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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




BOSTOW PUBLIC (JBRARY 
GOI/EflNMtN) UUliUMtNlfeOtPAftTMENT 

Rproucn 
^ MAR 1 b u}33 



Bottom [PoQOcECB 

ANNUAL 
REPORT 



I July 1,1977 to June 30, 1978 



."iSfS^t^ ^»' 



Joseph M. Jordan 
Police Commissioner 




Kevin H. White 
IVIayor 







4 I 



A Message from 
the Commissioner 



Policing in any municipality must recognize the vital 
importance of the community in its day-to-day operations. 
As a public service agency, we have a responsibility to 
provide fast, efficient police services tailored to meet the 
demands and pfofessional standards of our neighborhoods. 

The following report provides both a structural analysis 
of the Boston Police Department, as well as a detailed 
evaluation of our performance during the last year. 

During the past fiscal year, we have seen some notable 
improvements in terms of policing in Boston. The success 
of Team Policing has been expanded to include other areas 
of the City. Our communications procedures have been 
further streamlined and improved for faster, more efficient 
911 response. The concept of directed patrol has been 
introduced in selected areas of the City where additional 
police attention has been required. Our patrol fleet has 
been greatly assisted with the introduction of a smaller, 
more efficient patrol vehicle. During the Spring and 
Summer months of 1978, a City-wide campaign was launched 
to enforce the City's public drinking ordinance's and in 
doing so, aim at curbing related juvenile gang activity. With 
the establishment of our Community Disorders Unit, any' 
infringement of a citizen's basic rights is given immediate 
and concerted police attention. Two recruit classes totalling 
almost 120 officers were appointed to supplement the City's 
patrol force. During the last 12 months, the Department's 
Mounted Patrol Unit has significantly expanded. Our neighborhoods 
now enjoy the visibility, personal contact, and mobility that 
the horse patrol provides. By January 1979, sixty mounted 
beats will be fielded. 

All of these developments have reinforced our commitment 
to the community. The Boston Police Department will continue 
to manage our resources, deploy our manpower, and establish 
priorities based on the service needs of the City's neiighborhoods . 
inis has to occur if we are truly f: maintain our posture as 
a public service agency. 






-"^ 



^^/ 



^.-J'l"^..'' 

itoieplii M. J6rdan 
Police Commissioner 



S^ 





Office 
of the 

Commissioner 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Message from the Police Commissioner i 

Section I : Office of the Police Commissioner 1 

Staff Section 2 

Labor Relations Office 4 

Legal Affairs Office 5 

Special Investigations Unit 5 

Management and Budget 7 

Section II : Bureau of Investigative Services 10 

Criminal Investigative Division n 

Internal Affairs Division 15 

Staff Inspection Division 17 

Planning and Research Division 19 

Section III: Bureau of Administrative Services 22 

Personnel Division 23 

Services Division 25 

Training and Education Division 28 

Section IV: Bureau of Field Services 30 

Police Area A 32 

Police Area B 33 

Police Area C 34 

Police Area D 35 

Police Area E 35 

Police Area F 37 

Division G 3g 

Division H 40 

Section V 42 

Boston Police Department Budget 43 

Total Part I Crimes by Month 45 

Total Part I Crimes by District 46 

Total Part I Crimes per 10,000 Population by District 47 

Workload, Population, Square Miles, Road Miles by District 48 

Commendations 49 

Boston Police Department Roll of Honor 57 

Boston Police Department Commissioners Since 1878 58 

Boston Police Department Organizational Chart 59 



11 



FE OF THE POLICE COMMIS.SIONER 



STAFF SECTION 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

Administrative Section 

This Unit is responsible for managing and coordinating the activities of 
the Police Commissioner's Office, coordinating correspondence to and from the 
Department, managing appointments for the Commissioner, and providing an effec- 
tive working relationship with the Bureau of Administrative Services and the 
Bureau of Investigative Services. The Unit has the general responsibility to 
assist the Commissioner in developing programs to improve the quality of police 
service and in reviewing and evaluating recommendations made by other units as 
to their feasibility and completeness. 

Operations Unit 

This Unit is responsible for coordinating management of the Department's 
field services through the Bureau of Field Service and for evaluating and assist- 
ing in the development of programs to improve the quality of enforcement activities 
and service delivery. 

Confidential Secretary 

The Confidential Secretary directs an Informational Services Unit responsible 
for keeping members of the Department and the public informed of police activities 
by publishing an employee newsletter and by maintaining liaison with news media 
by preparing and disseminating news releases, coordinating news conferences and 
requests for interviews and coverage. It prepares slide shows, movies, brochures, 
displays and booklets and coordinates a Spcjaker's Bureau and tours of police 
facilities. A Crime Prevention Unit provides advice to citizens on personal and 
property protection. 

PERSONNEL 

Assistants to the Commissioner 2 
Sergeants 2 

Police Officers 14 

Civi Lians 13^ 

:l Total Personnel 



ACTIVITIES 

Administrative Unit 

The Administrative Unit of the Police Commissioner's "f ice in) conjunction 
with the Bureau of Administrative Services assisted in a wide variety of support 
functions which aided in the efficient opc^ration of the Boston Police Department. 
In addition to the normal daily functions of managing the Police Commissioner's 
Office and coordinating the paper work flow of the Department, the unit assisted 
in the development and implementation of the expanded Mounted Patrol Unit which 
was inaugurated in July, 1978. 

The unit also assisted in the requisition and purchase of police patrol 
vehicles which complied with the Mayor's 1978 directive on fuel efficient auto- 



OFFICE OF THE POLICE CONWISSIONER 



STAFF SECTION 

ACTIVITIIS 

mobiles for City use. 

The unit was also responsible for the i:ontinuinR supervision of the Boston 
Police Commercial Burglar)- Project which is operating in each police district 
and seeks to assist merchants in proper sec jrity and other safeguards which can 
be employed to greatly rctlucc commercial burglary. 

Operations Unit 

The Operation's Unit of the Police Commissioner's Office, in conjunction 
with the Bureau of Field Services, monitored the performance of daily field 
operations. The unit reviewed, on an ongoing basis, the quality of service being 
rendered to the public and when adjustments or corrective action became necessary, 
the appropriate measures were taken. The Department's resource allocation plan 
was examined periodically to ensure that the plan reflected the changing needs 
of the neighborhoods and communities. Recommendations were made to the Police 
Commissioner for the development of innovative and more useful patrol operations, 
such as Directed Patrol and Team Policing to respond to the increasing service 
demands of the community. 

The Operations Unit was also responsible for directing the activities of the 
Community Disorders Unit (CDU) . This unit, under direct suiicrvision of the 
Operations Unit, monitored, coordinated, (>valuated and planjied strategies to 
effectively prevent, investigate, and reduce the impact of community disorders 
on the neighborhoods and its citizens. Tlie CDU developed a close working rela- 
tionship with State and Federal Law Enfor:ement agencies in order to seek their 
cooperation when citizens were deprived of their access to nove about the City 
frecl}- or when their right to live peacef jlly and safely was jeopardized by acts 
of th'-eats, harassment, or violence. 

Confidential Secretan- 



Xjring the fiscal /ear, the Informations Ser\^ices Unit handled 201 requests 
for tjurs of police facilities. Tlie unit arranged 169 sperking engagements, 4.S 
canin? demonstrations, 10 Nfounted Patrol appearances and 51 Stop Rape prograris. 
The staff prepared 107 press releases to 156 recipients; and over 577 news 
reports were called into local and national news outlets, radio stations and 
daily newspapers. Tlie unit handled an average of 500 tele])hone inquiries pe - 
week. 

The unit arranged 5 badge presentation ceremonies for retired police officers; 
10 promotional and installment ceremonies were also arranged. The unit coorlinated 
award presentations by the Police Commissioner, as well as 55 interviews and 20 
appearances. Tlie News Media Liaison Officer responded to the scenes of all 
majo" incidents where the news media was present and briefed them on the situation. 
Tlie unit handled over ""50 requests from all over the world for Boston Police 
shoulder patches. New brochures published by the Department included and up- 
dated report to the coinmunity. 



:e of the police commissioner 



L'J^OR RELATIONS 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Labor Relations Section represents the Police Commis^noner at employee 
collective bargaining negotiations, conferences, and grievance discussions. This 
Section assisted in the development of policies regarding labor relations negotia- 
tions, and advises the Command Staff to ensure compliance with the provisions of 
the various collective bargaining agreements. IVhenever possible, the Section 
works to resolve grievances at the imit or district level. The five separate 
employee organizations throughout the Department are the Boston Police Patrolmen's 
Association, the Boston Police Superior Officers Federation, the American Federa- 
tion of State, City, and Municiple Employees, the Service Employees International 
Union, and the Boston Police School Traffic Supervisors Association. 

PERSONNIiL 
Superintendent 1 

Civilian 1_ 

2 Total Personnel 

ACTIVITIES 

In the past year, the Labor Relations Section has prepared and dissemina':ed 
grievance and arbitration decisions in the form of Department Orders. This is done 
to provide information and guidance to al personnel, and to encourage contra';t 
adherence. Decisions upholding manageria preogatives whicli are protected by the 
Agreenent were also disseminated through Department Orders. 

]n addition, the Section has maintained a close liaison with the Office of 
Labor Relations at City Hall, and attended all labor relations meetings, conferen- 
ces, etc., that related to the Department's interests. The Section processed em- 
ployee grievances, formally and informally', and responded to inquiries from person- 
nel on labor related mat.ters. 

The number of formal grievances that were processed from July 1, 1977 through 
June sO, 1978 are as follows: 



Commissionei-'s 








State Labor 




level 


Ci 


ty level 
81 


Arbitration 
65 


Commission 


B.P.P.A. 


110 


49 


B.P.S.O.F. 


37 




35 


10 


1 




AFSQ'E 


13 




8 


1 


4 


S.E.l.U. 


10 




8 


6 






In addition, there were twenty cont 'act negotiation sixssions with the virions 
employee organizations. 



^FICE OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 



LEGAL AFFAIRS OFFICE 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Legal Affairs Office maintains liaison with the City Law Department, 
other criminal justice agencies, and local bar associations, encouraging tlieir 
participation in the development of responses to the legal problems of the police. 
It formulates legislative programs and participates in the legislative process. 
It prepares and reviews contracts and agreements, prepares legal opinions and 
provides the Police Commissioner with a legal perspective on policy matters. 
Legal Affairs personnel assist in the development of law related training 
programs and bulletins and provide legal advise and guidance to sworn members 
concerning arrests, warrants, searches, and other legal problems. 



PERSONNEL 

Special Assistant Corporation Counsel (Legal Advisor) 1 

Secretary 1 

Law Student Interns 2 



4 Total 



ACTIVITIES 

During the fiscal year, the Legal Advisor represented the Department in State 
District Courts, Superio"^ Court, Appeals Court, Supreme Judicial Court, Federal 
District Court, and the U.S. Court of Appeals. The Legal Advisor prepared nuirer- 
ous le.^al opinions for tlie Police Commissioner and other meirbers of the Commard 
Staff, drafted Commissioner's Memoranda on new legislation and other developirients 
affecting police operations and drafted several new Department regulations. The 
Legal Advisor also responded to all requests for access to I apartment records 
brought under the Freedom of Information j*ct. 

The Legal Advisor is also the Police Commissioner's de5ignee to the Criminal 
History Systems Board and the Security anc'. Privacy Council. The Board and th(> 
Council were established by state statute in 1973, to regulate all agencies in 
Massachusetts which maintain criminal record information. The Board | also regulates 
the collection, maintenance, access to and dissemination of criminal records infor- 
matiop and is establishing a computerized record system. 



E OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 



SPECIAL INVESTIGATIONS UNIT 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Special Investigations LFnit is responsible for providing the Police Com- 
missioner with complete and accurate information on the maintenance of integrity 
in the Department. It seeks out information regarding corruption in the Depart- 
ment, investigates thoroughly and aggressively all instances in which a member is 
reported or suspected of having accepted a bribe or of other involvement in crim- 
inal activity, and reports its findings to the Commissioner. It also monitors the 
efforts and effectiveness of all police commanders to combat corruption, looks for 
weaknesses in the Department that may encourage its exi^tance, and makes appropriate 
recommendations to the Commissioner. The ultimate mission of this Unit is to re- 
duce, and wlien possible, eliminate police corruption and the potential sources of 
corruption. 



PERSONNEL 

Lieutenant Detectives 1 

Sergeant Detectives 2 

Detectives 2 

Civilian L 



6 Total Personnel 



. ACTIVITIES 

Tactical Intelligence Products 

The Special Investigations Unit has disseminated l,48r> tactical counter- cor- 
ruption intelligence products related to Alcohol Law Violations, Illegal Sexual 
Activities, Gambling Activities, and Organized Crime Activities to the Polici,^ 
Commissioner, his staff, Area Field Commanders, Investigative Units and Internal 
Control Units. 

Strategic Intelligence Products I 

Tlie Unit has disseminated 12 strategic counter-corruption intelligence pro- 
ducts related to city wide Alcohol Law Violations, Illegal Sexual Activities, 
Gambling Activities, Narcotic Law Violations, and Organized Crime Activities to the 
Police Commissioner for use in policy planning and modification. 

Tlie Unit also engaged in 6 counter-corruption special projects ordered by the 
Police Commissioner. 



TFICE OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 



MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET SECTION 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Management and Budget Section is responsible for budgeting, auditing and 
analysis of all Department programs. It also operates data processing systems 
prepares statistical reports, seeks to ensure accuracy of official reports and're- 
cords and works to develop improved management systems. This Section is divided 
into four sub-sections, each having a specific responsibility. 

Auditing and Finance Section 

This section prepares the Department budget, monitors expenditures, audits 
all vouchers paid by the Department, encumbers all accounts and appropriations, 
and initiates and processes orders for payment. 

Purchasing and Inventory Section 

This Section coordinates the acquisition, inventory, and disposition of 
Department property. 

Systems Analysis and Programming Section 

This Section is responsible for analysis, design, prograjraning and implementa- 
tion of all computer systems. 

Data Processing Section 

This Section maintains the computer systems to provide management information 
and controls. This Section is composed of four units: 

1- The Computer Operations Unit uses computers to maintain files and produce 
reports responsive to the informational needs of the D(^partment. It is a 24- 
hour, seven day per week operation and is available to street officers via 
on-line terminals in the Operations Section, 

2- The Field Reports Unit reviews, codes, routes, and prepares data received from 
other units for the data collection units. 

The Data Collection Unit keypunches ;md verifies all documents necessary for 
maintaining computer files and delivers its output to the computer facility. 

The Data Control Unit disseminates computer produced reports for internal use 
in or from crime reporting and other governmental agencies. It is also respon- 
sible for all computer library maintenance, computer run preparation, schedul- 
ing and error correction. 



3. 



PERSONNEL 



Director 
Lieutenant 
Sergeants 
Police Officers 
Civilians 



1 
1 

2 

4 

48 

56 Total Personnel 



E OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 



MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET SECTION 
ACTIVITIES 

Auditing and Finance Section 

This section prepared the Annual Budget for presentation to the Mayor. It 
audited all vouchers paid by the Department and it also handled and completed all 
medical payments for officers injured on-duty. 

Purchasing and Inventory Section 

This Section processed all requisitions and service orders. After materials 
had been received, or work performed, this Section authorized payment. A stockroom 
clerk distributed all office and custodial supplies and stored all lost, stolen, 
and abandoned property turned in by the various districts and units. 

Systems Analysis and Programming Section 

This Section maintained all data processing systems for the Department. It 
handled 800 programs for over 20 applications, the major applications being Field 
Incident Reporting, Computer Aided Dispatching, Arrest Reporting, Budget and Inven- 
tory, Stolen Vehicles and Wanted Persons. The Section processed all requests for 
information, and designed and implemented any new programs, as were necessary. 

Data Processing Section 

The Data Processing Section provided management support and overall super- 
vision to coordinate the tasks performed by the sub-units, and created a workflow 
for accomplishing the responsibilities for the Section. The activities for the 
sub-units were as follows: 

Computer Operations Unit - It is the responsibility for this unit to maintain 
and operate two computer systems. The first system consists of two Data Gen- 
eral Eclipse S2000 mini -computers with peripheral printers, disk drives, and 
magnetic tape units. This system is dedicated to an on-line Computer Aided 
Dispatch System in the Operations Division. It operates in a fail-safe atti- 
tude for maximum up- time. The second computer is an [BM System 3, Model 10 
computer consisting of a computer, disk drive, dual density tape driver, card 
reader and line printer. This computer system is a remote communication de- 
vise used in time sharing on an IBM 370, Model 158 computer located in Boston 
City Hall. All Boston Police batch processing is done on this system. The 
Unit produced daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly reports for crime analysis, 
resource allocation, personnel, inventory, payroll and Uniform Crime Reports. 
Selective analysis reports in incident, arrest, and personnel categories were 
available upon request. A seven terminal information network in an on-line 
remote environment from the City Hall computer is maintained. This communi- 
cation capability allows message switching on a naticinal level through the 
National Law Enforcement Teletype Service and automated data searching through 
the National Crime Information Center. I 

Field Reports Unit - This unit is divided into two groups; the Field Reports 
group and the Insurance Reports group. The Field Re])orts group prepared all 
documents submitted by the field forces for computer processing. Preparation 
consists of editing, correcting and selecting specific data from the documents. 
The selected data is color highlighted for processing by the Data Collection 
Unit. All documents, after preparation for processing, are filed permanently 

8 



hCE OF THE POLICE COMMISSIONER 



MANAGEMENT AND PUEXlET SEfTION 
ACTIVITIES 



in the Field Reports area. The Insurance Reports group provides requested 
copies of all records filed by the Field Reports group. Records arc re- 
searched and distributed in accordance with the Public Record Law and the 
Criminal Record Information Act. 

Data Collection Unit - This Unit converts the data selected for computer 
processing by the Field Reports Unit into machine readable data that can be 
used as input for the System 3 computer. This process, commonly known as 
keypunching, is done first by recording the data on a disk, using an IBM 3742 
Data Recorder machine and then by comi)iling the separate disks on magnetic 
tape, using an IBM 3747 Data Converter. The data tape is then ready for 
computer processing. 

Data Control Unit - This Unit assisted the Computer Operations Unit by main- 
taining magnetic tape files, program documentations, and such card files as 
are presently used. It also compiled various types of statistics for analysis 
and distribution. 



Detectives 



Bureau 
of 




Investigative 
Services 

Tlie Bureau of Investigative Services evaluates police per- 
formance and investigates complaints against Department 
personnel. A legal section supplies advise on possible violations in 
the Department Rules and Regulations. External inquiries are 
provided by the Bureau in the form of specialized criminal 
investigations. The Bureau also provides management studies and 
nformation through a Planning and Research Division. 



10 



\UREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Criminal Investigative Division is responsible for developing information 
on, as well as the investigation of, criminal activity in the City. The Division 
is divided into four sections, each having specific responsibilities. 

Intelligence Section 

The Intelligence Section keeps the Police Commissioner informed of suspected 
organized crime members and of any known or suspected groups or individuals who 
are associated with radical or militant organizations. 

Vice Control Sectiqn 

The Vice Control Section provides specialized assistance to area and district 
commanders for control of illegal gaming, liquor law violations, prostitution 
and related crimes. It also investigates and reports attempts by criminal organi- 
zations to gain control of licensed establishments or businesses. 

Organized Crime Section 

The Organized Crime Section conducts investigations of organized criminal 
activity for the purpose of court prosecution when warranted. In addition, liai- 
son is maintained with other governmental agencies and confidential records and 
files are kept. 

Central Investigative Section 

The Central Investigative Section is conprised of four units, each handling 
specialized criminal investigations. Each unit and its specific responsibility 
is as follows; 

Drug Control Unit - This unit is responsible for city-wide enforcement of the 

Massachusetts Controlled Substance Act, development and implementation of drug 

related public education programs, and liaison with public and private organi- 
zations involved in prevention and control of drug abuse. 

Homicide Unit - This unit investigates and prepares cases for Grand Jury pre- 
sentation on all homicides, suspicious deaths, serious assaults, and battered 
child cases, in which the victim is in danger of death. The unit also investi- 
gates the sudden death of infants on the recommendations of the Medical 
Examiner . 

General Investigative Unit - This unit is responsible for city-wide investiga- 
tions ot crime against persons and property, such as robbery, crimes against 
banking institutions and retail stores, fradulent and larcenous schemes, con- 
sumer fraud, automotive thefts and other crimes. The unit supplements other 
Central Investigative Section units, when required, by conducting surveillances, 
investigations and related duties. 

Rape Investigation Unit - This unit is responsible for the coordination and 
supervision ot all Department investigations concerning rape and sex crimes, 
techniques, standardized reporting and crime analysis, and investigates methods 
of operation by rapists. The unit also maintains a continuous liaison with 
agencies involved in medical and psychological aid to victims, and other 
agencies, as necessary. 



11 



EAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION 



PERSONNEL 



Deputy Superintendent 

Lieutenants 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



1 

3 
13 

1 
59 

6 
_5 
88 



(2 Detailed) 
(5 Detailed) 

Total Personnel 



ACTIVITIES 



I ntelligence Section 

The activities for the fiscal year included the processing of 20,997 Field 
Interrogation/Observation reports, 289 meetings with State and Federal authorities, 
63 investigations of dissident groups, and 196 investigations of known criminals. 
The Intelligence Section rendered assistance to State and Federal authorities on 
408 separate occasions. These activities resulted in the submission of 114 special 
reports to the Police Commissioner. 

Vice Control Section 

The Vice Control Section made over 1,500 arrests and were issued 175 search 
warrants during the fiscal year. Of the total arrests made, 931 were for vice 
offenses, and 301 were for illegal gaming. These arrests resulted in over 3,000 
separate court appearances by Vice Control personnel. 

Organized Crime Section 

This section submitted 2,170 Field Interrogation/Observation reports concern- 
ing organized crime figures and other criminals. Assistance was rendered to the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation on 504 occasions, to the Alcohol, Tobacco, and 
Firearm Bureau on 167 occasions, and to the U.S. State Department on 177 occasions. 
The Organized Crime Section also assisted the Attorney General's Office 248 times, 
and assisted other police departments and agencies on over 1,000 separate occasions 
The section spent over 580 hours in court, made 28 arrests, and submitted 1,020 
special reports on organized crime members and other criminals to the Police 
Commissioner. 

Central Investigative Section 

Due to the distinct and separate functions of each unit within the Central 
Investigative Section, the activities of each unit are reported individually. 

The Drug Control Unit submitted 617 Field Interrogation/Observation reports, 
initiated 658 investigations and completed 640 of them. The Unit was issued 
217 search warrants, resulting in 248 arrests. The Drug Control Unit 
provided assistance to outside agencies in 41 investigations. As a result 
of the unit's investigations, the unit made a total of 589 arrests during 
the fiscal year, 540 of them were for narcotics violations. In compliance 

12 



BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE DIVISION 

with the responsibilities of the Unit, Drug Control personnel gave 64 
drug lectures and displays to help educate the public concerning the use 
and abuse of drugs. 

The Homicide Unit recorded a total of 85 homicides during the fiscal year, 
57 of them having been cleared by arrest. The remaining 28 homicides are 
still under investigation. There is no statute of limitations for the crime 
of murder, so these 28 homicides can remain under investigation, theoretically, 
forever. The Unit also investigated 52 related cases, including suicides, 
accidental deaths, assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon, and 
investigations initiated by the Medical Examiner. The Unit has been working 
in conjunction with the Boston Fire Department's Arson Squad regarding the 
deliberate burning of buildings in which lives were lost. 

The General Investigative Unit is comprised of seven squads, each dealing 
with a specific type of criminal activity. The individual squads and their 
yearly activities are as follows: 

The Auto Squad investigated 550 cases during the fiscal year, 330 of them 
having been cleared by arrest and the remaining 220 pending investigation. 
The Unit made 54 arrests, 100 separate court appearances, and filed 65 
Field Interrogation/Observation reports. The Unit uncovered one of the 
largest commercial motor vehicle theft rings, resulting in the arrest of 
six persons and in the recovery of many of the stolen vehicles. 

The Burglary Squad investigated 950 cases, which resulted in 392 arrests 
for breaking and entering into both commercial and residential properties. 
Arrests were also made for murder, rape, armed robber)', and unarmed 
robbery. The Unit made 500 separate court appearances, received 750 
complaints, and sought and executed 94 warrants of search and arrest. 
The Unit continued with sur\^eillance of areas with especially high fre- 
quencies of breaking and entering. This includes the designated target 
areas of Districts One and Four. 

The Fugitive Squad worked in conjunction with other legal jurisdictions 
in the matter of persons wanted by these jurisdictions. The Unit conducted 
811 rendition and extradition investigations. Thus far 691 cases have 
been completed, the remainder are pending investigation. The investiga- 
tions resulted in the apprehension and successful processing of 21 felons. 
The Unit made a total of 190 court appearances. 

The Arson Squad investigated 444 cases of arson or fires of a suspicious 
nature, in cooperation with the Boston Fire Department. The activities of 
the Unit also included the clearance of 120 cases, 210 court appearances, 
556 interviews of victims, witnesses, or suspects, and 46 arrests and 
prosecution for arson and related offenses. Approximately thirty percent 
(301) of the Unit's activities were spent in surveillance of the areas of 
the City with a high frequency of arson. These areas are the Back Bay, 
Brighton, Dorchester, South Boston and Roxbury. Many arson. cases can not 
be prosecuted due to the fact that the perpetrators have not yet reached 
the age of legal responsibility [Age 7) . 

The Fraud Squad conducted 84 fraud investigations, clearing 71 of these 
cases. A total of 23 felons were arrested and prosecuted during the fiscal 
year. Victims of the fraud schemes received a total of $29,000 in restitu- 
tion from the courts. The Unit's other activities included the clearance of 
28 cases of fraud for other law enforcement agencies, 78 court appearances, 
and they received 51 warrants. 



B1'£AU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



CRIMINAL WvTSTIGATIVE DIVISION 

The Bank Squad handled 235 cases of larceny and fraudulent check schemos, 
completing 219 of these cases. The remaining 16 cases are still under 
investigation. The efforts of the Bank Squad resulted in the arrest and 
successful prosecution of 98 felons. In cases involving more than one 
police district, the Bank Squad presents the case to the Grand Jury, thus 
relieving the detectives at the district level. The Bank Squad also 
assisted all detectives in the various districts, alerting them to the 
current schemes being perpetrated. The Squad made a total of 160 court 
appearances . 

The Rape Investigation Unit reported that there were 444 rapes during the 
fiscal year. This constituted a 9.71 increase over the number of rapes during 
the previous year. The Unit analyzed, tabulated, and filed each incoming rape 
report on a da^y basis. The Unit worked in conjunction with the Informational 
Services Unit of the Commissioner's Office in presenting the "Stop Rape 
Program". This lecture series was designed to help reduce a woman's chances 
of becoming a potential rape victim. The program was presented throughout 
the City at the request of business, educational, and medical institutions, as 
well as social groups and community organizations. The Unit also maintained 
liaison with other agencies concerning rape, such as the Mayor's Task Force on 
Rape, the Massachusetts Hospital Association, and other law enforcement agen- 
cies throughout the Commonwealth. 



14 



BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERIVCES 



INTERNAL AFFAIRS DIVISION 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Internal Affairs Division is responsible for supervising the discipli- j 
nary processes of the Department to ensure that they are both fair and construe- 1 
tive in nature. The Division thoroughly investigates, or causes to be investigated 
all reports of allegations of police misconduct, and makes appropriate recommenda- 
tions to the Police Commissioner. The Division also reviews complaint data as to 
type and source, and recommends training programs or changes in procedure to reduce 
the causes and frequency of complaints. 

PERSONNEL 
I 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Lieutenant Detective 1 

Sergeant Detective 2 

Sergeant 1 

Detectives 2 

Civilians _2 

9 Total Personnel 

ACTIVITIES 

All Complaints received by the Internal Affairs Division were catalogued, 
filed by number, name of complainant, name of police employee, and the District 
or Unit involved. During the fiscal year, the Division investigated 127 formal 
complaints. Of the total formal complaints, 106 were lodged against sworn officers 
and 21 were against civilian employees. Formal complaints are tho'^e which result 
in recommendations deduced from the conclusions developed during the course of 
the investigation. Upon completion of the investigation the complainant is for- 
mally notified by a communication from the Police Commissioner of the results of 
the investigation pertaining to his/her complaint. The current status of the 127 
formal complaints is as follows: 

Resolved 104 

Pending 23 

127 Total Formal Complaints 

In addition to the Formal Complaints, the Division received 213 other com- 
plaints, which due to their superficiality, or shallow nature, did not require 
an extended investigation. The cases were processed in a conciliatory manner 
and satisfactorily resolved by the Division. These complaints were classified 
in the following manner: 

Miscellaneous Complaints 100 

Use of Force Complaints 84 

Court Complaints 29 

.1^ 



r-AU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 

INTERNA]. AFFAIRS DIVISION 

ACTIVITIES 

In accordance with Boston Police Rules and Regulations, #303, Section 13, 
"Deadly Force", it is incumbent upon the personnel of the Division to participate 
in the investigation of a person wounded or killed as a result of the application 
of deadly force by a member of the Department, Consequently, the Internal Affairs 
Division has set up a separate report and filing system captioned "F.D.R.B." 
(Firearm Discharge Review Board) . 

Each case is numbered consecutively and all reports and information pertain- 
ing to each investigation is filed for future reference. This becomes a separate 
entity from those incidents and complaints previously reported. In the fiscal 
year, the Internal Affairs Division investigated 35 F.D.R.B. cases. 

During the past year. Rule #109, of the Department Rules and Regulations, 
"Discipline Procedures", was put into effect. As a result, the Internal Affairs 
Division, in compliance with this rule, distributed pre-numbered Complaint 
Control Forms (BPD Form #1920) to the Districts and Units of the Department. 
The Division has initiated and is maintaining a log of all Complaint Control 
Forms that have been issued, and a file of all Complaint Control Forms received 
from the various Districts and Units, in which complaints were made and/or 
received against police department personnel. 



16 



BURtAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



STAFF INSPECTION DIVISION 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Staff Inspection Division is responsible for evaluating the level of 
performance of the Units, Districts, and Divisions of the Department, with par- 
ticular emphasis on their efforts to attain departmental goals and assist in the 
development of performance standards. It also reviews rules and orders as to 
their adequacy and to which they are complied with throughout the Department. 

Field Inspection Unit 

The Field Inspection Unit personnel of the Staff Inspection Division are 
responsible for insuring the prompt and efficient pulice response to calls to 
the Department's emergency number 911 and the effectiveness of police enforce- 
ment activities. 



PERSONNEL 



Captains 
Lieutenants 
Sergeants 
Police Officers 
Civilian 



3 (1 Ccanmanding) 

5 

1 

1 
J. 
11 Total Personnel 



ACTIVITIES 



The Staff Inspection Division investigated many diverse complaints involving 
police personnel in procedural infractions. A total of 172 cases were investiga- 
ted throughout the year. Upon completion of these investigations recommendations 
were submitted to the Police Commissioner. 

The Division monitored and documented the usage of sick leave by Department 
personnel to identify and investigate sick leave abuse. Random visits were made 
to the homes of officers on sick leave to verify their illness or injury. 

The Division conducted monthly visits to each District and Unit to insure 
compliance with all written directives of the Command Staff. Gun and Drug lockers 
were inspected to insure proper security and inventory control practices of these 
lockers. Department vehicles were inspected to guarantee that the vehicles were 
equipped and kept clean. Walkie -Talkies were also inspected to insure proper 
working order and inventor)' control. The Division conducted roll calls at the 
Districts and Units. The Officers were inspected for their appearance and their 
equipment . 

All private towing companies that applied for towing contracts with the 
Department were investigated to assure; (1) that the facilities of the company 
had the space available to accomodate towed vehicles, (2) that the company had 
been properly licensed by the Department of Public Utilities, and (3) that the 
equipment and security of the company proved adequate. Tlie Staff Inspection 
Division also monitored monthly towing assignments to insure that each towing 
company received these assignments on an equal basis. 



lEAU OF INVESTJGATIVE SERVICES 



STAFF INSPECTION DIVISION 

ACTIVITIES 

The Staff Inspection Division processed the 911 Survey Cards each month. 
This system is utilized by the Department to determine the public's satisfaction 
or dissatisfaction with police services rendered to them, and how the Department 
may improve upon its sendees. A monthly report was filed that reflected the 
comments and responses of the public with the Police Commissioner. 

Field Inspection Unit 

The Field Inspection Unit personnel monitored the responses of Patrol Super- 
visors to various calls on each District. Complainants were interviewed on the 
scene to ascertain if the response unit arrived promptly and proper action was 
taken. 

The Field Inspection Unit also monitored the Operations Division on selected 
tours of duty to insure that calls received on emergency number 911 were handled 
efficiently and quickly and that the response units were clearing the calls with- 
out undue delay. 



18 



BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH DIVISION 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Planning and Research Division is responsible for researching operational 
and administrative problems in the Department and assisting affected units in devel- 
oping effective response to those problems. It works closely with other units in 
preparing long-range and contingency plans and is responsible for forms control. 
This Division is composed of five sections, each with certain responsibilities. 

Written Directives Section 

This section is responsible for preparing Rules and Regulations, Special 
Orders, Commissioner's Memoranda, and Circulars as directed by the Police Commis- 
sioner. 

Administrative Analysis Section 

This section researches problems that arise pertaining to the administration 
of the Department and develops thorough objective reports detailing the findings 
of such studies. 

Crime Patterns and Trends Section 

This section gathers and analyzes data relating to specific target crimes, 
identifies patterns and trends of use to field officers and commanders, disseminates i 
such information to concerned units throughout the Department. 

Graphic Arts Section 

This section prepares illustrations, graphic layouts, crime scene sketches 
and other art work as required by the various units and divisions of the Department. 

Grants Management Section 

This section establishes and maintains liaison with potential and actual 
funding sources and supervises development and implementation of grant proposals. 



PERSONNEL 



Director 
Sergeant 
Police Officers 
Civilians 



1 

1 
4 

_1_ 

13 Total Personnel 



ACTIVITIES 



Written Directives Section 

The activities of this section include the promulgation of the following 
written directives as directed by the Police Commissioner: 



19 



Bl£AU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH DIVISION 

Special Orders j^26 

Commissioner's Memoranda 119 

Circulars 30 

Rules and Regulations 4 

279 Total Directives 
The topics of the newly issued Rules and Regulations are as follows: 
Rule and Regulation #109 Discipline Procedures 
Rule and Regulation #306A Badges, Identification Cards 
Rule and Regulation #314 Traffic Enforcement 
Rule and Regualtion #400 Special Officers 

Administrative Analysis Section 

This section worked on a variety of special projects, as well as the daily 
routine activities. These activities included the following: 

1. Designing and printing ->f 97 numbe:3d department forms 

2. Revision and printing of 38 numbered department forms 

3. Response issued to over 320 letters of request, questionnaires, surveys, 
etc., received from various police departments, agencies or citizens from 
around the country 

4. Response issued to over 3,100 walk- in/telephone requests for service 
received from members of the department or outside agencies 

5. Compilation of a reference catalog of staff studies completed by police 
planning and research divisions across the nation 

6. Completed a research project on Directed Deterrent Patrol in preparation 
for a grant proposal 

7. Conducted a survey and preliminary study of One-man versus Two-man Vehicle 
Patrol in the United States 

8. Completed a crime and service call analysis project for Team Policing im- 
plementation in District Two. 

9. Conducted research into Auxiliary Police programs existing in the United 
States 

10. Compiled a Police Dispatcher's Manual 

11. Compiled a 911 Operator's Manual 

12. Conducted a survey on Intelligence Operations of selected law enforcement 
agencies nationwide 1 

13. Conducted preliminary research into a new departmental Alert Mobilization 
Plan 

14. Compiled a manual of Boston Police Planning and Research Division capabili- 
ties, role, and function 

15. Conducted a nationwide survey of Automated Crime Analysis systems 

16. Collaborated with the Northeastern University Center for Applied Social 
Research in their study of the effects of the Bartley-Fox Gun Law 



BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 



PLANNING AND RESEARCH DIVISION 



17. In conjunction with the Department's Systems and Data Processing Section, 
began development of an automated Crime Patterns and Trend Analysis capa- 
bility for the Boston Police Department 

18. Conducted Juvenile Arrest Data Analysis Project for the City of Boston's 
Youth Activities Commission 

Crime Patterns and Trends Section 

During the fiscal year this section gathered and analyzed data on a number of 
target crimes. This analysis has resulted in the dissemination of thirty-seven 
Crime Bulletins for the following crimes: 



Commercial Burglary 

Rape 

Residential Breaking and Entering 

Handbag Snap 

Unarmed Robbery 

Auto Theft 

Armed Robbery 

Follow-up Crime Bulletin 



18 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 



_5 

37 Total Bulletins 
This section also disseminated a Total Area Crime Bulletin for District 14. 

Graphic Arts Section 

This section worked on over 400 projects during the fiscal year. These 
projects included suspect drawings, crime scene sketches for court presentation, 
illustrations for Department publications, graphic design and layouts and other 
art work as required. 

Grants Management Section 

This section worked on a number of grant related projects during the year. 
These projects included: 

1. Proposal for a C.E.T.A. Planning Unit 

2. Proposal for C.E.T.A. Elderly Specialist 

3. Team Police research for a grant for Team Policing in Charlestown 

4. Directed Patrol 



21 




!lcotiiT 1ft/y^Nq1tAR 




search Warrants '^^K, 

Motor Vehicle Searches ^j>* 
Searches ,nc,<fe„, To A,,^^, 









Bureau 
of 

Administrative 
Services 

The Bureau of Administrative Services is responsible for 
providing services to support the field activities of the 
Department. Divisions and sections of a supportive nature are 
organized under this bureau with a general mandate to arrange 
the availability of their resources to meet the needs of the 
Department and the public in the most effective manner possible. 



22 



BUREAU OF AEMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Personnel Division is responsible for the administration of the Depart- 
ment's personnel system. It develops standards and policies for all personnel 
actions, including establishment of job specifications, recruitment, selection and 
promotion, transfer, discipline, leaves and retirement, and monitors all personnel 
activities. The Division coordinates processing of all new employees, conducts 
background investigations, processes all personnel actions affecting existing 
personnel, and maintains central personnel files. It supervises the medical pro- 
gram of the Department, the Stress Program, and related personnel services activities, 
It provides liaison with City personnel services and the Massachusetts Division of 
Personnel Administration. The Division includes the following sections: 

Personnel Records Section 

This section maintains personnel files and related records for all Department 
employees . 

Medically Incapacitated Section 

This section includes all sworn and civilian employees who have been absent, 
on sick or injured leave, for more than thirty calendar days. 

Suspended and Extended Leave Section 

This section includes all sworn and civilian employees on suspension or extend- 
ed leave for more than thirty calendar days. 

Personnel Processing Section 

This section processes all appointments, transfers, and promotions. 

PERSONNEL 

Director 1 

Sergeant 1 

Police Officers 6 

Police chap 1 ins 2 

Civilians 8 

18 Total Personnel 

ACTIVITIES 

f 
During the fiscal year, the Medically Incapacitated Section arranged physical 
examinations for a.U civilian and sworn personnel, including pre-employment and 
pre -promotional physicals, and examinations subsequent to illness or injur>^ The 
section maintained all personnel medical records, brought them up to date regularly, 
and supplied these records to the Boston Retirement Board upon request. These 
records were also made available to others that required thejn, upon permission of the 
individual employee. 



IREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



PERSONNEL DIVISION 

ACTIVITIES 

The Processing Section processed over one hundred civilian employees hired 
over the past year. Background investigations were undertaken and Department forms 
completed. In addition to orienting the new employees, the Processing Section dealt 
with all the actions affecting the allocations of manpower within the Department, 
such as transfers, requests for re-assignment, applications for open positions, 
resignations and retirements. 

The Personnel Division was responsible for the compilation, dissemination, 
and selection process of vacant positions and job openings. These were posted regu- 
larly and applications were taken for both sworn and civilian positions. The 
Division planned and administered selected portions of promotional examinations for 
selected sworn and Civilian positions. This was done under the guidance of the 
Massachusetts Division of Personnel Administration. 

Assessment centers for prospective Lieutenants and Sergeants took place in 
September and October, 1977. These seminars included simulated written tests and 
lecture periods. During December, 1977, and January, 1978, career interviews were 
set up so that the interviewers could get a clearer understanding of the personality 
of each officer. 

Recruitment selection began in January, 1977, with an added interest in the 
area colleges. Neighborhood representation was also an intregral part of the 
recruitment process. An ultimate goal of the Department is to have every neighbor- 
hood in the City of Boston represented by at least one police officer. In January, 
1978, the Department was brought one step closer to that goal. 

Tlie Personnel Division administers the Comprehensive Employment and Training 
Act (CETA) within the Department. The Environmental Ordinance Enforcement Unit, 
begun in August, 1977, enforces City Ordinances that have been continually broken 
in the past. These civilian employees have greatly alleviated the problems of stray 
dogs, dog foul, and trash and rubbish complaints. Al'^o through CETA, nearly forty 
additional Police Clerks and Typists have been placed in the district stations, thus 
freeing more police officers for street duty. 

Great emphasis was placed on recruiting minorities for the 1978 Police Exam. 
The end result was that the minoTity percentage that took the exam was identical to 
the minority percentages of the City. This was the highest number of minorities 
that have ever taken the Police Exam. 

In November and December, 1977, the Department hired 126 permanent Police 
Officers, including 64 minorities. On February 28, 1978, 13 Sergeants were pro- 
moted to the grade of Lieutenant, and on March 14, 1978, two Lieutenants were 
promoted to the rank of Captain. 

A new program, entitled Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention was begun in 
November, 1977. This program, run by police officers who are trained at the Boston 
University School of Medicine, is the first of its kind in the countp^. These 
officers, while on the job, teach co-workers the importance of keeping track of 
high blood pressure, as well as having a well defined diet. Once a month these 
officers are trained in special areas having to do with cardiovascular disease. 
They, in turn, teach other police officers what they have learned, with the hope 
that an end will eventually come to all heart attacks and hypertension within the 
ranks of the Department. 



BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



SERVICES DIVISION 
RESPONSIBILITIES 



The Services Division prepares the Department budget and administers the 
Office of the Chief Clerk which is responsible for receiving, recording, and 
transmitting to the City Treasurer all license fees -collected by the Department. 
The Division is divided into seven sections, each providing specific services 
to other units in the Department and/or to the public. 

Maintenance Section 

Communications Maintenance Unit installs, repairs, and maintains all 
Department communications equipment. An Engineering Unit is responsible 
for keeping abreast of technological innovations in communicating systems 
and equipment J maintaining the Operations Center and related transmitting 
and receiving equipment. 

Signal Services Unit handles installation, maintenance, repair and 
alteration of all electrical appliances, equipment, lines and related 
accessories in the Department vehicles. 

Automotive Maintenance Unit is responsible for the maintenance and repair 
of all Department vehicles. 

Building Maintenance Unit is responsible for the maintenance and repair 
of all police buildings. 

Central License Section 

The Central License Section investigates, processes and records all appli- 
cations for licenses and bicycle registrations. hTien appropriate, it also inves- 
tigates and reports upon applications for licenses and permits issued by other 
City and State agencies. 

Warrants Section 

The Warrants Section serves as a clearing house for all warrants issued 
by the courts. 

Private Detail Service Section 

The Private Detail Service Section is responsible for coordinating all 
off-duty police services rendered by members of the Department to private 
employees. The Section keeps accurate records of all private detail activity 
and is responsible for billing and processing payments received. The Section 
also administers centralized paid details for Superior Officers. 

Payroll Section 

The Payroll Section prepares and maintains accurate records and, files 
of all payroll related activities. ' 

Technical Services Section 

The Technical Services Section is responsible for obtaining, preserving, 
and analyzing physical evidence for eventual court presentation and for assisting 
in the development of techniques and procedures for effective crime scene search. 
The Section includes the Crime Laboratory Unit, the Identification and Photo- 
graphy Unit, and the Ballistics Unit. 

25 



BUEAU OF AIMNISTRA.TIVE SiRYICES 



SERVICES DIVISION 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Printing Section 

The Printing Section prints and prepares for distribution all forms, direc- 
tives, bulletins, and other official documents necessary for the efficient admin- 
istration of the Department. 

PERSONNEL 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Directors 2 

Captains 2 

Lieutenants 4 

Sergeant Detectives 2 

Sergeants 10 

Detectives 5 

Police Officers 39 

Civilians 123 

188 Total Personnel 

ACTIVITIES 

The Services Division collected a total of $953,226.64 in license fees 
during the fiscal year. These monies were transmitted to the City Treasurer 
by the Chief Clerk's Office. The Chief Clerk's Office also supervised the 
awarding of contracts with private vendors, supplying a variety of services 
to the Department. 

The Automotive Maintenance Unit serviced the Department's vehicles on a 
24 hour basis. The Unit investigated all accidents in which Department vehicles 
were involved. Purchasing, servicing, supplies and materials fvor the 498 
Department vehicles totaled over $2,000,000 during the fiscal year. 

The Communications Maintenance Unit, supervised by a civilian Director, 
installed and maintained the electronic equipment associated with the Boston 
Police radio and cable TV network. The radio network has a total of 47 transmit- 
ters, including main, stand-by, and emergency transmitters. More than 80 
satellite receivers interconnected to a repeater voting system ensured maximum 
radio coverage on all frequencies. 

The Unit serviced an elaborate recording system that permits the simultaneous 
tape recording of ninety different radio and television positions in the Operations 
Center. All emergency telephone and radio communications were recorded and the 
tapes were kept for future reference. A paging system, used to page administra- 
tive personnel, occupied a police-assigned frequency and was serviced by personnel 
assigned to the Communications Maintenance Unit. 



BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



SERVICES DIVISION 
ACTIVITIES 



All radios televisions, and associated equipment assigned to the Department 
were serviced and maintained by this Unit. Communications Maintenance is resoon- 
sible for more than thirty-two pieces of equipment, the Unit was also responsible 
for the installation of all new equipment. All of the radio maintenance personnel 
are Federal Communications Commission license holders. 

The daily activities of the Unit consisted of the repair of mobile radios 
walkie-talkies, base stations, satellite receivers, and all police radio equip- 
ment throughout the City. The Unit was also involved in the continual scrutiny 
?: ^11 frequencies, both receiving and transmitting, to assure compliance with 
the FCC rules and regulations. Presently, the Department has approximately 800 
walkie-talkies and 500 mobile radios. 

The Signal Services Unit maintained and serviced all electrical wiring and 
equipment used by the Department. It was responsible for installation and 
maintenance of more than 27 miles of coaxial cable used in the Department's 
TV network. The Unit serviced and maintained all the generators which provide 
emergency power to all Divisions in the event of electrical failure The Unit 
installed, maintained and repaired all electrical lights, lines, and equipment 
in all Department facilities. The Unit installed new coaxial cables throughout 
the City and removed those cables that were discontinued. The Unit also installed 
and maintained the taxi signs and poles and the sight-seeing poles and signs 
throughout Boston. The Unit is assigned 7 trucks, one specifically for the in- 
stallation of cables. 

• -. ?^ Payroll Section prepared, audited, and processed all payrolls. This 
included the special overtime payrolls and the Collective Bargaining compensation 
amendments under the existing contract agreements. There were a total of ninety- 
two different rates of pay within the Department. The total payroll processed 
in the Payroll Section was in excess of $53,000,000. 



77 



IREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



TRAINING AND EDUCATION DIVISION 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Training and Education Division is responsible for the development 
of Department training standards and administration of all training and educa- 
' tion programs. It is organized into four sections, each with specific respon- 
sibilities. ^ ^ 

Program Development Section 

This Section is responsible for initiating and developing new training 
programs. It prepares course prospecti, selects instructors, gathers teaching 
materials and coordinates course development which affects units in the Department. 
Program Coordinatign Section 

This Section is in charge of on-going, in-service training programs and 
includes the Registrar who is responsible for scheduling, attendance and 
testing. 

Technical Training Section 

This Section operates the police range, develops firearms standards, and 
coordinates a firearms qualification program. 

Recruit Training Section 

This Section is responsible for implementation and coordination of all 
recruit training programs and for supervising recruits throughout the recruit 
training year. 

PERSONNEL 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Captain 2 

Sergeants 7 

Police Officers g 

Civilians g 

25 Total Personnel 
ACTIVITIES 

The Training and Education Division acted to coordinate all training within 
the Department and all training requests from outside agencies. Th3 Division 
initiated programs and guided the development of course curriculum. 
Program Development Section 

This Section acted to develop training resources and materials for the De- 
partment. The Section was primarily responsible for the operation of the audio - 
^""Tt .^""l^^^^ located at District One. Tlie Section produced training tapes 
and handled all requests for video teams. 



BUREAU OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



TRAINING AND EDUCATION DIVISION 
ACTIVITIES 

Program Coordination Section 

The activities of this Section included the assignments of classrooms, 
handling daily assignments, maintaining all attendance records, developing 'test- 
ing materials and maintaining all other academic records. This Section also 
handled all in-sendce training programs. These programs included First Responder 
Training, Hostage Negotiations, Detective Forensic Science Training and other 
programs required by the Department. 

Technical Training Section 

This Section, located at the Boston Police Department Firearms Range at 
Moon Island, facilitated the firearms training for all of the training sections. 
This included training for recruits, as well as in-service training programs. 
Recruit Training Section 

During the fiscal year, this section supervised two classes of Boston Police 
Recruits. These two classes, totalling 125 men and women, are now serving their 
first year as Boston Police Officers. This Section also handled the various 
Regional Recruit Training Programs. 



29 



'/■■• 







Bureau 
of 

Field 

Services 




Boston Police Department 

"Announces the New Concept 

of Team Police for the 

Meeting House Hill Area." 

We tnvIM lk« Communltv «o ii>«»< 

Hm ■»» comnMiHiina oltkcr. SflL Edwari! 

r. Connolly ami hto (Mm o( 12 offlc«»«. 

The«< oHlcera will b« at SI. P«l«i» achocl 

yard on Jaly 2»tli ttom 6:C« ■ B:30 p.rn 

Tfcey ara anxloiia to make - '- 

tancc and aarve yowT co 
paraancnt baala. 
Alao coaia ae* tha toUowl 
K-9 UnK Danor 
Crime Preventlt 
Stop Rape 
Mounted 
Drug Control • 
SWAT 

Police CommUalor 
Invitca you and yr 
the dcmonatratlc 
creaM lor the cb*' 



The Bureau of Field Services has primary responsibility for 
delivery of effective and efficient police services to the 
community. The bureau is responsible for providing general 
police services throughout the City, and is divided into eight 
divisions. 



30 



BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 

The Bureau of Field Services has primary responsibility for delivery of 
effective and efficient police services to the community. This bureau is 
responsible for providing general police services throughout the City, and is 
divided into eight divisions. 

Each Field Services division commander provides complete administrative and 
field supervision in the division under his control and is responsible for meeting 
the needs of citizens in the area and for the accurate interpretation and imple- 
mentation of Department rules and policies in the districts and units for which 
he is responsible. Each district is responsible for all police services within 
the district boundaries except those that are specifically assigned to other 
units in the Department. District personnel are responsible for providing the 
best possible police service to their communities; and they cooperate fully with 
specialized units in seeking new ways to improve the overall effectiveness of 
police operations in the district. Each district maintains a patrol force 
sufficient in size to provide around-the-clock coverage, and each contains its 
own administrative, supervisory, and command personnel. 

TEAM POLICING 

Team Policing is a concept developed to bring about a change in traditional 
police operations. Its main objective is to produce a community-centered police 
structure that is responsive to different neighborhood lifestyles. This goal of 
improving police-community relations will hopefully restore a feeling of confi- 
dence by citizers in the police. 

Team Policing allows the officers assigned to each team to be responsible 
for all police services in a given geographic area. Each team, headed by a 
Team leader assumes full responsibility for the quality of police services and 
control of crime in a neighborhood. Officers not only handle 911 calls, but 
also conduct investigations and perform follow-up investigations in their area. 

Interaction between the police and community is the key to Team Policing. 
Officers are encouraged to establish relationships with residents in their area. 
Pol ice -community meetings are also used as a channel by which citizens can air 
their complaints against the type of police service being rendered. The estab- 
lishment of a referral system with local agencies has helped alleviate the non- 
police problems in the neighborhoods. 

Team Policing has been met with great success in Charlestown, Mission Hill, 
and many of the housing projects throughout the City. It has enabled the Boston 
Police Department to return law enforcement to the community and break the tradi- 
tional bonds of police service. 

I 



31 



RVU OF FIEID SERVICES 

POLICE AREA A 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

Police Area A is responsible for rendering police service in Districts Seven 
and Fifteen. This includes the neighborhoods of East Boston and Charlestown, 
respectively. 



Population 
Road Miles 
Square Miles 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 

Deputy Superintendent 1 X 

Captains 1 

Lieutenants 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



District 


1_ 


District 15 


39,900 




15,353 


39.1 




22.6 


2.871 




1.323 



Part I Crimes 
Part II Crimes 
Part III Services 

Totals 
Arrests 



4 




1 




9 


10 


6 


5 


53 


43 


25 


15 


ACTIVITIES 




2,362 


1,210 


1,789 


928 


21,343 


13,684 


25,494 


15,822 


582 


501 



32 



BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



POLICE AREA B 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



Police Area B encompasses solely District One. The neighborhoods included 
m District One are Chinatown, Beacon Hill, the North End, and Downtown Boston. 

District 1 

Population 25 843 

Rdad Miles 73 3 

Square Miles 1,369 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 



Deputy Superintendent 




1 


Captains 




1 


Lieutenant Detectives 




1 


Lieutenants 




3 


Sergeant Detectives 




1 


Sergeants 




7 


Detectives 




22 


Police Officers 




107 


Civilians 




20 


ACTIVITIES 






Part I Crimes 


12 


,059 


Part II Crimes 


4 


,268 


Part III Services 


53, 


,550 


Totals 


69, 


,877 


Arrests 


4, 


,468 



33 



U OF FIELD SERVICES 



POLICE AREA C 



RESPONSIBILITIES 

Police Area C includes District Four and Fourteen. District Four renders 
police service to the Back Bay and South End areas. District Fourteen covers 
Brighton and Allston. 

District 4 District 14 

I 

Population 66,907 63,587 

Road Miles 78.1 66.3 

Square Miles 2.434 4.446 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 



Deputy Superintendent 

Captains 

Lieutenant 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



Part I Crimes 
Part II Crimes 
Part III Services 

Totals 
Arrests 



1 


1 


1 


1 


4 


3 


1 


1 


14 


11 


21 


10 


144 


78 


25 


28 


ES 
13,098 


5,642 


4,502 


2,699 


72,835 


36,729 


89,835 


45,070 


3,345 


863 



^ 



BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



POLICE AREA D 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



Police Area D includes Districts Two and Three. District Two encompasses 
Roxbury and North Dorchester, and District Three covers the Mattapan area. 



Population 
Road Miles 
Square Miles 



District 2 


District 3 


84,926 


64,881 


137.6 


100.0 


4.349 


3.808 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 



Deputy Superintendent 

Captains 

Lieutenants 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



Part I Crimes 
Part II Crimes 
Part III Services 

Totals 
Arrests 





1 




1 




3 




1 


17 


12 


19 


8 


160 


73 


37 


22 


ACTIVITIES 




9,580 


4,631 


4,376 


1,799 


64,907 


33,887 


78,863 


40,317 


3,710 


1,182 



JiS 



AU OF FIELD SERVICES 



POLICE AREA E 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



Police Area E includes District Six and Eleven. District Six covers South 
Boston and District Eleven covers Dorchester. 



Population 
Road Miles 
Square Miles 



District 


6 


District 11 


38,488 




87,557 


44.3 




87.2 


2.369 




4.638 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 



Deputy Superintendent 

Captains 

Lieutenant 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



1 
1 

3 
1 

13 
5 

83 
30 



I 



1 
1 

2 

1 

11 

10 

105 
46 



ACTIVITIES 



Part I Crimes 
Part II Crimes 
Part III Services 

Totals 
Arrests 



2,916 

1,833 

43,779 

48,528 

691 



6,002 

3,576 
59,444 
69,022 

1,8301 



J^ 



UREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



POLICE AREA F 



RESPONSIBILITIES 



Police Area F includes District Five and Thirteen. District Five covers 
the neighborhoods of Roslindale, Hyde Park and West Roxbury. District Thirteen 
covers all of Jamaica Plain. 



Population 
Road Miles 
Square Miles 



District 


_5 


District 13 


104,703 




45,525 


185.0 




78.5 


12.492 




4.238 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 



Deputy Superintendent 

Captains 

Lieutenant 

Sergeant Detectives 

Sergeants 

Detectives 

Police Officers 

Civilians 



Part I Crimes 
Part II Crimes 
Part III Services 

Totals 
Arrests 



1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




4 


1 




1 


12 




8 


10 




8 


83 




53 


47 




23 


ACTIVITIES 






4,396 


3 


,016 


3,352 


2 


,064 


44,120 


28 


,942 


51,868 


34 


,022 


1,718 


1 


,544 , 



37 



UiAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



DIVISION G 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

PPt.n?^''i^^°?K^ u" comprised of the Tactical Patrol Force, the Mobile Operations 
Patrol and the House o£ Detention. TTie responsibilities of each of these units 
are as follows: 

Tactical Patrol Force 

The Tactical Patrol Force is comprised to two specialized units: 

Anti-Crime Unit - TTiis unit functions as a selective group concentrating on 
the reduction of street crimes and robberies throughout the City. The Unit 
supplements regular patrol, plainclothes and anti-crime forces in selected 
areas, has canine capability, and is specially equipped and trained for 
emergencies. 

Emergency Service Unit - This unit responds to all incidents likely to re- 
quire the use of special tools and equipment. It also responds to sniper 
and hostage incidents and is responsible for bomb search and disposal. 

Mobile Operations Patrol 

The Mobile Operations Patrol is the Department's motorcycle unit which is 
used for traffic enforcement, patrol, and selective tactical operations. 

Mounted Patrol Unit - ITiis unit patrols areas of the City on horseback and 
IS used for preventive patrol and traffic control as the need for and pro- 
priety of such ser'.dce is determined. 

House of Detention 

ITie House of Detention is responsible for the care and custody of all women 
prisoners until the court has disposed of their cases or until they have been 
otherwise released m accordance with the law. 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 

Captains 4 

Lieutenants X 

Sergeants j^g 

Police Officers 179 

Civilians 95 



299 Total Personnel 



.^S_ 



UREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 
I 



DIVISION G 

ACTIVITIES 
Tactical Patrol Force 



Anti-Crime Unit - This Unit was involved in the selective enforcement and 
reduction of street crimes and robberies throughout the City The unit 
^f\ ^^J^ f f!;^' "^^f ' ^^ Breaking and Entering complaint^. 39 Robberies. 
123 Drug related incidents and 438 other incidents. The Canine Unit operates 
as part of the Anti-Crime Unit. TTiis Unit perfomed 182 b^l3Lrsea?chef 
52 canine demonstrations, and responded to 470 Assists to other units These 
activities led to 78 arrests by the Canine Unit. 

gnergency Sen/ice Unit - This Unit was involved in all incidents which requir- 
ed the use ot special tools and equipment. During the fiscal year this , .nit 
responded to 950 bomb threats. 152 bomb and explofive rel^S incidents "i- 
ducted 25 investigations, and handled 190 calls for special service. ?heSnit 
also gave 15 public relations lectures on emergency services. 

Mobile Operations Patrol 

The Mobile Operations Patrol is a highly visible, mobile, tactical, response 
mit consisting of multiple function police officers on motorcycles- and in ?he 
Mounted Patrol Unit, on horseback. TTie Unit's activities for the yea^included the 
Honf "r^^ 21,894 moving violations. 102.332 parking citations. aXd ^38 ta^i violl 
tions. Tlie Unit also towed 1.148 vehicles, responded to 13,990 gang calls^d 

224 arrets!' ' '' °'''' ''''' '°' '"^'^"- ^^^^ activitfes'resilterin 

^""^^k Tf^''"^ ""^^ ;-^'' ""^^ ^^^ involved in multiple police functions 
tnrougn the use of skilled officers on horseback. In addition to regi?a? beat 
patrols, the unit was utilized at public events for crowd control and p?even 
tive operations. Along with these activities, the Unit participatS in 23 
Operation Safety demonstrations, 17 parades, 29 sporting events, and 48 civic 
^e ld7Til7n7Tl "^^ ""'k '°"^"^'^' '' g^°^ ^°^^' °f the'police stab es. 

s: cap^buitLVof'^srun^t.^'^ ^"' °' ^'^ '^^"^ ^^^^ '^^ '^^^''y -— ^ 

House of Detention 

Th. 11^^ House of Detention is involved in the care and custody of female prisoners 

nsca^'v.^f fu^'u ^''^n^i °'^'" ^^'' enforcement agencies in the area. During the' 
fiscal year, the House of Detention processed 5,659 prisoners and lodgers. 



39 



PIEAU OF FIELD SERVICES * 



DIVISION H 
OPERATIONS 

RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Operations Division is responsible for receiving citizen's calls for 
assistance through the 911 emergency telephone and for assigning police resources 
to handle these calls. The division is divided into two sections. 

Operations Center Section 

This section receives and records telephone calls for police service and 
dispatches units in accordance with Department directives and plans developed 
by the Bureau of Field Services. The Division maintains current knowledge of 
conditions throughout the City and assigns police response units to meet chang- 
ing requirements fbr service. The Operations Duty Supervisor has final responsi- 
bility for the movement of field units to provide the most effective police 
services possible. 

Message Center Section 

This section contains the Department Stolen Car Unit as well as communica- 
tions facilities with LEAPS and NCIC computers. The Stolen Car Unit is respon- 
sible for recording and maintaining Department files on stolen cars and recoveries 
They also maintain listings of all vehicles towed within the City for parkine 
violations. ^ 



PERSONNEL DEPLOYMENT 

Deputy Superintendent 1 

Lieutenants 4 

Sergeants 18 

Police Officers 61 

Civilians 85 

169 Total Personnel 

ACTIVITIES 

A Computer Aided Dispatch System enabled the personnel of the Operations 
Center Section to receive and process 1,199,604 telephone calls during the fiscal 
year. Police response units were dispatched to 551,637 of these calls. The 
majority of the remaining calls were either handled by the police dispatchers 
over the telephone, or were transfered, by direct line, to the Fire Department 
and/or Health and Hospital Dispatchers. The Fourth of July is ordinarily the 
busiest day of the year, receiving over 4,600 calls in a twenty-four hour period 
TTie average number of daily calls is 3,286. An exception to this general rule 
occured during and immediately following the storm of February 6 1978 The 
number of calls rose abnomially to a peak of 10,311 calls on Febraury 10, 1978. 

The Message Center Section of the Operations Division consists of the Auto 
Theft Unit, the Towed Vehicle Unit and the Teletype Unit. The Auto Theft Unit 



I 

BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 



DIVISION H 
OPERATIONS 
ACTIVITIES 



recorded all reports of stolen vehicles in the City. This list was then cross- 
checked with the list of all towed vehicles compiled by the Towed Vehicle Unit 
The Teletype Unit had computer and teletype capabilities to enter and receive 
information from the computer at Boston City Hall, the State LEAPS computer and 
the National Computer Information Center (NCIC) in Washington, B.C. In addition 
the Unit relayed all Department teletype messages to the various Districts and 
Units within the Department. 



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TOTAL PART I CRIMES 

(by month) 



July 1,1977 to June 30, 1978 
July 1,1976 to June 30, 1977 



6.585 ^ 



5.524 



6.439 



6.413 



5.407 




5.823 



5.230 



3.744 



JULY 



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I 



CCMCNDATIONS 

The Boston Police Department Awards Beard, consisting of Deputy Superinten- 
dent James J. MacDonald, Deputy Superintendent Anthony J. Leone, Lieutenant 
Joseph P. Sheridan, Officer James A. Donadini and chaired by Captain Morris V. 
Allen, convened for the purpose of selecting officers who have distinguished 
themselves in the performance of duty so as to merit the awards presented to 
them at the Boston Police Relief Association Ball on December 14, 1977. 

TOE SCHROEDER BROTHERS MEDAL FOR COURAGEaJS POLICE SERVICE 
THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD 
' THE BOSTON BANK AWARD 
presented to: 

DETECTIVES ARNOLD JAMES AND JQIN J. McMANUS, DISTRICT THREE 

On Friday, April 29, 1977, at about 1:30 p.m., Detectives James and MoManus 
were patrolling the Mattapan Square area on Fairway Street. As they approached 
the National Shawmut Bank they observed a hold-up in progress. Detective James 
manuevered the police vehicle onto the sidewalk, blocking the felon's escape 
route, while Detective NfcManus drew his service revolver. The felons reacted 
with a fusillade of firepower directed at the Detectives, striking Detective 
James in the face and Detective McManus in the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. As 
a result of his wounds, Detective James lost control of his vehicle and the car 
collided with the bank building, coming to a stop on top of the attache case 
containing the currency stolen by the felons . 

Throughout the incident the primary motive and concern of the officers was 
the protection of the victim and apprehension of the felons, without regard for 
their oim personal safety. Both officers sustained critical wounds and required 
extensive hospitalization. The bravery of these two men is best exemplified by 
the fact that they nearly sacrificed their lives in the course of executing 
their sworn duties. The culprits were ultimately captured after an intensive 
investigation. 

THE WALTER SCOTT MEDAL OF VALOR 
THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AW.ARD 
THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD 

presented to: . 

OFFICER THOMAS J. POLLARD, JR., DISTRICT FOURTEEN 

On December 21, 1976, at 1:00 p.m.. Officer Pollard, who was off-duty and 
in civilian attire, was entering a variety store at 411 Washington Street, 
Brighton. The store owner, who knew Officer Pollard to be a police officer, ex- 
citedly approached Officer Pollard and told him that a white male had just caused 
an uproar in his store by acting in an irrational manner. The oimer also said 



COMMENDATIONS 

that this person was carrying something that appeared to be a rifle wrapped in 
rags. 

Officer Pollard immediately began to search the area and saw the suspect 
entering the Budget Beauty Salon at 385 Washington Street. As Officer Pollard 
entered the Salon he observed the suspect holding four women at bay with a 
large double-edged ax. Officer Pollard identified himself as a police officer 
and told the S'lspect to put the ax gently on the floor; he then instructed the 
owner to call for police assistance. Officer Pollard's experienced demeanor 
calmed the suspect to the point where he did place his weapon on the floor, at 
which point he attempted to flee. In the course of restraining the suspect, 
Officer Pollard was repeatedly kicked and punched by the suspect. 

Investigation revealed the suspect to be a patient of the West Roxbury 
Veterans Hospital Psychiatric Unit and was returned to that facility. It is 
obvious that Offider Pollard's quick and professional response rescued the four 
women from a terrifying experience. There is no doubt that the actions of this 
officer averted a potential tragedy. 

THE DEPARTMENT MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 

THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AW.ARD 

THE BOSTON BANK AWARD 

presented to: 

DETECTIVE WILLIAM T. CURRIER, JR., DISTRICT FOURTEEN 

On Friday, July 8, 1977, at about 11:35 a.m., off-duty Detective Currier, 
while at the Circle Lounge, 469 Neponset Avenue, was informed by a waitress that 
a white male had just approached a male employee, seated at a rear booth, and 
ordered him at gunpoint to bring the receipts he was counting and come outside. 
The waitress stated that she followed them outside, at which point the gunman 
threatened her life and ordered her back inside the lounge. A patron of the 
lounge had also followed them outside, intending to assist the employee. 

Upon receiving this information. Detective Currier, along with the bartender, 
proceeded outside and circled to the right of the lounge. A2 he turned the 
comer Detective Currier observed the employee lying on the ground, the male 
patron standing against the wall and the suspect standing a few feet away. 
Detective Currier drew his service revolver, identified himself and ordered the 
gunman to drop his weapon. For several seconds the gunman and Detective Currier 
stood apart, each with a gun pointed at the other, and both ordering their 
adversary to drop his gun. The gunman finally lowered his left arm and slipped 
his weapon into his pants pocket. Detective Currier then relieved the gunman 
of his .25 caliber cocked "Titan" pistol and the $4,000.00 in U.S. currency 
taken from the male employee. 

Detective Currier's conduct during this incident was a model of courage and 
restraint. Even though off-duty, he completely disregarded the danger to him- 
self and faced down a dangerous gunman, reflecting credit on both himself and 
the Department. 



50 



COMCNDATIONS 

. ' THE DEPARTMEm' MEDAL OF HOMOR 
THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AWARD 
THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD 
THE BOSTON BANK AWARD 
presented to: 

OFFICERS THOMAS R. CLIFFORD, JR. Ai'vJD ROBERT C. DiPASQUALE, DISTRICT FOUR 

On Friday, February 4, 1977, at about 8:10 a.m., Officers Clifford and 
DiPasquale, while cruising on Westland Avenue, observed large quantities of 
dense smoke and flame emmanating from the top floors of #68. The Officers imme- 
diately notified Operations and then entered the burning, four story buildinp. 
They began bonginjg loudly on all apartment doors on the firbt and second floors, 
and they forced open the doors where there was no immediate response, in order 
to rescue any sleeping occupants. Due to the intense heat, smoke, and fire the 
officers were forced to retreat from the building. They then repeated the pro- 
cess of allerting the occupants at #66 Westland Avenue. After this building was 
completely evacuated, the officers returned to #68 and forced open a locked door 
to find an unknown male, either sleeping or unconscious, and carried him form 
the building. 

Captain Collins, of the Boston Fire Department, stated that of the thirty- 
one apartments in the building, twenty to twenty-five were occupied. He estima- 
ted that the officers evacuated approximately forty- five people. 

The officers, despite their suffering from smoke inhalation, remained at 
the scene assisting the firefighters in setting up fire lines. Only after this 
was completed were they removed to Boston City Hospital. The actions of Officers 
Clifford and DiPasquale at the scene of the massive conflagration, in which 
four people pe'rished, undoubtedly prevented further tragic loss of life and 
brings credit to the Department. 

THE DEPARTr-ENI MEDAL OF HONOR 

THE BOSTON POLICE RELIEF ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL AlVARD 

THE THOMAS F. SULLIVAN AWARD 

THE BOSTON BANK AWARD 

presented to: 

OFFICER EBVARD R. GAUGHAN, DISTRICT Tlv'O 

At about 8:10 p.m., Wednesday, September 28, 1977, Officers McDermott, Maf- 
feo, and Sergeant Doucette of District Two, responded to a grocer)' store hold- 
up progress at 147 Centre Street, Roxbur>'. Upon arrival, the offiters learned 
that two males, armed with a sawed off shotgun and a handgun, had just robbed 
the store of $482.00. One suspect had fired one round from the sawed-off shot- 
gun to intimidate the owner and the customers in the store. 

All of the witnesses were taken to District Two and were questioned by the 
above officers, as well as Officers Poggi and Gaughan. Officer Poggi's knowledge 
of the Spanish language enabled the officers to determine the names and addresses 
of the suspects. The five officers responded to the suspect's address on Heath 
Street in Roxbury, sighting the getaway car parked outside. Officers Gaughan, 



CCMIENDATIONS 

Maffeo, and Poggi proceeded up the stairs of the building to the second floor, 
while Officer McDermott and Sergeant Doucette watched the windows from outside 
the building. Upon entering the apartment, the three officers observed a door 
close at the far end of the hallway. The officers outside the building then 
observed one of the suspects attempting to escape out the window. The officers 
warned the suspects that they would be shot if they attempted to escape, where- 
upon the culprits closed the screen. 

The three officers outside the closed door heard the sound of a shell being 
loaded into the chamber of a shotgun. Officer Gaughan flung open the door and 
observed one of the suspects standing with a loaded shotgun aimed directly at 
him. He also observed the other suspect and two small children in the room. 

Officer Gaughan then threw himself against the entrance of the door, point- 
ing his service revolver at the suspect and ordered him to drop his weapon. A 
stand-off between' Officer Gaughan and the suspect continued for several seconds 
until the suspect finally lowered his weapon. The suspects were than subdued 
and arrested. 

The Department is indeed proud to recognize the courage and professionalism 
shown by Officer Gaughan in averting gunfire with the presence of two small 
children, while facing an am^^ed felon holding a cocked sawed-off shotgun. The 
performance of all the officers involved exemplifies the essence of teamwork in 
policing and they are to be commended. 

WILLIAM J. TAYLOR AWARD 
presented to: 

OFFICERS JOSEPH MUGfWJO AND ROBERT GALLO, DISTRICT SEVEN 

Officers Mugnano and Gallo are partners, nights, in a sector car in East 
Boston. For the past two and one half years, they have performed in a most pro- 
fessional and exemplary manner. Within the past year alone, they have made over 
fifty arrests. These arrests have resulted in convictions on a multitude of of- 
fenses, such as Armed Robbery, Narcotics Sales, Rape, Stolen Vehicles, Breaking 
and Entering in the Nighttime, as well as many others. 

It is a great pleasure to recognize the kind of quality exhibited daily by 
Officers Joseph Mugnano and Robert Gallo. 

SPECIAL CITATIONS 
presented to: 

DETECTIVES FRANCIS SHEEN.AN AND THOM'^S J. CONNOLLY, DISTRICT FOUR 

On Wednesday, March 2, 1977, at about 5:00 p.m.. Detectives Slpeenan and 
Connolly received a telephone call from a woman who stated that her eighteen 
year old daughter had been the victim of a kidnapping and rape on March 1, 1977, 
that continued through to March 2, 1977. 

The woman stated that her daughter, while walking along Beacon Street, near 
Bay State Road, at 11:00 a.m., on March 1, was assaulted by two males who forced 
her at knifepoint to enter an automobile. She was ordered' to keep her head down 
while the suspects drove to either Jamaica Plain or Roxbury. She was subseauently 
brought into a building and taken to the second floor. She was held in the 



CONMENDATIONS 

building and f-rced to perform various sexual acts and indignities. At about 
10:00 Dm. that evening two other black males entered the apartment and raped 
her while the original two looked on- k u id^jcu 

After interviewing the girl, the mother became reluctant to have the detec- 
tives pursue their investigation, "nie professional manner displayed by the 
officers eventually allayed the fears of the parents and the investigation pro- 
ceeded with painstaking searches of various neighborhoods to identify the area 
of the City that the young girl had been taken to. 

As a result of the detectives perserverance and dedication in retracing the 
vague movements of the victim, including the tireless combing of unfamiliar 
areas, the two culprits were ultimately arrested and brought to trial much to 
the credit of the Department and to the satisfaction of the victim and her family. 

' SPECIAL CITATIONS 

presented to: 

CAPTAIN ALBERT L. FLATTERY, FIELD INSPECTION UNIT AND 
OFFICERS JAMES C. LAIVLER AND MICHAEL W. FEENEY, DISTRICT FOUR 

At about 2:16 p.m., Nfonday, August 8, 1977, Officers Lawler and Feeney were 
dispatched to 171 West Newton Street on a report of four black males breaking 
and entering m the rear of that location. Captain Flattery notified Operations 
he would also respond. Within minutes the officers and the Captain arrived 
simultaneously and were met by a female resident of #169 who stated that the 
tour males had forced the window and had entered the dwelling: a residence of 
five nuns of the Order of Saint Joseph. 

Upon receiving this information, Captain Flattery and Officer Feenev went 
to the front door of the house, while Officer Lawler drove to the rear of the 
building to prevent the escape of the culprits. Officer Feeney observed two of 
the suspects hiding themselves behind some hedges. Realizing that t^.ev had 
been seen, the t^vo males fled on foot down West Newton, with the officer in 
pursuit. 

Meanwhile, Captain Flattery entered the front of the residence to determine 
if the occupants weie safe, at which time he was met by a frightened and hyster- 
ical nun, whom he escorted from the house. .He then reentered the house, drawing 
his service revolver, and at gunpoint confronted a black male on the second 
tloor landing. At the same time. Officer Lawler had confronted another of the 
suspects exiting from the rear. Both suspects were placed u"der arrest, while 
Utticer Feeney was pursuing the third suspect . 

■A /y l^r^ ?^ ^^^ suspects were returned to the dwelling, where they were 
Identified by the resident nuns. One of the nuns stated that she had been con- 
fronted by the suspects in her bedroom, wliere they demanded monev, put a long 
handled brown knife to her throat and threw her to the floor. Thenj dragging 
her bodily down to the dining room, out of fear for her life, the nun produced 
^naw .^H°^ ,^is seemed to provoke the culprits further, for they became quite 
Z17. A tu f ^^^ """ '"^° ^^ ^^^i^^- At ^bout this time the fourth suspect 
reentered the house to alert his associates that the police had arrived. 

There is no doubt the excellent response by Captain Flatten- and Officers 
Lawler and Feeny prevented a much more serious and dangeroiLs situation from 

rTn.°^^!^^' ^"""".l^t ^''^P^^?' ^^^i"g assaulted one of the nims twice, were be- 
coming more agitated and dangerous with each passing minute. 



CCMCNDATIONS 



Additionally, the leadership qualities displayed by Captain Flattery in 
coordinating a teamwork approach to apprehension, and the directing and control- 
ling of the situation at hand was in keeping with the highest tradition of the 
Department . 

SPECIAL CITATION 
presented to: 

OFFICER LEO C. PARKER, DISTRICT SEVEN 

At about 12:20 a.m., Thursday, January 20, 1977, Officer Parker was enroute 
to District Seven to perform a last half tour of duty, when he observed smoke 
coming from a group of attached dwellings located at #99, 101, 103, 105 and 
111 Maverick Street. The offic^^r entered the above dwellings, and going from 
door to door, aroused the residents of each occupied apartment. In the second 
floor hall of #109 he found a Spanish woman '.'ith a small child, who sooke no 
English and was obviously confused by the smoke in the hall. Of ficer Parker 
led the woman to the street, where she was cared for by a neighbor. The officer 
then reentered the building to make certain that there where no persons left 
inside. 

Although this fire resulted in four alarms being sounded, and caused heavy 
damage to the buildings, there were no injuries to any of the 'residents. Offi- 
cer Parker's quick action and complete disregard for his own safety were un- 
doubtedly responsible for the fact that all residents escaped unharmed. Upon 
arrival at District Seven, although visibly affected by smoke inhalation, he 
refused medical attention and continued on his scheduled tour. He is eminent- 
ly qualified for this citation. 

SPECIAL CITATION 
presented to: 

OFFICERS ROBERT A. BUCCAFUSCA AND ANTHONY P. LANDRY, DISTRICT TWO 

On Thursday, December 23, 1976, at about 8:05 p.m., Officers Buccafusca and 
Landry, m a wagon, while on routine patrol of Maywood Street, observed a two 
story wooden dwelling on fire. The officers immediately notified Operations, 
then forced the front and rear doors of #40 Maywood Street and entered the 
premises. Within the dwelling vvfere five children that were unaware their home 
was on fire. They were quickly led to safety by the officers. The officers 
then returned to the second floor of the burning building and removed a thirty 
year old woman and her three sons. Damage to the building was estimated at 
$20,000. Three alarms were sounded and there were no civilian injuries due to 
the alertness and spontaneous action by the officers. Both officers con^jlained 
of smoke inhalation and were coughing, but refused medical attentioi]!. 

The service provided by these officers was without regard for their own 
personal safety, but for their concerted efforts, eight children, as well as 
the other occupants would have been in extreme peril. 



54 



CCMCNDATIONS 

SPECIAL CITATIONS 
presented to: 

OFFICERS MARY L. CURRAN, JOSEPH NOLAN, JAMES GORMAN, 
DENNIS C. THOMSON AND MR. PATRICK SLfLLIVAN 

On Wednesday, July 6, 1977, at about 1:15 a.m., two persons died one 
person was seriously burned, several injured and twenty persons evacuated from 
their homes as a result of a serious fire which destroyed a four story brick 
dwelling house located at 35 High Street, Charlestown. Extensive damage also 
occured at #33 and #37 High Street. 

Officers Gorman and Thomson responding to an unrelated radio call for a dis- 
turbance at Cordis and High Streets observed the fire in progress, sounded the 
alarm, alighted from their vehicle and irmiediately entered the burning dwelling 
While the responding firefighters entered #35 High Street, the officers fought 
their way through dense smoke and extreme heat and successfully alerted all of 
the occupants. In one case, Officers Gorman and Thomson ascended to the third 
floor of #33 High and broke down the door in order to rescue an elderly resident. 

At the same time. Officers Curran and Nolan, assigned to a wagon, responded 
to the fire and upon arrival observed two persons on a third story ledge calling 
for help. The two males and one female had escaped to the ledge from their fourth 
floor apartment. Officers Curran and Nolan, together with Mr. Patrick Sullivan 
of Charlestown, went to the roof top of #41 High Street and rescued a male and 
female from the ledge. One of the males had fallen from the ledge to the sidewalk 
and was pronounced dead on arrival at Massachusetts General Hospital. The female 
sustained second degree bums over twenty- five percent of her body. Her husband 
suffered first degree bums on both ams and hands, he was treated at the hospi- 
tal and released. Officer Nolan sustained injuries to his right thumb and left 
forearm, Mr. Sullivan sustained lacerations to both of his feet while assisting 
in the rescue. ° 

The prompt action taken by all of the officers, as well as by Patrick Sulli- 
van, reflects an unselfish dedication to respect for life and it is a pleasure 
to award these citations. 



SPECIAL CITATIONS 
presented to: 

OFFICERS JOHN E. ULRICH AND ALBERT LAFONTAINE, DISTRICT THIRTEEN 

Over a period from August 28, 1976 through February 2, 1977 these two offi- 
cers made a total of four hundred and forty one drug related arrests, in the 
Jamaica Plain area, of which two hundred and ninty three are pending in the courts 
The manner in which Officers Ulrich and LaFontaine have conducted thdir investi- 
gation; their intelligence, persistance and overall competence has resulted in 
a dramatic curtailment of illegal sales of narcotics in the Jamaica Plain area 
1 he performance of these two officers has brought praise from the community and 
reflects favorably on the Boston Police Department as a whole 



55 



COMMENDATIONS 

SPECIAL CITATION 
presented to: 

DETECTIVE JOHN RIDLON, DISTRICT FIFTEEN 

Detective Ridlon, assigned to District Fifteen and temporarily detailed to 
the Bureau of Investigative Services, Intelligence Section, became involved in 
an investigation which concerned approximately twenty five robberies. Members 
of the Massachusetts State Police were also involved in the investigation. The 
intense, difficult investigation was seven months in duration and required 
extensive travel within and outside of Massachusetts. Numerous interviews and 
interrogations that were conducted by Detective Ridlon demonstrated an exceptional 
degree of competency and were instrumental in convicting the armed robbers. In 
addition, the expertise of Detective Ridlon in protecting and maintaining 
witnesses who were in constant danger, was vital to the successful prosecution. 
Ten persons have been indicted for bank robberies in Middlesex, Norfolk and 
Suffolk Counties. A large number of weapons and silencers have been siezed. 

It is a pleasure to recognize the performance of an officer whose diligence 
and competence has resulted in the removal from society of ten dangerous felons. 

SPECIAL CITATION 
presented to: 

OFFICER ROBERT KEENAN, DISTRICT THREE (RETIRED) 

Officer Bob Keenan, was a me.T.ber cf the Boston Police Department for more than 
thirty years, most of which he served as the Chief Clerk of District Three. The 
performance of personnel assigned to administrative duties is rarely recognized, 
but is a vital function necessary to departmental efficiency. Officer Keenan 
was not content to just do his job; with his business acumen he made innovations 
in clerical procedures. Many of these innovations have been instituted through- 
out the department, resulting in a savings of time and materials. Officer Keenan 
was a model for all to emulate . His rapport with his fellow employees was 
exceptional and he went far beyond the degree of assistance and cooperation 
that is required of all departmental personnel. 



56 



BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 
ROLL OF HONOR 



To those members of the Boston Police Department who gave their lives 
in the protection of their fellow citizens. 



EZEKIAL W. HODSDON 
ALFRED M. STURDIVANT 
JOHN T. LYNCH 
FREDERICK SCHLEHUBER 
RICHARD J. GALL IVAN 
.UBERT R. PETERSON 
THOMAS J. NORTON 
PATRICK J. CARR 
JOHN J. EARLE 
JOSEPH C. REISER 
CIIAJILES E. DEININGER 
ADOLPIl F. BUTTERMAN 
WILLIAM G. CLANCY 
WARD M. BRAY 
ANDREW B. CUNEO 
DANIEL J. McSHANE 
PETER P. OGINSKIS 
JOSEPH. E. GONYA 
ALBERT MOTRONI 
BENJAMIN ALEXANDER 



FRANK J. COMEAU 
HARRIS B. McINNIS 
HERBERT D. ALLEN 
EDWARD Q. BUTTERS 
JOHN I. JACKSON 
JAMES J. TROY 
FRANKLIN B. DREYER 
FREDERICK W. BARTLETT 
JOSEPH L. CAVAGNARO 
WILLIAM L. .ABBOTT 
JOHN P. M. WOLFE 
GEORGE J. HENLEY 
JAMES T. MALLOY 
JAMES BRICKLEY 
DANIEL A. McCALLUM 
JAMES D. HUGHES 
JAMES B. ROCHE 
LAURENCE V. SHERIDAN 
WALTER BAXTER 
EDWARD J. KELLEY 
JOHN H. MANNING 



THOMAS A. DAVIS 
PAUL J. MURNAN'E 
PATRICK C. GANNON 
JAMES G. McCANN, JR 
STEPHEN P. HARRICAN 
FRA.NK B. CALLAHAN 
WILLIAM F. HEALY 
MICHAEL J. CROWLEY 
JOHN J. GALLAGHER 
JA^ES B. O'LE'U^Y 
GEORGE J. HOLf-ES 
CHARLES A. McNABB 
FRANCIS A. JOHNSON 
WALTER A. SCHROEDER 
JOSEPH M. MULLEN 
JOHN D. SCHROEDER 
DON.UD A. BROW 
FRANCIS E. CREANER 
RICHARlj) F. HALLOPvVN 
WILLIAM R. BECKMAN 



57 



BOSTON POLICE COMMISSIONERS 
SINCE 1878 



NAME 


SERVICE 


FROM 


TO 


Henry S. Russell 


July 8, 1878 


March 1, 1880 


Samual R. Spinney 


July 8, 1878 


May 3, 1880 


James M. Bugbee 


July 8, 1878 


May 5, 1879 


Hemy Walker 

1 


May 5, 1879 


April 21, 1882 


Edward J. Jones 


March 26, 1880 


April 21, 1882 


Thomas J. Gargan 


May 3, 1880 


April 21, 1882 


Tliomas L. Jenks 


April 22, 1882 


July 23, 1885 


Nathaniel Wales 


April 22, 1882 


July 7, 1885 


Benjamin D. Barley 


April 22, 1882 


May 6, 1883 


Michael P. Curran 


May 7, 1883 


July 23, 1885 


Albert T. Whiting 


July 23 ,1885 


May 6, 1895 


Williajn H. Lee 


July 23, 1885 


May 28 ,1894 


William M. Osborne 


July 23, 1885 


April 30, 1893 


Robert F. Clark 


May 1, 1893 


May 4, 1903 


Augustus P. Martin 


May 28, 1894 


May 1, 1899 


Charles P. Curtis, Jr. 


May 6, 1895 


May 1, 1905 


Harry F. Adams 


May 1, 1899 


June 4, 1906 


Williams H. H. Emmons 


May 4, 1903 


June 4, 1906 


Charles H. Cole, Jr. 


May 1, 1905 


June 4, 1906 


Stephen O'Meara* 


June 4, 1906 


December 14, 1918 


Edwin U. Curtis* 


December 30, 1918 


March 28, 1922 


Herbert A. Wilson 


April 3, 1922 


May 5, 1930 


Eugene C. Hultman 


May 7, 1930 


December 27, 1934 


Joseph J. Leonard 


December 27, 1934 


February 23, 1935 


Eugene M. McSweeney 


February 23, 1935 


November 25, 1936 


Joseph F. Timilty 


November 25, 1936 


' November 26, 1945 


Thomas F. Sullivan 


November 26, 1943 


August 26, 1957 


Leo J. Sullivan 


September 5, 1957 


March 15, 1962 


. Edmund L. McNamara 


May 1, 1962 


May 31, ]972 


Robert J. di Grazia 


November 15, 1972 


November 14, 1976 


Joseph M. Jordan 


November 15, 1976 





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ACKN0l\rLEDGB1ENTS 



The Boston Police Department 1977-78 Annual Report was prepared hy the 
Planning and Research Division, Bureau of Investigative Services; 

Jane E. Leiby, Editor 

Robert Neville, Graphics 









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