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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

ANNUAL REPORT 



Public Works Department 



YEAR 1924 




Compliments of 



Joseph A. Rourfce, 



Commissioner of Public Works 



PLEASE EXCHANGE 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Public Works Department 



YEAR 1924 



\<^ (C ©ITBITA JD. ^7/ 

vyV ^ „ ^ „ v/Y 



CITY OF BOSTON 
PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1925 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 
OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Appropriations 

Appropriations, special 



Contracts : 

Ashes 

Bridge work 

Ferry work 

Gas, furnishing same 

Gas, hghting streets with 

same 

Hired teams 

Miscellaneous, Sanitary 



Service 

Offal 

Snow and ice 

Water pipes, laying . . 
Water pipes, relaying . 



Contracts : 

High Pressure Fire Serv- 
ice 

Employees 

Expenditures 

Expenditures, by items, seg- 
regated budget 

Financial statement 

General review 

Maintenance, comparative 
table 

Organization 

Pavements, area of 

Pavements, changes in 

Pavements, length of 

Pavements, miles of 

Revenue 



Part II. — Appendix A. 

Administration expenses, Central OfRce 



42 



IV 



Contents. 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
BRIDGE AND FERRY DIVISION. 

(Bridge Service.) 

(Page 43.) 

Page 

43 



Appropriations, special 

Appropriations, special, sum- 
mary of 



Bridges, work done on : 

Beacon Street Bridge 

Braddock Park Foot- 
bridge 

Cambridge Street Bridge 
(over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) 

Chelsea Bridge North .... 

Chelsea Bridge South 

Chelsea Street Bridge .... 

Commercial Point Bridge, 

Congress Street Bridge . . . 

Cottage Farm Bridge (over 
Boston & Albany Rail- 
road) 

Dartmouth Street Bridge, 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge, 

Harvard Street Bridge, 
Dorchester 

Huntington Avenue Bridge 
(over Boston & Albany 
Railroad) 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge, 

Meridian Street Bridge . . 

Northern Avenue Bridge . . 

Redfield Street Bridge, 
Dorchester 

Reservoir Road Bridge, 
Brighton 

Summer Street Bridge 
(over Reserved Chan- 
nel) 

Walworth Street Bridge 
(over New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Rail- 
road) 



43 



53 



53 



Bridges, work done on : 
Reoairing wharf and 
Dredging Dock, Engine 
31, Commercial street. . 54 

Expenditures 62 

Expenditures, special appro- 
priations 62 

Expenditures, special appro- 
priations, summary of . . 72 

Financial statement 62 

List of Bridges : 

In charge of Bridge and 
Ferry Division, Bridge 
Service 73 

In charge of Bridge and 
Ferry Division and Park 
and Recreation Depart- 
ment 73 

In charge of Park and 

Recreation Department, 73 

Maintained by Metropol- 
itan Park Commission . . 73 

Maintained by railroad 

corporation 73 

Maintained by United 
Stales Government .... 73 

Of which Boston main- 
tains the part within its 
limits 73 

Of which Boston main- 
tains the wearing sur- 
face 73 

Of which Boston pays a 
part of the cost of main- 
taining 73 

Repairs on bridges 65 

Width of bridge openings ... 74 
Work done 43 



Contents. 



(Ferry Service. 

(Page 55.) 



Appropriations 

Appropriations, amount paid 
from 

Appropriations, comparison 
of (five years) 

Appropriations, special 

Balance sheet 

Comparative balance sheet 
(five years) 

Comparison of appropria- 
tions, receipts and ex- 
penditures (five years). . . . 

Difference in travel between 
ferries 



Page 

77 



80 



81 



87 



Expenditures 

Expenditures, comparison of 

(five years) 

Expenditures and receipts 

since 1858 

Ferryboats 

Financial statements 

Receipts at each ferry 

Receipts, comparison of (five 

years) 

Ticket statement 

Total travel on both ferries 

(six years) 

Work done 



Page 

77 



Appendix C 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
HIGHWAY DIVISION. 

General Review. 

(Page 90.) 



(Lighting 

(Page 

Page 
Arc lamps, total cost ])er 

lamp, per annum 101 

Defects 95 

Electric lights, number and 

kind of 100 

Electric lights, cost of 100 

Expenditures 93 

Financial statement 93 

Gas lamps, number and 

Idndof 99 

Gas lamps, total cost per 

lamp per annum 99 



Service.) 
93.) 



Page 



Incandescent lamps, total 

cost per lamp per annum, 102 
Lamps, number of, installed 

during year 95 

Lamps, discontinued 95 

Lamps, repaired and altered, 96 
Number and style of lamps, 

January 1, 1925 97 

Outages on street lamps .... 97 

Rebates 97 

Repairs 96 

Revenue 93 

Work done 94 



Contents. 

(Paving Service.) 
(Page 90.) 



Granolithic sidewalks (be- 
tween pages, 118, 119). 
Highways, Making of (be- 
tween pages 118, 119). 

Cambridge street and 
Court street (between 
pages 118, 119). 

Garage, Albany street (be- 

, tween pages 118, 119). 

Stuart street (between 
pages 118, 119). 

Paving service (between 
pages 118, 119). 

Reconstructing and re- 
pairing streets by con- 
tract (between pages 
118, 119). 



Street improvements (be- 




tween pages 118, 119). 




Expenditures, objects of.. 


111 


Ex]3enditures, detail of. . . 


112 


General review 


90 


Macadam streets, mainte- 




nance of 


117 




119 


Permits, revenue from 


119 


Snow and ice removed by 




contract 


115 


Street openings 


119 


Work done . 


90 


By contract, summary of. 


103 


By day labor, summary of, 


107 



Appendix D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SEWER AND SANITARY DIVISION. 

(Sewer Service.) 



(Page 

Pag 



Catch-basins, cleaned by 

contract 

Executions of court on ac- 
count of land takings. . 
Expenditures : 

Maintenance 

Maintenance, detail of . . . 
Maintenance, detail of, 

recapitulation of 138 

Sewerage works, detail of, 141 
Sewerage works, loan .... 128 

Financial statement 

Land-takings, executions of 

court 

Miles of sewers, February 1, 

1925 

Pumping sewerage, average 
cost per million foot gal- 
lons 



139 



153 



129 
137 



128 



153 



158 



160 



121.) 

Pumping station. Calf Pas- 
ture, work done 

Pumping stations, 
ment of 



equip- 



160 



Pumps, Calf Pasture, aver- 
age lift and duty 160 

Refuse, removing same from 

gate house 160 

Sewers built, charged to 

sewerage works 141 

Summary of sewer construc- 
tion (twelve months) . . . 157 

Summary of sewer construc- 
tion (five years) 159 

Work done 121 

Work in charge of division . . 121 



Contents. 



(Sanitary Service.) 



(Page 123.) 



Page 

Appropriations 161 

Ashes, collected by contract, 

number of loads 166 

Districts, map of 169 

Expenditures, items of 163 

Financial statement 161 

Income 161 

Maintainance 161 



Materials: 

Amount expended on offal, 
ashes and rubbish by 
districts 

Ashes and house dirt re- 
moved (five years) 

Collected by districts. . . 

Cost of collecting and dis- 
posing of refuse by con- 
tract 



164 



165 
164 



164 



Cost of collecting and dis- 
posing of refuse by day 
labor (between pages 
168, 169.) 

Final disposition of 

Garbage removed (five 

years) 

Number of loads collected 
from February 1, 1920, 
to January 29, 1925... 
Offal collected by con- 
tract, number of loads. 
Waste and rubbish re- 
moved (five years) 

Refuse collected, detail of 
(between pp. 168, 169) . 

Revenue 

Sanitary districts 

Work done 

Work done for other services. 



168 



165 



165 



165 



161 
169 
123 
162 



(Street Cleaning and Oiling Service.) 



(Page 124. 



Page 

Expenditures, distribution of, 170 

Expenditures, items of 170 

Financial statement 170 

Macadam streets, cost of 

oiling 175 

Snow removed, cost of 173 



Streets : 

Cleaned, total cost of (be- 
tween pages 174, 175). 

Swept by machines (be- 
tween pages 174, 175). 

Treated with oil, cost of . 

Work done 



175 
124 



Vlll 



Contents. 
Appendix E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION. 

(Water Service.) 



(Page 

Page 

Construction, cost of 184 

Elevators 185 

Expenditures 181 

Expenditures, detail of 181 

Expenditures, comparison of, 181 

Financial statement 181 

Hydrants, total number of, 

January 31, 1925 189 

Hydrants, total number and 
kind of, established and 

abandoned 189 

Income branch 185 

Main pipe, cost of extension, 193 
Main pipe work, mainte- 
nance of 192 

Meter branch 186 

Meter repairs 186 

Meters : 

Applied 186 

Changed 186 



176.) 

Page 

Condemned 186 

In service, January 31, 

1925 187 

Installed 186 

On hand January 31, 1925, 189 

Repaired 189 

Set 189 

Receipts, comparison of 181 

Revenue 181 

Service pipes : 

Maintenance of 192 

Repairs, cost of 201 

Total number of lengths 

of 188 

Water: 

Debt 184 

Sinking fund 184 

Water pipes, total length of, 188 

Work done 176 

Work done, detail of 176 



(High Pressure Fire Service.) 
(Page 176.) 



Page 

Expenditures 205 

Financial statement 205 



Work done. 



Page 

176 



Appendix F. 



REPORT OF THE BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGE COMMISSION. 

(Page 207.) 

Page 
Drawtenders' report 211 



Page 
Bridges in charge of com- 
mission 207 

Draw openings 210 



Expenditures 209 

Work done 207 



[Document 23 — 1925.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1925. 



Boston, February 1, 1925. 

Hon. James M. Curley, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 
Sir, — In compliance with Revised Ordinances the 
annual report of the operations and expenses of the 
Public Works Department for the year ending January 
31, 1925, is respectfully submitted. The Public Works 
Department, created by Ordinances 1910, chapter 9, 
now chapter 28 of the Revised Ordinances of 1914, was 
formed by consohdating the Engineering, Water and 
Street Departments. 

Organization. 
The department is composed of five main divisions, 



Central Office. — The Central Office is composed of 
the accounting force of the entire department under the 
charge of the secretary and chief clerk. 



2 City Document No, 23. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. — This division, under a 
division engineer, has the charge and care of all bridges 
used as highways which are in whole, or in part, under 
the control of the city ; the care and management of the 
ferries owned by the city, including boats, slips, drops, 
and buildings. 

Note. — The Boston and Cambridge Division, so 
called, is not strictly speaking a division of the PubUc 
Works Department, as this work is in charge of a com- 
mission of two, one member appointed by the Mayor of 
Boston and the other by the Mayor of Cambridge, 
under the provisions of chapter 412 of the Acts of 1904; 
but because of the fact that the present Commissioner 
of Public Works is the Boston member of this commis- 
sion and also because one half of the expense of this 
commission is defrayed by the Bridge Service, it is in 
this report treated as a division of this department. 

Highway Division. — This division, under a division 
engineer, has the care of the construction, reconstruc- 
tion, and maintenance of roadways and sidewalks; the 
care of lamps and the hghting of streets, parks, and 
alleys. 

Sewer and Sanitary Division. — This division, under 
a division engineer, has charge of the construction of 
sewers, catch-basins, and waterways; the collection 
and removal of ashes, garbage, and refuse; street 
cleaning; and the oiling and watering of streets. 

Water Division. — This division, under a division 
engineer, has the care of water pipes, installation of 
meters, water service, laying and relaying of water 
mains, and the high pressure fire service. 

General, 
The past year witnessed the completion of the Albany 
street garage in which are housed motor vehicles of all 
divisions operating within a limited radius from this 
location, and in which minor repairs are made on all 
motor equipment for the entire city. This garage is 



Public Works Department. 3 

active during every twenty-four hours of the entire 
year, and particularly are its services appreciated for 
the mobilization and equipment of vehicles and plows 
for snow work in the winter, for night street cleaning, 
and for emergency purposes. 

We are still deficient in garages in the outlying yards, 
particularly in West Roxbury and in the Hancock street, 
Dorchester, paving yard, and a loan of $50,000 should 
be obtained the coming year for the construction of a 
garage in the latter yard. 

The Park Department has taken over for park pur- 
poses the property in East Boston where is now located 
our Public Works Department yard handling paving, 
sanitary, water and sewer activities. A new location 
must be sought elsewhere. 

In order to catch up with the deferred reconstruction 
of bridges, we established a policy of rebuilding four 
railroad bridges and one drawbridge, all inside the debt 
limit, during the four years of the administration, as a 
result of which Cambridge Street Bridge, Allston, Beacon 
Street Bridge, and Chelsea South Bridge have been 
completed. Dartmouth Street Bridge is now being 
reconstructed; and a loan of $100,000 inside the debt 
limit should be available for the reconstruction this 
year of the Massachusetts Avenue Bridge over the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. 

Congress Street Bridge has been in deplorable condi- 
tion for some time past and should be replaced at once 
with a bascule draw span, at an estimated cost of 
$800,000 and authority for a loan for this amount, out- 
side the debt limit, s hould be sought from the Legis- 
lature. The above record of reconstruction within the 
debt limit justifies this request. 

During the Peters administration a loan of $1,000,000 
outside the debt limit, was allowed by the Legislature 
for ferry improvements, including the construction of 
two new ferryboats. We have built two double team- 
ing drops of modern design, and a contract has been 



4 City Document No. 23. 

awarded for a second pair of drops, which are now 
nearing completion and which will greatly facilitate 
vehicle travel on and off the boats at the South Ferry. 

Before similar drops can be installed at the North 
Ferry it will be necessary to provide new boats, in 
order to support properly the outboard end of the 
modern drop which rests on the boat itself. The 
''Hugh O'Brien," a side-wheel boat, was built in 1883 
and should be scrapped and sold as junk. The "Gover- 
nor Russell" was built in 1898 and is in fair condition 
for ordinary traffic with the old drops. The "General 
Sumner," built in 1900, is in very poor condition both 
for heavy traffic and for supporting the new drops. 
Hence an immediate necessity exists for the construc- 
tion of two new steel boats of the SuUivan-Flaherty- 
Palumbo type, which are the only three modern boats 
now in service at the ferries, although the "Noddle 
Island" was rebuilt in 1921 and is a substantial wooden 
craft well fitted for service for many years. A loan of 
$1,000,000 outside the debt hmit, should be requested 
of the Legislature to provide for ferry improvements, 
including two new boats, and whatever balance remains 
to be utilized for drops. 

Our paved roadways are rapidly deteriorating because 
of heavy traffic due to motor truck transportation, and 
particularly is this true of the heavily loaded trucks 
engaged in inter-city and state transportation. The 
state built and now maintains as a general traffic high- 
way about a mile and a half of boulevard on Washington 
street, West Roxbury, northwest from the Dedham line, 
and this is the total contribution to the City of Boston 
from state highway funds. In addition to what might 
be called city highways, we must maintain and keep 
in good condition various main traffic arteries from the 
center of the city to the outskirts, from five to nine 
miles in length, which take care of this traffic, and yet 
the city receives not one cent of the income from motor 
vehicles collected by the state. 



Public Works Department. 5 

We have available each year but $1,000,000 for the 
reconstruction and repair of streets by contract, a sum 
hopelessly inadequate for the purpose, and it is extremely 
unfair to the city to deny it a certain proportion of the 
receipts from automobile fees now spent by the State 
Department of Public Works on traffic highways in 
other parts of the state, than in the City of Boston. 

At present, due to statutory limitations, we can 
spend only $1,000,000 within the debt Umit for sewerage 
works each year. This is hopelessly inadequate and 
the Legislature should be petitioned for authority to 
increase this amount to $1,500,000. Such approval was 
refused by last year's Legislature; but when it is con- 
sidered that twenty years ago we spent $1,500,000 for 
sewerage works, and we are flooded with petitions for 
sanitary sewers for new dweUings throughout the city, 
and there is a continuous necessity for covering open 
brook courses in order that flood conditions in new and 
old built-up sections shall be avoided, the justice of this 
request becomes apparent. 

At present we assess upon abutters for sanitary 
sewers $2 per Hneal foot of frontage on each side of the 
street, which was also estabhshed by law when 
the cost of sew^erage works was much less than it is 
today. The average cost for such construction amounts 
to $10 per Kneal foot, and there is no reason why this 
assessment should not be increased by statutory 
amendment to at least $4 per lineal foot. 

Attention is again called to the rehnquishment to the 
Massachusetts General Hospital of the North Grove 
street sanitary yard and the substitution of another 
yard either on the land of the Boston Elevated Railway 
or on that of the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad at Commercial street, on the waterfront, and 
the installation of an incinerator for the North and 
West Ends and city proper districts. 

The disposal of litter and ashes in inland dumps, both 
in the day labor and contract districts, should be super- 



6 City Document No, 23. 

seded within a short time by incineration which, when 
adopted, will include garbage. Within two years the 
South Bay dump will be filled, and whether or not 
incineration for this district is provided previously, 
another slip to handle refuse and ashes should be con- 
structed alongside the existing garbage shp at Albany 
street in 1926, which will be in accordance with the 
requirements of the Coleman disposal contract under 
which the material must be received and disposed of by 
the contractor. 

During the past ten years — • from 1914 to 1923, 
inclusive — there was turned back into the city treasury 
from excess water revenue over $2,000,000, a greater 
part of which should have been spent in reinforcing old 
main supply fines into the city. The two low service 
supply lines to the city are a 48-inch in Beacon streets 
laid in 1859, and a 30 and 36-inch in Tremont street, 
laid in 1847. The condition of the latter fines in 
Tremont street, between Castle street and the Common 
is such that the gates are kept closed and ^vill be opened 
only for emergency purposes. These pipes cross the 
existing railroad bridge at Castle street in an overhead 
crossing and mil have to be removed on account of the 
Tremont street widening. 

In order that the low service supply to- the city may 
be guaranteed, we should continue the existing 48-inch 
line which comes direct from the reservoir down Beacon 
street and Commonwealth avenue to Massachusetts, by 
extending it down Commonwealth avenue into the 
Common, thus replacing the Beacon street line which 
may go out of service at any time. The present 30 
and 36-inch mains in Tremont street should be united 
into one 48 and carried in a tunnel either under Tremont 
Street Bridge or Berkeley Street Bridge and through 
Park square into Charles street and connect with 
the new 48-inch from Commonwealth avenue. A loan 
of $800,000 outside the debt fimit should be sought from 
the Legislature, in order that this work may be prose- 



Public Works Department. 7 

cuted immediately, since the safety of the city proper 
from conflagration depends particularly upon these 
two old existing pipe Hues. 

The next fiscal year will end on December 31, 1925, 
and the fourth quarter's water income will not be 
available as in previous years. In order to provide 
services in locations where no mains now exist, to 
practically complete the high pressure fire service, and 
to provide other necessary extensions, the City Council 
should be requested to approve a loan outside the debt 
limit for this work, in accordance with chapter 44, 
section 8, of the General Laws. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph A. Rourke, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



City Document No. 23. 



Expenditures Under the Maintenance Appropriation of the 

From February 1, 1924, 



Group and Item. 



Bridge. 



A. Personal Service as per Schedule A: 

1. Permanent employees 

2. Temporary employees 

3. Unassigned 

B. Service Other than Personal: 

1. Printing and binding 

2. Postage 

3. Advertising and posting 

4. Transportation of persons 

5. Cartage and freight 

6 Hire of teams and auto trucks. . . . 

7. Heat 

8. Light and power 

9. Lighting streets, alleys and parks. 



10. Rent, taxes and water 

12. Premium on surety bonds 

13. Communication 

14. Motor vehicle repairs and care. 

15. Motorlees vehicle repairs 

16. Care of horses 



18. Cleaning. 
19, 



Removal of ashes, dirt and garbage. . 

20. Disposal of ashes, dirt and garbage . . 

21. Removal of snow 

22. Medical 

23. Veterinary 

24. Blacksmith 

27. Testing materials and supplies 

28. Expert and architect 

29. Stenographic, copying and indexing. 
32. Towing 

35. Fees, service of venires, etc 

36. Boiler inspection 

37. Photographic and blueprinting 

39. General plant 

40. Harness, etc., repairs 

41. Horseshoeing and clipping 

42. Repairing streets, etc 



$80,630 29 



8326,381 27 
18,859 57 
5,259 83 



$303,669 07 
11,373 89 
7,196 77 



129 68 

19 20 

556 62 

3 94 

120 26 



6 00 




37 84 


194 91 


291 25 


2,449 72 



42 00 

15 00 

7 50 

35,901 70 



Public Woeks Department. 



Several Services by Items of the Segregated Budget, 
to January 31, 1925. 



Lighting. 


Paving. 


Street 
Cleaning 

and 
Sanitary. 


Sewer. 


Water. 


Totals. 


$6,642 73 


$938,.522 94 


$1,505,222 04 


$378,060 77 


$815,074 02 


$4,354,203 13 




o,328 13 


51,551 62 


1,974 75 


11,400 60 


100 488 58 




19 580 15 


49 667 26 


1'' 919 43 


91 791 23 


116,414 67 
2.345 56 






770 00 


204 00 


364 85 


30 00 


396 27 


291 52 


264 06 


536 87 


1,852 56 


30 00 


86 35 


79 50 


17 00 


32 50 


309 00 


15 00 


862 73 


211 90 


1,261 11 


9,074 50 


12,297 12 




6 89 


121 92 


37 37 


269 33 


756 55 




34 300 26 


107 535 97 


00 00 


305 35 


145.598 81 
5 029 50 








48 85 


3 503 OS 




1,805 83 


3,892 24 


3,245 39 


1,850 56 




802,771 91 










802.771 91 




4,088 00 


1,783 33 






8,140 63 
128 00 




9 00 


3 00 




25 00 




1,675 08 








6.219 09 
42.903 93 


193 54 


10,468 04 


20,921 84 


1,596 85 


6,933 09 




1,835 32 


31,375 23 






33,712 01 
9 00 






9 00 








169 30 


83,594 16 




84,111 56 
368.344 76 
350.656 48 

76,479 05 
38 00 






368,184 00 






111 73 


350 418 25 




126 50 




76,479 05 














38 00 






55 00 
1 781 51 


505 11 
365 30 






560 11 




404 70 


69 35 


2,640 86 
13 50 










13 50 












1,400 00 
60 34 


60 34 





















340 00 


10 00 


726 00 


759 00 


173 00 


1,211 00 


2.933 00 




60 00 
135 00 




47 00 










11 50 


154 00 


18,445 17 


6,731 23 


30,079 90 


24,168 46 


85,249 21 


270.464 49 




454 30 




15 75 


19 50 


489 55 




5 089 55 


8 4''4 59 


13 97 


601 85 
53,452 30 


14.129 96 
66.936 92 




12,110 47 




1,374 15 







10 



City Document No. 23. 



Expenditures Under the Maintenance Appropriation of the 

From February 1, 1924, 



Group and Item. 


Central. 


Bridge. 


Ferry. 


C. Equipment 








3. Electrical 










$1,255 08 


$4,925 54 




5 Motorless vehicles. . 


$900 00 


6. Stable 








7. Furniture and fittings 




129 40 


17 80 


9. Office 


88 00 




11. Marine 




3,959 02 


13. Tools and instruments 




1,875 77 


4 016 11 








16 Wearing apparel 






97 50 






144 41 

1,650 51 

95 93 

4,442 56 


2,196 65 
727 09 


D. Supplies: 
1. Office 


2,664 04 
95 95 




83 10 


3. Fuel 


75,278 43 


4. Forage and animal 












7. Veterinary 










1 12 

306 32 


96 49 

1,508 77 

1 30 

1,456 87 

229 16 


395 85 


11. Motor vehicle 




13. Chemicals and disinfectants 


253 10 






4,056 20 
140 52 


E. Materials: 




2. Highway 






3. Bridges 




34.689 99 




4 Ferries 




13.319 21 








6. Water. 








9. Machinery 




310 10 

892 59 

19 51 








1,642 63 








F. Special Items: 
2. Damages 










5,194 72 
694 28 


10,554 27 






833 15 








Totals 


$86,511 11 


$458,071 30 


$523,527 46 







Public Works Department. 



11 



Several Services by Items of the Segregated Budget. — Concluded. 
to January 31, 1925. 



Lighting. 


Paving. 


Street 
Cleaning 

and 
Sanitary. 


Sewer. 


Water. 


Totals. 




S6,850 00 








$6,850 00 
491 41 










$491 41 


$32 97 


$47,733 40 


.546,058 59 
17,587 48 


.S10,903 56 


18,617 .56 


129,526 70 
18,487 48 
3,739 28 
2,929 41 
1,299 69 
3,959 02 

125.997 23 
7,000 00 
1.520 53 




025 31 


2,830 02 


76 25 






439 65 


S3 25 




o 259 31 




433 03 




178 00 
















10,825 .33 


9,838 31 


2,316 37 








7 000 00 








25 00 


81 90 


826 63 


489 50 


1,971 50 


1,229 09 


2,088 35 


3.223 69 


90 55 


10.944 24 


157 44 


G,371 14 


3,311 01 


1,968 74 


9,972 63 


26,823 20 






2,566 71 
4,431 05 






3.511 95 




9,187 45 


59,656 91 


1,817 24 
2,692 51 




23 112 20 


96 790 05 


1 587 11 


124,181 87 
12 65 












28 25 


231 10 






. 




145 86 


171 69 




1,059 36 
33,978 92 


185 30 


10,727 18 


11,632 76 


1,695 92 


7,922 67 




153 15 


190 75 


262 19 


59 60 


920 09 




3,920 26 


1,036 18 


3,900 59 




20,085 73 

6,977 97 
189.267 13 
34.689 99 
13.319 21 
12.812 03 
381.629 80 
310 10 




1,198 71 
158,893 93 


2,382 21 


2,667 67 






30,373 20 










































381,629 80 












147 41 




195 84 


3.57 26 


1,088 61 
4,349 96 

34 1''4 5*^ 


4.324 34 
67.140 68 

34.124 62 
92.363 57 






38,234 48 


9,998 37 






181 00 


26,195 64 


21.780 24 


8,915 54 


19.542 16 




5,594 87 


19,028 85 


2,616 52 


3,251 81 


32,019 48 




$830,726 90 


$1,451,541 38 


$2,852,373 69 


$635,928 74 


$1,608,320 10 


$8,447,000 68 



12 



City Document No. 23. 



Personnel Expenditures Under the Maintenance Appropriation 

From February 1, 1924, 



Group and Item. 


Central. 


Bridge. 


Ferry. 


Commissioner 


$9,000 00 






Division engineers 


$3,750 00 


$1,250 00 








Clerks and stenographers 


60,557 33 


3,532 01 


1,386 59 






Assistant engineers (civil) 




11,657 89 
6,776 41 
6,024 20 
447 05 
2,374 55 
2,088 36 
5,559 00 
















Rodmen 












Foremen 


















Blueprinters 


4,345 86 
1,633 67 
4,564 11 








6,576 42 


390 00 


Cement testers 




















529 32 










2.005 48 
























28,719 27 






227,387 68 








36.836 00 


Engineers (steam) 






28.072 50 






1,888 40 


1.888 40 








Feeders 














23,094 32 


General foremen .... . . .'. 






3,008 22 








1,945 40 


Laborers, janitors, teamsters, watchmen, stablemen, etc 




15.452 47 
29,683 50 


25,387 66 






25,319 48 

























Public Works Department. 



13 



of the Several Services by Items of the Segregated Budget, 
to January 31, 1925. 



Lighting. 


Paving. 


Street 
Cleaning 

and 
Sanitary. 


Sewer. 


Water. 


Total, 














Sl,2o0 00 


$3,750 00 


83,333 33 


Sl,666 67 


S5,000 00 


20,000 00 




750 00 




■^ 005 16 


3 500 00 


6,255 16 
185,.591 81 


3,592 73 




4,113 12 


5,179 39 


79,422 40 




85 8-1 








85 84 












35,782 83 
17 15'' 29 




6'^8 62 




5 580 60 


4,166 66 
8 592 33 




4,994 26 




11,696 08 


31,306 87 

4,737 62 

284,651 62 




1,297 17 




2,993 40 




1,800 00 


44,383 89 


136,251 88 


46,248 30 


53,.593 00 




24,826 61 






20,651 16 
1 700 00 


47,880 60 
48,507 14 
1,150 01 
4,345 86 
71,405 46 
4,564 11 
1,250 44 




41 248 14 






























30,604 37 




20,456 00 










1,250 44 










427 67 


















5oq 32 
















2,005 48 


4 760 8'' 




0,247 80 


13,014 10 
11,114 82 
28,719 27 
227.387 68 
36,836 00 










































20,094 50 




11 909 81 


1,700 00 


61,776 81 
7,553 60 
26,244 75 
13 018 75 


















26,244 75 




1,056 50 


11,962 25 














23,094 32 




2,921 78 


6,016 44 


2,482 88 


4,944 58 


19,373 90 

1,945 40 

2,119,319 44 

578,157 56 

14,792 60 

47,274 57 






547,505 19 


1,178,471 49 
69,380 69 


115,670 50 
20,206 87 


236,832 13 
250,746 64 
















47,274 57 




1 





14 



City Document No. 23. 



Personnel Expenditures Under the Maintenance Appropriation of 

From February 1, 1924, 



Group and Item. 


Central. 


Bridge. 


Ferry. 






$183 33 


$83 33 






80,232 50 








22,103 93 


Sealers 




















3,000 00 
















1.486 98 


















Tollmen 






20.459 01 


















VVharfmen 


















































$80,630 29 


$326,381 2J 
18,859 57 
5,259 83 


$303,669 07 




11,373 89 






7,196 77 








Totals 


$80,630 29 


$350,500 67 


$322,239 73 







Public Works Department. 



15 



the Several Services by Items of the Segregated Budget.— Concluded. 
to January 31, 1925. 



Lighting. 


Paving. 


Street. 
Cleaning 

and 
Sanitary. 


Sewer. 


Water. 


Total. 




S366 66 
7.907 75 


$2,0.58 29 


$91 67 
62,178 00 


S5.30 00 
3,139 00 


$3,333 28 




153,457 25 




22,103 93 










4,629 00 


4,629 00 








30,421 51 






2.607 12 


3,.509 59 


2,005 48 
1,770 34 


11,122 19 






1,770 34 






517 18 




2,004 16 




1.417 9.5 


3,309 04 


6,108 22 
1,090 00 


10,835 21 




1,286 20 


2,376 20 








20 459 01 




500 00 


2,250 00 
3,357 62 


125 00 


125 00 


3,000 00 




3 357 62 














1.486 98 


1,586 94 






3 073 92 




1,700 00 


4,980 00 
1,804 90 
7,099 23 


6,680 00 








1,804 90 




5,847 53 


1,486 98 


3,087 17 


17,520 91 






86,642 73 


S938,522 94 
5.328 13 
19.580 15 


$1,505,222 04 
51,551 62 
49,667 26 


$378,060 77 
1,974 75 
12,919 43 


$815,074 02 
11,400 60 
21,791 23 


$4,354,203 13 
100,488 56 




116,414 67 






16.642 73 


$963,431 22 


$1,606,440 92 


$392,954 95 


$848,265 85 


$4,571,106 36 



16 



City Document No. 23. 





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Public Works Department. 



17 



Revenues 1924-25. 



On Account of the Public Works 

General Revenue, as per City 

Bridge Service : 



Department. Credited to 
Auditor's Statement. 



Bridge repairs 


.1875 74 




Rent 


400 00 




Labor and material 


80 78 




Maintenance, etc., Chelsea 






Bridge .... 


25,000 00 


$26,356 52 


Ferry Service : 






Tolls 


. $80,102 17 




Free ferries .... 


1 00 




Cleaning booths . 


48 00 




Commission on telephones 


128 70 




Sale of old material 


64 68 




Rents . . 


417 16 




Headhouse privileges . 


400 00 


81,161 71 






Lighting Service : 






Lighting bridges . 


$2,630 89 




Damages to lamp-posts 


336 00 


2,966 89 


Paving Service: 






Sidewalk assessments . 


. $38,518 78 




Labor and materials . 


11,535 60 




Permits 


33,320 47 




Sale of material . 


643 18 




Labor and material chap 


ter 




28, section 9 (or sections 


9 




and 10), Revised Ordinance 


s . 1,065 25 




Inspectors' services 


1,995 00 




Rents 


25 00 




Excess charges 


75 


87,104 03 






Sanitary Service: 






Collection of waste 


. $104,656 74 




Sale of manure 


3,059 08 




Sale of old material . 


1 00 


107,716 82 






Street Cleaning and Oiling Serv 


ice: 




Removing dirt 


$656 25 




Board of horse 


283 50 




Sale of tank .... 


150 00 




Oiling streets 


22 00 




Sale of carts .... 


40 00 




Rent 


200 00 


1,351 75 






Carried forward 


$306,657 72 



18 



City Document No. 23. 



Brought forward 
Sewer Service: 


$306,657 72 


Entrance fees 


$9,285 01 


Labor and material 


1,824 65 


Assessments .... 


59 64 


Inspectors' services 


124 11 


Pumping sewage . 


10,300 00 


Damage to automobile 


117 75 


Sale of material . 


39 56 


Rent 


10 00 


Water Service : 


21,760 72 


Rates, 1925 .... 


$38,385 72 


Prior years .... 


3,710,189 56 




$3,748,575 28 


Fees 


6,087 18 


Off and on . 


558 00 


Service pipes and repairs . 


97,380 71 


Sale of materials . . . . 


3,062 52 
665 32 


Damage to hydrants . 


Relocating box . . . . 


13 63 


Relocating hydrants . 


600 00 


Relocating pipes . . . . 


365 64 


Establishing gate 


287 29 


Elevator pipes installed 


135 44 


Sale of gasolene . . . . 


193 60 


Testing meters . . . . 


225 00 


Sale of junk 


3,768 60 


Sale of merchandise 


93 00 


Fire pipes installed . 


59,927 94 


Interest on bank deposit 


1,273 25 


Labor and material . 


4,289 74 
367 50 


Board of horses .... 


Abandoning pipe .... 


237 77 


Repairing pipes .... 


287 57 


Sale of auto accessories 


52 72 


Sale of lamp wick 


80 


Repairs to fountains . 


77 84 


Water post changes . 


41 84 


Establishing hydrants 


71 87 


Post hydrant rate 


1,585 80 


Rebate on gasolene 


8 00 


Furnishing water 


5 50 


Drill returned 


83 00 


Removing hydrants 


125 00 


Pipes delivered . . . . 


376 76 


Workingmen's compensation 


69 00 


Total for Water Service 


. 3,930,893 11 




$4,259,311 55 



Public Works Department. 



19 



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20 



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22 



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1 Furnishing gas and for equipment and lighting of gas lamps 
for a period ol ten years, from April 1, 1914, to March 31, 
1924, inclusive. 



Public Works Department 



23 



il 


$3,388 70 
60,779 35 

143,565 99 


m 


$11 00 
11 00 

11 00 


1 


Completed June 30, 1924. . . 
Completed June 30, 1924... 




1 

a 


May 14. 1924. 
May 14. 1924. 

May 20, 1924. 


2 


Charlestown Gas and Electric 
Company. 

Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company. 

Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company. 


i 

y. 

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O 


Furnishing illuminating gas in the Charlestown district 
for a period of three months, from April 1, 1924, to 
June 30, 1924, inclusive. 

Furnishing illuminating gas in the City of Boston, ex- 
cluding Charlestown and Hyde Park, for a period of 
three months, from April 1, 1924. to June 30. 1924. 

mclusive. 

'Furnishing gas and for the equipment and lighting of 
eas lamps for a period of ten years, from April 1. 1924, 
to Marcn 31. 1934. inclusive. 



24 



City Document No. 23. 





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25 



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27 





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City Document No. 23. 



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98,499 90 

6,625 78 

7,443 65 
6,092 62 


11 
as 


$8,703 00 

6,657 50 

6,865 00 
5.531 50 


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Completed May 22, 1924. . . 

Completed June 27, 1924. . . 

Completed July 31.1924... 
Completed Aug. 23, 1924... 


t3 

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Mar. 31. 1924. 

Mar. 31, 1924. 

April 26. 1924. 
May 23, 1924. 


2 

03 
s: 

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J. Williams & Co 

M. DeSisto Company 

J. A. Costello <t Co 


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• Congress street, from Franklin street to Atlantic avenue: 
South street, from Tufts street to Kneeland street; 
Kneeland street, from Utica street to Atlantic avenue, 
city proper; Burnham street, from Southampton 
street to South Bay avenue; Moore street, from 
Southampton street to South Bay avenue; South 
Bay avenue, at Moore street, Roxbury; Burgoyne 
street, from Beaumont street to Helena road, Dorches- 
ter; Province street, from Bromfield street to School 
street; and Province court, from Province street, city 
proper. 

> Blue Hill avenue, Hazleton street, Hiawatha road, Mor- 
ton street, Wildwood street, Dorchester; Florence 
avenue, Brighton; Partridge street, Pond View ave- 
nue, Walden road, West Roxbury Parkway, Wood- 
brier road. West Roxbury. 


street, Brighton; Beech street, Cornell street. Grand- 
view street, Granville street and Winton street. West 
Roxbury. 

1 RpfltPt, BtrPPt. frnm Van Winklp strppt to Cndman strppt- 


Norwell street, from Carmen street to Vassar street ; 
Fairview street, from Adams street, Dorchester; 
Bftyswater street, from Lillian street to Nancia street. 
East Boston; Randolph street, from Harrison avenue, 
city proper; Bowen street, from F street to Dorches- 
ter street. South Boston; and Leverett street, from 
Green street to Cotting street, city proper. 



Public Works Department. 



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1 Hawkins street, from Sudbury street to Chardon street; 
Bowker street, from Sudbury street to Chardon street; 
Chardon street, from Green street to Portland street; 
Kneeland street, from Tyler street to Atlantic avenue; 
Atlantic avenue, from Kneeland street to Essex street; 
South street, from Kneeland street to Beach street; 
Chatham street, from Merchants row to Commercial 
street; Commerce street, from Commercial street to 
Atlantic avenue; Milk street, from Arch street to 
Washington street , Washington street, from Bromfield 
street to Milk street; Kilby street, from Milk street to 
State street; Doane street, from Kilby street to Broad 
street; Broad street, from Doane street to State street; 
State street, from Broad street to Commercial street; 
Hanover street, from Salemstreet to Washington street; 
Hanover street, from Portland street to Scollay square; 
India street, from India square to Custom House street; 
North street, from Merchants row to Union street; 
Union street, from North street to Hanover street; 
Union street, from Hanover street to Haymarket 
square; Sudbury street, from Friend street to Hay- 
marketsquare; Custom House street, from Indiastreet 
to Broad street; Kingston street, from Essex street to 
Beach street; Fleet street, from Commercial street to 
Hanover street, city proper. 



Public Works Department. 



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Public Works Department, 35 

The following changes in pavement were made during 
the year, 

0.10 mile or 1,532 square yards sheet asphalt changed to bitulithic. 

0.00 mile or 25 square yards sheet asphalt changed to granite block. 

0.00 mile or 15 square yards sheet asphalt changed to concrete. 

0.00 mile or 3 square yards asphalt block changed to bitulithic. 

0.00 mile or 5 square yards asphalt concrete changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.00 mile or 18 square yards asphalt concrete changed to bitulithic. 

0.00 mile or 51 square yards asphalt concrete changed to concrete. 

0.00 mile or 145 square yards bitulithic changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.02 mile or 352 square yards Topeka changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.03 mile or 715 square yards Topeka changed to bitulithic. 

0.00 mile or 183 square yards Topeka changed to granite block. 

0.02 mile or 3,116 square yards granite block changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.00 mile or 1 14 square yards granite block changed to rubber. 

1.60 miles or 38,882 square yards granite block changed to bitulithic. 

0.11 mile or 3,013 square yards granite block changed to wood block. 

0.00 mile or 22 square yards granite block changed to brick. 

0.00 mile or 94 square yards granite block changed to concrete. 

0.00 mile or 233 square yards granite block changed to macadam. 

0.05 mile or 1,076 square yards wood block changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.00 mile or 34 square yards wood block changed to bitulithic. 

0.22 mile or 6,005 square yards wood block changed to granite block. 

0.01 mile or 300 square yards plank on bridges changed to granite block. 

0.03 mile or 459 square yards plank on bridges changed to wood block. 

0.02 mile or 345 square yards plank on bridges changed to concrete. 

0.03 mile or 500 square yards plank on bridges changed to macadam. 

0.00 mile or 184 yards brick changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.00 mile or 222 "square yards brick changed to granite l^lock. 

1.62 miles or 27,226 square yards macadam changed to sheet asphalt. 

1.29 miles or 61,814 square yards macadam changed to bitulithic. 

0.16 mile or 14,507 square yards macadam changed to granite block. 

0.52 mile or 12,430 square yards macadam changed to concrete. 

0.11 mile or 2,052 square yards gravel changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.35 mile or 10,878 square yards gravel changed to bitulithic. 

0.17 mile or 3,718 square yards gravel changed to granite block. 

2.01 miles or 32,442 square yards gravel changed to concrete. 

0.05 mile or 570 square yards gravel changed to macadam. 

0.00 mile or 136 square yards not graded changed to sheet asphalt. 

0.00 mile or 703 square yards not graded changed to granite block. 

0.00 mile or 38 square yards not graded changed to wood block. 

0.10 mile or 1,424 square yards not graded changed to concrete. 

0.00 mile or 21 square yards not graded changed to macadam. 

0.40 mile or 7,245 square yards not graded changed to gravel. 

Employees, 

The following tables show the number of requisitions 
made on the Civil Service Commission for men; the 
number appointed, reinstated, died, resigned, transferred 
and retired; also the grade and number of employees in 
the department: 

Requisitions made on the Civil Service Commission . 42 

Number of men called 109 

Number of men certified 232 



36 



City Document No. 23. 



Number of men appointed 

Provisional appointments made permanent 

Promotions allowed 

Reinstatements allowed .... 
Number of men resigned .... 
Number of men died .... 

Number retired under the Veterans' Retirement Act 
Number retired under the Boston Retirement Act 
Number of transfers to other departments . 
Number of transfers from other departments 



164 

7 

37 

*22 
26 
41 
4 
91 
14 
42 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 3,095 persons eligible for employment in the several 
divisions and of that number 3,016 were upon the 
January, 1925, payrolls. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services. 


Title. 


go 
o 


> 

f2 


1 


1 

a 


ll 


pS 


1 


1 


i 






1 




















_ 


1 
1 


1 
1 








1 




1 
1 


















1 

39 














Clerks 


19 
12 

5 
13 

5 
37 
10 
24 

8 


6 

19 

10 

23 

10 

40 

3 

3 

1 


3 


1 


1 


2 
9 
5 
6 
1 
3 
1 
3 




39 
3 


111 




45 












23 












49 












16 






47 
8 


40 
10 






32 
12 


200 






44 






30 






17 








3 






3 

1 










3 


Chauffeurs 


3 

21 

1 


5 

4 


10 
3 


8 

1 


\ 


4 
14 




14 
6 


45 






2 






















45 


160 


126 


88 


60 


6 


49 


2 


122 


658 







Seventeen on eligible list February 1, 1924. 



Public Works Department. 37 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


1° 


1 
1 




S 
1 


1 

ll 


1 


1 




1 


3 


Brought forward 

Cement testers and assistants 


45 
3 


160 


126 


88 


60 


6 


49 2 


122 


658 
3 


2 
















2 






7 














7 






1 
1 






1 








2 








3 








4 


8 










130 




130 














26 
12 

1 






26 






11 


6 

2 

12 

4 

1 










1 


30 






1 




4 






1 
3 


6 








10 






26 
15 

1 






1 


42 














19 








1 
8 








2 


7 










8 




















4 








9 












9 












1 

7 
2 
11 
1 
2 








2 


. 
















7 




















2 


Laborers 




320 


83 




140 






184 


741 


Lamplighter 




1 








^ 










21 
8 

33 
2 


29 












8 




















33 








9 

17 












11 


















3 






18 
2 








35 
























87 


1 










3 
20 


91 






1 
8 










21 






3 


1 




3 
12 


3 




18 










12 
























48 


595 


274 


T?5 


90O 


147 


188 


2 


401 


1,985 











38 City Document No. 23. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Services. 


Title. 


II 


1 


is 


>> 

1 


.S 


fS 


1 


i 
1^ 


i 
1 


1 




48 


.555 


274 


125 


205 


147 
12 


188 


2 


401 


1,985 




12 






3 


1 










94 


98 










1 






1 






10 














10 












1 










Sealers 
















3 


3 


Sewer flushers 






23 

2 
1 












23 






1 
10 
1 


1 






1 






4 














4 


Stonecutters 




























2 

1 
1 








1 
29 


30 


1 
1 






3 


Stablemen 




1.3 


3 












1 






57 


4 


45 


226 






12 


750 
























12 






12 


Chief veterinarian 




1 
6 

1 








1 






16 


12 

1 

4 
5 
13 


3 




4 








Weighers 




2 


Wharfingers ... 














3 
















4 


Wheelwrights and assistants 


















5 






7 


2 


2 








7 


31 














Totals 


48 


708 


328 


644 


467 


175 


194 


3 


528 


3,095 



Public Works Department. 



39 



Number of Employees Actually Employed February 1, 1924, and 
February 1, 1925. 



















'P^ 






























jg 














c S 








1 

1 

a 


1 


fc 
^ 


a 


1" 


-2 
'5 


■? 

^ 


5^ 




1 


February 1, 1924 


41 


193 


175 


3 


691 


600 


328 


447 


514 


2,992 


February 1, 1925 


39 


191 


169 


3 


695 


623 


325 


446 


525 


3,016 



Total Eligible Force. 



February 1, 1924 . 
February 1, 1925 . 



50 


195 


175 


3 


705 


632 


331 


466 


503 


48 


194 


175 


3 


708 


644 


328 


467 


528 



3,060 
3,095 



A-ppointments, Transfers, Resigjiations, Retirements, Deaths, etc., of Employe 





.; 


h 


si 


i 






1 




i 


u 


It 








2 




HQ 


n 




"S. 


-H- 


Services 


CO 


?,s 


1q 


i 


i, 


5 


n 
%< 


n 
r 


III 


ii 


.1 


1 
Q 


1 

^ 


1924-1925. 


i 


"1^ 

go 


III 


C3 
1 


1 

< 


^ 






3 


3 










*48 




2 








„ 




1 


1 






195 


Bridge 


194 


1 


3 




4 


3 


















175 








4 
















3 




3 

708 
644 










11 


33 
12 




- 


11 

17 


6 

S 




705 
632 


Pavin" 


34 
6 


8 


3 


22 






44 


5 


9 




2 




s 




466 


Street Cleanin" 


467 
328 


3 


3 




42 


6 


14 




1 




-> 




331 


Sewer 


7 


6 




9 


7 


12 






9 


2 




503 


Water 


528 


12 


8 




39 


41 


91 


- 


14 


69 


26 




3,060 




3,095 


69 


42 


■^ 


164 










Includes eight Central Office employees who are paid on Water Service pay roll. 



PART II. 

APPENDICES, 



42 



City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX A. 



Central Office. 

Appropriation $88,933 91 

Expenditures from February 1, 1924, to January 

31, 1925 86,511 11 



Balance unexpended and transferred to the 

Citv Treasurer $2,422 80 





Expe? 


iditures. 








Salary, commissioner 








S9,000 00 


Salaries of clerks, stenographers, etc. 




69,996 62 


Automobile expense : 










Wages, chauffeur . 






SI, 633 67 


Bay State sedan . 






1,181 81 


Gasolene . 






236 39 


Storage . 






150 00 


Repairs . 






90 50 


Supplies . 






103 12 


Tires and tubes 






68 52 


Oil, grease, etc. 






22 3 


L 


Registration . 






12 00 










Q AQC QO 






0,t:E70 O^ 


Printing 








2,454 31 


Stationery . 










454 78 


Postage 










211 56 


Telephone tolls . 










37 84 


Travel expenses, car fares, etc. 








201 31 


Typewriter . 








• 


88 00 


Inspection and repairs. 


typewr 


iters 






74 25 


Books, papers, etc. . 










362 17 


Sundries 










125 95 


Surety bond 










6 00 



$86,511 11 



Public Works Department. 43 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
BRIDGE AND FERRY DIVISION. 



Boston,. Febrvuiry 1, 1925. 

Mr. J. A. RouRKE, 

Cominissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the following 
report of the income, expenditures, and operation of the 
Bridge and Ferry Division for the year ending January 
31, 1925. The expenditures of the division m the 
regular maintenance appropriations of the department 
were $981,598.76. Under special appropriations, 
$595,354.24 additional was expended, making the 
total expenditures for the year $1,576,953. 

After years of litigation between the cities of Boston 
and Chelsea, the latter city has agreed to carry out the 
provisions of the findings of the Special Commission 
and the decree of the Supreme Court in regard to the 
bridges between Boston and Chelsea, constructed under 
the provisions of chapter 581, Acts of 1911, as amended 
by chapter 341, Acts of 1913. The city of Chelsea 
paid $25,000 on January 1, 1925, as a first installment 
on the payment of $100,000 to the City of Boston, 
agreed upon by Boston and Chelsea, on account of the 
maintenance charges of Chelsea Bridge and Meridian 
Street Bridge up to February 1, 1924. 

The wearing surface of the following bridges has 
been changed from wooden sheathing to a more per- 
manent type of pavement or they have been treated 
with a bituminous topping: 

In some cases these jobs were occasioned by the 
complete rebuilding of the structure when it was deemed 
advisable to change from the lighter type of structure 
formerly in vogue, with wooden sheathing, to a per- 
manent structure usually of steel incased in concrete 
with a paving of permanent type. 

In other cases where the under plank has been down 
for some time but is still good for a few years, a bitumin- 



44 City Document No. 23. 

ous top has been put on, particularly where the bridge 
is a large structure. The bituminous top costs much 
less than the wood block but needs attention at least 
once a year. 

Wherever the job is comparatively small and the 
under plank has needed replacing, it has been deemed 
advisable to put tongued and grooved under plank 
down, on top of which is placed wood block with asphalt 
joints, so that the roadway should need no repairs for a 
considerable period of years. 

Arlington Street Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad). — 
Wood block. 

Ashland Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad). — Granite block. 

Ashland Street Bridge {over Stony Brook) . — Bituminous top. 

Babson Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad) . — Wood block. 

Beacon Street Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad). — 
Granite block. 

Belgrade Avenue Bridge {over New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad). — Granite block. 

Bennington Street Bridge {over Boston, Revere Beach and 
Lynn Railroad). — Wood block. 

Berkeley Street Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad). — 
Bituminous top. 

Blue Hill Avenue Bridge {over New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad). — Bituminous top. 

Boylstofi Street Bridge {over Boston arid Albany Railroad). — 
Bituminous top, outside car tracks only. 

Broadway Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad) . — Wood 
block. 

Brookline Avenue Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad). 
— Wood block. 

Cambridge Street Bridge {Allsto7i) over Boston and Albany 
Railroad. — Wood block. 

Chelsea South Bridge. — Granite block and wood block. 

Dana Avenue Bridge {over New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad) . — Wood block. 

Everett Street Bridge {over Boston and Albany Railroad). — 
Bituminous top. 

Glenwood Avenue Bridge {over Mother Brook).— Wood block. 

Harvard Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad). — Wood block. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge {over Stony Brook).— Wood block. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge {over Mother Brook). — Granite 
block. 

Hyde Park Bridge {over electric connection) . — Wood block. 

Milton Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad). — Wood block and bituminous top. 



Public Works Department. 45 

New Allen Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad). — -Wood block. 

Sprague Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and Hart- 
ford Railroad) . — Bituminous top. 

Walworth Street Bridge {over Neio York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad). — Wood block. 

West River Street Bridge {over Mother Brook). — Wood block. 

West Fourth Street Bridge {over New York, New Haven and 
Hartford Railroad, outside car tracks). — Bituminous top. 

Beacon Street Bridge. 

A contract was made January 3, 1923, with the 
Phoenix Bridge Company at a price of $104,416.01, 
for replacing the old bridge with a new structm-e, using 
the existing abutments. The subcontractor for the 
approaches and concrete work was A. G. Tomasello 
& Son Company. The work of reconstruction was 
completed April 30, 1924. 

The new structure is of steel encased in concrete. 
It has three main giiders carrying a system of steel 
floor beams supporting two roadways with a concrete 
floor on which is laid granite block paving. The side- 
walks have a granolithic surface and are carried on 
brackets from the two outside girders. All the metal 
below the floor is encased in concrete, and cast-iron 
plates are used over the railroad tracks to diminish the 
effect of locomotive exhaust. The bridge was widened 
on the westerly side so that it is now as wide as the street 
on either side. The water pipes have been placed under 
the railroad tracks so that with the new bridge a very 
much larger space is afforded for traffic than was the 
case with the old structure. 

Braddock Park Footbridge. 

Extensive repairs have been made to the corroded 
steel work of this bridge and adjacent steps and a com- 
plete new wooden flooring placed by the day labor force. 

Cambridge Street, Allston, Bridge over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 

A contract was made June 22, 1922, with the Boston 
Bridge Works, Inc., at a price of $133,621.78, for remov- 
ing the old bridge and replacing it with a new structure, 
utilizing the existing abutments. The subcontractor 
for the approaches and concrete work was Cross & 
Roberts. The bridge was completed May 17, 1924. 



46 City Document No. 23. 

The new structure consists of four steel trusses, 
carrying steel floor beams, encased in concrete and 
supporting a concrete floor with wood block paving. 
There are three roadways, the middle carrying two 
lines of street railway tracks. The bottom chords of 
the trusses are raised above the floor level so that the 
locomotive gases will not cause corrosion. The easterly 
sidewalk is built outside of the easterly truss, thereby 
widening the bridge and giving a greater width to the 
easterly roadway. On the west side of the bridge 
brackets are built out from the truss to carry the gas 
pipe, thereby removing the gas pipe from the roadway 
surface. These changes have made all the roadways 
wide enough to carry two lines of vehicles with ease. 
The approaches to the bridge are paved with granite 
block 

Chelsea Bridge North. 

Many of the piles supporting the sidewalk and road- 
way of the south approach to the swing draw at Chelsea 
Bridge North which were broken and decayed and 
several spur shores which had broken loose were repaired 
by the W. L. Miller Company, under a contract dated 
September 27, 1924. The work was completed on 
October 29, 1924, at a cost of $2,800.76. A complete 
rebuilding of these pile approaches will be necessary 
in a few years. 

A contract was awarded to the Murray Engineering 
Company, October 17, 1924, for cleaning and painting 
the steel work of Chelsea Bridge North draw span. 
The work will be finished in the spring of 1925. The 
City of Boston supplies the paint for the two finish 
coats, and the contractor the red lead paint for touching 
up rusty spots. The two finish coats are of blue lead 
and the paint weighs approximately eighteen pounds 
to the gallon. 

Chelsea Street Bridge. 

The Rendle-Stoddard Company was awarded a 
contract for repairing the fender guard on October 4, 

1924. It was also found necessary to extend this fender 
guard down stream about twenty-five feet to protect 
the pile bridge properly from the large steamers now 
passing through this bridge. Spur shores have been 
fitted under the draw pier and some planking on the 
pier replaced. The work was completed January 3, 

1925, at a cost of $4,668.52. 



Public Works Department. 47 

Chelsea Bridge South. 

As a preliminary step toward the building of a per- 
manent new structure at Chelsea Bridge, over the south 
channel of the Mystic river, a temporary bridge was 
constructed alongside the existing bridge in 1913-14. 
The draw span of this temporary structure was the 
same as that used in the temporary bridge at the Chelsea 
Bridge North. 

Various studies based on borings at the site were made 
for a permanent structure and a plan adopted on which 
licenses were obtained from the Public Works Depart- 
ment of the state and from the War Department. The 
plan provided for a bridge 365 feet long and 61 feet wide, 
having a 46-foot roadway and two 7^-foot sidewalks. It 
provided for a channel in the waterway 75 feet wide with 
a depth of 25 feet and with piers at such a depth that it 
would be possible ultimately to dredge the channel to 35 
feet at mean low water. 

The draw span consists of a four-leaf bascule draw of 
the Strauss type, with main trunnion supports 119 feet 
between centers, operated by electricity. The draw span 
is paved with wood block. 

The approach spans are composed of deck plate girder 
and beam spans, supporting a floor of concrete; the road- 
way has a wearing surface of granite block and the side- 
walks a granolithic surface. 

Autom.atic gates of the yielding type protect the draw 
opening. These gates are designed to stop a two-ton 
automobile traveling at twenty miles an hour without 
damage to either the gate or the automobile. 

The masonry foundations of the bascule span reach to a 
depth of 40 feet below mean low water on the southerly 
side of the channel and 45 feet below mean low water 
on the northerly side and are in hardpan. They were 
placed by the use of steel sheet piling coffer dams. The 
lower parts of the foundations are of concrete and were 
placed under water. From about 15 feet below mean 
low water to the top of the piers, the concrete and 
masonry was laid in the dry, although the water was 
allowed to flow over it after a few hours had been allowed 
for the setting of concrete and mortar. The foundations 
for the approach spans rest on piles. All concrete from 
about mean low water to the top of the piers is faced with 
granite masonry. 

The draw fender pier is about 426 feet long, the oak 



48 City Document No. 23. 

piling is from 60 to 65 feet long, and the timber in the 
construction is of yellow pine or Douglas fir. 

The bridge was built under a contract with the Hol- 
brook, Cabot & Rollins Corporation, approved May 2, 
1922, and the work was completed July 19, 1924. A 
large part of the wood work was sublet to the W. L. 
Miller Company, the steel work to the Boston Bridge 
Works, Inc., and the paving and curbstones to C. W. 
Dolloff & Co. 

On October 17, 1923, a contract for a new drawtenders' 
house was made with the W. L. Miller Company, and 
the work was completed December 26, 1923, at a cost of 
$5,374. 

The construction of this bridge has greatly facilitated 
the movement of traffic, both on the street and through 
the waterway, and heavy lighterage charges have been 
saved the firms up stream from the draw span. 

An agreement of 1914 between the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company and the City of Boston provided 
that the city should rebuild a part of the freight shed on 
Mystic wharf, which was torn down during the construc- 
tion of the temporary bridge, the rebuilding to be done 
when the permanent bridge was constructed. 

The Boston & Maine Railroad Company requested 
that in lieu of the rebuilding of the freight house that the 
city amend the agreement and pay the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company the amount of money that would be 
required for the rebuilding of the freight house. It was 
finally agreed that an amendment be made to the agree- 
ment, providing that the city pay to the Boston & Maine 
Railroad Company $4,750 and the amendment to the 
agreement will soon be signed. 

Some claims on the part of the contractor for the 
rebuilding of Chelsea South Bridge are still outstanding, 
so that the cost of this construction has not been finally 
determined. 

Commercial Point Bridge. 

Patrick A. Colleran was awarded a contract for repair- 
ing and strengthening this bridge. The work consisted 
in refitting about six old spur shores, replacing girders, 
braces and girder caps where necessary and repairing 
the existing abutments by cleaning and filling the joints 
of the masonry with cement mortar and pinners. It was 
necessary to do considerable posting from new low water 
girders to strengthen the structure, as the tops of the 



Public Works Department. 49 

old piles were badly decayed. The contract was com- 
pleted September 17, 1924, at a cost of $2,194.40. 

Congress Street Bridge. 

Borings were made under a contract with Martin F. 
Gaddis, approved on August 23, 1923, for wash borings 
across the channel, to determine the material for the 
foundations of the proposed bridge. The contract was 
completed on October 2, 1923, at a cost of $1,666.02. 

Plans drawn for the construction and maintenance 
of a new permanent bridge were approved by the De- 
partment of PubHc Utihties on November 28, 1924. 
Application has also been made to the War Department 
for permission to build this bridge. 

The new^ structure will be of masonry and steel, with 
a draw having a clear opening of not less than 75 feet 
for the passage of vessels. Pile and timber fender 
guards and piers will also be constructed. 

A portion of the existing water pipe and tunnel will 
be changed by extending the westerly end of the pipe 
about 23 feet and building a new shaft at this point. 
The depth of channel will be increased to 25 feet at 
low water and the foundations of the new bridge built 
to allow the deeping of this channel to 30 feet at low 
water, if required by the Government. 

The construction of this bridge will depend upon 
Legislative action authorizing a loan outside the debt 
limit to the amount of $800,000. 

Cottage Farm Bridge over Boston and Albany Railroad. 

A contract was approved with Maurice M. Devine 
on August 5, 1924, for repairing the under part of the 
structure with gunite. This work was paid for by the 
Park Department but the engineering work and super- 
vision was executed by the Bridge Service. 

Some of the gunite of this bridge had become loose 
from the action of the locomotive gases. The loose 
material was removed and a new surface of gunite laid, 
which will probably last for five or six years, thereby 
protecting the steel and brick work of the structure. 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge. 

A contract was awarded to the W. H. Ellis & Son 
Company on March 25, 1924, for repairing the fenders 
of the Dorchester Avenue Bridge, over Fort Point chan- 



50 City Document No. 23. 

nel. The faces of the waterways were repaired, fender 
guards, capsills, caps and other timber work renewed 
where directed, new piUng was provided where neces- 
sary, spur shores refitted and corner irons placed. The 
cost of this work was $3,896.60. 

A contract was awarded to the C. & R. Construction 
Company for repairing the sidewalks and flooring on 
August 28, 1924. This work consisted of replacing 
parts of the downstream sidewalk on both sides of the 
channel by putting in new stringers, new planking and 
new surfacing. Incidentally it was necessary to renew 
the adjacent curbsticks, roadway planking, some road- 
way stringers, and to repave some of the roadway. 
Some work was also required in the roadways near the 
draw cracks, where in co-operation with the city the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company removed and re- 
placed the car track and paved in the track. This con- 
tract was completed October 23, 1924, at a cost of 
$7,899.22. 

Dartmouth Street Bridge over Boston and Albany Railroad. 

An order of the Public Utihties Commission, issued 
April 27, 1923, provides for the rebuilding of this bridge 
in accordance with plans submitted by this division. 
It provides for the removal of the present superstructure 
and for the construction of two new piers on which will 
be placed a steel bridge, the steel below the flooring to be 
encased in concrete. The middle truss will be removed 
and the girders of the bridge will be placed on the side- 
walks, thus making a single roadway instead of the two 
roadways on the present bridge and improving traffic 
conditions. The roadway is to be paved with granite 
block and the sidewalks will have a granolithic finish. 
There will be no street car tracks on the structure. 

In the belief that this work should be done in two 
parts, a contract was awarded on September 5, 1924, 
to the New England Foundation Company to build the 
piers. There are two piers of reinforced concrete sup- 
ported on concrete columns which rest on a layer of 
hard clay, and the bottoms of the columns are at about 
elevation 24. 

The columns were placed by excavating inside steel 
caissons until hard bottom was reached, then the foot- 
ing was enlarged and the excavation filled with concrete. 
On account of vibration in the ground due to the very 
close proximity of the railroad tracks, it was deemed 



Public Works Department. 51 

advisable to leave the steel shells in position. It was 
necessary before constructing the piers to make some 
slight alterations in the sewer system by relocating 
sections of the drains which would interfere with the 
building of the piers. In building the piers old piling 
and some parts of an old pier were encountered, causing 
a slight delay in the work. The contract, amounting 
to $27,193.69, was completed January 9, 1925. 

A contract was awarded to the C. & R. Construction 
Company, approved December 4, 1924, for building 
the steel and concrete superstructure for $72,455.50. 
Only the steel fabrication has been started. 

Harvard Street Bridge, Dorchester. 
In co-operation with the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company, the day labor force has 
laid a tongued and grooved yellow pine plank floor, on 
which has been placed a wood block pavement with 
asphalt joints, making a much more permanent pave- 
ment than the old wooden sheathing. 

Huntington Avenue Bridge over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 
Under a contract approved October 31, 1924, the 
C. & R. Construction Company has removed all the 
loose concrete from the arches and beams on the under 
surface and has painted all exposed surfaces of metal 
work and the fences. The City of Boston supplied the 
paint for this work. Gunite was applied to surfaces of 
metal exposed by the removal of loose concrete. The 
contract will be completed in the near future. 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge over Electric Connection, 
Hyde Park. 

In co-operation with the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company, the wooden floor has been 
entirely renewed by our day labor force. 

A 4-inch tongued and grooved yellow pine plank has 
been placed on new stringers furnished by the railroad 
company and a wood block wearing surface, with asphalt 
joints, set on the yellow pine plank. 

Meridian Street Bridge. 
The Boston Elevated Railway Company, in co-opera- 
tion with the Bridge Service day labor force has com- 



52 City Document No. 23. 

pletely renewed the wooden flooring of the draw span, 
doing the work on Saturdays and Sundays, shutting off 
all travel for two days and two nights in two consecutive 
weeks. 

Northern Avenue Bridge. 

June 23, 1924, a contract was awarded the W. S. 
Rendle & Son Company for repairing the fender piers 
and building pile supports. The planking on the draw 
pier was renewed and the greater part of the stringers and 
capsills were replaced with new material. All loose 
spur shores were refitted and additional piles were driven 
in the fender pier near the sweep of the ends of the draw, 
for the purpose of supporting the jacks for the blocking 
up and leveling of the draw span. New corner irons 
were provided where required. The work was completed 
November 14, 1924, at a cost of $17,270.43. 

The continued settlement of the main draw pier at this 
bridge has made necessary the resetting of the draw 
track and the end bearings of this bridge. A contract 
was approved August 21, 1924, with the Edward J. 
Carnes Company, to raise and block up the draw. The 
draw was swung off over the draw pier and jacked up on 
pile supports which had been previously placed. The 
existing track was then cleaned and reset on antimonial 
lead at proper grade. New landing blocks for the end 
supports were installed and the draw placed in proper 
working condition. The cost of this work, completed 
November 6, 1924, was $6,938.73. 

The great amount of teaming travel over this and 
other bridges in the city has prompted this department 
to obtain a wearing surface which would be of a lasting 
nature. From the standpoint of first cost the ordinary 
method of sheathing with a wooden flooring has proven 
the most economical. This involved, however, the clos- 
ing of parts of this bridge and others to travel so fre- 
quently that it has become a matter of public incon- 
venience. An experiment was instituted on this bridge 
with the use of rubber pavement. In May a small sec- 
tion of the bridge over the draw pier was laid with this 
pavement which consists of blocks of composition rubber 
laid on a waterproofing compound and cemented together 
with a rubber cement. The rubber pavement was sup- 
plied by the Wright Rubber Products Company of 
Racine, Wis., and was laid by the Bridge Service force. 



Public Works Department. 53 

To date it has proven to be very successful and a severe 
test has been appHed by the deraihnent of a freight car 
of the Union Freight Railroad. This car which ran 
over part of the pavement caused a slight depression in 
the surface which disappeared shortly after ordinary 
traffic had passed over it. 

Redfield Stneet Bridge, Dorchester. 
The railroad has renewed the wooden stringers, on 
which the day labor force placed yellow pine deck 
plank, covered by 2-inch spruce, on which was laid a 
bituminous top of tarvia, stone and sand. 

Reservoir Road Bridge, Brighton, over Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 
The wooden flooring of this bridge has been entirely 
renewed by the day labor force, in co-operation with the 
forces of the Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 

Summer Street Bridge over Reserved Channel. 
A contract was awarded to the W. H. Ellis & Son 
Company on July 18, 1924, for the repairs of the piers 
and fender guards. All old timbers and flooring were 
removed and replaced with new material. Old piles 
were removed and old spur shores refitted. The 
landings for the draw were repaired and readjusted and 
repairs made to the woodwork of the draw foundations. 
The capsills, stringers, caps and planking of the piers 
and fender guards were renewed where necessary. 
The work was completed October 2, 1924, at a cost of 
$8,018.25. 

Walworth Street Bridge over New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad. 

It was found that this bridge, formerly maintained 
by the railroad company, was in very poor condition, 
and the timber was very badly decayed. 

The day labor force has completely renewed this 
bridge, putting in heavier timbers of yellow pine on 
which was placed a floor of 4-inch yellow pine tongued 
and grooved plank. For a wearing surface there was 
placed a wood block pavement, with asphalt joints. 
The approaches were also changed with bituminous 
macadam to meet the new grade. 



54 City Document No. 23. 

Repairing Wharf and Dredging Dock, Engine 31, Com- 
mercial Street. 

By request of the Fire Commissioner, estimates and 
a plan for repairs to the wharf and the dredging of the 
dock, to accommodate the fire boat, were prepared. 

The contract with the Bay State Dredging Company 
was approved February 15, 1924. The work consisted 
of general repairs on the wharf i*icluding the driving of 
pihng on the faces of the dock, replanking the runways 
and the deck of the wharf; also the dock itself was 
dredged to minus fifteen. The work was completed 
April 1, 1924, at a cost of $4,184 29. 

Miscellaneous. 

During the past year many bridges which had spruce 
plank for wearing surfaces have been covered with a 
bituminous topping from ^ inch to 1 inch thick, composed 
of broken stone and sand bound together with Tarvia. 
The results have been on the whole very satisfactory 
and will prove economical in the maintenance of the 
planking. 



Public Woeks Department. 55 



FERRY SERVICE. 



The following steam ferryboats are in commission : 

When Gross 

Name. Built. Type. Length. Tonnage. 

Hugh O'Brien 1883 Side wheel 175 ft. 3 in. 645 

Governor Russell 1898 Propeller 164 " 3 " 713 

Noddle Island (rebuilt)... 1921 " 174 " 5 " 564 

General Sumner 1900 " 164 " 3 " 450 

John H. Sullivan 1912 " 172 « 3 " 527 

Lieutenant Flaherty 1921 " 174 " 727 

Ralph J. Palumbo 1921 " 174 " 755 

"Governor Russell." 
On Jmie 24, 1924, the ferryboat "Governor Russell" 
was taken out on the marine railway of R. T. Green's 
yard, Chelsea, for examination of a propeller. A 
broken tail shaft was found; the other tail shaft had 
been broken and renewed in December of the previous 
year. After receiving bids to make the necessary 
repairs, the stern bearing was plugged and the boat 
towed to the Atlantic Works, East Boston, and a new 
tail shaft, complete with sleeves and bushings, was 
installed. The cost of this work was $853. 

"Noddle Island." 

On September 5, 1924, a contract with the Atlantic 
Works was approved for the sum of $2,926 to install a 
ventilating plant on the ferryboat "Noddle Island." 
When the boat was built in 1920, an exhaust system of 
ventilation was installed. Wliile this system was at 
first deemed sufficient to create satisfactory conditions 
below decks, it was soon decided that a supplementary 
system to introduce fresh air would be desirable. To 
this end, a turbine blower was installed with all necessary 
piping outlets and inlet. At the sam.e time, the piping 
of the exhaust plant was also renewed with suitable 
gauge galvanized iron ducts. After the installation, 
all galvanized iron ducts, connections and fittings were 
given a coat of bitumastic enamel paint in an effort to 
prevent the rapid corrosion of this kind of piping on 
board ship On September 19, 1924, the boat was taken 
out on the marine railway of R. T. Green's yard, Chelsea, 



56 City Document No. 23. 

for general repairs to the hull. While extensive repairs 
were not contemplated, when an examination of the 
copper sheathing of the under water body of the boat 
was made possible, it was evident that a large number 
of sheets of yellow metal would be required to make 
satisfactory repairs. At the same tim.e, one of the tail 
shafts was found so far down that a complete new 
stern tube and a new composition sleeve on the tail 
shaft were required. Miscellaneous work, such as 
painting the wood of the upper body of the hull, cleaning 
inlet boxes and strainers, and attaching four new pro- 
peller blades was also done. This work cost $2,619. 

"General Sumner." 

On March 10, 1924, the ferryboat "General Sumner" 
was taken out on the marine railway of R. T. Green's 
yard, Chelsea, for minor repairs to the hull. The hull 
was cleaned and painted and the inlet strainers were 
removed and cleaned. While the required repairs were 
not large, it was apparent from the condition of the 
planking and hull system generally that extensive 
repairs will be necessary shortly if the boat is to remain 
in commission. Perhaps the chief causes of damage are 
the heavy loads that are now carried (many of the coal 
trucks from adjacent yards weighing each in excess of 
fifteen tons when loaded, coupled with the fact that four 
lines of vehicles are now carried on the boat where the 
boat was originally designed for but two), and the 
strains set up as these excessive loads go on and leave 
the boat. 

"John H. Sullivan." 

A contract was awarded to the R. T. Green Company, 
Chelsea, Mass., on October 17, 1924, to repair the 
ferryboat "John H. Sullivan." 

The work done under this contract consisted of dry- 
docking the boat, cleaning, scraping and wire brushing 
the hull, backing out 5,054 defective rivets and driving 
new ones, electric welding 74 defective rivets, caulking 
814 feet of seams, painting the hull with two coats of red 
lead and one coat of anti-fouling paint, allowing suffi- 
cient periods of time between coats for the paint to dry, 
spot welding 608 guard iron fastenings, and furnishing 
in place landing irons to take the ends of the new electri- 
cally operated ferry drops. 

While this work was progressing it was found necessary 
to make further repairs, which consisted of rewooding 



Public Works Department. 57 

both stern bearings and fitting new keys for the wheels, 
raising both rudders, instalhng new blow backs on two 
sea cocks, packing main stuffing boxes, repairing one 
sponson brace, and renewing one disc and stem in one 
sea valve. The total cost of the repairs, including the 
extra work as noted above, was $5,683.46. While the 
repairs to the hull were approximately as anticipated 
in the contract it may be mentioned that the deteriora- 
tion of the rivets, plates and hull system generally is 
such that future repairs to the hull at greater cost may 
be required. 

In connection with the contract for building the ferry 
bridges, both ends of this boat were strengthened and 
altered to fit the new drops, by the J. Edward Ogden 
Company. 

' ' Lieutenant Flaherty. ' ' 

A contract was awarded to the Atlantic works. East 
Boston, on November 10, 1924, to repair the hull of the 
''Lieutenant Flaherty." The work done under this 
contract consisted of drydocking the boat, cleaning, 
scraping and wirebrushing the hull, electric welding 330 
defective rivets, caulking and welding some seams, paint- 
ing the hull with two coats of red lead and one coat of 
anti fouling paint, spot welding 1,241 guard iron fasten- 
ings, and furnishing in place suitable landing plates for 
the ends of the electrically operated ferry bridges. While 
the work was progressing, an extra work order was given 
to deliver on board a turbine generator furnished by the 
city, plug blow off openings, make new opening above 
braces, clean and drain bilges, furnish new guard timber 
on end, and effect minor repairs. The total sum paid 
the Atlantic Works for these repairs, including the extra 
work, was $2,540.65. While the work required to make 
satisfactory repairs on hull at this time was not as exten- 
sive as anticipated, there are indications that future 
repairs will be more costly. Before the boat again went 
into service, the turbine generator, mentioned above, 
was installed in place of one of the two original gen- 
erators which are connected up with reciprocating 
engines. Owing to the vibration set up in the boat when 
the old generators were running, it was thought advisable 
to use a turbine set in which there is no vibration. From 
the beginning the new generator has given complete 
satisfaction and that with a steam consumption much 
less than expected. 



58 City Document No. 23. 

''Ralph J. Palumbo." 

A contract was awarded to the Atlantic Works, East 
Boston, on December 11, 1924, to repair the hull of the 
ferryboat "Ralph J. Palumbo." The work done under 
this contract consisted of drydocking the boat, cleaning 
and painting the hull in a manner similar to the 
"Lieutenant Flaherty," backing out 910 defective rivets 
and driving new ones, backing out 10 defective rivets 
and replacing with tap rivets, electric welding 672 defec- 
tive rivets, caulking and welding 260 feet of seams, spot 
welding 1,243 guard iron fastenings, rewooding one stern 
bearing, raising one rudder, installing a new turbine 
generator, furnished by the city, recanvassing and 
painting the upper deck, furnishing in place new boiler 
fronts, cleaning bilges, and making several minor repairs. 
The total cost amounted to $5,750.37. The condition 
of the under water body of the boat is such that next year 
som.e plates will need renewal and further riveting will be 
required. 

Electrically Operated Ferry Bridges. 

The satisfactory operation of the two electrically 
operated ferry bridges at the South Ferry, built last year, 
made it advisable to construct two more of a similar 
type. A contract was awarded to the Rendle-Stoddard 
Construction Company, Chelsea, Mass., on July 29, 
1924, to build the necessary foundations at a cost of 
$30,856.98. On August 5, 1924 a contract was awarded 
to the J. Edward Ogden Company, New York, to install 
two electrically operated ferry bridges with gallows 
frames and accompanying machinery, one at the north- 
erly drop on the East Boston side and one at the south- 
erly drop on the Boston side, at a contract price of 
$234,000. This contract will complete the change from 
the old pontoon and wooden ferry bridges to the new 
steel type at the South Ferry. 

The new steel ferry bridges have been built with a road- 
way of sufficient width to accommodate a double line of 
vehicles; the side walks are narrower than those on the 
wooden bridges. In this way, the movement of the 
vehicles is accelerated until the time of unloading and 
loading is not more than the time required for the move- 
ments of the pedestrians. 

In the new installation, dead load counterweights, 



Public Works Department. 59 

located in the side towers operating by means of cables 
running over sheaves in the gallows frames, are capable 
of balancing all but about two tons of the dead load at 
the end of the bridge. The rest of the dead load and 
thirty-eight tons of the live load are taken care of by 
means of the live load counterweights. The live load 
counterweights consist of about twenty tons of cast iron 
for each bridge. The leads from the bridge to these 
counterweights run over sheaves in the gallows frames 
and down to a sheave in the middle tower of the gallows 
frame ; from the counterweights, leads are taken up and 
over this sheave, hung on the leads from the end of the 
bridge and down to the electrically operated winch. In 
this way the counterweights correspond to the standing 
end of a two-part purchase on the leads from the bridge 
and get a Hft of forty tons on the end of the bridge by 
means of twenty tons of counterweights. By means of 
an ingenious arrangement at the end of the bridge, the 
mooring of the boat is accomplished in a satisfactory 
manner, without any independent means for such pur- 
pose, through the pull exerted by the live load counter- 
weights. After careful consideration, the normal pull on 
the mooring device was reduced by dividing the live load 
counterweight, so that only when the excessive loading 
of the bridge takes place, will the full effect of the coun- 
terweights (forty tons) be called into play. 

To raise and lower the bridge, a master control is 
located at the end where the deckhand on the boat may 
step from the boat to the bridge; in this way additional 
hands to operate the installations are not necessary. 
By means of overload releases, relays, limit switches, 
slack cable releases and similar devices the safe operation 
of the bridges is insured as far as possible. Not only are 
these devices used to safeguard against errors in manual 
operations but they automatically take care of the effect 
of the rise and fall of the tide and such changes in the 
elevation of the boat as may be caused by changes in 
trim when loads go on or off. The supports for the 
canopies at the inshore ends of the north drop, Boston 
side, and south drop, East Boston, have been altered to 
furnish wider roadways, and new wire gates on steel 
frames have been constructed for the new conditions. 

With the completion of these new ferry bridges, the 
city will probably have the largest and best set of ferry 
bridges extant. 



60 City Document No. 23. 



Ferry Piers. 

Under a contract with the W. H. Elhs Company, 
dated August 7, 1924. considerable repairs to the 
North Ferry piers were completed on January 31, 1925, 
at a ccst of $20,638.82'. This work included the re- 
building of the head of the north pier on the Boston 
side, by driving new piles, rebinding all three pier heads 
on the East Boston side, and fitting in place chafing 
irons on the wearing surfaces of certain of the piles in 
all the piers. The last item is an attempt to reduce 
the excessive wearing of the surface piles which are 
rapidly cut through by abrasion caused by the guard 
fastenings on the beats slipping by as they enter the 
slips. These chafing irons are attached to each fifth 
pile approximately, and from present indications, the 
irons accomplish all that was expected of them. 

North Ferry Pontoon. — Repairs were made by the 
Murray Engineering Company, to the pontoon and 
drop of the North Ferry, Boston side, which were con- 
siderably dam.aged by a ferryboat on August 7, 1924. 
The work required the rebuilding and re-ironing of out- 
shore end of the drop, fitting in place a new spring 
beam on the land end, taking the pontoon out of the 
water on a railway for calking, fastening of new block- 
ing timbers, and resheathing complete with heavy 
yellow metal. When the bottom chords of the main 
trusses of the drop were uncovered, it was found neces- 
sary to make extensive repairs to replace the unsound 
tim.ber. In order to expedite the work, an order was 
given to the W. H. Ellis Company, which was engaged 
in repairs to the adjacent pier, to drive a few temporary 
piles for construction purposes, block up the outshore 
end of the drop while the pontoon was being repaired, 
and build a new pile and timber guide for the drop to 
work against. The repairs to the pontoon were done 
under contract at a cost of $2,875. The repairs to the 
drop were made by the day labor force of the Ferry 
Service aided by the Murray Engineering Company. 

Under a contract made with the W. H. Ellis Com- 
pany, dated October 28, 1924, the coal pocket dock at 
the South Ferry, East Boston, was repaired at a cost 
of $1,455.56. This work consisted of rebuilding the 
foundation under the boiler and winch of the hoisting 
engine, driving new piles, fitting new caps and beams, 
laying a new^ deck, making fast new caps and covering 



Public Works Department. 61 

boards, and driving and fastening new chafing and 
mooring piles. These last piles are for mooring ferry 
boats when not in commission and are made fast to the 
outside caps of the dock by means of bolts and large 
cleats to prevent any side motion. This work was 
completed on January 6, 1925. 

Under a contract made with the Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, dated June 18, 1924, some minor repairs 
were made on several piers at a total cost of S4, 133.75. 
Included in this work was the temporary straightening 
of pier head of the middle pier South Ferry, Boston, 
and the necessary driving of piles and timber work at 
the inshore ends of the piers of the south slip, South 
Ferry, East Boston, to fit the piers so that the boats 
can approach the new steel bridge more safely. Each 
pier was slightly extended on the inshore end to pro- 
tect the concrete foundations of the new gallows frame 
and the chafing planking of the south pier was removed 
for a distance of about thirty feet so that the boat 
entering the slip would line up properly: This con- 
tract was completed on July 25, 1924. 

Under a contract made with the Rendle-Stoddard 
Company, dated July 8, 1924, the middle pier of the 
South Ferry, Boston, about 130 feet long, was entirely 
rebuilt. In order to maintain the service at the South 
Ferry while the terms of this contract were being ful- 
filled, it was necessary to rem.ove and rebuild first the 
upstream half of the pier while the downstream slip 
was being used and, on the completion of this phase, to 
complete the other half of the pier while the upstream 
slip w^as in commission. As on the corresponding East 
Boston side, the inshore ends of the piers of the north 
or upstream slip were built to conform to the line of 
the guards of the steel ferryboats. While this was a 
rebuilding of a former structure, the fact was con- 
sidered that heavier loadings and heavier boats than 
the original pier was expected to resist, would act 
against the new pier; for this reason a more rugged and 
substantial installation was built. This work com- 
pleted on December 1, 1924, cost $32,656.13. 

Yours respectfully, 

John E. Carty, 
Division Engineer. 



62 



City Document No. 23. 



BRIDGE SERVICE. 



Financial Statement, 1924-25. 
Expenditures fr 0771 Maintenance Appropriation. 

Boston bridges $426,330 81 

31,740 49 
$458,071 30 



Boston and Cambridg-e bridges 



Total Expenditures. 

From maintenance appropriations . $458,071 30 
From special appropriations . . 317,758 25 



$775,829 55 



EXPENDITURES ON BOSTON BRIDGES. 

(1 .) Administration : 
Salaries : 

Division engineer $3,750 00 
Supervisor 3,000 00 
Engineers and draughts- 
men .... 24,805 29 
Foreman .... 2,088 36 
Clerk .... 2,105 75 
Inspectors . 2,374 55 
Medical inspector . 183 33 
Pensions : 

Veterans .... 4,834 72 

Laborers .... 360 00 

Holiday time 2,043 50 

Vacations .... 1,748 70 

Pay to injured employees, 694 28 
Printing, postage and 

stationery . . . 1,542 29 
Traveling expense . . 268 85 
Telephone .... 34 88 
Engineers' supplies and in- 
struments .... 228 93 
Typewriter inspection . 33 00 
Advertising . . . 139 69 



$50,236 12 



Public Works Department. 



63 



(2.) 



Yard and Stockroom : 






Yard: 






Clerk, janitor and 




watchmen 


$3,837 26 




Traveling expense . 


247 77 




Tools, new 


823 58 




Tools, repairs . 


883 92 




Telephone 


139 24 




Towels and furnishings 


15 00 




Supplies . 


85 64 




Repairs at yard 


5,937 95 


Sll,970 36 






Stockroom : 






Stock purchased during 




year 


S6,846 79 




Stock used during year 


7,035 81 




Decrease in stock . 




189 02 




$11,781 34 



64 



City Document No. 23. 



A^itoniobiles. 





Truck, 
B-1. 


Truck. 
B-2. 


Foreman, 
B-3. 


Supervisor, 
B-4. 


Division 
Engineer. 


Total. 


Wages, chauffeur 






S933 00 
138 25 
384 79 
101 57 
424 89 
178 19 
150 70 
12 00 
461 50 


$1,526 57 
150 00 
168 29 
30 97 
240 35 
135 89 
25 75 
12 00 
574 00 


$1,151 57 

150 00 

226 12 

13 41 

320 35 

196 33 

49 60 

12 00 

1,400 00 


$3 611 14 












$1,214 56 

17 86 

279 43 

150 41 

4 00 

2 00 


$116 34 
16 48 
162 S3 
76 94 
28 75 
4 00 
1,655 00 


9 no 10 


Supplies 


180 29 




1.427 85 
737 76 
258 80 
42 00 


New tires and tubes 

Repairs, tires and tubes. . 




4 090 50 








Totals 


$1,668 26 


$2,060 34 


$2,784 89 


$2,863 82 


$3,519 38 


$12,896 69 



Bridges. 
Ex-penditures on Tide Water Bridge^. 



Bridges. 


Draw- 
tenders' 

Salaries. 


Mechanics' 
Wages. 


iSIaterial. 


bIiIs!^ 


Supplies. Total. 


Broadway 


$15,180 90 
20,746 90 
17.433 56 
18,035 25 
15,270 60 
15,910 78 
15,154 57 
15,185 12 
15,154 13 
15,730 69 
15,652 81 
17,145 69 
15,641 52 
15,483 10 


$769 65 
2,601 30 
4,117 99 
1,190 72 
2,083 90 
3,056 32 
4,248 83 
1,408 05 
1,027 67 
785 65 
3,153 21 
3,491 55 
1,819 20 
2,008 00 


$22 64 

1,551 50 

464 25 

20 71 

559 98 

1,254 49 

2,831 47 

339 36 

580 62 

124 92 

3,835 84 

1,329 75 

737 36 

512 03 


$136 57 

1,017 15 

4,863 83 

1,287 76 

221 06 

378 34 

6,110 06 

263 86 

711 02 

807 28 

4,207 56 

2,407 02 

648 25 

690 40 


$407 48 

1,475 41 

1,515 96 

1,786 31 

887 55 

1,468 79 

782 21 

298 64 

448 45 

932 09 

468 80 

5,191 64 

848 76 

1,928 85 


$16,517 24 


Charlestown 


27,392 26 




28,395 59 


Chelsea South 


22,320 75 


Chelsea Street 


19,023 09 


Congress Street 

Dorchester Avenue 


22,068 72 
29,127 14 
17,495 03 


* L Street 


17,921 89 


Maiden 


18,380 63 


Meridian Street 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street 

Warren 


27,318 22 
29,565 65 
19,695 09 
20.622 38 


Totals . 


$227,725 62 


$31,762 04 


$14,164 92 


$23,750 16 


$18,440 94 


$315,843 68 







' Now Summer street over Reserved channel. 



Public Works Department. 



65 



Repairs on Inland Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Materials. 


$570 00 


247 00 


1 13 


97 76 


1,672 87 


35 19 


1 09 


383 22 


889 52 


2,134 21 


271 05 


3,163 34 


500 06 


41 00 


941 07 


204 89 


1 44 


59 27 


1 40 


1 09 


692 87 


1 44 


301 44 


185 25 


271 00 


1,139 44 


941 92 


238 58 


185 60 


63 21 


2,296 38 


1,698 84 


1 09 


290 45 


193 23 


1 44 


257 55 



Albany Street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 

A Street (Stairs) 

Arlington Street 

Ashmont Street (Peabody Square) 

Austin Street 

Beacon Street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 

Beacon Street (over outlet) 

Berkeley Street 

Blakemore Street 

Blue Hill Avenue 

Boston Street (over Railroad) 

Boylston Street (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 

Braddock Park 

Baker Street 

Broadway (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 

Brookline Avenue 

Broadway (over Foundry Street) 

Broadway (over Lehigh Street) 

C Street (Stairs) 

Charlesgate West (over Ipswich Street) 

Columbus Avenue 

Clarendon Street 

Dartmouth Street 

Durham Street 

Dorchester Avenue 

Everett Street 

Fairmount Avenue 

Florence Street 

Gainsborough Street 

Huntington Avenue 

Harvard Street 

Hyde Park Avenue (over electric connection) 

Ipswich Street 

Irvington Street 

Massachusetts Avenue (over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad), 

Massachusetts Avenue (over Boston & Albany Railroad) 

Metropolitan Avenue 



66 



City Document No. 23. 

Repairs on Inland Bridges — Concluded. 



Labo 

and 

Materia 


r 
Is. 


$887 


90 


116 38 


11 


00 


243 43 


49 00 


992 


63 


199 


78 


12 


94 


317 01 


1 


83 


1 


83 


33 


09 


22 


52 


214 


50 


3,037 


41 


082 01 


373 96 


578 


69 


47 


41 


44 


00 


7,429 


33 



Norfolk Street 

Neptune Road 

New Allen Street 

Oakland Street 

Perkins Street (Foot) 

Redfield Street 

Reservoir Road 

Shawmut Avenue 

Southampton Street 

Summer Street (over A Street) . 
Summer Street (over B Street) . 
Summer Street (over C Street). 

Toll Gate Way 

Tremont Street 

Walworth Street 

Webster Street 

West Fourth Street 

West Newton Street 

Winthrop 

Wadsworth Street 

Cleaning bridges 



Totals . 



Summary of Expenditures. 

Administration 

Yard and stockroom 

Automobiles and trucks 

Tide water bridges 

Inland bridges 



Total 



$50,236 12 
11,781 34 
12,896 69 

315,843 68 
35,572 98 

$326,330 81 



BRIDGES 



Salaries of engineers 
Transit Department pay roll 
Murray Engineering Company 
William L. Miller Company 
M. F. Gaddis . . \ 



REPAIRS, 


ETC. 


Bridge 


North. 










S145 76 

76 80 

2,337 50 

4.303 73 

666 03 



Carried fonvard 



$7,529 82 



Public Works Department. 67 



Brought foruwd $7,529 82 

Advertising 14 50 

Material 2,166 02 

Repairs 453 40 

Traveling expense 8 35 



Chelsea Street Bridge. 
Rendle-Stoddard Companv .... $3,968 24 

Repairs 326 70 

Advertising 13 65 

License 1 00 

Engineer's supplies 2 00 



Commercial Point Bridge. 

Salaries of engineers $316 66 

R A. CoUeran 2,194 40 

Advertising 7 50 

Bituminous surface 230 00 



Dorchester A\^ntje Bridge. 

Salaries of engineers $625 12 

C. & R. Construction Company . . 6,716 64 

Repairs . 858 20 

Advertising 8 00 

Traveling expense 2 25 

Bituminous surface 193 55 

Material 597 78 



Huntington Avenue Bridge. 

Salaries of engineers $559 13 

C. & R. Construction Company . . • 7,564 32 

M. F. Gaddis ....... 170 49 

Materials 570 36 

Advertising " . . 7 00 

Traveling expense 8 90 



Meridian Street Bridge. 

Repairs $3,610 00 

Material 1,225 81 

Advertising 48 55 



$10,172 09 



4,311 59 



2,748 56 



9,001 54 



8,880 20 



4,884 36 



Northern Avenue Bridge. 

Salaries of engineers .$2,105 34 

Transit Department pay roll .... 278 40 

Edward J. Carnes 6,988 73 

C. & R. Construction Companv . . . 1,062 15 

W. S. Rendle Companv . " . . . 19,010 46 

Repairs ..." 237 38 

Material 1,907 07 

Engineers' supplies 3 00 

Traveling expense 10 80 

Advertising 94 35 

Freight 68 38 

31,766 06 

earned forward . • $71,764 40 



City Document No. 23. 



Summer street Over Reserved Channel. 

Brought forward $71,764 40 

Salaries of engineers $291 52 

W. H. Ellis & Son Company .... 8,018 55 

Advertising . . . . . . . 17 40 

Photographs .35 00 

Material 240 58 

Traveling expense 1 05 

8,604 10 

Webster Street Foot Bridge. 

Material $481 11 

Repairs 155 93 

Flagman 96 43 

Mechanics 132 00 

Transit Department pav roll .... 873 10 

1,738 57 

Albany Street Bridge Over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Repairs $93 79 

Transit Department Pay roll .... 346 40 

440 19 

Austin Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 305 00 

Blakemore Street Bridge. 

Material $50 00 

Bituminous surface 221 10 

271 10 

Blue Hill Avenue. 

Bituminous surface 621 50 

Broadway Bridge. 
Repairs 28 GO 

Boston Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 196 50 

Brookline Avenue Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 583 59 

Boylston Street Bridge Over Boston & Albany Railroad. 
Bituminous surface 344 50 

Berkeley Street Bridge. 

Material $314 60 

Bituminous surface 234 40 

549 00 

Byron Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 173 50 

Bennington Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 164 80 

Charlestown Bridge. 

Bituminous surface $646 50 

Transit Department pay roll .... .63 90 

710 40 

Carried forward ' . . . $86,495 15 



Public Works Department. 69 



Central Avenue Bridge. 

Brought fonvard $86,495 15 

Bituminous surface 439 00 

Chelsea Bridge South. 
Repairs 2 33 

Clarendon Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 143 65 

Congress Street Bridge. 
Repairs 89 12 

Everett Street Bridge. 

Material $1,047 27 

Bituminous surface 601 10 

1,648 37 

Fairmount Avenue Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 286 10 

Harvard Street Bridge. 

Repairs $58 00 

Bituminous surface 976 50 

1,034 50 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge Over Stony Brook. 
Bituminous surface 950 00 

Hyde Park Avenue Bridge Over Electric Connection. 

Repairs $77 80 

Bituminous surface 900 00 

Transit Department payroll .... 17290 1.15070 

Milton Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 419 50 

Norfolk Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 327 00 

Neftuxe Road Bridge. 

Material $196 60 

Bituminous surface 155 50 

353 10 

Redfield Street Bridge. 

Material $1,423 75 

Repairs 63 00 

Bituminous surface 300 00 

1,786 75 

Reservoir Road Bridge. 
Advertising 22 30 

Sprague Street Bridge. 
Bitimiinous surface 353 71 

Southampton Street Bridge. 
Bituminous surface 237 80 

Carried forward $95,739 08 



70 



City Document No. 23. 



Warren Bridge. 

Brought fonvard $95,739 08 

W. H. Ellis & Son Company 881 73 

West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Material $480 38 

Bituminous Surface 1,816 50 

2,296 88 



Walworth Street Bridge. 

A. G. Tomasello & Son $800 93 

Repairs 78 00 

878 93 

Totals $99,796 62 



The Pheon 
Repairs . 
Installing lights 
Material . 
Traveling expense 
Photographs . 
Engineers' supplies 
Salaries, engineers 



Beacon Street Bridge, Rebuilding 
Bridge Company 



$18,650 85 

1,191 83 

487 14 

56 50 

25 80 

15 00 

10 26 

162 50 

$20,599 88 



Cambridge Street Bridge, Rebuilding. 

Boston Bridge Works $16,339 03 

Material 56 50 

Photographs 15 00 

Traveling expense 2 10 

Salaries, engineers 112 50 



$16,525 13 



Chelsea Bridge South. 
Holbrook, Cabot and Rollins Corporation .... $130,84535 

W. L. Miller Company 3,209 10 

Boston Bridge Works 551 11 

Strauss Bascule Bridge Works 800 00 

Photographs 100 00 

Inspection of material 105 00 

Water supply pipe 81 00 

Light and power services 499 92 

Paving draw span 650 00 

Equipment tools 698 62 

Repairs 587 98 

Traveling expense 185 55 

Engineers' supplies 12 78 

Salaries, engineers 5,686 86 



Congress Street Bridge, Plans, Etc 

Engineers' supplies 

Salaries, engineers 

Advertising 

Photographs 



$144,013 27 


$35 84 

917 07 

16 15 

30 00 

$999 06 



Public Works Department. 71 



Dartmouth Street Bridge. 

New England Foundation Company $23,114 64 

Western Union Telegraph Company 3,233 35 

The Pierce Company . . . ' 840 20 

Mark H. Lynch 692 85 

M. F. Gaddis 761 38 

Central Construction Company 18 63 

Material 151 65 

Advertising 30 50 

Inspection of material 45 94 

New York, New Haven <fe Hartford Railroad . . 11 10 

Traveling expense 55 50 

Engineers' supplies 224 58 

Salaries, engineers 6,642 05 



$35,822 37 



Old Harbor Impro\'ements. 
Engineers' supplies $1 92 



72 



City Document No. 23. 



Expenditures from Special Appropriation in Charge of Bridge Service. 





Balances 

from 
1923-24. 


Total Credits, 

Including 

Balances 

Carried Over 

and Transfers. 


Expended 

During Year 

1924-25. 


Balances 

Unexpended 

January 31, 

1925. 




$2,245 40 
66.237 77 
34,840 24 
33,420 05 
24,845 97 


$113,245 40 
54,238 28 

184,840 24 
33,420 05 
24,845 97 

145,000 00 

1 92 


$99,796 62 
20.599 88 

144,013 27 

16,525 13 

999 06 

35,822 37 

1 92 


$13,448 78 
33,638 40 
40,826 97 
16.894 92 
23.846 91 

109 177 63 






Cambridge Street Bridge, rebuilding 

Congress Street Plans etc 


Dartmouth Street Bridge 




80 17 

515 98 

10,927 06 

6,479 22 




Hyde Park Avenue Bridie- 




Sea wall, etc., Roxbury CanaP 














$179,591 86 


$555,591 86 


$317,758 25 


1237.833 61 





1 $80.17 transferred to East Boston Ferry, Improvements. 

2 $515.98 transferred to East Boston Ferry, Improvements. 

3 $10,927.06 transferred to East Boston Ferry, Improvements. 
* $6,477.30 transferred to East Boston Ferrv, Improvements. 



Public Works Department. 73 



Boston Bridges. 

Number wholly maintained by Boston: 

In charge of Bridge and Ferry Division . 65 
In charge of Bridge and Ferry Division and 

Park and Recreation Department . . 2 
In charge of Park and Recreation Depart- 
ment 18 



— 11 



— 85 
II. Number of which Boston maintains the part 

within its limits : 
In charge of Bridge and Ferry Division . 6 
In charge of Park and Recreation Depart- 
ment 5 

III. Number of which Boston pays a part of the 

cost of maintenance: 
In charge of Bridge and Ferry Division . 8 
In charge of Commissioners for Boston and 

Cambridge Bridges 6 

In charge of Commissioners for Granite 

Avenue Bridge 1 

— 15 

IV. Number of which Boston maintains the whole 

or a part of the wearing surface ... 33 

V. Number maintained by Metropolitan District 

Commission 6 

VI. Number maintained by railroad coiporations: 

1. Boston & Albany Railroad .... 4 

2. Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany 
Railroads 1 

3. Boston & Maine Railroad. Eastern Di- 
vision 1 

4. Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Rail- 
road 1 

5. New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, Midland Division . . .13 

6. New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, Old Colony Division ... 4 

7. New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad, Providence Division ... 16 

— 40 
VII. Number maintained by the United States 

Government 1 

Total number 191 



74 



City Document No. 23. 







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Public Works Department. 75 



Granite Avenue Bridge.* 

Granite Avenue Bridge is under the jurisdiction of a 
commission composed of the Mayor of the City of 
Boston and the chairman of the Board of Selectmen of 
the town of Milton. 

The replacement of broken and bent angles in the 
lateral bracing system and other minor repairs were 
done this year. 

Following is the financial statement: 

Drawtenders' salaries $2,313 50 

Fuel 31 50 

Light 20 19 

Office supplies 17 65 

Material 24 58 

Repairs 185 06 

Supplies 3 75 



$2,596 23 



Maintained jointly by County of Suffolk and town of Milton. 



76 



City Document No. 23. 



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Public Woeks Department. 77 



FERRY SERVICE. 



Financial Statement for the Year Ending January 31, 

1925. 

I. Receipts. 

Total cash receipts durmg the year . . $81,161 71 

Cash in hands of tolhnen at beginning of year . 200 00 



$81,361 71 



Cash paid over to City Collector .... $81,161 71 
Cash in hands of tohmen, January 31, 1925 . 200 00 



$81,361 71 



2. Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Received from annual appropriation for Ferry 

Service . . . . . . . . $521,688 80 

Transferred from Sanitary Service 7,865 71 



$529,554 51 
Transferred to ferry improvements . . . 6,027 05 



Unexpended balances from special 

appropriations, February 1, 1925 $113,072 86 

Appropriation for East Boston 

Ferry improvements, etc . . 275,000 00 

Appropriation for ferry improve- 
ments, etc. 60,000 00 

Transferred from Bridge Service . 2,857 00 

Transferred from Ferry Service . 6,027 05 

Transferred from bridges, repairs, 

etc 9,000 00 

Transferred from Sanitary Service, 6,721 13 

Transferred from Roxbury sea 
wall, etc., 10,927 06 

Transferred from Old Harbor im- 
provements . . . . 6,477 30 

Transferred from Hyde Park Ave- 
nue Bridge 515 98 



$523,527 46 



Carried forward . . . $490,598 38 $523,527 46 



78 City Document No. 23. 

Brought forward . . . $490,598 38 $523,527 46 

Transferred from Dover Street 

Bridge 80 17 

Transferred from Beacon Street . 1,999 49 

■ — - 492,678 04 

Total appropriations, transfers and balances 

carried over $1,016,205 50 

Total expenditures 798,529 14 

$217,676 36 

Unexpended balances of special appropriations, 
January 31, 1925 $217,676 36 

3. Result of Operations for the Year. 

Receipts for the year (net income) . . . $81,161 71 
Ordinary expenses (maintenance 

appropriations) .... $523,527 46 

Interest paid on ferry debt . . 41,710 00 

Depreciation on ferryboats . 57,315 17 
Decrease in value of machinery and 

tools 162 41 

Decrease in value of fuel on hand . 2,729 93 
Decrease in value of supplies on 

hand 278 96 

Net outgo for the year 625,724 03 

Net loss for the year *$544,562 32 

* Does not include expenditures for special appropriations. 



Public Works Department. 



79 



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80 



City Document No. 23. 



Comparative Balance Sheets at the Close of Each Year. 





January 31, 
1921. 


January 31, 
1922. 


January 31, 
1923. 


January 31, 
1924. 


January 31, 
1925. 


Asselt. 














S200 00 

146 20 

35,852 94 

947,082 35 

379,450 27 

2,227 90 

610,100 00 

$1,97.5,0.59 66 

315,815 68 
6,395,570 42 


S200 00 

1S7 85 

27,308 70 

263,531 73 

1.024,067 76 

2,005 11 

610,100 00 


$200 00 

251 37 

25,831 83 

255,944 84 

972,070 25 

1,804 60 

610,100 00 


$200 00 

392 35 

23,097 11 

113,072 86 

914,754 98 

1,624 14 

610,100 00 


$200 00 


Rents receivable 


489 21 
20,088 22 


City Treasurer (balance of appro- 


217.676 36 


Ferryboats (less depreciation) 

Machinery and tools 


857,439 71 
4,163 58 


Real estate, land and buildings 


610,100 00 






Total tangible assets 


$1,927,401 15 

315,815 68 
6,865,402 36 


$1,866,202 89 

315,815 68 
7,393,091 23 


$1,663,241 44 

315,815 68 
8,149,845 42 


$1,710,157 08 


Cost of avenues, etc., East Boston, 
(previous to 1870)'. 


315,815 68 




8,966,610 71 






Totals 


$8,686,445 76 


$9,108,619 19 


$9,575,109 80 


$10,128,902 54 


$10,992,583 47 


Liabilities. 

Capital invested by City of Boston 
to date 


57,739,363 41 
947,082 35 


$8,845,087 46 
263,531 73 


$9,319,164 96 
255,944 84 


$10,015,829 68 
113,072 86 


$10,774,907 11 


Appropriations account (credit 


217,676 36 






Total liabilities 


$8,686,445 76 


$9,108,619 19 


$9,575,109 80 


$10,128,902 54 


$10,992,583 47 















Details 


of Capital Invested by the City oj Boston. 




Total expenditures to date per ferry 


$15,113,454 44 

15,211 67 

279,148 85 


$16,309,053 08 
29,795 00 
279,148 85 


$16,865,009 88 
49,585 00 
279,148 85 


$17,658,444 98 
44.585 00 
279,148 85 


$18,501,559 12 


Interest of debt for the year (per 
City Auditor's reports) 

Interest previous years, etc. (net 
debits, per City Auditor's reports) 


41,710 00 
279,148 85 


Total expenditures 

Deduct total receipts paid to City 
Collector 


$15,407,814 96 
7,668,451 55 


$16,617,996 93 
7,772,909 47 


$17,193,743 73 
7,874,578 77 


$17,982,178 83 
7,966,349 15 


$18,822,417 97 
8,047,510 86 


Excess expenditures, capital 


.$7,739,363 41 


$8,845,087 46 


$9,319,164 96 


$10,015,829 68 


$10,774,907 11 















Included in deficiency of assets in Table 4. 



Public Works Department. 



81 



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$27,347 91 

280 20 

1,525 94 

1,947 00 

13,204 50 

35,796 62 

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$80,103 17 
417 16 
64 68 
576 70 




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5,013 70 
1,386 59 
7,633 27 


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1,212 80 

1,621 50 

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84 City Document No. 23. 

Total Expenditures Upon Ferries Since 1858-59. 

Expenditures for avenues, paving^ interest, etc., 
previous to the purchase of the ferries by the 

City $444,101 30 

Purchase of the ferries April, 1870 . 276,375 00 

Expenditures for ferryboats since April, 1870 . 1,642,202 91 
Expenditures for new buildings, piers, drops, etc ., 607,523 64 
Expenditures for tools and fixtures (prior to 

1910) 14,752 46 

Expenditures for land from Lincoln's Wharf in 

1887 5,562 52 

Expenditures for land from Battery Wharf in 

1893 10,000 00 

Total expenditures on capital account . $3,000,517 83 
Expenditures for repairs of all kinds . . 2,420,706 58 

Expenditures for fuel 2,466,506 91 

Expenditures for salaries and wages . . . 8,458,845 52 
Expenditures for all other sources . . . 2,475,841 13 

$18,822,417 97 

Total Receipts from Ferries 1858-59. 
Receipts from rents, etc., previous to purchase of 

ferries $29,588 56 

Receipts from ferry tolls since purchase of 

ferries 7,733,434 55 

Receipts from rents since purchase of ferries . 70,291 20 

Receipts from sale of ferryboats .... 152,567 44 
Receipts from all other sources, per ferry books, . 31,094 26 

Receipts from all other sources, additional, per 

City Auditor 30,734 85 

Total receipts from all sources . . .$8,047,710 86 
Less amount with tollmen as capital . 200 00 

Total receipts, auditor's reports . . . $8,047,510 86 

Regular Annual (Ordinary) and Special Appropriations 
(Extraordinary) of the Ferry Service for the Year 
Ending January 31, 1925. 
Appropriations (regular) for the year ending 

January 31, 1925 $521,688 80 

Transferred from Sanitary Service . . . 7,865 71 

$529,554 51 
Transferred to Ferry Improvements, etc , ^ . 6,027 05 

$523,527 46 

Amount of expenditures (regular) for the year . $523,527 46 



Public Works Department. 



85 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 
East Boston Ferry Improvements, etc. 

Unexpended balance, February 1, 1924 $110,315 47 

Loan inside debt limit 275,000 00 

Transfers to appropriation 20,000 00 

$405,315 47 

Expenditures for year 1924-25 202,726 78 

Unexpended balance, January 31, 1925 .... $ 202,588 69 

Expenditures for year made up as follows : 

Labor, Ferry Service employees $1,481 20 

Labor, Bridge Service employees 5,029 71 

Labor, Transit Department employees .... 297 00 

Travel expense 170 85 

Hardware, chain links, etc 173 61 

Lumber 52 50 

Analysis of paint 50 00 

Canopy supports 39 58 

Gates 260 00 

Miscellaneous construction work 1,694 45 

Labor and materials and plant constructing pile fender at 

South Ferry 995 74 

Amount paid to J. Edward Ogden, Inc., under 
contract for two sets of gallow frames and 
accompanying machinery for South Ferry, $236,912 00 
Less deduction for electric current 171 95 



Less amount paid in 1923 .... 

Amount paid to W. H. Ellis & Son Company, 
under contract for ferry bridges. South 
Ferry, East Boston, cost of work 

Less amount paid in 1923 

Amount paid to Rendle Stoddard Construc- 
tion Company, under contract for founda 
tions for ferry bridges for South Ferry (com 
pleted,) cost of work to date 

Less 7| per cent retained 

Amount paid to J. Edward Ogden, Inc., 
under contract for two electrical operating 
bridges with gallow frames and accom- 
panying machinery (unfinished), cost of 

work to date 

Less 15 per cent retained .... 



$236,740 05 
129,909 50 



$20,046 92 
16,641 04 



$30,856 98 
2,314 27 



$63,180 00 
9,477 00 



Ferryboat "Noddle Island." 
Unexpended balance February 1, 1924 .... 
Transferred from Sanitary Service 

Expenditures for year 1924-25 



106,830 55 



3,405 88 



28,542 71 



53,703 00 
5^202,726 78 



$1,569 17 
6,721 13 

$8,290 30 

$8,290 30 



86 City Document No. 23. 

Expenditures for year as folIoAvs: 

Final payment to Richard T. Green Company 

on contract §1,290 30 

Execution of court in favor of Richard T. 

Green Company, on account of contract, 7,000 00 



$8,290 30 

Ferry Improvements, etc. 

Unex-pended balance, February 1, 1924 $1,188 22 

Appropriation from taxes . ' 60,000 00 

Transferred from other appropriations 17,884 05 

$79,072 27 
Expenditures for year 1924-25 63,984 60 

Unexpended balance, January 31, 1925 $15,087 67 

Expenditures for year made up as follows: 

Advertising $19 30 

Car fares 62 00 

Photographs 20 00 

Channel gutters furnished and set 479 50 

Edgestone set, artificial stone sidewalks built, etc . . 1,818 00 

Repaired head of centre pier. South Ferry, Boston side . 1,360 03 

Sheathing torn off and piles driven. South pier, East Boston 

side 2,146 34 

Repairs to drops 8,163 76 

General repiars on drops, piers, etc 1,566 72 

Amount paid to Murraj' Engineering Company under con- 
tract for repairs to pontoons 2,875 00 

Amoimt paid to Atlantic Works, repairing 
hull of ferrj'boat "Lieutenant Flaherty," 
cost of work to date (unfinished) . $2,540 65 

Less 15 per cent retained .... 381 10 

2,159 55 

Amount paid to Rendle Stoddard Construc- 
tion Company, under contract, rebuilding 

middle pier, etc., cost of work to date (com- 
pleted) $32,656 13 

Less 7^ per cent retained 2,449 21 

30,206 92 

Amount paid to W. H. Ellis & Son Company, 

under contract for rebuilding piers at 
North Ferry (unfinished), cost of work to 

date $15,420 57 

Less 15 per cent retained .... 2,313 09 



13,107 48 



$63,984 60 



Receipts at Each Ferry. 
North Ferr]^. 



From Tollmen. 


Foot 
Passengers. 


From 
Tickets. 


Totals. 




$9,016 97 
8,640 28 


$4,335 50 
4,714 00 


$13,352 47 


East Boston side 


13,354 28 




Totals 


$17,657 25 


$9,049 50 


$26,706 75 





Public Works Department. 



87 



From tollmen $26,706 75 

From gatemen: 

56,789 foot passengers at 1 cent . $567 89 

Cash fares for teams . 25,367 73 

25,935 62 



Total at North Ferrv 



. $52,642 37 





South Ferry. 






From Tollmen. 


Foot 
Passengers. 


From 
Tickets. 


Totals. 


Boston side 


$5,114 86 
4,575 80 


$2,692 00 
2,063 00 


$7,806 86 


East Boston side 


6,638 80 






Totals 


$9,690 66 


$4,755 00 


$14,445 66 



From tollmen 

From gatemen: 

29,609 foot passengers at 1 cent . $296 09 

Cash fares for teams . . . 10,490 85 



Total at South Ferry 

North and South Ferries .... 

Tickets paid for at ferry office 

Received in lieu of free ferries July 4, 1924 



Total from rates 
Rents for the year 
Headhouse privileges 
Care of public telephone booths 
Commission on public telephones 
Old material sold 



$14,445 66 



10,786 94 



$25,232 60 



$77,874 97 


2,227 20 


1 00 


$80,103 17 


417 16 


400 00 


48 00 


128 70 


64 68 



Total receipts for year 



$81,161 71 



Travel on the Ferries from February 1, 1924, to January 
31, 1925, Inclusive. 



Foot passengers at 1 cent each 
Foot passengers by ticket 
Foot passengers free . 

Total foot passengers 



North Ferrj' 

1,822,514 
20,923 



1,843,437 



South Ferry 

998,675 
2,205 
1,584 

1,002,464 



88 



City Document No. 23. 



One-horse teams, light motor trucks, 
pleasure carriages and runabouts. 

Two-horse pleasure carriages, hacks 
and touring cars . 

Two-horse teams and motor trucks. 

Three-horse teams and heavy motor 
trucks 

Four-horse teams .... 

Handcarts, etc 

Drag wheels 

Free teams, hacks and motor ve- 
hicles 



282,189 



132,571 



260,331 
194,903 


78,666 
81,554 


421 
1,318 

2,277 
3 


815 

1,067 

821 

1 


20,067 


10,005 


761,509 


305,500 



Motor Vehicle Traffic (Reports of Captains). 

February 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925. 



North Ferry. South Ferry 



Runabouts . . 
Touring cars. 
Trucks 



193,133 
3 296,339 
5 202,938 



- 33,155 
* 86,625 
6 90,717 



126,288 
382,964 
293,655 



Totals 592,410 



210,497 



802,907 



Includes 1,514 free. "- Includes 787 free. 

' Includes 3,387 free. ^ Includes 7,029 free. 



3 Includes 9,130 free. 
6 Includes 3,270 free. 



Total paying foot passengers . 
Total free foot passengers 

Total foot passengers carried 



2,844,317 
1,584 

2,845,901 



Total paying teams . 
Total free teams 

Total teams carried 



1,042,564 

27,988 

1,070,552 



Public Works Departmeni 



89 



Total Travel on Both Ferries from February 1, 1919, to 
January 31, 1925. 





1919-20. 


1920-21. 


1921-22. 


1922-23. 


1923-24. 


1924-25. 




494,372 

330,023 

4,372 

4,542 

173,821 

4,935 

6 


437,254 

314,109 

4,105 

3,774 

226,742 

5,224 

1 


468,831 

303,529 

1,605 

4,311 

299,791 

4,122 


502,407 

341,257 

1,850 

6,061 

368,711 

4,333 


445.839 

314,672 

1,548 

4,816 

366,846 

4,409 


406,336 
291 710 






1.249 




2.105 


Two-horse carriages, hacks %■■ ■ • 
Two-cent tolls, handcarts, etc.. . 


338.031 

3,098 

35 








Paid teams at both ferries 

Free teams at both ferries 


1,012,071 
17,447 


991,209 
16,650 


1,088,189 
22,458 


1,224,621 
29,349 


1,138,135 
26,197 


1,042.564 
27.988 


Total teams at both ferries. . . 


1,029,518 


1,007,859 


1,110,647 


1,253,970 


1,164,332 


1.070.552 


Foot passengers paid 


4,424,773 
4,500 


3.987,785 
3,305 


4,390,781 
4,479 


3,711,491 
1,865 


3,244,419 
1,650 


2.844.317 
1.584 






Total foot passengers 


4,429,273 


3,991,090 


4,395,260 


3,713,356 


3,246.089 


2.845.901 



Note. — Team travel includes automobiles. 
* Includes one-seat automobiles. 1 Includes motor trucks. { Includes two-seat automobiles. 



90 City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Boston, February 1, 1920. 

Mr. Joseph A. Rourke. 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith a statement of the 
activities and expenditures of the Paving and Lighting 
Services for the year ending January 31, 1925. 

The maintenance expenditures of the Highway Divi- 
sion for the year were as follows: 

Lighting Service .$830,726 90 

Paving Service 1,4.51,541 38 



.1l;2,282,268 28 



The department forces, in addition to patching and 
maintaining roadways, did considerable construction 
work in scarifying and preparing roadways for asphalt 
top to be installed by the patching contractor, in 
building bituminous macadam roadways and in 
relaying granite blocks with grouted joints. 

Although the past winter was comparatively free 
from snow, the Champion blade plows attached to 5-ton 
motor trucks operated by the city and by contractors 
made a new record in keeping the main traffic arteries 
in first-class condition for travel. 

A portable stone crusher was installed at the Massa- 
chusetts avenue lot, where vast quantities of paving 
blocks are stored, and all blocks not suitable for further 
use were converted into commercial broken stone for 
use in the City Proper and in other districts as required. 

Tw^o asphalt plants, one in Dorchester and one in 
Brighton, operated by the department forces, have been 
producing hot mix for the several districts as the occasion 
required. 



Public Works Department. 91 

The boilers of the steam road rollers are inspected each 
j^ear by the state boiler inspector and, as a result of this 
inspection, there are four condemned rollers in the junk 
pile. Three of these rollers were replaced by one 
Buffalo-Springfield steam roller and two Acme gasolene 
rollers, making our roller equipment at present two 
gasolene and eight steam rollers. The older rollers 
were overhauled and repaired and made ready for the 
season's work. 

The rolling stock is gradually changing from horse 
drawn to motor driven vehicles. The present equip- 
ment includes : 

One 5-ton Pierce Arrow. 

One 3-ton G. M. C. 

Eighteen Reo trucks. 

Ten Ford trucks. 

Ten Ford sedans for foremen. 

One Buick Touring, for Division Engineer. 

One Buick Touring, for Chief Inspector. 

It is recommended that nine Reo trucks, one Ford 
runabout, one snow loader, one wrecking car with 
derrick, and one stone loader be purchased this coming 
year, with the intention of further motorizing the 
service. It is expected, with the addition of new motor 
trucks, the use of carts and horses, of which there are 
80, will be reduced to a minimum. 

Tools and equipment have been kept in good condi- 
tion by renewals and replacements except the carts, 
both single and double, which have been repaired 
extensively. 

Construction. 

Construction work was started early in the year. 
Twenty-two streets were rebuilt under repair and con- 
struction contracts in which 64,000 Square yards of 
granite blocks were recut and relaid in a cement con- 
crete base, and 110,000 square yards of Warrenite 
bitulithic pavement and 12,000 square yards of rein- 
forced concrete roadways were laid. 

A departure from bituminous surfaces to concrete 
was made this season when about 40,000 square yards 
of reinforced concrete, seven inches deep, were laid on 
twenty-two streets under the ''Highways, Making of" 
appropriation. Sixty-five thousand square feet of arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks were laid under a contract com- 
prising a group of sixteen streets. 



92 City Document No. 23. 

A flight of concrete steps with pipe rails was con- 
structed in Northwood street, connecting Leyden with 
Gladstone street, East Boston. Some of the important 
contracts completed are Blue Hill avenue, west side, 
from Canterbury street to the Neponset river, surfaced 
with Warrenite bitulithic on a Telford base, thus com- 
pleting the two roadways to Milton. Shawmut avenue, 
Roxbury street to the Boston & Albany Railroad bridge 
was rebuilt with Warrenite bitulithic on a 6-inch con- 
crete base and the brick walks replaced with artificial 
stone. 

Border street. East Boston, from Sumner street to 
Central square, was paved with new granite blocks on a 
6-inch concrete base and new artificial stone walks were 
laid. Grove street, from Washington street to Centre 
street, West Roxbury, was constructed with Warrenite 
bitulithic on a 6-inch concrete base. 

Very truly yours, 

James H. Sullivan, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



93 



HIGHWAY DIVISION — LIGHTING SERVICE 



Financial Statement. 

Expenditures February 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925. 

Electric Lighting: 

Arc. 
Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company . . . . . $438,886 80 
Charlestown Gas and Electric 

Company 24,672 13 

$463,558 93 



Incandescent. 
Edison Electric Illuminating 

Company $90,111 94 

Charlestown Gas and Electric 

Company 17 95 

Charlestown Gas and Electric 

Company fire alarm lamps . 200 56 

Gas Lighting: 

Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany $236,317 99 

Charlestown Gas and Electric 
Company . . . 12,663 86 

Charlestown Gas and Electric 

Company fire alarm lamps . 468 64 



Salaries and Wages: 

Division Engineer (part of) 
Clerk .... 
Stenographer and clerk . 
Lighting inspector 
Pensions .... 



Automobile Expense: 

Gasolene, oil, etc 

Registration 

Shoes and tubes, new and repairs, 

Supplies 

Repairs 

Storage 



Carried forward 



$1,250 00 

2,105 75 

1,486 98 

1,800 00 

181 00 



$168 51 

10 00 

41 32 

6 56 

51 42 

144 00 



90,330 45 



249,450 49 



6,823 73 



421 81 

$810,585 41 



94 



City Document No. 23. 



Brought forward .... 
Constructio7i: 

Installing lamps and posts and 
removing and relocating lamps, 
posts, etc 



Ojpce Expenses: 

Printing $63 30 

Postage 30 00 

Stationery and periodicals . . 94 14 

Miscellaneous: 
Travel expenses (car fares) . . $15 00 
Typewriter repairs and inspec- 
tion 12 00 

Gas lamp posts .... 1,944 00 

Globes and shade frames . . 28 55 

Typewriting 60 34 

Advertising 30 00 

Installing boulevard lamps on: 

Esse.x street .... $1,767 10 

Bowdoin street .... 604 90 

Columbus park .... 5,207 41 

Columbia road .... 809 80 

Blue Hill avenue 1,954 66 

Washington street 992 45 

Sha^vmut avenue . . . 2,276 85 



$810,585 41 



4,820 00 



187 44 



2,089 89 



13,613 17 

Total $831,295 91 

Less rebate on installations 569 01 

Total $830,726 90 

Revenue Credited to General Revenue. 
Lighting Boston and Cambridge Bridges . $2,630 89 

Damage to posts 336 00 

$2,966 89 

The following is a statement of the work done during 
the year under the supervision of the Division Engineer. 

Arc lamps have been provided for skating and tobog- 
ganing during the season at Franklin Field, Franklin 
Park and Wood Island Park the same as in years past. 

Boulevard type white way lamps have been installed 
in Province street, School street to Bromfield street, 
Essex street, Washington street to Atlantic avenue, 
Shawmut avenue, Tremont street to Roxbury street, 
Washington street, Stuart street to Hollis street, Wash- 



Public Works Department. 95 

ington street, Castle street to Dover street, Columbus 
Park and Strandway, Massachusetts avenue, South- 
ampton street to Shirley street, Bowdoin street, Quincy 
street to Olney street. Blue Hill avenue, Fremont 
street to Mattapan square. Thus throughout the city 
the lighting system has been increased, including the 
boulevard type and new magnetite arcs, by the installa- 
tion of 162 lamps and 75 incandescents and 14 gas lamps 
at various locations. The usual amount of regulation 
and relocation of lamps and services made necessary by 
street construction, the building of sewers and other 
works has been conducted throughout the year. 

Petitions and requests for new lamps received from 
citizens and from officials, also complaints in relation to 
the lighting service have been investigated and attended 
to. All streets in the underground district prescribed 
for the year have been inspected and the necessary 
changes and additions have been made. 

The number of miles of streets and ways lighted by 
this service is as follows: 

Pubhc streets and alleys 615.35 

Public footways 1 . 35 

Park roads, footways and ]:)rivate streets and alleys 

approximately 309 . 10 

925.80 



During the year the following defects were reported 
by the police: Ai'c lamps 8,321, incandescent 3,462 and 
gas lamps 3,081. 

There are in operation 20,519 arc, incandescent and 
gas lamps divided as foUows: 5,737 arcs, 4,913 incan- 
descents and 9,729 single mantle gas lamps and 140 
fire alarm gas lamps. 

Lamps Installed. 

Magnetite arc lamps 167 

Tungsten lamps 95 

Single mantle gas lamps 83 



Lamps Discontinued. 

Magnetite arc lamps 

Tungsten lamps 

Single mantle gas lamps .... 
Single mantle fire alann gas- lamps 
Spot lights, police incandescent lamps 



345 

5 
54 
69 

2 
12 
— 142 



Net increase 203 



96 



City Document No. 23. 



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Public Works Department. 



97 



Lamps of various types in use on January 1, 1925, 
as compared with the number in use on January 1, 
1924: 



January, Januaiy, Increase o: 
1925. 1924. Decrease. 



Single mantle gas 

Fire alarm gas 

Magnetite series 

Magnetite multiple * 

Tungsten incandescents. 
Spot light traffic police. . 



9,727 

140 

5,737 



4,913 



9,713 

142 

5,575 

*23 

t 4,849 

12 



14 
—2 
162 

41 
—12 



Totals 



20,517 



20,314 



203 



* Changed to 1,100 candle power incandescent. 

t Thirty-four 60-oandle power incandescent transferred to Metropolitan District Com- 
mission, January 1, 1925. 

Street Lamp Outages. 

Rebates for lamps not lighted on schedule time or 
out before the proper time have been received on the 
various monthly bills as follows: 



Incan- 
descent. 



Gas. 



Arc. 



February, 1924. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January, 1925. . 



$7.61 

63.70 

31.16 

4.10 

5.02 

1.63 



3.15 
3.52 
2.53 
1.54 
3.20 



«114.21 

57.48 

9.09 

12.85 

3.86 

5.62 

6.29 

28.00 

21.32 

22.98 

27.24 

133 . 89 



$189.27 

380.63 

144.95 

45.50 

34,77 

41.32 

98.27 

62.53 

135.18 

140.53 

173.52 



Totals . 



$127.16 $442.93 



$1,446.47 



98 City Document No. 23. 



Gas Lighting. 

There are 9,727 single mantle gas lamps and 140 
single mantle fire alarm gas lamps. 

The city furnishes the lamp-posts and the Gas Com- 
pany sets the lamp-posts and provides service pipes 
laid from the gas mains to the top of the posts; main- 
tains all such pipes and posts in good condition and 
repair; furnishes gas, lanterns, burners and all other 
necessary equipment including labor for lighting and 
care. 

The lighting service provides for the gas, hghting 
and care of the fire alarm signal lamps and the Fire 
Department for the lanterns, posts, setting and repair- 
ing of same. 



Public Works Department. 



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108 City" Document No. 23. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, PAVING SERVICE. 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation $1,502,997 89 

Transferred to Lighting Service . $15,869 17 
Transferred to Overseeing of the 
Public Welfare Department, 
Central Office .... 35,587 34 

51,456 51 

$1,451,541 38 
Expended during the year 1,451,541 38 

Special Appropriations. 

Highways, making of: 

Amount expended during the year . . . $401,906 64 

Granolithic Sidewalks. 

Balance February 1, 1924 $14,357 41 

Appropriation from taxes 50,000 00 

$64,357 41 
Expended during the year 63,235 61 

Balance January 31, 1925 $1,12180 



Reconstructing and Repairing Streets by Contract. 

Balance February 1, 1924 $83,388 27 

Appropriation from taxes 950,000 00 

$1,033,388 27 
Expended during the year 1,004,427 46 

Balance January 31, 1925 $28,960 81 



Street Improvements. 

Balance February 1, 1924 $38,980 62 

Expended during the year 34,699 93 

Balance January 31, 1925 $4,280 69 



Public Works Department. 109 

Garage, Albany Street. 

Balance February 1, 1924 $83,314 15 

Transferred from Beacon Street Bridge . 10,000 00 

$93,314 15 
Expended during the year 88,544 16 

Balance January 31, 1925 $4,769 99 

Cambridge Street and Court Street. 
Expended during the year $5,965 10 

Stuart Street. 
Expended during the year ...... $627 86 



110 City Document No. 23. 



PAVING SERVICE. 

Summary of Expenditures. 

Paving Service $1,451,541 38 

Highways, making of 401,906 64 

Granolithic sidewalks 63,235 61 

Reconstructing and repairing streets by contract, 1 ,004,427 46 

Street improvements 34,699 93 

Garage, Albany street 88,544 16 

Cambridge street and Court street . . 5,965 10 

Stuart street 627 86 



Total $3,050,948 14 

Income. 

Statement showing the amount of bills and cash 
deposited with the City Collector from February 1, 
1924, to January 31, 1925, and credited to General 
Revenue. 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . $48,457 22 

Permits 33,766 97 

Services of inspector 1,876 00 

Labor, material furnished, etc 13,339 72 



Total $97,439 91 



Amount Paid Into the City Treasury During the Year. 

Edgestone and sidewalk assessments . . $38,518 78 

Permits 33,320 47 

Sei-vice of inspector . . . . 1,995 00 

Labor, material furnished, etc 13,269 78 



Total $87,104 03 



Public Works Depaetment. 



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112 



City Document No. 23. 



SCHEDULE A. 

Expenditures for Fiscal Year 1924-25. 

Salary of division engineer (part of) 

Salary of division engineer in charge (part of) 

Salaries of office clerks and stenographers 

Salaries of assistant engineers (office work) . 

Salaries of permit office clerks . . . , 

Salaries of permit office inspectors 

Salaries of engineering inspectors (office work) 

Salaries of district inspectors .... 

Salary of medical inspector (part of) 

Medical attendance on injured employees (out 

side) 

Salary of general foreman .... 
Salary of chief veterinarian (part of) 
Salary of inspector of horses . 
Salary of constable and inspector . 
Pensions paid to veterans (retired) 
Pensions paid to laborers (retired) 
Compensation allowed injured employees 



cs, etc. . 
charged to 



$616 39 

197 45 

65 76 

89 80 

569 50 

302 62 



Vacations allowed laborers, mechan 
Holidays, not including holidays 

street accounts . 
Postage 

Printing 

Stationery 

Traveling expenses, carfares, etc . 
Engmeering supplies and incidentals 
Stationery .... 

Printing 

Postage 

Transit repairs 

Transit and calculating machine 
Miscellaneous 
Supplies for laboratory 
Artificial stone sidewalks, new, a; 

department force (see reconstructing and 
repairing streets by contract and street im- 
provements) 

Asphalt and bitulithic pavement repairs. Tem- 
porary repairs, labor, teaming, materials (see 
also, reconstructing and repairing streets by 
contract and street improvements) . 
Brick block repairs, labor, teaming and materials, 

Carried forward 



id repairs by 



$3,750 00 

750 00 

7,671 97 

8,321 90 

10,430 03 

18,290 44 

11,272 57 

3,342 47 

366 66 

121 15 

2,921 78 
500 00 
1,486 98 
2,005 48 
7,870 25 

18,325 39 
5,473 72 

35,169 47 

79,671 24 

277 46 

4,110 60 

1,226 32 

904 83 

1,841 52 



73 87 



30,033 84 



12,616 40 
552 64 

$269,378 98 



Public Woeks Department. 



113 



Brought forward 

Wood block repairs, labor, teaming and materials, 

Crosswalks repaired, not included elsewhere 

Fence repairs 

Plankwalk repairs 

Edgestone, sidewalks and gutters (new) not in- 
cluded elsewhere 

Rent of land, wharves, etc 

Expense of stables, including drivers, feeders, 
fodder, horseshoeing, repairs to harnesses, 
wagons, carts, etc. . . $161,549 80 

Amount earned by department 

teams 141,749 45 



$269,378 98 

11,984 35 

1,630 12 

7,209 23 

1,845 72 

9,315 35 
4,088 00 



Electric lighting at yards and stables . 

Gas lighting at yards and stables .... 

Fuel for heating yards, buildings, offices and 
stables 

Electrical appliances, labor and materials, yards 
and stables . 

Rent of towels 

Stoves, pipes, grates, etc 

Telephone service 

Ice .... 

Signs, making and putting up, etc. 

Tools, hardware, etc., new, cost of repairing, etc.. 

Oil for lighting around defects, etc 

Expenses of yards, including salaries of general 
foreman, foremen, clerks, yardmen, watch- 
men, tool wagons, etc 

Repairs of yard buildings, stables, sheds, shanties, 
etc 

Sanding icy and slippery streets 

Repairing culverts and building new culverts 

Chests for central office, making of 

Premium on surety bonds 

Traverse street subway .... 

Repairs to and inspection of typewriters 

Trimming and removing trees 

Painting traffic lines 

Marking catch-basin locations 

Repairs to snow dumps 

Miscellaneous 

Work done and material 
corporations, etc. 

Furniture ... 

Photographs 

Airdrome, East Boston 

Dandie mixer 

Carried forward . 



furnished individuals 



19,800 35 


1,200 94 


252 18 


4,690 30 


31 67 


169 30 


37 69 


1,572 03 


125 46 


19,310 65 


33,033 77 


1,164 00 



47,176 43 



11,732 34 


4,721 20 


8 97 


133 71 


9 00 


1,276 50 


67 00 


925 00 


1,243 50 


412 50 


76 83 


97 04 


6,138 27 


26 00 


120 00 


1,034 16 


980 10 


$463,018 64 



114 City Document No. 23. 

Brought forward $463,018 64 

Sanitary service, work done and material fur- 
nished . : 100 00 

Street Cleaning and Oiling Service, work done and 

material furnished 487 62 

Sewer Service, work done and material furnished, 110 70 
Water Service, work done and material furnished, 1,140 79 
Bridge Service, work done and material furnished, 43 52 
High Pressure Fire Service, work done and ma- 
terial furnished . 070 50 

Park Department, work done and material fur- 
nished 419 42 

Steam rollers, cost of operating, re- 
pairs, etc $16,833 69 

Less amount earned by steam rollers, 13,824 00 

3,009 69 



Gas rollers (two) 11,994 60 

Steam roller 6,850 00 

Stone crusher. South End District, operating, 

rentalof crusher, supplies, etc. . . 15,913 30 
Garage, Albany street, employees' wages, fuel, 

gasolene, supplies, etc 12,457 90 

Tractor "Bear" 5,200 00 

Asphalt plant, Ashmont District .... 2,950 72 

Tractors, mixers, etc., supplies, etc. . . . 406 67 

Total $524,774 07 

Credits: 

Automobiles : 
Amount earned by trucks $94,450 00 
Cost of operation, repairs, 
supplies, equipment, 
etc., including purchase 
of 5 Ford Sedans, 1 
Pierce Arrow and 6 Reo 
trucks .... 76,253 52 



Asphalt Plant, Brighton District : 
Repairs, operating 

expense, materials, etc., $35,315 30 
Less materials used on 

streets .... 53,755 39 

Stock: 

Materials delivered on 

streets .... $157,592 44 
Cost of ma- 
terials . $92,926 22 
Labor and 

teaming, 36,208 34 

129,134 56 



$18,196 48 



18,440 09 



28,457 88 
65,094 45 



Total $459,679 62 



Public Works Department. 



115 



Loads of Snow Removed from February 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925, 
by Department Forces. 



District. 


Single* 


Double.t 


Auto 
Trucks. t 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Cost.§ 


South Boston 


540 
1,087 
1,234 

274 

1,519 
1,223 
1,019 
1,331 

300 


2,244 
287 


2,101 


20,418 
3,035 
2,468 
3,455 

19,414 
4,958 
6,667 

23,977 
6,097 

1,350 


$14,977 02 




7,707 52 






9,980 88 


Brighton 


193 
2,738 
442 
327 
413 
1,145 

146 




388 

1,638 

99 

540 

3,450 

52 


13,961 11 


West Roxbury 


21,825 74 




14,655 11 




34,492 34 


South End and North End 

Ashmont 

North End (see South End.) 
Hvde Park 


47,105 33 
9,359 33 

3,978 58 






Totals 


9,213 


7,935 


8,268 


91,839 


$178,042 96 







* Single loads, 2 cubic yards. 
t Double loads, 3 cubic yards. 
J Auto truck loads, 6 cubic yards. 

§ Includes cost of plowing gutters, cleaning sidewalKS, and picking ice not carted 
away. Also automobile snow plows furnished by contractors. 



Snow and Ice Removed by Contract from February 
January 31, 1925. 



1924, to 



Snow Districts. 



Number of 
Loads. 



Cubic 
Yards. 



Cost per 
Cubic 
Yard. 



Total 
Cost. 



District No. 1.. 
District No. 2 . . 
District No. 3. . 
District No. 4 . . 
District No. 5 . . 
District No. 6. . 
District No. 7 . . 
District No. 8. . 
District No. 9. . 
District No. 10. 



3,816i 
2,857 



3,735^ 
6,407^ 



5,662 
5,046 



5,814 
3,1365 



3,137 

1,882^ 



5,434 
3,477 



6,569 
4,139i 



3,905i 
2, 394 J 



5,376 
1,901 



5,814i 
3,109i 



$0 70 
49 



$2,671 56 
1,399 93 

2,614 85 
4,164 88 

3,680 31 
2,523 00 

4,360 51 
2,101 46 

2,352 75 
1,223 63 

4,075 51 
2,433 90 

4,598 30 
2,607 89 

2,499 52 
1,340 92 

4,300 80 
1,292 68 

3,779 43 
1,834 60 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



1923 contract. 

1924 contract. 



Note. — The capacity of the loads varies from three (3) to ten (10) cubic yards. 



116 



City Document No. 23. 



Loads of Dirt and Street Cleanings Removed from February 1, 1924, 
to January 31, 1925. 



Districts. 


Single.* 


Double.t 


Auto 
Trucks. J 


Cubic 
Yards. 


South Boston 


157 

210 

748 

1,143 

2.756 

453 

5,122 

1,870 

165 

2,443 


405 
132 

326 
2,668 

538 
1,080 

721 

778 


424 1 ^ ^^ 1 


East Boston 


1,781 

1,446 

8 

2,216 

43 


474 




748 




12,481 
16,768 
1,577 






Roxbury 


20,578 








3,312 


North End .... 


165 


Hyde Park 


4,257 


Totals 


15,067 


6,648 


5,918 


63,871 







* Single loads, 1 cubic yard, 
t Double loads, 2 cubic yards. 
i Auto truck loads, 6 cubic yards. 



Public Works Department. 



117 



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118 



City Document No. 23. 



Edgestone and Brick Sidewalk Recapitulation for 1924. 



Districts. 


Edgestones, 
Linear 
Feet. 


Brick, 
Square 
Yards. 




398 
232 

1,129 
301 
120 
545 

1,250 

103 




East Boston Pa\ing District, No. 2. . 








Brighton Paving District No 4 










100 




312 










North End Paving District, No. lO 


- 






Totals 


4,078 


412 







New Granolithic Sidewalks Laid by Department Forces During 1924. 



Districts. 


Square 
Feet. 


Location of Work. 


South Boston 


1,096 
1,197 

— 

2,474 
4,949 

2,439 




East Boston . 


Sumner and Orleans streets, at new fire 




house. 
















Centre street. 


South End 


Sterhng street. Province street, Decatur 


Ashniont 


street. 
Welles avenue, Roslin street, Walnut 


North End 


street. 


Hyde Park 








Totals 


12,155 





PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 







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Public Works Department. 
Street Openings. 



119 



Under Classes 1 and 2 of the schedule of permit fees, 
permits were issued for openings in public ways as 
follows : 



To Whom Issued. 



Number of 
Permits. 



Length : 
Feet. 



Sewer and Water Services 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company 

Boston Elevated Railway Company 

Dedham and Hyde Park Gas and Electric Com- 
pany ^.\ 

Edison Electric Illuminating Company 

NeAv England Telephone and Telegraph Company 

Quincy Market Cold Storage and Warehouse Com- 
pany 

Miscellaneous 

Emergency permits 

Emergency permits used and returned 

Totals 




39,552 
43,050 
99,757 

6,804 

299,250 

13,004 

987 
104,934 

19,540 



526,878 



Making a total length of openings approximately 
one hundred miles. 

Total of all permits issued 21,222. 

Permits for other than street openings have been 
issued as follows : 



Cleaning snow from roof 
Erecting and repairing awnings 
Erecting and repairing buildings 
Painting or minor repairs on buidings 
Moving buildings in streets 
Feeding horses in streets 
Placing signs flat on buildings 
Projecting signs from buildings 
Raising and lowering safes, etc. 
Emergency permits for above 
Special permits 

Total .... 



41 

840 

1,612 

5,272 

12 

62 

1,250 

129 

124 

500 

802 

10,644 



The revenue from, issuing permits amounted to 
$33,766.97, divided as follows: 



Street openings 
Other purposes 

Total . 



$5,974 50 
27,792 47 

$33,766 97 



120 City Document No. 23. 

Of this amount $28,417.37 was deposited with the 
City Collector and 15,349.60 was billed to public service 
corporations. 

Bonds. 

There are now on file 2,507 surety company bonds in 
amounts of one, three and twenty thousand dollars 
covering the city against claims for damages, etc, 
through the use of permits. 

Defects in Sidewalks and Roadways. 

Fourteen thousand six hundred and twenty nine 
notices were sent to the foremen of paving districts, 
contractors, public service corporations and others to 
make repairs to pavement defects for which they were 
responsible. 

Eighty-one notices were sent to property owners to 
repair defective conditions for which they were liable. 



Public Works Department. 121 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWrER AND SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, February 1, 1925. 

Mr. Joseph A. Rourke, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir,^ I submit herewith a statement of the 
activities, operations and expenditures of the various 
services of the Sewer and Sanitary Division for the 
year ending January 31, 1925. 

The maintenance expenditures of the Sewer and 
Sanitary Division were as follows: 

Sewer Service $632,455 15 

Sanitary Service . ; 2,852,373 69 



Total .$3,484,828 84 



Sewer Service. 

During the year 1924-25 there were built throughout 
the city 10.468 miles of sanitarj'- sewers and surface 
drains. 

Two hundred ninety-one catch-basins were built or 
rebuilt, making a total number under the care of the 
Sewer Service on February 1, 1925, of 16,843. 

Ten thousand three hundred twenty-seven catch- 
basins and 160 drop inlets were cleaned out by contract 
and a total of 34,176.85 cubic yards of material removed 
therefrom. 

Tw^o thousand nine hundred and four permits have 
been issued, as follows: 289 to district foremen, 299 to 
contractors, and 2,316 to licensed drain layers for re- 
pairing or laying new house drains. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $9,148.10 have been 
deposited with the City Treasurer for collection from 



122 City Document No. 23. 

estates for which no sewer assessment was ever paid, 
in accordance with Ordinances of 1910, chapter 9, 
section 10. 

Plans for the assessment of estates for sewer con- 
struction have been furnished the Board of Street 
Commissioners, representing 25,733.09 Unear feet of 
sewers and appurtenances, costing $247,886.16. 

One thousand three hundred fifty-six complaints have 
been investigated and a report in writing has been made 
in each case. 

In the city proper, the principal construction work 
was the building of the sewer in Congress street, between 
Atlantic avenue and Purchase street. The old sewer in 
Devonshire street opposite the First National Bank 
Building was rebuilt for the bank by the firm of 
Stone & Webster. 

In Roxbury, new sewers were built in Elm Hill 
avenue, between Seaver street and Schuyler street; in 
Bolster street, between Mozart street and Wyman 
street; in Mark street, from Day street easterly, and in 
Harrishof street, between Warren street and Humboldt 
avenue. 

In South Boston, a small sewer was built in P street, 
between Columbia road and East Sixth street. 

In Dorchester, another section of the Dorchester 
Brook sewer was built in Humphreys street and the 
sewer is now completed of the required size between 
Norfolk avenue at the Edison Plant and Dudley street. 

In Brighton, Shepard brook, easterly branch, was 
built in private land between Everett street and Hich- 
born street, to care for the large manufacturing plants 
now being located here. Pipe sewer and surface drains 
were also built in Nottinghill road and Foster street. 

In West Roxbury, pipe sewers have been built in the 
Parkvale road area, which will relieve floodings in a 
newly built-up area. Pipe sewers have also been built 
in Bradeen street, private land and Stellman road, and 
the outlet for the Germantown district has been com- 
pleted through Washington street and East street to the 
state sewer in Dedham. 

In Charlestown, a 10-inch pipe sewer was built in 
Crescent street betwen Roland street and Cambridge 
street. 

In East Boston, the Moore street overflow has been 
rebuilt and extended to tidewater. 



Public Works Department. 123 

At the Calf Pasture pumping station, new iron floors 
and ladders have been built in the filth hoist house. A 
duplicate oil feed line has been installed for the new 
oil-burning boilers and a contract let for electrical 
motive power for No. 1 and No. 2 centrifugal pumps. 



Sanitary and Street Cleaning Service. 

The collection and disposal of a city's waste is a 
problem involving matters of vital importance to the 
comfort, convenience and health of every citizen. A 
satisfactory solution of the problem presented by 
municipal waste will mean more than the efficient 
removal of useless or offensive m.aterial from the prem- 
ises of the household. It will result in the passing of 
littered streets, befouled alleys, and rubbish covered 
vacant lots, and it will add much toward higher standards 
of community cleanUness. 

The satisfactory solution of the waste problem in any 
large city is considered a municipal responsibility in the 
larger sense, but it also involves individual responsi- 
bility for every citizen. The citizen in many cases 
ignores this responsibility and nothing will bring more 
forcefully to the individual a sense of his duty than 
complete and efficient performance by municipal 
authorities of their own share of the work. 

To secure sanitary economical methods of refuse 
collection, suitable equipment must be provided, and 
during the past year two large Pierce Arrow motor 
trucks have been added with special equipped bodies 
and nine steel bodied trailers. These trailers are 
specially constructed and well adapted for the trans- 
portation of garbage and have been used to advantage 
also in the transportation of rubbish and ashes. 

The tendency for improvement in the design of equip- 
ment for the character of work to be performed in the 
Sanitary Service is manifest, since officials have begun 
to realize the betterments that can be made in equip- 
ment for a more sanitary collection. The Sanitary Serv- 
ice has at present eight Pierce Arrow trucks, 5-ton 10 
cubic yard capacity, working on the collection of ashes; 
also three Reos and two Fords on the collection of 
garbage. This motor equipment has proven very satis- 
factory, and the motorization of the whole service could 
be consistently recommended. 



124 City Document No. 23. 

During the past year the question of obtaining dumps 
for the disposal of ashes and rubbish in districts outside of 
the ten-year contract with the Coleman Company has 
become very serious. It is also only a question of a very 
short time before the large South Bay dump furnished 
by the Coleman Company under their contract will be 
filled, and it will become necessary to build a Receiving 
Station for ashes and rubbish at our Albany Street Yard. 
Such a station would not only result in a great saving on 
depreciation and equipment but would accelerate the 
collection of rubbish and ashes in the Roxbury, South 
End, and Back Bay districts, and could be so designed 
that at the expiration of the Coleman contract in 1932, 
with certain changes and additions, it would be available 
for an incineration plant. 

Difficulty in obtaining dumps in the Charlestown 
district is also acute. It will be necessary to secure 
additional facilities in the near future for the disposal of 
the ashes and rubbish in this district. 

Incineration, disposal by burning or destruction by 
fire, seems to be the only successful method from a sani- 
tary standpoint of alleviating this nuisance. 

Steeet Cleaning. 

Methods of street cleaning have undergone some 
changes in the past five or six years. Mechanical appa- 
ratus has taken the place of hand sweepers on most of our 
smooth streets. In Boston, as in all large cities, it is 
still necessary to use hand brooms and horse-drawn 
sweepers in some of our rough paved streets. I am 
firmly of the opinion that motor apparatus will have been 
so developed and perfected within the next few years 
that the elimination of all horses in the Street Cleaning 
Service will be possible. 

The parking of automobiles seriously interferes with 
the operation of the Street Cleaning Department in all 
large cities. With the exception of the White Wings, 
or pick-up men, daylight cleaning has been abandoned. 
Night cleaning is less satisfactory and more expensive 
than day cleaning, but changed traffic conditions and 
parking have made it necessary. 

The methods used in the City of Boston for street 
cleaning are quite satisfactory, but as a clean city is 
dependent upon well paved streets, until Boston has 



Public Works Department. 125 

finished its proposed paving program, we cannot expect 
to have a spotless town. The rapid growth of the smooth 
pavement in our suburban districts calls for an exten- 
sion of the street cleaning activities to those sections of 
the city. This means an additional appropriation for 
the purchase of motor and other necessary equipment. 
With this additional motor equipment and the great 
improvement for its housing by the building of a munic- 
ipal garage, this Service will be in a most advantageous 
position to produce better results in municipal cleanhness. 

Yours respectfully, 

E. F. Murphy, 

Division Engineer. 



126 



City Document No. 23. 



SEWER SERVICE. 



The work of the Sewer Service is carried on under 
chapters 28 and 40, Revised Ordinances of 1914, and the 
following statutes : 



Chapter 426, 1897, as amended by 450, 1899 and 268, 

Chapter 383, 1903, as amended by 464, 1907. 

Chapter 550, 1907. 

Chapter 204, 1908. 

Chapter 514, 1908. 

Chapter 74, Special Acts, 1918. 



1903. 



The Duties of the Sewer Service. 

1. Preparation of plans for sewerage works. 

2. Construction and maintenance of all drainage 
works. 

3. Investigation of complaints in regard to defective 
drainage. 

4. The granting of permits for sewer construction. 

5. The preparation of plans for the assessment of the 
cost of sewer construction. 

6. The examination of the plans of other corporations 
proposing to construct works in public streets with 
reference to their probable interference with sewerage 
works. 



Employees on pay roll January 31, 1924 
Employees on pay roll January 31, 1925 
Weekly pay roll for week including January 

1924 ■ 

Weekly pay roll for week including January 

1925 

Monthly pay roll January 31, 1924 
Monthly pay roll January 31, 1925 
Monthly pension roll January 31, 1924: 

Veterans 

Laborers 

Monthly pension roll January 31, 1925: 

Veterans 

Laborers 



326 
323 

$10,202 91 

$11,224 30 
$400 00 
$400 00 

$455 21 
$421 52 

$343 88 
$240 76 



Public Works Department. 127 

Average weekly pay roll, including monthly roll 
and exclusive of pension roll for fiscal year, 
charged as follows : 

Maintenance *$7,586 19 

Construction $3,964 89 

Average number of men employed . . . 331 

Men on pension roll January 31 1924: 

Veterans 9 

Laborers 14 

Men on pension roll January 31, 1925: 

Veterans 7 

Laborers 8 

Average number of horses maintained by the 

service during the year 17 

Rate of wages paid to common laborers . . $4 50 

* Includes amount charged to Paving Service, $165. 



128 



City Document No. 23. 







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Public Works Department. 



129 



MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURES FEBRUARY 1, 1924, TO 
JANUARY 31, 1925. 



Sewer Service. 
Improved Sewerage 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, inside 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, outside 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, engines 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, boilers 
Pumping Station, Union Park street 
Pumping Station, Summer street 
Pumping Station, Hyde Park 



Moon Island .... 
Main and intercepting sewers 



Stony Brook. 



$100,836 70 

36,034 40 

46,245 80 

23,014 79 

7,970 72 

1,381 71 

1,073 96 



Maintenance 



$216,558 08 
21,976 10 
16,177 70 

$254,711 88 



,608 22 



Miscellaneous Maintenance Charges. 

Cleaning catch-basins 110,872 22 

Yards and lockers 292 96 

Employed at yards 29,922 06 

Automobiles $18,959 94 

Horses, carts, harnesses, etc 9,566 36 

Teaming 11,431 04 



Less amount earned by service teams and auto 
trucks 



Cleaning sewers 

Office salaries 

Office expense 

Repairing department buildings 
Repairing catch-basins, South Boston 
Repairing catch-basins. East Boston 
Repairing catch-basins, Charlestown 
Repairing catch-basins, Brighton 
Repairing catch-basins. West Roxbury 
Repairing catch-basins, Dorchester 
Repairing catch-basins, Hyde Park 
Repairing catch-basins, Roxbury 
Repairing catch-basins, city proper 
Repairing sewers, South Boston 
Repairing sewers. East Boston . 
Repairing sewers, Charlestown . 
Repairing sewers, Brighton 
Repairing sewers. West Roxbury 
Repairing sewers, Dorchester 



$39,957 34 



17,732 10 



$2,506 25 
1,344 38 
1,501 98 
1,456 53 

531 27 
1,688 26 
4,042 74 

166 58 
2,524 54 
4,352 72 
2,699 48 
5,241 16 
2,045 06 

933 33 
3,139 93 
5,612 35 



22,225 24 

53,283 60 

19,227 78 

2,514 93 



Carried forward 



$39,786 56 $499,658 89 



130 City Document No. 23. 

Brought fonvard $39,786 56 $499,658 89 

Repairing sewers, Hyde Park . . . 516 20 

Repairing sewers, Roxbury .... 4,992 24 

Repairing sewers, city proper .... 4,914 36 

• 50,209 36 

Pension roll (veterans) 4,872 05 

Pension roll (laborers) 3,692 49 

Annuities 351 00 

Fuel and oil 2,630 86 

Hardware tools, etc 5,262 42 

Engines and boilers 385 63 

Sundries and miscellaneous charges 48,836 97 

Telephones 367 78 

House connections 11,581 69 

Rubber goods 819 42 

Gatehouse, Fenway 4,276 21 

Stock 13,274 99 



$646,219 76 
Credit. 
Stock transferred and used in construction . $9,459 45 
Fuel and oil transferred and used in con- 
struction 831 57 

10,291 02 



$635,928 74 



Charges to Various Parties for Work Done and Material Furnished, etc. 

Frank Weiss $13 35 

M. A. French 6 67 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Division .... 10,300 00 

Francis X. Courtney 15 49 

Edward A. Moore ' . *21 47 

A. A. Knight & Son Corporation 7 75 

Humboldt Garage 7 50 

Charles Breiding 3 88 

Egleston Square Garage 15 00 

F. C. Troop 15 00 

Frank Mason 6 67 

George E. Cherry 22 78 

Cobb Theater 7 75 

George C. Irwin Company 7 75 

Nora Belideau 7 50 

R. H. McDowell .•.-.• "^ ^7 

The Employers Liability Assurance Corporation, Limited, 117 75 

Louis Martinello 9 82 

William Quinn • 5 00 

J. Miller 11 10 

Leo Heller 91 00 

J. P. Perry & Company, Inc 7 50 

Knickerbocker Garage 7 75 

D. Carmody 7 50 

Joseph Cagginano 7 75 

P. F. Doyle 10 00 

M. Person 25 00 

M. Person *2 13 

Transit Department 33 00 

Carried forward $10,801 53 

* Uncollected 1924-25. 



Public Works Department. 131 

Brought forward $10,801 53 

Parkway Realty Company 1 100 00 

Lally Brothers 8 50 

Frank Greens 4 00 

H. P. Dodge 8 38 

Maurice P. Horan 8 38 

A. G. Tomasello & Son 563 57 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Company . . 45 91 

T. Dennehy 21 00 

I. Lazarus 8 38 

Park Department 74 15 

Parkway Realty Company f 100 00 

Park Department . . " 22 10 

Leo Heller 24 00 

Lloyd H. Chase 10 00 

Warren E. Locke 4 14 

Dr. John Adams 8 50 

L. V. Niles 34 00 

Annie M.Carey 11 25 

Abraham R. Taylor , 8 38 

Henry Lesser 8 50 

H.J.Cassidy 10 75 

Hotel Huntington 8 25 

M. J. Creehan 11 88 

William Manganiello 11 87 

Margaret H. Lannon 2 40 

Payson Dana 8 50 

S. Esserman 3 50 

Walter .1. -Dwyer 8 75 

Michael Creehan 13 12 

James A. Kennedy 7 80 

Frank X. Weiss 13 23 

A. J. Chapski 13 13 

Arthur Harrington lo 00 

Arthur Harrington *10 96 

B. W. Robinson 3 00 

S. P. Brickley ] 50 

Marden & Orlando Construction Company .... jlOO 00 

W. P. Gorman & Co " . . . . +50 00 

Supply Department 25 00 

F. W.'Burnham JO 75 

Humboldt Avenue Garage 10 75 

J. J. Kennedy fUS 44 

Nicholas DeMassa 8 50 

Anthony Esposito 8 50 

F. L. Gale 3 26 

G. R. Price 13 25 

Martin M. O'Hare 16 50 

Randall Faichney Company 15 00 

Randall Faichney Company *11 88 

F. J. Reardon . . ' 11 50 

T. F. Reardon 5 00 

W. P. Gorman & Co t^S 91 

E. N. Samit t96 25 

A. A. Kincaid 13 25 

J. Sperraza 13 25 

George Gonia 8 50 

Angelo Miceli 13 25 

T. Hurney U 75 

Carried forward $12,628 80 

* Uncollected 1924-25. 

t Credited to Sewerage Works Appropriation. 



132 City Document No. 23. 

Brought forward $12,628 80 

Michael Cuddy 25 00 

Mary Markowitz 35 06 

A. J."^ Granara 8 50 

Frank X. Weiss 18 23 

Hugh J. Cassidy 13 00 

S. H. Hudson 8 50 

Jennie M. Miner 19 94 

Max Novack 25 00 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company 257 93 

$13,039 96 

Uncollected 1924-25 46 44 



$12,993 52 
Bills deposited in other years paid 1924-25 .... 170 06 



Total amount collected $13,163 58 

Entrance fees charged and collected in accordance with 

Ordinances of 1910, chapter 9, section 10 . . . 9,148 10 



Public Works Department. 



133 













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785 40 

1,760 17 

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1,557 14 

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3,581 67 

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287 50 
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1,451 64 
2,427 55 
1,928 40 
3,009 52 
1,184 01 

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2,188 42 
2,851 45 

384 60 
1,147 19 
2,339 95 


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4,042 74 

166 58 
2,524 54 
4,352 72 
2,699 48 
5,241 16 
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3,139 93 
5,612 35 

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136 



City Document No. 23. 



Miscellaneous Account, Detail. 



Labor. 

Vacations 

Sick leave .... 

Snow removal and cleaning streets 
Salary, general foreman . 
Salary, inspector of castings 
Workingjmen's compensation . 
Repairing streets 
New fence, Chikl Street Yard 
Repairing buildings, Sanitary Ser 

vice 

Central office and other charges 
Miscellaneous .... 
Inspection— Complaints : Defective 

drainage, prevention of gasolene 

entering common sewers 



Teaming. 
Removing snow and cleaning streets, 
Miscellaneous 



Stock . 
Transportation 
Repairing streets 
Medical attendance 
Ice ... 
Investigating leak, 

street 
Miscellaneous 



Washington 



$9,355 57 
2,533 34 
9,266 33 
1,198 75 
1,788 26 
2,604 52 
1,174 21 
1,034 23 

1,285 95 

4,091 83 

671 08 



7,796 27 



$2,437 52 
176 75 


$383 30 
582 97 

1,162 43 

38 00 

220 10 


822 07 
213 49 



$42,800 34 



2,614 27 



3,422 36 



$48,836 97 



Public Works Department. 



137 





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$7,260 03 
3,330 41 
5,020 46 
5,881 29 
1,504 05 
1,366 79 

1,150 23 
600 63 
166 39 






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31,423 22 
37,369 06 
17,133 50 
18,611 00 
12,995 91 

6.045 33 
781 08 
907 57 






Total 
Expendi- 
tures. 


§100,836 70 
36,034 40 
46,245 80 
23,014 79 
21,976 10 
16,177 70 

7.970 72 
1,381 71 
1,073 96 


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138 



City Document No. 23. 



Recapitulation. — Maintenance, Detail, 1924=25. 





Improved 
Sewerage. 


Outside 
Improved 
Sewerage. 


Totals. 


Labor 


$160,492 24 


$243,458 13 

85,279 11 

17,383 44 

17 25 

1,439 25 

1,191 61 


$403,950 37 




85,279 11 




2,324 13 

800 90 

58.155 53 

2,032 81 

923 18 

1,095 59 

112 29 

976 00 

25,993 06 

287 22 

1,518 93 


19,707 57 


Waste 


818 15 


Fuel 


59,594 78 


Oil 


3,224 42 




923 18 


Valves 




1,095 59 


Transportation, etc 


1,196 49 

3,483 57 


1,308 78 


Horses, etc 


4,459 57 




25,993 06 


Telephone 


367 78 
6,250 77 
49,172 58 


655 00 




7,769 70 




49,172 58 








Credits. 
Outside Imnroted Sewerage. 

Labor $11,431 04 

Stock 9,459 45 

M/ecellaneous 7,132 63 


$254,711 88 


$409,239 98 
28,023 12 


$663,951 86 




28,023 12 








$254,711 88 


$381,216 86 


$635,928 74 







Supplies, Pumping Station, Calf Pasture. 

2,887 pounds waste, 20 cents to 26 cents. 

308 pounds cotton rags, 16 cents. 
3,008 pounds grease, 15 cents. 
4,730 gallons engine oil, 21.3 cents to 23.8 cents. 
1^278.2 gallons cylinder oil. 29.5 cents to 32 cents. 
10 gallons lard oil, $1.75. 
55^ gallons sperm oil, $1.40. 

10 gallons air cylinder oil, 75 cents. 
765 gallons kerosene, 12 cents. 

Fuel, Entire Service. 

1,336,366.4 gallons fuel oil, $57,108.87. 
172.12 tons anthracite, $2,485.91. 



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152 



City Document No. 23. 



Recapitulation. 



District. 


Linear Feet 
Sewers. 


Linear Feet 

Catch-basin 

Drains. 


Manholes. 


Catch-basins. 


Amount 
Expended. 




521 17 
1,763 14 

160 10 
6,913 14 
21,610 23 
8,776 65 
3,863 55 
4,314 21 

279 57 




3 
12 

1 
40 
134 
63 
31 
19 
17 




$7,748 06 


East Boston 




9 


33,605 06 






2,095 30 


Brighton 


174 

408 05 

245 


10 
23 

18 


65,070 25 


West Roxbury 


251,168 76 




133,164 69 


Hyde Park 


19,595 51 




111 
1,135 


10 
70 


30,373 48 


City Proper. . . 


48,781 89 







Sewerage Works Construction, February 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925, 
Inclusive. 

New Catch-basins and Manholes built by Day Labor and Contract. 



District. 


Catch-basins. 


Manholes. 


Total Cost. 


South Boston 


12 
6 
4 
10 
25 
63 
9 
59 
24 


10 

1 
5 

8 

10 

1 

16 

34 


$9,156 34 




2,640 69 


Charlestown 


4,052 55 




4,410 08 


West Roxbury 


10,839 94 




19,822 09 


Hyde Park 


3,941 52 


Roxbury . . 


29,019 72 




26,883 04 








212 


92 


$110,765 97 







Sewerage Works Loan, 1924-25. 

Engineers' salaries, general 

Amount charged to construction of sewers . 



$106,013 05 
23,609 00 

S129,622 05 



Public Works Department. 
Engineering Expense. 



Labor . 
Teaming 
Borings 
Transportation 
Supplies, etc. 



Pumping Station Consteuction 
Advertising 
Labor 

Contracts . 
Professional services 



Materials, etc. 



Sundries. 



Labor . 
Paving service 
Material 



153 



$2,592 31 

805 00 

1,414 04 

2,059 47 

4,937 48 

SI 1,808 30 



$8 50 

1,878 65 

10,233 53 

857 98 

2,010 77 

$14,989 43 



$1,462 76 

126 30 

35,206 39 



$36,795 45 
Less material charged to jobs 36,190 99 



$604 46 



Court Executions and Awards on Account of Land- 
takings, ETC. 

J. J. Kelleher, Germantown district $500 00 

Fred H. Plouff, River street, Hyde Park . . 500 00 
C. & R. Construction Company, Muddy river 

conduit, contract dated June 25, 1920 . . 17,000 00 



$18,000 00 



Sewerage Works, Charles River Basin. 

Expenditures Fehrvxiry 1, 1924, to January 31, 1925. 



Accounts. 


I abor. 


Paid to 
Contractors. 


Total. 




$1,523 09 
1,471 54 




$1,525 09 


Sewers built in entire city 


$47,573 93 


49,045 47 


Totals 


$2,996 63 


$47,573 93 


$50,570 56 







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154 



1,992 24 

666 42 
8,051 07 

24,730 42 

5,781 82 

183 23 
3,611 30 

177 51 
865 53 
274 54 

185 13 


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10" pipe, sanitary 

12" pipe, sanitary. 
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6 

1 

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g " 


1" 

1 

a 

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2 

1 

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1 ^ 


Parkvale road and Church street, from Weld 
street to 150 feet southeast of Parkvale road.* 

Dorchester. 
Hosmer street, from Norfolk street to 167 feet 


J 

"o 

1 

is 

1 

i 

^ 2 

li 

= 1 


street to Callender street. 

ROXBDRY. 

Public Alley No. 937. from Bovlston street to about 


S 
.a 

s 

o > 

1 ^ 


1 

i 

z 

■£ a 

S 2 

1 i 


southerly. 

City Proper. 
Stuart street, from Washington street to Columbus.. 


2 
1 

1 

H 



155 



156 



City Document No. 23. 



Recapitulation. 



District. 


Linear Feet 
Sewers. 


Linear Feet 

Catch-basin 

Drains. 


Manholes. 


Catch-basins. 


Amount 
Expended. 


Brighton 










$1 577 06 




2,506.98 
192.50 




19 




42.171 17 
3 794 53 


Dorchester 






Roxbury 






1 317 58 












185 13 















Catch=basins in Charge of Sewer Service. 





Catch-b.'^.sin Dat.\ for 
Ye.\r Ended J.\nu.\ry 31, 1925. 


Total for Whole City 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Service. 


District. 


Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 


Net 
Increase. 


Previous 

Report to 

February 1, 

1924. 


Grand Total 

to 

February 1, 

1925. 




68 
95 
12 
15 

4 
20 
48 
81 

9 


55 
57 
5 
2 


13 
38 

7 
13 

4 
20 
48 
44 

9 


3,295 

2,895 

1.267 

901 

768 

1,318 

2,252 

3,563 

391 


3,308 


Roxbury 


2 933 






East Boston 


914 


Charlestown 


772 






1.338 


West Roxbury. 




2 300 


Dorchester 




37 


3,607 


Hyde Park. . 


400 








Totals 


352 


156 


196 


16,6.50 


16.846 



Public Works Department. 



157 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
January 31, 1925. 



District. 


Built by 

City by 

Contractor or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Length Built. 




Linear Feet. 

205.57 
4,382.41 

521.17 
1,929.14 

160.10 
6,912.64 
24,207.16 
8.527.15 
3.S63.55 


Linear Feet. 
287.50 


Liriear Feet. 

493.07 
4,382.41 

521.17 
3,965.91 

160.10 
7,419.55 
2.5,.551.26 
8,918.75 
3,863.55 


Miles. 
093 


Roxbury 


830 


South Boston 




099 




2,036.77 


0.751 




Brighton 


506.91 

1,344.10 

391.60 


1 405 








1 689 


Hyde Park 


732 








Totals 


50,708.89 


4,566.88 


55,275.77 









158 



City Document No. 23. 



Net Increase in Length of Sewers Between February I, 1924, and 
January 31, 1925. 



District. 


Length of 

Sewers Built 

During the 

Twelve 

Months 

ended 

January 31, 

1925. 


Length of 
Sewers Re- 
built or 
Abandoned 
During the 
Twelve 
Months 
ended 
January 31, 
1925. 


Net Increase for the 

Twelve Months Ended 

January 31, 1925. 


City proper 


Linear Feet. 

493.07 
4,382.41 

.521.17 
3,965.91 

IGO.IO 
7,419.55 
25,551.26 
8,918.75 
3,863.55 


Linear Feet. 
423.90 
77.90 


Linear Feet. 

69.17 

4,.304.51 

.521.17 

3,541.81 

160.10 

7,419.55 

2.5,125.26 

7,798.10 

3,863.55 


Miles. 
013 




0.815 


South Boston 


099 




424.10 


0.671 




030 


Brighton 




1 405 




426.00 
1,120.65 


4.758 


Dorchester 


1 477 


Hyde Park 


0.732 








Totals 


55,275.77 


2,472.55 


52,803.22 


10.000 







Total Length of Sewers. 

Common sewers and surface drains previous to February 1, 1924 

Net increase of common sewers and surface drains between February 1, 1924, 
and January 31, 1925 



Total common sewers and surface drains to January 31, 1925. 



Intercepting sewers connecting with Metropohtan sewers to January 31, 
1925 



Boston main drainage intercepting sewers to January 31, 1925. 




Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to January 31, 1925. . 
Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works to February 1, 1925, 



1,012.22 
597.03 



* No addition during 1924. 



Public Works Department. 



159 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
February 1, 1925. 





1920. 


1921, 


1922. 


1923. 


1924. 


Built by city by contract or 
day labor 


Linear 
Feet. 

42,541.12 

12.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

37,115.48 

279.18 


Linear 
Feet. 

63,156.54 

1,641.30 


Linear 
Feet. 

41,076.39 

2,609.10 


Linear 
Feel. 

50,708 . 89 


Built by private parties 


4,566.88 


Totals 


42,553.12 


37,394.66 


64,797.84 


43.685.49 


55,275.77 



Sewage Statistics for Year Ended January 21, 1925. 



Month. 


Total 
Pumped 
Gallons.* 


Average 
per Day 
Gallons. 


Minimum 
per Day 
Gallons. 


Maximum 
per Day 
Gallons. 


Aver- 

Lfft 
Feet. 


Average 
Duty Foot- 
pounds per 
Gallon of Oil. 


1924. 














Febraarv 


2,601,398,738 


89,703,370 


76,371,754 


113.552,958 


33.6 


7.500,000 


March 


3,464,154,266 


111,746,918 


77,110,783 


141,088,605 


35.5 


7,800.000 


April 


3,467,092,220 


115,569,740 


85.073,797 


150,134.735 


35.6 


7.800,000 


Mav 


3,565,556,856 


115,017,963 


85,388.831 


153,427,544 


35.5 


8.100,000 


June 


3,220,712,080 


107,357.069 


86.457.126 


133,581,353 


33.6 


8,200,000 


July 


2,646,363,489 


85,366,532 


56,246,839 


111,581.798 


35.7 


7,900,000 


August 


2,597,777,991 


83,799,290 


65,117.047 


156,562.167 


35.7 


7,800,000 


September 


3,106,235,317 


103,551,177 


76.481.467 


123.447,894 


33.6 


7.700,000 


October 


2,694,435,960 


86,917,289 


70,232,474 


108,423 518 


36.0 


7,200.000 


November 


2,374,462,701 


79,182,090 


59,748,846 


131,340,528 


36.5 


7,200,000 


December ?. . . . 


2,818,223,072 


90,910,422 


75,891,398 


122,354,514 


36.0 


7,500,000 


1925. 














January 


2,959,900,679 


95,480,667 


67,160,836 


146,051,605 


36.0 


7,700,000 


Totals 


35.517,312,572 








429.3 






97,317,706 








35.8 















* Gallons pumped based on displacement. Total gallons of oil burned from February 1, 1924, to January 31, 
1925. inclusive — 1,322,170. 



160 



City Document No. 23. 



Cost of Pumping. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 

Million Foot 

Gallons. 


Labor 


$72,482 80 
58,175 48 
2,886 90 
2,026 66 
25,871 15 


$0 05954 




04778 




00237 




00166 




02125 








$161,442 99 


$0 13260 








$7,510 00 


$0 00618 







Sewage Statistics for Year Ending January 31, 1925. 




Weight. 
(.Pounds.) 



1924. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1925. 

January 



75,271 
43,862 
60,973 
38,319 
25,669 
56,394 
55,671 
33,139 
58,332 
57,117 
55,912 



68.203 



628,862 



314^V/(j tons. Averages 241 pounds to cheese. 



Sludge Received and Removed in Deposit Sewers, Calf Pasture, 

1924. 
Sludge in sewers February 1, 1924 . 2,694 cubic yards 

Received during year .... 1,966 " " 



Removed during year 

Sludge in sewers February 1, 1925 



4,660 
2,983 

1,677 



Public Woeks Department. 161 



SANITARY SERVICE. 



Financial Statement. 

Appropriation S2,898,443 36 

Expended by Sanitary Service .$1,931,188 36 
Expended by Street Cleaning and 
Oiling Service . . . . 921,185 33 

2,852,373 69 



Transferred to other departments and services, S46,069 67 

Income. 

Statement showing amount in cash and bills deposited 
with the City Collector from February 1, 1924 to 
January 31, 1925, and credited to general revenue. 

Tickets and bills for the removal of ashes and 

waste $104,645 85 

Sale of manure . . .... 3,507 00 

Labor and materials 88 32 



Total $108,241 17 

Amount Paid into the City Treasury During the 
Year. 

Removal of ashes and waste .... $104,656 74 

Sale of manure 3,059 08 

Labor and materials 1 00 



$107,716 82 



Total Cost of House Dirt, Waste, Rubbish and Offal, 1924. 

Salaries, divisi'on engineer, supervisor, general 

foreman and medical inspector . . . $16,196 11 

Office supplies and expenses, printing, sta- 
tionery, etc. 3,553 97 

Ashes, waste and rubbish account . . . 1,215,877 62 

House offal account 574,517 79 



Carried forward $1,810,145 49 



162 City Document No. 23. 

Brought forward $1,810,145 49 

Retired veterans' pensions . . $1,651 29 
Retired laborers' pensions . 7,938 29 

9,589 58 



Total $1,819,735 07 

CONSTEUCTION REPAIRS AND HORSESHOE- 
ING Account. 

Expended for labor . . $84,523 36 

Expended for stock . . 35,813 17 

120,354 53 



Work Done for Other Services. 

Paving Service .... $6,147 97 

Sewer Service .... 1,315 52 

Water Service .... 1,437 75 



$1,940,089 60 



8,901 24 



Total $1,931,188 36 



Public Works Department. 



163 



Items of Expenditure for the Year 1924-25. 



Salary, division engineer (in part) 

Salary, supervisor (in part) 

Salary, medical inspector (in part) 

Salary, chief veterinary (in part) 

Salary, foremen 

Salaries, yard clerks 

Lai lor, collecting and disposing of house dirt and ashes 

I.almi, collecting and disposing of waste and rubbish , 

Lalior, collecting and disposing of house offal 

Lai >or and stock at stables and yards 

Hired teams on ashes 

Contractor on ashes, East Boston, Brighton, West Roxbury, Dorchester and 

Hyde Park. 
Contractor on offal. East Boston, Brighton, West Roxbury, Dorchester and 

Hyde Park. 

Holidays, pay allowed 

Vacations, pay allowed 

Grain 

Hay and straw 

Medical attendance and pay allowed injured employees 

Veterinary services and medicines 

Outside wheelwright, blacksmith, horseshoeing, etc 

Labor, stock and wheelwright, blacksmith, painting, etc 

Repairs to stables and sheds 

Fuel 

Gas 

Electric light and power 

Printing, stationery, office supplies, etc 

Automobile expense 

Retired veterans' pensions 

Retired laborers' pensions 

Rent 

Telephone tolls and rentals 

Total 



$1,666 67 

1,754 79 

1,029 14 

1,125 00 

20,307 71 

3,475 23 

603,272 69 

38,533 03 

340,763 69 

84.091 06 

69,919 95 

244,684 OC 

123,500 00 

87,324 46 
27,555 25 
21,899 58 
28,693 16 

13.387 26 
320 65 

31,157 75 
97,744 05 

31.388 58 
3,869 33 

357 73 
3,486 26 
3,938 90 
34,152 18 
1,651 29 
7,938 29 
1,500 00 

700 68 



$1,931,188 



164 



City Document No. 23. 





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Public Works Department. 



165 



House Dirt and Ashes Removed. 



Years. 


Loads. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Tons. 


1920 


288,646 
264,244 
272,245 
280,448 
276,818 


891,042 

967,955 

1,025,555 

1,065,625 

1,099,636 


363,097 


1921 


394,435 


1922 


417,915 


1923 


434,234 


1924 


448,094 







House Offal Removed. 



Y'ears. 


Loads. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Tons. 


1920 


40,881 
47,711 
44,860 
50,115 
50,584 


100,865 

118,237 
110,555 
127,052 
142,822 


59,507 


1921 


69,182 


1922 


71,175 


1923 

1924 


74,962 

84,264 







Waste and Rubbish Removed. 





Loads. 


Cubic 
Yards. 




Years. 


Paper 
Carts. 


Market 
Wagons. 


Tons. 


1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 


3,794 
3,295 
2,850 
1,924 
1,901 


2,717 
2,306 
4,055 
4,589 
4,601 


47,949 
52,224 
54,071 
53,409 
53,443 


5,641 
6,144 
6,455 
6,394 


1924 


6,390 



Loads of Material Collected from February 1, 1920, to January 29, 
1925. 



Years. 


Ashes. 


OffaL 


Rubbish. 


Total 
Loads. 


Tons. 


1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 


238,646 
264,244 
272,245 
280,448 
276,818 


49,881 
47,711 
44,860 
50,115 
50,584 


6,511 
6,786 
6,905 
6,513 
6,502 


286,038 
318,741 
324,010 
337.076 
333,904 


428,245 
469,961 
495,545 
515,590 

538,748 



166 



City Document No. 23. 



i 

o 


1 


2,237 
6,468 
5,417 
17,890 
1,472 


1 


u 


3,791 
10,962 

9,182 
30,322 

2,496 

56,753 


24 






1 






i 




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3,132 

369 
7,408 

624 


2 


l5 








o 
§ 




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i 




30,373 
27,420 
21,016 
106,962 
6,200 


1 


II 


74,535 
67,290 
51.575 
262,485 
15,215 


1 


3 ^ 


796 

6,729 

1,145 

8.581 

21 


IN 


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35,335 
3,001 


'to 

1 




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2 
■i 


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1 

> 




1 





Public Woeks Department. 



167 



Summary. 





Material. , 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Tons. 


\shes 


471,100 
56,753 


191 971 


Offal . . . 


33,484 







Final Disposition of all Material in Loads and Tons (2,000 Pounds). Collected 
by the Sanitary Service, February 1, 1924, to January 29, 1925. 





,j 






























i 


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Q>: 


Q ° S 






CLAS.S OF Refuse. 


%l 


m 








s s 











H o 












^o8 


2 
< 
































Loads. 


Tons. 


Loads. 


Tons 


H 


^ 




243,786 


363,085 


33.032 


85,009 


276,808 


448.094 
84,264 
6,390 


Offal 


44,587 


68,670 


5 997 


15 594 


50,584 
6,502 




6,502 


6,390 












Total 


294,875 


438,145 


39,029 


100,603 


333,904 


538.748 





168 



City Document No. 23. 



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Cost of Collection and Disposal of Refuse by Day 


Labor Force in the 


City of Boston for the Year Ending January 31, 


192S. 






Chabactih or Rwube. 


Cost per Ton by Disthicts. 


Cost op Distbicts. 




Districts 
and Pop- 
ulation 


Tons 
(2,000 
lbs). 


?o°l>^s' 


To CoUect. 


For Disposal. 


Total 
and Disposal. 


To CoUect. 


Total Cost 
to CoUect. 


For 
Disposal. 


Total Cost 
of Disposal. 


Total Cost 
of CoUection 

Disposal. 


Total Cost 
Disp°o'ial. 


Where Disposed of. 




(Mixed refuse, principaUy ashes (no kitchen wastes) .... 
Garbage principaUy kitchen wastes 


36,233 

5,451 

114 


....... 



41,818 

■■24,4ii 

' 86,693 

■ 99,667 

■ 61,334 


$2 1451 
5 4463 
5 8552 


$0 0704 


$2 9928 

5 4468 

6 8552 


$75,215 61 

29,688 00 

667 50 




$2,550 82 










(72 878) 










Coleman Disposal Company. 


















Coleman Disposal Company. 




jMixed refuse, principally ashes (no kitchen wastes) .... 




$105,571 11 




$2,550 82 


$108,121 93 


$1 4830 






22,591 
1,320 


Ar. $2 5855 
$2 1116 


Av. to 0704 
SO 0427 


Av. $2 6559 
$2 1543 


$47,703 43 
13.932 58 


S964 21 


















Coleman Disposal Company. 




Mixed refuse, principaUy ashes (no kitchen wastes) .... 




60,671 77 




964 21 


61,635 98 


1 4410 






65,693 

19,SU 

889 


Av. $2 5249 
$3 7412 
5 3363 
12 6029 


Av. $0 0427 
$0 0450 


Av. 82 5676 

S3 816^^245,773 77 
5 3363 104,116 95 
12 6029 1 11,104 04 


$2,998 00 
















(155,793) 




















Mixed refuse, principaUy ashes (no kitchen wastes) .... 




360,994 76 




2,998 00 


363,992 76 


2 3364 






79,020 
16,408 
4,179 


Av. S4 2279 
$3 4810 
5 9292 
10 9008 


Av. $0 0450 
SO 0161 
1538 


Av. $4 2729 
S3 4582 
6 0832 
10 9008 


$275,155 4S 
97,287 02 
45,554 32 


$1,339 45 
2,524 15 
































Mixed refuse, principaUy ashes (no kitchen wastes) .... 




417,996 79 




3,863 60 


421,860 39 


3 5740 






52,536 
7,590 
1,20S 


Av. $4 49G3 
»2 1651 
3 6S71 
8 7411 


Av. $0 0405 


Av, S4 2368 
$2 1551 
3 1571 
8 7411 


$123,366 13 
27,716 46 
10,559 21 




Coleman Disposal Company. 


10 (74,736) 














Coleman Disposal Company. 


















Coleman Disposal Company. 








161,641 82 






161,641 82 
345,000 00 


2 0271 








Av. S2 4537 




Av. $2 4537 






345,000 00 




, 





































313,26 3 


Av. S3 5334 


Av. SI 1344 


Av. $4 6678 




$1,106,876 25 




$355,376 63 


$1,462,252 88 


$3 1778 















1 for disposal of aU refuse collected by the city force and Dorchester contracts. 

Total as above $1,462,252 88 

Add total of contract tabic, page 168 468,935 48 



Coleman Disposal Company'i 



Net amount of appropriation. . . 
tract oaUs for $345,000 per year. 



81,931,188 36 

































Detail. 


of Collected Re 


use in B 


oston to 


r the Y 


ear End 


ng January 29 


1025. 












































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■ 5.M0 1 6,302 


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333,30. 


63&..8 



Public Works Department. 



169 



CITY OF BOSTON cHARLfkToWwU 
SANITARY DISTRICTS P0P.3i833 ■7341!^ 

1924 '^'X ^'•4- ' 



lO-N&W.END^ % 

POP. 74736 I64llbs| 

8.9.-So.END8cB.BAYv 

POP. 117735 (s51.0m 




A""^.- BRIGHTON 

POP. 44020 



I 989 Ibl 
4rE.fe0ST0N 

*^'**^ C43.00) 



So.BdSTON 




FIGURES SHOW ESTIMATED 
MEAN 1924 POPULATION AND 
POP. PER ACRE; ALSO.TOTAL 
WEIGHT OF REFUSE AND COST 
PER CAPITA FOR THE YEAR. 



170 



City Document No. 23. 



SEWER AND SANITARY DIVISION — STREET 
CLEANING AND OILING SERVICE. 



General Administration : 



Salary, su;pervisor (in part) . 


$1,605 51 


Salary, general foreman 


3,008 22 


Pensions, retired veterans . 


4,337 51 


Pensions, retired laborers . 


7,142 70 


Annuity, Acts of 1920 — chapte 


r 


132 


600 00 


Salary, medical inspector 


800 00 


Salary, chief veterinarian 


1,000 00 


Stationery .... 


427 70 


Telephone .... 


681 78 


Printing 


940 60 


Injured employees 


5,322 59 


Miscellaneous 


289 30 


Auto repairs and maintenance 


2,093 60 




JJtZOjZ'iy 01 


General expenses other than genera 


i adminstration : 


Wages, stablemen . 


$48,086 66 


Wages, yardmen 


10,352 65 


Wages, watchmen . 


5,796 94 


Wages, foremen's driver 


664 52 


Wages, clerks and messengers 


6,600 06 


Hay and straw 


26,808 48 


Grain 


19,393 83 


Electric light .... 


223 74 


Veterinary service and medicines 


3, 443 31 


Horseshoeing .... 


3,611 85 


Harnesses, etc. 


614 39 


Fuel 


561 72 


Horses 


7,000 00 


Care of horses .... 


9 00 


Stable and yards, rent of 


283 33 


Stable and yards, supplies . 


1,701 95 


Stable and yards, building repair 


3, 2,059 84 


Auto repairs and maintenance 


4,313 16 

IQQ COS AO 






Operating expenses: 




Salaries, district foremen 


. $18,520 18 


Salaries, inspectors 


50,591 98 


Wages, laborers 


. 438,143 70 


Hired autos .... 


14,246 50 


Holidays and pay allowed . 


58,748 29 


Carried forward . 


. $580,250 65 $166,774 94 



Public Works Department. 



171 



Brought forward . 


$580,250 65 


$166,774 94 


Vacations .... 


20,018 13 




Dumps, use of . . . 


3,469 90 




Snow licenses .... 


500 00 




Cart repairs .... 


1,823 40 




Water cart repairs 


130 00 




Tools and repairs . 


1,798 07 




Vehicle supplies 


293 52 




Sweeping machine repairs . 


148 08 




Push carts and barrels . 


2,627 74 




Snow plows, repairs 


583 22 




Push brooms, teamsters brooms 






etc 


1,878 50 




Machine brooms . 


3,535 00 




Sand 


834 44 




Water cart hose . 


325 37 




Flushing hose 


537 80 




Refuse boxes . . . 


356 40 




Shovels, hoes and picks,' etc 


1,273 45 




Miscellaneous 


1,793 30 




Autos, repairs and maintenance 


52,756 52 


674,933 49 




$841,708 43 



Street Watering and Oiling Branch. 



General administration : 
Salary, supervisor (in part) 
Stationery 
Advertising 
Printing . 
Telephone 
Miscellaneous 
Auto repairs and maintenance 



$139 61 

37 19 

10 00 

105 00 

51 57 

137 22 

1,295 81 



General expenses other than general adminstration : 



Horseshoeing 

Yard and stable supplies 

Auto repairs and maintenance 



Operating expenses : 
Inspectors : 

Water 

Oil . 

Sanding . 

Vacation . 

Holiday . 



$20 75 
159 45 
514 31 



$4,477 

5,033 

807 

533 



809 35 



$1,776 40 



694 51 



Carried forward . 



$11,660 67 $2,470 91 



172 



City Document No. 23. 



Brought fonuard . 




$11,660 67 


$2,470 91 


Calcide .... 




84 09 




Stable repairs 




30 69 




Labor: 








Water .... 




4,290 54 




Oil 




1,385 67 




Sanding .... 




6,889 28 




Vacation .... 




250 50 




Holiday .... 




848 88 




Calcide .... 




339 00 




Building repairs 




1,047 04 




Allowed time ... 




124 51 




Showers .... 




40 50 




Hired autos . 




11,289 75 




Hired electric car sprinkler 




4,864 00 




Tools .... 




52 18 




Hose 




45 00 




Hydrant repairs . 




112 66 




Sand 




5,416 74 




Road oil . 




24,122 02 




Calcide .... 




756 52 




Auto repairs and maintenance 


3,355 75 


77,005 99 
$79,476 90 


Street Cleaning expenditures 


$841,708 43 




Street Watering and Oiling ex 


- 




penditures .... 


79,476 90 








$921,185 33 





Public Works Department. 



173 



DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES. 



Removing snow .... 

Snow work on crossings and gutters, 



$83,583 32 
22,754 30 



Flushing streets .... 
Street patrolling by teams 
Street patrolling by push carts 
Collecting of refuse boxes . 

Cleaning of paved streets 
Cleaning of paved streets Elgin and 

Springfield sweepers 
Cleaning of macadam streets . 
Cleaning of public alleys . 

Sanding of slippery streets 
Work done for Sanitary Service 

Totals 

Oiling public streets and ways 
Watering public streets and ways 



$36,119 60 

174,829 05 

13,215 73 

$235,292 57 

38,560 32 

63,669 70 

1,360 58 



$106,337 62 
25,013 61 



224,164 38 



338,883 17 

4,584 69 

142,724 96 

$841,708 43 
49,610 42 
29,866 48 



Totals $921,185 33 



174 



City Document No. 23. 



Summary. 





Street Cleaning Branch. 


Street Watering and Oiling ' 
Branch. 




1922-1923. 1923-1924. 


1924-1925. 


1922-1923. 


1923-1924. 


1924-1925. 


Labor 


$614,050 85 
29,355 00 
97,478 06 


$630,918 48 
29,825 00 
159,290 50 


$685,772 62 
14,246 50 
141,689 31 


$38,869 45 
16,539 23 
79,315 18 


$23,510 89 
20,270 00 
65,061 44 


$27,454 38 




16,153 75 


Supplies and repairs 


35.868 77 


Totals 


$740,883 91 


$820,033 98 


$841,708 43 


$126,723 86 


$108,842 33 


$79,476 90 







Cost of Snow Work and Volume Removed. 



Districts. 


Crossings 
and Gutters. 


Removal. 


Total Cost. 


SingleLoads. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Cost per 
Cubic Yard. 




$3,565 56 
906 89 

2,165 49 
102 10 
444 43 
591 87 

3,405 15 
431 02 

2,118 28 

8,983 51 


$2,880 66 
847 02 
686 55 


$6,446 22 

1,753 91 

2,852 04 

102 10 

444 43 

591 87 

23.839 18 

4,037 29 

30,710 38 

35,560 20 


823 
295 
234 


2.058 
736 
585 


$1 39 




1 15 




1 17 




























20,434 03 

3,606 27 

28.592 10 

26,576 69 


14.919 
1,232 
12.834 
14.463 


37,297 
3,080 
32,085 
36,158 


547 


Back Bay 


1 17 


North and West Ends 


891 
735 








$22,714 30 


$83,623 32 


$106,337 62 


44.800 


111,999 


746 







Snow Summary. 





Cost of 
Inspection. 
Labor and 
Teaming. 


Cost of 
all Other 
Charges. 


Total Cost. 


Amount of Snow- 
Removed. 


Cost per 
Load. 


Cost per 
Cubic 
Yard. 


Items. 


Loads. 


Cubic 
Yards. 


Snow removal 

Snow crossings and 


$55,515 43 
14.880 21 


$28,067 89 
7,874 09 


$83,583 32 
22,754 30 


44,800 


111.999 


$1 86 


$0,74'- 


gu era. 












870,395 64 


$35,941 98 


$106,337 62 





















ning of Paved Streets and Macadam Gutters. 



^liiS.^ 



%jf 



E^ 



YARDS OF DIRT REMOVED. 



Paveb Stbeets and Macadam Cdtt£H8. 



Public Works Department. 



175 





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176 City Document No. 23. 



APPENDIX E. 



RERORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, February 1, 1925. 

Mr. J. A. RouRKE, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the following report 
of the operations, income and expenditures of the Water 
Division for the year ending January 31, 1925. 

The development of unimproved property in the 
suburbs, especially in West Roxbury, Dorchester and 
Brighton, has continued without interruption through- 
out the entire year. The total length of 6-inch to 16- 
inch water pipe laid for extension was 7.3 miles, all 
occasioned by the construction of new buildings. Again, 
as in the past three years, the greatest volume of work 
was done in West Roxbury, and petitions for water 
service in this district called for the laying of 2.7 miles 
of pipe ; in the Brighton district two miles of water pipe 
were laid to satisfy the demands for water. 

In anticipation of the rebuilding of the Massachusetts 
Avenue Bridge over the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, the existing 24-inch low service 
main carried on the bridge was relocated under the 
railroad tracks and, in addition, the two dead ends of 
the 24-inch high service main on either side of the bridge 
were connected by the laying of 30-inch steel pipes 
under the railroad tracks. The high service main 
serves as a cross connection between the 42-inch high 
service main in Huntington avenue and the 36-inch high 
service main in Tremont street. Both m.ain pipes under 
the tracks and on either side of the bridge abutments 
are 30-inch steel riveted pipe, laid with cover of 7 feet 
below the tracks; the horizontal length of the pipes 
is 103 linear feet, with ninety-degree elbow pipes at 
either end; the vertical legs are 30-inch steel pipes 
terminating at the upper end of pipes, with ninety-degree 



Public Works Department. 177 

elbow pipes on which are 24-inch manholes. The upper 
elbows have the normal cover of 4 feet and connect to 
the 24-inch cast-iron pipes by reducers. The vertical 
legs are 20 linear feet in length. The entire length of 
the steel pipes is encased in a concrete monolith 18 
inches thick. Each manhole has a brick chamber to 
provide access to the steel pipes. 

A start was made during the year to improve the 
supply of the high service area in Brighton dependent 
on a 16-inch main by laying 3,000 linear feet of 24-inch 
pipe in Cleveland circle, Sutherland road and Common- 
wealth avenue, the main connecting to and supplied 
from the 30-inch and 35-inch high service mains of 
the Metropolitan Water System. This main is laid 
practically through the center of the high service terri- 
tory and will maintain a constant pressure under heavy 
drafts and end the dangerous situation formerly existing 
as regards adequate fire protection. The construction 
of the West Border road in West Roxbury Parkway 
by the Metropolitan District Commission called for the 
laying of 2,050 linear feet of 16-inch main connecting 
to the Bellevue tank and serving as a second supply to 
the extra high service area in West Roxbury. 

The completion of the Neponset Bridge over the 
Neponset river under construction for the past three 
years permitted the city again to supply the various 
islands in Boston Harbor belonging to Boston. Nine 
hundi-ed fifty linear feet of 12-inch pipe were laid 
in the westerly sidewalk of the bridge, crossing the chan- 
nel by a siphon pipe under the channel. During the 
construction of this bridge the islands were supplied 
by water obtained through the courtesy of the city of 
Quincy. 

For the improvement of fire protection and to fur- 
nish the quantity of water demanded by the modern 
fire engine, our policy of replacing lines of old and small 
sized pipes with larger sizes, 8-inch, 10-inch or 12-inch, 
has continued and during the year 2,170 linear feet of 
4-inch and 6-inch pipe were relaid with 8-inch and 12- 
inch pipe in the city proper. 

Two thousand two hundred eighty-five linear feet 
4-inch and 6-inch pipe were replaced by 8-inch and 
12-inch pipe in Roxbury. 

Three thousand seven hundred ninety linear feet 4- 
inch and 6-inch pipe were replaced by 8-inch and 12- 
inch pipe in Dorchester. 



178 City Document No. 23. 

Nine hundred thirty Unear feet 4-inch and 6-inch 
pipe were replaced by 8-inch and 12-inch pipe in West 
Roxbury. 

Three thousand three hundred fifty hnear feet 4-inch 
and 6-inch pipe were replaced by 8-inch and 12-inch pipe 
in Hyde Park. The total length of pipe replaced was 
2.5 miles. 

Among the longer lengths replaced were : 

City Proper. 

Province street, from School street to Bromfield 
street, 514 linear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Leverett street, from Green street to Cotting street, 
860 linear feet 12-inch by 12-inch pipe. (Original pipe 
laid in 1849.) 

Oneida street, from Harrison avenue to Albany street, 
507 Hnear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Roxbury. 

Pilgrim road, from Brookline avenue to Longwood 
avenue, 1,830 linear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

South Boston. 

Bowen street, from F street to Dorchester street, 
450 linear feet 4-inch by 10-inch pipe. 

Dorchester. 

Humphrey street, from Dudley street to Groom street, 
950 linear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Humphrey place, from Humphrey street, 355 Unear 
feet 4-inch by 8-inch pipe. 

Blue Hill avenue, from Harvard street to Paxton 
street, 900 linear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Wildwood street, from Morton street to Paxton street, 
640 linear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Hyde Park. 

Thatcher street, from River street to Metropohtan 
avenue, 760 Hnear feet 4-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Metropolitan avenue, from Thatcher street to Central 
avenue, 1,200 Hnear feet 6-inch by 12-inch pipe. 

Greenwood avenue, from River street to Metropohtan 
avenue, 940 Hnear feet 4-inch by 8-inch pipe. 



Public Works Department. 179 

All work in connection vAih the extension of and 
relaying of water pipes was performed under twenty- 
four contracts awarded at various intervals during the 
working season from April to November, inclusive, and 
ever}-^ applicant for water requiring a main pipe extension 
was cared for \nthout delay. 

During the year service pipes to the number of 1,532 
were installed, varying in size from f-inch to 12-inch, as 
compared -with 1,382 ser\dces laid in 1923. This con- 
tinued increase of service pipes is an indication of the 
building activities in the suburbs. One hundred ninety- 
eight of the total number of services installed were 
4-inch pipes to furnish sprinkler protection. Cleaning 
of the older pipes laid previous to or in the early '70's 
was continued \\dth a resultant improvement in the 
water system. Under a contract with, the National 
Water Main Cleaning Company of New York, 28,900 
linear feet of 6-inch, 8-inch and 12-inch pipe were cleaned 
in Roxbury and 36,300 linear feet of 12-inch and 16- 
inch pipe were cleaned in Brighton. The permanent 
paving of the longer thoroughfares such as Shawmut 
avenue. Blue Hill avenue, Congress street, Pearl street. 
South street, Charles street, Essex street. Centre street, 
Roxbury, Border street, East Boston, placed a severe 
demand on the resources of the maintenance force. In 
anticipation of the permanent pavement, the pohcy 
has been continued of gating all post hydrants, replacing 
the old decaying wooden gate and hydrant boxes mth 
either cast-iron or concrete boxes, and the regulating 
and setting to grade all sidewalk cocks and tubes in order 
that every service may be controlled at the sidewalk 
and excavation in the roadway eliminated. 

The regular work of the Distribution Branch repair- 
ing leaks, estabhshing fire and service pipes, freeing 
stoppages, shutting off and letting on water, etc., was 
handled to cause a minimum of delay or discomfort to 
applicants for water, to water takers and to the traveling 
public. 

In cotnpKance \\dth the Acts of 1907, relative to 
metering water services, 3,814 meters were set on old 
services in existence prior to 1907 and 1,258 meters were 
set on new service pipes, a total setting of 5,072 meters. 
On January 31, 1925, the total number of meters in 
ser\dce was 85,636 and there remain to meter only 
Wards 25 and 26 of Brighlion, having about 5,000 
services unmetered. At the present rate of installa- 



180 City Document No. 23. 

tion, the entire city will be on metered service by 
January 1, 1926. With 94 per cent of Boston metered, 
the work of the meter branch is increasing correspond- 
ingly and in addition to the meters installed as above, 
7,485 meters have been changed and reset and 6,287 
meters have been repaired dming the year. 

A new record has been made in the Income Branch 
by the collecting of $3,930,893 for the year — exceeding 
the revenue for 1923-24 by $20,000. Practically all 
money collectible for unpaid water bills of previous years 
has been collected and from now on the receipts will be 
only for the bills rendered each year. The statute 
making water bills a lien on real estate still continues 
to work to the benefit of the Water Division in prompt 
payments and prevents loss to the city when property 
changes owners. 

The policy of advertising the main pipe and special 
castings contracts in the last months of the year for the 
next season's work has been followed and works to the 
utmost satisfaction. Without exception, all deliveries 
for the year 1924 were as specified in every contract 
awarded and at the beginning of the working season a 
sufficient quantity of every variety of stock was on 
hand and both pipe laying contracts and work by the 
Water Division employees were performed without any 
delay. 

Under a contract awarded in April 8,000 finear feet 
of 12-inch high pressure fire pipe and 4,000 finear feet 
of 16-inch high pressure fire pipe were laid in various 
streets in the business district, supplying sixty hydrants. 
There are now 15.8 miles of pipe with 430 hydrants in the 
High Pressure Fire System. 

Further detailed information regarding operations of 
the various branches of this division will be found in the 
tables pubfished herewith. 

Very respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 

Division Engineer. 









Receipts and Expenditures, 1915=25. 

Receipts. 












1915-16. 


1916-17. 


1917-18. 


1918-19. 


1919-20. 


.920-21. 


1921-33. 


1933-23. 


1923-24. 


1934-25. 


Sales of water 


S2,S59,707 92 
84,977 77 


S3,037,974 66 
71,374 55 


$2,872,867 89 
79,223 75 


$2,998,922 73 
50,529 81 


$3,244,542 57 
54,111 33 


$3,364,937 04 
64,598 71 


$3,407,579 24 
05,479 69 


$3,694,448 30 
97,499 70 


$3,813,571 42 
97,164 30 


$3,748,575 2S 
182,317 S3 






S2,944,6S5 69 


$3,100,349 21 


2,952,091 64 
* 4,826 39 


83,049,452 54 


$3,298,653 90 


$3:429,535 75 


$3,473,058 93 


53,791,948 00 


$3,910,735 72 


"53,930,893 11 












S2,944,6S5 69 


53,100,349 21 


52,956,918 03 


$3,049,452 54 


$3,298,653 90 


53,429,535 7o 


$3,473,058 93 


$3,791,948 GO 


$3,910,735 72 


53,930,893 U 




S1S4,470 24 

1 135,014 40 

24,500 00 

259,046 70 


8135,014 40 
t 87,146 19 
25,774 OC 
407,823 86 


887,146 19 

t 25,087 31 

27,264 14 

16,000 00 

35,000 00 


$25,087 31 
t 3,487 83 
26,165 88 

124,263 90 

30,000 00 


t $3,487 83 






t $43,733 95 


t $200,000 00 
24,141 IS 
50,522 49 
113,570 40 
208,180 00 

410,000 00 


$24 141 18 






$43,733 95 
34,596 76 
161,000 00 


28 737 35 


Transferred to Collecting Department 


30,317 74 
390,095 22 


$33,570 54 
209,958 26 


46,425 42 
250,233 01 
200,000 00 

23,000 00 

100,000 00 


58,653 86 
















Transferred to appropriation for High Pres- 










' 






Transferred to appropriation for High Pres- 
sure Fire system extension 

































Expenditures. 





1915-16. 


1916-17. 


1917-18. 


1918-19. 


1919-20. 


1920-21. 


1921-22. 


1922-23. 


1923-24. 


1924-25. 




$904,135 19 
49,455 84 

1.665,006 20 

91,259 22 

738 38 


$917,823 64 
47,868 21 

1,669,432 79 

87,866 59 

62S 33 


$1,045,543 65 

97,058 88 

1,752,004 76 

80,494 28 

611 20 


51,055,842 87 

51,599 48 

1,741,008 84 

71,208 00 

962 90 


$1,010,634 32 

3,487 S3 

1,805,104 07 

61,162 73 

1,339 82 


tSl,253,166 33 


t$l,232,418 76 


t$l,396,212 50 


$1,229,573 73 

384,038 82 

1,872,413 17 

25,534 00 

941 93 


51,608,320 10 




215,042 67 


MetropoUtan water assessment 


1,885,924 91 
43,874 33 
1,041 3S 


1,958,528 33 
41,852 66 


1,784,257 21 
34,449 49 
1,104 32 


1,829,973 63 
24,680 00 


Refunded water rates . . . 


626 68 








52,710,594 S3 


$2,723,619 56 


52,975,712 77 


52,929,682 18 


52,881,728 77 


$3,186,006 95 


$3,233,728 22 


$3,216,023 52 


53,512,501 65| 53,678,643 OS 



^ Transfer from Reserve 



expenses and extensions, there being one appropriation only. 



Public Works Department. 181 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts. 

Sales of water S3,748,575 28 

Service pipes and repairs 97,380 71 

Fire, motor and elevator pipes, new and repairs . 60,105 22 

Labor and materials for miscellaneous work .... 8,021 94 

Fees for Summonses . , 6,087 l8 

Sales of old materials 5, 436 18 

Sales of merchandise 1,784 91 

Interest on bank deposits 1,273 25 

Damages to hydrants 639 93 

Shutting off and letting on water for non payment . 558 00 

Board of horses 367 50 

Testing meters 225 00 

Sales of gasolene 193 60 

Drill returned 83 00 

Workmen's Compensation 69 00 

Sales of automobile accessories 52 72 

Damage claim 25 39 

Rebate on gasolene 8 00 

Delivering water 5 50 

Sale of lampwicks 80 

Total income S3,930,893 11 

Transferred to City Loan account to pay 

Hyde Park Water Debt $16,000 00 

Transferred to credit of Collecting Depart- 
ment 58,653 86 

Transferred to appropriation for Service 

Mains and Re-laying Mains .... 217,638 84 

Transferred to appropriation for High Pres- 
sure Fire Svstem Extension .... 175,000 00 

467,292 70 



$3,463,600 41 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses and extensions $1,608,320 10 

Interest on water loans 24,680 00 

Refunded water rates 626 68 

Metropolitan water assessment 1,829,973 63 

$3,463,600 41 

Seevice Mains and Relaying Mains. 
Balance unexpended February 1, 1924 . . $24,141 18 
Appropriation from water income May 20, 

1924 $200,000 00 

Appropriation from water income January 31, 

1925 17,638 84 

Total appropriation 1924-25 $241,780 02 

Expended during fiscal year 1924-25 215.042 67 

Balance unexpended $26,737 35 



182 City Document No. 23. 

Details of expenditures under appropriation for cur- 
rent expenses and extensions for the fiscal year ending 
January 31, 1925. (From revenue.) 

Extension. 

Construction of new mains .... $130,563 78 

Replacement of old mains .... 49,989 76 

New hydrants 9,756 30 



Total extensions $190,309 84 

Maintenance. 
Office and Engineering Branch : 

Salaries and wages . . . $47,756 52 
Traveling expenses . 1,505 35 

Printing, stationery and jjost- 

age 2,706 70 

Miscellaneous .... 1,149 49 

$53,118 06 

Income Branch : 

Salaries and wages . . . $151,739 72 
Traveling ex^jenses . . 2,321 45 
Printing, stationery and port- 
age 5,964 06 

Miscellaneous .... 4,245 59 

164,270 82 

Distribution Branch : 

Salaries and wages . . . $35,486 02 
Traveling expenses . . 965 48 
Printing, stationery and post- 
age 876 35 

Miscellaneous .... 1,990 92 

39,318 77 

Meter Branch: 

Salaries and wages . . . $16,377 53 

Travehng expenses ... 26 30 

New meters and setting . 74,366 02 

Meters, repairing, resetting, 

testing, etc 36,643 61 

Printing, stationery and post- 
age 623 33 

Shops 17,382 99 

Laborers' vacations . . 1,313 15 

Hohday 5,189 30 

Miscellaneous .... 1,439 27 

153,361 50 

Inspection of castings 7,335 40 

Damages 35,399 52 

Yards 69,239 33 

Shops 39,727 41 

Stables 11,353 08 

Tools and repairs 28,965 85 

Main pipe relocation 15,403 75 

Main pipe repairs 93,309 69 

Service pipes, new 106,273 26 

Service pipes, changes 12,324 17 

Service pipes, repairs 114,781 56 

Hydrant, changes 34,456 70 

Hydrant, repairs 64,560 63 



Carried forward $786,491 85 $190,309 84 



Public Works Department. 183 

Brought forward $786,491 85 $190,309 84 

Water post, changes 119 17 

Water post, repairs 767 13 

Fountain, changes 214 91 

Fountain, repairs 4,469 07 

Fountain, on account of ice . . 1,260 35 

HoHday 49,096 44 

Investigations 616 89 

Off and on water 22,101 11 

Accommodation work 1,685 32 

AVork on account of Office and Engineering 

Branch 66 97 

Work on account of Income Branch 736 13 

Work on account of Meter Branch . 724 15 

Work on account of waste detection . . 310 47 

Work on account of new meters . 8,568 53 

Work on account of meter repairs . . . 9,586 41 

Launch, repairs and suppHes .... 410 13 

Veterans' pensions 7,849 58 

Ijaborers' pensions 11,692 58 

Laborers' vacations 14,505 32 

Workmen's compensations .... 3,251 81 

Emergency Service 55,390 54 

Garage 1,572 05 

Medical inspector 550 00 

Taxes 269 00 

High Pressure Fire System .... 5,092 79 

Harbor service 120 81 

Automobiles 40,759 66 

Total maintenance 1,284,986 82 

Merchandise sold and stock consigned to iunk 3,989 95 

Stock purchased " . . . . 487,597 65 

$1,966,884 26 
Less stock used and disposed of 358,564 16 

Total expendtiures from appropriation for current 

expenses $1,608,320 10 



Details of expenditures under appropriation for ''Ser- 
vice Mains and Relaying Mains." (From revenue.) 

Construction of new mains $138,889 14 

Replacement of old mains 26,236 61 

New hydrants 4,738 80 

Main pipe, relocation 17,879 41 

Main pipe, repairs 2,716 85 

Service pipes, new 16,909 38 

Service pipes, changes 10 80 

Service pipes, repairs 300 03 

Hydrant, changes 5,169 54 

Hydrant, repairs 73 04 

Fountain repair.? 10 80 

New meters 2.092 07 

Yards ' 16 20 

Total expenditures "Service Mains and Relaving 

Mains," 1924-25 " . $215,042 67 



184 City Document No. 23. 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION AND CONDITION 
OF WATER DEBT. 

Cost of construction to February 1, 1925 .... $19,546,435 08 

Cost of construction to February 1, 1924 .... 19,186,260 69 

Increase during the year $360,174 39 

Outstanding loans February 1, 1924 $625,000 00 

Outstanding loans February 1, 1925 250,000 00 

Decrease during the year $375,000 00 

Water Sinking Fund February 1, 1924 $359,000 00 

Water Sinking Fund February 1, 1925 . . 000,000 00 

Decrease during the year $359,000 00 

Gross Water Debt February 1, 1924 $625,000 00 

Gross Water Debt February 1, 1925 250,000 00 

Decrease during the year $375,000 00 

Cochituate Water Sinking Fund receipts 1924-25: 

Interest on investments $9,925 00 

Interest in bank deposits 1,491 14 

$11,416 14 

Cost of existing works January 31, 1925: 

Pipe yards and buildings $94,832 16 

Engineering expenses 57,873 ' 58 

Distribution system (addition during the year, $360,- 

174.39) 18,925,729 34 

Hyde Park water works 468,000 00 

$19,546,435 08 

High Pressure Fire System additions during the year 

($325,803.11) $2,026,023 84 



Public Works Department. 



185 



Income Branch. 

Table No. 1.— Statement of Each Year's Water Rates, 1906 to 1925, 
as of January 31, 1925. 



Account of 
Year. 


Amount 
As.sesscd. 


Amount 
Abated. 


Amount 
Collected. 


Outstanding. 


1906 


§2,524,205 25 
2,619,031 00 
2,645,962 55 
2,694,408 57 
2,845,900 66 
2,863,501 75 
3,001,771 87 
3,004,331 52 
3,034,885 83 
2,960,797 45 
3,130,590 53 
3,120,878 86 
3,359,691 95 
3,210,116 91 
3,503,644 58 
3,615,629 41 
3,612,681 41 
3,816,896 92 
3,831.504 44 
115,351 49 


$37,599 28 
34,959 33 
36,939 32 
49,407 44 

117, 818 49 
65,439 47 
49,937 87 
42,088 77 
41,544 93 
15,084 24 
16,390 64 
19,287 29 
98,624 99 
27,111 37 
01,968 25 
:?4,098 26 
31,357 21 
32,810 87 
25,834 56 
176 20 


82,486,605 97 
2,584,071 67 
2,609,023 23 
2,645,001 13 

2.728.182 17 
2,798,062 28 
2,943,402 48 

2.954.183 62 
2,970,232 82 
2,903,015 36 
3,062,749 14 
3,043,454 21 
3,197,142 01 
3,114,260 45 
3,379,770 19 
3,523,553 38 
3,520,318 43 
3,722,286 43 
3,485,828 89 

38,385 72 




1907 




1908 




1909 




1910 




1911 




1912 . . 


$8,431 52 


1913 


8,059 13 


19J4 


23,108 08 


1915 


42,697 85 


1916 


51,450 75 


1917 

1918 

1919 


68,137 36 
63,924 95 
68,745 09 


1920 


61,906 14 


1921 


57,977 77 


1922 


61,005 77 


1923 


61,799 62 


1924 


319,840 99 


1925 .... 


76,789 57 






Total outstanding, 








$963,874 59 


1 






Note: Ai 

Table No. 1 


nount outstandi 

I.— Elevato 


ng same date m 

r. Motor an 


1924, $981,950.44. 

d Fire Services. 



Elevator services instslled 

Elevator services abandoned 

Total number of elevator services in use January 31, 1925 

Fire services installed 

Fire services abandoned 

Total number of fire services in use January 31, 1925 

Total number of motor services in use January 31, 1925.. , 
Number of motor servieee metered 



2 
508 
203 

2 
2,. 508 



186 



City Document No. 23. 



Table No. 1. 



Meter Branch. 

statement of Work During Fiscal Year 1924=25. 





1 


1 

(5 


Changed. 




Jl 


1 




Make. 


O 


d 




Hersey disc 


247 
190 
16 


389 

104 

27 

11 

12 

12 

4 

4 

6 

1 

1 

111, 


3,213 

1,480 

209 

117 

133 

126 

44 

24 

13 

11 


2,845 
1,042 

52 

58 
58 
17 ■ 
15 , 
12 
5 


3,687 

2,169 

303 

171 

195 

183 

66 

33 

19 

15 

7 

2,121 


2,559 
1,282 
73 
123 
55 
57 
44 
18 
12 
16 


138 
63 
2 

8 

1 

3 


519 










American . 


130 




10 
7 
5 
1 
1 




Nash 




Lambert . . 


5 


Trident 








Empire 




Hersey detector 


7 
841 




32 


King 


1,444 


698 


1,277 


117 










3,566 

176 

5 


52 


667 
3 


2,569 
24 


8,045 
245 


770 


143 

1 




Federal 




Protectus 


\ 




1 






1 
1 


1 






Standard 




I 

















469 




Totals 


5,072 


735 


7,485 


7,48o 


17,261 


6,287 


1,623 





Public Works Department. 



187 



Table No. II. 

Meters in Service, January 31, 1925. 



Make. 


DI.4.METER IN INCHES. 


1 


i 


1 


n 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


Totals. 




42,922 
363 
471 
434 
312 
202 


3,182 
346 
490 
182 
104 


1,415 
223 
304 
120 

3 


717 
174 
186 
31 
18 
4 


255 
178 
164 
36 
17 


103 
61 
64 
3 

16 
4 

51 
10 


50 
24 
50 


4 
14 
10 






48,648 
1,383 




Crown 


1 739 


Nash 


806 


Lambert.. . . 


3 
9 

15 
1 

15 








S^g 


Trident 


3 

26 


13 


6 


247 










8 
28 

171 
12 

447 


26 
8 

23 
1 


1 
16 
2 


8 
57 






10,003 
193 








10,178 


Keystone. . . , 


2 






403 


Metropolitan 


13 




227 
















674 


Worthington turbine 










1 








1 


Empire. . . 


137 


3 


3 


4 












147 


Protectus 






1 


2 
2 


2 




7 


Gem 










1 






Standard 


5 

7,155 

6 

11,909 
















353 

1 
321 


,« 


106 


81 


28 










7,909 

8 












Union 


















3 


King 


222 


76 


65 












12,593 






1 


8 






9 


B. W. W 




1 














1 
213 


















1 


Federal 




















213 
























Totals 


74,555 


5,656 


2,606 


1,335 


869 


351 


170 


71 


15 


8 


85,636 



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owned 
arv 31, 
alves in 
ves in si 
ffs in sa 

laid ar 
■ear 192 
lives in 
ves in si 
ffs in sa 
abanc 

1924-2! 
alves m 


= S I^-^bS 






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Janu 
ate VI 
ir val 
low-o 
ength 
ing y 
ate VI 
ir val 
low-o 
ength 
year 
ate Vi 


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188 



Public Works Department. 



189 



Table No. II. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System January 31, 1825. 





t 

^ 


a 

1 


a 

1 


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1 

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482 
4 

335 
2 
33 


40 

1 
163 


523 
9 

403 
3 

495 


291 

6 

448 

4 

894 

15 

501 

8 

1,163 

221 
15 

215 
9 
62 
37 

290 


125 










58 
39 
15 
10 
13 

1 
13 

2 
21 

4 
16 

6 

25 

2 

5 


1,519 


" (private) 










58 


186 










1,504 


(private) 










20 


185 

1 










1,783 












17 


Brighton (public) 


21 


50 


282 










947 










10 


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215 


147 

1 

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260 


124 
29 










2,370 








1 


15 


South Boston (public) 


„■ 

3 
32 

8 
86 
13 










659 










45 




15 

1 
38 

1 


217 
145 
26 


36 










521 


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43 


15 










348 












56 


Hyde Park (public) 


42 


7 
13 


127 
55 


1 




493 








4 




72 


Deer Island (private) 






1 


19 
6 

3 
3 
9 




20 




















6 






















2 




















1 


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3 


i 




















9 
























Total number (public) 


.'1,315 


532 
4 


3,111 


4,085 
136 


822 
3 


7 
13 


127 
55 


1 


' 


144 
114 


10,144 


Total number (private and 
suburban) 


30 


380 



190 



CiYY Document No. 23. 



Table No. III. 

Service Pipes of Various Sizes Connected With the Syste 



I, January 31, 1925. 



Size. 


Total Number. 


Aggregate Length 
in Linear Feet. 


j-ineh 


6,914 

87,103 

3,673 

5,622 

589 

1,695 

2,302 

12 

996 

2,972 

204 

62 

15 

18 


158 ''87 




2,420,216 
124.792 
200 813 


1-inch.... 


1-inch 




17,434 


l^-inch 


51 170 






2Hnch 


267 


3-inch 


28 307 


4-inch. 


81.866 
23 900 


6-inch. . . 


8-inch 


4.380 




1,771 


12-inch . . . 


3 896 


16-inch 


448 






Totals 


* 112,18'2 


3,1877790 







* The completion of the metering of all servicee to within 5 per cent of the total number 
of live service pipes discloses the fact that the total number of service pipes will not exceed 
90.000. The large discrepancy is found to be due to the fact that previous to 1880 no 



deductions were made for pipes abandoned, etc. 



Public Works Department. 



191 



Table No. IV. 

Hydrant Repairs. 



Cause of Repairs. 


Number 
of Jobs. 


Cost. 




421 
71o 
50 
9,655 
16 
38 
145 
138 

91,392 


$6,935 33 




5,637 99 


Prost . 


475 36 




3,490 45 


Contractors, corporations, other departments and divisions 

Street construction and repairs 


490 98 
1,316 20 


Repaying on account of repairs 

Traffic 


2,076 89 
2,160 36 


Hydrants inspected, oiled, cleaned, pumped, wasted and cleared 


22,647 93 


Salt delivered to Fire Department bags — 3 243 


3,710 75 




42 2 


355 87 






Totals 


102.992 


$49,298 11 







192 



City Document No. 23. 



Table No. V. 

Maintenance of Main Pipe for Fiscal Year. — Emting Januari/ 31, 1925. 



Nature op Work. 


Number 
of Jobs. 


Total Cost. 




40 

33 

4t 

92 

. 5,996 

7,892 

91 

57 

106 

333 

219 

123 

40 

41 

246 

38 


$476 86 


Cleaning main pipes (bv contractors) . 


21,849 20 




147 41 




1 039 52 


Gates examined, salted, inspected, etc 


3,476 47 




2,488 96 




2,432 85 




1,033 97 




1,436 09 




14,480 10 




5,038 83 




3,564 93 




4,266 72 




3,419 81 


Repaying (including contractor's miscellaneous jobs) 

Miscellaneous jobs ... . 


7,656 60 
2,264 67 






Totals. . . 


15,391' 


$75,072 99 









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204 



Public Works Department. 



205 



WATERWORKS STATISTICS — CITY OF BOSTON. 
For the Fiscal Year Ending January 31. 1925. 

Distribution. 

Mains. 

Ivind of pipe: Cast iron, wrought iron. 

Sizes: 2-inch to 48-inch. 

Extended, miles, 7.27. 

Sizes, enlarged, miles, 2.11. 

Total miles now in use, 901.01. 

Public hydrants added, 116. 

Public hydrants now in use, 10,144. 

Stop gates added, 163. 

Stop gates now in use, 13,656. 

Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 31. 

Number of blow-offs, 695. 

Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services. 

Kind of pipe and size, lead and lead lined: |-inch to 2-inch, cast iron. 

2|-inch to 12-inch, wrought iron and cement lined: f-inch to 2-inch. 

Extended, feet, 29,759. 

Total miles now in use, 603.74. 

Service taps added, 1,284. 

Total service taps now in use, 112,182. 



High Pressure Fire System Extension. 



Appropriations to January 31, 1925. . 

Expenditures to January 31, 1924 

Expenditures during the year 1924-2.") 
Extension: 

Engineering 

Automobiles 

Yard 

Inspection of pipe laying 

Inspection of castings 

Tools and repairs 

Vacations 

Atlantic avenue 

Berkeley street 

Bowker street 

Broad street 

Canal street 

Chardon street 



Carried forwar'l . 



s»,usu 


yi 


452 


88 


1,499 


90 


2,638 


12 


898 


44 


eoo9 


30.5 


73 


17,754 


67 


30 


95 


6,296 


18 


2,157 


95 


13,254 


71 


9,003 62 



$1,764,293 32 



81,764,293 32 



$2,128,000 00 



$2,128,000 00 



206 



City Document No. 25. 



High Pressure Fire System Extension. — Concluded. 



Brouylit forward 

Chatham street 

Commerce street 

Commercial street 

Custom House street 

Doane street 

Fleet street 

Hanover street 

Hawkins street 

India street 

Kilby street 

Kingston street 

Kneeland street 

^Market street 

Milk street 

North street 

Portland street 

South street 

State street 

Sudbury street 

Union street 

Washington street 

Total extension 1924-25 

Maintenance: 

Main pipe repairs 

Hydrant repairs 

Sewer service 

Total maintenance 

Stock purchased 

Total expenditures, 1924-25 

Total expenditures to January 31, 1925. 
Unexpended balance January 31, 1925. . 



$62,434 15 


7,899 58 


8,917 80 


515 32 


2,504 86 


4,479 58 


9,050 68 


12,068 42 


6,411 79 


5,698 85 


6,964 94 


4,056 18 


17.529 39 


1,979 72 


5,681 03 


4,147 21 


271 20 


5,094 21 


4,069 66 


2,714 11 


14,506 95 


5,093 25 



$167 IS 

2,078 72 

109 32 



$192,088 88 



2,355 22 
127,881 38 



$1,764,293 32 



322,325 48 



.?2, 128,000 00 



Public Works Department. 207 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGE COMMISSION. 



Boston, February 1, 1925. 

To the Honorable the Mayor: 

SiRj — As commissioner for the City of Boston, I 
respectfully submit herewith the annual report of the 
Boston and Cambridge Bridge Commission for the year 
ending January 31, 1925. 

This commission is composed of two members, one 
appointed by the Mayor of the City of Boston and the 
other by the Mayor of the City of Cambridge, under 
provisions of chapter 467, Acts of 1898. 

The commission has charge of the maintenance of 
the following-named bridges between Boston and Cam- 
bridge: Anderson, Cambridge Street, River Street, 
Cambridge and Prison Point. 

As there is no separate appropriation made for the 
City of Boston's portion of the expenses of this com- 
mission, the same is taken from the appropriation for 
the Bridge and Ferry Division, Bridge Service. The 
amount expended during the fiscal year ending January 
31, 1925, was $31,740.49. 

Brookline Street Bridge (over Charles River 
AT Cottage Farm). 

This bridge has been taken over by the Metropohtan 
District Commission for the purpose of making repairs, 
until such time as a new bridge is built at this location. 
Conferences have been held in regard to the new struc- 
ture, since the plans must be approved by the mayors of 
Boston and Cambridge. It is hoped that the work of 
constructing the new bridge will be started during the 
coming year. 

Harvard Bridge. 

The Metropolitan District Commission took over 
Harvard Bridge during the past year for the purpose ot 
maintaining it and making it safe for the next ten or 



208 City Document No. 23. 

fifteen years. The draw span was eliminated and 
the bridge at this point reconstructed to make it as 
wide as the rest of the structure. 

The commission went to considerable expense in 
keeping this bridge open to travel both before and during 
the period of reconstruction. In the rebuilding of the 
bridge by the Metropolitan District Commission, under 
chapter 442, Acts of 1924, steel stringers were placed 
instead of the wooden stringers, 6-inch yellow pine 
plank floor laid on top of these stringers, and a granite 
block paving placed on the plank for a wearing surface. 
A new high concrete curb was placed on either side and 
granolithic sidewalks were built. 

Prison Point Bridge. 

This bridge was entirely resheathed and considerable 
patching and repairs were made to the pier. 

River Street Bridge. 

Two steel header beams, broken under the traffic, 
were replaced and some of the other steel work, which 
was in bad condition, was repaired. The bridge was 
sheathed once and a very large amount of under plank 
replaced. 

It is expected that some time during 1925 this bridge 
will be rebuilt by the Metropolitan District Commission, 
as the plans for rebuilding have been approved by the 
mayors of Boston and Cambridge. 

Western Avenue Bridge to Cambridge. 

This bridge has been rebuilt by the Metropohtan 
District Commission and will be turned back to this 
commission for the purpose of maintenance some time 
during the coming year. 

The bridge now is a three-arched reinforced concrete 
structure, 60 feet wide, and traffic between Boston 
and Cambridge has been greatly improved by the addi- 
tion of this structure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph A. Rourke, 

Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



Public Woeks Department. 



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