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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

Boston Police 

2002 Annual Report 






MISSION STATEMENT 

We dedicate ourselves to work 
in partnership with the community, 
to fight crime, reduce fear and improve 
the quality of life in our neighborhoods. 
Our mission is neighborhood policing. 



THE VALUES OF THE 

BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I. Guarantee the Constitutional Rights of All Citizens 

II. Maintain the Highest Standards of Honesty and Integrity 

III. Promote Professionalism of the Boston Police Department 

IV. Enhance the Working Relationship between the Department 
and the Neighborhoods 

V. Improve the Quality of Life in our Neighborhoods 




CONTENTS 



Produced by 

The Office of the Police Commissioner 

Bruce Blake, Editor 

Sgt. Det. Brendan D. Flynn, Proiect Manager 



At a Glance 


1 


Editorial Staff 


Message from the Mayor 


2 


Bruce Blake 


Message from the Police Commissioner 


3 


Sgt. Det. Brendan D. Flynn 


Office of the Police Commissioner 


4 


Donald McGough 


Bureau of Administrative Services 


6 


Robert G. Neville 


Bureau of Investigative Services 


8 


Gregory Mahoney 


Bureau of Professional Development 


10 




Bureau of Internal Investigations 


12 


Cover Design & Photo 


Part One Crime Statistics 


16 


Gregory Mahoney 


Bureau of Field Services 


18 


Graphic Design 


Area A - District 1 


20 


Robert G. Neville 


Area A - District 7 


22 


Gregory Mahoney 


Area B - District 2 


24 


Elizabeth Clairwood 


Area B - District 3 


26 


Marc Vaillancourt 


Area C - District 6 


28 


Lisa Perry 


Area C - District 11 


30 


Christopher Croke 


Area D - District 4 


32 




Area D - District 14 


34 


Photography 


Area E - District 5 


36 


Gregory Mahoney 


Area E - District 13 


38 


Elizabeth Clairwood 
Marc Vaillancourt 


Area E - District 18 


40 


Lisa Perry 


Operations Division 


42 


Richard Neville 


Bureau of Special Operations 


44 


Identification Unit 


The Boston Strategy II 


46 


City Hall Photography 


Special Events 


48 




Democratic National Convention 


49 


Statistical Data 


Harbor Patrol 


50 


Office of Research & Evak 


Sailing Project 


51 


Carl A. Walter - Director 


Profiling Issues 


52 


Special Thanks to 


English as a Second Language 


53 


Detective Mary Mclnness 


Crime Laboratory 


54 


Clara Ruggiero 


Domestic Violence Unit 


55 


Edward P. Callahan 


Awards 


56 


James Jordan 


Boston Police Department Retirees 


59 


Lt. Det. Francis T. Miller 


In Memorium 


60 


Supt. Ann Marie Doherty 


Directory 


61 


Supt. Thomas A. Dowd 


Boston Police Department Organization 


62 


Mary Jo Harris 



Taylor Small 

Massachusetts State Police 
Marilyn Sferrazza 




AT A GLANCE 



City of Boston 

Founded 

Government 

City Budget 

Area 

Open Space 

Altitude (In feet above sea level) 

Average Annual Temperature 

Rainfall (in inches) 

Resident Population 

Daytime Population 

Median Income 

Police Officer/Population Ratio 

Public Safety Spending per Capita 

Population Density 

Registered Voters 

Average Median Selling Price for Homes 

Residential Property Tax per IK 

Commercial Property Tax per IK 

Paved Streets (miles) 

Sidewalks (miles) 

Parks & Recreation Facilities 

Private/Parochial School Population 

Public School Population 

Per-Pupil Spending 

Public Schools 

Charter Schools 

Non-Public Schools 

Pilot Schools 

Colleges & Universities 

Hospitals 

Major Newspapers 

Television Outlets 

MBTA Travelers 

Languages Spoken in Boston Homes 

Ethnicity in Boston 



1630 

Mayor/City Council 

$1.8 billion 

48.9 Sq. Miles 

19.27 percent 

28 

50.6 F. 

45.89 

589,141 

2 Million 

$52,792 

1 per 276 Residents 

$661.06 

12,166 

263,026 

$289,000 

$11.29 

$30.33 

784 

1,500 

541 

20,600 

62,400 

$10,026 

131 

14 

72 

13 

41 

21 

2 

8 

1.2 Million Boardings Daily 

140 

More than 100 Types 




Boston Police Department 

Organized 1854 

Sworn Officers 2,138 

Civilian Personnel 819 

Budget $220 Million 

Median Age 44 

Mean Years of Service 19 

Facilities 25 

Patrol Vehicles 744 

Specialty/Support Vehicles 89 

Motorcycles 69 

Water Craft 6 

Horses/Ponies 14 

Canines 14 

E-911 Calls 623,930 

Call Screening (Non-Emergency) 20,274 

Total Calls Recorded 644,204 

W/ireless 911 Calls 87,025 

Calls in Foreign Languages 58 

Special Events Policed 425 



Dear Fellow Bostonians: 




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We have made great strides in Boston over the last year, and we 
continue to strengthen the city's reputation as one of the best places 
to live, work and conduct business. Much of this progress stems 
from the steady and measurable gains made by the Boston Police 
Department. As you look through this report, you will notice that 
violent crime in Boston is at its lowest in three decades. We thank 
our police officers for their unwavering commitment to protecting the 
quality of life in our neighborhoods. 

There is no doubt that the Boston Police Department is among the 
finest in the nation and shines as a beacon for police departments 
across America. As host of the Regional Community Policing 
Institute, Boston also shares its successful community policing 
strategies with other police forces throughout New England. 

Now we face the difficult challenges of the national recession, and 
we must do more with less. I am determined to do everything 
possible to protect our city services and build on the foundation of 
past improvements. Despite these budget realities, however, we 
have much to anticipate in the coming years. Our great past paved 
the way for an even better future. The Big Dig is nearing completion, 
several major development projects are underway, and we will open 
three new schools this year. We rely heavily upon the Police 
Department for the implementation and execution of public safety 
measures to serve as the backbone of these endeavors. 



As Boston continues to grow and flourish, you and 
your neighbors are still our strongest partners in 
our efforts to reduce crime in each of your 
neighborhoods. We all have an important role to 
play in making Boston's streets safer. I look to 
you, the people of Boston, to maintain your 
cooperation and collaboration with each other and 
with the Police Department, to make Boston the 
safest city in America. 

Let us always remember that Boston is America's 
birthplace. The seeds of democracy and freedom 
were planted and cultivated here. I salute 
Commissioner Evans and the Boston Police 
Department for their daily professionalism and 
courage as they carry on these ideals on behalf of 
us all. 



Sincerely, 




k^^--^ 



Thomas M. Menino 
Mayor of Boston 




Dear Neighbor: 

As Bostonians, we can all take pride in the fact 
that despite difficult times, our City remains a very 
safe place to live, work, and visit. Our 
neighborhoods remain vital, vibrant, and diverse 
places to do business, go to school, or raise a 
family. This is due in large part to the strength of 
our police-community partnerships, and the spirit 
of cooperation they help to promote through- 
out Boston. 



These successes have not come easily for our Department or our city 
as a whole. We have all been deeply affected by the changed 
realities of our post-9/11 world. As our Department's 
responsibilities have grown, our numbers have diminished, but our 
resolve, professionalism, and commitment have not. Department 
personnel continue to provide Bostonians with the very best in public 
safety services. Through their daily use of superior training, 
techniques, and equipment, their diligent efforts are emblematic of 
our Department's "First In the Nation" status, and a source of pride 
for grateful Bostonians. 



In recent years we had begun to see increases in 
crime for the first time in a decade. These modest 
increases seemed to underline the fact that 
changing times had brought with them a new set 
of challenges. Our crime rates had fallen so far 
for so long, that some people wondered if we had 
reached the bottom point in a cycle, or if crime 
might already be starting to creep back up, despite 
our best efforts. 



Certainly there is still much more for us to do-both as a Department 
and as a community. New challenges will require new ways of doing 
business, but our core mission remains the same. As a Department 
we pledge to continue working with you to fight crime, reduce fear, 
and improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods. Our joint 
efforts have been successful thus far, and with your continued 
support and participation, we look forward to doing everything we 
can to make Boston the safest city it can be. 



I am pleased to tell you that this is not what has 
happened. As you'll see in this report, during 
2002, Boston's crime statistics again returned to 
their encouraging downward trends. We saw 
decreases not only within specific major 
categories, such as shootings and homicides, but 
also in Part I Crime taken as a whole. Even more 
encouraging, our rate of violent crime in Boston 
dropped to a level not seen here in over 
three decades. 



Sincerely, 




Paul F. Evans 
Police Commissioner 



Superintendent-in-Chief James M. Hussey 

OFFICE OF THE POLICE 
COMMISSIONER 



Community Disorders Unit 

Graphic Arts Unit 

Office of Administrative IHearings 

Office of Communication 

Office of Family Assistance 

Office of labor Relations 

Office of tfie Legal Advisor 

Office of Media Relations 

Office of Researcfi and Evaluation 

Office of Strategic Planning and 
Resource Development 



• A comprehensive personnel-utilization study was 
conducted that will guide the Department's 
ongoing re-organization efforts in the 
months and years to come. As part of this 
process, a consulting firm with a background in 
public administration was engaged to perform an 
audit of every position in the entire Department. 
From this data, recommendations were provided 
to Commissioner Evans on how the Department 
could gain additional street-level patrol staff by 
eliminating redundancies and consolidating 
administrative positions. 



As Boston's public safety needs have grown increasingly complex, 
the Office of the Police Commissioner (OPC) has continued to lead 
and support the efforts of BPD personnel citywide. OPC's strong 
research, policy development, planning, and community and 
employee relations capabilities help to guide the Department's 
overall provision of core policmg services. They also shape the 
organization's ability to successfully adapt to changing circumstances 
in preparation for the many new challenges that lie ahead. Though 
their functions are quite diverse, OPC staff members all work 
together toward the Department's overall mission of working in 
partnership with the community to fight crime, reduce fear, and 
improve the quality of life in Boston's neighborhoods. 

To do this, OPC staff members work directly with other Department 
employees, with a variety of state, local, and federal agencies, and 
with a broad spectrum of community members and civic leaders. 
Strong police-community partnerships play an important role in 
creating successful crime-prevention and problem-solving strategies, 
so maintaining close ties with numerous individuals, agencies, and 
organizations is essential. In several key areas, these collaborative 
efforts are being used to build upon the Department's recent 
successes, while also clearing a path for new initiatives. During the 
year 2002 some of these innovative efforts included: 



• The fourth-annual series of BPD Violence 
Prevention Grants awarded $500,000 to over 45 
community-based partner organizations. These 
organizations share common goals with the 
Department, which they are asked to articulate via 
a rigorous screening process. Those selected then 
use their awards to fund a diverse set of 
neighborhood-based crime prevention programs 
throughout the community. 

• OPC's Office of Family Assistance continued to 
provide support to the spouses, parents, children 
and other family members of active and retired 
BPD personnel who are injured, disabled, or 
demised. It also acts as the Commissioner's 
liaison to groups such as the Boston Retired Police 
Officers Association, and Mass. Chapter, Concerns 
of Police Survivors. 

• The Office of Strategic Planning and Resource 
Development helped the Department to secure and 
manage an additional $25 million in new and 
continuing program grants from federal, state, and 
private donors, including a $2.8 million Port 
Security Grant, and a million dollar Department of 
Justice grant to create a new Boston Juvenile 
Re-entry Initiative. 



• OPC's Security Unit hosted and provided 
dignitary protection for a number of high ranking 
visiting and local officials including: Mayors, 
Members of Congress, a number of visiting Police 
Chiefs/Commissioners, and delegations from 
Israel, Singapore, Pakistan, New Zealand, and 
Brazil among others. Numerous advance planning 
and security considerations for city officials 
were accomplished. 

• OPC's Office of Research and Evaluation briefed 
the United States Attorney's Office and other 
Anti-Terrorism Task Force members on BPD's 
consequence management and plume modeling 
technologies used in the assessment of potential 
terrorist threats. ORE also trained numerous 
Department employees, including members of 
Special Operations, HazMat and the Explosive 
Ordnance Unit, on the use of its Consequence 
Assessment Tool Set Mapping and Management 
application. 

• The Office of Research & Evaluation provided 
detailed crime briefings for the Commissioner and 
command staff at regularly scheduled Crime 
Analysis Meetings. It also provided research and 
other technical support for the Department's 



ongoing Gang Assessment Initiative, Unsolved Shooting Project, 
Personnel Analysis Meetings, and Operation Safe City emergency 
response reports, as well as over 500 citizen requests for localized 
crime analysis information. 

• Community Disorders Unit personnel investigated a total of 331 
bias-motivated cases in 2002, down from 402 in 2001, a 16 
percent decrease. 

• Using new technologies. Graphic Arts personnel and the Medical 
Examiner's Office worked together to develop composite facial 
reconstructions in cases involving unidentified skeletal remains. 
With $20,000 of seed funding from the Bureau of Investigative 
Services for specialized computer equipment, and assistance from 
Boston's Museum of Science and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical 
Center, they successfully developed innovative new methodologies 
that may eventually be utilized by law enforcement and forensic 
personnel across the country. Additionally, they support the 
multi-media requirements of the entire Department and some 

city agencies. 

• The Office of Media Relations fielded thousands of inquiries in 
2002, both from media outlets all over the world, as well as local 
citizens. These included phone, email, and written requests for 
statistics. Freedom of Information Act documents, and other BPD- 
related information. Media Relations also hosted numerous press 
conferences, generated 225 press releases, and hosted 40 "Call the 
Cops" television shows on the Boston Neighborhood Network. 



Bureau Chief William J. Good, III 

BUREAU OF 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

SERVICES 



The Bureau of Administrative Services includes: 

• Central Supply Division 

• Evidence Management Division 

• Facilities Management Division 

• Finance Division 

• Fleet Management Division 

• Human Resources Division 

• Information Technology Division 

• Licensing Division 



The Department's Bureau of Administrative Services (BAS) provides 
the essential support services which BPD personnel depend on to do 
their jobs throughout Boston each day. The Bureau is responsible 
for a range of planning, human resources, finance, licensing, and 
information technology functions. They manage the physical plant 
and equipment including fleet vehicles, supplies, property, evidence 
and building maintenance and repair. There is a strong focus on 
customer service, covering both internal units and employees and 
the general public. 

During 2002, the BAS Finance Division continued to support the 
Department's overall mission through its supervision of the 
Department's fiscal resources. Finance Division personnel are 
responsible for ensuring, via diverse internal controls and a 
prescribed reporting structure, that the Department operates in 
compliance w/ith the budget approved for it each year by Boston's 
elected City Council. In 2002, this important function included 
oversight of an Operating Budget of $220 million, External Funds of 
$10 million, and $30 million in Paid Police Detail funds. 



The Finance Division has made notable 
improvements to facilitate better use of the 
Department's financial resources during recent 
years. During 2002, the Department began 
modifying much of its internal business-process 
technology, specifically the PeopleSoft Financial 
and Payroll System. These comprehensive 
changes now enable Finance personnel to provide 
real-time reports to the Department's senior 
leadership on a range of fiscal issues. 
Additionally, the Finance Division is also working 
to assist in the conversion of the current financial 
system to a web-based version, scheduled for 
implementation in 2003. This improvement will 
enhance the overall availability of financial 
information, and will also provide improved 
management access to an online database used 
for tracking both Operating and Grant-based 
budgetary funds. 

In addition to its responsibility for the 
maintenance of BPD's 194,000 sq. ft. Headquarters 
at One Schroeder Plaza, Facilities' personnel 
continued to care for 11 neighborhood police 
Stations, as well as thirteen additional specialized 
unit locations. Even with all of these 
responsibilities, Facilities' personnel found time to 
engage in several new initiatives. 



Major renovations and other improvements at several of the 
Department's heavily used neighborhood stations figured prominently 
among these new projects. Such construction projects would require 
professional supervisory capabilities if conducted anywhere, but 
required even more planning and close attention to detail given the 
24/7 nature of the policing activities conducted at these facilities. 
In District E-5 (West Roxbury), the improvements include a newly 
upgraded HVAC system, a completely renovated cell-block area, an 
addition that will house new office and locker space, and an on-site 
fitness center. Improvements in District C-11 (Dorchester) included 
a renovated HVAC system, along with improvements to detectives' 
and other office spaces. In East Boston, Facilities worked with local 
personnel on an exterior beautification project which included the 
planting of flowers and trees outside the District A-7 station. 

The Central Supply Division, while always an essential service 
provided to the Department, was called into action post 9-11. 
The Department was faced with providing officers with "new tools 
of the trade". The Central Supply Division was commissioned to 
provide emergency equipment, i.e. gas masks, nitrile gloves, surgical 
masks, etc., for sworn personnel to prepare for responses to 
critical incidents. 



Along with supplying emergency equipment the Central Supply 
Division has been continuing its body armor replacement program. 
This program's main goal is to keep the officers on the street 
protected by replacing their bulletproof vests every five years. 

The Central Supply Division not only keeps officers equipped but also 
maintains and manages all department records and archives, 
processes lost and found property, and conducts auctions to dispose 
of surplus department and unclaimed vehicles and found property. 

In keeping with the spirit of "Community Policing," the Central Supply 
Division donates bicycles to the "Bikes not Bombs" program. This 
program gives young people ages 12 to 18 the opportunity to earn 
the donated bicycles by repairing them. Instructors, ages 16 to 18, 
teach safety and mechanics while the youths earn wages and gain 
vocational skills. 




Superintendent John F. Gallagher, Jr. 

BUREAU OF 
INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 

The Bureau of Investigative Sen/ices includes: 

• Drug Control Division 

• Forensic Technology Division 

• Honnicide Unit 

• Investigative Planning Division 

• Major Investigations Division 



The Bureau of Investigative Services (BIS) highly trained staff is 
called upon daily to deal with a wide variety of cases requiring their 
diligence and expertise. During 2002, bank robberies remained a 
high priority, even though many of them were committed by suspects 
who did not show a weapon. To address this problem, BIS 
personnel convened a city-wide meeting among the FBI Bank 
Robbery Task Force and local bank security managers to share 
information and plan new strategies. BIS personnel also met with 
additional bank representatives via the Massachusetts Bankers 
Association. Together, these meetings resulted in a number of 
innovative recommendations to deter future robberies and 
apprehend repeat offenders. As a result, local banks experienced 
17 percent fewer robberies, and the joint Bank Robbery Task 
Force identified 35 suspects wanted for 95 percent of all of the 
robberies committed. 

A cooperative effort among the Bureau's Homicide, Sexual Assault, 
Crime Lab, and Identification Units led to the identification and 
arrest of suspects wanted for numerous serious crimes. In one 
case, investigators solved a 1997 Roxbury homicide after the Crime 
Lab developed a DNA profile from blood samples collected at the 
crime scene. When submitted to a Massachusetts-wide database, 
the DNA profile identified a suspect who was subsequently indicted. 

The trend for criminals to perpetrate "techno-frauds" such as identity 
theft is a growing concern for law enforcement agencies across the 
country. The Major Case Unit provided a strong local response to 
these issues through a number of notable investigations and arrests 
in 2002. In one, Major Case Unit personnel investigated a seemingly 
simple but deceptive ATM-banking scam. In it, unwitting customers 
were directed to swipe their bank cards into an alternate device 
while the customary equipment was supposedly inoperative. The 
suspects would later retrieve the device to download the victims' 



vital personal information. Major Case Unit 
investigators caught and arrested 2 individuals for 
this scheme and seized their illegal computer 
equipment as evidence. 

The Ballistics Unit achieved notable success during 
2002 through their efforts to identify weapons and 
other ballistics evidence used in multiple 
shootings. Teaming up with the Office of Research 
and Evaluation, Ballistics Unit personnel analyzed 
evidence submitted through the National 
Integrated Ballistic Identification Network, or 
NIBIN, to identify trends and patterns. This 
information assisted investigators in solving 
numerous related homicide and aggravated 
assault cases. Ballistics also improved their 
evidence-tracking and data-sharing capabilities 
with help from BPD's Information Systems Group 
(ISG). An ISG programmer worked closely with 
Ballistics personnel to create a customized, web- 
based "Ballistics Case Management" database. 

Given the events of September 2001, the need for 
cooperative exchange of sensitive law 
enforcement information is critical. In 2002, the 
Intelligence Unit hosted the 47th annual Law 
Enforcement Intelligence Unit (LEIU) conference, 
attended by over 140 delegates from all over the 
world. It provided a forum for discussion of key 
issues and fostered the development of positive 
relationships which facilitate the easy exchange of 
sensitive information and intelligence. 

The number of reported auto thefts continued to 
decrease throughout the city in 2002 due to 
several key factors. These included the 
implementation of a new reporting policy to deter 
fraud and promote cooperation with the insurance 
industry, the assignment of district-specific auto 
theft investigators, and the ongoing efforts of the 
Auto Theft Unit. With assistance from the Major 
Case Unit, Auto Theft Unit personnel successfully 
identified "hot spot" areas, deployed "bait" 
vehicles, and obtained other equipment to 
significantly reduce auto thefts and arrest 
offenders. 



The Bureau of Investigative Services has also 
continued to develop new ways to reach out to the 
victims of crime. BIS personnel train both recruit 
officers and domestic violence advocates on topics 
such as crisis intervention, conflict resolution, 
and victims' rights. They provide victim assistance 
literature in readily accessible areas of district 
stations, and have also created their own 
pamphlets on identification theft, sexual assault, 
and domestic violence. 



In 2002, the Sexual Assault Unit initiated a 
program known as BASIN, or Boston Area Sex 
Investigators Network. The network includes 
state, local, and university police departments. 
The primary goal of the group is to share 
intelligence, strategies, and resources to enhance 
sexual assault investigations in the greater Boston 
area. The group also seeks to provide individuals 
at the highest risk of being sexually assaulted-- 
youths between the ages of 15-24--with easy 
access to comprehensive information about sexual 
assault and the resources available to victims of 
this crime. In collaboration with BASIN, Emerson 
College staff and students established a web page, 
SurviveRape.org. The web site is hosted by the 
City of Boston and contains links to service 
providers and the BASIN network members. 



The Domestic Violence Unit hosted a training program for police 
officers and others on trauma response. The Trauma Center, funded 
through a grant from the Commonwealth's Department of Mental 
Health, provides training focused on ways to communicate with 
grieving youth and families. Basic and advanced concepts of 
traumatic stress associated with child abuse, homicide, and other 
incidents are included in the 4-day training, as well as discussion 
of the cumulative impact of such trauma on detectives and 
responding officers, and strategies they can use for self-care 
and stress reduction. 

The Bureau's Drug Control Division (DCD) continued to have a 
serious impact on the distribution of controlled substances 
throughout the city by disrupting several organized groups involved 
in illegal drug trafficking. One investigation targeted the distribution 
of so-called "club drugs" after receiving intelligence. A coordinated 
effort by Drug Control Division, the Drug Enforcement Administration, 
and the US Customs Service led to the seizure of a significant 
amount of ketamine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and GHB. As a 
result, the investigators also arrested one individual believed to be a 
major distributor of these drugs in Boston-area nightclubs. 




Superintendent Ann Marie Doherty 
Superintendent Robert R Dunford 

BUREAU OF 

PROFESSIONAL 

DEVELOPMENT 

The Bureau of Professional Development includes: 

• Training & Education Division (Academy) 

• Regional Roundtables on Ethics 
and Integrity (RRT) 

• Regional Community Policing Institute of 
New England (RCPI/NE) 



The Boston Police Department's diverse training needs are managed 
by its Bureau of Professional Development. Through it, new recruits 
and seasoned veterans alike receive the best training available. This 
training prepares officers for the growing challenges they face in 
their patrol, investigative, or specialized duties. In addition to the 
Boston Police Academy itself, the Regional Roundtables on Ethics 
and Integrity, and Regional Community Policing Institute of New 
England also help the Department to work closely with other 
jurisdictions throughout New England. Together they continue to 
develop and implement innovative training programs for law 
enforcement personnel across the country. 

Recruit Class 39-02 graduated 48 new officers in 2002, after 
receiving 31 weeks of intense training. It was the first incoming 
recruit class to go through the Department's comprehensive 
Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) framing. The WMD training 
was also provided to veteran officers and encompassed both the 
Domestic Preparedness Awareness program created by Department 
of Justice, as well comprehensive training in the Incident Command 
System, or ICS. Commanders received as much as two additional 
days of Incident Command instruction, including joint training and 
tabletop exercises with members of the Boston Fire Department, 
Boston Emergency Medical Services, and the MBTA, Cambridge, and 
Brookline Police Departments. The in-depth exercises successfully 
explored a variety of detailed "what if" scenarios that could involve 
public safety and other officials from jurisdictions throughout the 
metropolitan Boston area. 



Modifications to the Department's use of force 
policies required new training for all officers in 
this important area during 2002. The training is 
ongoing, and will be undertaken in three phases. 
The first phase was delivered via an informational 
videotape played at roll calls and addressed 
changes in the BPD's policy on the "Use of Deadly 
Force." In the second phase, officers received 
instruction on use of force options, and the 
specifics of the Department's policy concerning its 
use. In the final phase, officers will receive bi- 
annual scenario-based training requiring them to 
use their judgment regarding use of force in 
realistic exercises. These exercises are designed 
to challenge and strengthen their judgment, 
decision making skills, proper threat assessment, 
and other issues relating to the Department's 
warranted use of force options. 

Under the Regional Roundtable on Ethics and 
Integrity, a Police Executive Development 
Roundtable emerged. During 2002, a sub-group of 
this executive roundtable formed a new group to 
focus on concerns which directly impact law 
enforcement agencies within Massachusetts who 
serve larger populations. This group, which 
includes the BPD, seeks to share best practices 
and build upon existing positive inter-agency and 
cross-discipline relationships. 



10 



The Boston Police Department's Developmental Round-table Review 
(DRR) process was inaugurated in January of 2002. All sworn 
members of the Department received an initial orientation on the 
process during their annual in-service training session. In it they 
learned that Developmental Roundtable Review is a Department- 
wide mentoring initiative designed to help individual officers improve 
their skills throughout their law enforcement careers. 



During 2002, the Regional Community Policing 
Institute of New England (RCPI/NE) furthered the 
design and delivery of four additional curricula 
targeted towards police chiefs and/or senior 
policy makers. These courses included the Use of 
Force in a Community Policing Environment, 
Citizen Complaint Intake and Investigation, Early 
Identification and Intervention Systems, and Racial 
Profiling: Issues and Dilemmas. Instructors are 
currently being trained to conduct these executive 
level seminars nationwide in 2003, under the 
auspices of the Community Oriented Policing 
Services Office within the Department of Justice. 



Throughout the rest of the year, this initiative was conducted via 
one-on-one employee meetings with their supervisors, the use of 
coaching techniques, focused goal setting, and the regular evaluation 
of progress toward those jointly developed professional goals. By 
creating a written action plan together, supervisors and direct- 
reports work to make planned improvements and structured moves 
toward skill development. Developmental Round-table Review is also 
expected to be a useful tool for commanders, enabling them to 
review and better assess their entire staff's future training needs. 




11 



Superintendent Thomas A. Dowd 

BUREAU OF INTERNAL 
INVESTIGATIONS 



The Bureau of Internal Investigations includes: 
J Internal Affairs Division 
' Anti-Corruption Division 

• Auditing & Review Division 

• Recruit Investigation Division 



During 2002, the Bureau of Internal Investigations (BII) continued to 
augment and streamline its services throughout the Department. 
This was particularly true for its Auditing and Review Division, which 
sought to increase the technical proficiency of its personnel through 
education and training. This included graduate-level instruction on 
internal auditing methods at Bentley College's Graduate School of 
Business. As one result, this enhanced auditing capability now aids 
BII's overall ability to evaluate, interpret, and improve the 
effectiveness of various Department management practices. 

In another portion of this ongoing improvement, Auditing and Review 
also significantly expanded its areas of inquiry during 2002. These 
areas now include the monitoring of all Paid Police Detail and 
Overtime assignments to ensure compliance with contractual 
limitations on hours worked. They also check for any potential 
conflicts that might arise from such instances, recommend 
preventive / remedial measures, and then monitor their compliance 
once implemented. 

The Auditing and Review Division has also worked diligently to 
develop and implement a new computerized monitoring system for 
employee disciplinary measures, designed to ensure consistency and 
fairness in their application throughout the Department. This new 
system is already making it much easier to track this data, to quickly 
flag any unusual circumstances, and then to generate useful reports 
from the data in a more timely and user-friendly fashion. This aids 
both BII staff, and the senior managers throughout the Department 
who depend on this data to monitor the changing needs of their 
command and its personnel. 



Computerized case-tracking improvements, along 
with the addition of new personnel also aided BII's 
Internal Affairs Division. The new case-tracking 
system not only allows better data collection and 
analysis regarding citizen complaints, but also 
provides more up-to-date information for use 
during the Department's regular Personnel 
Analysis Meetings. The Personnel Analysis 
Meeting (PAM) was modeled after the 
Department's highly successful Crime Analysis 
Meeting (CAM). CAM uses the analysis of crime 
data to identify problems and develop innovative 
solutions. Similarly, PAM involves the analysis of 
personnel data such as the use of sick time, citizen 
complaints, and even Department commendations 
to assist supervisors in identifying and solving 
problems involving employees, or in some cases 
preventing such problems from developing. 

Internal Affairs has also improved its response to 
domestic violence situations involving Department 
employees by creating specialized investigative 
teams for an immediate response. 

During 2002, the Bureau's Anti-Corruption Division 
continued to create new partnerships to effectively 
investigate allegations of corruption made against 
City of Boston employees. Members of the 
division reached out to community members and 
other agencies such as Suffolk University and the 
FBI via classes and other training sessions they 
conducted to explain their mission and goals. In 
addition to this outreach work, the Anti-Corruption 
Division also continued to maintain strong 
investigative and prosecutorial partnerships with 
the FBI, the Massachusetts State Police, the 
Commonwealth's Office of the Attorney General, 
the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office, and 
the U.S. Attorney's Office as well. 



12 



IAD Complaints 1998 - 2002 



150 




i 








CM 






(0 

■ 


00 
(M 


N 
(0 

■ 


(0 
CM 


(M 
M 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

I Complaints Against Civilian Employees/ Outside Agencies 
I Complaints Against Police Officers 



Number of Complaints 
Per Employee 

7% - Complaints 




93% - No Complaints 



Total Number of 
Internal Affairs Cases - 2002 



43% - Internally Generated 



COMPLAINTS 


EMPLOYEES 


PERCENTAGE 


Zero Complaints 


2,763 


93.2% 


One Complaint 


174 


5.9% 


Two Complaint 


24 


.8% 


Three or More Complaints 


4 


.1% 


TOTAL: 


2,965 


100% 




57% - Externally Generated 



CASES 


EMPLOYEES 


PERCENTAGE 


Internally Generated 


106 


43% 


Externally Generated 


139 


57% 


TOTAL: 


245 


100% 



13 



Types of Situations 
from which Complaints Arose - 2002 



20% - Miscellaneous Police Services 



1 3% - Arrest at Scene 



1 0% - Traffic Stop 




2% - Booking Station 

3% - Parking Violations 
3% - Insubordination 
5% - Radio/Patrol Duty 
6% - Paid Details/OT 

6% - Threshold Inquiry 



7% - Drug Testing 



7% - AWOL/Tardy/lnjured/Sick 



9% - Domestic Violence 



9% - Off-Duty Misconduct 



Allegations Against 
Department Personnel - 2002 



17% - Respectful Treatment 



1 5% - Negligence/Abuse of Discretion 



14% - Excessive Force 




2% - Details/Overtime 

2% - Self Identification 
3% - Untruthfulness 

3% - Duties & Responsibilities 
3% - Directives & Orders 

5% - Alcohol & Substance Abuse 



7% - Attendance/Reporting for Duty 



9% - Conduct Unbecoming 



10% - Conformance to Laws 



10% - Miscellaneous Rules Violations 



Discipline Administered - 2002 



5 Terminations 

4 Ninety + Day Suspensions 
2 Sixty to Ninety Day Suspensions 

1 1 Forty-Five Day Suspensions 

8 Six to Thirty Day Suspensions 



4^esignations with Charges Pending 
1 1 Oral Reprimands 

7 Written Reprimands 




25 One to Five Day Suspensions 



77 Total Officers Disciplined 

LJ Suspensions H Reprimands H Resignations H Terminations 



14 



Reported Use of Service Baton, 
O.C. Spray, and Bean Bag 1998 - 2002 



Firearm Discharges 1998-2002 



5G 








CM 

in 












1 






CO 


0) 




' 








1. 


CO 


^ 
^ 














25 





0) 




T- 

1 


(A 


C 


v 

■D 


00 


U 

c 
o 










19 


98 


19 


99 




20 


00 


2001 


2002 



I I Service Baton H O.C. Spray H Bean Bag 

NOTE: The term "service baton" also encompasses the use 
of other impact weapons used under exigent circumstances 
in place of a service baton, e.g., flashlight. 

Bean Bag - The BPD began using this less lethal force 
option in 2001. 



20 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

I I Fatal Incidents H Accidental Incidents H Total Incidents 



After researching a complaint against an officer, the Internal Affairs 
Division investigator prepares a report and submits it with his/her 
recommendation to the IAD Team Leader. After further review/ 
the reports are forwarded through the chain-of-command to the 
Chief of the Bureau of Internal Investigations (B.I.I.). After the 
Chief of B.I.I, reviews and accepts the reports, the completed 
report with a recommended finding is forwarded to the Legal 
Advisor for the Boston Police Department, and ultimately to the 
Police Commissioner. 

There could be multiple allegations within one case, with varied 
dispositions. The hierarchy for how a decision or finding is 
categorized is: 



Dispositions of Individual Allegations 
Against Sworn BPD Officers - 2002 



200 



150 



100 




Sustained j Unfounded | Filed 

Not Sustained Exonerated Pending 



SUSTAINED: Sufficient evidence supports the complainant's 
allegations and personnel are subject to disciplinary action. This 
finding may reflect a need for some action. 

NOT SUSTAINED: Investigation failed to prove or disprove the 
allegations. The weakest finding, as it reflects the inability to prove 
or disprove. 



EXONERATED: Action complained of did occur - 
however, action was reasonable, proper and legal. 
May reflect a need for training or a 
change/creation of a policy. 

FILED: The matter is placed on file without any 
disposition. 



UNFOUNDED: Investigation reveals action complained of did not 
occur. 



If a citizen is not satisfied with the investigative 
process, he/she may make an appeal to the 
Community Appeals Board. 



15 



CRIME STATISTICS 

Measuring Progress Toward A Safer City 



The Boston Police Department gathers many types of data in order 
to develop the specific crime-fighting and prevention strategies it 
uses to carry out Its important mission each day. These examples 
illustrate the kinds of statistical information which Department 
personnel use to identify, analyze, understand, and successfully 
address local crime trends and patterns: 

Crime Trends 

Boston's 2002 crime statistics showed improvement in all areas of 
serious crime, including: 

• Violent Crime fell to a record 31-year low (Figure 1). 

• Homicides decreased, and were 24 percent 
below the City's 20-year average (Figure 2). 

• Part I Crime — which the FBI defines as homicides, 
rapes, robberies, aggravated assaults, burglaries, 
larcenies, and vehicle thefts — was down by 

4.5 percent from 2001, the third lowest rate since 
1967 (Figures 3 & 4). 

• Shootings dropped 28 percent below the City's 10-year 
average, with 45 fewer incidents than in 2001. Several 
Department strategies highlighted in this report, 
including the Boston Re-entry Initiative and the 
Unsolved Shootings Project, have been designed to 
achieve further reductions in this important area 
(Figure 5). 



FIGURE 1: Violent Crime 1983 - 2002 



16,000 

14,000 

12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

4,000 
































V 


^ 




' 




>« 
























IT) 


U) 




CO 


O) 


o 


^ 


OJ 


n 


^ 


in 


(0 


N 


CO 


0> 


o 


,_ 


N 


GO CO 


00 


00 


CO 


GO 


CO 


m 


m 


CD 


(Ti 


<J) 


O) 


o> 


Oi 


0) 


0> 


o 


o 


o 








m 


O) 


m 


m 


(D 


0) 


0) 


9) 


01 


a> 














T 


- 1- 
































w 


M 


N 



FIGURE 2: Homicide 1983 - 2002 



150 



100 



50 



20 Year Average: 79.4 




n<jtfjtONOOff)0»-CMn^inioNooffiOT-cj 

OOCOOOC0000000010)0>0?)0)0)a)0>0>000 



FIGURE 3: Part One Crime 1983 - 2002 



80,000 








































70,000 ^^.^^ L^ 
























60,000 ^^^ > 
























50,000 


















1 


■^ 


V 














40,000 


























\ 


s 










_^ 1 


30,000 , , 
























s 


1 j. -.U 


"1 


20.nno 







































16 



n 


<t 


in 


(A 


N 


CO 


Ol 


o 




CM 


n 


^ 


tn 


<s 


N 


CO 


Ol 


o 




CM 








CI) 


00 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


01 


01 


01 


0> 


01 


01 


01 


01 


01 








01 


o> 


01 


01 


01 


01 


Ol 


01 


01 


Ol 


01 


0) 


01 


01 


01 


Ol 


Ol 


o 


o 
esj 


^ 



FIGURE 4: Part One Crime Comparison 
2001 - 2002 



►►CRIME TYPES 


01 


02 


% Chg. 


►►Homicide 


66 


60 


-9.1% 


►►Rape* 


361 


369 


2.2% 


►► Robbery* 


2,524 


2,533 


0.4% 



►►Aggravated Assault 4,412 3,994 -9.5% 

►►Burglary* 4,222 3,830 -9.3% 

►►Larceny* | 17,608 17,824 1.2% 

►►Vehicle Theft* 8,194 7,096 -13.4% 

►►TOTAL PARTI 37,387 35,706 -4.5% 
*lncludes "Attempts" 



FIGURE 5: Shootings 1993 - 2002 



The Department received a total of 514,379 calls 
for service during 2002 (Figure 6). Calls for 
service, an indicator of demand for police services, 
fell four percent from tfie previous year. At the 
same time, the number of these calls being 
handled by the Department's Neighborhood 
Interaction Unit (NIU) increased 11 percent to 
19,910 (Figure 7). The NIU takes reports of less 
serious crimes over the phone from citizens who 
wish to file a report, but do not request that an 
officer respond in person. Such reporting frees up 
the time of officers patrolling Boston 
neighborhoods, allowing them to engage in more 
preventive strategies. 

Public Safety Survey Results 

In addition to using crime statistics, the 
Department also conducts regular citizen opinion 
polls to identify and solve crime-related problems 
and assess overall performance. The Boston 
Public Safety Survey h3S been conducted bi- 
annually by the Department since 1995 for this 
purpose. It helps to identify neighborhood crime 
issues, potential problem areas, and the impact of 
crime and other factors on Bostonians' 
perceptions of their relative safety and overall 
quality of life. 

Results from the most recently conducted survey 
in 2001, show that nearly 80 percent of Boston's 
residents feel safe walking alone in their 
neighborhoods at night. This percentage has 
increased 42 percent since 1995, and has 
remained constant since 1999 (Figure 8). 

A broader measure of community concerns can be 
seen in residents' impressions of the quality of life 
in their neighborhood. The citywide rating for 
quality of life increased slightly from 1999 to 2001. 
With residents ranking it on a scale of 1 to 10, it 
rated a 7.3 in 1999 and increased to 7.4 in 2001. 
Nearly three-quarters of all respondents in 2001 
gave their quality of life a rating of seven or higher 
on this scale. 



500 
400 
300 
200 
100 



10 Year Average: 248 






a)9)0)9>O)G)O>OOO 
0)0)00)0)9)0)000 



FIGURE 6: Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 

600,000 



500,000 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



FIGURE 7: Calls for Service Handled by the 
Neighborhood Interaction Unit 
1998-2002 



20,000 



15,000 



10,000 




5,000 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



FIGURE 8: Percentage of Residents Who 
Feel Safe Walking Alone in their 
Neighborhood at Night 




1995 



1997 



1999 



2001 



17 



Superintendent Bobbie J. Johnson 

BUREAU OF FIELD 
SERVICES 

The Bureau of Field Services includes: 

• District Commands: 

Area A/ Districts 1 &7 
Area B / Districts 2 & 3 
Area C / Districts 6 & 1 1 
Area D/ Districts 4 & 14 
Area E / Districts 5, 13, & 18 
'> Operations Division 

• Special Police Division 

• Support Services Division 



As the largest section of the Boston Police Department, the Bureau 
of Field Services (BFS) includes approximately two-thirds of its total 
sworn staff. These personnel provide essential public safety 
services from 11 neighborhood police stations on a round-the-clock 
basis. In addition to this key patrol function, BFS also encompasses 
the Court Unit, the Special Police Division, the Neighborhood Crime 
Watch Unit, the Special Events Planning Unit, the Operations 
Division, and the City's Juvenile Detention Facility. Together, all of 
these varied personnel work toward the Department's larger goal of 
promoting successful community policing efforts throughout Boston. 

In 2002, BFS engaged in a number of collaborative partnerships to 
provide new types of training for its officers. For example, teaming 
up with the Boston University Medical School the Bureau provided 
officers with specialized training to identify senior citizens suffering 
from Alzheimer's Disease, as well as the means to access the 
specialized services necessary for their care and safety. 



Complaints regarding overloaded trucks traveling 
through city streets provided the catalyst for a 
unique collaborative initiative conducted with the 
Massachusetts State Police. Officers were first 
trained in commercial vehicle regulations. Then 
they used portable truck weighing scales to gauge 
and fine those responsible for broken underground 
pipes, recurring street surface destruction, and 
other damage caused by their illegal use. 

In September of 2002, BFS and Special Operations 
personnel worked together with the 
Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles to 
perform a citywide vehicle safety check. This 
focused inspection of 126 private vans and buses 
used to transport Boston school children. It 
discovered numerous safety and licensing 
violations. A total of 155 citations were issued, 
and additional inspections are planned to make 
sure these vendors will remain in compliance with 
the relevant safety regulations. 



18 




For over a decade, Boston has participated in 
National Niglit Out. It is a program which 
highlights the community's efforts to work with 
police to fight and prevent crime in their 
neighborhoods. The Neighborhood Crime Watch 
Unit coordinates this multi-day celebration which 
takes place at numerous events held at diverse 
venues all across Boston.. In each of the last ten 
years, and again in 2002, Boston has been 
recognized as one of the Top Ten Cities 
participating nationwide. 



BFS personnel have also continued with Operation 
Crosswalk, an innovative program which enhances 
pedestrian safety on Boston's busy streets by 
targeting motor vehicle offenses at selected 
dangerous, high-incident intersections. Since its 
inception in 2001, BFS personnel have issued 
13,119 citations. This helped to reduce pedestrian 
accidents by 51 incidents, and motor vehicle 
accidents by 327 incidents in 2002. 



In November 2002, the BFS employed the 
Community Anti-terrorism Training Institute ("CAT- 
Eyes") to come to Boston and train police officers 
and Crime Watch personnel in community anti- 
terrorism-awareness teaching methods. During 
2003, the Department's Community Service 
Officers will implement this program by providing 
free preparedness presentations to community 
groups throughout the City. The Boston Police 
Department is believed to be the first major police 
department in the New England region to 
implement a CAT-Eyes program. 



19 



DISTRICT A-1 

Captain Bernard P. O'Rourke 

40 New Sudbury Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02114-2999 

(617) 343-4240 



During 2002, District A-1 personnel used a variety 
of innovative measures to continue to promote the 
concepts of neigtibortiood policing throughout the 
Downtow/n, Beacon Hill, Charlestown, Financial 
District, Chinatown, and North End neighborhoods. 

Since September 11th, District A-l's personnel 
have remained particularly cognizant of the fact 
that Boston has become a potential target for 
future acts of terrorism. Together they protect the 
thousands of people w/ho live, work, and shop in 
the district's neighborhoods, as well the many 
sites with historic and symbolic significance along 
the Freedom Trail, among downtown's large 
concentration of office buildings, and throughout 
the area's burgeoning maze of new transportation 
infrastructure. During 2002, these growing 
security duties included intricate protective 
measures for several Liquefied Natural Gas 
tankers, which made numerous heavily escorted 
journeys through Boston's inner harbor. District 
A-1 personnel provided an extensive land-based 
security presence via observation posts in 
locations along the waterfront, all strategically 
placed to afford maximum protection during the 
safe passage of each tanker. 



District A-1 staff continue to work closely with groups such as the 
Midtown Park Plaza Neighborhood Association, formed by local 
residents and businesses to combat drug-related crime m the 
Theater District. Together they discuss quality of life issues, crime 
prevention, and other community-related concerns in a joint attempt 
to eradicate illegal drug dealing. At the same time, comprehensive 
anti-crime initiatives such as "Operation Vice Grip" and "Operation 
Wilbur" have effected numerous drug-dealing and prostitution 
arrests in the Theater District and nearby Bay Village and Chinatown 
neighborhoods. 

Operation Vice Grip was used in conjunction with the ongoing 
Operation Squeeze to target prostitutes in addition to their would-be 
customers. Operation Wilbur has also been an ongoing strategy, 
focusing specifically on drug arrests in the Theater District. In 2002, 
four hundred and fifty-six drug arrests were made as a result of 
these combined efforts, due to significant cooperation among the 
District's patrol officers, its Drug Control Unit, the BPD Citywide Drug 
Control Unit, and the Youth Violence Strike Force. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 

10,000 I I I I I I I I I 



8,000 



6,000 



4. OOP 



lOYearlW8^§8fftB2?^ 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



20 




District A-l's Drug Control Unit also performed "Operation Cordo-N- 
Grato" which targeted heroin dealing in the North End. It resulted in 
twelve additional arrests, along with the execution of two search 
warrants. Working in cooperation with other investigative units 
throughout the Department, District A-l's Drug Control Unit 
further assisted the Massachusetts State Police in a criminal 
investigation known as "Operation Neighbor Hoods" in the North End. 
This initiative recovered numerous firearms, included the execution 
of five search warrants, and resulted in the arrests of several 
high-level organized crime figures. District A-l's warrant arrests 
increased by 35 percent, with total drug arrests rising by V percent 
from last year. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 

►>A-1 01 02 %Chg. 


^►Homicide 


4 


4 


0% 


►► Rape* 


34 


41 


21% 


►►Robbery* 


363 


351 


-3% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


407 400 


-2% 


►►Burglary* 


613 448 


-27% 


►► Larceny* 


3,661 3,840 


5% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


734 610 


-17% 


►►Total Part 1 
*lncludes "Attempts" 


r 5,81 6 5,694 


-2% 



In 2002, District A-l's calls for service increased 10 percent from 
67,245 to 74,424. This increased workload was also complemented 
by enhanced performance from District personnel, with emergency 
response times in Charlestown dropping to the lowest in the entire 
city-just four minutes for the most urgent "Priority 1" calls. 

At the same time, regular meetings of the District A-1 Advisory 
Committee helped A-1 personnel to work with representatives from 
neighborhoods throughout the district to improve quality of life and 
crime issues. In addition to these representatives, district personnel 
also continued to work closely with members of: the Downtown 
North Association; the Chinatown, Charlestown, and North End 
Safety Committees; the Bay Village, and Leather District's 
Neighborhood Associations; and the Lower Washington Street, and 
Charlestown Youth Task Forces on a regular basis. 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 



oil 


y 


N 


y 


n^ 


1998 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 



DISTRICT A-7 

Captain James M. Claiborne 

69 Paris Street 

East Boston, iUlassachusetts 02128-3053 

(617)-343-4220 



During 2002, District A-7 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote ttie concepts of neighborhood 
policing throughout East Boston. 



Among these, the special emphasis A-7 personnel have continued to 
place on outreach to a variety of community groups has been 
particularly well received. The Latino community comprises 
approximately 42 percent of East Boston's population, and so a 
monthly meeting with representatives of the various Latino social 
service agencies in East Boston provides a regular opportunity for 
outreach and networking within this important segment of the 
community. At the same time, these kinds of pro-active meetings 
and strategy sessions help A-7 staff members to gain a growing 
understanding of the Latino community's concerns. The closer 
working relationships they help to foster also encourage the 
cultivation of ongoing partnerships, as well as police-community 
crime-prevention measures throughout East Boston's neighborhoods. 



Officers from District A-7 have established an 
excellent working relationship with the City's 
Inspectional Services Department (ISD). During 
the past year this partnership resulted in 
numerous inspections at local businesses. In 
several instances, multiple violations of local 
Building, Health, Environmental, and Safety codes 
were discovered. Citations were issued, and in one 
case an entire residence had to be condemned for 
safety reasons. This partnership has proven very 
successful in rooting out negligent, absentee 
landlords and other unscrupulous vendors, and 
makes an important contribution to an improved 
quality of life for those who live and work in 
East Boston. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 

2,500 
2,000 





1,500 



i,ooo 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 







Being responsive to the community concerns noted in its Strategic 
Plan remains a high priority for District A-7. This can be seen in its 
continued dedication to roadway safety through the use of a T-55 
traffic enforcement car, Speed Board, and radar guns in high volume 
areas. In 2002, three additional officers were trained to use this 
equipment, and together, A-7 officers totaled 11,419 motor vehicle 
citations and 7,477 parking violations. 

One particularly effective policing effort in 2002 concerned an officer 
who observed a suspicious motor vehicle being operated in Maverick 
Square. After further investigation, the officer arrested the vehicle's 
driver on numerous drug warrants. Still sensing that something 
wasn't right, he then had the motor vehicle towed to District A-7, 
where it was legally inspected more closely. 



As a result, $7,000.00 in hidden U.S. currency and 
a package believed to be one kilo of cocaine were 
discovered. This one arrest alone prevented 
cocaine with an estimated street value of 
approximately $150,000, along with an additional 
$3,200 in illicit U.S. currency (which the suspect 
had on his person) from reaching East Boston's 
streets. 

District A-7 personnel also increased their 
monitormg of licensed premises in 2002. In a 
series of random checks initiated by Captain 
Claiborne, "Operation Butt Out" used officers and 
three teenage volunteers to visit numerous 
establishments. Their purpose was to ensure 
regulatory compliance with Massachusetts 
General Laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco 
products to minors. Perhaps as a result of the 
publicity surrounding this program, almost all of 
these establishments were found to be in 
compliance. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 

►►A-7 I 01 1 02 % Chg. 



►►Homicide 


4 


3 


-25% 


►►Rape* 


15 


18 


20% 


►►Robbery* 
►►Aggravated Assault 
►►Burglary* 


110 
236 
258 


115 
213 
193 


5% 
-10% 
-25% 


►►Larceny* 


615 


591 


■4% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


432 


356 


-18% 


►►Total Part 1 
*lncludes "Attempts" 


1,670 


1,489 


-11% 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



DISTRICT B-2 

Captain Albert E. Goslin 

135 Dudley Street 

Roxbury, Massachusetts 02119-3203 

(617) 343-4270 





During 2002, District B-2 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of neighbortiood 
policing ttirougfiout Roxbury and North Dorchester. 

In late spring, District B-2 personnel unveiled their comprehensive 
new Crime Reduction Strategy. To execute it, teams of officers, 
detectives, and supervisors worked closely with a diverse set of 
partner agencies. They developed and implemented crime 
prevention, intervention, and enforcement measures tailored to the 
needs of specific neighborhoods. These teams include members of 
the Probation Department from Roxbury, Dorchester, West Roxbury, 
and the Boston Municipal Court, as well as representatives from the 
Massachusetts Parole Board, the Department of Youth Services, the 
Boston Housing Authority Police, and the Roxbury Youth Works. 

Together these teams planned, conducted, and then analyzed the 
results of a coordinated set of ongoing anti-crime activities. These 
measures included numerous warrant apprehensions as well as 
increased patrols, both visible and undercover, within known 
neighborhood "hot spots." Mutli-agency teams also conducted joint 
visits to local probationers' and parolees' homes to see if they were 
abiding by the terms of their court-mandated return to their 
neighborhoods. If found to be non-compliant, these individuals were 
immediately targeted for additional prosecution. For those willing to 
make more productive choices, home visits provided additional 
opportunities for officers to provide positive reinforcement to these 
individuals and their families as they began to reintegrate 
themselves back into the community. 



District B-2 personnel also began implementing a 
focused set of measures designed to address 
shootings in the Grove Hall area during 2002. 
Known as the Grove Hall Initiative, its four- 
pronged strategy tracked and targeted specific 
behaviors, territories, times, and persons involved 
in drug trafficking and other violent activities. 
Armed w/ith this information, officers then removed 
these dangerous individuals from the 
neighborhood via several major sweeps. For 
example, in a second phase of "Operation Steel 
Curtain", five firearms were seized as the result of 
eight arrests for a variety of drug offenses. 
Conducted in cooperation with the Youth Violence 
Strike Force, "Operation Halls of Justice", resulted 
in another 12 arrests, and the seizure of four 
additional firearms. Together, these initiatives 
and others like them have significantly diminished 
the number of shootings and aggravated assaults 
in the neighborhood, while also removing armed 
criminals and their weapons from the streets. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 
10,000 11'' 11 




8,000 


k 








1 

10 Year Average: 6,282 


- 


6,000 L||l|||| 


\ 
1 


\ 


^^^^^^^^^^H 










4,000 


^ 


* 


1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 

►►B-2 01 02 % 


■2002 

Chg. 


►►Homicide 


18 


17 


-6% 


►►Rape* 


67 


I ^8 


16% 


►►Robbery* 


415 


368 


-11% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


880 


832 


-5% 


►►Burglary* 


575 


549 


-5% 


►► Larceny* 


1,970 


1,822 


-8% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


\ 1,388 


1,265 


-9% 


►►Total Part 1 
*lnclucles "Attempts" 


5,313 


4,931 


-7% 



25 



Captain Pervis Ryans, Jr. 

1165 Blue Hill Avenue 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 02124-3914 

(617) 343-4700 




Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



5,ooo 



4,000 



3,000 



2.000 




1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



During 2002, District B-3 personnel continued to 
use a variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neigfiborhood policing throughout 
Dorchester and Mattapan. 

Detectives working on domestic violence cases 
found their efforts bolstered in 2002, both through 
enhanced training, and the addition of some useful 
new tools. A threat-assessment software package 
now aids investigators in finding, tracking, and 
intervening when necessary to prevent repeat 
offenders from harming their intended victims. 
Digital cameras also allow them to provide 
immediate, on-scene, visual documentation of any 
injuries to victims, as well as other evidence found 
at crime scene locations. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 

►►B-3 01 02 % 


-2002 

Chg. 


►►Homicide 


12 


15 


25% 


►►Rape* 


57 


48 


-16% 


►►Robbery* 


215 


266 


24% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


655 


566 


-14% 


►►Burglary* 


312 


287 


-8% 


►► Larceny* 


926 


1,056 


14% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


836 


699 


-16% 


►►Total Part 1 
*lncludes "Attempts" 


3,013 


2,937 


-3% 



This type of documentation has been a key to 
prevention efforts and successful prosecutions 
alike. In both areas, District B-3 personnel 
continued to work closely with the District 
Attorney's Office. Together, their efforts were 
further facilitated by the Dorchester District Court. 
One of only three of its kind in the nation, the 
Court's specialized programs were created as a 
prototype for new methods of domestic violence 
prevention and prosecution efforts by the 
Department of Justice. 



Preventing auto-theft has also been a continuing area of focused 
effort. Worlcing closely with patrol staff and state officials, B-3 
detectives now enter every auto theft into a database, and analyze it 
for emerging trends. They conduct routine investigations at local 
auto shops, and gather intelligence from concerned citizens and 
legitimate business owners. This wealth of data helps them to 
identify at-risk vehicles, potential theft locations, and the players 
who may be involved in vehicle theft, insurance fraud, the re-sale of 
stolen parts, and illegal dumping of abandoned vehicles onto 
neighborhood streets. Captain Ryans has also used this information 
pro-actively to mail out a "Stolen Car Alert" full of anti-theft tips to all 
local vehicle owners determined to be in high-risk categories. 

In response to growing tensions and the threat of escalating 
violence within local schools, B-3's Community Service Office helped 
to create a process to resolve the problem. Officers quickly brought 
together a coalition of concerned groups including: students, 
parents, school administrators, the BPD's School Police Unit and 
Youth Violence Strike Force, local clergy and community leaders, and 
representatives from multiple City and State agencies. These 
diverse groups came together to jointly identify the problem and its 
causes, ask each other for input and assistance, and then to pool 
their resources to work out a solution. 





\1 I 




Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 



50,000 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



27 



DISTRICT C-6 

Captain Robert Cunningham 

101 West Broadway 

South Boston, l\/lassachusetts 02127-1017 

(617) 343-4730 






During 2002, District C-6 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of neighborhood 
policing throughout South Boston. 



Highlighting the year in District C-6, was an all out effort to control 
illegal parking on both the side streets and major thoroughfares of 
South Boston. This effort had been long-planned via a series of 
meetings with neighborhood residents, city officials, and local 
community leaders. However, a tragic fire in October of 2002, 
resulting in the death of an eight-year-old girl, became the 
unexpected catalyst for its implementation. Spearheaded by 
officers from District C-6, this comprehensive effort quickly gained 
the attention of residents and business owners throughout the 
community. During 2002, District C-6 personnel issued over 22,000 
parking violations, an increase of 30 percent over 2001. 



District C-6 personnel also redoubled their efforts 
to serve arrest warrants in an expeditious manner. 
To do this, the warrants are now broken down by 
geographical location. With this information in 
hand, the responsibility for service is then 
assumed by the appropriate Beat Team Leaders 
and the response units assigned to that particular 
sector. LInder this program, warrant service has 
increased 75 percent, with 31 warrant arrests in 
December alone. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



3,ooo 



2,500 




2,000 



1,500 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



District C-6 also re-established its presence on the 
World Wide Web by registering its updated 
website: southbostonpolice.com, and adding new 
content. The site now includes a "Most Wanted" 
page, a traffic and parking update, and even a 
contest page which awards an "official District 6 
T-shirt" to one lucky winner each week. 

The District's Drug Control Unit continued its 
efforts to remove illegal drugs and associated 
criminal activity from the neighborhoods. Working 
undercover, together with members of the BPD 
Major Case Unit, the Massachusetts State Police, 
and the Salem, New Hampshire P.D., the District 
C-6 Drug Unit executed a search warrant where 



31 kilos of cocaine and over $130,000 in U.S. currency were seized. 
By itself, this one operation was the largest single seizure of drugs 
and drug money in Boston during 2002. 

Members of the C-6 Community Service Office continue to form and 
maintain close working partnerships with numerous community, 
business and non-profit organizations. CSO personnel assisted in the 
planning for the 2nd Annual South Boston Street Festival, which had 
over 15,000 attendees. They also continued to work with local youth 
by supporting job-development activities, sports programs, and Gang 
Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) programs. Also, at the 
request of the Department of Defense, District C-6 personnel trained 
over 1,000 South Boston federal employees in a customized 
"street-smarts" awareness and crime prevention program, which 
earned them a Special Merit Award from the federal government. 



In addition to its police officers. District C-6 also counts two 
clinical social workers among its staff members. They are part of 
the Department's citywide participation in the Youth Service 
Providers Network which targets at-risk young people. Together 
they provided counseling to nearly 150 young people and their 
families in 2002, many of whom had been referred to them by the 
C-6 Drug Control Unit. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 



►»C-6 

MHomicide_ 

►►Rape* 



01 



17 



02 




% Chg. 
-100% 



►►Robbery* 


75 


111 


48% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


235 


236 


0% 


►►Burglary* 


212 


225 1 


6% 


►►Larceny* 


1,122 


1,137 


1% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


494 


431 


-13% 


►►Total Part 1 


2,157 


2,166 


0% 



*lncludes "Attempts" 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 



50,000 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



29 



DISTRICT C-11 
Captain Thomas F. Lee 
40 Gibson Street 
Dorchester, MA 02122-1223 
(617) 343-4330 



During 2002, District C-11 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of neigtiborhood 
policing throughout Dorchester. 

Drug trade in Dorchester took a direct hit as a result of an 
undercover investigation known as Operation Crossbow. Over the 
course of six months, C-11 Drug Control Unit and federal Drug 
Enforcement Administration personnel worked together to make a 
series of undercover buys. Through them over 70 grams of heroin 
were purchased. This led to the arrest of two suspects and the 
seizure of over 200 additional grams of heroin. A subsequent search 
warrant prompted a further seizure of 14 grams of heroin, assorted 
production and packaging paraphernalia, and monies thought to be 
drug proceeds. Together, the drugs seized in this investigation 
represented a possible street value in excess of $70,000. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



7,000 



6,000 



5,000 



4,000 



10 Year Average: 4,968 



3, OOP 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



Since the summer of 2002, personnel from District 
C-ll's Community Service Office have worked 
closely with the Colonel Daniel Marr Boys and 
Girls Club on a promising new program known as 
"Street Smarts." The idea behind it is to bring 
local young people together with the officers who 
serve their community in a safe, fun, and relaxed 
setting. This opportunity encourages them to 
learn first hand what a police officer's work-day 
really entails-in contrast to the many non-factual 
stereotypes they may have heard about, or seen 
on television. It also gives the young people a 
chance to develop positive, long-term relationships 
with adults who are willing to act as mentors and 
positive role models for their group. Thus far, 
over 30 pre-teens have participated. 

Many of District C-ll's successes in lowering 
crime district-wide can also be seen in the 
mirrored success of Dorchester's ongoing Safe 
Neighborhood Initiative. Through it, police 
personnel continue to work closely with 
representatives from the Massachusetts Attorney 
General's Office, the Suffolk County District 
Attorney's Office, the Department of Youth 
Services, and neighborhood-based health centers. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 

►►c-11 01 1 02 ,%Chg. 


►►Homicide 


7 


10 


43% 


►►Rape* 


55 


57 


4% 


►► Robbery* 


412 356 


-14% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


688 576 


-16% 


►►Burglary* 


516 524 


2% 


►► Larceny* 


1,793 1.661 


-7% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


1,217 1,062 


-13% 


►►Total Part 1 
*lncludes "Attempts" 


4,688 4,246 


-9% 



30 



Through this collaboration they meet regularly with community 
members, provide increased opportunities for education and 
awareness, and have also put in place several badly needed 
community liaison personnel to reach out to the growing Vietnamese 
community in Dorchester. 

A newly renovated station house now aids C-11 personnel in their 
mission. After five months of working in nearby trailers, the 
construction resulted in new and expanded space for the district's 
detectives, its domestic violence programs, and the C-U Community 
Service Office. Using this new space as a springboard, officers have 
continued to target some of the most difficult problems in the 
neighborhoods they serve via ongoing initiatives such as the 
"Close To Home" domestic violence prevention program. 
A summertime "Party Line" directs a dedicated patrol car to noisy 
addresses so that other patrol staff can focus on more pressing 
emergencies, while after-school youth programs and others geared 
toward the specific needs of senior citizens remain popular with 
community residents. 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 







1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



DISTRICT D-4 

Captain Edward C. Wallace 

650 Harrison Avenue 

Boston, MA 02118-2423 

617-343-4250 



During 2002, District D-4 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of neighborhood 
policing throughout the Back Bay, South End, Lower Roxbury, and 
Fenw/ay neighborhoods of Boston. 

D-4 personnel marked the passage of 2002 by successfully 
overseeing numerous large-scale events. Often these events were 
unplanned, and many required a significant police presence to be 
deployed on short notice. Tensions related to a janitors' strike 
focused on several downtown office buildings with marches, 
protests, and blockades at several locations. In each case, District 
4 personnel protected the strikers' rights to peacefully assemble 
and air their views, while also addressing the concerns of nearby 
businesses, schools, and residential areas. Working closely with 
the leaders of the strike and protest groups, business leaders, and 
other City agencies, D-4 personnel made sure local residents were 
able to go about their daily lives without undue interruption or 
fear of violence. 



District D-4 personnel continued to maintain a 
positive presence with the young people of their 
district, particularly during the summer months of 
school vacation. Their stepped-up efforts to 
prevent youth violence paid off with a significant 
reduction in violent incidents. Violent crime in 
District 4 dropped 15 percent from 2001, while 
firearm-related arrests almost doubled, resulting 
in a 138 percent increase in recovered firearms. 

District 4 also continued to maintain close 
relationships with numerous civic and 
neighborhood groups. Approximately fifteen to 
twenty of these groups meet monthly to share 
information and talk about neighborhood 
crime-fighting strategies. Most every 
neighborhood is represented, including: the 
Hurley Block Neighborhood Association, the 
Parkland Management Advisory Committee 
(Southwest Corridor), the Roxbury Crossing 
Neighborhood Association, the East Fenway and 
West Fenway Police Panels, the South End Police 
Panel, and the Back Bay Neighborhood 
Association. These meetings are always well 
attended and help D-4's officers to cultivate 
cooperative, long-term relationships with these 
groups. Their active members continue to be the 
"eyes and ears" of the community, and by 
providing vital information leading to arrests, they 
remain an important key to the overall success of 
D-4's neighborhood policing efforts. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 

»^^D-4 1 01 02 % 


-2002 

Chg. 


►^Homicide 


5| 2 1 


-60% 


►►Rape* 


34 42 


24% 


►►Robbery* 


485 468 


-4% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


495 444 


-10% 


►►Burglary* 


623 635 


2% 



►►Larceny* 

►►Vehicle Theft* 
►►Total Part I 
'Includes "Attempts" 



4,226 
1,160 
7,028 



3,887 

843 

6,321 



-8% 
-27% 
-10% 






The Youth and Police in Partnership (YPP) program continues to 
support at-risl< youth in District 4 through its Youth Council. This 
program has been very successful during the past seven years, 
having served hundreds of local youth, and has now been expanded 
to include six additional police districts. Numerous BPD volunteers 
donate their time to the program, and their efforts have also 
promoted close partnerships with organizations such as 
Northeastern University's Law School and College of Criminal Justice, 
the Huntington Theatre, the Department of Youth Services, and 
Harvard University. Through these ongoing developments, the 
program continues to fulfill its mission as a comprehensive citywide 
youth service program. 

Reaching out to the community is a common theme in District 4, and 
so it was perhaps unsurprising that D-4 personnel were able to 
share their knowledge and expertise with residents in other parts of 
Boston during 2002. After a high incidence of attacks on women in 
adjacent Brighton and the North End, its officers conducted self 
defense and safety awareness classes for interested residents. 
Using Rape Aggression Defense techniques, they taught classes 
designed to increase potential victims' chances of surviving an 
attack. These classes were overwhelmingly successful, with 
approximately 300 attendees. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



12,000 



1 o,oog 



8,000 



6, OOP 




1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 




Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 





DISTRICT D-14 

Captain William B. Evans 

301 Washington Street 

Brighton, Massachusetts 02135-3301 

(617) 343-4260 




During 2002, District D-14 personnel continued to 
use a variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neigfiborfiood policing tfirougtiout 
Allston and Brighton. 

D-14 personnel were particularly active in their 
ongoing partnership w/ith the City of Boston's 
Inspectional Services Department. Together, ISD 
and BPD personnel routinely conducted 
inspections of suspect properties for health, 
safety, and other local code violations. Often 
these buildings are sub-standard, multi-family 
dw/ellings. Typically they provide poorly maintained 
and over-priced housing to large numbers of 
college students. The inspections program has 
helped to correct violations that have been ignored 
by unscrupulous absentee landlords, and to fine 
them for what appears in some cases to have 
been years of such neglect. Some properties were 
found to be so hazardous upon entry that they had 
to be evacuated and even condemned to ensure 
the occupants safety from vermin, faulty utilities, 
exposed wiring, rotting trash, and other dangers. 



Maintaining strong partnerships with neighboring schools such as 
Boston College, Boston University, and Harvard University, has also 
remained a key part of District D-14's overall crime prevention 
strategy. In addition to providing Captain Evans with opportunities 
to speak to their incoming students on a variety of public safety 
issues, university administrators now participate in regular weekend 
ride-alongs with District personnel. These joint efforts seek to 
prevent underage drinking by finding and eliminating boisterous 
off-campus parties before they can create unwanted problems for 
the students or their neighbors. At the same time, this tactic also 
helps to lessen or prevent other crimes too, such as vandalism, 
assault, disorderly conduct, and drunken driving. It may also help to 
explain positive trends such as D-14's reduction of auto thefts by 17 
percent, break-ins by seven percent, and sexual assaults by 25 
percent in 2002. 




Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 


5,000 


\ 




i ' 1 I 1 




\ ' 






1* 




4,000 


^^ ' 


^ 


\ 


10 Year Aver 


age: 3,323 




^ 


1 


3,000 


^m 






\ 


-\^ 




2,000 








"^ 


1993 1994 1995 


199 


6 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 







Reducing crime while worl<ing in partnership with organizations 
throughout the community has also continued to play an important 
part in District 14's ongoing efforts to address Allston-Brighton's 
quality of life concerns. For example, local liquor stores have 
continued to work with D-14 undercover personnel as part of 
"Operation Keg," and the Governor's Highway Safety Task Force's 
"Cops In Shops" program. Together, these programs prevent 
underage drinking by targeting the illegal purchase and distribution 
of alcohol to minors. D-14 personnel make arrests, confiscate the 
products, and the illegal identification which is often used to secure 
them. At the same time, aggressive traffic enforcement, via 15,246 
citations issued in 2002, has contributed to a reduced rate of auto 
accidents citywide. 



Part One Crime Con 

►►D-14 


iparison 2001 - 2002 

01 02 % Chg. 


►►Homicide 


2 


1 


-50% 


►► Rape* 


20 


15 


-25% 


►► Robbery* 


84 


173 


106% 


►►Aggravated Assault 


157 182 


16% 


►►Burglary* 


473 439 


-7% 


►► Larceny* 


1,319 1,485 


13% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


462 384 


-17% 


►►Total Part 1 
•Includes "Attempts" 


11,517 2,679 


6% 




Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 




35 



DISTRICT E-5 

Captain Timothy J. Murray 

1708 Centre Street 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 02132-1542 

(617) 343-5630 



During 2002, District E-5 personnel continued to 
use a variety of innovative measures to promote 
tfie concepts of neighborfiood policing throughout 
Roslindale and West Roxbury. 

One key element of E-5's overall plan has been to 
provide staff with the best possible tools for their 
difficult work. This can be seen in the creative 
new floor-plan of their recently-renovated facility 
in West Roxbury. It now includes amenities such 
as a lunchroom and gym, in addition to office 
space for individual detectives, and an 
interrogation room with full videotaping 
capabilities. Detectives at E-5 were also the first 
to display their "most wanted" suspects on-line 
for all to see. These steps have all contributed to 
the Department's highest solve rate, along with a 
reduction of Violent Crime by 11 percent, and a 25 
percent increase in overall arrests by District E-5 
personnel during 2002. 



Perhaps in part because of the District's changing demographics, the 
number one quality of life concern voiced by E-5 residents in 2002 
remained traffic enforcement. This important area of police and 
community collaboration had been clearly articulated in the District's 
Strategic Plan, and so it has been a major goal for E-5 
personnel in recent years. Armed with the positive results of a 
related study they conducted in 2001, District personnel dramatically 
increased their motor vehicle stops again in 2002. With more than 
12,000 vehicle stops. District E-5 personnel tallied a 50 percent 
increase since 2000, which also prompted a corresponding 30 
percent decrease in motor vehicle accidents. As a further result, 
District E-5 also noted the fewest vehicular accidents citywide. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 



►►E-5 


01 


02 


% Chg. 


►►Homicide 





4 100% 


►► Rape* 


11 


8 


-27% 


►►Robbery* 


88 


74 


-16% 



►►Aggravated Assault 


130 


117 


-10% 


►►Burglary* 


187 


161 


-14% 


►►Larceny* 


490 


506 


3% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


346 


383 


11% 


►►Total Part 1 


1,252 


1,253 


0% 



♦includes "Attempts" 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



2,000 



1,500 



6 Year Average: 1 ,309 




1,000 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 
NOTE: Prior to 1997 District e-13 was a section of District E-5 




District E-5 personnel also continued to work closely with 
community residents to keep them abreast of their efforts, and to 
encourage new collaborations and partnerships in crime prevention. 
Dozens of neighborhood-based Crime Analysis and Prevention 
Meetings gave Captain Murray the opportunity to provide local 
residents with the same up-to-the-minute crime statistics and trend 
information shown to the Department's senior commanders at their 
Headquarters briefings. These extremely visual and factual 
presentations use PowerPoint and crime mapping software to vividly 
depict recent crime trends in a specific neighborhood or 
geographical area. Their use also helped to spur the creation and 
ongoing participation of Crime Watch groups, as well as increased 
participation in targeted anti-car-theft programs. 

District E-5 personnel conducted another highly successful year of 
their "Operation Pick-Off" in 2002, which resulted in numerous 
warrant arrests. This was in turn part of a larger plan, which 
sought to reduce crime by actively targeting repeat offenders before 
they could commit additional crimes. This strategy paid off 
handsomely. During 2002, E-5's personnel posted a 79 percent 
increase in warrant arrests, along with corresponding 14 percent 
and 16 percent decreases in burglaries and robberies, to leave 
District E-5 with the lowest crime rate in the City for the second 
straight year. 






Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 

30,000 


25,CK)0 i 




1 








20,000 

15,000 

10,000 

5,000 




MUM 












^^1 




m5m 


w 



1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



37 



DISTRICT E-13 

Captain Robert M. Flaherty 

3347 Washington Street 

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 02130-2639 

(617) 343-5630 



During 2002, District E-13 personnel continued to use a variety of 
innovative measures to promote the concepts of neighbortiood 
policing ttiroughout Jamaica Plain. 

District personnel w/orked closely with a unique cross-section of 
community groups and concerned citizens to achieve many of the 
shared goals that they had established in the District's Strategic 
Plan. One new project brought to fruition in 2002 was the creation 
of a Community Mediation Program. Its goal is to assist 
neighborhood residents in peacefully resolving civil disputes-such as 
landlord/tenant issues, disagreements among neighbors, 
parent/juvenile issues, and other family disputes before they can 
become contentious or lead to violence. The program received 
operating space through an ongoing partnership with the Egleston 
Square Main Streets organization, and now includes the services of 
two E-13 officers who've been trained and certified as professional 
mediators. 

District 13's detectives also took a considerable bite out of the 
incidence of car-breaks, the District's number one crime, by working 
closely with Beat Team supervisors and patrol officers on each shift. 
Together they made over 20 arrests for this specific type of offense 
alone. They also assisted in the successful prosecution of a 
notorious scam artist who had been preying upon Jamaica Plain's 
elderly community. The detectives were instrumental in the 
prosecution of a serial burglar, by using DNA evidence they'd 
collected from a 1998 break-in to secure a conviction. One positive 
result of these focused efforts and others like them was a district- 
wide decrease in violent crime of 11 percent during 2002. 




Continuing to target motor-vehicle-related 
offenses and the associated quality-of-life 
concerns they often engender was another high 
priority for E-13 personnel in 2002. In traffic 
enforcement, officers issued 11,660 moving 
citations, an increase of over 1,200 citations. 
Parking violations also increased to 10,690, with 
an increase of over 2,000 violations issued. 

The District's successful automobile noise 
reduction campaign continued as well. In addition 
to improving citizens' quality-of-life by significantly 
decreasing the volume of noise disturbances, 
"Operation Sound Off" generated an additional 
positive side effect: In these stops officers often 
discovered motorists who were operating vehicles 
while unlicensed, many of which were unmsured, 
or unregistered. 




Part One Crime Comparison 2001 

►►E-13 01 02 % 


-2002 

Chg. 


►►Homicide 8 


2 


-75% 


►►Rape* 30 


17 1 


-43% 


►►Robbery* 151 


161 


7% 1 


►►Aggravated Assault 272 


228 


-16% 


►►Burglary* 221 


212 1 


-4% 


►►Larceny* 901 


1,136 


26% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 670 


642 


-4% 


►►Total Part 1 2,253 

♦Includes "Attempts" 


2,398 1 


6% 




Community members have been, and will continue 
to be valued partners in many of Jamaica Plain's 
ongoing crime-prevention and community-building 
efforts. This can be seen in the close cooperation 
among District personnel and groups such as the 
Jamaica Plain Business Association, the Urban 
Edge Community Development Corporation, the 
Egleston Square Y.M.C.A., and the Hyde Square 
Task Force. E-13's Community Service Officers 
have also maintained close relationships with 
non-profit elderly service organizations such as 
Ethos and IVIatch-Up. District 13 personnel were 
pleased to see that a Jamaica Plain neighborhood 
crime watch group was recognized as one of the 
Top Ten in the entire City of Boston by the Police 
Commissioner, Mayor Menino, and the 
Department's Neighborhood Crime Watch Unit. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



2,500 



L 



2 , OOO 6 YeaT Averagef2T 




1,500 



1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 

NOTE: Prior to 1997 District E-13 was a section of District E-5 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 




1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



39 



DISTRICT E-18 

Captain Frederick J. Danieis 

1249 Hyde Parle Avenue 

Hyde Park, IMassacliusetts 02136-2891 

(617) 343-5600 



During 2002, District E-18 personnel continued to 
use a variety of innovative measures to promote 
the concepts of neighborhood policing in Hyde Park 
and Readville, as well as portions of Mattapan and 
Jamaica Plain. 

Drug interdiction came to Cleary Square during 
2002 in the form of "Operation Clear-E." This 
initiative resulted in the arrest of four street 
dealers for marijuana sales, as well as the seizure 
of large quantities of marijuana, $4,390 in cash, 
and a firearm. The E-18 Drug Control Unit also 
successfully closed down a brazen storefront 
drug-sales operation by targeting an establishment 
known as Smoke and Grooves 2. Several thousand 
dollars of drug paraphernalia, over $1,000 dollars 
in cash, and additional large amounts of marijuana 
were seized. 

District 18 personnel discovered that the shop had 
also been selling illegal CD's. This matter was 
turned over to the Massachusetts Attorney 
General's Office for prosecution. Throughout the 
course of the year, these and other cooperative 
efforts like them netted over $30,000 in seized 
drug proceeds, 19 handguns, and one machine gun. 



E-18 personnel also revitalized their theft prevention and anti-crime 
measures to address the District's number of car-breaks in several 
important ways. First, innovative new prevention measures included 
a focused awareness campaign. It targeted two important groups: 
motorists and the vendors who service their vehicles. Automotive 
shops and other local businesses were asked to display anti-theft 
literature and posters warning of the penalties for receiving 
stolen property. 

Motorists were also warned when they were observed to be at 
risk by leaving valuables unattended in unlocked vehicles. Pamphlets 
which resembled a parking ticket were issued to these motorists 
advising them of the dangers of this type of behavior. Further, the 
District's Anti-Crime Unit was deployed on the morning watch, to 
specifically address the issue of larceny from motor 
vehicles, and worked closely with neighboring jurisdictions. Over 40 
arrests were effected, and a significant amount of stolen electronic 
components were recovered. 



Reported Part One Crime 1993 - 2002 



2.500 



2,000 



1,500 




1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 



40 




Among District E-18's most important achievements in 2002 was the 
cultivation of a close partnership with the Boston Transportation 
Department and groups of concerned local residents. Several senior 
citizen residents of the Blake Estates housing complex had been 
seriously injured while crossing to the nearby Shaw's Supermarket 
on Hyde Park Avenue. To heighten safety awareness among both 
area motorists and pedestrians, new crosswalk signage and flashing 
traffic signals were added and re-timed. The local Elks Lodge also 
donated additional pedestrian crossing signs, which Shaw's and 
Blake Estates residents worked together to site and install to help 
prevent future accidents. 



Part One Crime Comparison 2001 - 2002 



►►E-18 


01 


1 02 


% Chg. 


^^ Homicide 


4 


2 


-50% 


►► Rape* 


21 


19 


1 -10% 


»> Robbery* 


126 


90 


-29% 



►►Burglary* 


232 


157 1 


-32% 


►► Larceny* 


585 


703 


20% 


►►Vehicle Theft* 


455 


421 


-7% 


►►Total Part 1 


pT.680 


1,592 1 


-5% 




'Includes "Attempts" 



Calls for Service 1998 - 2002 



35,OCX) 




1998 



999 2000 2001 2002 



OPERATIONS DIVISION 

Deputy Superintendent William H. Bradley 

One Schroeder Plaza 

Boston, MA 02120 

(617) 343-4600 



During 2002, the Emergency Operations Center 
received 623,930 emergency 9-1-1 calls-many of 
these in foreign languages. Operations personnel 
prepared over 7,000 stolen vehicle reports, and 
handled more than 60,000 towed vehicles. 
Neighborhood Interaction Unit (NIU) personnel 
also dealt with an additional 19,910 non- 
emergency incident reports via telephone, while 
the Operations Tape Librarian created, catalogued, 
and compiled over 3,800 cassette tapes for 
administrative and criminal investigations, and 
provided testimony in numerous court 
proceedings. 

The Operations Division also continued its 
comprehensive efforts to hire and train 43 
civilians to replace police officers as emergency 
dispatchers in 2002. Thus far, more than 30 
civilian Dispatchers have already moved into these 
on-air positions. More will follow them as they 
complete their training. Over the course of 
several years, as this change-over to civilian 
dispatchers is completed, it will free up a like 
number of police officers for neighborhood patrol 
assignments and other duties citywide. The 
addition of their presence on a daily basis will be a 
significant aid to the Department's community 
policing efforts throughout Boston. 



The Operations Division's primary goal has always been to provide 
professional, emergency dispatch services to support street-level 
officers and their commanders with information that is as timely, 
accurate, and complete as possible. Their efforts to do so 24-hours a 
day, every day of the year resulted in nearly 50 commendations for 
meritorious service among Operations Division personnel in 2003. 
The following is but one example among many: 

At approximately 01:36 hours on Tuesday morning, August 27, 2002, 
a Police Dispatcher received a partially garbled radio transmission 
indicating a possible "officer-in-trouble" distress call. The Dispatcher 
immediately cleared the channel and alerted all nearby units. After 
recognizing the radio number transmitted, the Dispatcher sent 
back-up units to the A202A unit's last known location. It was later 
learned that its two officers had observed and attempted to question 
a suspect which earlier bulletins had identified as likely to be armed 
and dangerous. 

When approached by the officers on foot, the suspect opened fire 
with a handgun, striking one officer in both the arm and leg. The 
officers returned fire, but the suspect was able to flee on foot. The 
Dispatcher quickly worked to piece together multiple sources of 
information while also coordinating the arrival of additional back-up 
units. At the same time, the fleeing suspect continued to fire at 
pursuing officers, until he was finally wounded, and then subdued. 
Throughout this emotional incident, the Dispatcher worked calmly 
and professionally with street officers to provide them with the 
information and other resources they needed. 



42 





Emergency Medical Services personnel quickly transported both the 
wounded officer and the arrested suspect to area hospitals for 
life-saving medical treatments. The officer continues to recover, 
while the suspect remains in custody, facing attempted homicide and 
other serious charges. 

Operations Division personnel have always prided tinemselves on 
their close professional working relationships with all of the public 
safety agencies in Boston, as well as those throughout the region. 
Police personnel have always worked shoulder to shoulder with their 
counterparts at the Boston Fire Department and Emergency Medical 
Services at the street level. However, since September 11, 2001 
there has been a growing urgency to more closely synchronize the 
agencies' efforts at the dispatch and strategic levels as well. To 
accomplish this important goal, the agencies first convened a 
committee to set up a Boston Public Safety Inter-operability Channel. 
Its creation provided a direct operational radio link among personnel 
at each of the three agencies, as well as the Boston Emergency 
Management Agency. 



Using this link, commanders at each of the 
agencies can now contact operational staff from 
any of the other agencies, or all of them at once. 
In a crisis situation this capability will be 
invaluable and could help to save countless lives, 
including those of its users. 

Since its creation, this group has supervised 
further implementation, testing, and maintenance 
of this emergency radio capability, which can be 
made operational in seconds. Weekly testing is 
conducted to make sure that interoperability 
function of this channel can be available 
immediately if it is ever needed. Additional 
phases of this project are already underway to 
increase communications with other city agencies 
as well (i.e., Parks and Recreation, Public Works, 
etc.), and to any neighboring jurisdictions who may 
wish to participate in the future. 



43 



Superintendent Paul F. Joyce, Jr. 

BUREAU OF SPECIAL 
OPERATIONS 

The Bureau of Special Operations includes: 

• Mobile Operations Division 

• Tactical Support Division (Mounted Unit, K-9 Unit) 

• Youth Violence Strike Force 

• Environmental Safety Division (Haz-Mat Unit, 
Harbor Patrol, Explosive Ordnance Unit) 

• School Police Unit 

• Youth Service Officer Unit 



As its name implies, the Bureau of Special Operations (BSO) consists 
of several highly trained units that are frequently called upon to 
address many of the Department's most challenging and potentially 
dangerous assignments. Whether they are involved in executing 
high-risk warrants, rendering safe an explosive device, testing 
potentially hazardous materials, or providing security at a high- 
profile public event or a public school, BSO personnel successfully 
perform a surprisingly diverse set of public safety roles throughout 
Boston each day. 

During 2002, the Youth Violence Strike Force (YVSF) continued its 
ongoing efforts to successfully track, arrest, and prosecute gang 
members and other violent felons. Working with numerous law 
enforcement agencies and community partners, they continued 
prevention, intervention, and enforcement initiatives such as 
Operation Cease-fire and Operation Night Light. As noted elsewhere 
in this report, they also augmented these earlier successes with 
several new and promising companion programs. These include the 
multi-agency Boston Re-entry Initiative, and an intense collaboration 
among YVSF and other BPD investigative personnel to solve 
shootings where further incidents of retribution are thought to be 
likely. The effective combination of these efforts were again 
honored by the United States Department of Justice, through its 
selection of Boston for its Project Safe Neighborhood Award for 
violence prevention. 



Dealing with the unique concerns posed by 
potential terrorist acts has also remained a top 
priority for the entire Department in 2002. Several 
BSO units are at the forefront of these ongoing 
domestic preparedness efforts. For example, in 
2002 the Explosive Ordnance Unit dealt with over 
200 calls regarding suspicious, potentially 
explosive devices. New bomb suits, sophisticated 
x-ray and containment equipment, and training 
with the FBI and other agencies all helped them to 
respond safely and professionally to each of these 
calls. Each threat was rendered harmless without 
further incident. 

Similarly, the Hazardous Materials Response Unit 
continued to work closely with diverse state, local, 
and federal agencies to plan, train for, and 
maintain the constant readiness necessary to deal 
with incidents involving chemical, biological, 
radiological and other hazardous materials. These 
ongoing preparations involved the research and 
evaluation of complex new equipment, procedures, 
and training methods, as well as planning for 
numerous "what if" eventualities. Hazmat 
personnel then use this data to participate in 
highly detailed drills and tabletop exercises with 
other City of Boston and regional public health and 
safety agencies. They also work closely with 
Boston Police Academy staff to provide up-to-date 
Weapons of Mass Destruction, and critical 
Incident Command System training to BPD 
personnel on a regular basis. 



44 



The Mobile Operations Patrol Unit's (MOP) Harley 
Davidson motorcycles provide an impressive visual 
element to their diverse duties throughout the 
City. During 2002, these duties included a number 
of arrests for disorderly conduct during 
demonstration and other incidents of civil unrest, 
as well as those resulting from their daily patrols, 
and the nearly 40,000 traffic citations they issued 
throughout the year. MOP personnel also staff the 
Department's highly skilled Entry and 
Apprehension Team, provide extensive dignitary 
protection, crowd control, and special event escort 
services, and have also been heavily involved in 
the elaborate, security measures provided for the 
LNG tankers journeying through Boston Harbor. 



The primary goal of the School Police Unit in 2002 continued to be 
providing a safe and secure learning environment for Boston's 
schoolchildren. Using Student Threat Assessment Teams, School 
Police were able to react immediately to over 200 threats against 
specific schools or members of a school community. These teams 
included psychologists who worked with officers, school officials, and 
parents to create an appropriate but flexible response to each 
threat. Key education and prevention programs also encouraged 
young people to make positive life choices before they become 
involved gang violence, drug abuse, truancy, and other unproductive 
behaviors. As a result of these collaborative efforts, Boston's 
schools noted an almost 10 percent drop in overall incidents, along 
with a 30 percent drop in the number of recovered weapons. 




45 




In response to new violent crime challenges in 2001 and 2002, the 
Boston Police Department and its many partners developed some 
important - and promising - new initiatives. As 2002 drew to a close, 
these efforts were recognized by the Bush Administration. Known 
collectively as "Boston Strategy 11", they won a prestigious Project 
Safe Neighborhoods Award from the U.S. Department of Justice. 
Project Safe Neighborhoods is the federal government's signature 
firearm violence prevention program nationwide. 

Boston's four-pronged strategy includes the following ongoing 
initiatives: 

• Unsolved Shootings Project 

• Boston Re-entry Initiative 

• District-based Strategies 

• Law Enforcement/Community Crime Reduction Strategy 

Using a balanced approach, these programs make purposeful, 
combined use of prevention, intervention, and enforcement 
measures. In 1994, Commissioner Evans launched a new direction 
for policing in Boston, emphasizing that "You cannot be credible on 
enforcement if you are not credible on prevention." This philosophy 
still holds today, and can be seen in the common principles guiding 
the four programs: 

• Focused intervention, analysis, and prioritization 
of offenders 

• Fair and balanced message 

• Consistent follow-through 

• Strategic collaboration 



The Unsolved Shootings Project (USP) - One of the 
most promising of the new initiatives, the project 
uses a strategic approach to firearm violence 
prevention. It recognizes that a relatively small 
number of people are actively involved in 
perpetuating firearm violence. Often they engage 
in retaliatory incidents, driving further cycles of 
violent retribution. By focusing intense and quick 
scrutiny on the open cases, and the individuals 
most likely to retaliate, this initiative seeks to 
break these dangerous cycles before they 
can grow. 

Partners in this effort include: the Boston f'olice 
Department, the Suffolk County D.A.'s Office, and 
the US Attorney's Office. Key officials from BPD's 
Bureaus of Investigative Services, Field Services, 
and Special Operations, along with the Office of 
Research and Evaluation meet with prosecutors 
and federal law enforcement agencies on a bi- 
weekly basis to examine all open shooting cases in 
the city. Their objectives are to: 



Solve shooting cases in which witness 

and/or victim reluctance is hindering 

prosecution. 

Identify the suspects who are driving 

the shootings, using all lawful and 

constitutional means to remove them 

from the community. 



46 




At each meeting, the working group lool<s at the 
following categories from the previous two-week 
period: 

• firearm arrests 

• reported firearm incidents 

• "shots fired" calls for service, looking 
for any new trends or patterns 

• intelligence data 

• ongoing investigations 

• possible evidence matches from the 
ballistics comparison database 

• suspect activity _ 

• offenders expecting imminent release 
from incarceration 

A significant outcome of the intensified focus on 
these cases has been a reduction in shootings and 
open cases during 2002. The Department 
recorded 27 percent fewer open cases in calendar 
year 2002 versus 2001, with a decrease from 170 
to 128. Shootings were also down by 20 percent, 
dropping from 222 to 179. 

Boston Re-entry Initiative - This initiative seeks to 
deter repeat offenders by supervising high-risk 
criminals as they return to the community from 



county, state, and federal prisons. The program 
began by addressing the highest-risk offenders 
slated for release from the Suffolk County House of 
Correction. It has since expanded to include both 
juveniles and adults returning from the state and 
federal systems as well. The program is young and 
still in formation, but early results have been 
promising. 

District-based Initiatives - Partnerships in each of the 
city's 11 police districts include representatives from 
local police, parole, probation, the District Attorney's 
office and the Department of Youth Services. They 
intentionally mirror, and are intended to actively 
support the successful citywide partnerships which 
they were modeled on during recent years. 



Law Enforcement-Community Crime Reduction Strategy - The 

Department is leading the development of a new intensively focused 
intervention and prevention strategy with high-risk individuals and 
families in several crime-impacted neighborhoods. This goal is being 
achieved via close working relationships with: The Boston 
Foundation, Mayor Menino's Boston Centers for Youth and Families, 
the Commonwealth's Executive Office of Health and Human Services, 
and numerous other community, faith-based, and criminal justice 
partners. 

Research and experience indicate that a close relationship exists 
between crime problems and health and human service problems. 
As a result, these problems are often found clustered together 
around a small number of significantly challenged families and 
individuals. These groups may be involved with multiple city or state 
agencies at any given time. This initiative seeks to strengthen the 
links among these various service providers in order to give affected 
families and individuals a greater chance to break the cycles of 
violence they find themselves in. By maximizing their opportunities 
for community support, self-betterment, and the creation of positive 
life-choices, other destructive habits, behaviors, and counter- 
productive choices can either be eliminated, or at least significantly 
diminished. 



47 




Although the Special Events Unit does much of its work "behind the 
scenes", its function within the Bureau of Field Services is important. 
Each year the Unit devises detailed operational plans for dozens of 
major events and hundreds of smaller ones. Some of the major 
events-like the annual St. Patrick's Day Parade, or the Caribbean 
Carnival-attract hundreds of thousands of people, and require 
months of planning with district personnel, neighboring jurisdictions, 
the MBTA, and many others. 



kept apart from each other to the extent possible, 
while still allowing their competing views to be 
heard. Sometimes this necessitates the rapid 
deployment of additional specialized personnel and 
equipment. If necessary, march routes can be 
shifted, or physical barriers can be employed to 
protect the participants, police, and the general 
public. 



In recent years, and particularly since September 11, 2001, Special 
Events' personnel have also been called upon to plan how the 
Department will deal with the growing number of political 
demonstrations and protest groups. Often a protest organized by 
one group will spur a counter-protest by another. Or an unplanned 
demonstration could impede pedestrian or motor vehicle traffic on 
the City's streets, or create difficulties for emergency-response 
personnel. So a delicate balancing act is often necessary to ensure 
that 1st Amendment rights are guaranteed to all, while also 
preserving the legitimate public safety expectations of the larger 
community. 

Such complex situations sometimes act as potential catalysts for civil 
disobedience, retributional violence, and property crimes, so the 
importance of prevention through proper prior planning can not be 
overstated. In such instances, Special Events tries to work with the 
participants well beforehand to make sure that opposing groups are 



Special Events Unit personnel work closely with a 
large number of internal and external groups to 
create workable plans that keep everyone safe. 
They host weekly meetings to review upcoming 
events throughout the City, and then plan for any 
special measures that may be required in 
cooperation with any of the City, state, and 
regional agencies who participate. Community 
outreach also plays an important role, particularly 
for groups who may not know what types of 
permitting or advance preparation will be 
necessary for their event or gathering. Though 
labor-intensive, this collaborative approach 
continues to win praise, keep the peace, and 
enable groups of all types to have their messages 
heard in a safe environment. 



In the fall of 2002, the Democratic National 
Committee selected the City of Boston to host its 
2004 convention. "You can feel the energy in the 
city," noted DNC National Chairman Terry 
McAuliffe. "There's no city the Democratic Party 
would rather be in than Boston." The DNC's 
selection of Boston is quite an honor, since it has 
never before hosted a national political convention 
until now. 

One of the major strengths of Boston's successful 
DNC bid was its comprehensive public safety 
component. This detailed content was particularly 
important, since dealing with potential 
demonstrations and terrorist threats is now a key 
challenge at such gatherings. The Department 
noted its depth of experience in handling similar 
high-profile national events in the past, by making 
peaceful and professional use of its existing 
capabilities. 




Some of the positive examples noted were: the New England Patriots 
Super Bowl victory celebration, the 2000 Presidential Debate; the 
1992 and 2001 Sail Boston Regattas; the Major League Baseball All- 
Star Game, and a much-publicized national Biotech Conference which 
attracted thousands of participants and demonstrators. In each of 
these cases, the Department successfully demonstrated how its 
extensive planning, community relations, intelligence, and crowd 
control capabilities all combined to greatly minimize the need for 
confrontation, violence, and mass-arrests. This expertise has also 
been routinely put to use for popular annual events like Boston's 
First Night celebration, the Boston Marathon, and large parades and 
ethnic festivals which draw hundreds of thousands of attendees from 
all over the East Coast. The Department further pointed out that its 
personnel regularly coordinate detailed security measures 
for high-profile international dignitaries, as well as frequent 
Presidential and Vice Presidential visits. 




Boston's public safety agencies have received numerous accolades 
from federal and state agencies, convention groups, and others for 
their professional and dedicated coordination of major events. 
However, while winning the convention bid should bring with it the 
prospect of national attention and important economic development 
opportunities for Boston, its selection is only the beginning of a 
lengthy and complicated planning process. Exhaustive preparations 
for the event itself, as well as the safety of attendees, 
demonstrators, and the City's own residents are already well 
underway. Additional preparations will continue throughout 2003. 
In all of these endeavors the Department's goal will be to make sure 
that by 2004 we are prepared to support, as Mayor Menino has 
proclaimed, the "best convention in DNC history." 



49 



Boston Harbor has always played a key role in the City's 
development, which now includes four centuries of seafaring history, 
innovation, and commerce. Policing this important gateway to 
Boston and the entire New England region falls squarely onto the 
shoulders of the BPD's Harbor Patrol Unit, whose commander is 
Boston's official Harbormaster. 

Relying primarily on four vessels ranging in size from 22-83 feet in 
length, the Harbor Patrol Unit is responsible for ensuring the safety 
of 44 square miles of scenic, but busy coastal waterways. Working 
in close cooperation with numerous state, local, and federal agencies 
including the U.S. Coast Guard, the Harbor Unit's personnel enforce 
maritime codes and environmental regulations, supervise 2,000 
moorings, and also provide emergency search, rescue, and recovery 
services as needed. 



To address these concerns, the Harbor Unit has 
already increased the level of services it provides. 
These include additional highly visible patrols, as 
well as unannounced spot location checks, and 
underwater explosives security sweeps. They also 
include regular security details for Liquefied 
Natural Gas tankers moving through Boston 
Harbor, as well as providing escorts for some 
250,000 passengers on the 70 cruise ships which 
passed through and berthed in the harbor. 

As part of its planning efforts to make Boston's 
harbor security a national model, the Harbor 
Patrol Unit is also working with the Department of 
Transportation to outfit the unit with 3 new 
vessels via its Port Security Grant Program. Two 
IMightCat Interceptor boats will now provide BPD 
personnel an enhanced high-speed pursuit and 




Since September 11, 2001, the Harbor Patrol Unit's responsibilities 
have changed and grown considerably. The Unit's personnel 
continue to act as the primary law enforcers and emergency first- 
responders in drownings, groundings, and other maritime and harbor 
island incidents requiring their attention. 

At the same time, serious domestic preparedness concerns have 
now become an important round-the-clock responsibility as well, 
since the United States Departments of Transportation and 
Homeland Security have rated Boston harbor as a potential 
high-threat area. This is due in part to its high volume of 
commercial shipping, use as a fuel energy depot, and popularity 
as a tourist destination. 



intercept capability that will be useful in defending 
against potential terrorist acts, in rescue efforts, 
and in drug interdiction patrols. 

An additional 57-foot vessel will house a floating 
command post for water-borne critical incident 
management. In addition to an ambulance-like 
medical suite, this vessel will also aid in 
underwater hazard detection, environmental 
protection, and emergency rescue efforts. Its 
advanced electronics will also facilitate 
inter-agency satellite communications and 
precision navigation capabilities. Federal funds 
are expected to cover the entire cost of the 3 
ships' combined $3 million price tag, and delivery 
is expected to take place in late spring and early 
fall of 2003. 



50 




YOUTH SUMMER 
SAILING PROGRAM 



District A-7 personnel coordinated a new Boston 
Police Activities League (PAL) Sailing Program at 
East Boston's Piers Park Sailing Center. The idea 
for the program came about as the result of a 
meeting among Department personnel, the 
leadership of PAL, and representatives from the 
Sailing Center. Together they formulated a plan 
that builds on the success of the Department's 
popular Junior Police Academy program, via 
$39,000 in grant funding from PAL. 

The program combines sailing lessons with 
additional instruction in topics like first aid, gang 
violence prevention, and the dangers of drug use. 
It also helps to promote values like self-respect 



and cooperation, and gives kids and cops a useful opportunity to 
meet and get to know each other in a pleasant, waterfront 
recreational setting. "It's really about survival skills; surviving on the 
water, surviving in the city," noted PAL President Gerald Ridge. 

Approximately 100 young people, ages 11-14 from East Boston, Hyde 
Park, Roxbury, Mattapan, downtown, and Brighton participated in the 
program's inaugural year. For many, it was the first sailing 
experience of their lives. Partners such as the East Boston YMCA, 
and Jamaica Plain's Italian Home for Children also worked closely 
with District A-7's Community Service Office to make the program a 
success, so much so that it has already been funded for the summer 
of 2003. 



51 



BPD WORKING PROACTIVELY 
TO ADDRESS PROFILING 
ISSUES ^ 



Over the course of the past several years racial profiling has become 
a controversial and increasingly important nationwide issue. At the 
same time, the Boston Police Department has been at the forefront 
of the law/ enforcement agencies working to successfully address 
community and employee concerns surrounding this complex issue at 
the state, local, and federal levels. 

In the area of policy development, BPD has been one of the leaders 
of a coalition of more than two-dozen public safety agencies 
throughout the Commonwealth. This group has advised the 
legislature, the Executive Office of Public Safety, the Massachusetts 
Attorney General's Office, and two successive Governors on law 
enforcement issues related to racial profiling. Together they worked 
on the implementation of new legislation, which went into effect in 
early 2001. Through it, Massachusetts enacted a new statewide 
policy addressing police practices in motor vehicle stops, and 
specifically mandating the collection of standardized data for future 
analysis. Additionally, the Department has advocated for and worked 
on improving how analysis is completed once data is collected. 

At the federal level, the Department has also facilitated an ongoing 
dialogue between the Department of Justice and police departments 
across the country. These activities have included the creation of a 
statewide Police Executive Development Roundtable (PEDR) group, 
designed to examine and address issues involving police integrity. 
Through this group, and others such as the Regional Community 
Policing Institute of New England, and the International Association 
of Chiefs of Police, the Department has advocated for improved 
nationwide efforts to train, supervise, evaluate, and where 
necessary to discipline law enforcement personnel who engage in 
unlawful racial profiling practices. This advocacy has taken the 
form of curriculum development for chiefs and senior policy makers 
on issues impacting police integrity, including racial profiling issues 
and dilemmas. 



Much of the work done by Department personnel 
has centered on efforts to identify best practices 
and then to create the appropriate policies and 
practices necessary to strengthen them. This can 
be seen in the revision of the Department's Field 
Interrogation and Observation procedures. A 
newly revised Department rule mandates how this 
activity will be conducted, while a new form and 
database allow for standardized and streamlined 
data collection. While the Department is 
responsive to the community in collecting data, the 
Department also seeks to do so in a way that 
supports rather than hinders officers' community 
policing efforts. Over the course of time, this data 
will further assist the Department in gauging the 
success of its existing policies and practices, and 
then fine-tuning them as necessary. 

A great deal of emphasis has also been placed on 
community outreach and cooperation. The 
Department works closely with each of the various 
groups already mentioned above as well as many 
others. Their joint goal is to keep lines of 
communication open so that they can develop a 
mutual understanding of the issues involved which 
purposely takes into consideration the diverse 
viewpoints of the community as a whole. As a 
result, the Department maintains strong 
collaborative partnerships with a diverse set of 
stakeholders throughout the community. 



52 



The Boston Police Department continues to place a 
special emphasis on useful crime prevention and 
intervention activities, along with its more 
traditional investigative and enforcement roles. 
Doing this requires a w/illingness to challenge 
assumptions. It also requires an ability to look at 
the Department's larger role within the community 
it serves in new and creative ways. 

For example, during 2002 BPD personnel actively 
sought new ways to work with Boston's diverse 
ethnic communities. In particular they looked to 
engage those who, as recent immigrants, were 
not yet entirely familiar with the laws and other 
criminal justice practices of the Commonwealth. 
In doing so, they had two goals. First, they used 
these contacts to prevent many crimes before they 
could happen. Second, BPD officers wished to 
cultivate strong, long-term ties to these new and 
growing segments of our community. These kinds 
of relationships promote productive two-way 
communication, and also help link new immigrant 
populations to the kinds of public safety, 
healthcare, and other basic services that their 
families may need, but may not know how 
to access. 



To forge these kinds of ties, Department personnel identified areas 
where they found needs for additional attention, support, or 
services. One significant unmet need identified in East Boston was 
for English classes for the local Latino population. This need was 
particularly acute, since approximately 2,000 people were already on 
waiting lists for such English as a Second Language instruction. 

To address this need. District A-7 personnel submitted a detailed 
proposal to the East Boston Foundation. The Foundation awarded an 
initial grant to fund English as a Second Language instruction for 35 
local adult Latino residents, using a Spanish-speaking language 
instructor assigned to District A-7. The program was a success. 
Media outlets including the Boston Sunday Globe touted the positive 
aspects of police officials teaching Latino residents the English 
language. On July 18th, Mayor Thomas M. Menino was on hand to 
present graduation certificates to each of the initial 35 graduates. 
He lauded the program for its efforts to promote the safety and 
vitality of the Latino community in East Boston through this unique 
example of police-community partnership and cooperation. 




53 



The Bureau of Investigative Services achieved a number of 
significant accomplishments during 2002. Among the most important 
of these accomplishments was the Crime Laboratory Unit's national 
accreditation by the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors- 
Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD-LAB). The Unit completed a 
comprehensive four-day accreditation inspection performed by three 
ASCLD-LAB inspectors from forensic laboratories in Virginia, Utah, 
and South Carolina. This type of accreditation is granted only after 
an extremely thorough evaluation of a laboratory's management 
practices, personnel qualifications, technical procedures, quality 
assurance program, and facilities. ASCLD-LAB notified the Crime 
Laboratory that each of these factors had not only been met, but also 
exceeded their high standards for accreditation. 



Crime Laboratory Unit generated 422 DNA profiles 
from biological evidence for input into the CODIS 
database. This resulted in the Lab identifying 74 
case-to-case "hits" and evidence linking 29 
convicted offender profiles which were already 
contained in the database. 

Using this powerful tool, the Crime Laboratory Unit 
also began a Sexual Assault Cold Case Project in 
the summer of 2002 in partnership with the Sexual 
Assault Unit. The project's objective is to generate 
DNA profiles from cases identified as "no-suspect 
blitz rapes." The profiles generated are entered 
into the CODIS database to provide investigators 
with potential suspects or new leads via 




This achievement is a further validation of the Crime Lab's ability to 
consistently deliver world-class professional forensic services to the 
Boston Police Department and the citizens of Boston. Its receipt 
comes as the result of years of careful preparation, hard work, and 
dedication by the Crime Lab's entire staff. The accreditation is also a 
direct reflection of the remarkable teamwork and diligence that the 
laboratory staff exhibits on a daily basis to identify and aid in the 
prosecution of violent criminals. 

One tool the Crime Lab uses to do this is the Combined DNA Index 
System, or CODIS. It is a computer database that contains DNA 
profiles from unsolved crimes, as well as DNA profiles from a 
number of convicted offenders. The database links information 
between the Boston Police, the Massachusetts State Police, and 
investigative agencies throughout the United States. The Crime 
Laboratory Unit added this new investigative tool to its battery of 
existing forensic services in the fall of 2000. By the end of 2002, the 



case-to-case linkages. The scope of this project 
included approximately 500 cases from 1984 to 
1993. Cases from 1994 to 1999 had already been 
processed during a previous CODIS project. 
Casework received since 1999 had already been 
processed as part of the Lab's day-to-day routine. 
Once the Sexual Assault Unit had identified the 
cases with potential biological evidence, they 
worked with the Crime Lab to review them. 
Together they identified 200 cases for subsequent 
analysis and DNA profiling. By the end of 2002, 
these had already generated 36 new DNA profiles, 
resulting in three convicted offender "hits" and 
eight new case-to-case linkages. 



54 




In September of 2000, the U.S. Department of 
Justice provided $5 million in funding to begin the 
Judicial Oversight Demonstration Initiative. This 
innovative domestic violence prevention / 
prosecution project has proven to be a significant 
catalyst for other subsequent improvements as 
well. Organized by the Department's Domestic 
Violence Unit and its many community and law 
enforcement partners, these additional positive 
changes now include: 

• The Repeat Call Analysis Program - 
Allows the staff to. maintain and 
distribute regular reports from a 
timesaving, domestic violence offender 
database. 



• Computer connectivity with Dorchester District Court - 
Allows real-time judicial access to up-to-date information 
on the violation of restraining orders, outstanding 
warrants on high-risk repeat offenders, and other 
relevant databases. 

• Government Partnerships - The Domestic Violence Unit 
commander was named by Attorney General John Ashcroft 
to the National Advisory Committee on Violence Against 
Women, has also served as an advisor on Gov. Romney's 
Public Safety Committee, and works closely with the 
Commonwealth's Executive Office of Public Safety. 

• Sex Offender Registration Information Unit - Now 
assisted by Domestic Violence Unit detectives in tracking 
offenders who fail to register. 



• Domestic Violence Advocates - Now in 
place at each of the Department's 11 
district stations. 

• High-Risk Repeat Domestic Violence 
Offenders - Now targeted by a regular 
working group of criminal justice 
partners, using additional federal grant 
funding to implement the Department's 
successful No Next Time strategy. 



• Domestic Violence Unit-hosted training - Led by experts 
from Washington, D.C. and the Urban Institute, including 
remarks from Diane Stuart of the U.S. Department of 
Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 



55 



BPD 2002 

AWARD RECIPIENTS 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
POLICE OFFICER LOUIS H. METAXAS 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Jeffrey T. Bird District B-2 



THE SCHROEDER BROTHERS MEMORIAL MEDAL 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE REQEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Police Officer Zenaida Flores District A-1 

Police Officer Carlton A. Williamson District A-1 

THE WALTER SCOH MEDAL 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCTATTON MEMORIAL AWARD 

Sergeant Detective Daniel M. Keeler B.I.S.-Homicide Division 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
DETECTIVE ROY J. SERGEI 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Paul F. Brooks District D-4 

Police Officer Eric A. Francis District D-4 

Police Officer Ted R. Rivera District D-4 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
DETECTIVE THOMAS J. GILL 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer John C. Dailey District C-6 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
POLICE OFFICER THOMAS F. ROSE 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Sergeant Courtney C. Matthews Academy 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
SERGEANT RICHARD F. HALLORAN 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Sergeant Detective Robert M. Merner District B-2 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
POLICE OFFICER JEREMIAH J. HURLEY, JR. 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer John J. Bresnahan District C-6 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
POLICE OFFICER BERISFORD WAYNE ANDERSON 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Scott R. Roby District C-11 

THE MAYOR'S MEDAL OF EXCELLENCE 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

Police Officer Susan A. Lucero District C-11 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
DETECTIVE SHERMAN C. GRIFFITHS 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Stephen Rioux District B-3 



THE WILLIAM J. TAYLOR MERHORIOUS SERVICE AWARD 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Michael P. Linskey District B-2 



THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR IN MEMORY OF 
DETECTIVE JOHN J. MULLIGAN 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
Police Officer Gregory D. Dankers District B-3 



56 




COMMISSIONER'S SPECIAL CHATION 
Police Officer James R. Tarantino 
Police Officer Michael R. Want 

COMMISSIONER'S SPECIAL CITATION 
Police Officer Michael LoPriore 
Police Officer Lance R. Norwood 
Police Officer Martin 0. Velez 



District B-3 
District B-3 



District A-7 
District A-7 
District A-7 



COMMISSIONER'S UNIT CITATION 

This Unit Citation is awarded to the following officers who are 

assigned to District C-11, the Sexual Assault Unit and the Youth 

Violence Strike Force. 

Superintendent Robert P. Dunford 

Lieutenant Detective Joseph J. Zinck 

Lieutenant Detective Gary S. French 

Sergeant Detective John J. Donovan 

Sergeant Detective Daniel J. Downey 

Sergeant Detective Elton M. Grice 

Detective Thomas E. Lembo 

Detective Lisa R. Holmes 

Detective Todd M. Hartgrove 

Detective Kevin W. Sweeney 

Detective Joseph P. Lally 

Detective Brian J. McEachern 

Detective Robert J. Twitchell 

Detective Paul G. Schroeder 

Detective John Jay Greene 

Detective James P. Nolan 

Detective Richard F. Atwood 

Detective William L. Kee 

Police Officer Martin M. O'Malley 

Police Officer William M. Bulger 

Police Officer Michael P. Keaney 

Police Officer Brendan A. McCarthy 

Police Officer Dennis Rorie 

Police Officer Tahisha L. Skeen 

Police Officer Gregory P. Long 

Police Officer Edward P. Meade 

Police Officer Paul J. Passanisi 



On Wednesday, October 2, 2002, the following members of the 
Boston Police Department were honored for their performance of 
outstanding acts of bravery and courage at the Annual 
Massachusetts State Trooper George L. Hanna Memorial Awards for 
Bravery Ceremony held at the State House: 



STATE TROOPER GEORGE L. HANNA MFDAL OF VALOR 
Sergeant Detective William J. Robertson 
Drug Control Unit - District B-3 

Police Officer William I. Griffiths 
District A-1 

Police Officer Michael C. Hanson 
District B-2 

Police Officer Edward P. Meade 
Youth Violence Strike Force 

STATE TROOPER GEORGE L. HANNA AWARDS FOR MERIT 
Lieutenant Robert W. Ciccolo, Jr. 
District B-2 

Police Officer Edward J. Garvey 
Drug Control Unit - District B-3 

Police Officer Scott M. Mackie 
Drug Control Unit - District B-3 

Police Officer Edmund J. Rautenberg 
District A-1 



These actions for which the above officers were cited reflect 
favorably not only on themselves, but on the Department and City 
which they so ably serve. On behalf of the Department, I extend 
my congratulations for their pride and commitment and dedication 
to duty. 

Paul F. Evans 
Police Commissioner 



BPD RETIREES 2002 




Deputy Superintendent Edward R. Eagar Jr. 

Captain Detective Melbert J. Ahearn 

Lieutenant Detecive Patricia Eagar 

Lieutenant Eric Hahn 

Sergeant David M. Allen 

Sergeant Detective Ttiomas Creavin 

Sergeant Diane M. Culhane 

Sergeant Detective William H. Dacey 

Sergeant Detective Harry Deltufo 

Sergeant Ttiomas E. Flanagan 

Sergeant Detective William Kelley.Jr. 

Sergeant David Kennedy 

Sergeant Ttiomas R. Matheson 

Sergeant Detective Thomas H. Miller 

Sergeant Detective Stephen A. Murphy 

Sergeant Dennis J. Ross 

Sergeant Ronald S. Smith 

Ofticer Thomas J. Adams 

Detective Robert F. Ahearn 

Officer Robert F. Allen 

Officer Gerard M. Arroyo 

Officer John F. Bilodeau 

Detective Stephen A. Brady 

Officer David M. Brodbeck 

Officer Angelo G. Conti 



Officer David K. Cravi^ford 
Officer Brian J. Cunningham 
Detective George F. Degregorio 
Officer David Dickerson 
Officer Ronald L. Dinocco 
Officer Daniel E. Donahue Jr 
Officer Richard J. Goode 
Officer James Happnie 
Officer Paul M. Jackson 
Officer Bradford H. Jones 
Officer William P. Kenney 
Officer John V. Lehmann 
Officer Thomas W. Lynch 
Officer Richard A. MacDonald 
Officer Charles Manuel 
Officer Robert M. Marciano 
Officer Gerard M. McDonald 
Officer George F. McGrath 
Officer Dennis McKenna 
Officer Edward O'Toole 
Officer Patrick A. Quinn 
Officer Robert M. Rogers 
Officer Richard D. Tuden 
Detective Joseph F. Wells 
Officer Paul Wosny 



59 



IN MEMORIUM 




Boston Police Department Active Duty Deaths for the year 2002: 

Detective William W. ("Wally") Gillis, District C-6 

Officer Joel V. Nickrosz, District B-2 

Officer Kenneth M. Lynch, District C-6 

Officer William F. O'Reilly, Jr., BAS-Central Supply Unit 

Sergeant Detective Richard C. Famolare, District D-4 

Officer John T. Connolly, District B-3 




"We are not this story's author, who fills time and eternity with His purpose. Yet His 
purpose is achieved in our duty, and our duty is fulfilled in service to one another." 
- President George W. Bush, January 20, 2001 



60 



BPD DIRECTORY 



Executive Offices 

343-4500 Office of the Police Commissioner 

343-4577 Bureau of Administrative Services 

343-4300 Bureau of Field Services 

343-4526 Bureau of Internal Investigations 

343-4497 Bureau of Investigative Services 

343-4410 Bureau of Professional Development 

343-5646 Bureau of Special Operations 

343-5043 Chief Administrative Hearings Officer 




Key Operational Services 

343-4661 Central Supply 



343-4379 


Facilities Management 


343-4665 


Finance 


343-4610 


Fleet Management 


343-4475 


Hackney Carriage 


343-4677 


Human Resources 


343-4545 


Labor Relations 


343-4550 


Legal Advisor 


343-4520 


Media Relations 


343-4520 


Neighborhood Crime Watch 


343-4530 


Research & Evaluation 


343-5096 


Resource Development & Strategic Planning 


343-4620 


Telecommunications 


Key Investigative Services 


343-4465 


Ballistics 


343-4527 


Community Disorders 


343-4690 


Crime Lab 


343-4350 


Domestic Violence 


343-5625 


Drug Control 


343-4470 


Homicide 


343-5200 


Major Investigations 


343-4400 


Sexual Assault 


343-4328 


Intelligence Unit 


343-4444 


Youth Violence Strike Force 



Area/District Stations 

343-4240 A- ' 40 New Sudbury Street 

Beacon Hill, Charlestown, Chinatown, 
North End, Bay Village, Financial District 



343-4220 



69 Paris Street 
East Boston 



343-4270 B-2 135 Dudley Street 

Roxbury, North Dorchester 

343-4700 ■ ' 1165 Blue Hill Avenue 
Dorchester, Mattapan 

343-4730 ; 101 West Broadway Street 

South Boston 

343-4330 C-11 40 Gibson Street 
Dorchester 

343-4250 D-4 650 Harrison Avenue 

Back Bay, South End, Fenway, Lower Roxbury 

343-4260 D-14 301 Washington Street 
Allston, Brighton 

343-4560 E-5 1708 Centre Street 
Roslindale, West Roxbury 

343-5630 E-13 3347 Washington Street 
Jamaica Plain 

343-5600 E-18 1249 Hyde Park Avenue 
Hyde Park, Mattapan, Readville 



343-4600 Area G Operations Division 



61 




COMMUNITY 

DISORDERS 

UNIT 



OFFICE OF 

LABOR 
RELATIONS 



OFFICE OF 

MEDIA 
RELATIONS 



OFFICE 
OF 

COMMUNICATIONS 



OFFICE 

OF THE 

POLICE COMMISSIONER 



V 



/ 



BII 



BUREAU OF 

INTERNAL 

INVESTIGATIONS 



BPD 

BUREAU OF 
PROFESSIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 



OFFICE 

OF THE 

LEGAL 

ADVISOR 



OFFICE OF 

ADMINISTRATIVE 
HEARINGS 



OFFICE OF 

RESEARCH AND 

EVALUATION 



OFFICE OF 
STRATEGIC 
PLANNING 



BIS 

BUREAU OF 

INVESTIGATIVE 

SERVICES 




BUREAU OF 
FIELD SERVICES 



BSO 

BUREAU OF 

SPECL\L 
OPERATIONS 



BAS 

BUREAU OF 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

SERVICES 



62