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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

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i 50vernmh:jt documents 

DHPARIMENT 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Annual Repo 



1951-1952 




T 



Kevin H. While 



GOVDOC 
.62 



Josepii M. Jordan 
Commissioner 




BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1931 - 1982 
ANNUAL REPORT 




CONTENTS p^^^ 

Message From The Police Commissioner i 

Organization. Boston Police Department .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 2 

Boston Police Department Functions .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' .' .'.'.'.'.'.' 3 

Boston Police Department Arrests. 1981-1932.' .' 7 

Boston Police District Map .'.'.'.'.'.'.' 8 

Police Department Budget. 1981-1982. . .' .' .' .' .' .' .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 9 

Police Department Personnel Listing .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' in 

Department Awards Recipients L 

In Memoriam ^^ 





Joseph M Jordan 

fcljcf HeadquanerS'bih Floor 

1 Ss B«rkele\ Sir«i 

Boston M\OJII(i 

61"/24" -1120 



Boston R>lice 
Department 

A Message from the Commissioner 

The period covered by this Annual Report is one of the most 
difficult in the history of the Boston Police Department. 

The passage of Proposition 2% in November 1980 combined with 
the Tregor Rebate Decision and School Department overspending nec- 
essitated drastic budget cuts in all areas of municipal government. 

The Police Department was not immune from this process and 
saw its budget slashed from $72 million to $52 million. Since 
more than 907. of the Department's budget is devoted to personnel 
cost force reduction and layoffs were inevitable. 

The first step was to encourage members of the Department 
who were close to retirement to retire early. Incentives were 
offered to those individuals who did retire early. 

The next step was the elimination of all capitol expenditures 
and this was followed by layoffs. The civilian sector of the 
Department was reduced by more than 400 and then the uniform branch 
was reduced by 257. 

The reduction in budget, materials, and manpower forced the 
Department to analyze the demands for service placed upon it and 
then reorder its priorities. 

Because of these stringent measures the Department was able 
to keep within its new budget. When additonal funds became available 
to the city late in January the Department was the first city agency 
to be allowed to recall personnel and early in February one hundred 
laid off officers were called back to their positions. In March an 
additonal sixty officers were brought back and the Department began 
implementation of its Anti-Crime Program, Call Screening Program, 
and Moving Violations Enforcement Program. 

As we move Into the new fiscal year I anticipate the rapid 
recall of the remainder of our lald-off personnel. I also antic- 
ipate an increase in our budget of about $4 million which should 
enable us to make some capitol purchases. 

Although this year has been extremely difficult it did have 
some positive side-effects. The fiscal constraints forced the 
Department to replan Its policies and priorities and institute new 
programs and procedures that will continue to serve us for the fore- 
seable future. 




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FUNCTIONS OF THF m<^l(^^ pn[ icf nFPflRTH FNT 
OFFICF OFTHF POl TfF rnMfiJSMQUPR 

E X E CUTIYF OFPTr P - ThE EXECUTIVE OFFICE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ENSURING THAT 
ALL ORDERS. INSTRUCTIONS AND POLICIES OF THE PoLICE COMMISS ONER ARE 
CARRIED OUT. FhIS OfFICE ALSO EVALUATES POLICE SERVICE^ AN^ "s ' IT 

luccEs'sFu"" °''"'" '' ''' ""°" ''''''' ^^-'^ ^"^ Departm"t'?s 
Administratiyf SFnioM - This Section manages the activities of thf Pn, ,rc 
OMMissioNER's Office, including the scheduling f h s o 's 

SZS^' 'the'^:::""" ^: ^-r-departmental corresp'ndenc . 
uP E RATlONf^ Unit The Operations Unit reports to the Commissioner on 

DAILY OPERATIONAL ACTIVITIES AND LONG RANGE PROJECT . THnnAL 

UPERVISES THE DEPARTMENT'S COMMUNITY DISORDERS UnIT. W ESP NSIBLE 
CRIMES ''"'''"'""' '"'''"''°' ''' INVESTIGATION OF RACIALLY MOTIVATeT 

toPMATiONA i SFPvir p^ ^rr ri PM - This Section, through news media liaison 

PRESS conferences AND OTHER PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES. KEEPS DEPARTMENT i^r 
BERS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMED OF PoLICE DeP RTMN A TIV T 

"DETA"sPEAKF:''rR """" J" ^^^'^ '""^^^ PROGRAm! a'd ;o 

T CH ? L AS ST ' - ""' ^'''' ^''''''''' ^''' '' °^°" '' ^^OVIDE 
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO THOSE WHO DESIRE IT 

P^Mr/ri"'"' '^''"" ■^ " ■'"' ^""' "^'-""""^ Section represents the 
PoucE Commissioner at employee collective barcainino NEC0TiAT,o»rLABOR 

CONFERENCES AND GRIEVANCE DISCUSSIONS. ThIS SECTION ALSO ASSms ^P 

Police Commissioner in developing labor relations pol c es a v s 
THE Command Staff in instituting compliance procedures. 

OTHER CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND JUDICIAL OFFICES AND AGENCIES IN ORDER TO 

D LOP RESPONSES TO LEGAL PROBLEMS THAT ARE GERMANE T P IC DEP T.E-TS 

This Office also handles all legal matters that transact in "e Depart 
^^^^^^^^"^l^fnfi^^ - This Unit provides the Police Commissioner 

D JarTMENT Ihf ZTrTT '° '"' "*"'^"'"'« °f '"EGRITV WITHIN THE 
UEPARTMENT. The SPECIAL INVESTIGATION UNIT INVESTIGATES CORRUPTION 
MONITORS ANT I -CORRUPTION EFFORTS AND LOOKS TO SHORE 3 « s t^'T 
MAY ALLOW THE EXISTENCE OF CORRUPTION. WEAKNESSES THAT 

B anagfmfnt ANn Phwft VrTin ri - This Section is responsible for budget- 

'd T 'CE^S^^NrSi^T'"' " ''' ""'"™"^ "°"'"'- THEY ALS ; RATE 

«EP^RT?AN:°"prEV™;G :N\™:r ° iiiTr'" """ ^"^■"'"^ 

-E^™ THE RECORDING. P^OCE^^LTAr^M^^I^NElro^'oE^Ar ^pr 

BURFAII nF pjpip cppu|ppo 

The Bureau of Field Services has primary responsibility for the del- 



n. 



ivery of effective and efficient police services to the community. 

Each Field Service Division Commander provides complete administrat- 
ive AND field supervision IN THE DIVISION UNDER HIS CONTROL AND IS RES- 
PONSIBLE FOR MEETING THE NEEDS OF CITIZENS IN THE AREA. DISTRICT PER- 
SONNEL ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR PROVIDING THE BEST POSSIBLE POLICE SERVICES 
TO THEIR COMMUNITIES. ThESE PATROL FORCES ALSO PROVIDE FULL COOPERATION 

with specialized units in seeking ways to improve the overall effective- 
ness of police operations within the district. 

Each district maintains a patrol force sufficient in size to provide 
continuous coverage and each maintains its own detective, administrative. 

supervisory and COMMAND PERSONNEL. 

The Bureau of Field Services provides general police services through- 
out THE City and is divided into the following eight divisions: 
Area A - Provides coverage for East Boston, Charlestown, and the Downtow-c 

AREAS OF Boston. 
Area B - Provides coverage for Roxbury, Mattapan and parts of Dorchester. 
Area C - Provides coverage for South Boston and parts of Dorchester. 
Area D - Provides coverage for the South End, Back Bay and Allston- 

Brighton, 
Area E - Provides coverage for Hyde Park, West Roxbury, Roslindale and 

Jamaica Plain. 
Tea^i Police - Provides specialized coverage in selected areas of the 

City, particularly public housing projects. 
Operations - Receives calls through the 911 Emergency Telephone SYSTEf. 

AND assigns police RESOURCES TO HANDLE THESE CALLS. OPERATIONS 
DISPATCHES UNITS IN ACCORDANCE WITH DEPARTMENT DIRECTIVES AND 
PLANS DEVELOPED BY THE BuREAU OF FlELD SERVICES. ThE MESSAGE 

Center, as part of the Operations Division, contains the Stolen 
Car Unit as well as communications facilities with NCIC and LEAPS 
computer systems. 
Planning and Research Division - Planning and Research is responsible for 
researching operational and administrative problems in the Department and 
assisting affected units in developing effective responses to these prob- 
lems. They work with other units in preparing long-range and contingency 
PLArfs and are responsible for forms control, written directives, graphic 
arts, and the analysis of crime patterns and trends. 

BUREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 

The Bureau of Investigative Services oversees activities of the var- 
ious investigative units that comprise the Criminal Investigation Divis- 
ion TO ASSURE THAT THE BEST POSSIBLE INVESTIGATORY PRACTICES AND PROCED- 
URES ARE MAINTAINED ON A CONTINUOUS BASIS. ThE BuREAU IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE 
FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF PROPER LIAISON WITH FEDERAL, StATE AND LOCAL DEP- 
ARTMENTS AND AGENCIES WHICH ARE CONCERNED WITH ALL ASPECTS OF THE CRIMINAL 
INVESTIGATION PROCESS. ThE BuREAU IS MADE UP OF THE FOLLOWING DIVISIONS 
AND UNITS; 

I. Centrai Investigations Unit - This Unit is responsible for the invest- 
igation OF general crimes against the person and personal property. 
II. Criminai Invfstigation Division - This Division is responsible for 

DEVELOPING information ON, AS WELL AS INVESTIGATION OF, CRIMINAL ACT- 
IVITY within the City and is comprised of the following: 



1. Intelligence Unit - This Unit is responsible for keeping the 
Police Commissioner informed of all operational responses of 
THE Department to planned criminal occurrences. 

2. Vice Unit - The Vice Unit is responsible for investigating pros- 
tltutiony gamingy liquor law violations, pornography and drug 
trafficking. vice also investigates reported attempts by crimin- 
al organizations to gain control of licensed establishments and 
businesses. 

3. Organized Crime Unit - This Unit conducts investigations of 
organized criminal activity for the purpose of court prosecut- 
IONS. The Organized Crime Unit also maintains liaison with 
other criminal justice agencies and maintains its own confid- 
ential records and files. 

^. Homicide Unit - The Homicide Unit investigates and prepares 

FOR the Grand Jury cases of homicide, suspicious deaths, 

serious assaults and battered child cases. 
5. Tfchnical Services Section - This Section maintains the Crime 

Laboratory, the Identification and Photography Unit and the 

Ballistics Unit. 

BUREAU OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

The Bureau of Inspectional Services evaluates police performance 

AND investigates COMPLAINTS MADE AGAINST DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL. ThE 

Bureau is divided into the following divisions: 

I. Internal Affairs Division - This Division is responsible for review- 
ing COMPLAINT investigations AND INVESTIGATING ALLEGATIONS OF POLICE 

MISCONDUCT. Internal Affairs, while responsible for department disc- 
ipline, ALSO ADVISES THE POLICE COMMISSIONER AS TO WHERE ADDITIONAL 
TRAINING and/or CHANGES MAY BE NEEDED IN ORDER TO REDUCE COMPLAINT 

frequency. 

II. Staff Inspection Division - Staff Inspection is responsible for 

EVALUATING DEPARTMENTAL PERFORMANCE TOWARD PRIMARY GOALS. ThIS DIV- 
ISION ASSESSES RULES AND REGULATIONS, MAKES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPR- 
OVEMENT AND ASSISTS IN POLICY AND TRAINING DEVELOPMENT. ThE StAFF 

Inspection Division is also responsible for conducting periodic insp- 
ections OF UNITS AND DISTRICTS, PERFORMANCE AND STAFFING ASSESSMENT, 

and supervision of private towing firms under contract with the 
Police Department. 

BUREAU OF APfllNISTRATIVE SERVICES 

The Bureau of Administrative Services is responsible for providing 
services to support the field activities of the Department. The Bureau 
is divided into TWO divisions: 
I. Services Division - This Division administers the Office of the Chief 

Clerk, which is responsible for receiving, recording and transmitting 

TO the City Treasurer all license fees collected by the Department. 

The Services Division also includes: 

1. The Maintenance Section - This Section is responsible for the 
servicing of automobiles, buildings and communications 
equipment. 

2. The Central Iicensing Section - The Central Licensing Sectio:. 

REGULATES PaWN ShOP OPERATIONS, GUN LICENSING AND THE CITY'S 



6. 



Hackney Carriage industry. 

3. The Warrants Section - The Warrants Section serves as a clear- 
inghouse FOR ALL WARRANTS AND SUMMONSES. 

^. Privatf Detail Section - This Section is responsible for the 
coordination of all off-duty police services rendered by members 
OF THE Department to private employers. 

5. Printing and Mailing Section - This Section prints and distrib- 
utes ALL official DEPARTMENT DOCUMENTS NECESSARY FOR THE ADMIN- 
ISTRATION OF THE Department. They are also responsible for the 

HANDLING AND DISTRIBUTION OF ALL U.S. AND DEPARTMENT MAIL. 

RURFAll OF SPFCIAI OPERATIONS 

The Bureau of Special Operations provides the Department with an 

ARRAY OF highly-trained AND SPECIALIZED OFFICERS WHO ARE UTILIZED IN 
MANY DIFFERENT SITUATIONS WHERE ORTHODOX METHODS WILL NOT SUFFICE. ThE 

Bureau is divided into the following units: 

I. Mobile Operations Patrol - This Unit is a motorcycle patrol unit and 
is used for crowd control^ parks patrol and other instances where the 

USE OF A motorcycle IS ADVANTAGEOUS. 

II. Mounted Patrol Unit - This Unit is a horse patrol unit and is used 

FOR neighborhood PATROLS, CROWD CONTROL, PARK PATROL AND TRAFFIC 

assignments. 
11 1. Harbor Patrol Unit - This Unit, through the use of various vessels, 

PATROLS those AREAS OF BoSTON HaRBOR THAT FALL UNDER THE JURISDICT- 
ION OF THE City of Boston. 

IV. Emergency Services Unit - The Emergency Services Unit provides supp- 
ort SERVICES TO ANY POLICE UNIT REQUIRING AID IN SPECIAL SITUATION'S, 
WHETHER IT BE THE ERECTION OF BARRICADES OR THE ASSEMBLING OF A 
COMMAND POST IN A CRISIS-TORN AREA. ThIS UnIT IS ALSO RESPONSIBLE 
FOR THE DISARMAMENT AND DISPOSAL OF EXPLOSIVE DEVICES. 

V. Canine Unit - The Canine Unit provides highly-trained dogs for 

PATROL duty, drug SEARCHES, BUILDING SEARCHES AND CROWD CONTROL. 

VI. Threat Mana gfmfnt Teams - These teams provide expertise in threat 

CRISIS SITUATIONS, PARTICULARLY WHERE THERE ARE HOSTAGES INVOLVED, 

VI I. House of Detention - The House of Detention is responsible for the 

CARE AND custody OF ALL FEMALE PRISONERS UNTIL THE CoURT HAS DISPOS- 
ED OF THEIR CASES OR THEY HAVE BEEN RELEASED IN ACCORDANCE WITH LAW. 



7. 



ARRESTS - July 1. 1981 - June 30. 1982 

Part Qnf OpppNgp^ 

Homicide - 58 

Forcible Rape - 193 

Robbery - 1.^50 

Aggravated Assault - 1,752 

Burglary - 1.781 

Larceny - i\i^r^j 

Motor Vehicle Theft - 638 

Arson - 57 

Part Two nrppN'^F^ 

Simple Assaults. A&B. A&B/P.O. - 753 

Forgery and Counterfeiting - 91 

Fraud - 59 

Embezzlement - ] 

Stolen Property - 753 

Vandalism - 375 

Weapons Violations - i\r^\ 

Prostitution & Controlled Vice -1.507 

Sex Offenses 115 

Narcotics Offenses - 1,723 

Gambling - 599 

Offenses Against Family. Child. - 40 

Driving While Intoxicated - 35/| 

Violation of Liquor Laws - 179 

Disorderly Conduct - 2.100 

Motor Vehicle Offenses - 564 



8. 



Watertown 




Newton 




Brookline 



'^^^■..A 



Hotbuxy V 





Revere 



Winthrop 



( Ue.6t Rcxbu 



/ 



Dedham 




Milton 



Qutncy 



Canton 

Boston Police Reporting Districts and surrounding communities 



9. 



Boston Police Department 1931 - 1982 Budget 

Personal Services 

Permanent Employees tzi/. cnc ,^n 

Overtime W.506.379 

Unemployment Compensation ^'olH?r> 

TOTAL Personal Services ,,^;2o7.512 

Contractual Services 

Communications . .,,o rr^n 

Heat. Light and Power * ZcTnnn 

Building Maintenance and Repair ycnnn 

Equipment Service and Repair cyn'oni 

Transportation of Persons I nnn 

Tnx. r ^^^'^^^^^^^ous Contractual Services mm 

Total Contractual Services $hw£ 

Supplies and Materials 

Automotive Supplies and Materials $i 9m onn 

Food Supplies l^m 

Heating Supplies and Materials n/nnn 

Household Supplies and Materials ^ 7iq 

Medical. Dental, etc. '.JTr. 

Office Supplies and Materials qq qin 

Clothing Allowance /j92 325 

Tnx. c '^^^^^'-'-ANEous Supplies and Materials 259^30^' 

Total Supplies and Materials ^..'zI'bsJ 

Current Charges and Obligations 

Tot., r ^''^^^^Jl'-ANEOUS CHARGES AND OBLIGATIONS $ 523 586 

Total Current Charges and Obligations $ 523;5S5 

Equipment 

Miscellaneous Equipment t ci ccn 

Total Equipment ! °-^'^50 

$ 61.550 

GRAND TOTAL 

$53,501,160 



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mm 

On January 25, 1982. the Boston Police Department Awards Board selected 

THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS AS BEING WORTHY RECIPIENTS OF THE FOLLOWING DESIG- 
NATED Medals and Awards: 

Tmf ^rHROPriFR Bro thfrs Mfdai For Courageous Pni irF Service 

ThF nPPARTMENT Mpn&l OF HONOR 

Tpp Rn<::TnN Poi ir.F RflIEF A «i?inr.iATlON Wfmorial AwARD 
Thf THnwAt; F. Si m tvan Award 

To: flFFTrPR Bria n .1. Cunningham OF DISTRICT B 

At about 2:20 a.m.. Saturday, January I^j 1981, Officers Cunningham and 
Austin were patrolling on Blue Hill Avenue inbound when they heard what seem- 
ed TO BE gunshots COMING FROM SOMEWHERE TO THE REAR OF THE VEHICLE. ThE 
officers quickly REVERSED DIRECTION AND DISCOVERED A MAN LYING FACE DOWN IN 
THE ROADWAY SUFFERING FROM GUNSHOT WOUNDS TO THE CHEST. 

The OFFICERS radioed for an AMBULANCE AND ADMINISTERED FIRST AID TO THE 

VICTIM. They were then approached by two citizens who stated that they had 

SEEN the shooting AND WERE WILLING TO ACCOMPANY THE OFFICERS TO IDENTIFY THE 
CULPRIT. WHO HAD FLED THE SCENE ON FOOT SHORTLY BEFORE THE ARRIVAL OF THE 

officers. 

Officer Austin remained with the victim and Officer Cunningham placed^the 

WITNESSES IN THE POLICE CRUISER AND DROVE IN THE DIRECTION OF THE SUSPECT'S 

flight. As the officer pulled into Vesta Road, he observed a vehicle pulling 

FROM THE CURB AND BOTH WITNESSES SIMULTANEOUSLY STATED THAT THE DRIVER WAS THE 

man responsible for the shooting. 

After instructing the witnesses to lie down on the floor of the cruiser. 
Officer Cunningham chased the suspect vehicle for a short distance and forced 

it to the CURB. 

Officer Cunningham then exited the police cruiser with his service revolvef 

DRAWN while at THE SAME TIME THE SUSPECT EXITED HIS VEHICLE WITH HIS FIREARM 

blazing away at the officer. 

The first shot struck Cunningham in the shoulder and the second shot 

STRUCK the windshield OF SERGEANT MoRRISSEY'S CRUISER. WHICH HAD ARRIVED ON 

the scene during the gun battle. 

Officer Cunningham returned the fire and struck the assailant causing him 
TO collapse to the ground fatally wounded. 

Sergeant Morrissey administered first aid to both the officer and the sus- 
pect, both of WHOM HAD COLLAPSED FOLLOWING THE SHOOTING. 

It IS INDEED AN HONOR TO RECOGNIZE THE COURAGE OF THIS OFFICER. 

Thf Wai tfr Sr-QT T FIftiai of Vai or 

Thf Dfpartm fnt Mfhai of Honor 

Thf Boston Poi it f Rfi iff Association Nemoriai Award 

Tmf Thomas F. S im ivan Award 

Thf Boston Ba nk Award 

To: TlFTFrTivF Josfph P. Smith of DISTRICT D 

About 1:^1 p.m.. Friday. October 29. 1981. Detective Joe Smith was off 

DUTY. WAITING IN LINE AT A BANK IN ChARLESTOWN WHEN HE SUDDENLY OBSERVED 
THREE HOODED SUSPECTS ENTER THE VESTIBULE IN A CROUCHED POSITION AND THEN 
ENTER THE BANK. 



i 



16. 



The second male was found a short distance away^ bleeding from an apparent 

SHOTGUN WOUND TO THE SIDE. ThIS SUSPECT WAS REMOVED TO THE MASSACHUSETTS 

General Hospital and held for treatment. 

The Department Medal of Honor 

The Boston Policf Relief Association Memorial Award 

The Thomas F. Sullivan Award 

The Boston Bank Award 

To: Petectives John. M. Pumphret and Bartolemo Cesso of District D 

At about 7:15 p.m., Saturday, October 10, 1981 these officers, while on 
Berkeley Street near Boylston Street observed three persons at the Capital 
Bank located on Boylston Street. 

Suddenly they saw a flash and heard a gunshot at which time they observed 

A MALE fleeing FROM THE CAPITAL BaNK, HOLDING A REVOLVER IN HIS RIGHT HAND 

and a night deposit bag in his left. 

The suspect darted past the officers who yelled at him to halt. The susp- 
ect PAID NO heed to the OFFICERS AND CONTINUED RUNNING INTO PROVIDENCE StREET 

alley with the officers following on foot. 

Once in the alley, the suspect turned on the officers with his gun raised 
TO A firing position. The suspect was again warned to drop his weapon or 

ELSE BE FIRED UPON, AND AT THIS TIME THE CULPRIT TOSSED THE WEAPON TO THE 
GROUND. 

Further investigation disclosed that a female employee of the Limited, 
located on boylston street, was making a night deposit while accompanied by 
a security guard when she was approached by a male who pointed a gun at her 

AND ORDERED HER TO GIVE UP THE MONEY BAG. ThE SUSPECT THEN FIRED A SHOT OVER 
HER HEAD AND FLED, PASSING THE POLICE CRUISER IN THE PROCESS. 

The DEPOSIT bag was recovered at the scene and CONTAINED $2,566.W IN CASn 

and checks. 

The Department Medal of Honor 

The Boston Poi tcf Rfi iff Asi^nrTAu nN Memoriai Award 

The Thomas F. S un ivan Award 

The Boston Bank Award 

To: Officers John J. Buckley. Jr.. and James F. Gorman of District A 

At about 1:51 p.m., Friday, November 6, 1931, Officers Robert Wentzell and 
James O'Malley were assigned to a sector car in Charlestown and while on patrol 

WERE hailed by A CITIZEN WHO INFORMED THEM OF A ROBBERY-IN-PROGRESS AT THE 

Knights of Columbus Hall on West School Street. 

The officers responded to the location and discovered a Ford Maverick 
parked in the parking lot. Upon investigating the vehicle they found that the 
ignition was popped and called for a backup unit. 

Officers Buckley and Gorman in another sector car, accompanied by Detective 
James Troy, responded to the call and positioned themselves at the rear of the 
BUILDING. Troy assumed an escape preventing position and Buckley and Gorman 
approached the rear door when suddenly the door opened and the officers were 

confronted by ROBBERS ARMED WITH TWO HANDGUNS AND A SHOTGUN. 



17. 



Buckley ordered the suspects to drop their weapons and at this time the 

SUSPECT armed with THE SHOTGUN RAISED HIS WEAPON INTO A FIRING POSITION AND 

Officer Buckley rapidly discharged three rounds from his service revolver^ 

WOUNDING one SUSPECT AND CAUSING THE REMAINING TWO TO SURRENDER. 

Recovered at the scene were two loaded handguns and one fully-loaded 

SHOTGUN. 

Thf Wiiiiam J. Taylor Weritoriqus Service Award 
Thf Boston Pqi.icf Rfi iff Association Mfmoriai Award 
Thf Boston Bank Award 

To: Officers Cornfuus J. Moynihan and Joseph H . McSqrley of District A 

These two officers have distinguished themselves by their consistent sense 
of responsibility and professionalism, their devotion to duty, their alertness, 
their keen powers of observation and the ability to be suspect whereby these 
factors have brought about and culminated in the arrests of numerous armed 
and dangerous felons. 

These officers have made quality arrests over the past year for such 
CRIMES AS Rape, Armed Robbery, Breaking and Entering, Larceny, Narcotics 

violations, and numerous OTHERS. 

It is a PLEASURE TO RECOGNIZE THE EFFORTS OF THESE DEDICATED MEN. 



The Hill 1AM J. Taylor Meritorious Sfrvicf Award 
The Boston Pol icf Relief Association Mfmoriai Award 
The Boston Bank Award 

To: Detectives Arthur Linsky and Paul T. WcDonough of the Criminal Investig - 
ation Division 

During the past year Detectives Linsky and McDonough while assigned to the 
Organized Crime Unit of the Bureau of Investigative Services have effected 
numerous arrests for armed robberies, burglaries and other serious crimes. 
Additionally, these two detectives have made major contributions to the 

SOLUTION of many HOMICIDES. In SOME INSTANCES THEY HAVE BEEN THE ARRESTING 
OFFICERS AND ON OTHER OCCASIONS HAVE HELPED TO PROVIDE KEY EVIDENCE SUCH AS 
RECOVERY OF THE WEAPONS USED, LOCATION OF EYEWITNESSES AND LEAD DEVELOPMENT. 
It SHOULD BE NOTED THAT THIS IS THE FIRST TIME TWO DIFFERENT TEAMS OF 

OFFICERS HAVE BEEN VOTED THIS AWARD IN A SINGLE YEAR SINCE ITS INCEPTION, AND 

THAT THE DECISION TO EXPAND THIS AWARD FOR THIS CALENDAR YEAR WAS NOT WITHOUT 

MANY HOURS OF DISCUSSION BY THE AWARDS BoARD. 

Special. Citation 

To: Officfrs Rorfrt C. Wfnttfi i . Jam fs J. n'flAi LFv AND TlFTFrtivF Jamfs R. 

Trqy of District A 

This Citation is awarded to these individuals for the meritorious action 
they took in conjunction with officers buckley and gorman in containing the 
robbery suspects and successfully aborting the robbery-in-progress at the 
Knights of Columbus Hall in Charlestown. 



18. 



SPFriAi Citation 

To: Officers Stfphfn A. DaCorta. Thomas J. Adams. Dean R. Smith. Detectives 
Francis Sheehan and Thoma s Tonnoi i y 

At 10:20 p.m., Friday, November 2L 1980, the Delta 201 wagon, manned by 
Officers DaCorta and Adams was dispatched to Church's Fried Chicken on 
Huntington Avenue to investigate a report of a hold-up. 

Further information was provided by Dean Smith, who was performing a paid 
detail nearby and left the detail upon receipt of the radio call to investig- 
ate. Officer Smith did confirm that a hold-up was in fact occurring. 

Both DaCorta and Adams arrived within minutes and began evacuating the 
customers and employees who were being held by the gunman. They were joined 
by Detectives Sheehan and Connolly who coordinated their efforts with the 

THREE officers AND WERE SUCCESSFUL IN DISARMING THE SUSPECT AND PLACING HIK 

under arrest. 

Special Citation 

To: Officers Peter F. Mugford and Robfrt D. Kylf of Mobile Operations Patroi 

At approximately 1:59 p.m., Thursday, November 13, 1980, Officers Peter 
Mugford and Robert Kyle, both assigned to motorcycle units, received a radio 
call concerning a hold-up- in-progress at the Federal Reserve Bank at 600 
Atlantic Avenue. Both officers responded to the call and upon arrival were 
informed by a bank guard that a male wearing a green army fatigue jacket had 
just robbed one of the tellers at knifepoint, and that the suspect was still 

IN THE BUILDING, WHICH WAS BEING SEARCHED BY OTHER GUARDS. MuGFORD AND KylE 
IMMEDIATELY BEGAN A SEARCH OF THE BUILDING AND OBSERVED THE SUSPECT RUNNING 
IN A CORRIDOR. ThE TWO OFFICERS INTERCEPTED THE SUSPECT AT GUNPOINT, PLACED 
HIM UNDER ARREST AND RECOVERED $15,000.00 AND THE HUNTING KNIFE USED IN THE 
ROBBERY. 

Spfciai Citation 

To: Officers Francis M. Cai i an and John J. Murphy of District B 

At ABOUT 10:27 a.m., Tuesday, July 21, 1981, two men entered the Sav-Mor 
Pharmacy on Humboldt Avenue in Roxbury. One of the men brandished a sawed- 

OFF SHOTGUN AND POINTED THE WEAPON AT THE MANAGER. ThEY ORDERED HIM TO GET 
DOWN ON THE FLOOR AND THEN WENT BEHIND THE COUNTER AND STRUCK THE MANAGER ON 
THE SIDE OF THE HEAD WITH THE GUN. ThEY THEN ORDERED A FEMALE CLERK TO THE 
FLOOR, AND WHEN SHE INFORMED THEM THAT SHE WAS PREGNANT ONE OF THE SUSPECTS 
STATED THAT HE DIDN'T CARE, AND TOLD HER TO LIE ON HER STOMACH. OnE OF THEM 

then stepped on her back and emptied the cash register. 

Unknown to the robbers, the emptying of the cash register tripped a silent 

ALARM AND DETECTIVES CaLLAN AND MuRPHY RESPONDED TO THE CALL. 

Upon arrival at the store, the officers observed the robbery-in-progress 
and using caution, drew their service revolvers, entered the store, confronted 
the robbers, disarmed thek and placed them under arrest. 



19. 



flpprlAi riTATlQN 

To: Offi^"^ ^^^^^ ^ ^^1^^ ^"" ^^'^""'^^ ^' ^^^^^^'^ ^^ District D 

At about 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, February 17, 1981, Officers Foley and Ferm- 

AN0,ASS16NED TO A PATROL CAR, RESPONDED TO A RADIO CALL ON UnDSDOWNE STREET 
TO is ^A HEALTH AND HOSPITALS AMBULANCE. UPON APPROACHING THE LOCATl N, 
THE CERS DID OBSERVE THROUGH A PLATE GLASS WINDOW AN APPARENT HOLD-UP-1 - 
PROGR A THE SALVATION ArMY StORE AT 61 BROOKLINE AvENUE. OBSERVED WA A 
Te SUSPECT POINTING AN AUTOMATIC PISTOL AT THREE EMPLOYEES WHO HAD THEIR 

"''^Upon'evLating the situation, Foley got out of the cruiser Jn^ proceeded 
UP Landsdowne Street and across Brookline Avenue, while ^^^'"'^llll'^l'' 
cruiser to the intersection of Landsdowne and Brookline in an effort to cut 

OFF THE ESCAPE ROUTE OF THE SUSPECT. At THIS TIME THE SUSPECT SAW THE 
OFFICERS AND FUD THE SCENE ON FOOT DOWN BrOOKLINE AvENUE WHERE HE ENTERED A 
WAITING VEHICLE. As HE ENTERED THE VEHICLE HE AIMED HIS WEAPON AT POLEY 
WHO OBSERVED AT THIS TIME THAT THERE WAS A Sf^LL CHILD WITH THE DRIVER OF _ 

"^"^ NorwiLlNc/TO RISK A SHOOTOUT, FOLEY JUMPED INTO THE CRUISER AND BOTH 
HE AND FeRMANO PURSUED THE ROBBERY SUSPECTS FOR A SHORT DISTANCE, FORCED THEM 
TO THE CURB, DISARMED THEM AND PLACED THEM UNDER ARREST. ThE THREE-YEAR OLD 
SON OF ONE OF THE SUSPECTS WAS PLACED INTO PROTECTIVE CUSTODY. 

^PFrifii r.lTATION 
To: O fF'^'-''^ r.HARi F ^ M. Wo^Fi ANn .In^FPH F . PlSHKIN PF DISTRICT B 

All TOO often in a major police department the day to day activities of 

CERTAIN police OFFICERS GO OVERLOOKED AND UNREWARDED. 

They appear at roll call on time, are properly uniformed and are neat and 

clean in appearance. 

They are the first to respond to a radio call for a back-up car or go to 

THE AID OF A FELLOW OFFICER. 

They follow the instructions of superior officers to the letter and are 

VERY DEPENDABLE AND NEED LITTLE IF ANY SUPERVISION IN THE MOST INTRICATE 0^ 
INVESTIGATIONS. ^ ...ftocMCKT- 

During the past year these officers have exhibited all of the aforement 

lONED qualities AS WELL AS HAVING BEEN COMMENDED FOR THE ARRESTS OF MURDER 
SUSPECTS, NUMEROUS ROBBERY SUSPECTS AND MISCELLANEOUS OTHERS. 

Thes^ two officers were finalists in the search for Taylor Award winners 

AND IN ANY OTHER YEAR WOULD HAVE BEEN SELECTED BY THE AWARDS BoARD. 

SPPrift' f'TATlON 
To: nppirpp TlANlCL J- TlnwNFY OF MoRIIF QPFRATIONS PaTRQ L 

This officer was another candidate for the Taylor Award. 
Officer Downey received numerous recommendations for commendation over 
the past year, resulting from off-duty recognition of a suspect under arrest 

FOR ANOTHER CRIME IN ANOTHER JURISDICTION (SUSPECT WAS BEING SHOWN ON A 

television newscast). The suspect was wanted for a rape in Boston in 1975 

AND wis DESCRIBED AS A SEXUALLY DANGEROUS PERSON. ThE SUSPECT WAS SUBSEQUENT- 
LY TRIED, CONVICTED AND SENTENCED FOR THE RAPE. 



Officer Downey arrested two suspects for Armed Robbery and Assault and 
Battery With A Dangerous Weapon. He made a traffic arrest and discovered that 

THE suspect was WANTED ON TWO COUNTS OF ArMED RoBBERY. WhILE WORKING A PAID 
DETAIL, HE ARRESTED A PURSE SNATCHER WHO AT THE TIME WAS WANTED FOR SEVERAL 
ARMED ROBBERIES BY THE MASSACHUSETTS BaY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY. He 

has arrested drug suspects, and colured a fleeing armed robbery suspect 
within ten minutes of a convenience store hold-up which occurred in 
Dorchester. 

The Department is proud of both this officer and his K9 "Bandit." 

Special Citation 
To: Sfrgfant Waitfr L. Cannfy of District A 

At about 3:15 a.m., Wednesday, September 2, 1931, Sergeant Canney was 
assigned as a Patrol Supervisor in East Boston. While on routine patrol on 
Bennington Street he detected a strong odor of smoke in the area and then 
observed flames coming from the rear of 140 Putnam Street and four adjacent 
dwellings, The Sergeant immediately notified the Operations Division and 
requested fire apparatus and additional police units to assist him in the 
evacuation of the burning buildings. 

Following the radio dispatch the Sergeant immediately entered 1^*0 Putnam 
Street, which appeared to be the main source of the blaze, and began banging 
on doors and calling out to the residents on the first floor apartments. He 
then rwDE his way through the smoke and flames to the upper stories of the 
building. He was at this time joined by Officers Regan and Manning who assist- 
ed HIM IN ALERTING THE RESIDENTS AND LEADING THEM TO SAFETY. 

The Sergeant then re-entered the building with Officers Regan and Hanning 
and attempted to return to the second floor to again rouse the persons inside, 
but was forced back by the intense smoke and flames. 

At this time they were joined by Officers Stone and Skeen and all five 

•OFFICERS alerted THE REMAINING RESIDENTS BY REPEATED ENTRY INTO THE FLAME 
ENGULFED BUILDINGS, EVACUATING A TOTAL OF 35 PEOPLE FROM NINE SEPERATE THREE 
STORY WOOD FRAMED DWELLING HOUSES. SiX ALARMS WERE STRUCK FOR THE FIRE. ThE 
CAUSE OF THE BLAZE WAS LISTED AS "SUSPICIOUS" AND DAMAGE WAS ESTIMATED TO BE 

IN EXCESS OF $150,000. OD Five of the nine houses were totally destroyed. 

Sergeant Canney was removed to the Massachusetts General Hospital, was 
treated for smoke inhalation and subsequently released. 

Speciai Citation 

To: Sergeant William J. Donovan of District D and Officer John A. M cReynolds 
OF Mobile Operations Patrol 

At about 2:55 p.m., Thursday, February 26, 1982, Sergeant Donovan was 
IN A sector car on Columbus Avenue when he observed two unknown males run ■ 

FROM BRADDOCK PaRK TO COLUMBUS AvENUE, WHERE THEY JUMPED INTO A 1980 YELLOW 

Ford which was being operated by a third male. The car sped away at a high 
rate of speed in a southerly direction on columbus avenue. 

At the same time, another unknown male (the victim) WAS OBSERVED CHASING 
THE FLEEING MOTOR VEHICLE ON FOOT. 



21. 



Responding without hesitation. Sergeant Donovan immediately executed a 

U-TURN toward the VICTIM WHO YELLED/I WAS JUST ROBBED, THEY PUT A REVOLVER 

to my head and took $360.00 from me." 

Sergeant Donovan immediately initiated pursuit and braodcasted a descript- 
ion OF THE vehicle AND THE DIRECTION IN WHICH IT WAS TRAVELING. At MASSACHUS- 
ETTS AND Columbus Avenue, the vehicle was stopped in a traffic tie-up. The 
Sergeant alighted from his vehicle with his service revolver drawn and appr- 
oached THE SUSPECT VEHICLE. 

The operator suddenly backed-up, drove out of the line of traffic across 

THE center island AND SPED DOWN MASSACHUSETTS AvENUE AGAINST THE TRAFFIC FLOW. 

The Sergeant jumped back into the cruiser and pursued the suspect vehicle 

THROUGH several BLOCKS IN THE SoUTH EnD. He WAS JOINED IN THE PURSUIT BY 

Officer John A. McReynolds, who at the intersection of East Brookline and 
Washington Streets forced the vehicle to a stop with his motorcycle. The 
three suspects fled on foot into the Cathedral Housing Project. 

Donovan and McReynolds Pursued the suspects on foot and captured two of 
them on a third floor landing as they were attempting, to gain access to the 
roof. The third suspect escaped. 



f^PPriAi Citation 

To: r.AnFT Kfvin .1. RiirKi fy of OpfratiqnS 

At 1:35 p.m., Monday, December 3, 1980, Cadet Kevin J. Buckley, assigned 
to the Personnel Division and detailed to the Office of the Supervisor of 
Cases, Suffolk Superior Court, was on his lunch relief in the vicinity of 
THE Rix Drug Store in Downtown Boston. At this time he observed an unknown 
male running on Washington Street in a suspicious manner. Cadet Buckley then 

OBSERVED A MOUNTED PaTROL OFFICER EMERGE FROM Pl AlLEY IN PURSUIT SHOUTING 

"Grab him." 

Cadet Buckley immediately pursued the suspect on foot and following a 

FOOT RACE captured THE SUSPECT AND RESTRAINED HIM AGAINST A PARKED VEHICLE 
PENDING THE ARRIVAL OF THE MOUNTED OFFICER, WHO ARRESTED AND HANDCUFFED THE 
SUSPECT. 

While restraining the suspect, Buckley was informed by an unidentified 

PEDESTRIAN THAT THE SUSPECT HAD DROPPED A WALLET IN THE STREET DURING THE 

PURSUIT. Following the arrest, Buckley retrieved the wallet and delivered 

IT TO THE OWNER WHO HAD ARRIVED ON THE SCENE AND STATED THAT SHE WAS ABOUT TO 
ENTER THE "HUNGRY TRAVELER" RESTAURANT ON CoURT SQUARE, WHEN SHE FELT A TUG 
ON HER POCKETBOOK AND SAW THE SUSPECT FLEE. ShE SCREAMED AND WAS HEARD BY 

the mounted officer who took up the pursuit. 

But for the swift action of Cadet Buckley the felon may have escaped. 



22. 




IN MEMORIAM 

Lieutenant John F. Hennessey, Badge ^258 
Sergeant George F. Hoey, Jr., Badge 5513 
Detective Edward Caruso, Badge 5392 
Police Officer Steven M. McFarland, Badge 3017 
Police Officer Daniel Sweeney, Badge ^576 
Police Officer John Bondaryk, Badge 37^*6 
Police Officer Felix J. Klimek, Badge 5009 
Police Officer William F. Harvey, Badge 6275 
Police Officer Thomas J. Gill, Badge ^553 



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