. It provides kids 
ages 9-16 with a chance to work toward specific goals in academic, 
employment, and community service settings. Each young person 
signs a contract of 60-90 



PFlC3<3Fi>\IV1 



days duration that com- 
mits them to academic and 
behavioral improvements, 
and the avoidance of alco- 
hol and drugs. When they 
demonstrate continued success in setting, and 
achieving their goals through these short and 
then longer-term contracts, the young people 
gain confidence, rewards, and often become posi- 
tive role models and mentors in their community. 




21 




Youth Programs 




I 




Summer of Opportunity 

The Summer of Opportunity Program was developed by 

members of the Youth Violence Strike Force and John 

Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. in 1994. It uses 

community-based agencies and law enforcement partners 

to identify at-risk youth. Then it helps them to bridge 

the gap between their neighborhoods and the world of 

work by providing job and leadership skills. Thus far, 

300 young people have participated. They attend a 

highly structured 6-week summer program designed to 

prepare them for an after-school, 46-week, paid internship program at 

John Hancock, BPD, and other employers throughout Boston. By 

providing alternatives to violence these partners are working together to 

create long-term solutions that help young people. 

Kids at Risic Program 

The Kids at Risk Program is a fund rais- 
ing initiative supported wholly by outside 
'donations, primarily through a partner- 
ship with Boston area radio stations and 
the SFX/Don Law Company. Together 
they've helped to raise over $200,000 
since 1994. The Youth Violence Strike 
Force identifies inner-city youths who 

want to move in a more positive direction and the program funds their 

participation in overnight camps, enrollment in 

youth centers, and attendance at football, 

hockey and basketball camps. 

Auctions of concert tickets on 

local radio stations and the 

annual Reaching Youth 

Stair Climb are its key 

fund raising vehicles. 





Ytouth and Student-Athlete 
Collaborative 

The Youth and Student-Athlete Collaborative brings 
local youths together with college student-athletes 
and Boston Police Department Youth Service Officers. 
Interaction with athletes from five area universities - 
Boston College, Boston University, Harvard 
BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT Unlvcrsity, Northcastcm University and 

UMass-Boston - helps these young 
people develop positive long- 




SHARED VISION 



BOSTON COLLEGE • BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

HARVARD UNIVERSITY ■ UMASS BOSTON 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



nai 



term relationships, boosts self-esteem, 
and exposes them to some local 
college-level educational oppor- 
tunities. Program participants 
visit local campuses and partic- 
ipate in recreational athletic 
activities throughout the school 
year, which culminate in a day- 
long spring Sports Fest featur- 
ing instruction in a variety of 
different sports. Over a thou- 
sand Boston young people have 
participated thus far. 




^_,^p^ YMGA Summer 

^H^^ Camps Program 

^B^ The YMCA of Greater Boston 

^H and the Boston Police 

^^M YMCA of , ■, ■, 

^H Greater Boston Department havc scrvcd the 

^^^^^^B Keeping Fanvhes Sljung *■ 

community together for 
nearly 150 years. This 
strong partnership shares 
their combined youth-oriented 
resources, and has resulted in 
the provision of over 200 YMCA 
Summer Camp scholarships for each of the last four 
summers. BPD-nominated youngsters attend two- 
week sessions at YMCA Day Camps, and also meet with 
their local Youth Service Officers throughout the year. 
Many also choose to become YMCA members. 



mmm 

program 





23 



BPD's Rich History 





I 




As the oldest met- 
ropolitan police 
force in the coun- 
try, the Boston 
Police Department 
takes great pride in 
its history, and in 
its status as a 
national law 
enforcement leader. 
Even before its 
formal charter in 
1854, the roots of 
the Department's 
history were always 
colorfully inter- 
twined with that of 
Boston as a whole, 
from as far back as 
the early 1600's up 
until the present 
day. Now utilizing 
state of the art 
technology, and 
headquartered at 
One Schroeder 
Plaza, BPD person- 
nel continue to 
demonstrate that 

they are part of one of the finest police departments in the 
country, and why the Department's "First In the Nation" 
status will continue to ring true as more than just a 
motto well into the new millennium. 



1901 - Division 14 Patrol Wagon 



1897 - Mug Shot 
- Pickpocket 




1967 - Motorcycle Officer 




1901 - Police Boat "Guardian" 



u 

8 




I 





fD's St. Michael 



On Tuesday, July 1 1th the Tall Ships paraded into 
Boston Harbor led by the U.S.S. Constitution, America's 
"Ship of State." This international armada was said to 
be the finest and largest gathering of tall ships ever in the 
U.S. More than eight million people from Greater-Boston and 
New England enjoyed the ten-day maritime celebration. From 
Boston, the fleet then raced to Halifax and on to Amsterdam 
for the conclusion of Tall Ships 2000 Race Series. 



Bureau op 





Superintendent Bobbie J. Johnson 



^^ 



he Bureau off Field Services includes: 

• District Commands: 
Area A / Districts 1 & 7 
Area B / Districts 2 & 3 
Area C / Districts 6 & 11 
Area D / Districts 4 & 14 
Area E / Districts 5, 13, & 18 

• Operations Division 

• Special Operations Division 

• Special Police Division 

• Support Services Division 

As the largest of its five bureaus, the Bureau of Field Services (BFS) includes 
most of the Department's uniformed patrol staff. Whether they are assigned to 
the eleven full-service police stations located in neighborhoods throughout 
Boston, or a variety of specialized units, BFS personnel are tasked with the 
important role of delivering efficient, effective police services to citizens across 
the City on a daily basis. 

In addition to keeping the peace throughout the city, BFS personnel also 
patrol Boston's busy harbor, coordinate myriad special events, and have 
formed an extensive network of community partnerships with federal, state, 
and local government agencies. BFS personnel are also actively engaged with 
local schools, clergy, businesses, and other community based organizations in 
neighborhoods all across Boston including the work of the award-winning 
Neighborhood Crime Watch program, and many other innovative police-com- 
munity partnerships within each police district. 

By working closely with the community, officers not only get to know their 
individual beats better, but citizens also come to know them too. Many 
become more actively involved in crime prevention and community improve- 
ment efforts as a result. Together they can be seen developing common goals 
cind implementing practical neighborhood policing strategies to meet the ever- 
changing needs of their neighborhoods. 



^HIMiHI^^frr' ' 



In addition to processing 599,133 emergency 
911 calls in 2000, the Operations Division also 
handled more than 45,000 towed vehicles. Its 
Neighborhood Interaction Unit also processed 
another 15,297 non-emergency incidents via 
telephone, thus freeing up thousands of 
additional service hours for Department 
personnel to use toward other neighborhood 
policing initiatives throughout Boston. It's 24- 
hour -a-day taping capability resulted in over 
3,000 instances where cassette tapes of 91 1 
calls were used in investigations and court pro- 
ceedings. 

In 2000, 82 commendations for meritorious service were issued to civilian 
and sworn personnel assigned to the Operations Division. The following 
story is but one example among many: 



18:31 Hours, Saturday, 8 January 2000 - Communications Equipment 
Operator Rosa Cepeda answers an emergency call from a frantic woman 
who whispers that a burglar has just broken into her home. Obviously 
frightened, and hiding in a closet, the woman can hear the intruder moving 
through the house. CEO Cepeda calmly urges the caller to stay quiet while 
she in turn enters all of the pertinent information into the computer for an 
immediate police response. 

Hearing the burglar coming into the room, the woman begins to panic. CEO 
Cepeda again calmly reassures her saying: "Stay quiet so he doesn't spot 
you. I'm going to stay on the line with you. We have four police officers 
coming, they should be there any minute. " 

Supplementing the call with 
updated information, CEO 
Cepeda continued to speak to 
the hiding caller while moni- 
toring this tense situation for 
several more minutes. Police 
arrived and arrested the sus- 
pect at gunpoint inside the 
house. Later the arrestee also 
proved to be a suspect in 
several additional house 
breaks and had stolen jewelry 
in his possession. 




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Faneuil Hall 
Marketplace 



Captain Bernard P. O'Rourke 
40 New Sudbury Street 
Boston, MA 02114-2999 
(617) 343-4240 i 




District A- 1 personnel have used a variety of innovative measures to continue to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing throughout the neighborhoods of Downtown, Bay 
Village, Beacon Hill, Charlestown, Chinatown and the North End including: 

"Operation Banned in Boston" - This cooperative effort linked ongoing 
local law enforcement efforts with those of concerned citizens and neighborhood busi- 
nesses to target areas frequented by prostitutes in and around the Chinatown, Bay 
Village, and Theater District neighborhoods. Strides toward eliminating this illegal 
activity have been taken with an over 10% increase in arrests, and also by specifically 
targeting not only prostitutes, but their pimps and customers as well. Local residents 
have provided valuable cooperation, as did merchants such as Store 24 by changing 
their hours of operation in this area. Together this combination of efforts has deprived 
potential lawbreakers of their preferred places to congregate and has resulted in a 
noticeable reduction of illegal activity and an improved quality of life for local residents. 

"Operation Wiliiur" - in a plan similar to the one noted above. District A-1 
personnel also sought to remove the closely related problem of illegal drug use and sales 
in and around Boston's Theater District. Working together, the Drug Control and 
Anti-Crime Units along with additional A- 1 patrol personnel targeted areas around 
Tremont and Stuart Streets with great effect. In just a few weeks of focused effort they 
were able to tally the arrests of 34 suspects and send a message to drug dealers and 
other law-breakers that such illegal activity will not be tolerated. 

Victory Program - Although still in its infancy, this promising new program 
was founded in District A- 1 . It has already become popular with young people seeking 
mentors to help them work toward specific academic, employment, and community 
service goals. By committing to academic and behavioral improvement, and the avoid- 
ance of alcohol, tobacco and drugs, they also receive guidance toward substantial 
rewards like employment and recreational opportunities. As they gain confidence, many 
have become role models in their community, and helped to recruit other young people 
for the program. Several of the program's Charlestown participants have already used 
their successes in this program as a springboard to improved educational opportunities. 




< A-> 






Captain James M. Claiborne 
69 Paris Street 
East Boston, MA 02128-3053 
(617) 343-4220 




District A-7 personnel continued 
to use a variety of innovative 
measures to promote the con- 
cepts of neighborhood policing 
throughout East Boston including: 

Drug Control Efforts - 

Early in the year, specific tips and 
citizen complaints linked ongoing ille- 
gal drug activity to the Maverick Housing 
Development, and a particular East Boston 

drinking establishment. The combination of drug activity and the violence it seemed to 
trigger rankled community residents, who were justifiably indignant at the negative 
impact these activities were having on their children, their business community, and 
their neighborhood. In response to these concerns, officers from District 7's Drug 
Control Unit quickly staged a number of successful undercover operations. These 
undercover efforts made significant use of the community's input and cooperation. As a 
direct result, officers executed 18 separate search warrants, effected over 150 arrests, 
and seized three guns and large quantities of drugs. 

Latino Citizens Police Academy - East Boston is home to a significant 
Latino community. However, some of these residents have had little opportunity to meet 
the officers who serve their community. To bridge this perceived cultural and language 
gap. District A-7's officers were pleased to provide a first-ever BPD Latino Citizens Police 
Academy during 2000. Coordinated by Officer Dan Simons, these informative seminars 
on local laws, police policies and procedures took on a real community flavor. Boston 
Police Academy staff members taught them in Spanish and the sessions were hosted by 
the Most Holy Redeemer Church. 

YOUttl Initiatives - During the past year District A-7's officers have also 
significantly increased their ability to engage East Boston's young people in a variety of 
special events, outings, and programs geared to their interests. In collaboration with 
the Mayor's Office of Special Events and Tourism, A-7 held its first annual Halloween 
Party with over 800 attendees. Similar events at Easter and Christmas have also met 
with wide acclaim by citizens throughout East Boston. 



Captain Albert E. Goslin 
135 Dudley Street 
Roxbury, MA 02119-3203 
(617) 343-4270 



Fort Hill, Roxbury 




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District B-2 personnel continued to use a 
variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing 
throughout Roxbury, and North 
Dorchester including: 

Drug Dealers Removed - 

District B-2's Drug Control Unit continued to 

produce impressive results, including 715 arrests, 77 

search warrants served, 303 arrest warrants cleared, and over 

$80,000 in drug proceeds seized. As a result of these efforts nearly 

30 weapons were recovered, along with nearly a kilo each of heroin and cocaine, as 

well as 3,000 hits of ecstasy, 16 pounds of marijuana, and a $70,000 Mercedes 

vehicle in Operations "Brasso" and "Hand-Me-Down". 

A FOCUS on YOUth - District B-2's Community Service Officers, Youth 
Service Officers, community residents, and others have worked together to organize 
a diverse set of activities for neighborhood young people. Many volunteer their 
time because they believe in the larger goal of providing local youths with alterna- 
tives to gangs, drugs, guns and violence. Over 1,400 young people have been 
engaged in positive activities such as: G.R.E.A.T., Explorer groups, talent shows, 
and organized athletics such as basketball, skiing, skating, and bowling. Each of 
these efforts has been designed to help them get to know local police and each 
other in safe, friendly, and positive settings while also helping them to learn matu- 
rity and build self esteem. 

Community OuCreaCh - Responsiveness to community concerns such 
as traffic issues resulted in B-2 personnel writing 7,880 moving vehicle citations in 
2000. Similarly, the B-2 newsletter, with a circulation of 7,500 copies helps 
District personnel to stay in touch with neighborhood residents as well as over 50 
different community groups. Events such as the annual B-2 Youth and Family Day 
also attracted over 2,100 attendees for a lively afternoon of food, games, safety 
information, demonstrations and entertainment. 



^^ 



<»-* 



s 



Captain Pervis C. Ryans, Jr. 
1196 Blue Hill Avenue 
Dorchester, MA 02126-1819 
(617) 343-4700 



Franklin Park Zoo 




District B-3 personnel 
continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood 
policing throughout Dorchester 
and Mattapan including: 

Ytouth Service 
Providers Netmroric - 

District B-3 personnel regularly 
collaborate with the Youth Service Providers 

Network case-workers in their area. Serving young people by trying to keep 
them out of trouble, helping them to get the services and support they need, and 
educating them about potential educational, employment, recreational, and other 
opportunities that are available to them are their common goals. As B-3 
personnel have noted: "These dedicated workers are a critical adjunct to our 
effort to tackle the ever complicated social problems that contribute to criminal 
and other anti-social behaviors. We are very fortunate to have them with us." 



La¥ir Enforcement Partnerships - The year 2000 saw the 

inauguration of a close partnership between B-3 personnel and the 
Massachusetts State Police (MSP) Community Action Team. As a result, the 
MSP Troopers who serve the Mattapan/ Dorchester community have become new 
members of the B-3 Neighborhood Council. They now also participate along with 
B-3 personnel in a variety of activities, including monthly neighborhood 
meetings, the annual summer National Night Out crime prevention celebrations, 
and numerous youth outreach and community service activities. 

Ongoing Community Outreach and Education 

Efforts - Crime prevention is one of the most important facets of police work 
throughout our city, however it is particularly evident in the volume and quality 
of B-3's ongoing community outreach and education efforts. Just a few of these 
include: student internships, the monthly "B-3 Community Spirit Award", the 
work of the B-3 Neighborhood Council, the Adopt-a-Classroom Program, and 
B-3's close ties to nearly 20 separate Crime Watch groups. 



Fort Independence at Castle Island, South Boston 




District C-6 personnel con- 
tinued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood polic- 
ing throughout South Boston including: 

Drug Control Efforts - Lead by Sgt. Det. Paul Murphy, members of C-6's 
Drug Control Unit have aggressively tracked illegal drug activity wherever it could be 
found. The unit's diligence outpaced most other districts in the City, and was responsi- 
ble for the recovery of tens of thousands of dollars in illegal drug proceeds. At the same 
time, large amounts of narcotics were seized as part of these ongoing dnag interdiction 
efforts which also resulted in over 300 drug- related arrests. 



Neighborhood Concerns Addressed - District c-6 personnel have 

taken great strides in the past year to address the community's ongoing quality of life 
concerns, such as public drinking and associated acts of violence and vandalism. To do 
this, Sgt. William Duggan and the members of the C-6 Anti-Crime Unit have regularly 
monitored numerous package stores and licensed premises. In doing so, they have 
specifically targeted offenses of underage drinking, and have also actively sought to pros- 
ecute adults who have illegally purchased alcohol for minors. 



Opportunities for 'VOUth - As part of its ongoing Strategic 
Plan, C-6 personnel have continued to broaden and deepen their ties with the young 
people of South Boston. Among the most innovative of these initiatives is an employ- 
ment program that's part of BPD's larger partnership with the Youth Service Providers 
Network. Federal grant money from the Youth Focused Community Policing program 
helps to fund up to six months of after-school and weekend employment for local young 
people with a variety of neighborhood-based businesses and agencies. Often this intro- 
duction to the world of work provides young people with the experience, skills, and con- 
nections they'll need to pursue more long-term job opportunities in the future. 



# 



< «-tf 






Captain Robert P. Dunford 
40 Gibson Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122-1223 
(617) 343-4330 



Kennedy Library and Museum 





District C- 1 1 personnel 
continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to 
promote the concepts of 
neighborhood policing 
throughout Dorchester 
including: 

Removing Drug 

Houses - Cooperation with the 

community continues to be a priority for District 

C-ll's personnel. This often took the form of using community input to help find, 

remove, and prosecute those responsible for illicit drug activity. In addition to 1 1 drug 

house evictions, officers are also monitoring another 7 locations. Sixteen additional 

problem locations have already been dealt with successfully, and the problems 

associated with these locations have now been remedied. Along with good old-fashioned 

police work, perhaps this successful record is also due at least in part to the more than 

270 community meetings attended by District personnel throughout the year. 

"Operation Dog Tog" - District C- 1 1 works closely with the New England 
Animal Control / Humane Task Force. Participation in this partnership also extends to 
law enforcement agencies in other states beyond the region, as well as parts of Canada, 
and is in high demand due to the quality of the training it helps to provide. This year 
the partnership netted 1 1 separate hearings at District C-11 before the City of Boston's 
Animal Control Officer, as well as another 1 7 successful convictions for animal abuse in 
Dorchester District Court. 

Technology Aids Community Outreach - For a number of years, 

District C-H's web-page has been known within BPD as a model for others to emulate. 
In addition to providing a wealth of information about the District's personnel and pro- 
grams, it also gives users a good introductory overview of the various neighborhoods 
served by C-H's personnel. E-mail has also greatly reduced the response time for 
requests for information submitted by local residents, as well as others from literally 
around the globe. Often these requests come from people wishing to learn more about 
the purpose, operation, and programming provided by the Community Service Office. In 
doing so, they are able to learn how Neighborhood Policing works here in Boston, so that 
they can implement similar community policing efforts where they live. 



Skyline at 
Copley Square 





District D-4 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of 
neighborhood policing throughout Back Bay, South 
End, Lower Roxbury and the Fenway by: 

Grime Reduction Strategy - Distnct 

D-4's recent strategic planning process revealed 
that the majority of the individuals involved in vio- 
lent crimes are already known to the criminal justice system. As a result, D-4 has 
enhanced its partnerships with other law enforcement agencies such as: Probation, 
the Department of Youth Services, Parole, local Streetworkers, the Youth Violence 
Strike Force, and a number of neighborhood-based clergy. A team comprised of 
these members now meets regularly. After being briefed by D-4 staff members on 
current trends, they also receive updated maps displaying every person on 
probation, parole, or under DYS supervision. The meetings help D-4 personnel and 
their partners to create tailored supervisory plans for those under sanction. 

IffOUttl Outreach Efforts - The plan also calls for other prevention 
alternatives such as summer camperships to local day camps and participation in 
the "Summer of Opportunity", a job and life skill training program supported by 
John Hancock Financial Services Company. Other efforts include: visits with the 
Youth Service Providers Network's social worker, the annual Junior Police Academy, 
run by Youth Service Officer John Ridge, the "Kids at Risk" Program, and the Youth 
and Student Athlete Collaborative. 

MaiCing Positive Ciianges - Over the past five years (1996-2000) 
District D-4 has posted an impressive 25% decrease in serious crime (homicide, 
rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, and vehicle theft). In part, 
these successes can be credited to partnerships with local colleges and universities 
as well as numerous other neighborhood-based organizations. D-4 personnel have 
worked together with these partners to devise and implement customized neighbor- 
hood-policing plans addressing a broad range of quality of life issues, such as public 
drinking on a neighborhood by neighborhood basis. 



^^ 






^^ 



Captain William B. Evans 
301 Washington Street 
Brighton, MA 02135-3357 
(617) 343-4260 



Oak Square, 
Brighton 




District D-14 personnel continued to use a 
variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing 
throughout Allston and Brighton including: 

Alcohol Enforcement 

Eff OI^S - The large student population 
in D-14 has sometimes proven problematic 
for long-term neighborhood residents in the 
past. However District D-14's ongoing efforts 
are going a long way to make sure that those 
problems will soon be a fading memory. Now in it's third year, "Operation Keg" success- 
fully prosecuted over 250 alcohol arrests in 2000, while the related "Cops in Shops" 
program, in partnership with the Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission - netted an 
additional 75 arrests. Both of these programs have significantly increased the 
atmosphere of tranquillity, and provided a noticeably improved quality of life for many 
very appreciative local residents. 

Building On University Partnerships - Working directly with leaders 
at both Boston College and Boston University has become an everyday fact of life for 
District 14's personnel. Whether it is via Captain Evans' annual "get acquainted" 
orientation messages to incoming freshman, or the special expanded college editions of 
the D-14 "Callbox" newsletter, both on and off-campus students are now getting the 
chance to get to know their local officers before there are any problems. Some of the 
issues they've addressed together include: the Commonwealth's alcohol laws, common 
sense street safety techniques, traffic enforcement, parking, and pedestrian safety. 

VOUth Athletic Programs - Getting young people interested in sports 
instead of crime is a simple but effective tool that has been used with great effect by 
District 14 personnel. Both Officers Chris Rogers and Steve Law of the D-14 
Community Service Office have been instrumental in bringing strong soccer and Pop 
Warner football programs back to life in AUston-Brighton. As they note, these sports 
programs "help the kids stay out of trouble, and make us seem more like real people to 
them... We're proud of our efforts here." 



Millennium Park, 
West Roxbury 





District E-5 personnel continued to use a 
variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing 
throughout Roslindale and West Roxbury including 

Strategic Plan iitiplementation - 

Working together in partnership with the citizens they 

serve has long been a source of particular pride for District E-5's personnel. So it was 
hardly surprising that these long-term partnerships with local schools, businesses, 
churches, community organizations, crime watches and other concerned individuals 
throughout the community, paid off with a variety of positive outcomes during the year 
2000. As one particularly good example of this, the District saw its overall crime rate 
decrease. Included in this overall drop were significant decreases in quality of life 
concerns such as graffiti and public drinking. 



Police Activity League Partnership - Giving Boston's young people 
the chance to try fun new activities while getting to know their local police officers in a 
safe environment is one of the main goals of the Police Activities League. Perhaps 
nowhere is this goal more evident than in the ongoing efforts of E-5 officers to engage 
local youngsters in activities from amusement park outings to martial arts instruction, 
and Gang Resistance Education and Training, to flag football. In fact, collectively these 
efforts have involved hundreds of children, helped to raise thousands of dollars to fund 
future efforts, and allowed local young people to successfully represent Boston in several 
national competitions. 

Red Sox Program a "Home Run" - Now in it's third year, the Rookie 
T-ball League is quite a hit with young people aged 6 through 10. Coordinated by 
Officer James Hagerty, the program is sponsored by the Boston Red Sox professional 
baseball franchise. The team provides shirts, hats, balls, bats and all of the other neces- 
sary equipment. The Red Sox have also been kind enough to invite the programs' young 
participants to Fenway Park with complimentary tickets, a theme echoed with similar 
invitations to sporting events by local colleges such as Northeastern and Boston 
University. 



^^ 



< E-t^ 






Captain Robert M. Flaherty 
3345 Washington Street 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130-2639 
(617) 343-5630 



Bandstand at 
Jamaica Pond 




District E-13 personnel 
continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to 
promote the concepts of 
neighborhood policing 
throughout Jamaica Plain 
including: 

"Operation Rotten Egg" - a 

variety of citizen complaints about illegal drug, gun, 
and car theft activity in the Egleston Square area marked it as a "hot 
spot" for District E-13's Drug Unit detectives. Their own undercover 
observations indicated that 4 jointly-owned auto body shops were the 
focal points for most of these crimes. Working closely with Boston's 
Inspectional Services Division, they were able to make over 50 
drug- related arrests, and then to revoke the licenses for these 
premises for numerous additional code violations. As a result, crime 
in this area has dropped substantially, and local residents continue 
to praise the effectiveness of these concerted efforts. 

Health Center PartnersHIp - Working to prevent 

domestic violence is the primary goal for the partnership between 
District E-13 and the Brigham and Women's Brookside Health Center. 
This relationship grew to include a useful monthly information- 

sharing meeting which is now attended by as many as a dozen sepa- 
rate women's service agencies, as well as E-13's grant-funded 
civilian "Peace Advocate. Together they are helping to bring women 
who are in danger the services they need. These efforts will continue 
to grow with the inauguration of an annual "Stop Violence Against 
Women Week" which will provide information and promote awareness 
of domestic violence issues throughout the community. 




21 



National Night Out 
in Hyde Park 



Captain Frederick J. Daniels 
1249 Hyde Park Avenue 
Hyde Park, MA 02136-2891 
(617) 343-5600 i 



District E-18 personnel continued to use a 
variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing 
throughout Hyde Park, Mattapan, and 
Readville, including: 

Beat Team implementation - 

Using a combination of Beat Team leaders 

and Community Service Officers, District 18 

has continued to work closely with the 

community to prevent crime and target 

ongoing quality of life concerns in local neighborhoods. This included attendance at 

approximately 100 community meetings to successfully discuss and address issues such 

as speeding, house breaks, car breaks, disorderly houses, and parking. By placing a 

renewed emphasis on open communication and teamwork. Captain Daniels has made 

these efforts a focal point for District 18's ongoing neighborhood policing strategies. 




^^ 



- Increased vigilance and visibility were the 
primary goals of this proactive initiative throughout E-18. Officers visited each of the 
District's banks and check cashing locations on a weekly basis. In doing so they were 
able to make themselves better known to these businesses, warn them about some 
recent armed robberies, and also advise them on what to do and what to look for if 
similar suspects were to visit their own establishments. These efforts have subsequently 
helped to raise awareness, and their positive focus on prevention and information- 
sharing has also resulted in improved community relations. 

Home Breaks RemedHed - Last autumn saw several local residents in one 
Hyde Park neighborhood victimized within a relatively short time-span by a brazen 
house thief. E-18 Detectives Walker and Warren have now tied at least 4 separate 
incidents to this particular suspect. In one, she indicated that she was "looking for 
work" as an au pair. In another, she walked directly through the front door of a home 
while its startled owner looked on from the adjacent yard. In a third, she mistakenly left 
behind her own keys, and was eventually arrested during a further B&E by Officer 
Taxter. Detectives are now actively seeking to discover if there were any other potential 
incidents that this suspect may have been involved in prior to her arrest and 
prosecution. 



PO< 



47 

Iff 

a 



Deputy Superintendent ^^ 
PhiUip M. Vitti n 



BMP Bicycle Patrol 



170 Hancock Street 
Dorchester, MA 
02125-2134 
(617) 343-4863 



»«>' 



.^ 




The Special Police Division (SPD) supervises 

and coordinates the efforts of the Boston 

Housing Authority Police (BHAP) within the 

City's twenty-seven family housing developments 

in neighborhoods throughout Boston. They also 

supervise the Boston Municipal Police (BMP) to protect all city-owned property, including 

Boston's schools, parks, libraries, health centers, and foreclosed or abandoned properties. 

Long-Cerm Partnerships HVorlnng - SPD has created numerous long- 
term partnerships with community residents and BHA tenants, crime watch groups, local 
courts, and a diverse array of city, social service, law enforcement, and youth service 
agencies. Among the most important of these efforts are a variety of localized community 
task forces, which meet regularly to focus on issues of mutual concern, and to identify 
concerted problem-solving strategies. 

These joint efforts yielded approximately 830 BMP arrests, including a 300% increase in 
warrant arrests in the parks due to directed patrols. At the same time, BMP officers also 
responded to over 5,000 intrusion alarms in many of Boston's 580 city-owned buildings. 
Together, BHA and BMP officers effected 776 arrests specifically within Boston Housing 
Authority developments, and also participated in a variety of HUD and DEA task forces, 
which resulted in numerous felony arrests and indictments. These efforts were in signifi- 
cant factor in reducing reported crimes within BHA developments by over 5 percent. 

IflOllCh Programs - Many officers involve themselves in creating and promoting a 
wealth of youth-oriented activities and programs. These initiatives allow younger BHA 
tenants to try activities such as golf, skiing, tennis, fishing, and bowling. A variety of 
summer outings and participation in additional programs run by BPD's Youth Service 
Officers have also helped to break down the isolation of these young people by involving 
them with their peers in community- wide programs. 

COIlintuniCy Policing On WiieelS - Weather permitting, both the BHAP 
and BMP also make good use of bicycle patrols in the City's parks as well as in some of 
the housing developments. Bicycles provide officers with greater access to courtyards 
and alleyways, while also increasing their visibility and promoting improved relations with 
local residents. 



41 



OPERMTr 



NS 





o 



The Special Operations Division includes: 

• Tactical Support Group: 

Canine Unit, Mobile Operations Patrol Unit, Mounted Unit, & 
Entry and Apprehension Team 

• Environmental Support Group: 

Hazardous Materials Response Unit, Explosive Ordnance Unit, & 
Harbor Patrol Unit 

• Youth Violence Strike Force 

• Youth Service Officer Unit 

The diversity of the Special Operations Division's highly-trained units underscores the 
often difficult and dangerous nature of the jobs they are called upon to perform on a 
daily basis. As experts in their fields, they provide the Department and many other 
jurisdictions with a broad range of knowledge and expertise in complex topics such as 
gang intelligence, crowd control, drug and hazardous materials detection, fugitive 
apprehension, and many others. 

The Youth Violence Strike Force has continued its award-winning efforts to contain and 
prevent youth violence via a new School Safety program at Dorchester High, and an 
intervention initiative with students of the Grover Cleveland School, which included 
home visits with local clergy. These efforts supplanted approximately 700 instances of 
field interrogation /observation, as well as an average of 260 warrant service 
arrests /attempts conducted by YVSF personnel each month. These efforts were also 
over and above their ongoing work with numerous other law enforcement agencies and 
local clergy. 

At the same time, the Explosive Ordnance Unit rendered over 90 potentially explosive 
devices safe in 2000, while the Mobile Operations Patrol Unit issued over 40,000 
moving violations and provided dignitary protection. Special Operations and numerous 
other BPD personnel also enabled the City of Boston to host such varied special events 
in 2000 as: the international BIOTECH 2000 Conference, the Shriners Convention and 
Parades, the Sail Boston 2000 Tall Ships Regatta, the first Presidential Debate, 
numerous other parades, cultural festivals, and heavily attended annual celebrations 
like the Boston Marathon. 




BIOTECH 2000 Conference Spurs Readiness 

Special Operations, and numerous other personnel from all across the 
Department displayed their professionalism and resourcefulness during 
numerous weeks of intense planning and training prior March's BIOTECH 
2000 Conference. Over 11,000 international registrants — as well as an antici- 
pated vocal and perhaps violent complement of protesters — were all expected 
to converge on the Hynes Auditorium and other venues throughout Boston. 
Elaborate security plans were quickly put into place to prevent violence and 
property damage, while also guaranteeing the public's right to assembly and 
free speech. 

In demonstrating such a strong commitment to forward-looking training, 
BPD's detailed BIOTECH 2000 preparations also assured the community of 
Boston's readiness for any future threats to public safety, and helped to deter 
those who sought to disrupt this conference and other large-scale public 
events throughout the City. 



Crowd control training exercise 





"The Boston Police made sure that all BIO registrants felt safe and secure and 
our program went on as scheduled. The citizens of Boston should be very proud 
of their Police Force. Again, thank you for the outstanding sendee provided by 
your department. " 

Sincerely, 

Raymond J. Briscuso 

Executive Director 

BIO - Biotechnology Industry Organization 




Bureau of 
Internal 
Investigations 

Superintendent James M. Hussey 



^ 




he Bureau off Internal Investigations includes: 

Internal Affairs Division 
Anti-Corruption Division 
■ Auditing & Review Division 
Recruit Investigation Unit 

The Bureau of Internal Investigations (BII) assisted in both the development and the 
implementation of the Department's series of Personnel Analysis Meetings. These 
meetings are designed to assist commanders and superior officers in supervising 
their personnel by providing them with the following types of data on each officer for 
the previous five-year period: sick leave records, motor vehicle accident records, 
injured on duty records, IAD complaint history, use of force history, restraining order 
history and a record of any Department commendations received. With this 
snapshot of each officer, commanders and supervisors will be able to focus their 
energies on the business of better supervising their personnel in preparation for 
personnel evaluations. 

The Internal Affairs Division (IAD) investigates incidents of alleged police misconduct, 
reviews District/ Unit level complaint investigations to assure that they are thorough 
and complete, analyzes complaint statistical data and proactively assists in the 
development of needed training modules. In addition, the Commander of IAD 
reviews the investigative efforts of the Recruit Investigation Unit. 

The Anti-Corruption Division is charged with investigating instances in which a 
Department member is reported or suspected of involvement in criminal activity 
involving abuse of position and any other investigation at the direction of the Chief, 
BII, or the Police Commissioner. Cases where charges are sustained by the 
investigator but which are deemed not serious enough to merit criminal prosecution 
are referred to IAD and handled through the administrative discipline process. 



# 




The Auditing & Review Division performs audits of 
specific functions within units and districts to assess 
their level of performance and their compliance with 
Department policies and its Rules and Procedures. As 
problems or issues are identified, Auditing & Review 
makes recommendations for the development or modifi- 
cation of such policies and procedures. In keeping with 
their mission, Auditing & Review continues to conduct 
extensive reviews of District and Unit records, including search warrants, confi- 
dential informant files and detail/ overtime records to ensure compliance with 
Department Rules & Procedures. 

The Recruit Investigation Unit conducts background investigations on all police 
recruit applicants and such other Department employees as directed by the 
Chief, BlI or the Police Commissioner. When necessary, investigators assigned 
to Recruit Investigations conduct initial applicant interviews to determine the 
suitability of potential employees. 




■o »n O 



45 



IAD COMPLAINTS 1996 - 2000 



350 
300 
250 
200 
150 
100 





296 



231 





166 



192 





228 







H p p ps p 



1996 



1997 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Bureau of 

Internal 

Investigations 

Statistics 



H Complaints Against Boston Officers 

d Complaints Against Department Civilian Employees/Outside Agencies 



TOTAL NUMBER OF 
INTERNAL AFFAIRS CASES 

Cases 

350 



1999 - 2000 
325 



300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 




53% 



47% 




1999 



235 



54% 



46% 



2000 



Externally Generated Cases 
Internally Generated Cases 



NUMBER OF COMPLAINTS 

PER SWORN OFFICER 

2000 



100% 
90% 
80% 
70% 
60% 
50% 
40% 
30% 
20% 
10% 


Complaints 



1, 

c 


;«9B unicer 

NO 
OMPLAINTS 






1 


















I 


173 OHicers 

ONE 
COMPLAINT 


25 Officers 

TWO OR 

MORE 

COMPLAINTS 



1 2+ 

TOTAL OFFICERS: 2,156 



m 



Incidents 



20 
18 
16 
14 
12 
10 
8 



FIREARMS DISCHARGE 1996 - 2000 








1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 

Total Incidents IH| Fatal Incidents ^^ Accidental Incidents 



80 





1996 



REPORTED USE OF 

SERVICE BATON /O.C. SPRAY 

1996 - 2000 




Baton 



1997 



1998 



1999 



2000 



NOTE: The term "service baton" also encompasses the use of other impact 

weapons used under exigent circumstances in place of a service baton, 
i.e., flashlight, sap, et cetera. 



TYPES OF SITUATIONS FROM WHICH 
COMPLAINTS AROSE - 2000 




5% Drug Testi) 
6% Traffic /Parking 

6% Off Duty Misconduct 
10% Domestic Violence 

10% Radio Call/ Patrol Duties 



4% Performing Detail 

3% Insubordination 

2% Threshold Inquiries 
1% Evidence Handling 



Arrests 



11% Motor Vehicle Stop 




iscellaneous 
Services 



13% AWOL, Tardy, Injury 
and/or Sick Abuse 



ALLEGATIONS AGAINST 
DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL - 2000 



3% Substance Abuse 
5% Other Miscellaneous Rules 

6% Reporting, for Duty, 
Time and Attendance 

8% Duties & Responsibilities 



3% Directives & Orders 



11% Neg. Dutyy 
Unreasonable Judgement 



12% Confor 




19% Respectfxd Treatment 



Use of Force 



Unbecoming 



^^ 



DISPOSITIONS OF INDIVIDUAL ALLEGATIONS 
AGAINST SWORN BPD OFFICERS - 2000 



39% 



26% 


■ 


■ 




^^H 






■ 




■ 


■ 


1 


1 






I 


1 


I 






■ 




I 


1 


■ 


■ 




■ 


1 


■ 


16% 


1 6% 1 


7% 


1 


6% 



NOT 



SUSTAINED SUSTAINED UNFOUNDED EXONERATED FILED 



PENDING 



INTERNAL AFFAIRS INVESTIGATIVE PROCESS: 

After researching a complaint against an officer, the IAD investigator prepares a 
report and submits it with his/her recommendation to the IAD Team Leader. 
After further review, the reports are forwarded through the chain-of-command to 
the Chief of the Bureau of Internal Investigations (BII). Once the Chief of BII 
reviews and accepts it, the completed report with a recommended finding is for- 
warded to the Legal Advisor for the Boston Police Department, and ultimately to 
the Police Commissioner. 



There could be multiple allegations within one case, each with varied dispositions. 
The hierarchy for how a decision or finding is categorized is: 



SUSTAINED: 



Sufficient evidence supports the complainant's allegations, 
and the offending officer is subject to disciplinary action. 
This finding reflects a need for some further action. 



NOT SUSTAINED: Investigation failed to prove or disprove the allegations. The 
weakest finding, as it reflects the inability to prove or 
disprove 



UNFOUNDED: 



Investigation reveals the action complained of did not 
occur. 



EXONERATED: 



FILED: 



Action complained of did occur - however, it was 
reasonable, proper and legal. May reflect a need for train- 
ing or a change /creation of a policy. 

The matter is placed on flle without any disposition. 



If a citizen is not satisfied with the investigative process, he/she may make an 
appeal to the Community Appeals Board. 



49 







Fairness & 
Professionalism 




I 




Implementing Positive Change: A Work in Progress 

In May of 1999, Commissioner Evans invited volunteers from across the 
Department to assist in creating a new Fairness and Professionalism Committee. 
Its goal was "to discover what issues helped, hurt, or hindered the advancement of 
professionalism and the establishment of basic fairness within the Department." 
These efforts resulted in a 37-page Report of the Boston Police Department 
Committee on Fairness and Professionalism issued on August 24, 2000. 

This report culminated an extensive, detailed, year-long process of organizational 
inquiry and introspection by a large group of BPD personnel in a diverse set of 
focus groups. These sub-groups represented every demographic sector of the 
Department, and were asked to candidly discuss the overall quality of the many 
work-life issues they experience in their jobs each day. 




Together, the Committee ultimately generated a comprehensive list of 
recommendations that emerged from the transcripts of their various focus groups. 
The Department has since adopted many of these recommendations, and also is 
considering others for implementation in the future. Thus far the Department has 
already introduced a new process for staff rotation and assignment of veteran 
personnel. Better procedures have also been adopted for use of civilian personnel, 
enhanced information sharing — particularly on a number of personnel issues, and 
a new harassment policy is currently under development. 



£mi£iRD. 



THE SCHROEDER BROTHERS MEMORIAL MEDAL 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Police Officer Brian E. Guilfoyle 



District B-2 



THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Police Officer Michael J. Connolly 
Police Officer Richard L. Medina 



District A-1 
District C-6 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

DETECTIVE ROY J. SERGEI 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Detective Kevin McGoldrick, Jr. 
Detective Michael F. Devane 
Detective Brian C. Black 
Police Officer Walter T. Mitchell 
Police Officer Shawn N. Harris 



District B-3 
District B-3 
District B-3 
District B-3 
District B-3 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

DETECTIVE THOMAS J. GILL 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Detective William E. Doogan, III 
Police Officer James J. Morrissey 



District B-3 
District B-3 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

DETECTIVE SHERMAN C. GRIFFITHS 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Police Officer Kevin C. Coyne 



District C-11 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

POLICE OFFICER LOUIS H. METAXAS 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Sergeant Martin B. Kraft 
Detective Robert E. McClain, Jr. 
Police Officer Lynwood Jenkins 
Police Officer Julian J. Turner 
Police Officer Horace N. Kincade 
Police Officer Tahisha L. Skeen 



Operations 
YVSF 

District A- 1 
District A-1 
District C-11 
District C-11 




THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

DETECTIVE JOHN J. MULLIGAN 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Entry and Apprehension Team: 

Lieutenant Robert E. OToole 
Sergeant Francis W. Flynn 
Sergeant Brian R. Fleming 
Sergeant Gary Barker 
Police Officer Kevin Ford 
Police Officer Jeffrey T. Tobin 
Police Officer Lorenzo I. Woodley 
Police Officer Lawerence E. Martinez 
Police Officer David E. Cardinal 
Police Officer Anthony Green 
Police Officer Roudolphe P. Szegda 
Police Officer Patrick B. Santry 
Police Officer Thomas J. Gallagher 
Police Officer Phillip A. Owens 
Police Officer Ronnie C. Jones 
Police Officer Rodney O. Best 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

POLICE OFFICER THOMAS F. ROSE 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 




Police Officer Berlino Felix 



District C- 1 1 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

POLICE OFFICER JEREMIAH J. HURLEY, JR. 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Detective Lisa C. Lehane 



District C-11 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

POLICE OFFICER BERISFORD WAYNE ANDERSON 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 



Police Officer William P. Henry 
Police Officer Terry J. Thomas 



District B-3 
District B-3 



9 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 

SERGEANT RICHARD F. HALLORAN 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Police Officer John F. O'Brien District E-5 

Police Officer Dennis J. Driscoll District E-5 

THE MAYOR'S MEDAL OF EXCELLENCE 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Detective Ellis E. Thornton District D-4 

Detective Richard W. Walsh District D-4 

THE WILLIAM J. TAYLOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE AWARD 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Captain Robert P. Dunford District C- 1 1 

COMMISSIONER'S SPECIAL CITATION 

Police Officer Edward L. Fleming Drug Control Unit 

COMMISSIONERS SPECIAL CITATION 

Detective Daniel P. Duff District C-11 

Detective Paul A. Maclsaac District C-11 

UNIT CITATION 

Youth Violence Strike Force 




THE AMERICAN RED CROSS CLARA BARTON HUMANITARIAN AWARD 

Police Officer Cecil Jones District D-14 

THE THEODORE ROOSEVELT POLICE AWARD FOR BOSTON 

Sergeant Detective Jeffrey Walcott ISG 

Sergeant Brendan M. Craven BFS Court Unit 





Superintendent-In-Chief Robert: P. Faherty 
Superintendent Donald E. Devine 
Deputy Superintendent John D. Ferguson 
Lieutenant Detective James T. Curran 
Lieutenant Detective Thomas A. Reilly 
Lieutenant Detective Robert G. Cyr 
Lieutenant Francis M. Graham 
Lieutenant Robert E. Hayden Jr. 
Sergeant Detective Kathleen M. Johnston 
Sergeant Gerald A. Meehan 
Sergeant Robert G. St. Peter 
Sergeant Kenneth E. Taylor 
Detective Bartolomeo O. Gesso 
Detective John J. Crowley 
Detective William C. Dwyer 
Detective John C. Ghilardi 
Detective Thomas A. Gomperts 
Detective William P. Hill 
Detective Robert J. Jordan 
Detective Francis J. McQuarrie 
Detective Mark F. Malloy 
Detective Charles W. Mosel 




Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 
Police 



Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 
Officer 




John A. Benedetti 
David L. Bent 
Ronald W. Bird 
Ronald E. Erickson 
Michael S. Flemmi 
Richard M. Haddad 
Cornell D. James 
John F. Kennedy 
Thomas L. Matthews 
Paul A. Murphy 
Bernard C. Olsen 
Philip J. Pennellatore 
John W. Provance 
Thomas E. Regan 
William J. Reynolds 
Thomas P. Traynor 
Robert L. Toomey 
Willard T. Vautour 



Retired nonagenarians 
honored at Special 
Ceremony by Retired 
Boston Police Officers 
Association (R.B. P.O.A.) 



40 Years op Seruece to\ 

Boston & BPD\ 

Superintendent-ln-Cliieff 
Robert P. Paherty: 
Appointed i960 - Retired 2000 

Faherty leaves at the pinnacle, a good cop, an even 
better human being." 

Brian McGrory 

Boston Globe, 23 June 2000 



'He's basically a street cop..." 

Police Commissioner Paul F. Evans 




"...the cops in uniform. They carry the brunt of the load in the street." 
Robert P. Faherty 



"His word is his bond. He was a stabilizing force in the Department, never 
influenced by any politics. He's going to be sadly missed." 

Officer Thomas Nee, President 

Boston Police Patrolman's Association, Inc. 



"I would like to thank every member of the Boston Police Department for forty 
great years. I have enjoyed every minute, and 1 will miss you all." 

Robert P. Faherty 

Boston Herald, 30 June 2000 



After 40 exemplary years 

on the job, former 

Superintendent-in-Chief 

Robert P. Faherty retired 

on June 30, 2000. As one 

of its founders, he is an 

active member of the 

Retired Boston Police Officers 

Association, and continues to play 

a key leadership role in RBPOA's efforts to create 

a permanent Boston Police Museum. 




Photo by: Dillard Morrison Productions 




fiVKijBRfEfiiaiM 



The Hundred Club: 41 Years of Caring 

In 1959, then-Police Commissioner Leo 
Sullivan authorized the creation of The 
Hundred Club. Since then, this local group 
has grown to represent a diverse set of busi- 
ness, professional, and civic leaders who've 
quietly provided millions of dollars in financial 
assistance to the families of those who've trag- 
ically lost a loved one in the line of duty. They 
have become true partners in BPD affairs by 
providing this aid without any expectation of 
public reward for over 41 years, by subscrib- 
ing to the motto: "We care for those who care 
for us." On behalf of the Boston Police 
Department, thank you for these kind efforts 
for so many years. 




Aethre outy BPD Personnel 
who Passed nwtty in 2000: 

Sergeant Marlene Orlandi 
Sergeant Michael O'Rourke 
Detective Edward J. Dooley III 
Jane F. Murphy 
Thomas Slade 



.J 

*1 



"How far you go in life depends on your being 
tender with the young, compassionate with the 
aged, sympathetic with the striving, and toler- 
ant of the weak and strong. Because someday 
in your life you will have been all of these." 

- George Washington Carver 



Mr. Norman Knight 
President 

Ms. Peg O'Connor 
Clerk 



« 





Executive Offices 

Office of the Police Commissioner 343-4500 

Bureau of Administrative Services 343-4577 

Bureau of Field Services 343-4300 

Bureau of Internal Investigations 343-4526 

Bureau of Investigative Services 343-4497 

Bureau of Professional Development . . . .343-4410 
Chief Administrative Hearings Officer . . .343-5043 

Key Operational Services 

Central Supply 343-4661 

Facilities Management 343-4379 

Finance 343-4665 

Fleet Management 343-4610 

Hackney Carriage 343-4475 

Human Resources 343-4677 

Labor Relations 343-4545 

Legal Advisor 343-4550 

Media Relations 343-4520 

Neighborhood Crime Watch 343-4345 

Research & Evaluation 343-4530 

Resource Development & 

Strategic Planning 343-5096 

Telecommunications 343-4620 

Key Investigative Services 

Ballistics 343-4465 

Community Disorders 343-4527 

Crime Lab 343-4690 

Criminal Investigations 343-4495 

Domestic Violence 343-4350 

Drug Control 343-5625 



NOTE: All numbers begin with the 617 Area Code 

Homicide 343-4470 

Major Investigations 343-5200 

Sexual Assault 343-4400 

Technical Services 343-4517 

Youth Violence Strike Force 343-4444 

Area/District Stations 

A-l 40 New Sudbury Street 343-4240 

Boston, Beacon Hill, Charlestown, 

Chinatown, North End, Bay Village 
A-7 69 Paris Street 343-4220 

East Boston 
B-2 135 Dudley Street 343-4270 

Roxbury, North Dorchester 
B-3 1165 Blue Hill Avenue 343-4700 

Dorchester, Mattapan 
C-6 101 West Broadviray Street . . . .343-4730 

South Boston 
C-11 40 Gibson Street 343-4330 

Dorchester 
D-4 7 Warren Avenue 343-4250 

Back Bay, South End, Fenway, 

Lower Roxbury 
D-14 301 Washington Street 343-4260 

Allston, Brighton 
E-5 1708 Centre Street 343-4560 

Roslindale, West Roxbury 
E-13 3347 Washington Street 343-5630 

Jamaica Plain 
E-18 1249 Hyde Park Avenue 343-5600 

Hyde Park, Mattapan, Readville 

Area G Operations Division 343-4600 

Area H Special Operations Division . . .343-5646 




Boston Police Headquarters - One Schroeder Plaza 



BPD ORGANIZATION 



Odice ot ttie Police l^oiiissioiiei' 






/COMMUNITY' 
DISORDERS 
UNIT 



OFRCEOF 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

HEARMGS 



% OFFICE OF '^ 
/ LABOR 
/ RELATIONS 



^ 

(_ 



OFFICE OF . 
COUUUNICATION 



OFFICE OF 

THE NIGHT 

SUPERINTEI ^ 




OFFICE / 

OF THE \ 

LEGAL . 

ADVISOR t 



fi^ 



If OFFICE OF -«• 
^ STRATEGIC 
LANNING 



OFFICE OF 

MEDIA 
RELATIONS 



[bj_J7] [^ 



SUPPORT SERVICES 
DIVISION 




OFFICEOF v 
RESEARCH AND 
EVALUATION 



DISTRICT 
COMMANDS 



OPERATIONS 
DIVISION 



SPECIAL OPERATIONS 
DIVISION 



r B.A„iri [b.pst] [ bxs^ 



RECRUIT 
INVESTIGATIONS UNIT 



ANTI-CORRUPTION 
DIVISION 



AUDITING & REVIEW 
DIVISION 



INTERNAL AFFAIRS 
DIVISION 



SPECIAL POLICE 
DIVISION 



INFORMATION 
TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



FLEET MANAGEMENT 
DIVISION 



FACILITIES 
MANAGEMENT DIVISION 



TRAININGS, 
EDUCATION DIVISION 



REGIONAL 
ROUNDTABLES 



REGIONAL COMMUNITY 
POLICING INSTITUTE 



HUMAN RESOURCES 
DIVISION 



FINANCE 
DIVISION 



HOMICIDE UNIT 



INVESTIGATIVE 
PLANNING DIVISION 



MAJOR 
INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION 



DRUG CONTROL 
DIVISION 



FORENSIC 
TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



LICENSING & PUBLIC 
SERVICE DIVISION. 



CENTRAL SUPPLY 
DIVISION 



EVIDENCE 
MANAGEMENT DIVISION 



^^ 



BFS: BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 
B 1 1 : BUREAU OF INTERNAL INVESTIGATIONS 
B AS: BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 
BPD: BUREAU OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
BIS: BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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