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Full text of "Annual report of the Police Commissioner for the City of Boston"

BOSTOTsl 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




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ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
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ANNUAL 
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ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 
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ANNUAL 
ANNUAL 

July 1,1984 to 

Raymond L. Flynn 
Mayor 



REPORT 
REPORT 
REPORT 
REPORT 
REPORT 
REPORT 
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REPORT 
REPORT 
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REPORT 

June 30, 1985 

Francis M. Roache 
Police Commissioner 



J>oc. t o-P . 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Introduction i 

History of the Boston Police Department 1-2 

Organizational Structure - Boston Police Department 3 

Commissioner's Office A-5 

Executive Office 5-6 

Bureau of Professional Standards 6-7 

The Research and Development Division 7-8 

Informational Services Division 9 

Training and Education Division 9-10 

Bureau of Field Services (including Areas A-E) 10-16 

Division G - Special Operations 16-18 

Division H - Operations 18-19 

Bureau of Investigative Services 19-21 

The Intelligence Division 21-23 

Bureau of Administrative Services 23-25 

Bureau of Neighborhood Services 25-27 

198A - 1985 Budget 28 

Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted 29 

9-1-1 Calls Received 30 

Units Dispatched by Month 31 

Actual Part I Offenses by Month 32 

Part I Clearances by Month 33 

Graph - Part I Offenses 34 

Area A Part I Offenses/Clearances Comparison 83-84/84-85 35 

Area B Part I Offenses/Clearances Comparison 83-84/84-85 36 

Area C Part I Offenses/Clearances Comparison 83-84/84-85 37 

Area D Part I Offenses/Clearances Comparison 83-84/84-85 38 

Area E Part I Offenses/Clearances Comparison 83-84/84-85 39 

Demographics 40 



INTRODUCTION 



The task of policing Boston's rapidly growing city becomes more 
complex every year. Methods of dealing with new problems to the 
welfare of our community are continually being updated to provide 
improvements in the areas of service delivery, prevention of crime 
and apprehension of offenders. Only through continual aooption of 
improved policies and utilization of updated technologies can the 
Boston Police Department keep pace with today's ever changing 
society and provide the quality of service that allows Bostonians to 
feel at ease in the knowledge that they are being properly protected. 

In an effort to achieve this goal, a broadening concept of 
social responsibility on the part of the police has resulted in a 
more positive philosophy of service. This in turn has generateo new 
programs emphasizing a revitalized relationship with the 
neighborhoods that the police serve. 

Our progress toward better police service for the past fiscal 
year is outlined in the following annual report. 



HISTORY OF THE BOSTON POLICE DEPARTMENT 



The Boston Police Department was the first organized police force 
in the United States. It began as a constable force similar to the 
one in England, and for many years that concept served Boston well. 
Constables were men who were empowered by town selectmen with 
statutory authority to enforce the law. The constable was well known 
in the small community at the time, and he knew his fellow citizens 
well. Strangers could not remain long in town without the constable 
knowing it; nor could illegal activities be carried on without his 
hearing about them. This combination of official authority and 
familiarity with the people and customs of nis community provided 
enough means for him to enforce the law -- as long as his community 
remained small. 

However, as Boston grew larger, the constables ran into problems. 
Though they held practically the same powers as the present day 
police, they lacked the resources to deal with an increasingly 
complex society. Officers were poorly paid and had to hold other 
jobs to support themselves. This cut severely into the time they 
could devote to peace keeping. Nor was there any organization or 
singleness of purpose; when there was more than one constable in a 
community, no system existed to coordinate their efforts. 

Inevitably, the colonial legislature had to provide for a watch 
that would "walk in and about" the streets at night -- the first 
formal move toward a public patrol and the initial step toward 
establishing a system of watchmen -- trained, paid, fixed in numbers 
and sworn to officer. In 1861 the Boston selectmen were authorized 
to appoint up to 30 citizens as watchmen, with the town "agreeing to 
pay the charge". The men would be put into divisions, with one from 
each group installed as constable (head) of that unit. At first, 
temporary, these measures became part of a general law applying to 
all towns in the Commonwealth. Especially made clear was the 
provision that the watchmen force was to be funded by the towns for 
the use of their service. 



In 1801 the Boston selectmen were authorized to form as large a 
force of watchmen as they deemed expedient. They were also to set 
up an administrative structure of constables, wherein the division 
constables were to submit to the head constable "an account of the 
state of the town during their tour of duty". * The head constable 
reported to the selectmen. 

This structure held until the establishment of the city charter 
in 1822, wherein peacekeeping duties were taken over by the Mayor 
and city aldermen. (The word "police" was used in the Commonwealth 
for the first time in this charter. It was first applied in England 
about thirty-five years earlier.) 

The most important change resulting from the two centuries of 
transition from "constables" to "police" is "state of the art" 
technology. Officers are now trained in defensive driving, rapid 
deployment, computers, preserving evidence and communications. 

However, most criminal cases in Boston are still solved the "old 
fashioned way" through observation, leg work, perserverance , 
witnesses, informants and luck. Two famous cases, the Boston 
Strangler and the Brinks Heist, were solved by a combination of the 
above ingredients. 

Finally, it must be emphasized that the development of the 
Boston Police Force has been an evolutionary process. The obligation 
of today's police has not changed: they have the same obligation to 
preserve the "peace of the Commonwealth" as their constabulatory 
predecessors had to keep "the King's peace". 



Footnote 

Boston Days and Ways by Mary Caroline Crawford. 



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3 



COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 

Francis M. Roache was appointed the Police Commissioner of 
Boston by Mayor Raymond L. Flynn on February 1, 1985. He succeeded 
Joseph M. Jordan, who had served in this capacity from November 15, 
1976. Commissioner Roache is the thirty-fourth person to be 
appointed Police Commissioner since a single Commissioner replaced a 
board of three to govern the Boston Police Department. 

On February 7, 1985, the newly appointed Commissioner announced 
the first phase of the Department's reorganization. Among the 
changes were the addition of the Bureau of Neighborhood Services, 
the appointment of a new Super intendent- in-Chief , three 
Superintendents, two Deputy Superintendents and the Department's 
first civilian bureau chief. 

Appointed to the rank of Super intendent- in-Chief was John A. 
Gifford, a former Deputy in command of the Operations Division. 

Superintendent John E. Barry, formerly responsible for the 
Homicide Unit was promoted from Deputy and named Chief of the Bureau 
of Investigative Services. Lieutenant Joseph F. Dunford was 
appointed Deputy Superintendent and placed in command of the Drug 
Unit. 

Superintendent James F. MacDonald, formerly commander of the 
South Zone, was named Chief of the Bureau of Field Services. 

Deputy Superintendent Joseph C. Carter, formerly night commander 
of Area B, was promoted to the rank of Superintendent and named 
Chief of the newly created Bureau of Neighborhood Services. The new 
Bureau encompasses the Sexual Assault Unit, the Senior Affairs Unit, 
the Crime Prevention Unit and the Community Disorders Unit. 

Commissioner Roache also announced the appointment of Mr. Peter 
Welch as the Director of the Bureau of Administrative Services. 
Mr. Welch formerly served as the Special Assistant to the Director 
of the Department of Public Facilities. This is an innovative move 
on the part of the Commissioner, as a civilian has never before been 
placed in charge of a bureau within the department. 



4. 



The day to day functioning of the Police Department relies upon 
the successful communication of the Commissioner's goals and 
intentions to officers and the public alike. It also requires the 
conscious and effective control of policing means and ends employed 
by the Department. To ensure this, the Commissioner's Office 
consists of an extensive support staff which includes the following; 
The Executive Office, The Labor Relations Office, Legal Affairs and 
The Bureau of Professional Standards (including the Internal 
Affairs, Ant i -Corrupt ion and Staff Inspection Divisions), 

THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE 

The Executive Office, headed by Superintendent in Chief Gifford 
is ultimately responsible for the delivery of police services to the 
city. Superintendent Gifford, an attorney and former Deputy in Area 
E and Operations, is the highest ranking officer and functions as 
officer in command, in charge of all police activities. His office 
determines standards of behavior and integrity appropriate for the 
members of the police department. It ensures the implementation and 
obeyance of the Commissioner's orders and policies and acts as 
liaison between the Commissioner and the Bureaus. 

THE LABOR RELATIONS OFFICE represents the Commissioner at employee 
collective bargaining negotiations, labor conferences and grievance 
discussions. This section also assists the Police Commissioner in 
developing labor relation policies and advises the Command Staff in 
instituting compliance procedures. 

LEGAL AFFAIRS formulates legal opinions for the Commissioner and 
provides him with a legal perspective on policy matters. In addition, 
the Legal Advisor provides legal advice to members of the force 
concerning the performance of their duties. The office also prepares, 
reviews and participates in the legislative process. The Legal 
Advisor represents the Department in selected civil litigation and 
maintains liaison with the City Law Department and other criminal 
justice agencies, encouraging their participation in the development 
of responses to the legal problems of the the police. 



Legal Affairs personnel assist in the development of law-related 
training programs and in the drafting of rules and regulations of 
the Department. 

The Legal Affairs Office is also responsible for the 
presentation of all cases where disciplinary charges are brought 
against Department employees. Legal Affairs personnel present the 
evidence and handle subsequent litigation before the Civil Service 
Commission, State and Federal Courts. 

BUREAU OF PROFESSIONAL STANDADS 

On March 27, 1985 Albert J. Sweeney was sworn in at a public 
ceremony to serve as Superintendent of the newly implemented Bureau 
of Professional Standards. Superintendent Sweeney was appointed to 
the Boston Police Department on October 7, 1970 and rose to the rank 
of Lieutenant in 1978, Prior to his most recent appointment. 
Superintendent Sweeney served as Deputy Chief of Operations for the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Police. 

Superintendent Sweeney reports directly to the Police 
Commissioner to ensure that the professional standards of the Boston 
Police Department are maintained. 

This Bureau monitors, evaluates, investigates, and updates 
rules, regulations, procedures and policies. Complaints concerning 
violations of the above standards and policies are handled by this 
Bureau. The Bureau of Professional Standards consists of the 
following divisions: 

The Internal Affairs Division is responsible for the Departmental 
disciplinary process and investigates complaints of police 
misconduct from the public and departmental personnel, ensuring a 
thorough investigation. This division recommends disciplinary action 
for violations of rules, regulations, procedures and policies. It 
also reviews and analyzes disciplinary actions taken by the 
department to assess their fairness, and advises the Bureau Chief 
where additional training and operational changes are needed to 
reduce complaints. 



The Anti-Corruption Division is responsible for providing the 
Bureau Chief with complete and accurate information concerning the 
integrity of the department. This division performs intensive 
investigation of any instance where a member of the department is 
suspected of being involved in criminal activity. It also monitors 
the efforts and effectivness of police commanders to combat 
corruption in their assigned areas, and looks for weaknesses in the 
department, making necessary recommendations to the Bureau Chief. 
The Staff Inspection Division is responsible for the evaluation of 
Departmental performance, evaluates the relevance and adequacy of 
rules and regulations, and recommends changes according to need. 
This division assists in the development of departmental policy and 
procedures to improve perfomance and standards; performs periodic 
inspections of units and areas to assess their level of performance, 
staffing and needs. Staff Inspection also monitors the performance 
of private towing companies working in conjunction with the police 
department . 

Directly under the supervision of the Executive Office are the 
Research and Development Division, Informational Services, Training 
and Education and the following Bureaus; Field Services, 
Investigative Services, Administrative Services and Neighborhood 
Services . 

THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT DIVISION has the responsibility of 
updating, improving upon or creating departmental policy in a timely 
and appropriate manner. It gathers a variety of statistics on crime, 
provides an analysis of such, and ensures its subsequent 
distribution to the proper units. Research and Development is a 
troubleshooting section, seeking remedies to departmental 
inefficiencies, inaccuracies, and gaps in policy or programs. The 
Division also prepares long range plans to improve the delivery of 
police service to the public. 

During the 1984-1985 fiscal year, the Research and Development 
Division improved upon its format of the Command Staff Report, which 
disseminates monthly performance, personnel and operations figures. 

Included in the Command Staff Report is data from the Uniform Crime 

7. 



Report, computerized criminal statistic printouts, and graphic 
representations of beat manning, free patrol time and sick and 
injured figures. 

Also revitalized by Research and Development was the 
Distinguished Guest Lecturer Program. Amoung the speakers this past 
year were the Honorable William J. Bennett, Secretary of Education 
and Judge Wexler of Israel. During the 85-86 year, the Department 
can expect to hear from prominent persons in television, sports, 
medicine and other diverse fields. Members of the department can 
also expect a responsive new suggestion network. Suggestion boxes 
will be placed in the area stations for the convenience of 
department members. 

This Division has kept a continuous record of suicides and 
attempted suicides in Boston jails and in contiguous communities. It 
is believed that the use of background data on suicide victims in 
jails may provide insight into the prevention of future suicide 
attempts. Research and Development uses this information, and 
materials from around the country to educate members of the 
department regarding this problem. 

The Victim Assistance Program plan of action as developed by 
Research and Development, is perhaps most indicative of the type of 
work this Division does. Research and Development was instrumental 
in developing this program that attempts to meet the special needs 
of victims of violent crimes. A plan of action was developed that 
included the training and education of police personnel in 
sensitivity to the victims of crime. Also targeted was the need for 
police follow-up service and guidance for the victim if he or she 
was to become involved in the criminal justice process. It was the 
role of Research and Development to pull together the many divisions 
of the police department and integrate various social agencies and 
the courts to form a comprehensive assistance network for victims 
of violent crime. 



8. 



INFORMATIONAL SERVICES 

Since January, 1985, the Informational Services Unit has 
published over one hundred twenty-five (25) news releases and 
advisories informing the media and public at large of actions and 
activities undertaken by' the Boston Police Department. Also, the 
Informational Services Unit, in a further effort to assist media 
relations, has increased staffing which now provides twenty-four 
hour a day coverage, seven days a week. 

Over the past year, the Unit has developed and introduced new 
policies and guidelines for all departmental personnel wliich 
strictly define the department's role and relationship with regard 
to the dissemination of information to the public. 

Informational Services has also initiated an Anti-Auto Theft 
Crime Patrol Program in conjuction with a local radio station. This 
program was established to deter auto thefts throughout the city and 
is now also used to control specific types of criminal activity 
which exist in certain areas. The results of this new program have 
been successful particularly in the recovery of stolen motor 
vehicles and the apprehension of violators of the motor vehicle laws. 

This unit is also responsible for overseeing and planning all 
department ceremonies and activities relating to the issuance of 
awards, special citations and commendations. 

THE TRAINING AND EDUCATION DIVISION under the Supervision of Lt. 
Robert Dunford, oversees the development and administration of all 
training and education programs which include: preparing new 
curriculum; course development; firearms standards; recruit training 
programs; first responders; detective training; community disorders 
training and promotional training. 

Several developments within the Division are deserving of 
special attention. Among these were the establishment of a permanent 
home for the Police Academy, the hiring of 144 new Police Officers, 
and the institution of drug testing and permanent height to weight 
requirements for these new officers. 



9. 



The new Boston Police Academy is located at 85 Williams Avenue, 
Hyde Park, in the old Fairmount Middle School which was built in 
1953. The new facility is named in honor of Deputy Superintendent 
William J. Hogan, who had served as Director and Director Emeritus 
of the Academy for more than ten years. He had an ongoing associa- 
tion with the Academy as instructor and guest lecturer for more than 
thirty years. At the time of his death, Deputy Hogan was recognized 
as the foremost expert on criminal law in New England. The school 
was closed in June of 1981 and it remained vacant until October 18, 
1984, when the Department announced that it would relocate its 
Academy to this facility. Since that time it has undergone 
extensive rehabilitation and restructuring. The Academy building now 
has sixteen classrooms, a large lecture hall, a law library, offices 
for administration and staff, extensive locker rooms, a gymnasium, 
an auditorium and work-out rooms equipped with Nautilus and weight 
lifting equipment. In addition to being a training center for the 
Boston Police Department, the Academy also serves as a regional 
resource for police and law enforcement agencies throughout New 
England . 

While the Training and Education division has the primary 
responsibility of training new recruits, it is also responsible for 
the in-service training mentioned above. This training is critical 
in its capacity of keeping members of the department well versed in 
new policy techniques. 

BUREAU OF FIELD SERVICES 

The Bureau of Field Services is charged with the command of 
police personnel assigned to neighborhood Areas A-E, and Divisions F 
(Team Police), G (Special Operations), and H (Operations Division). 
It is this Bureau which is responsible for the patrol and delivery 
of police services to Boston's neighborhoods. The Bureau of Field 
Services directs the deployment of all command, supervisory, 
investigative and patrol units. It ensures the proper response to 
emergency calls received in its Operations (9-1-1) Center. It 
suggests and implemenmts long range and contigency plans, while 
coordinating efforts with other bureaus to update and improve police 

services . 

10. 



The Bureau of Field Services is divided into five ( 5)administra- 
tive areas and three (3) administrative divisions. In Areas A-E, 
area personnel are responsible for the provision of police services 
to the community. Each area maintains a patrol force of cars, 
motorcycles, walking beats and mounted patrols sufficient in size to 
provide continuous coverage in each area. Area personnel cooperate 
fully with specialized units in seeking ways to improve the overall 
effectiveness of police operations in the area. 

AREA A 

Area A, encompasses East Boston, Charlestown, the North End, 
Beacon Hill and downtown Boston and covers |3,69 square miles and 
78.3 road miles. This Area, perhaps the most diversified of all the 
Areas, houses the sixth largest airport, numerous tourist 
attractions, the financial capital of New England as well as several 
major hospitals and the largest retail/commercial section in the 
state . 

Due to the complexity of this Area it is not surprising that 
crime ranges the gamut from A to Z. Heavy emphasis is placed on 
personal safety for all who live, work and tour the Area. Because of 
the large number of people coming into the neighborhoods and 
downtown areas, it is necessary to employ a combination of foot, 
mounted, and directed patrol. Specialized units from headquarters 
are assigned daily and seasonally. 

Area A leads the city in prostitution/vice related arrests. Gang 
patrols have been utilized to combat public drinking/vandalism and 
the Auto Task Force members are utilized to deter auto theft which 
is a major problem. The Community Service Officers of Area A are 
used as the sounding board for complaints from neighborhood groups 
and the business community alike. Two neighborhood councils interact 
with all city departments on a monthly basis to insure that the 
level of police services are maintained and targeted for use. 

This area recently underwent a reorganization relative to 
patrol. All patrol, walking, service and mounted units and rapid 
response personnel were given the opportunity of selecting 
particular areas for their assignments. This change benefitted both 

the department and the neighborhood. 

11. 



Due to the increased publicity surrounding drug/alcohol abuse, 
Area A requested that guest speakers attend meetings at area high 
schools to alert the students to the dangers of these substances. At 
the present time, a pilot program is being developed to target a 
younger audience in this awareness effort. 

Finally, increased efforts to combat the sale of illegal drugs 
are underway. Coordination between Area personnel. Drug Control 
Units both locally and federally are constantly being upgraded with 
the hope of alleviating this serious menace. With continued 
communication and cooperation, the efforts of the community and the 
police will insure this problem receives the highest priority it 
deserves . 

AREA^ 

Area B, which consists of Roxbury and Mattapan covers 8.2 square 
miles and 237.6 road miles. Under the command of Deputy Superinten- 
dent William Celester, several changes occurred during the 1984-1985 
fiscal year worth noting: The Youth Assistance Unit was introduced, 
personnel were added to existing units and the Area demonstrated an 
impressive arrest and assist record. The new Youth Assistance Unit 
was one of the most important projects initiated by Area B in the 
1984-1985 fiscal year. The unit, which is comprised of three 
officers: Officers Suzanne James, William Lopez and Raymond Mosher, 
provides comprehensive referral, counselling, and mediation 
services, as well as basic police services to the children of 
Roxbury and Mattapan. 

The officers, specially trained in child abuse and sexual 
exploitation detection, as well as in the laws and statistics of the 
Massachusetts Juvenile Police Officers Association have compiled an 
admirable case record. Since April, 1985, 400 missing children cases 
have been cleared, nine (9) child abuse complaints made, six (6) 
investigations made of alleged sexual abuse of minors, over 
twenty-two (22) cases closed involving weapons or parental 
kidnapping, and over seventy (70) family referrals made to family 
assistance agencies. The unit works together with parents to find 
viable options for troubled youth as alternatives to the criminal 
justice system. The unit, if unable to reach the youth via parental 

12. 



cooperation or counselling, will also assist the youth in court, 
seeking the best judicial remedy available for the particular 
individual. The unit works closely with the Youth Speaker's Bureau, 
the Department of Social Services, the Department of Welfare and Job 
Assistance Programs to provide the most comprehensive assistance to 
the youths of Roxbury and Mattapan. 

Area B also sponsors the Boston Police Explorers, a group of 
forty (40) 14-19 year olds. Once again, members of the department 
work closely with teens, training them in first aid, interpersonal 
relations, and community related programs. 

The anti-crime unit has increased by ten (10) with an increase 
in drug arrests of 33% compared to last year. In addition, there are 
now two (2) Community Service Officers. These officers work with 
community groups to coordinate crime watch efforts, youth service 
efforts and all issues affecting the community that police services 
can enhance. In cooperation with the Youth Assistance Program, the 
children of Area B were offered extensive fingerprinting services. 
This service, free of charge, provided fingerprints of the child and 
upon completion, released the prints to respective parents. 

Area B was proud to recognize the efforts of five (5) of its 
officers with Special Citations: Officer Rudolph E. Szegda and 
Officer Joseph P. Lally entered a burning building to awaken a 
sleeping tenant and lead him to safety. Officer Lally suffered smoke 
inhalation and burns in the dispatch of duty. Officer Robert Rosado, 
Officer David P. Roberto and Officer Timothy Murray were commended 
on their use of the warrant printout book which culminated in more 
than three hundred (300) arrests. 

AREA C 

Area C, comprised of Dorchester and South Boston, covers 7.007 
square miles and 131.50 road miles, and is commanded by Deputy 
Superintendent Daniel Flynn. During the past year, these communities 
have taken a more active role in matters of Public Safety. Along 
with the Police Department they have identified drug and alcohol 
abuse as serious community problems and have developed educational 
and preventative programs to address these issues. In matters of 

public safety, an exchange of information between community groups, 

13. 



the business community and the police has helped to clarify the role 
of the community and the responsibilities of the police. This has 
helped the community set realistic expectations for the Police and 
reduce frustrations. Working with the Drug Control Unit and outside 
agencies, Area C Police Officers have made a significant number of 
drug arrests during the year. Although the problem has'nt been 
eliminated, an important effort has begun to address the problem. 

In the area of domestic violence, the statistics are alarming; 
approximately one third of female homicide victims are killed by 
their husbands or boyfriends and over one million reports of child 
abuse or neglect are filed each year in this country. Efforts have 
been developed to enhance the ability of the Boston Police to 
respond to incidents of family trouble. Inter-agency communication 
and cooperation has improved agency response and helped to diffuse 
dangerous situations. 

Within the next year efforts will continue to combat drug and 
alcohol abuse and to increase police and community cooperation. 
Also, the efforts of the Dorchester Task Force to respond to 
incidents of racial violence in cooperation with the department will 
continue . 

AREA D 

Area D, which encompasses diverse communities such as the South 
End, Back Bay, and Br ighton-Al Iston , covers 6.88 square miles and 
144.4 road miles. Under the command of Deputy Superintendent Paul 
Evans, this Area demonstrated the necessary responsiveness to each 
community's special needs. In the South End, Area D personnel were 
instructed to crackdown on drug dealing, prostitution, and street 
crimes that prevented the safe passage of residents. The concerted 
efforts of Area D personnel in this area has made this possible. 

The Brighton-Allston area characterized by the high 
concentration of student residents, has been recognized as a target 
area for burglaries and other such crimes. Area D has responded 
accordingly. With the recognition of this special problem. Area D 
personnel are particularly alert to behavior associated with 
property crimes in the Allston-Brighton area. 



14 



Two incidents worth noting occurred in early 1985. In February, 
Officer Quinn of Area D was shot in the line of duty while 
attempting to halt the robbery of a supermarket. In early 1985 
Officers Dominquez and Tully, while making a routine traffic stop 
discovered three males transporting a victim in the back of their 
van. The three were apprehended and charged with murder. 

In addition, Area D had six (6) of its officers recognized with 
formal awards or citations in 1984: Officer Kiernan M. Fitzgerald 
received the Schroeder Brothers Memorial Award, the Department Medal 
of Honor, the Boston Police Relief Association Memorial Award, the 
Thomas F. Sullivan Award and the Boston Bank Award. Officer 
Fitzgerald, while off duty, had confronted a male armed with a .38 
caliber revolver who had been firing upon motorists on Columbus 
Avenue. The male, advised by Officer Fitzgerald to drop his weapon, 
took aim at Fitzgerald. Fitzgerald drew his weapon, advised the male 
that he would shoot, and successfully disarmed the suspect. Officer 
Eduardo Dominquez, Jr., was cited for assisting in the apprehension 
of an armed robbery suspect while off duty. Officer William J. Walsh 
was cited for the off duty capture of one armed robbery suspect and 
his assist in the subsequent capture of a second armed robbery 
suspect in the vicinity of Massachusetts Avenue. Officers Kevin 
Jones and Richard J. Sweeney were cited for an arrest of a 
suspicious male whom they discovered, after pursuit, had committed a 
particularly vicious robbery minutes before. Detective Marisela 
Perez received a special citation in recognition of her continued 
bravery and diligence as a decoy in the South End. 

AREA E 

Area E, which consists of West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Hyde 
Park, Roslindale and Readville covers 16.73 square miles and 263.5 
road miles. This Area had particular success with its gang unit 
during the past year. These residential areas have in the past been 
riddled with youth gang disturbances, public drinking and disorderly 
conduct. This past summer the new "gang car" responded to 1,000 
public drinking, disorderly conduct and gang calls. The increased 
police presence, and the visible patrol of the gang unit, resulted 

in a 50°6 decrease of total gang related calls for service. 

15. 



Area E had an impressive arrest record, showing tripled drug 
arrests, and a twofold increase in total arrests. Area E has also 
experienced a decrease in criminal offenses especially Part One 
crimes as a direct result of team policing. The "community-police 
officer relationship" consisting of concerned neighborhood residents 
and devoted police officers has been proven effective as shown by a 
tragic homicide that occured June 19, 1985. 

It's well known that crimes go unsolved due to insufficient 
evidence. An innocent victim was brutally shot and killed on 
Washington Street in Roslindale. One resident discovered a .22 
calibre automatic pistol among pup tents and immediately reported 
his findings to Area E and brought police officers back to the scene 
where the evidence was discovered. Another citizen lent his personal 
support and knowledge to the overall scheme and helped match a motor 
vehicle that contributed to other evidence. As a result of the 
officer's meticulous research and with the cooperation of these 
residents, a suspect was apprehended. With such continued support, 
crimes will continue to be solved and hopefully, with resident 
watch/team policing endeavors, future crimes can be prevented. 

DIVISION G, SPECIAL OPERATIONS 

Division G, the Special Operations Division provides the 
department with specialized units which are utilized in situations 
where traditional methods are insufficient. The following units 
make up Special Operations: the Mobile Operations Patrol Unit, the 
Canine Unit, the Explosive Ordinance Unit, the Threat Management 
Team, Hostage Negotiation Team, the Harbor Patrol Unit, Technical 
Services, Dignitary Protection and Hazardous Material Enforcement 
Unit. 

The Explosive Ordinance Unit has been upgraded to include the 
most up-to-date bomb transportation and detection devices. The 
Boston Police Department, in conjunction with Natick Labs, developed 
and implemented the use of new bomb suits to better protect 
Explosive Ordinance personnel. The use of a highly specialized 
robot has proven successful in the detection and removal of 
explosives from buildings, and has been integrated into the 

Explosive Ordinance Unit's activities. 

16. 



The Threat Management Unit and The Hostage Negotiation Team 
have also benefited from the use of the robot mentioned above. The 
robot is sent into those situations in which hostages are held or in 
which police personnel are physically endangered. The robot, 
equipped with speakers and microphones, transmits messages between 
police and captor. New equipment incorporated into daily use by 
these teams also include an armored vehicle, barrier trucks, video 
units, and ballistic shields used in dynamic entry maneuvers. 

Special Operations also serves a positive purpose in its 

protective capacity. The Dignitary Protection Unit protects an 

average of 2 to 3 dignitaries each week. The Hazardous Material 

Enforcement Unit recently removed barrells of hazardous waste from 

areas within the communities of Dorchester and Roxbury in which 

children had free access to the poisonous materials. The Mounted 

Unit and the Canine Unit offered its resources to area police in 

weeks past to assist in the search for a missing child. The Canine 

Unit has trained similar canine units throughout the New England 

area. The Boston Police Canine Unit has served as a role model to 

newly organized units throughout the country. It offers training 
programs and suggestions that enhance canine patrol. 

The Harbor Patrol has been expanded to include fifteen (15) to 
eighteen (18) scuba divers. Scuba divers are now equipped with the 
most up-to-date underwater technology. The Boston Police 
Department's underwater photography capabilities have greatly 
expanded investigation possibilities. Divers can now develop 
underwater still photos in two (2) to three (3) minutes. Crime 
scene photography can now include underwater evidence. This 
capability has been demonstrated in the location of a boat on which 
it is believed a young student was murdered. The evidence secured by 
the scuba team offered invaluable evidence in the ongoing murder 
investigation. The Harbor Patrol Unit also maintains an inflatable 
boat, used in low water rescue missions. The unit also has aquatic 
sleds that enable divers to swim at six (6) times the speed they 
would attain without the sled. 



17 



The coordinated efforts of Special Operations with other units 
in the Department has made possible the safe and successful arrests 
of over 100 drug offenders. Ballistic shields and armored vehicles 
have been particularly useful in these dynamic entry arrests. 
Overall, Special Operations provides important crisis management 
services as well as more positive protective services. 

DIVISION H, THE OPERATIONS DIVISION , is an essential branch of the 
Bureau of Field Services. Operations receives the emergency calls 
for service, determines proper response to such calls, and 
accordingly directs the deployment of rapid response units. The 
city, divided by North and South districts, is served by the rapid 
response unit in all critical, emergency situations. All other 
non-emergency police calls are dispatched to area units. The rapid 
response unit is designed to remain available for all critical calls 
in which an individual's life is in jeopardy or when conditions 
indicate that delay would result in serious injury, illness or the 
escape of a felon. The 9-1-1 Operations Center receives an average 
of 3,000 calls a day. 

The Telecommunications Center , which contains the Stolen Car 
Unit and Tow Unit, maintains a network with the Law Enforcement 
Agency Processing System (LEAPS), the Criminal Justice Information 
System (CJIS), the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications 
System (NLETS), and the National Criminal Information Center (NLIC). 
These systems provide the Boston Police Department with motor 
vehicle registration information, warrant checks, missing persons 
information, and stolen property itemizations, as well as other 
police related data. The Stolen Car Unit received 15,550 calls 
reporting stolen vehicles in the 198A-1985 fiscal year. 

In February of 1985 Operations updated its telecommunications 
system by switching to the Horizon Phone System. At the same time 
the Boston Police Department added twenty (20) new 911 lines. The 
Horizon system indicates the number of calls received per hour, per 
shift, per operator. It computes calls in which the caller hangs up 
before speaking with the operator. The Horizon indicates time 
lapses between the initial ring and the response to the ring of 



18, 



the phone, as well as quantities of time spent by the operator with 
the caller, and the time required to document that call after 
dispatch. Efficiency rates are also computed by Horizon. Finally, 
this system indicates when there is trouble in the telephone lines 
or system. Horizon enables the Operations Division to monitor its 
performance, isolate areas which need improvement, and respond 
accordingly. The result has been increased efficiency of police 
responses. 

THE BOREAU OF INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 

This Bureau, commanded by Superintendent John Barry, is staffed 
by 145 law enforcement personnel and 19 civilian personnel. The 
Bureau's objectives include the prevention of criminal offenses by 
identifying, apprehending, and effectively prosecuting those persons 
responsible. Investigative Services also maintains proper liaison 
with federal, state and local departments and agencies which are 
concerned with all aspects of the criminal investigation process. 
The Bureau is currently comprised of the three following divisions: 
Criainal Investigations, Intelligence and Technical Services. 

QIIMINAL INVEST I GAT lO MS 

The most significant change within this Division occurred with 
the establishment of the Sexual Assault Unit . Commencing July 1, 
1984 and headed by Lieutenant Detective Margaret O'Malley, the 
unit's personnel consists of twelve members composed equally of men 
and women, who are both street-wise and sensitive. 

Since the creation of Boston's Sexual Assault Unit it appears 
that more victims have confidence in reporting rape. This has 
resulted in a closer fit between the actual number of rapes and the 
number of reported rapes. Moreover, while reports of sexual assaults 
are rising, so are the number of arrests. In fact, statistics show 
that the number of apprehensions has doubled since the last fiscal 
year. ■ 



19. 



The Sexual Assault Unit has already gathered some striking 
statistics relevant to the types of rape committed. Data from the 
previous ten years indicate that victims who were sexually attacked 
by total strangers reported the assaults more often than those 
attacked or assaulted by acquaintances in so called "date" rapes. 

However, in the last year approximately three-quarters of the 
reported sexual assaults were committed by an assailant(s) known to 
the victim. In response to this trend members of the Sexual Assault 
Unit have been properly trained in sensitivity and thus ignore the 
myths surrounding acquaintance attacks. Further, rape counselors in 
Boston hospitals have noticed among the unit members a sensitivity 
to the trauma experienced by victims. This knowledge of this is 
filtering down, by word-of-mouth , from rape victim to rape victim 
and has led many former reluctant victims to come forward and report 
their attacks. 

Finally, while the Sexual Assault Unit's main objective is the 
apprehension of rapists, it also has a long range goal. The latter 
is to educate the public in an effort to change regressive attitudes 
about rape. Until this is accomplished the Unit faces an uphill 
climb in its drive to free victims from the terrors of sexual 
assault . 

The Drug Unit of the Boston Police Department is a major priority 
of Commissioner Francis M. Roache. Under his leadership, the Drug 
Unit has experienced a substantial increase in personnel to 
strengthen drug control enforcement within neighborhoods. During the 
initial months of his appointment, the Commissioner was faced with 
the fact that Roxbury was plagued with a series of shooting 
incidents. These were attributed to "drug wars" between rival New 
York and Detroit gangs. Information was compiled from various 
agencies and a booklet was distributed to those officers working in 
the area of concern. 

Increased police presence and numerous arrests calmed the area 
for several months, but in late May a new series of shootings 
occurred and it appeared that the same problems were erupting again. 
Subsequently, with the combined efforts of the Drug Unit, 
Intelligence, Homicide and Area B, an in-depth analysis was con- 



20. 



ducted. As a result of this study, both Area B and Homicide were 
supplied with information which led to warrants for and the arrests 
of a number of individuals in connection with these shootings. 

The additional personnel, coupled with the newly created Heroin 
Task. Force, have contributed to a doubling of arrest figures over 
the previous year. As the arrests increased, the number of those 
coming forward with drug-related information also increased. Strong 
emphasis has been placed on drug education programs within 
communities with the objective of increasing public awareness. The 
Unit continues to work in close cooperation with the Suffolk County 
District Attorney's Task Force, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
Customs Office, Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, and the 
Coast Guard. Finally, the Drug Unit works closely with the Drug 
Enforcement Agency and many other agencies. 

The Mis sing Persons Unit continues to maintain all record of lost 
children and missing persons. This Unit has established initial 
report and follow-up procedures which assist in keeping the files 
accurate and up to date. When a lost child or missing person has 
been located, the Missing Persons Unit is notified and proceeds to 
clear the report through N.C. I.C. to ensure the accuracy of the 
federal clearing house files. 

TtUii INTELLIGENCE DIYISIOM has undergone a dramatic reorganization 
which has included the addition of new personnel and an innovative 
approach to the gathering of intelligence information. The 
reorganization has also strongly delineated the functions of this 
unit as opposed to those of the Organized Crime Unit. 

Although both units continued to work closely together, the 
Intelligence Unit greatly broadened their responsibilities in order 
to keep the Department informed of crime trends and patterns in all 
areas of the city. In addition to the surveillance of those 
individuals responsible for traditional organized criminal 
activities, the Intelligence Unit now also maintains surveillance of 
such diverse organizations as motorcycle gangs, drug gangs, Asian 
organized crime, and radical and/or terrorist groups. 

21. 



The unit works closely with other agencies and departments 
throughout the country in order to have the most up-to-date 
information possible. This enables the Department to prepare 
contigency plans and, often, to stop a problem before it produces a 
crisis situation. 

A Greater Boston Intelligence Network was formed which is a 
coalition of Campus Police, local Departments, and Military and 
Federal Agencies which meet once a month for the purpose of sharing 
intelligence information. 

Highlights of activities carried out by the Unit are detailed 
below : 

A report on ORGANIZED CRIME IN THE BOSTON AREA 1924 to 1985 was 
also prepared for the President's Commission on Organized Crime. The 
report contains accounts of organized crime activities beginning 
with the first well organized illegal activity in Massachusetts ana 
continuning to the current organized crime trial. 

The Unit completed an investigation into a truck hijacking in 
Braintree which culminated in the arrest of one individual and the 
recovery of over $5,000 worth of stolen merchandise. 

The Intelligence Unit also prepared a booklet concerning those 
individuals from the Greater Boston area who are members of a local 
motorcycle gang. There was reason to believe that these individuals 
were heavily involved in drugs, pornography, and numerous assaults. 
The booklet was distributed to those officers assigned to the East 
Boston area where the gang headquarters was located. 

The Organized Crime Unit is, in effect, the "action arm" of the 
Intelligence Unit. As cases are being prepared for court 
prosecution, the most modern investigative techniques available are 
employed by this Unit. During the past year, three major 
investigations were conducted which culminated in seventeen 
indictments. As in previous years, the Unit continues to maintain 
liaison with various criminal justice agencies in addition to 
maintaining its own confidential files. 



22. 



TECHMICAL DIVISION 

The staff of the Crime Lab of the Boston Police Department are 
experts in the discovery and collection of evidence at the scene of 
a crime. The proper recovery of evidence during the processing of a 
crime is essential to assure its admission in court hence, both 
criminalists actively participate in crime scene searches. The 
majority of cases, over 150 this past fiscal year, dealt with 
homicides and rapes. As such cases can be complex, the addition of a 
comparison microscope, a freezer capable of storing fluids for 
extended periods of time and, electrophoresis equipment which is 
utilized for subgrouping purposes, have all helped to ensure the 
validity of evidence. 

Working in close conjunction with the Crime Lab is the 
Identification Unit, where 6,119 sets of fingerprints and photos 
were taken while processing prisoners. The Ballistics Unit, where 
all guns are received through some commission of crime, assisted in 
approximately 1 ,000 court cases during the past twelve months. 

BUREAU OF AmnCISTRATIVE SERVICES 

Essential to the functioning of the Bureau of Investigative 
Services, and all Bureaus within the Department is administrative 
coordination. This is supplied by The Bureau of Administrative 
Services, in addition to the funding, personnel, and materials 
needed by the Bureaus of Investigative Services, Neighborhood 
Services and Field Services in their daily functioning. The Bureau 
of Adminis trati ves takes its place at the base of the organizational 
chart along side the above mentioned bureaus because it offers 
critical administrative support which furthers the department's 
purposes . 

The Bureau of Administrative Services is charged with providing 
services which support the field activities of the department. As a 
result of sweeping changes introduced by the new Police Commissioner 
Francis M. Roache and Bureau Director Peter Welsh, the Bureau has 
been transformed from a general service agency to a highly 
structured utilitarian component, replete with specialized sections 
and units . 



23. 



The Budget Diyision is responsible for the preparation of the 
department's annual budget, the tracking and monitoring of 
expenditures, and the preparation of all reports relating to the 
budget. As resources in the public sector continue to diminish, the 
Budget Division has added personnel and updated their data 
processing equipment in order to closely monitor all expenditures, 
and to assess the cost effectiveness of various proposals and 
programs . 

The Division's Auditing aMd Finance Section monitors all 
department accounts and internal control mechanisms, and provides 
technical assistance for budget preparations. The purchasing and 
Inventory Section is responsible for acquisition and distribution of 
supplies and equipment, equipment repairs, auctions and disposal of 
surplus property. 

The Contracts and Pavel opaent Section is the newest innovation 
in the Bureau. The primary task of the Contracts and Development 
Section is the acquisition and management of all grants, both from 
the public and private sectors. Section specialists constantly 
monitor the availability of such funds, and respond swiftly when the 
application process for such funding is initiated. Thus far, they 
have had good success, resulting in the maintenence of police 
activities which could not exist without outside funding. This 
Section also prepares and manages service contracts, coordinates 
capital planning projects, and monitors the False Burglary Alarm 
Unit. 

The Personnel Division administers all facets of the 
Department's personnel system, including record keeping, personnel 
processing, recruitment, promotions, discipline, retirement, and the 
developing of standards and policies. This Division includes the 
following sections: Personnel Records, Personnel Processing, 
Medically Incapacitated, Suspended/Extended Leave and Payroll. 

The Licensing Diyision investigates, processes and records all 
applications for licenses issued by the Police Commissioner, such as 
handgun permits, vendor permits etc. This Division includes the 
Hackney Carriage Unit, which regulates the City's taxi industry, and 
the Pawn Unit, which monitors Pawn and Second Hand shops while 

attempting to trace stolen goods. 

24. 



The Data Processing Division maintains the Department's 
computer systems, which serve jointly to provide management 
information and controls, and to assist in the investigation of 
criminal activities. As more modern management technicians have been 
introduced to the department, Data Processing has responded by 
adding additional qualified programmers and updating computer 
hardware. This Division consists of the the following sections: 
Computer Operations, Field Reports, Data Collections, Insurance 
Reports, Systems Analysis/Programming, and Office Automation. 

The Graphic Arts Section prepares forms, i 1 lusti at ions and 
graphics for various department functions. This section also 
prepares crime scene sketches when requested, and has had great 
success in aiding suspect identification through composite sketches. 

The Maintenance Division is responsible for the purchase, 
installation and maintenence of all Department building and 
operating equipment. This Division includes Communications 
Maintenence, Fleet Management, Building Management and the Signal 
Service Section. 

BUREAU OF NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES 

The Bureau of Neighborhood Services is the third Bureau found at 
the base of the Boston Police Organizational Chart. While the Bureau 
of Investigative Services is concerned with the criminal act and its 
perpetrator, the Bureau of Neighborhood Services is concerned with 
the victim of those acts. 

This Bureau was established in May of 1985 as part of Mayor 
Flynn's commitment to making Boston's streets accessible to all 
citizens, regardless of race, religion or affiliation. The Bureau is 
primarily responsible for monitoring civil rights violations, 
addressing issues of crime prevention and intervention, and 
analyzing crimes directed against specific groups or types of 
individuals. As a result of Boston's diverse population, the Bureau 
also provides liaison between the department and the City's Hispanic 
and Asian communities. 



25 



The Victimization Monitoring Section provides the i.iain thrust 
o£ the Bureau's activities. This section assists other Bureaus and 
Units within the department relative to the incidence of violent 
crime, along with identifying the problems and perceptions of the 
victim. Criminal complaints, suspect identification and crime causes 
are also reviewed by the Victimization Monitoring Section. 

The Section's Domestic Violence Unit is charged with reducing 
the number of assaults and homicides that often occur in domestic 
situations. Reports of domestic violence are entered into the data 
processing system where they can be monitored, so that potential 
emerging patterns of violence can be detected. Once a pattern of 
trouble becomes obvious, unit officers follow-up so that such 
situations can be diffused before they evolve into tragic incidents. 
Arrest, counseling, and issuance of restraining orders are the 
primary weapons in the Unit's arsenal. In the past year, over 2000 
restraining orders were issued to curb domestic violence, and 
several arrsts were made where necessary. 

The Section's S enior Response Unit provides various services 
to Boston's Senior Citizens, including motorcycle patrols of elderly 
housing complexes, crime prevention seminars, and liaison to the 
City's Commission on the Affairs of the Elderly. 

The Victim/Witness Assistance Monitoring Unit is responsible 
for satisfying the physical, emotional, social and legal needs of 
violent crime victims and witnesses. The Unit received a great deal 
of technical assistance from NOBLE (National Association of Black 
Law Enforcement Executives) who selected Boston as one of the pilot 
sites for the program. As part of this innovative program. Unit 
members follow-up on all reports of violent crime, contact victims 
and witnesses, and advise them as to what services are available to 
them, and what they can expect to encounter while proceeding through 
the criminal justice system. As a result, victims and witnesses are 
given a sense of being supported and aided by a system which 
previously was perceived as only caring abouts the rights of the 
criminal . 

The Community Disorders Unit (CDU) investigates and takes 
appropriate action in those instances where a citizen's rights have 



26, 



been infringed upon by violence, threat or harassment. Where possi- 
ble, immediate action is taken to identify perpetrators, arrest them 
and bring them to court. In many cases, federal civil rights 
statutes are invoked and suspects find themselves facing Federal 
charges. The Community Disorders Unit also meets with community 
groups and leaders to discuss public safety problems and develop 
strategies to reduce the incidence of violent crime. 

This Unit (in existence since 1978) has historically been highly 
successful in its endeavors. In the past year, tensions ran high in 
several neighborhoods between residents and Asian-Americans who were 
new to the neighborhoods. By utilizing surveillance, field 
interviewing, neighborhood cooperation, restraining orders, and 
arrests, what could have developed into an explosive situation 
citywide was kept to a controllable minimum. Additional strategies 
included Asian-American outreach, mul t i - language posters and 
brochures, and the sponsoring of "English as a Second Language" 
classes. Due to its many sucesses, the CDU has become a model for 
many other police departments, and in fact, assists these 
departments by providing training and other resources for them. 

The Crime Prevention Section runs programs that help the 
community prevent crime by reducing criminal opportunities. This 
Section oversees Area Crime Prevention Officers, who offer their 
assistance to crime watch groups and civic associations, etc., by 
conducting crime prevention seminars and security demonstrations and 
surveys. These officers also administer the Identiguard Program, 
which allows citizens to engrave possessions to deter theft. The 
Neighborhood Watch Program is also run out of this Section. Since 
its inception, this Program has resulted in the creation of dozens 
of watches citywide, as residents band together to protect their own 
neighborhoods. The highly successful Officer Friendly Program forms 
the final link in the Crime Prevention Section. Thanks to the 
support of the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, this program is able to 
provide Boston's young school children with information and safety 
tips that might not otherwise be available. 



27 




77% SWORN 

PERSONNEL 



NON PERSONNEI 
EXPENDITURES 



9% CIVILIAN PERSONNEL 



1984 - 1985 BUDGET 



SALARIES/ OVERTIME $64,163,595. 

RENT, STRUCTURAL REPAIRS, UTILITIES, ADVERTISING, 

INSURANCE, ETC $2,228,735. 

MISCELLANEOUS MINOR EQUIPMENT, VEHICLE FUEL 

AND PARTS, UNIFORMS, OFFICE SUPPLIES, ETC $3,416,034. 

VEfflCLES, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT, 

OmCE EQUIPMENT, ETC $4,512,779 . 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $74,321,143. 



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ACTUAL PART I OFFENSES BY MOIMTH - FISCAL YEAR 198A - 1985 







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JULY 


7 


- 


50 


455 


428 




988 


2,057 


1,441 


5,426 


AUGUST 


7 


1 


34 


525 


411 


1 


,053 


2,148 


1,557 


5,736 


SEPT. 


4 


- 


54 


42 8 


440 


1 


,056 


2,306 


1,594 


5,882 


OCT. 


4 


3 


55 


445 


375 


1 


,000 


2,130 


1,676 


5,683 


NOV. 


3 


1 


29 


476 


349 


1 


,063 


2,083 


1,467 


5,476 


DEC. 


7 


1 


35 


545 


317 


1 


,111 


2,108 


1,576 


5,700 


JAN. 


10 


- 


19 


50 9 


2 94 


1 


,091 


1,931 


1 ,646 


5,500 


FEB. 


8 


3 


27 


426 


342 




924 


1,876 


1,405 


5,011 


MARCH 


8 


- 


53 


487 


387 


1 


,063 


2,171 


1 ,446 


5,615 


APRIL 


10 


1 


35 


506 


461 




851 


2, 292 


1,570 


5,726 


MAY 


6 


- 


54 


50 8 


470 




885 


2,287 


1,558 


5,768 


JUNE 


10 


4 


46 


467 


457 




858 


2, 223 


1,541 


5,605 



89 



14 



491 5,777 4,731 11,943 25,612 18,477 67,134 



PART I CLEARANCES BY »«ONTH - FISCAL YEAR 1984-1985 







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JULY 


3 


- 


22 


74 


115 


101 


228 


41 


584 


AUGUST 


2 


- 


11 


91 


179 


110 


388 


108 


889 


SEPT. 


2 


- 


23 


115 


144 


214 


381 


75 


954 


OCT. 


2 


2 


23 


112 


159 


211 


368 


108 


985 


NOV. 


4 


1 


15 


89 


148 


172 


358 


110 


897 


DEC. 


6 


1 


19 


120 


132 


184 


416 


86 


864 


JAN. 


6 


2 


14 


102 


14 7 


296 


392 


144 


1,103 


FES. 


5 


1 


12 


88 


126 


140 


286 


50 


708 


MA.^CH 


6 


- 


18 


88 


115 


107 


318 


77 


729 


APRIL 


6 


2 


26 


151 


213 


225 


489 


118 


1,230 


MAY 


2 


- 


26 


91 


168 


135 


264 


55 


741 


JUNE 


6 


- 


19 


96 


222 


134 


328 


41 


846 



50 



228 



1,217 1,868 



2,029 4,216 1,013 10,630 




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34 



PART I - OFFENSE/CLEARANCE COMPARISON - AREA A 

FY 83-8A/84-85 



OFFENSE 


AREA A 


AREA A 


CLEARED 


CLEARED 




1983-198A 


1984-1985 


1983-1984 


1984-1985 


Murder 


21 


13 






Clearance 


12 


11 


57.1% 


84.6% 


Manslaughter 


3 


2 






Clearance 


4 


1 


100% 


50% 


Rape 


31 


57 






Clearance 


18 


31 


58% 


54.3% 


Robbery 


1,136 


1,123 






Clearance 


269 


291 


24% 


26% 


Agg. Assault 


578 


665 






Clearance 


270 


364 


47% 


55% 


Burglary 


1,601 


1,825 






Clearance 


128 


262 


8% 


14.3% 


Larceny 


8,A82 


8,755 






Clearance 


1,492 


1,3 82 


18% 


16% 


Auto Theft 


3,739 


4,274 






Clearance 


238 


233 


6.3% 


5.4% 


Total 


15,591 


16,714 






Clearance 


2,431 


2,575 


15.6% 


15.4% 



PART I - OFFENSE/CLEARANCE COMPARISON - AREA B 



FY 83-84/84-85 



OFFENSE 


AREA B 


AREA S 


CLEARED 


CLEARED 




1983-1984 


1984-1985 


1983-1984 


1984-1985 


Murder 


39 


43 






Clearance 


25 


23 


64.1% 


53.4% 


Manslaughter 


3 


5 






Clearance 


1 


5 


33.3% 


100% 


Rape 


165 


199 






Clearance 


11 


89 


44% 


45% 


Robbery 


2,173 


1,994 






Clearance 


245 


255 


11.2% 


13% 


Agg. Assault 


1 ,931 


2,0 99 






Clearance 


688 


664 


36% 


32% 


Burglary 


2,848 


2,730 






Clearance 


183 


162 


6.4% 


6% 


Larceny 


3,511 


3,808 






Clearance 


292 


399 


8.1% 


10.4% 


Auto Theft 


3,088 


4,021 






Clearance 


106 


120 


3.4% 


3% 


Total 


13,824 


14,899 






Clearance 


1,612 


1,717 


11.7% 


11 .5% 



36. 



PART I - OFFENSE/CLEARANCE COMPARISON - AREA C 

FY 83-8A/84-85 



OFFENSE AREA C AKEA C CLEARED CLEARED 

1983-1984 1984-1985 1983-1984 1984-1985 



Murder 




16 




12 








Clearance 




9 




5 


56 


.2% 


42% 


Manslaughter 




2 




5 








Clearance 




1 




1 




50% 


20% 


Rape 




60 




70 








Clearance 




36 




23 




60% 


33% 


Robbery 




746 




136 








Clearance 




190 




166 


25 


.4% 


23% 


Agg. Assault 




670 




72 5 








Clearance 




287 




301 




43% 


42% 


Burglary 


1 


,664 


1 


,934 








Clearance 




274 




300 


16 


.4% 


16% 


Larceny 


2 


,854 


2 


,900 








Clearance 




389 




583 




14% 


20% 


Auto Theft 


2 


,683 


2, 


,982 








Clearance 




134 




217 




5% 


7.2% 


Total 


8 


,695 


9 


,364 








Clearance 


1 


,320 


1 


,596 


15 


.1% 


17% 



PART I - OFFENSE/CLEARANCE COMPARISON - AREA D 

FY 83-84/84-85 



OFFENSE 


AREA 


AREA D 


CLEARED 


CLEARED 




1983-1984 


1984-1985 


1983-1984 


1984-1985 


Murder 


14 


19 






Clearance 


9 


3 


64.2% 


33.3% 


Manslaughter 





2 






Clearance 





1 


- 


50% 


Rape 


87 


109 






Clearance 


28 


49 


32.1% 


45% 


Robbery 


1,535 


1,479 






Clearance 


457 


360 


30% 


24.3% 


Agg. Assault 


698 


818 






Clearance 


320 


337 


4 6% 


41.1% 


Burglary 


3,151 


3,726 






Clearance 


558 


927 


18% 


24.8% 


Larceny 


7,364 


7,815 






Clearance 


1 ,349 


1 ,404 


18.3% 


18% 


Auto Theft 


3,666 


5,043 






Clearance 


166 


85 


5% 


2% 


Total 


16,515 


19,001 






Clearance 


2,887 


3,166 


17.4% 


17% 



PART I - OFFENSE/CLEARANCE COMPARISON - AREA E 



FY 83-84/84-85 



OFFENSE 


AREA E 


AREA E 


CLEARED 


CLEARED 




1983-1984 


1984-1985 


1983-1984 


1984-1985 


Murder 


11 


9 






Clearance 


7 


8 


64% 


89% 


Manslaughter 


3 


1 






Clearance 


1 


1 


33.3% 


100% 


Rape 


47 


56 






Clearance 


26 


38 


55.3% 


68% 


Robbery 


557 


445 






Clearance 


167 


145 


30% 


33% 


Agg. Assault 


445 


423 






Clearance 


227 


202 


51% 


48% 


Burglary 


1,773 


1,728 






Clearance 


439 


378 


2 5% 


22% 


Larceny 


2,519 


2,334 






Clearance 


394 


446 


16% 


19.1% 


Auto Theft 


1,962 


2,157 






Clearance 


198 


358 


10% 


17% 


Total 


7,317 


7,153 






Clearance 


1,459 


1,576 


20% 


22% 



DEMOGRAPHICS 1985 



City of Boston Population 643,279 
Estimated Daytime Population of Boston 1,187,306 

Metropolitan Population 2,988,547 

Boston Land Area 50.1 square miles 

Metropolitan Land Area 1237 square miles 

City Parks 2,500 acres 

Paved Roadways 917 miles 



CITY COUNCILLORS 

Four at Large 

1. Joseph M. Tierney (President) 

2. Christopher A. lannella 

3. Michael J. McCormack 

4. Albert L. O'Neil 



NINE DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District One Robert E. Travaglini 

District Two James M. Kelly 

District Three James E. Byrne 

District Four Charles Calvin Yancey 

District Five Thomas M. Menino 

District Six Maura A. Hennigan 

District Seven Bruce C. Boiling 

District Eight David Scondras 

District Nine Brian J. McLaughlin 



40. 



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