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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

[Document 24—1939.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1938. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

Hon. Maurice J. Tobin, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — In compliance with the provi- 
sions of section 24 of chapter 4 of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1925, I respectfully submit a report of the acts and 
doings, receipts and expenditures of the Public Works 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1938. 

Organization. 

The Public Works Department was created under 
the provisions of chapter 9 of the Ordinances of 1910, 
by consolidating the Engineering, Water and Street 
Departments. The ordinance became effective on 
February 1, 1911. The department is comprised of 
five divisions, namely, Bridge and Ferry, Highway, 
Sanitary, Sewer, and Water, each under the direct 
supervision of a division engineer. 

Receipts and Expenditures. 
The receipts for the year from various sources were 
S136,407.95, which was exclusive of the Sumner Tunnel 
tolls and the receipts of the Water Division derived 
from the sale of water, the installation of domestic and 
fire pipes, changes in hydrants, etc. 



2 City Document No. 24. 

The amount received from the operation of the 
Sumner Tunnel was $836,379.57, which was $27,427.76 
in excess of the revenue derived in 1937. 

The total collections in the Water Division amounted 
to $5,155,051.39, which was $479,100.26 in excess of the 
receipts of 1937. 

The total budgetary expenditures for the year were 
$7,050,956.56, leaving an unexpended balance of 
$279,187.67. The total amount of $7,050,956.56, with 
the exception of 1934, when the total expenditures were 
$6,845,672.16,' represents the lowest expenditure in the 
Public Works Department since the year 1919; this, 
despite the fact that no vital or necessary services were 
curtailed or eliminated injudiciously, and the construc- 
tion and maintenance operations for 1938 compare 
favorably with those of any year since the organization 
of the department. The reason for the lower budgetary 
expenditure in 1934 can be attributed wholly to the pay 
reductions that were in effect that year. 

Personnel. 

As of December 31, 1938, there were 2,412 employees 
in the department. This is the smallest number of 
employees that has been in the department since its 
organization, February 1, 1911. The present personnel 
has been augmented by the addition of approximately 
800 welfare workers, who assist in the maintenance 
operations. 

Commissioner's Office. 

This is the Central Office of the department, where 
work of an executive nature pertinent to the duties of 
the commissioner is carried on; also, the advertising for 
and receiving of bids for contract work; the negoti- 
ating with the Civil Service Commission in matters 
affecting the personnel of the department; and the 
investigation of accidents to workmen, laborers and 
mechanics employed in the city service who come under 
the provisions of the Workmen's Compensation Act. 

There is a hbrary connected with this office, contain- 
ing an invaluable collection of reports and documents 
covering every phase of the development of the public 
works program of the City of Boston for the past half 
century. There are books on practically every subject 
pertinent to public works, besides reports from all over 
the world on pubHc works matters. Many of the 



Public Works Department. 3 

books are irreplaceable, and a record is kept at all 
times of all books lent, in order to prevent any loss. 

Former Commissioner of Public Works Edward M. 
Richardson resigned on June 20, and the present Com- 
missioner of Public Works was appointed on June 21. 

As of December 31, twelve employees were on the 
pay roll of the Central Office. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. 

Bridge Service. 

This division has charge and care of all bridges used 
as highways, w^hich are in whole or in part under the 
control of the city, the care and management of the 
ferries owned by the city, including boats, slips, drops 
and buildings, and the maintenance and operation of 
the Sumner Tunnel. 

Most of the construction and major repair work of 
this division was done under contract. Due to the 
nature of the work, it is not practical to have it done 
wdth the aid of W. P. A. grants. 

There are approximately 150 bridges w^hich are in 
whole or in part under the control of this division. 
Much of the repair work had been so neglected over a 
period of years that it became mandatory, in order to 
prevent a catastrophe, to institute a comprehensive 
program for the repair of certain bridges, and, in some 
cases, to rebuild structures that were in a particularly 
dangerous condition. 

The most important work completed by the Bridge 
Division this year included the repairs to the Beacon 
Street Bridge, the Warren Bridge, and the reconstruc- 
tion of a new footbridge at Irvington Street. 

The Warren Bridge w^as closed to traffic on January 8, 
1938, in the interests of safety, due to the necessity of 
making general repairs. A contract was awarded to 
A. Orlando, Inc., on June 20, 1938, and completed on 
December 15, at a cost of $35,537.22. The easterly 
draw was opened to vehicular traffic on November 19 
and the westerly draw on December 9. The bridge 
is now in such a condition that it should be unnecessary 
to make any major repairs for a period of ten years. 

A Federal grant was accepted in November, under the 
provisions of the PubHc Works Administration Act, in 
the amount of $119,250, for the altering and strengthen- 
ing of the Boylston Street Bridge, and the rebuilding of 



4 City Document No. 24. 

the Berkeley Street and Albany Street Bridges, all over 
the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad. The esti- 
mated total cost of these projects is $265,000, the 
Federal grant allotted on the basis of 45 per cent of the 
cost, but not to exceed the $119,250. 

A contract was awarded on December 20 to the 
Interstate Construction Company, Inc., for the neces- 
sary repairs and strengthening of the Boylston Street 
Bridge, at their bid price of $46,663. 

The agreement between the City of Boston and the 
Federal Government specified that construction on all 
three bridges should start by December 31. It was 
impossible to prepare the necessary plans and specifica- 
tions in time to allow the general construction of new 
bridges at Albany Street and Berkeley Street to start 
before that time. In view of this, and so as to preclude 
the possibility of having the Federal grants for the 
construction of these two bridges withdrawn, invitation 
bids were requested for removing the deck from the 
Berkeley Street Bridge and for grouting a wall at the 
Albany Street Bridge. On December 29 these con- 
tracts were signed, so that the work could be started 
within the specified period. The contract for grouting 
the wall at the Albany Street Bridge was awarded to the 
low bidder, Maurice M. Devine, Inc., at a bid price of 
$800. The contract for removing the deck from the 
Berkeley Street Bridge was awarded to J. J. Callahan, 
at a bid price of $400. 

Due to the number of fatal accidents that have 
occurred in the last few years, caused by cars skidding 
on the roadway surfaces of the bridges and plunging 
into the tidewaters over which the bridges span, a 
committee consisting of Thomas H. Sexton, Division 
Engineer of the Bridge Service, William T. Morrissey, 
Division Engineer of the Highway Division, and the 
present Commissioner of Public Works, was appointed 
by your Honor to recommend ways and means of 
preventing further accidents. 

This committee recommended that the heights of the 
existing curbs be increased to a minimum of 18 inches 
and that the surface car rails be removed, where pos- 
sible. A project was drawn up and approved by the 
W. P. A. authorities, for the necessary construction 
work involved on the Dover Street and Dorchester 
Avenue Bridges, and the viaduct connecting the Chelsea 



Public Works Department. 5 

North and Chelsea South Bridges in Charlestown. 
The work was completed on the Dover Street Bridge, 
and the work on both the Dorchester Avenue Bridge 
and the viaduct is in progress. The ordinary procedure 
is to place a 12-inch by 12-inch timber, securely bolted 
by angle irons to the pavement, on top of the existing 
6-inch curbs. This has already proved effective at the 
Dover Street Bridge in preventing a truck from going 
into the channel, and we propose protecting all such 
bridges in the City of Boston by this method within the 
next few years. 

Ferry Service. 

Operation of the South Ferry was curtailed on April 29. 
The present schedule calls for a thirty-minute opera- 
tion from 6 a. m. until 10 p. m., although between the 
hours of 7.15 a. m. and 11a. m., and from 2 p. m. until 
6.15 p. m., a fifteen-minute schedule is in operation. 
This is to take care of the traffic during the busiest 
hours of the day. 

With the curtailment of the service it was found 
necessary to operate only three boats, the ''Charles C. 
Donoghue," the ''Daniel A. MacCormack" and the 
"Ralph J. Palumbo." The ferryboat "Lieutenant 
Flaherty" was sold at public auction on April 27, for 
$41,600. This boat was put in operation in 1921 and 
the original cost to the city was $379,950. 

The present schedule has proved satisfactory and is 
adequate to care for the amount of pedestrian and 
vehicular traffic that uses this service. 

In September a contract was awarded to the Boston 
Dry Dock Company for making general repairs and 
cleaning and painting the ferryboat "Daniel A. Mac- 
Cormack." The work was completed on November 16, 
at a total cost of $5,714.20. 

Sumner Tunnel. 

The deficit incurred from the operation of the Sumner 
Tunnel was $437,868.91, which was $15,610.47 less than 
the deficit in 1937. 5,543,302 vehicles passed through 
the Sumner Tunnel during the year. 

The cost of maintenance and operation, $219,000, is 
lower than similar costs in any vehicular tunnel in the 
country, so that it is impossible to lower the deficit in 
any way by curtaifing the budgetary expenditures. 



6 City Document No. 24. 

Every effort is being made to reduce the deficit, and the 
decrease in the deficit for 1938, as compared with that 
for 1937, is a small ray of hope. 

I recommend that a general manager be appointed, 
at $5,000 a year, to take entire charge of the mainte- 
nance and operation. I feel that the appointment of a 
manager, experienced in the operations of tunnels of 
this kind, would be very beneficial in finding ways and 
means to reduce the deficit. Proper advertising, studies 
of the present toll schedule, and the formulating of plans 
to pro\dde vehicles with better access and egress to and 
from the tunnel, would be some of the many duties 
that would be imposed on a general manager. The 
salary that would be paid to him would be justified in 
view of the anticipated results. 

In order to direct more vehicles to the tunnel, we 
have been working on a plan with the Traffic Commis- 
sion to place additional and new types of directional 
signs in strategic locations on Route C-1, which ex- 
tends from Felton street in Saugus to the junction of 
the Riverway and Brookline avenue in Boston. This 
route is the auxiliary city route for Route No. 1, which 
is one of the most hea\dly traveled highways in this 
section of the country. We also propose supplementing 
the directional signs with green directional arrows, which, 
we feel, will be distinctive and in time will become 
known as the official tunnel route markers. 

In addition to the directional signs and arrows, we 
also contemplate ha\ing erected in the spring of 1939 
two large directional and advertising billboards along- 
side the Newburyport Turnpike, in Saugus, and on 
Route 1, in Boston or Dedham, to emphasize the ad- 
vantages of using Route C-1 through the Sumner 
Tunnel in preference to Route 1. The proximity of 
the portal of the tunnel on the Boston side to many 
points of historical interest will be emphasized and 
should tend to attract out-of-state motorists to visit 
these locations. I feel that by properly advertising the 
tunnel and providing adequate street widenings, and 
possibly overhead highways on the Boston side of the 
tunnel, a marked increase in tunnel traffic will result. 

Another improvement of a minor nature that has a 
potential major value was the installation in the cashier's 
office at the Sumner Tunnel of steel bars outside the 
windows, and bullet-proof glass and steel-plate barriers 
in the cashier's cage, similar to those installed in modern 



Public Works Department. 7 

banking establishments, in order to protect not only the 
tunnel receipts, but also to prevent any fatality to an 
employee in the event of a holdup at this location. 
Heretofore, no means of protection had been afforded 
to the employees at all, despite the fact that at times 
we have in this office approximately $10,000, repre- 
senting the tunnel receipts over a week-end. The 
money was counted every morning in the cashier's 
office and the employees were in imminent danger of 
being held up. The amount of $1,268 for the necessary 
changes is well justified by the protection given to the 
employees and to the funds. 

The first fatality in the tunnel occurred on December 
1, when the driver of a car lost control and the car 
swerved across the roadway, striking the south wall 
of the tunnel and overturning. Up to that time approxi- 
mately 23,400,000 cars had passed through the tunnel. 

Highway Division. 

This division has charge of the construction, recon- 
struction and maintenance of roadways and sidewalks, 
and the care of lamps and lighting of streets, parks and 
alleys. 

Practically all of the construction work was done 
under W. P. A. grants. 38.44 miles of highways were 
constructed and reconstructed during the year. In 
this division we took the fullest advantage of W. P. A. 
grants, and the work done was of great benefit to the 
city. Much needed improvements were made on main 
highways at the following locations: Reconstruction 
of Blue Hill avenue, from Mattapan square to Babson 
street; reconstruction of Dorchester avenue, from Old 
Colony avenue to beyond First street; and work has 
started on the reconstruction of Atlantic avenue and 
Commercial street. The work on Atlantic avenue has 
progressed very rapidly and, upon its completion, 
should be a tangible asset to the district and greatly 
facilitate and expedite the flow of vehicular traffic. 

We contemplate in 1939 starting construction to 
modernize the various district yards of the Paving 
Service, by constructing fireproof office buildings and 
garages at these locations. All of the proposed work 
is to be done under W. P. A. grants. We also propose 
abandoning the Brighton paving yard, at Chestnut Hill 
avenue, and constructing a model district yard at the 



8 City Document No. 24. 

site of the present Water Division yard on Western 
avenue, to be used as a central yard by the Paving, 
Water and Sewer Divisions. The present site at Chest- 
nut Hill avenue contains thirteen acres of land, is in a 
high-class, residential community, and should be made 
available for sale, for the purpose of a housing develop- 
ment under private sponsorship. The revenue derived 
from the sale of this land should be sufficient to provide 
for the construction of new buildings in the yard on 
Western avenue, which is in a more appropriate location 
than the Chestnut Hill avenue site. 

Over a long period of years steps were taken, with 
no success, to prevent the use of Bunker Hill street, 
Charlestown, as a speedway by so-called "loopers." 
At three locations street car reservations were installed 
and the available roadway for vehicular traffic was 
reduced to 8.5 feet, thereby making it impossible to go 
through these "bottle-necks" at a speed greater than 
twenty miles per hour. The results have been very 
satisfactory and have justified the installation of these 
reservations, as the looping has been reduced from an 
average of twenty per month to three a month. 

The work of removing the debris and trees blown 
down by the hurricane of September 21 was done by 
employees of this division, in conjunction with W. P. A. 
employees. All of the streets in the city were open for 
traffic within three days after the hurricane, and the 
cost to the city for supplies and equipment was $23,500. 
Many of the roofs of the buildings in the various district 
yards had been damaged and a W. P. A. project was 
completed for the necessary repairs, at a cost to the 
city of approximately $4,000, as compared with a 
Federal contribution of $10,000. The repairs to the 
sidewalks and roadway surfaces are in progress, under a 
W. P. A. grant, and the city's contribution will be 
approximately $15,000, the Federal $85,000. All of 
the repair work was done under W. P. A. grants, with 
the exception of minor repairs of an emergency nature, 
amounting to $700, which were done by private contract. 

A saving of approximately $32,000 was made in the 
Lighting Service by the changing of the 1,500 candle- 
power lamps to 1,000 candle power. The lighting 
effect by this reduction in candle power was hardly 
noticeable, and caused no inconvenience to the public 
and the lower candle power has proved adequate for 
lighting facilities. 



Public Works Department. 9 

A committee consisting of City Auditor Charles J. 
Fox, Assistant City Clerk John B. Hynes, and Election 
Commissioner William A. Motley, appointed by your 
Honor to study the advisability of increasing the fees 
charged in the various departments, recommended a 
general increase in all fees for permits issued by the 
Public Works Department. The amount collected in 
1938 for permits issued by the Permit Office of this 
department was $9,449.28. With the new schedule of 
fees, effective January 3, 1939, it is anticipated that an 
increase in revenue of approximately $4,000 should 
result therefrom. 

Under the provisions of chapter 500 of the Acts of 
1938 the sum of $1,194,300 was allocated to the City of 
Boston from the Highway Fund for the purpose of 
carrying out local highway projects to alleviate existing 
conditions resulting from unemployment. We proposed 
using a part of this appropriation to pay for materials 
and equipment needed on all W. P. A. projects under 
construction in 1938, thereby reducing our budgetary 
expenditures. We were precluded from using this 
money in this way, however, due to an opinion from 
Attorney-General Dever to the effect that the money 
should be used to finance projects over and above those 
projects that were ordinarily undertaken by this depart- 
ment. In view of this opinion, a bill is to be introduced 
in the Legislature in 1939, authorizing the City of 
Boston, and all other cities that received such appro- 
priations in 1938, to use this money at the city's dis- 
cretion to reduce the cost of maintenance and operations 
on all work pertinent to the construction and recon- 
struction of highways, surface drainage and bridges. 
It is anticipated that this bill will be acted upon favor- 
ably, thereby allowing the entire amount of $1,194,300 
to be used in 1939 in the budgetary requirements of the 
Highway Division. This will produce an immediate 
and tangible reduction in the budgetary requirements 
of the department for 1939. 

Sanitary Division. 

This division has charge of the collection and removal 
of ashes, garbage and refuse, street cleaning, and the 
oihng and flushing of streets. 

The collection work in Charlestown in 1938 and in 
prior years was done by city forces. A contract was 



10 City Document No. 24. 

advertised in November for the collection in 1939, to be 
done under contract. The bid price received for the 
year was $16,800, whereas, the cost to the city for this 
work was approximately $40,000, showing a substantial 
saving and proving conclusively that it would be 
economically beneficial to have all the collection work 
in the city done under contract. 

The collection of garbage and ashes in districts 
where the work is being done by city forces has not 
been entirely satisfactory, due to the daily fluctuations 
in the number of welfare workers who assist in this 
work. As is the case practically every year, we have 
to hire contractors at various times to assist in this 
work, in order to insure weekly collections. During 
the latter part of December, however, due to the trans- 
ferring of practically all welfare workers from other 
divisions of this department to the Sanitary Service, we 
were able to maintain weekly collections, and antici- 
pate that we shall be able to continue the schedule 
in 1939, unless conditions prevail, such as snowstorms, 
over which we have no control. 

The regularity of collection service in general, how- 
ever, is maintained better by contract forces, and I 
recommend that a change to contract collection be 
made systematically every year, so that in time the 
entire collection work will be done under contract. 
This transition, however, will have to be made slowly 
in order to make it unnecessary to discharge employees 
and in order to be assured of the economical soundness 
of such a program. 

Much of the criticism to which the department is 
subjected has been caused, to a great extent, by the 
unsanitary and dirty conditions of the alleys of the 
South End. We make every effort to keep these alleys 
in a clean condition, and if it were not for the work 
done by city forces the conditions existing in that 
section would be intolerable. Most of these alleys 
are private and it is the responsibility of the abutters 
to keep them clean. The Public Works Department 
should not be expected to remove litter from private 
property. The Health and Police Departments have 
sufficient powers, both by city ordinances and statute 
law, to prevent the littering of the alleys, and no marked 
improvement will be made until a concerted campaign 
is made by these departments to remedy existing con- 
ditions. The conditions are caused by a minority 



Public Works Department. . 11 

of the residents, who not only lack civic pride, but 
have no conception of the ordinary laws of sanitation 
nor of the inherent rights of their neighbors to live in 
a clean and respectable community. 

Incineration. 

The present ten-year contract for the disposal of 
garbage and refuse expires on July 1, 1942. This con- 
tract was originally awarded to the Brooklyn Ash 
Removal Company of Massachusetts, at their bid price 
of $3,780,000. Subsequent to the awarding, however, 
the contract was assigned to the Coleman Disposal 
Company. 

In 1908 and 1910 former Mayor George A. Hibbard 
appointed special commissions to investigate the prac- 
ticability of incinerating garbage and refuse. Both 
commissions reported that incineration was the most 
sanitary method and would be more economical to the 
city. In 1922 George A. Johnson Company, Inc., of 
150 Nassau street, New York, was appointed, at a cost 
of $3,700, to make a further study of this problem. 
This company also recommended that all garbage, 
refuse and combustible materials be incinerated. They 
proposed having eight incinerators constructed at various 
locations throughout the city. They reported that 
the city would save approximately $550,000 annually 
by instituting a method of incineration and having all 
collection done under contract. They stated that a 
revenue of $530,000 would be derived from the sale 
of electric power and from the residue of the incinera- 
tion. They proposed erecting power stations, in con- 
junction with the incinerators, in order to utilize the 
exhaust gases for the operation of electric generators. 
This, however, in my opinion, is impractical, as I do 
not feel that any revenue could be derived by the sale 
of electric power. 

It is my unqualified opinion, however, that the 
city will have to come to incineration sometime in the 
future. The inland dumps are becoming filled and 
some of the refuse from the City of Boston is being 
dumped in Revere and Dedham. It is logical to 
assume that in these towns an ordinance will be passed 
at some future date preventing the dumping of the 
waste material of Boston, and at that time the city 
will be faced with the problem of the disposing of this 



12 City Document No. 24. 

waste material within the city limits. The logical 
conclusion would be incineration, but a thorough study 
of it should be made, in order to eliminate any agitation 
against such incinerators by the residents of the areas 
in which it is proposed to erect them. Many complaints 
are received from the residents in sections where dumps 
are now being used. Just as much objection would 
probably come if it were proposed to construct in- 
cinerators in these locations. In view of this, I would 
not recommend, at this time, that any incinerators be 
constructed at any locations other than those locations 
now being used by the Coleman Disposal Company, 
under their ten-year contract for the receiving and 
disposing of the garbage and refuse. 

The three receiving stations, located on wharves at 
Atlantic avenue near Northern avenue, Albany street 
near East Canton street. Victory road, Neponset, and 
the inland dump at Mt. Vernon street (Calf Pasture), 
in Dorchester, are in out-of-the-way locations, and even 
under the present conditions are not the cause of many 
complaints from residents or businessmen in these 
localities. It is safe to assume that if incinerators 
were constructed at or near the four locations mentioned 
above, that the conditions would be improved, as 
modern incineration is odorless and smokeless, and, 
therefore, incinerators should not be so much of a 
nuisance as the present receiving stations at the wharves 
and the inland dump on Mt. Vernon street. From an 
architectural standpoint, incinerators could be so con- 
structed that the buildings would fit in with the character 
of the neighborhood and would be pleasing to the eye. 
The trucks going to and from the incinerators might 
be a cause for complaint, although the same condition 
regarding trucks exists at every dump. 

The most important question to be determined in 
discussing the advisability of changing to incineration 
is the cost of such a method. It has been claimed 
that incineration would be more economical than our 
present method of disposal. I am of the opinion, 
however, that the present method is probably more 
economical, but also more unsanitary, less satisfactory, 
and the cause of many complaints from the residents 
and business people. I would recommend that a 
study be made by competent consulting engineers as 
to the advisability of incinerating all the garbage 
and combustible material that are delivered to the 



Public Works Department. 13 

Coleman Disposal Company under the provisions of 
their ten-year contract. My purpose in having such 
a study made would be, first, to determine what the 
yearly cost of incineration over a ten or a twenty year 
period would be to the city, so that a comparison 
could be made with the average yearly cost of $378,000 
now paid to the Coleman Disposal Company. We 
would then have something tangible upon which to 
base our recommendations that incineration be adopted 
or that the present method of disposal be continued. 
My second purpose in considering incineration only 
at the four locations noted above, would be in order to 
have an opportunity to observe incineration and de- 
termine whether it would be more sanitary and practical 
to construct incinerators in the outlying residential 
sections rather than to dump the rubbish in dumps, as 
is now the procedure. 

The time to discuss incineration is now, and not six 
months before the expiration of the present contract. 
In the event that it is decided to change to incineration, 
there will be sufficient time before the expiration of 
the present contract for the construction of these 
incinerators and for the preparing of methods of pro- 
cedure to be followed. 

Sewer Division. 

This division has charge of the construction and 
maintenance of sewers, catch-basins and waterways. 

The W. P. A. was utilized to the fullest extent in this 
department, so that practically all of the construction 
work in 1938 was done under W. P. A. grants. 14,000 
feet of sanitary sewers and 28,000 feet of surface drains 
were constructed this year. Several brook courses 
were covered over and the work done with the aid of the 
W. P. A. was a distinct advantage to the city and a 
considerable saving resulted. 

Some of the more important work included the con- 
struction of the 1,115 feet of 4-foot 9-inch concrete 
conduit in Bussey brook. West Roxbury, the starting 
of a project to cover Stony brook in West Roxbury, 
the construction of 600 feet of a circular concrete con- 
duit in Oakland brook, Plyde Park, and the addition of 
conduits to Mariposa brook in Hyde Park. 

A contract was awarded to N. Cibotti, on November 
30, for the construction of a 6-foot concrete overflow 



14 City Document No. 24. 

conduit in Central Wharf, to replace a wooden conduit 
that was constructed in 1869. The wooden overflow 
had been out of operation since November, 1937, due 
to a general structural failure of this conduit at several 
locations. This is a P. W. A. project, and $32,676 was 
allotted to the city by the Federal Government as a 
grant for this work. The total cost of the project is 
estimated at $70,000. 

At the Calf Pasture pumping station there are in 
operation six electric pumps and one steam pump, to 
pump sewage to the outfall conduits and thence by 
gravity under Dorchester bay to the Moon Island 
reservoirs. There are approximately 80,000,000 gallons 
of sewage per day pumped at this station, and it is 
necessary to lift this sewage approximately 35 feet to 
the outfall sewers. To operate the single steam pump 
we have to maintain a crew of eight firemen, which, 
with the cost of fuel, results in a large expenditure to 
operate a single pump. 

In view of this, a study is in progress to determine 
the practicability of abandoning the present steam 
pump and substituting an additional electric or a Diesel 
pump. It is anticipated that a substantial saving will 
be made, although it is possible that the saving will be 
shown only by the transferring of the firemen needed 
to operate the present steam pump. 

Division Engineer George W. Dakin was retired on 
July 31, and his death occurred on August 22. He had 
been in the employ of the city for forty years, during 
which time he gave devoted service and was recognized 
as an eminent authority on the sewerage system of the 
City of Boston. 

On August 10 Robert P. Shea was appointed as 
Division Engineer. 

Water Division. 

The Water Division has the care of w^ater pipes, 
installation of meters, water service, laying and relay- 
ing of water mains and high pressure fire service, and 
the billing of all accounts for water consumption. 

Practically all of the construction work in this divi- 
sion was done under W. P. A. grants, and most of the 
work involved the extension of new mains and the 
relaying of old mains that were inadequate to provide 
proper fire and domestic service to the various com- 
munities. Most of the materials were supplied by the 



Public Works Department. 15 

W. P. A. A total of 43,444 feet of pipe was laid and 
relaid, in sizes from 8 inches to 42 inches. 

The most important project to be undertaken was the 
proposed relaying of the present 30-inch and 36-inch 
cast-iron water mains in Huntington avenue and 
Tremont street, from the Brookline line to Castle 
square, with 48-inch steel pipe. The cast-iron mains 
were laid in 1853, when the original distribution lines 
were installed to provide water from the Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir to the residents of Boston. The relaying of 
these mains had been contemplated for several years, 
but had been deferred, due to the financial condition of 
the city. The liberal W. P. A. appropriation for 
materials in 1938 presented an excellent opportunity 
to have the necessary work done, at a minimum cost to 
the city. This project was started in November and, 
at the present time, satisfactory progress has been 
made. Due to the heavily congested highways through 
which it will run and the character of the work to be 
done, it is by far the most difficult project that has been 
undertaken by this department since the inception of 
the W. P. A. It involves a total length of 15,000 feet, 
and all the pipe and sheeting, costing approximately 
$240,000, will be supplied by the Federal Government. 

Division Engineer James A. McMurry, of the Water 
Income Service, died on February 19, after a service of 
forty-two years in the employ of the city. 

On April 7 the Water Income Division was merged 
with the Water Engineers, both di\'isions thereafter 
operating under the direction of Division Engineer 
Daniel M. Sullivan. 

A major improvement in the method of billing was 
instituted, and this, in conjunction with a concerted 
drive to collect the outstanding water bills of previous 
years, was so successful that this year the Water De- 
partment has a surplus of $654,998.45, whereas for 
eight previous years a deficit had occurred. 

Boston and Cambridge Bridge Commission. 

This division is not, strictly speaking, a division of 
the PubUc Works Department, as the work is in charge 
of a commission of two, one member appointed by the 
Mayor of Cambridge and the other member, the present 
Commissioner of Public Works of Boston, acting as 
the Boston representative, under the pro\dsions of 
section 4 of chapter 27 of the Revised Ordinances of 



16 City Document No. 24. 

1925. One half of the expense of the commission is 
defrayed by the Bridge Service and because of this 
it is incUided in the report of the PubUc Works 
Department. 

The commission has charge and maintenance of the 
Longfellow, Prison Point and Cottage Farm Bridges. 
The expenditures paid by the City of Boston in 1938 
were $4,975.54, which include the cost of salaries, in- 
spection, light, repairs, etc. 

W. P. A. Program. 

Most of the construction work in 1938 was done 
in conjunction with the Federal Government, through 
the agency known as the Works Progress Administra- 
tion. Under this program the Federal Government 
pays for all the labor, except inspection, and part of 
the cost of the materials used on the various projects. 

The W. P. A. program in the Public Works Depart- 
ment for 1938 was the most extensive since its inception 
in November, 1935. Approximately 10,000 W. P. A. 
employees, representing about 40 per cent of the total 
quota in the City of Boston, have been engaged on 
projects sponsored by this department. The facilities 
of the W. P. A. were utilized to the utmost, primarily 
to provide work for those persons certified for W. P. A. 
employment, thereby lowering the number of welfare 
recipients who w^ould otherwise be on the direct relief 
rolls of the city, but also to secure street improvements 
and improvements in the sewerage and water systems 
which would have been impossible to effect without 
the aid of W. P. A. grants, due to the financial condition 
of the city. 

The various W. P. A. projects involving the High- 
way, Sewer and Water Divisions were operated as 
sub-divisions of city- wide blanket projects that were 
approved by the W. P. A. authorities at the start of 
the program in November, 1935. Although the projects 
were originally approved on the basis of a Federal 
contribution for materials of approximately $12 per 
man-month of labor, upon your Honor's assuming office 
as the Chief Executive of the City, the Federal con- 
tribution for materials was allotted on the basis of 
only $5 per man-month of labor. Through your in- 
dividual efforts, after negotiating with Federal au- 
thorities, it was agreed that a Federal contribution for 



Public Works Department. 17 

materials based on $12 per man-month of labor would 
be allowed on all subsequent projects of the Highway, 
Sewer and Water Divisions that were included in the 
original blanket project of November, 1935. This 
increased Federal contribution for materials has pro- 
duced a saving to this department, conservatively 
estimated at $500,000. 

In many cases the Federal Government has con- 
tributed an amount for materials far in excess of the 
agreed $12 per man-month. The Federal contribution 
for materials required in the resurfacing of Atlantic 
avenue. Commercial street and Causeway street 
amounts to $146,000, or $17 per man-month. This 
project was submitted to the W. P. A. authorities for 
their approval in September. 

The project for relaying the existing 30-inch and 
36-inch water mains in Huntington avenue and Tremont 
street, from the Brookline line to Castle square, with 
15,000 feet of 48-inch steel pipe was submitted to the 
W. P. A. authorities in September for their approval. 
This project will be operated in two sections. The first 
section of 7,600 feet has already been approved by the 
W. P. A. and the Federal contribution for materials is 
$126,505, whereas the city's contribution for materials 
is only $20,233. 

I am calling your Honor's attention to these two 
projects only to show the substantial benefits that have 
accrued to the City of Boston, due to the increased 
appropriations that the Federal Government has granted 
to this department for materials. 

The W. P. A. program carried on by the Public 
Works Department in 1938 was particularly beneficial 
to the city, not only from the standpoint of the liberal 
Federal contributions for materials, but also because of 
the improvements in the conditions of the highways 
and the sewerage and water systems. A continuation 
of the present program is anticipated for 1939. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Appropriations. 
The following table shows the total appropriations 
for current expenses allowed for the various divisions. 



18 



City Document No. 24. 



These figures include the amounts made available by 
vote of the City Council with the approval of the 
Mayor, together with subsequent transfers to or from 
the appropriations during the year: 



Central Office 
Bridge Service 
Ferry Service . 
Tunnel Service 
Paving Service 
Lighting Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division 
Water Division 
Water Income Division 

Total 



$34,347 57 
435,881 67 
262,904 38 
222,257 16 

1,559,089 41 
955,757 00 

2,131,164 59 
513,123 00 
964,153 55 
251,465 90 

^7,330,144 23 



Expenditures. 
The expenditures for the year were as follows: 



Current Expenses. 



Divisions and Services 
Central Office 
Bridg;e Service 
Ferry Service 
Tunnel Service 
Paving Service 
Lighting; Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division 
Water Division 
Water Income Division 



$33,031 32 
430,068 21 
245,134 46 
218,527 98 

1,513,164 83 
949,517 94 

2,114,116 81 
502,302 99 
804,170 47 
240,921 55 



Total $7,050,956 56 

Special Appropriations, Etc. 
Water Division: 

Metropolitan Assessment, interest, on 

serial loans. Collecting Department 

expense, etc $3,454,960 92 

Hurricane expense 23,315 88 

Bridges, repairs, etc. .... 44,506 64 

Sewerage works, revenue . . . 180,772 88 

Snow removal 279,001 22 

Public Works Program, chapter 464, 

Acts of 1935 57 51 

Bridges, reconstruction and repair of 

(P. W. A.) 162 15 

Chelsea North Bridge, repair and 

strengthening 588 96 

Chelsea North Bridge, water pipe 

trestle, reconstruction of (P. W. A.), 2,000 00 

Carried forward $3,985,366 16 $7,050,956 56 



Public Works Department. 



19 



Brought forward .... 

Chelsea Street and Eastern Avenue 
Bridge (W. P. A.) . 

Construction, reconstruction and 
replacement of sewers and cover- 
ing of open water courses (P. W. A.), 

East Boston Ferry, two additional 
boats and other permanent 
improvements 

Northern Avenue Bridge, reconstruction 
and repair (P. W. A.) 

Reconstruction of streets, revenue . 

Reconstruction of streets, non-revenue . 

Replacement of the Brookline avenue 
water main from Brookline line to 
Beacon street (P. W. A.) 

Sewerage works, non-revenue 

Sewerage works (W. P. A.) 

Water main construction (P. W. A.) 

Oakland and Ashland streets improve- 
ment 

Highways, making of ... . 



,985,366 16 S?, 050, 956 56 
23,000 00 

16,750 00 



19,064 81 

14,000 00 

53 85 

4,914 37 



13,000 00 

294,855 16 

5,896 98 

26,000 00 

888 39 
15,298 04 



Total 4,419,087 76 



Grand total 



$11,470,044 32 



Revenue. 

On Account of the Public Works Department , as Per 
Auditor's Statement. 

Central Office: 

Sale of plans, etc 



Bridge Service: 



$547 00 



Chelsea North Bridge . 








$8,652 00 




Chelsea South Bridge . 








157 00 




Northern Avenue Bridge 








17 00 




Clerical services . 








250 00 




Albany Street Bridge . 








334 25 




Broadway Bridge . 








117 95 




Maiden Bridge 








119 62 




Mystic Avenue Bridge 








85 06 




Junk .... 








44 25 




Damage to property 








199 62 




Charlestown Bridge: 




Rents 1,500 00 






11,476 75 


erry Service: 




Tolls $25,639 39 




Rent .... 








244 50 




Commission on telephones 








38 81 




Cleaning telephone booths 








48 00 




Junk .... 








1 00 




Concession 








10 00 








25,981 70 




ighting Service: 




Damage to posts 


295 66 


Carried forward 


$38,301 11 



20 



City Document No. 24. 



Brought forward 

Paving Service: 

From assessments on abutters for cost of 
laying sidewalks in front of their prem- 
ises, including material for the same. 

Assessments added to taxes . . . $15,061 46 

Assessments paid in advance . . . 1,072 00 

Permits 10,159 79 

Sale of material, etc 343 96 

Repairing signs, etc 74 31 

Labor and materials furnished, etc. . . 296 53 

Rent of signs 105 00 

Damage to truck 252 32 

Sanitary Service: 

Collection of commercial waste . . . $18,496 87 

Sale of manui-e 1,825 40 

Sale of garbage, etc 746 65 

Sale of junk, etc 200 00 

Sewer Service: 

Entrance fees . . . $808 36 
Labor and materials fur- 
nished 470 11 

Licenses 2 00 

Junk 232 20 



J,301 11 



Sewerage Works: 










Assessment, under chapter 








450, Acts of 1899 


$41,976 95 


Added to taxes: 








Paid in advance 


2,083 


56 


Unapportioned . 


3,567 


03 


Rent 


260 


00 


Services of inspector 


72 


34 








47 Q^iQ SR 










Water Service: 




Water rates due: 








For the year 1938 and prior 






$4,703,194 38 


Water added to taxes . 






348,033 35 


Service pipes for new water 


takers, 


ex 


- 


tending, repairing, etc. 






52,618 62 


Elevator and fire pipe connections 




12,224 99 


Fees on overdue rates . 






29,421 80 


Relocating hydrants 








851 90 


Sale of junk, etc. . 








6,143 99 


Labor and materials 








603 83 


Board of horse 








10 00 


Damage to property 








154 26 


Testing meters 








471 75 


Weighing fees, etc. 








362 39 


Miscellaneous income 








960 13 



27,365 37 



21,268 92 



49,472 55 



5,155,051 39 
$5,291,459 34 



Sumner Traffic Tunnel: 
Tolls, etc. 



,379 57 



Public Works Department. 



21 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,412 persons ehgible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 2,371 were upon the 
January, 1939, pay rolls. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services. 


Title. 


a o 

so 
o 


li 

C u 


(V 

■Ji 


"S. 




1 


"3 




u. O 




5 
o 




1 




















1 




1 
1 




1 








1 




1 


5 












1 




1 














1 
1 

1 

24 


1 
1 
21 
5 
1 
5 


2 




1 
1 

28 
14 

1 
11 

5 
34 

9 
12 

5 


9 
26 

7 
16 

7 
35 

5 












4 




2 
5 










1 

2 
12 

1 
2 
2 

1 
3 


7 


Clerks 


7 

1 


2 




4 


103 




58 












10 














34 














14 






43 
11 


27 
11 




2 

1 




13 
7 


157 






45 






15 






2 

5 

30 

3 


10 










2 


19 
















5 






78 
14 


87 
1 


70 




15 
1 


4 
12 




8 

5 


293 






3G 






1 






1 


1 
4 














2 


Cement testers and assistants, 


















4 




2 

1 
















2 








4 
2 


23 








9 
2 




38 






1 


2 


151 


7 










151 














8 
4 








8 






8 


5 
2 














17 










14 


1 






17 




















Carried forward 


9 


227 


161 


167 


133 


15 


39 


195 


40 


70 


1,056 



22 City Document No. 24. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


^ a* 

CO 
U 


1;! 
(2 


4) 


'c 


'c 




c 
c 

3 




E 

I- o 


01 

1 


o 


Brought forward 


9 


227 


161 


167 


133 


15 


39 


195 


40 


70 
38 


1,056 
38 






2 


8 
5 






11 
6 








21 


















11 


















1 


1 










1 












1 






5 




1 












6 








5 












5 












1 
4 
3 
6 
1 
5 










1 






















4 






















3 






200 
3 


74 
4 


250 

1 


155 


2 


6 


2 
2 

35 


85 

1 

12 

1 


780 






8 






2 




24 












35 








10 












12 


















1 








19 




4 
3 










23 




















3 






39 














1 
11 


40 




















11 






5 


1 


10 




3 
4 




2 




21 










4 






















4 


Repairers and auto mechanics, 




28 


3 


5 








19 


109 


165 








1 






















1 






















1 








26 
1 
2 












26 




1 

2 


2 
1 
7 
2 
















5 
















5 


















7 






















2 


























12 


521 


314 


441 


291 


72 


43 


204 


99 


329 


2,326 







Public Works Department. 23 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Services. 


Title. 


CO 
O 


0-, 


CO 


03 
■*^ 

'a 


c 
'c 

^ 03 


>> 


c 

3 




u. 
03 h5 


03 

is 


o 

H 




12 


521 


314 


441 

1 
9 


291 


72 


43 


204 


99 


329 


2,32ft 




1 






1 




4 












18 














1 


2 












6 


30 






42 












1 








1 










3 
6 
3 

463 












3 






















G 






5 
532 


2 
316 


1 
297 










2 


13 




12 


78 










Totals 


79 


204 


99 


332 


2,412 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1938, and 
January 1, 1939. 













OJ 








c.S 
















t: 








3 v 










SE 






o 


-0 ti 






03*^ 










O 






a 


i.B 


h 












c 
c 


2 


-a 


>. 

u 


1 


>2 


'S 




b. oj 


a! 
c3 


"3 




H 


o 


pq 


(i. 


^ 


fL, 


s 


s 


t» 


^ 


H 


January 1, 1938 


78 


11 


208 


104 


106 


552 


481 


321 


293 


349 


2,503 


January 1, 1939 


76 


12 


204 


77 


98 


521 


457 


309 


287 


330 


2,371 


Total Eligible Force. 


January 1, 1938 


78 


11 


209 


104 


107 


572 


488 


325 


297 


359 


2,550 


January 1, 1939 


79 


12 


204 


78 


99 


532 


463 


316 


297 


332 


2,412 



24 



City Document No. 24. 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, Etc., of Employees. 



^ 








00 










CO 


-0 « 


-c fe 


,^ 






£Q 


i^T. 


K 




^H 


4H 


£i 


c! 


c 

1 


b 


no H 


cSO 


Q 


3 
C 

03 

>-5 



Services 
1938-1939. 



CJ 


Bi 


C>0 




—1 


?!■» 


>> 


^ t. 






33 


m-C 






C 


go 


C3 

1-5 


H 



O t. 

■" ft 



m 



go a 



10 



11 
209 
104 
572 
488 
297 
325 
359 
107 

78 



Central Office 

Bridge 

Ferry 

Lighting and Paving 

Sanitary 

Street Cleaning .... 

Sewer 

Water 

Water Income 

Tunnel 

Totals 



12 
204 

78 
532 
463 
297 
316 
332 

99 

79 



35 



83 



60 



2,550 



',412 



60 



38 



PART II. 

APPENDICES 



(25) 



26 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE AND FERRY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir,— I respectfully submit the following report 
of the income, expenditures and operation of the Bridge 
and Ferry Division for the year ending December 31, 
1938. The appropriations and expenditures of the 
division were as follows : 

Bridge Service. 

Regular appropriation $428,259 67 

Transfers to 9,152 00 



Transfers from 

Expenditures 

Balance 

Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 

Balance from 1937 

1938 Appropriation 

Expenditures 

Transfer from 

Balance 



Bridges, Reconstruction and Repair of, P. W. A 

Transferred to 

Expenditures 

Balance 



$437,411 67 
1,530 00 


$435,881 67 
430,068 21 


$5,813 46 


$12,950 42 
63,700 00 


$76,650 42 
44,506 64 


$32,143 78 
162 15 


$31,981 63 


^ A. 

$162 15 
162 15 


$0 00 



Public Wokks Department. 27 

Ferry Service. 

Regular appropriation $272,188 69 

Transferred to 7,700 00 



$279,888 69 
Transferred from 16,984 31 



$262,904 38 
Expenditures 245,134 46 



Balance $17,769 92 

Sumner Traffic Tunnel. 

Regular appropriation $222,257 16 

Expenditures 218.527 98 



Balance $3,729 18 

The above does not include certain expenditures for 
construction work for other divisions and departments, 
which work was supervised by the engineers of this 
division. 

Under orders of the Department of Public Utilities, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, schedules of tolls and 
charges for the use of the Sumner Traffic Tunnel, 
between Boston Proper and East Boston, were approved, 
covering the year 1938. 

The city has been operating only one ferry, the 
so-called ''South Ferry," since early in 1933, with the 
Boston terminus at Eastern avenue and the East Boston 
terminus at Lewis street. 

The boat schedule in operation at the beginning of 
the year appeared excessive and not justified on the 
basis of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. In view of 
the fact that the amount of traffic is decreasing annually, 
a change of boat operation was put into effect April 29, 
1938. This calls for a 30-minute boat schedule daily, 
starting from East Boston at 6 a. m. and 6.15 a. m. 
from Boston; this boat continues to operate until 10 
p. m. daily. A second boat starts from East Boston 
at 7.15 a. m., permitting of a lo-minute schedule, 
and continues until 11 a. m. At 2 p. m. it resumes 
operation and remains in operation until 6.15 p. m. 
The second boat does not operate on Sundays or 
holidays. 



28 City Document No. 24. 

After eight months' trial the change in boat operating 
schedule appears to be sufficient for all traffic demands. 

The ferryboat "Lieutenant Flaherty" was sold at 
public auction April 27, 1938, for the sum of $41,600. 

The following Federal Relief Projects were sponsored 
by this division during the year : 

Works Progress Administration. 

Project 15778. 

Legal History and Cost Records of City of Boston 

Bridges. 

The reason for this project is that there are approxi- 
mately 200 bridges in the City of Boston. Some of 
these bridges are entirely in charge of the Bridge and 
Ferry Division; some are in charge of this division and 
other departments of the city; some are in charge of 
Boston and other communities jointly; some are main- 
tained partly by the city and partly by railroad com- 
panies; some are in charge of the Commissioners for 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges; some are maintained 
by the Metropolitan Park Commission and many are 
wholly maintained by railroad corporations. 

The city's records on many of these bridges are vague 
and scattered. It is the idea of this project to establish 
definite responsibility and to have a history of each 
bridge from the time it was first built; the name, loca- 
tion, type, owner, how and by whom maintained 
(whether wholly or in part), length, width, original 
cost, etc. The compiling of this history involves con- 
siderable time and work and it will be of great benefit 
to this department, to the Law Department (in the 
handling of claims, etc.), to other departments of the 
city and to the public in general. History when com- 
pleted will be kept on file in the office of this division. 
Data is derived from historical as well as statistical 
sources, such as Public, Widener and State Libraries; 
Registry of Deeds offices at East Cambridge and Boston; 
Waterways and Public Lands Division of Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works; Park Department; also 
Bridge and Ferry Division of City of Boston. Thirty- 
nine men are employed and it is estimated work will be 
completed about June 21, 1939. 

Project 17486. 
This project is for chipping, cleaning and painting 
steelwork on South Ferry landings (drops and gallows 



Public Works Department. 29 

frames), including wood fences on drops; two locations, 
one in Boston on Atlantic avenue and one in East 
Boston, two slips in each location. These ferry slips 
have not been painted for many years and are now 
rusted and badly in need of painting. Work will be 
completed in 1939. 

Project 167 U. 

This project is for demolishing buildings, shelters, 
obsolete wooden drops, machinery houses and obsolete 
machinery at North Ferry slips, East Boston and 
Boston. 

The wooden structures on the Boston and East 
Boston sides of the North Ferry, which are not now 
being used, are dilapidated, obsolete and dangerous to 
the public. They afford meeting or hiding places for 
notorious characters who cause damage and steal 
equipment and lumber. Some of the lumber in these 
structures will be salvaged and used elsewhere. The 
steel drops will not be demolished. When the work is 
completed we will have one steel drop on each side for 
emergencies. The work will be completed in 1939. 

Highway Division Project. 

Acting under directions of his Honor the Mayor in a 
communication to the Commissioner of Public Works, 
dated May 21, 1938, the following committee, consisting 
of Messrs. George G. Hyland of the Survey Committee 
(now Commissioner of Public Works), Division Engineer 
William T. Morrissey of the Highway Division and 
Division Engineer Thomas H. Sexton of the Bridge and 
Ferry Division, appointed by the Mayor to study all 
bridges in the city and make such recommendations as 
would tend to eliminate the hazards now existing on 
bridges, was organized, with Mr. Thomas H. Sexton as 
chairman. 

The committee decided to install safety curbs on 
Dover Street and Dorchester Avenue Bridges during 
1938 and to take care of other bridges during 1939. The 
work on Dover Street Bridge was finished in 1938 
and work on Dorchester Avenue Bridge is still in 
progress. 

The work being done calls for an increase in the 
height of the curb at the curb line from 7 inches to 18 
inches and also for the removal of the street car rails 
where possible. 



30 City Document No. 24. 

As the Bridge and Ferry Division has no funds to 
carry on this work the city's share of the cost is being 
borne by the Highway Division from its Item H. 

Federal Emergency Administration of Public 
Works. 

Docket 158J^-F. 

The city requested a grant from the Government for 
bridge alterations as follows : Altering and strengthening 
Boylston Street Bridge; rebuilding Berkeley Street 
Bridge and rebuilding Albany Street Bridge. The total 
cost of this work is approximately $265,000, and in a 
letter from the Federal Emergency Administration of 
Public Works, dated November 4, 1938, and signed by 
E. W. Clark for the Assistant Administrator, the city 
was given a grant not to exceed $119,250. 

Work was started immediately on plans and specifi- 
cations and on December 20, 1938, a contract was 
approved by the Mayor with the Interstate Construc- 
tion Company, Inc., for "Altering and Strengthening 
the Boylston Street Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad." 

On December 29, 1938, the Mayor approved a con- 
tract with J. J. Callahan for ''Removing Deck from the 
Berkeley Street Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 
Railroad." 

On December 29, 1938, the Mayor approved a con- 
tract with Maurice M. Devine, Inc., for ''Grouting a 
Wall at the Albany Street Bridge, over the Boston & 
Albany Railroad." 

The more important works undertaken during the 
past year in the Bridge Service were the repairs to 
Warren Bridge; repairs to Irvington Street Footbridge; 
altering and strengthening Boylston Street Bridge; re- 
pairing hull, etc., of ferryboats "Ralph J. Palumbo" 
and "Daniel A. MacCormack" and repairs to Beacon 
Street Bridge. 

Bridge Service. 
Albany Street Bridge Over the Boston & Albany Railroad. 
As part of the rebuilding program of this bridge, a 
contract with Maurice M. Devine, Inc., was approved 
by the Mayor for grouting a wall of the southerly 
abutment. 



Public Works Department. 31 

This contract was let under P. W. A. Project, Docket 
No. Mass. 1584-F. 

Field work started on December 30, 1938. 

Beacon Street Bridge. 

Work under contract for repaying, repairing and 
altering this bridge, which was entered into in 1937 
with the J. A, Singarella Construction Company, was 
completed on January 28, 1938. 

Under this contract 27.28 tons of wrought-iron blast 
guards were secured in place, 3,331.7 linear feet of 
fillet welds and 1,032 plug welds were made, 3,080 
square feet of wire-mesh reinforcing w^ere used, 690 bags 
of cement for gunite applied, 828 square yards of 
pavement were laid, 300 square feet of granolithic 
sidewalk replaced, besides the miscellaneous repairs 
and renewals necessary for a proper and workmanlike 
job. 

The total cost for completing the terms of this con- 
tract was $17,377.64. 

Berkeley Street Bridge Over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

As a part of the rebuilding program of this bridge 
and one of its abutments, a contract with J. J. Callahan 
was approved by the Mayor for the removal of the 
decking. 

This contract was let under P. W. A. Project, Docket 
No. Mass. 1584-F. 

Field work started on December 30, 1938. 

Boylston Street Bridge. 

The original Boylston Street Bridge, over the Boston 
& Albany Railroad tracks, built in 1888, consisted 
of two pony trusses each 216 feet long and a roadway 
built on a sharp skew. In 1908 the bridge was re- 
modelled and strengthened in order to carry electric 
cars. The major item of the work was the building 
of an independent bridge, complete, with trusses, floor 
beams, braces, etc., all within the existing bridge, 
subsequently this part of the structure was known as 
the ''Elevated Bridge." In 1927 the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company removed its tracks and abandoned 
the site. 

Since that time the city has attempted to maintain, 
in a satisfactory manner, the whole of the roadway, 



32 City Document No. 24. 

but due to the difference in deflections of the bridges 
under various loadings the problem of laying down a 
wearing surface and deck which would last for a reason- 
able time has been unsolved to date. 

On December 20, 1938, the Mayor approved an 
advertised contract with the Interstate Construction 
Company, Incorporated, to make extensive repairs 
and renewals to the bridge, including a remodelling, 
which will secure both bridges together so that deflec- 
tion of both bridges will be the same; a complete new 
wooden deck system with a bituminous or asphaltum 
wearing surface and the replacing of the conventional 
roller bearings at the expansion ends of the truss by 
bronze and steel self-lubricating plates. 

This work is being done under the Federal Emergency 
Administration of Public Works, P. W. A. Project, 
Docket No. Mass. 1584-F. 

Field work under this contract started on December 
23, 1938. 

Charlestown Bridge. 

Owing to normal wear and a breaking down of the 
cast iron of the cylinders, it became necessary to re- 
place one of two pressure pumps which generate the 
pressure for the end-lift jacks of the draw. The origi- 
nal pump, which was removed, was a l|-inch by 8-inch 
triplex single-acting pump, with cast-iron cylinders. 
Since the original motor was to be used in driving the 
new pump, only a slight increase in the capacity of the 
pump could be safely required. 

The new pump, as installed, is a l|-inch by 6-inch 
triplex single-acting, with stainless steel plungers, valve 
seats and disks and with the three cylinders machined 
out of a solid steel forging. Since the working pressure, 
2,000 pounds per square inch, causes leaks wherever 
working parts move, it was found necessary to renew 
four of these high pressure valves and at the same time 
the relief valve, protecting the whole system, was re- 
placed by a new bronze valve of ample capacity. 

All of the above work was covered in an advertised 
contract with the Hayes Pump and Machinery Com- 
pany, approved by the Mayor on September 2, 1938. 
Work was completed on November 3, 1938, at a cost 
of $2,196. 

Irvington Street Footbridge. 
This footbridge, originally laid down in 1891, spans 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad main 



Public Works Department. 33 

line tracks. In following years the erosion and corrosion 
of the steel, due primarily to flue gases from the passing 
locomotives, deteriorated the structural steel to such 
an extent that a new span became a necessity. 

On August 9, 1938, the Mayor approved an advertised 
contract with the West End Iron Works to remove 
the existing truss span and install a new girder span 
complete in all details. At the same time the con- 
tractor was required to clean and paint the supporting 
steel towers for the span. 

Work under this contract was completed on November 
21, 1938, at a cost of $3,987. 

Warren Bridge. 

Due to partial failure of some steel members in the 
draw leaves, coupled with considerable weakening 
of floor beams, girders, etc., due to corrosion, and a 
general rotting of much timber and pile work, this 
bridge was closed January 8, 1938, in the interest of 
safety. 

On June 20, 1938, the Mayor approved an advertised 
contract with A. Orlando, Inc., to make all necessary 
local repairs to the steel work and all renewals and 
repairs to timber and pile work in the draw pits and 
ends of the fixed spans to make the bridge again safe 
for vehicular traffic. 

Owing to various delays and the necessity of making 
further repairs than anticipated in the contract, which 
could not be determined until materials had been 
removed to do contract work, the repairs were not 
completed until December 15, 1938, at a cost of 
$35,537.22. 

It may be noted at this time that there were no 
repairs or renewals to the bridge trucks or machinery. 

Day Labor Force. 

The day labor force patched and replaced deck 
sheathing, headers and sidewalk planking on various 
bridges; repaired platforms, refastened treads; cleaned 
and painted draw houses and shelter houses; made 
repairs to draw houses and controller houses; added to 
and deducted from counterweights; repaired steps; 
removed snow and ice from bridges and sanded same; 
repaired piers, painted fences and gates; did general 
carpenter work and painting and made mechanical 
repairs, etc., patched sidewalks and roadways of follow- 



34 City Document No. 24. 

ing bridges : Albany Street, Beacon Street (over Muddy 
river), Boylston Street, Boston Street, Babson Street, 
Berkeley Street, Blue Hill Avenue, Babcock Street, 
Broadway, Bennington Street, Congress Street, Cam- 
bridge Street, Charlestown, Central Avenue, Chelsea 
South, Commercial Point, Chelsea North, Cummins 
Highway, Dorchester Avenue (over railroad), Dover 
Street, Dorchester Avenue, Everett Street, Glenwood 
Avenue, Glendale Avenue, Harvard Street, Hyde Park 
Avenue, Jones Avenue Footbridge, Meridian Street, 
Maiden, Mystic, Milton Lower Mills, Norfolk Street, 
Northern Avenue, New Allen, Prison Point, River 
Street, Summer Street over Reserved Channel, Summer 
Street over Fort Point Channel, Southampton Street, 
Sprague Street, Summer Street over B Street, Winthrop, 
West Fourth Street, etc. Also repaired wood block 
paving, patched headers, fences, steps, platforms, etc., 
at Boston Street, Braddock Park Footbridge, Broadway, 
Charlestown, Chelsea South, Congress Street, Dor- 
chester Avenue, Dover Street, Gove Street, Irvington 
Street Footbridge, Jones Avenue Footbridge, Perkins 
Street, Summer Street over Reserved Channel, Summer 
Street over Fort Point Channel, Tollgate Way Foot- 
bridge, Warren Bridge, Webster Street Footbridge, etc. 
Refastened treads at various bridges; painted draw- 
houses (inside and outside), repaired and rebuilt gates 
at various bridges; repaired floats, built and repaired 
sand boxes, removed traffic treads from Albany Street 
Bridge; patched pier at L Street Bridge and placed 
new track ties; repaired walings at Congress Street 
Bridge, patched pit at Dorchester Avenue Bridge, 
repaired and rebuilt coal bins at various bridges; re- 
paired walings in waterway at Warren Bridge, built 
concrete forms for fence foundation at yard, repaired 
motor house and fixed draw latches at L Street Bridge, 
repaired motor house, bridge pier and fence at Maiden 
Bridge, built new deck in one day at Charlestown 
Bridge, repaired boats, repaired and rebuilt roadway 
gates at L Street, repaired gear house and bulkheads at 
Summer Street Bridge, repaired landing blocks and 
platform under draw at Chelsea North Bridge, patched 
decking under granite block paving at various bridges; 
built new end of bay on Chelsea end of draw at Charles- 
town Bridge, built new deck and resheathed Sprague 
Street Bridge with asphalt plank; at Summer Street 
Bridge put in new beams and deck in one day; erected 



Public Works Department. 35 

portable shanty for Ferry Service; built shelves for 
Tunnel Service. Made miscellaneous small repairs 
at various bridges. 

During the winter months maintenance force worked 
on inspecting snow loading in Zone 2. Highway 
bridges are cleaned by welfare men, under supervision 
of Bridge Service maintenance men, every month of the 
year. Electrical and machinery maintenance is taken 
care of by electrician and machinist. 

Miscellaneous. 

In the course of the year part of the activities of the 
office force were taken up in work for other divisions 
and departments of the city. While these efforts, 
spread over the entire period, did not require a con- 
siderable amount of time, the nature of the work was of 
an advisory and investigating nature. 

Another duty of this division, in common with other 
divisions of the department, is the supervising and 
inspecting of the work done under contract in the 
removal of snow. 

Sanitary Division. 

Fort Hill Disposal Station. 

Upon the application of the Sanitary Division, this 
division drew up and supervised the work done under 
an advertised contract with Marinucci Brothers & Co., 
which was approved by the Mayor on September 2, 
1938, for dredging the dock at this station. 

This work is of a routine nature, since the dock is 
constantly filling from the surrounding silt of the Fort 
Point Channel bed and from spill from the barges into 
which refuse is dumped from the service floor of the 
station. 

Under this contract 1,670.5 cubic yards of material 
were removed at a total cost of $4,978. Work was 
completed on November 1, 1938. 

Victory Road Disposal Station. 
Under a contract entered into last year with 

A. Orlando, Inc., extensive repairs to this station were 
carried on and completed on April 16, 1938. 

In doing the work required, 4,834 linear feet of new 
oak piles were driven and secured in place, 8,834 feet 

B. M. spruce and 47,980 feet B. M. of yellow pine were 



36 



City Document No. 24. 



used, 330 gallons of wood preservative applied, 9,577 
pounds of bolts and similar fastenings installed, besides 
other miscellaneous work and materials required for a 
satisfactory repair project. 

The total cost for completing this contract was 
$10,865.66. 

Ferry Service. 
The following ferryboats are in commission: 



N.VME. 


When Built. 


Length. 


Gross Tons. 


Charles C. Donoghue 

Daniel A. MacCormack 

Ralph J. Palumbo 


1926 
1926 

1930 


174 feet 4 inches 
174 "4 inches 
174 "4 inches 


756.77 
756.77 
779 



All these boats are of the propeller type and are all 
steel boats. 

The work of this service for the year consisted of the 
following : 

Ferryboat '^Daniel A. MacCormack. ^^ 
On the expiration of the Annual Federal Papers, as 
noted under ferryboat ''Ralph J. Palumbo," bids were 
invited by the city for cleaning and painting the "Daniel 
A. MacCormack" and making certain repairs to the 
hull, machinery and auxiliaries. 

On September 12, 1938, the Mayor approved a 
contract with the Boston Dry Dock Company for the 
above work. The vessel was taken out on a marine 
railway, cleaned and painted as called for in the con- 
tract, both rudders and main stuffing boxes repaired, 
some new structural floor plates installed, four crank-pin 
boxes and six main bearing boxes rebabbitted and 
machined, four main engine piston rods and four valve 
stems put on centers and trued and certain miscellaneous 
repairs to main engines, piping, valves and auxiliaries 
were made. 

Work under this contract was completed on November 
16, 1938, at a total cost of $5,714.20. 

Ferryboat "Ralph J. Palumbo." 
On the expiration of the Annual Federal Papers 
under which the ferryboats operate, a contract was 
advertised for making repairs to the hull, superstructure 



Public Works Department. 37 

and machinery, to put the vessel in proper repair, so 
that, outside of accidents and minor running repairs, 
the ship might remain in continuous service for the 
following year without serious interruption. 

On April 14, 1938, the Mayor approved a contract 
with the Quincy Dry Dock and Yacht Corporation for 
the above work. The vessel was put in dry dock, 
entirely cleaned and painted, both rudders and main 
stuffing boxes repaired, some floor plates and structural 
supports renewed, both propellers repaired, four main 
crank-pin and bearing boxes rebabbitted and miscel- 
laneous repairs to the auxiliaries, piping and valves 
accomplished. 

Work under this contract was completed on May 27, 
1938, at a total cost of $8,356.68. 

Department Force. 
During the year machinists, carpenters, painters, 
riggers and electricians, who are included in the personnel 
of the Ferry Service, made all repairs possible to the 
plant to the extent of equipment at their disposal. 
This work consisted mainly of minor repairs to the 
machinery on the boats, repairs to ferry bridge 
machinery, ferry bridge roadways and headhouse repairs 
in general. 

Sumner Tunnel. 

Summary of Work During 1938. 

In the operation and maintenance of the tunnel, the 
system of rotating group schedule for maintenance 
work and "Trouble Notice Reports" (which were 
inaugurated in 1936 and 1937) was used very effectively 
during 1938. This system has been found to be ideal 
for maintaining the tunnel equipment in best working 
condition with practically no lost time in getting equip- 
ment back in service, especially with the small main- 
tenance force employed at the tunnel. During 1938 
there were written 447 Trouble Notice Reports, and 
repairs were made by maintenance men assigned to the 
particular equipment. 

In addition to the general maintenance of equipment, 
there was also considerable work done of a special nature. 

Toll Registering Equipment. — The work of rewiring 
the toll registers and key boxes which was started in 
1937 has been continued in 1938. This work is being 



38 City Document No. 24. 

done in order to eliminate all possibility of faulty 
operation of equipment due to grounds and shorts in 
the wiring. 

A number of treadles were repaired and overhauled 
during the year. On those treadles that still had the 
old type of cables the new type of Anhydrex insulated, 
Tirex rubber-jacketed cables have been installed. All 
treadles have been tested at regular intervals by Megger 
for insulation resistance and by a special pressure tool 
for determining the pressure necessary to operate the 
contact of each strip. 

All of the toll registering equipment has been care- 
fully maintained under expert supervision in order to 
keep the equipment in perfect working order. 

Traffic Signal System. — All relays and equipment 
connected with the trafhc signal system have been 
regularly cleaned, adjusted and tested. Periodic tests 
have been made on the Booth-Red system. Broken 
glass in signs and signals have been replaced and signal 
units have been cleaned as needed. 

Several relay and control stations have been com- 
pletely overhauled, and the old lead cables have been 
replaced by Anhydrex rubber-jacketed type of cables 
in order to eliminate the grounded condition and to 
prevent further electrolysis. 

Those traffic signal units on the south wall of the 
tunnel that have signs, such as ''No Passing," have had 
hinges installed on the frames for better maintenance 
in relamping and replacing the glass. 

Some preliminary work has been done for connecting 
and installing a minature traffic signal indication system 
in the control room. 

Telephone System. — Since replacing the old defective 
lead cables with Latox insulated, Anhydrex rubber- 
jacketed type of cables in 1935-36, there has been 
practically no trouble with the telephone system. 
Handsets and induction coils have been replaced or 
repaired as the trouble developed. Most of the trouble 
has been due to moisture in the instruments. The 
switchboard relays have been adjusted and checked 
periodically. 

Motor-Generators and Batteries. — All motor-genera- 
tors have been cleaned regularly, and the commutators 
of the generators have been ground and polished. 

The power batteries have been checked and cleaned 



Public Works Department. 39 

regularly. A representative of the Philco Company 
checked and tested both sets of batteries, and he stated 
that the batteries were being properly maintained and 
in a very satisfactory condition. 

Elevators. — - The elevators and the control equipment 
have been cleaned, checked, adjusted and repaired 
regularly. The annual load test and inspection was 
made by the Portland Elevator Company with the 
City of Boston elevator inspector. 

Carbon Monoxide Recording Equipment. — The carbon 
monoxide recording equipment has been very carefully 
maintained, checked and calibrated in order to keep 
the equipment operating correctly at all times. 

The audible and visible alarm on the carbon monoxide 
recorders is set for 2.5 parts of carbon monoxide in 10,000 
parts of air, and the operators are instructed to keep the 
dilution below 1.5 parts during certain periods of heavy 
traffic. Out of a total of 8,760 hours during 1938, 
the carbon monoxide recorders indicated a value of 2.0 
or more parts 441 times, or an average of 1.2 times 
each day. Most of these peaks of 2.0 and above were 
for a duration of only a few minutes. 

Ventilation Equipment. — All fans, motors, dampers 
and control equipment have been cleaned and tested 
at regular intervals, and necessary repairs and adjust- 
ments have been made. All damper motors have been 
overhauled, cleaned and painted. All exhaust fan 
rooms have been cleaned regularly. 

The exhaust fan rooms are lighted by overhead units 
suspended from the ceiling. Considerable trouble has 
been experienced with the fixtures becoming loose due 
to vibration and air currents. It is very difficult to 
clean the lighting unit, relamp and maintain the light- 
ing equipment. The ceiling is approximately 17 feet 
in the exhaust fan rooms, and the lights are mounted 
close to the ceiling. Loose fixtures and the diflficulty 
in reaching the units from a ladder make this equipment 
a source of danger to the safety of persons in the fan 
rooms. The exhaust fan rooms are being rewired, 
and the ceihng fixtures are being replaced by vapor- 
proof type of wall brackets. One fan room has been 
completed, and the work on other fan rooms is in 
progress. 

Fire Protection Equipmejit. — All fire extinguishers in 
the tunnel and ventilation buildings and garages have 



40 City Document No. 24. 

been inspected at intervals. A yearly inspection and 
test was made on all fire extinguishers in August. Fire 
extinguishers have been refilled or recharged as 
necessary. 

The tunnel fire water line has been tested periodically 
under pressure. From March 30 until November 15 
the pipe line was kept filled with water but not under 
pressure. The rest of the year the water line has been 
dry to avoid any possibility of freezing. 

When the water lines froze in the tunnel in 1935 
the fire hydrant located near the toll booths on the 
East Boston control island was taken out of service. 
This hydrant has been removed and the pipe blanked 
up. It is recommended that another fire hydrant be 
installed on the grass plot near the ''Exit" lane at East 
Boston. 

Miscellaneous Equipment. — All protective relays on 
switch gear were tested, checked, and set for proper 
operation. All switch gear has been tested for opera- 
tion at regular intervals. All switch gear and switch- 
boards have been cleaned, adjusted and carefully 
maintained. 

Changes in connections were made by the Boston 
Edison Company in the 13.8 KV switch gear so that 
proper indications will show on the board in the control 
room when the Edison circuit breakers are operated. 

The ''LK" relays were relocated and rewired on the 
lighting and service switchboard in order that these 
relays may be more easily and correctly maintained. 

Preliminary work has been completed and double- 
throw switches have been installed on the 460-volt 
switchboards in order to provide an emergency feed to 
the lighting and service switchboards for repairing the 
service selectors. Wiring and connecting this switch 
will be completed as soon as possible. 

The oil in the power transformers and the lighting 
distribution transformers was checked and tested for 
dielectric strength and acidity. All of the main power 
transformers were repainted. 

The neon signs on the plazas have been repaired and 
broken units replaced as necessary. 

The oil burners at the Boston ventilation building 
and the East Boston garage were given the regular 
annual inspection, overhaul and adjustment. 

All electrical manholes were pumped out and the 



Public Works Department. 41 

cables inspected. A broken floor drain from exhaust 
fan room W-18 in the Boston ventilation building was 
repaired. 

Tunnel, General. — The catch-basins, sumps and drain- 
age system in the tunnel were cleaned twice during the 
year. The tunnel roadway has been repaired as 
needed. The exhaust air duct above the tunnel ceiling 
was cleaned in the fall by means of the special vacuum 
cleaner. 

Administration Building. — New steel grill work and 
door with bullet-proof glass has been installed in the 
cashier's office. Bars have been installed on all windows 
on the first floor of the Administration Building. 

Miscellaneous. — Considerable experimental work has 
been done during the year on waterproofing material 
and also on rust and corrosion resisting paint. Ever 
since the tunnel was built there has been several bad 
leaks in the walls of the ventilation shafts, especially 
the walls of the East Boston shaft. The WTst wall of 
the East Boston ventilation shaft was waterproofed 
and all leakage on that wall has stopped. Some of 
the tunnel niches have also been waterproofed. Further 
work will be done along this line of waterproofing in 
order to stop all leaks and thus prevent serious injury 
to concrete and steel structures. During the past 
years it has been impossible to keep paint on some 
structures in the tunnel for a longer period than two 
or three months. Tests have been made on structures 
and equipment in the harbor pump room (about the 
worst place for rust and corrosion), using a different 
type of paint. After about a year this paint was found 
to be in good condition. 

Cables. — A number of old lead cables on the traffic 
signal system and the tunnel lighting have been replaced 
by Anhydrex rubber-jacketed type of cables. The 
work of connecting up the metering cable, which was 
installed in 1937, was completed and the cable put in 
operation in January. 

Additional trouble developed during the year on 
the control cable between the ventilation buildings. 
This trouble was on the control circuit of fan E-22. 
The trouble was located by means of instruments, and 
it was found to be near the center of the tunnel. The 
operation of the fan was taken care of by using spare 
conductors in the cable. 



42 City Document No. 24. 

In the annual report of 1937 reference was made to 
the cable survey made in 1935. These tests were made 
in collaboration with the engineers of the Simplex Wire 
and Cable Company. From that survey and a study 
of the results, it was determined that cable failures 
in the tunnel were due in large part to electrolysis from 
leakage currents, combined with some galvanic and 
chemical action. In the report of the cable survey 
it was brought out that all cables in the tunnel had been 
affected to a more or less extent, and that it would 
be necessary to install as soon as possible a ground 
network of sufficient size, and to properly bond and 
ground all cable sheaths in order to eliminate the elec- 
trolysis action and to prolong the life of the cables in 
the tunnel. 

All of the telephone cables in the tunnel were replaced 
in 1935-36, and the metering cable was replaced in 
1937. 

The necessary preliminary engineering work in con- 
nection with installing this ground network has been 
completed. About 2,900 feet of cable for the ground 
network was purchased late in 1938, and this cable 
will be installed in 1939 along with additional lengths 
that may be purchased. 

Operation of Fans. — In each ventilation building 
there are seven blowers and seven exhaust fans, or a 
total of fourteen blowers and fourteen exhaust fans. 
These fans are direct-connected to motors, and can 
be operated at two speeds: Low speed, 225 R. P. M., and 
high speed, 450 R. P. M. The fans are operated as much 
as possible at low speed in order to keep the power bill 
low. A summary of the fan-hours operation of the 
ventilation equipment is given below, with the figures for 
1937 given for comparison. 



1937. 1938. 



Fan hours on low speed 

Fan hours on high speed 

Average fan hours per day, low speed . . 
Average fan hours per day, high speed. 




Power Consumption — Summary. — Electrical power 
is supplied by the Boston Edison Company at 13,800 



Public Works Department. 



43 



volts by two cable lines to each ventilation building. 
This power is used not only for ventilation equipment, 
but also for pumps, elevators, electric heating and 
lighting of the tunnel and buildings. 

A summary of the power requirements for 1938 is 
given in the table below, with figures for other years 
for comparison. 



1935. 



1936. 



1937. 



1938. 



Total kilowatt hours 

Total cost of power 

Total vehicles 

Average cost of power per month 

Average cost of power per day 

Average cost of power per kilowatt hour . 

Average cost of power per vehicle 

Average kilowatt hour per vehicle 

Average kilowatt load 

Average power factor 

Average load factor 

Greatest monthly demand (kilowatt) . . . . 



2,724,090 

$36,631.39 

6,606,838 

$3,052.62 

$100.50 

$0.01344 

$0.00554 

.412 

311 

.905 

.392 

1,201 



2,698,852 

$38,472.28 

5,216,742 

$3,206.02 

$105.12 

$0.01425 

$0.00742 

.520 

310 

.921 

.342 

1,220 



2.766,850 

$38,607.68 

5,350,929 

$3,217.31 

$105.77 

$0.01395 

$0.00721 

.517 

313 

.920 

.355 

1,144 



2,843,914 

$39,921.23 

5,.543,302 

$3,326.77 

$109.37 

$0.01404 

$0.00720 

.513 

325 

.904 

.361 

1,236 



Garage Service Jobs. — During 1938 there were 341 
tow jobs reported, of which 119 were trucks and buses, 
and 222 were passenger cars. A summary of the tow 
jobs for the past four years is given below. 





1935. 


1936. 


1937. 


1938. 




456 


268 


357 


341 







Traffic Accidents in the Tunnel. — During the year 
1938 there were nine (9) traffic accidents in the tunnel. 
The damage to cars in all cases was slight. In three 
of the nine accidents personal injuries were claimed. 
In two of these accidents the personal injuries were 
only slight. On December 1 the tunnel had its first 
fatal accident. The total traffic through the tunnel 
from the time it opened on June 30, 1934, up to the 
time of the first fatal accident is approximately 
23,400,000. In this accident on December 1 the driver 



44 



City Document No. 24. 



of the car apparently lost control of his car, when travel- 
ing toward Boston, near Station 12, in the tunnel. The 
car swerved across the roadway against the south wall 
of the tunnel, riding up on the curb and water pipe line, 
and turned over. One man was killed and the driver 
of the car was injured. Apparently the man killed was 
trying to get out of the car at the time it turned over. 

Seven of the nine accidents were caused by cars 
traveling too fast, inattention to driving, not obeying 
traffic signals and tunnel guards' instructions, and not 
sufficient clearance between cars. In two of the acci- 
dents the driver lost control of the car. 

Fires in Tunnel. — There was only one fire in the 
tunnel during 1938. This fire occurred on November 26 
on an Eastern Massachusetts bus. The Boston Fire 
Department was called. The damage was slight. 

Booth-Red Summary. — In case of a fire, wreck or 
other serious trouble in the tunnel, the guards on duty 
in the tunnel push an emergency button which sets 
the red traffic lights and starts a horn blowing at both 
entrances to the tunnel. An alarm is also sounded in 
the control room. All traffic is stopped from entering 
the tunnel until clearance is given by the operator in 
the control room. 

During 1938 the Booth-Red was put on a total of 
13 times, for a total duration of 77 minutes, and an 
average duration of 5.9 minutes. Of the 13 times, the 
Booth-Red was put on 7 times by mistake, either by a 
welfare man or by a tunnel guard pushing the WTong 
button. Thus the Booth-Red was put on only 6 times 
for some trouble in the tunnel. A summary is given 
below for the last four years for comparison. 





1935. 


1936. 


1937. 


1938. 


Number of Booth-Red on 


38 

331 minutes. 

8.7 minutes. 

50 minutes. 


17 

107 minutes. 

6.3 minutes. 

34 minutes. 


20 

87 minutes. 

4 . 4 minutes. 

26 minutes. 


13 

77 minutes. 




5.9 minutes. 




38 minutes. 







The maximum duration of Booth-Red of thirty- 
eight minutes was due to the accident on December 1. 
Traffic was kept out of the tunnel until the city photog- 
rapher could arrive and get pictures. 

Traffic. — A summary of the traffic using the tunnel 
since it opened on June 20, 1934, is given on following page. 



Public Works Department. 



45 



1934.* 


1935. 


1936. 


1937. 


3,096,377 


6,606,838 


5,216,742 


5,350,929 


182,729 


550,569 


434,728 


445,910 


42,168 


127,053 


100,-322 


102,902 


5,926 


18,101 


14,292 


14,660 



1938. 



Total traflBc 

Average traffic per month 
Average trafiSc per week . . 
Average traffic per day. . . 



5,543,302 

461,942 

106,602 

15,187 



* 6 months, 185 days in 1934. 

Tunnel Administration Building Alterations. 

On October 13, 1938, an advertised contract with 
the Builders Iron Works was approved by the Mayor, 
to make certain alterations in the Administration 
Building of the Sumner Tunnel. 

The work done under this contract consisted of fitting 
grilles to windows of the first floor, furnishing and fitting 
steel doors in main office, installing bullet resisting glass 
at the counter and enlarging the grillage around the 
tabulating machines on the second floor. 

The installing of the bullet resisting glass and plate 
at the counter in the main office was deemed necessary 
as a protection to the personnel in the office, since 
considerable sums of cash are turned into the cashier 
in the course of the day by the tollmen at the portals 
of the tunnel. 

This contract was completed on November 29, 1938, 
at a cost of $1,268. 

Yours respectfully, 



Thomas H. Sexton, 

Division Engineer. 



46 



City Document No. 24. 



BRIDGE SERVICE. 



Financial Statement, 1938. 

Expenditures from Maintenance Appropriations. 

Boston bridges $425,092 67 

Boston and Cambridge bridges . 4,975 54 



Total Expenditures. 
From maintenance appropriations . $430,068 21 
From special appropriations . . 44,668 70 



Expenditures of Boston Bridges. 


Administration : 




Salaries : 




Division engineer 


$3,000 00 


Engineers and draughtsmen 


44,736 77 


Foreman .... 


2,500 00 


Clerks 


5.200 00 


Blueprinters 


2,800 00 


Inspectors .... 


6,900 00 


Veterans' pensions 


850 00 


Injured employees 


54 00 


Printing, postage and s 


ta- 


tionery .... 


$1,098 34 


Traveling expenses . 


196 50 


Engineers instruments 


35 80 


Office supplies . 


73 81 


Typewriter inspection 


13 50 



$430,068 21 



$474,736 91 



Yard and Stockroom: 
Yard: 

Clerk, watchmen and yardmen, 
Holidays and vacations 
Traveling expenses . 
Tools, new and repaired 
Repairs at yard . 
Telephone . 
Supplies 
Auto equipment 



Carried forward 



[men 


$7,611 


34 


2,428 


73 




281 


15 




933 


57 




445 49 




182 


54 




575 


05 




5,539 


01 



,040 77 



1,417 95 

,458 72 



$17,996 88 
$17,996 88 



Public Works Department. 



Brought forward 
Stockroom: 

Stock purchased 
Stock used . 

Decrease in stock 



SI 2,903 07 
16,250 81 



47 
$17,996 88 

3,347 74 

$14,649 14 



Tidewater Bridges. 



Bridges. 


Drawtenders' 

Salaries. 


Mechanics' 
Wages. 


Material. 


Repair 
Bills. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Broadway 


$17,104 14 

24.462 91 
20,505 94 
20,927 07 
20,247 87 
18,728 28 
16,850 33 
16,750 19 
17,749 19 
18,475 68 
18,445 16 
20,329 37 
19,203 31 

14.463 54 


$898 00 
5,011 06 
1,390 40 

384 12 
1,165 11 

869 82 
1,298 49 
1,102 90 
2,461 33 
1,346 35 
2,775 87 
1,800 08 
3,141 85 
4,271 63 


$250 40 

1,888 97 

399 13 

53 94 

105 27 

220 68 

395 33 

954 48 

600 66 

1,111 77 

886 12 

483 22 

2,971 06 

1,754 57 


$348 70 
603 43 

1,829 85 
190 33 
508 65 
180 20 
215 10 
190 33 
385 12 
375 23 

1,300 18 
503 73 

1,468 79 
735 72 


$247 43 
377 90 

1,183 67 
661 71 
597 70 
444 41 
224 44 
227 67 
349 29 
850 68 
347 89 
2,578 44 
364 96 
336 01 


$18,848 70 
32,.344 27 


Chelsea North 


25,308 99 


Chelsea South 


22,217 47 


Chelsea Street 


22,624 60 




20,443 39 


Dorchester Avenue 

Dover Street 

L Street * 


18,983 69 
19,225 57 
21,545 59 
22,159 71 


Meridian Street 

Northern Avenue 

Summer Street 


23,7.55 22 
25,694 84 
27,149 97 


Warren 


21,561 47 






Totals 


$264,242 98 


$27,917 31 


$12,075 60 


$8,835 39 


$8,792 20 


$321,863 48 



* Now Summer Street, over Reserved Channel. 



48 



City Document No. 24. 



Re-pairs on Inland Bridges. 



BRIDQEa. 



Labor 

and 

Materials. 



A Street Stairs. 
Albany Street. , 
Allston 



Austin Street — Prison Point 

B Street Stairs 

Babson Street 

Beacon Street over outlet 

Beacon Street over Boston & Albany Railroad 

Bennington Street ' 

Berkeley Street 

Blakemore Street 

Blue Hill Avenue 

Boston Street 

Boylston Street over Boston & Albany Railroad 

Braddock Park — Follen Street (Foot) 

Broadway Extension over Boston & Albany Railroad 

Brookline Avenue 

C Street Stairs 

Cambridge Street over Boston & Maine Railroad 

Central Avenue 

Commercial Point 

Camden Street — Gainsborough Street (Foot) 

Cummins Highway 

Dartmouth Street (rent) 

Dorchester Avenue 

Durban Street — West Rutland Square (Foot) 

Everett Street 

Glen wood Avenue 

Gove Street (Foot) 

Granite Avenue 

Harvard Street 

Huntington Avenue 

Hyde Park Avenue 

Irvington Street and Yarmouth Street (Foot) 

Jones Avenue (Foot) 

Massachusetts Avenue over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad . 



$7 54 

141 27 

181 09 

112 02 

1 92 

4,817 89 

19 66 

37 94 

38 53 
315 26 

42 26 
680 49 
193 76 
773 £5 

49 49 
357 73 

43 44 
5 18 

232 19 

293 01 

166 82 

8 22 

22 53 
300 00 
636 80 

16 22 
448 26 

18 33 
202 26 
260 82 

91 01 

27 90 
123 15 
111 13 
113 92 

56 00 



Carried forward . 



510,947 59 



Public Works Department. 



49 



Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Materials. 



Carried forward 

Milton Lower Mills 

Mystic Avenue 

New Allen Street 

Norfolk Street 

Public Landing — Northern Avenue. 

Perkins Street (Foot) 

River Street 

Southampton Street 

Sprague Street 

Summer Street over A Street 

Summer Street over B Street 

Summer Street over C Street 

Toll Gate Way (Foot) 

Tremont Street 

Webster Street (Foot) 

West Fourth Street 

Winthrop 

Western Avenue 

Cleaning bridges 

Snow removal and sanding 

Other services 

W. P. A. supplies 



$10,947 59 

160 13 

171 93 

139 26 

289 79 

26 49 

91 17 

25 96 

288 84 

1,460 74 

4 08 

669 78 

34 31 

353 51 

67 73 

269 62 

111 27 

337 77 

7 00 

2,671 00 

2,311 94 

320 45 

360 97 



Total. 



$21,121 33 



Summary. 



Administration . 
Yard and stockroom 
Tidewater bridges 
Inland bridges 



Boston and Cambridge bridges 
Total 



$67,458 72 
14,649 14 

321,863 48 
21,121 33 

$425,092 67 
4,975 54 

$430,068 21 



50 City Document No. 24. 

Special Appropriations. 

Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 

Beacon Street Bridge: 

J. A. Singarella Construction Company .... $4,849 41 

Charlestovvn Bridge: 

Ha5'es Pump and Machinery Company . $1,866 60 

Repair trusses 1,439 34 

Repair paving 472 21 

3,778 15 

Chelsea North Bridge: 

M. & R. Construction Company 3,065 33 

Chelsea Street Bridge: 

Repairs to concrete pavement . . . $952 35 

New gate 148 00 

Install two new bearings .... 273 00 

1,373 35 

Huntington Avenue Bridge: 

Repair and strengthen sidewalk 260 00 

Irvington Street Bridge: 

West End Iron Works 3,388 95 

Summer Street Bridge over Reserved Channel: 

Repairs to rods 126 25 

Saratoga Street Bridge: 

Repairs to paving 226 46 

Summer Street Bridge: 

Repairs to paving 224 57 

Summer Street over C Street: 

Repairs to paving 448 31 

Warren Bridge: 

A. Orlano & Co., Inc $25,667 67 

Material and paint 206 25 

Engineering survey 881 94 

Advertising 10 00 

26,765 86 

$44,506 64 



Bridges, Reconstruction and Repair of, P. W. A. : 

Advertising $99 00 

Travelling expenses 63 15 



$162 15 



Public Works Department. 



51 



SUMMARY. 
Expenditures from Special Appropriations. 



Balances 
from 
1937. 



Total Credits, 

Including 

Balances 

Carried Over 

and Transfers. 



Expended 

During 

1938. 



Balances 

Unexpended 

December 31, 

1938. 



Bridges, repairs, etc 

Bridges, reconstruction and 
repair of, P. W. A 



Chelsea North Bridge, re- 
pair and strengthening '. . 

Chelsea Street and East- 
ern Avenue Bridge, 
chapter 366, Acts 1933, 
as amended ^ 



Northern Avenue Bridge, 
reconstruction, chapter 
366, Acts 1933, as 
amended ' 



$12,950 42 



588 96 



39,020 55 



20,198 41 



$72,758 34 



$76,488 27 
162 15 

588 96 

39,020 55 
20,198 41 



$136,458 34 



$44,506 64 


162 


15 


23,000 


00 


14,000 


00 


$81,668 79 



$31,981 63 



16,020 55 



$54,200 59 



1 $588.96 transferred to Sinking Fund. 

2 .'523,000 expended for retirement of debt. 

3 $14,000 expended for retirement of debt. 



52 



City Document No. 24. 



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53 



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54 City Document No. 24. 

FERRY SERVICE. 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1938. 

1. Receipts. 

Total cash receipts during the year . . $25,981 70 

Cash in hands of tollmen at beginning of year, 40 00 



Cash paid over to City Collector 

Cash in hands of tollmen December 31, 1938, 



2. Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Received from annual appropriations for Ferry 
Service 

Unexpended balances from special appropria- 
tions, January 1, 1938 

Transferred to Sinking Fund .... 

Unexpended balances of special appropriations 
December 31, 1938 

3. Results of Operation for the Year. 

Receipts for the year (net income) 

Ordinary expense (maintenance) 

appropriations .... $245,134 46 
Interest paid on ferry debt . . 11,080 00 
Depreciations on ferry boats . 44,398 96 
Decrease in value of supplies on 

hand 1,056 17 

Decrease in value of ferryboats on 

account of sale of ferryboat • 

"Lieutenant Flaherty" ". . 70,846 20 



$26,021 70 


$25,981 70 
40 00 


$26,021 70 


$245,134 46 


$27,439 39 
19,064 81 


$8,374 58 


$25,986 70 



$372,515 79 



Increase in value of machinery 

and tools 1,193 38 



Net outgo for year $371,322 41 



Net loss for year .• * $345,340 71 

* Includes $41,600.00 credited to sale of city property. 



Public Works Department. 



55 



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56 City Document No. 24. 



Balance Sheet for Year 1938. 

Assets. 

Cash, tollman's capital $40 00 

Rents receivable 2,892 37 

Supplies in stock 16,356 37 

City Treasurer (balance of appropriation) special . . 8,374 58 

Ferryboats (less depreciation) 425,230 07 

Machinery and tools 3,107 50 

Eeal estate, land and buildings (assessors' valuation) . 610,100 00 

Damage received 325 00 

City Treasurer (annual appropriation) .... 105 07 

$1,066,530 96 
Cost of avenues, etc., East Boston (previous to 1871) . ^ 315,815 68 
Deficiency of assets (loss) 16,946,387 28 

Totals . $18,328,733 92 

Liabilities. 

Capital invested by the City of Boston to date . . $18,320,254 27 

Appropriations account (credit balances) .... 8,374 58 

H — Projects Relief 105 07 

Total liabilities $18,328,733 92 

Details of Capital Invested by the City of Boston. 

Total expenditures to date per ferry books .... $26,865,498 19 
Interest of debt for the year (City Auditor's report) . 11,080 00 

Interest previous years, etc. (net debits, per City Auditor's 

report) 378,908 85 

Total expenditures $27,255,487 04 

Deduct total receipts paid to City Collector . . . 8,935,232 77 

Excess expenditures, capital $18,320,254 27 



Comparison of Receipts, Appropriations Expenditures. 

Receipts. 

From foot passengers (tollmen) $12,252 10 

From foot passengers (office sales) 12 90 

From team tickets (office sales) 859 20 

From strip tickets (tollmen) 2,376 00 

From cash for teams (gatemen) ^ 10,052 78 

From gatemen's refunds 86 41 

Total from rates $25,639 39 

From rents 104 50 

From other sources 237 81 

Ordinary receipts $25,981 70 

' Included in deficiency of assets in balance sheet. 
2 Includes cash fares from extra passengers on teams (gatemen) . 



Public Works Department. 



57 



Expenditures {Ordinary) 
Office: 

Division engineers' salary (part) 

Clerk — assistant cashier 

Clerk (part time) . 

Retired veterans' pensions 

Retired employees' pensions 

Stationery 

Printing . 

Telephones 

Advertising 

Carfares . 

Postage . 

Premiums, surety companies 

Total office expenses 



$1,500 00 

1,700 00 

1,700 00 

5,978 33 

720 00 

83 98 

433 95 

289 33 

20 75 

212 25 

3 00 

95 00 

$12,736 59 



Ferryboats and Landings: 

Employees (wages) $174,393 85 

- - ... 26,198 74 

2,817 00 

3,552 02 

36 10 

489 86 

1,863 88 

730 75 

15,746 23 

290 19 

28 10 

16,251 15 



Fuel 

Teaming, weighing coal, etc. 

Supplies 

Gas 

Oil 

Electric light . . . . . 

Electric power . . . 

Repairs to boats 

Repairs of buildings, drops and piers 

Furnishings 

Other expenditures . . . . 



Total 



$245,134 46 



Receipts, Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Expenditures from Special Appropriations. 

Balance in treasury unexpended $8,374 58 

A ppropriat ions. 
Regular annual appropriations $272,188 69 

Total Expenditures Upon Ferries Since 1858. 



Expenditures for avenues, paving, interest, etc., previous 

to the purchase of the ferries by the city . 
Purchase of the ferries, April, 1870 
Expenditures for ferryboats since April 1, 1870 . 
Expenditures for new buildings, piers, drops, etc. 
Expenditures for tools and fixtures (prior to 1910) 
Expenditures for land for Lincoln's Wharf in 1887 
Expenditures for land for Battery Wharf in 1893 

Total expenditures on capital account 
Expenditures for repairs of all kinds 
Expenditures for fuel .... 
Expenditures for salaries and wages 
Expenditures for all other purposes 



$444,101 30 

276,375 00 

2,530,009 81 

1,491,468 59 

14,752 46 

5,562 52 

10,000 00 

$4,772,269 68 
3,027,770 27 
3,183,499 67 

12,814,621 42 
3,457,326 00 

$27,255,487 04 



1 Includes $1,094.93 expenses for relief projects. 



58 City Document No. 24. 



Total Receipts From Ferries Since 1858=59. 

Receipts from rents, etc., to purchase of ferries . . . $29,588 56 
Receipts from ferry tolls since purchase of ferries . . 8,595,287 64 

Receipts from rents since purchase of ferries . . . 73,618 90 

Receipts from sale of ferryboats 168,004 57 

Receipts from all other sources, per ferry books . . . 38,038 25 
Receipts from all other sources additional, per City 

Auditor 30,734 85 



Total receipts from all sources $8,935,272 77 

Less amount with tollmen as capital .... 40 00 



Total receipts, Auditor's Report .... $8,935,232 77 



Regular Annual (Ordinary) and Special Appropriations (Extraor= 
dinarv) of the Ferry Service for the Year Ending December 
31, 1938. 

Appropriations (regular) for the year ending December 31, 

1938 $272,188 69 

Amount of expenditures (regular) for the year . . . 245,134 46 



Transferred from Bridge Service . . . $1,200 00 
Transferred from Sanitary Service . . 6,500 00 



Transferred to Bridge Service . . . $6,152 00 

Transferred to Paving Service . . . 5,100 00 

Transferred to Sanitary Service . . . 2,936 63 

Transferred to Park Department . . . 2,795 68 



$27,054 23 

7,700 00 
$34,754 23 

16,984 31 



$17,769 92 
Transferred to City Treasurer 17,664 85 



$105 07 



Special Appropriations. 

East Boston Ferry, two additional boats and other im- 
provements : 
Unexpended balance January 1, 1938 .... $19,06481 



Transferred to Sinking Fund $19,064 81 



Ferry Improvements, Etc. : 

Unexpended balance January 1, 1938 .... $8,374 58 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1938 . . . $8,374 58 



Public Works Department. 



59 



Receipts of South Ferry. 



From Tollmen. 


From Foot 
Passengers. 


From 
Tickets. 


Totals. 


Boston side 


$6,104 20 
6,147 90 


$1,661 20 
714 80 


$7,765 40 
6,862 70 


East Boston side 






Totals 


$12,252 10 


$2,376 00 


$14,628 10 



From tollmen 
From gatemen: 
Cash for teams . 

Total at South Ferry . 
Tickets paid for at ferry office 



Rents for the year 
Headhouse privileges . 
Care of public telephones . 
Commission on public telephones 
Old material sold .... 

Total 



$14,628 10 

110,139 19 

2$24,767 29 
872 10 

$25,639 39 

114 50 

140 00 

48 00 

38 81 

1 00 

S25,981 70 



Travel on the South Ferry From January 1, 1938, 
TO December 31, 1938, Inclusive. 

Foot passengers at 1 cent each .... $1,225,210 00 



South Ferry. 

Handcart, or wheelbarrow and man 
Horse and rider .... 

Horse and cattle, each with attendant 
One or two horse vehicle with driver 
Motorcycle with driver . 

Trailer 

Three or four horse vehicle with driver 
Passenger automobile with driver and more 

one passenger 

Motor truck, six tons, or less with driver 
Motor truck over six tons, with driver 
Auto bus with driver 1 
Auto bus with driver and passengers/ . 
Free vehicles 



than 



5 cents 
5 cents 
5 cents 
5 cents 
5 cents 
10 cents 
10 cents 

1 5 cents 
15 cents"! 
20 cents/ 

30 cents 



33,681 



57,897 

33,622 
3,287 



0.0 
1,291 



1 Includes gatemen's refund . 

2 Includes 1 cent cash fares from foot passengers for year. 



60 City Document No. 24. 



SUMNER TRAFFIC TUNNEL. 



Receipts. 



Financial Statement for the Year Ending December SI, 

1938. 

Cash in hands of cashier at the beginning of year, $4,249 55 
Received from tolls .... $836,399 65 
Received through City Collector * . 25 50 

Commission on telephone tolls . 14 07 

Total receipts 836,439 22 

$840,688 77 



Cash paid over to City Collector .... $836,379 57 
Cash in hands of cashier December 31, 1938 4,309 20 

,688 77 



2. Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Received from annual appropriations for Sumner 

Traffic Tunnel $222,257 16 

Transferred to City Treasurer .... 3,729 18 

Total expenditures for year .... $218,527 98 

3. Result of Operation for the Year. 

Ordinary Expenses (maintenance 

appropriation) .... $218,527 98 

Interest paid on tunnel debt . . 851,452 50 

Sinking Fund 204,268 00 

Net outgo for the year $1,274,248 48 

Receipts for the year (net income) . . . 836,379 57 

Net deficit for the year $437,868 91 



* Includes $21 tickets sold in 1937; paid for in 1938; does not include $65 tickets sold 
in 1938; not paid for. 



Public Works Department. 



61 



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City Document No. 24. 



"3 
1 


311,948 
303,385 
358,465 
415,039 
537,977 
607,575 
597,313 


5 


582,775 
487,720 
503,953 
412,728 
424.424 




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3,824 
3,244 
3,704 
4,592 
6,375 
6,457 
6,458 


City- 
Owned 
Vehicles. 


6,591 
6,341 
7,046 
6,879 
6,665 


CO 
t^ 

00 

to 


25 Cents, 
Buses. 

9 


8,437 
7,684 
8,276 
8,230 
8,816 
8,651 
8,592 


25 Cents, 
Buses. 


10,890 
10,341 
10,595 
10,328 
10,919 




$1.00, 

Truck, 

Over 

10-Ton 

Capacity. 

8 


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$1.00, 
Truck, 
Over 
10-Ton 
Capacity. 


— 1 00 IN -H .-( 


1^ 


10 Cents, 
Motor- 
cycle. 

7 


105 
114 
175 
285 
528 
787 
*819 


20 Cents, 

Tractor 

With 

Trailer. 


CO 00 -H o 00 


o 

CO 


35 Cents, 

Truck, 
5-10-Ton 
Capacity. 

6 


1,028 
545 
616 
340 
354 
343 
348 


35 Cents, 

Truck, 
5-10-Ton 
Capacity. 


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Truck, 

Over 

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Capacity. 

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Pleasure 

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With 

Trailer. 


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Oi 


25 Cents, 

Truck, 

2-5-Ton 

Capacity. 

4 


2,053 
1.626 
1,977 
1,666 
1,804 
1,844 
1,824 


25 Cents, 

Truck, 

2-5-Ton 

Capacity. 


1 668 
1,737 
1,726 
1,867 
2,268 


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15 Tons. 

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2 


271,354 
269,238 
319,308 
371,839 
490,646 
556,643 
545,300 


15 Cents, 

Pleasure 

Car. 


528 692 
437,250 
453,166 
363,717 
373,617 


o 
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Truck, 
2-Ton 

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1 


25,140 
20,927 
24,401 
28,074 
29,442 
32,838 
33,957 


15 Cents, 
Truck, 
2-Ton 

Capacity. 


33,943 
31,183 
30,701 
29,188 
30,073 


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63 



Sumner Tunnel Service. 
Rates in accordance with provisions of section 9 of 
chapter 297 of the Acts of 1929, as amended by section 
2 of chapter 455 of the Acts of 1935. For period begin- 
ning January 1, 1939, and ending June 30, 1939. All 
rates are for vehicle with or without passengers. 



Single Trip Tunnel Toll Rates. 



Class. 



Description. 



Rate. 



1 

2 
3, 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 



Truck not in excess of two tons capacit}'' 

Tractor without trailer 

Passenger car 

Motorcj^cle 

Truck over two tons and up to five tons capacity, 
Tractor with trailer over two tons and up to 

five tons capacity 

Passenger car with trailer 

Truck over five tons and up to ten tons capacity, 
Tractor with trailer over five tons and up to 

ten tons capacity 

Tractor with trailer not in excess of two tons 

capacity 

Truck over ten tons capacity 

Tractor with trailer over ten tons capacity 

Bus with or without passengers 



;o.i5 

.15 
.15 
.15 
.25 

.25 
.20 
.35 

.35 

.20 
1.00 
1.00 

.25 



Removal of Meehanical Stalled Vehicles from Tunnel. 



Description. 



Rate. 



Passenger car 

Truck or tractor with trailer not in excess of two tons capacity, 
Truck or tractor with trailer over two tons and up to five tons 

capacity 

Truck or tractor with trailer over five tons and up to ten tons 

capacity 

Truck or tractor with trailer over ten tons capacity 

Bus 



$0.50 
.50 

.70 

1.00 
2.00 
1.50 



64 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I submit the following report of the 
operations and expenditures of the Highway Division 
for the year ending December 31, 1938. 

The maintenance expenditures of the division for the 
year were as follows : 

Lighting Service $949,517 94 

Paving Service 1,513,164 83 

Paving Service. 

The Paving Service appropriation in the budget 
called for $1,325,296,41. Due to an increased number 
of W. P. A. employees it was necessary to sponsor more 
projects than were contemplated when making up 
the 1938 budget and, in view of this, an additional 
amount of $175,000 on a loan was appropriated for the 
rental of equipment and the cost of materials. We 
have also had other transfers amounting to $66,343, 
giving the Paving Service a total credit of $1,566,639.41, 
and from this amount $7,550 was transferred, leaving 
a total amount of $1,559,089.41. The Paving Service's 
expenditures amounted to $1,513,164.83, leaving an 
unexpended balance of $45,924.58, of which $25,236.84 
has been carried forward. 

As of January 1, 1938, the regular employees num- 
bered 543 and on December 31, 1938, our personnel 
had decreased to 513. The amount of money taken 
in through the Permit Office of the Paving Service 
amounted to $9,449.28. 

Our day labor forces handled all the maintenance 
work on streets and a considerable amount of patching 



Public Works Department. 65 

work was done by this service in the surfaces of both 
sidewalks and roadways where openings were made 
by the Sewer and Water Divisions other than sheet 
asphalt pavements. 

Since 1933 there has been no attempt to keep the 
maintenance up on smooth pavement streets as this 
service has not the men in its employ to do the work 
properly. There are some 6,000,000 square yards 
of smooth pavement showing considerable wear for 
lack of maintenance and, if possible, the Paving Service 
should be allowed to draw up a contract for the repair 
of these streets for the year 1939. 

We had an average of 4,500 men, with a peak load 
from the month of June until the month of November 
of approximately 8,000 men on our W. P. A. program. 
The greater amount of work done in the Paving Service 
was done by W. P. A. forces and, during the past year, 
the following mileage of streets was constructed: 

Bituminous macadam 20 . 35 miles. 

Bituminous concrete 10.98 miles. 

Concrete pavement 7.13 miles. 



Total 38.44 miles. 

Much needed improvements have been made on the 
following main traffic arteries : 

Blue Hill Avenue (from Mattapan Square to Babson Street). 
— Removal of the reservation and the substitution of a center 
safety island. 

Dorchester Avenue (from Old Colony Avenue to beyond First 
Street). — Reconstruction of. 

Atlantic Avenue and Commercial Street. — Reconstruction is 
now under way. The work started about the first of October 
and is receiving favorable comment from the general public 
due to the progress being made and the efficient manner in 
which the project is being conducted. When completed the 
vehicular traffic should be greatly facilitated and expedited on 
this important highway. 

Relative to walls, the following have been built: 

Bremen street, East Boston. 
River street, Hyde Park. 
Kenrick street, Brighton. 

These walls have been constructed to save the main- 
tenance on the repair of fences and also for the safety 



66 City Document No. 24. 

of the traveling public. They are constructed of old 
paving blocks at a considerable saving to the city. 
There is also under construction at the present time a 
wall on Edgevvater Drive in Mattapan which will be 
used to hold in the Neponset river floods which have 
been a source of annoyance and discomfort to the 
abutters for a long period of years. 

We have built two new office buildings, one in the 
Roxbury paving yard and one in the West Roxbury 
paving district. We are at present engaged in remodel- 
ing a building in the Hyde Park paving yard which 
will house a number of city vehicles and which will 
mean a great saving to the city in garage rentals. 
This program of remodeling and erecting new buildings 
will continue and I feel that, with the cooperation of 
the W. P. A., we can construct new and smaller quarters 
to replace the old broken-down buildings in the various 
paving yards which have been a continual source of 
expense to keep up. 

In the Charlestown district traps were put in on 
Bunker Hill street to prevent "looping" in the district. 
At a recent hearing before the Department of Public 
Utilities the police captain of the district stated that 
these ''loopings" have been reduced from fifteen to 
twenty a month to about three a month for the past 
five months. Upon the above I feel that the purpose 
for which they were put in has been well served. 

In cooperation with the Bridge and Ferry Division 
we have constructed high curbs and removed the car 
tracks on the Dover Street Bridge which, no doubt, 
was the cause of a number of accidents and which, in 
my opinion, will put an end to same. Recently a 
ten-ton truck skidded and hit one of these bumpers 
and was thrown across the street to the other bumper, 
causing no damage to the bumpers and thereby giving 
a good test and showing that these will prevent future 
mishaps. We are now working on the Dorchester 
Avenue Bridge and on the viaduct in Chelsea street, 
Charlestown, and it is our intention to continue along 
these lines until such time as these hazardous conditions 
are eliminated on all bridges. 

Your attention is also called to the work done during 
the recent hurricane by employees of the Paving Service 
and W. P. A. forces. Within three days after the 
storm every public street had been opened to travel. 
At the present time we are working in two paving dis- 
tricts on repairs to sidewalk and street surfaces damaged 



Public Works Department. 67 

by the uprooting of trees. We will not complete this 
work until some time during the latter part of the 
spring of this year, as there is a considerable amount 
of work yet to be done. 

This has been the most successful and biggest year 
we have had under W. P. A. projects. There has been 
more work produced and the material advantages given 
us by the Government through the W. P. A. forces 
have made this so successful. 

There are also under my jurisdiction two white 
collar projects now operating, namely, the surveying 
of street intersections to abolish traffic hazards by the 
removing of small radii, which were satisfactory in the 
days of the horse and buggy, and the substitution of a 
large radii for automobile traffic. We also have a street 
numbering project under way which, for the first time 
in the history of the city, has the thought in mind of 
arranging a systematic location of street numbers to 
avoid confusion. 

In order that an idea of the money for the cost of 
this work may be had this will advise you that the 
Federal Government money for materials used and con- 
tracted for amounted to $1,147,978, and the cost to 
this service for materials, equipment, heat, light and 
communication amounts to approximately $609,189 up 
to December 31, 1938. 

Lighting Service. 

The Lighting Service appropriation of the Highway 
Division called for $965,000, and there was spent 
$949,517.94, leaving an unexpended balance of $6,239.06, 
after making a transfer of $9,243. 

In an effort to cut down the cost of lighting without 
reducing the number of lamps, which was done in a 
previous administration in an attempt to save money, 
but which at the time caused a great deal of criticism 
and resulted in an increase of crime by the shutting off 
of every other fight, Mr. Power of the Lighting Service 
and myself finally came to the conclusion that the 
Mazda type fights of 1,500 candle power could be 
changed to 1,000 candle power, thereby reducing the 
fighting effect by one third, which was hardly noticeable 
by the general pubfic and caused no serious incon- 
venience. 

This effected a total of 4,959 of these fights to be 
changed and resulted in the saving of approximately 



68 



City Document No. 24. 



$32,000. The saving this year will be greater, as it 
will be for the entire year, whereas in 1938 it covered 
a period of ten months or less. 

There are still 2,168 1,500 candle power arc lights in 
the city. These cannot be reduced at the present 
time to 1,000 candle power, as these lights are served 
by direct current, and until such time as the alternating 
current can be substituted these lights must remain as 
they are, but gradually we intend to reduce the 1,500 
to 1,000 candle power. 

It is noticeable that during the past year thirty-one 
lamps at 1,500 candle power and sixty-four lamps at 
1,000 candle power, located in various districts, were 
discontinued and locations of same abandoned without 
any inconvenience to the public. 

Petitions and requests for new lamps received from 
citizens and officials, also complaints in relation to the 
Lighting Service, have been investigated and attended 
to. Requests for lighting in newly developed sections 
should be honored by this service. Additional lights 
are only granted where absolutely necessary. 

All streets in the underground district prescribed for 
the year have been inspected and necessary changes and 
additions have been made. 

The following is a table showing the various types of 
lamps located within the City of Boston: 



Size of Lamps. 



Number of Lamps. 



December 31, 


December 31, 


1937. 


1938. 


21 


21 


2,695 


2,168 


4,469 


None 


423 


5,332 


407 


452 


80 


80 


99 


107 


43 


39 


4,904 


4,919 


505 


520 


184 


186 


51 


37 



3,000 candle power Twin Mazda 

1,500 candle power Arc 

1,500 candle power Mazda 

1,000 candle power Mazda 

600 candle power Mazda 

250 candle power Mazda 

132 candle power Mazda 

100 candle power Alazda 

80 candle power Mazda 

Fire Alarm Mazda. 

40 candle power Twin, 24-hour burning 

80 candle power 

60 candle power 

Totals 



13,881 



13,861 



Respectfully, 

William T. Morrissey, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



69 



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Public Works Department. 



73 



Work Done by Department Forces for the Year 1938. 



Snow removal .... 
Brick sidewalk repairs . 
Edgestonc (set and reset) 
Granite block roadway repairs 
Macadam roadway patched . 
Gravel sidewalk repairs . 
Street cleaning 
Granolithic sidewalk repairs . 
Bitiilithic and tar sidewalk repairs 
Asphalt roadway patched 
Bitulithic gutter repairs 
Granite block gutter repairs . 
Macadam roadway resurfacing 
Paved street repairs 



242,394 

19,971 

17,267 

6,875 

185,062 

118,079 

22,396 

146,633 

30,438 

2,890 

10 

2,169 

15,067 

396 



cubic yards, 
square yards, 
linear feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
cubic yards, 
square feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards. 



74 



City Document No. 24. 



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Table Showing Length and Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, Correct to January 1, 1939. 





Length in Miles. 


Are.* in Scc.iRE Yards. 




Sheet 
.Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 




* 142.01 
20.31 


t 141.80 
20 28 


187.91 
12.57 


1.78 
0.25 


0.79 
0.11 


0.97 
0.14 


§9.73 
1.39 


289.12 
41.35 


23.20 
3.32 


1.96 
0.28 


699.27 
100.00 


* 2,730,296 
20.47 


t 2.863,244 
21.47 


t 2,336.756 
17.62 


36.273 
0.27 


17,434 
0.13 


22.431 
0.17 


§ 192.874 
1.45 


4.720,850 
35.40 


357,592 
2.68 


59,015 
0.44 


13.335.765 










Jaucart 1, 1939, 


32.83 
0.69 
3 86 
8.89 
26 79 
25.13 
32 53 
11 43 
0.65 


26 03 

2 30 

3 99 
7.62 

14 . 16 
31.82 
35.05 
24.64 
5.26 


29.81 
10.29 
5 97 
12.71 
13.86 
3.43 
7.11 
65 
0.05 


0.64 
08 
0.01 
0.04 
0.10 
01 
06 

0.09 


0.15 
07 
06 
0.19 
04 
0.07 
07 
0.08 
0.05 


0.40 

03 
0,12 
0,14 

0,27 


1.60 
0.80 
0.44 
0.12 
3.60 
4.07 
3 29 
2 27 
0.29 


5 68 
9.13 
21.26 
15.70 
36.27 
69 01 
81.66 
21.01 
24 04 


0.19 

82 
0.29 
1.02 
4.66 
6.22 
2.00 
8.55 


0.01 
0.04 
1.29 

32 
0,07 

0.24 


97.13 
23.43 
36.48 
47 03 
94.98 
138.41 
165.23 
62 08 
39 22 


661.334 
10.172 
86.231 
167.516 
462.961 
458.307 
008.665 
260.788 
15,347 


592.021 
37.894 
90.127 
162.121 
278.329 
624.064 
654.514 
481.638 
108.172 


717.782 
245.915 
142.121 
326,662 
358.890 
156.432 
210.997 
75.381 
9.337 


9.572 
2.011 

325 
1.285 
3.658 

210 
1.669 
1.007 
1.488 


4.014 
1.999 

892 
4.797 
1,022 
1,380 
1,.346 
1,231 

747 


9.776 

771 
3.001 
3.380 

6.479 


33.167 
18.910 
26.090 

3.642 
64,824 
58,782 
61.385 
45.316 

7.056 


87.676 
132..303 
439.943 
279.033 
537.245 
1.085.268 
1.312.402 
354.080 
408.158 


2.066 


41 
865 
34.650 
61 
10,361 
2.312 
2.870 
7,965 


2.107,398 








16.612 
6.028 
13.070 
71.922 
82.433 
28.009 
133,278 


803.877 




987,635 




1,723.440 




2.466.710 




2.931.192 


Brighton . 


1,250.320 


Hvde Park 


691.548 






Totals 


141 80 
20.14 


150.93 
21.44 


83.88 
11.91 


0.93 
0.13 


0.78 
0.11 


0.96 
0.14 


18.48 
2.34 


283.62 
40.29 


22.64 
3.22 


1 97 
0.28 


703.99 
100.00 


2.721.311 
20.29 


3,028,880 
22.68 


2.243.517 
16.73 


21.225 
0.16 


17.428 
0.13 


22,407 
0.17 


309.162 
2.30 


4,636.108 
34.57 


352.318 
2.63 


59,015 
0.44 


13.411.371 


Percent.. .. 


100.00 







Total Poblic Streets 703.99 Miles. 
Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline is included in city proper, 

• Of this amount 0.10 mile or 834 square yards is Biturock; and 0.08 mile or 1.323 or 4.153 square yards is Warcolite; and 0.18 mile or 3.474 square yards is Carey Elas- 

square yards is Kvrock; and 0.02 mile or 470 square yards is Unionite. tite asphalt plank; and 0.12 mile or 2.797 square yards is Flintkote asphalt plank; and 

t Of this amount 0.02 mile or 667 square yards is Amiesite; and 33.18 miles or 600.321 0.10 mile or 1.436 square yards is Johns-Maiiville asphalt plank 

square yards is asphalt concrete; and 106.71 miles or 2.186,090 square vards is bitulithic; t Of this amount 0.02 mile or 165 square yards is cobble; and 66.20 miles or 1.72d,911 

and 0.02 mile or 4,973 square yards is Colprovia; and 0.06 mile or 959 square yards is square ^ards is granite block paving < 

Filbertine; and 0.00 mile or 4.000 square yards is Hepburnite; and 0.00 mile or 3.903 square 
yards is Laykold ; and 0.00 mile or 4. 167 square yards is Macasphalt ; and 0.24 mile or 5.644 
square yards is Simasco; and 11.30 miles or 206.297 square yards is Topeka; and 0.00 mile 
6.86 miles or 36,363 square yards public alleys included in this table; 7.56 miles or 334.419 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 3 95 miles or 123.247 square yards public 
streets in charge of Cimmonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 1.75 mdas or 8.729 square yards of accepted footways. 



-.„ --i concrete base. 
r 924 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 
r 3.493.176 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



Public Works Department. 



75 



Street Openings. 

Under Classes 1 and 2 of the schedule of permit fees 
permits were issued for openings in public ways as 
follows : 

Number of Permits. 

Sewer and Water Services 3,931 

Edison Company 901 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company 675 

New Enjj;land Telephone and Telegraph Company 279 

Boston Elevated Railway Company 164 

Dedham and Hyde Park Gas and Electric Company 18 

Emergency permits 1,395 

Miscellaneous 828 



Total 



8,191 



Permits for other than street openings have 
been issued as follows : 

Painting and minor repairs 2,318 

Placing signs flat on buildings 587 

Special permits 229 

Erecting and repairing buildings 391 

Repairing awnings 97 

Emergency permits for raising and lowering ... 50 

Moving buildings in streets 2 

Cleaning snow from roofs 30 

Driving cattle through streets 1 

Total 3,705 

Grand total 11,896 



The fees received from these permits amount to 
$9,449.28; of this amount $7,200.28 was deposited 
with the City Collector and $2,249 was billed to public 
service corporations. 

Bonds. 

There are now on file 1,850 surety bonds, in the amount 
of one, three, four and twenty thousand dollars, cover- 
ing the city against claims for damages, etc., through 
the use of permits. 



76 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX C. 

REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith a statement of the 
activities and expenditures of the Sanitary Division 
for the year ending December 31, 1938: 



Maintenance expenditures 




$2,114,116 81 


Motor deficiency ..... 




79,788 97 


Total cost approach 




$2,193,905 78 


I. Waste collection and disposal 




$1,513,912 85 


(a) By contract (Table II) . 


'. $380,829 58 






(6) Bv day labor (Table III) 


. 1,133,083 27 






II. Street Cleaning (Table V) . 




620,060 49 


Not directly chargeable to 1938 operation 


59,932 44 


(a) For other services . 


$10,523 39 






(b) Pensions and annuities . 


4,087 25 






(c) Injured roll 


5,506 89 






{d) W. P. A 


8,732 28 






(e) Unused stock . 


13,637 66 






(/) Preventive street cleaning 


17,444 97 






Personnel changes in permanent force: 








Total personnel January 1, 1938 






799 


Transfers from other departments and divisions 




11 


New appointments .... 






10 


Reinstatements ..... 






2 








822 


Deaths . . . 




. 17 




Resignations 




2 




Retirements 




. 29 




Discharged 




. 10 




Transferred out 




. 8 


66 


Personnel Januarv 1. 1939 






756 



Approach to True Cost. 
In this report, for the first time, an attempt is made 
to approach the true cost of operation by including an 
item called "Motor Deficiency," which represents equip- 
ment charges not paid for out of the Sanitary Division 
budget. These figures were obtained from the Public 



Public Works Department. 77 

Works garage, and include depreciation, storage in city- 
owned garages, and repairs performed by the city forces. 
On the other hand, I desire again to emphasize the 
fact that labor expenditures are far from representing 
true costs, because the division is operating with wel- 
fare men larger in number than our own permanent 
force, and since no charge is made for these welfare 
men a true labor cost cannot be determined. 

Expenditure Drop. 
The 1938 budget expenditures were $161,108 less 
than those of 1937 for the Sanitary Division. This 
diminution is accounted for as follows : 

Contracts $74,088 00 

Labor 29,919 00 

Other budget items . . . . 57,101 00 

While there was an increase in the price bid for the 
Brighton district contract for the removal of refuse 
and garbage, amounting to about $13,000, this was more 
than offset by reduced prices in all the other districts. 
The Elm Hill district contract which amounted to 
$29,400 in 1937, was discontinued in 1938, and the 
work in this district was done by Sanitary forces in 
1938, thus saving this expense. 

The diminution in the labor account was due to the 
continuance of the ''no-hiring" policy, with the losses 
in man power being made up, as in previous years, by 
welfare forces. 

Item B-14, Motor Vehicles Repair and Care, shows a 
saving of $11,000 during the year. By storing vehicles 
in outside yards, a considerable saving in rentals was 
effected. 

Savings were made in fuel, forage, materials, tires and 
tools. 

Five second-hand passenger cars were purchased from 
other departments at a cost of $1,250. 

Refuse Transfer Stations. 

Fort Hill Wharf was dredged, as the refuse scows 
were grounding at low tide. This work was done 
under contract. 

The contract work on the westerly side of the Victory 
Road Station, which was begun in 1937, was completed 
early in the year. The easterly side is still in an unsafe 
condition, and vehicles are not permitted thereon. 



78 City Document No. 24. 

Work Done by W. P. A. 

Victory Road ^<a^2on.— Retaining wall constructed; 
old ramp removed and replaced with a new one; entire 
building covered with transite; iron work repaired; 
new office building constructed; flooring replaced on the 
westerly side. 

Albany Street. — Ramp and upper platform re floored; 
new bumper sticks and fence ; lower section dust-proofed. 

Foi't Hill Wha7\f, Atlantic Avenue. — Made foundation 
dust-tight; built two offices and connected toilets with 
water and sewer; constructed concrete retaining wall, 
and decked over gap between concrete wall and building. 

Ward Street Station. — Removed the old ramp ; cleaned 
and scraped steel underpinning; removed old siding of 
building, and cleaned frame. 

Archives. — Work under the Archives Project is still 
going on. 

About one-third of the W. P. A. construction projects' 
work remains to be completed in 1939. 

The foregoing was in addition to hurricane work. 

Man Power. 

At the beginning of the year there was an average 
of 1,100 welfare men per day. This, however, had 
fallen by the first of July to 550, and then gradually 
to a low of 450 in November, after which there was a 
rise to 650 per day at the end of the year. These 
fluctuations resulted in considerable irregularity in the 
amount of work performed in the removal of waste 
material and the cleaning of the streets. 

Since the Sanitary Division depends upon men supplied 
by the Welfare Department for two-thirds of its man 
power, it is obvious that any improvement in the 
condition of the Welfare Department results in a short- 
age of man power in the Sanitary Division, to the detri- 
ment of the service rendered the public. Thus, savings 
in the Welfare Department would be offset by the neces- 
sity for additional expenditures in the Sanitary Division 
for man power in order to keep the number of employees 
at a level sufficient to render satisfactory service. 

Dead animals removed and disposed of numbered 
540 in 1938. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



79 



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80 



City Document No. 24. 





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82 



City Document No. 24. 



TABLE IV. 
Comparative Costs per Cubic Yard 1937-1938. 





Collection. 


Total 


Cost. 


Cubic Yards. 
1937. 




Day Labor Districts. 


1937. 


1938. 


1937. 

$0.52406 
Disposal. 


1938. 

$0.5346 
Disposal. 


Cubic Yards. 
1938. 




$0 8667 

9306 

1 1029 

9563 
9802 


$0 9052 

9979 

1 0998 

1 0288 
1 0245 


$1 3872 
1 4511 
1 6234 

1 4779 
1 5007 


$1 4398 
1 5325 
1 6344 

1 5634 
1 5591 


100,976 

43.202 

198,443 

230,740 
140,077 


98,476 




41,037 




236,480 


8 and 9. South End and Back 
Bay 


209,498 


10. North and West Ends 


137,478 




$0 9875 


$1 0326 


$1 5084 


$1 5672 


713,438 
$704,582 72 


722,969 


Collection Cost 


$746,570 88 















Contract Districts. 



Cost per Cubic Yard. 



1937. 



1938. 



Cubic Yards. 
1937. 



Cubic Yards. 
1938. 



2. East Boston 

4. Brighton 

5. West Roxbury 

6. Dorchester (including disposal) . 
II. Hyde Park 

7. Roxbury (Elm Hill Section) 



$0 6627 
4753 
5835 
8409 

6293 

1 0963 



$0 5527 
6283 
5090 
6298 
5499 



77,460 
92,738 
124,006 
285,410 
22,436 
30,197 



77,281 

87,271 

122,298 

329,089 

25,026 



Average. 
Totals... 



$0 754 



$0 5941 



632,247 



640,965 



Public Works Department. 



83 



TABLE V. 

Street Cleaning and Oiling Service, 1938. 

Distribution of Expenditures. 
Removing snow 
Brooming 
Pushcart patrolling 
Flushing streets 
Horse-drawn sweeping 
Motor sweeping 
Team patrol . 
Refuse box collection 
Sanding . 
Underpass 
Public alleys . 
Hurricane 

Total 

Oiling and watering of public streets and ways 

Total 



5,903 45 

260,335 04 

132,143 19 

4,488 06 

59,745 46 

21,433 80 

3,854 79 

19,650 27 

2,455 00 

2,976 81 

134 53 

3,828 26 

$599,948 66 
20,111 83 

$620,060 49 



Street Cleaning Operations. 

Broom gang 31,145 miles. 

Horse-drawn sweepers 3,523 miles. 

Motor sweepers 5,908 miles. 

Pushcart patrol 13,716 miles. 

Team patrol 944 miles. 

Flushing 970 miles. 



Catch-all boxes 



203,225 collections. 



One hundred and six thousand (106,000) gallons of road oil 
was spread, covering 42 linear miles of streets. 



84 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Deak Sir, — I submit herewith statement of the 
activities and expenditures of the Sewer Division for the 
year ending December 31, 1938. 

During the fiscal year 1938 there were built by con- 
tractors, day labor, private parties, and by the city 
under W. P. A. supervision, 8.97 miles of common 
sewers and surface drains throughout the city. After 
deducting 0.76 mile of sewers and surface drains, rebuilt 
or abandoned, the net increase for 1938 is 8.21 miles, 
which, added to the existing 1,187.23 miles of sewers 
and surface drains and 30.93 miles of intercepting 
sewers, makes a grand total of 1,226.37 miles of all 
sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and under the 
care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1939. 

There were 273 catch-basins built or rebuilt and 90 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 183 catch-basins and a grand total of 21,849 
catch-basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1939. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $808.36 have been 
deposited with the City Collector for collection from 
estates upon which no sewer assessments were ever 
paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 1910, chapter 9, 
section 10. 

886 permits have been issued, viz., 460 to district 
foremen and contractors and 426 to drain layers for 
repairing or laying new house drains. Inspectors from 
this office have personally inspected the work done 
under these drain layers' permits. 



Public Works Department. 85 

Plans for the assessments of estates for sewer con- 
struction have been furnished the Board of Street Com- 
missioners, representing 11,279.24 Hnear feet of sewers. 

834 complaints have been investigated and report in 
writing has been made in each case. 

2,478 gasoline traps have been examined in garages 
and cleansing establishments. 

950 grease traps have been examined in hotels, 
restaurants and commercial establishments. 

Reported in writing on 2,339 municipal liens to the 
City Collector in accordance with chapter 60, section 23, 
of the General Laws. Reported orally in the Sewer 
Assessment office on about 5,000 requests for infor- 
mation on municipal liens. 

413 notices have been mailed to abutters in con- 
formity with the Ordinances, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 



Respectfully, 



Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer. 



86 



City Document No. 24. 






3 
C 

•-5 



Loan 

Authorized 

and Not 

Issued 






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o 
o 

o 

lO 

o 






-a 
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$10,820 01 

10 68 
274,370 73 

6,.343 11 


Total 
Expenditure.?. 


$502,302 99 

180,772 88 

294,855 16 

5,896 98 

16,750 00 


Eh ^ 

o 


} $513,123 00 

180,783 56 

569,225 89 

5,896 98 

23,093 11 


Is" 


oo 
oo 

oo 
00 "O 

O — 1 
St 










Appropria- 
tion and 
Revenue, 
1938. 


$514,253 00 

159,054 47 
.500,000 00 






Balance 

on Hand 

January 1, 

1938. 




$21,729 09 

69,153 55 

5,896 98 

23,093 11 


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Public Works Department. 



87 



MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURES JANUARY 1 
TO DECEMBER 31, 1938. 



Sewer Division. 

Improved Sewerage. 
Pumping; Station, Calf Pasture, inside 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, outside 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, engines . 
Pumping Station, Calf Pastui'e, boilers 
Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, Union Park 

street 

Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, Summer street, 

Moon Island 

Main and intercepting sewer .... 
Contract job — Central Wharf, rebuild wooden 
overflow : 
Built by IM. De Sisto under unadvertised 
contract, dated October 13, 1937; begun 
September 24, 1937; finished October 26, 
1937 



$102,979 36 
13,206 39 
41,453 99 
21,704 84 

9,201 43 

2,300 93 

27,186 80 

17,154 58 



1,789 09 











$236,977 41 


Maintenance — Regular. 


Automobiles 


. $43,808 37 


Cleaning catch-basins 








79,141 66 


Cleaning sewers . 








41,361 15 


Employed at yards 








27,257 53 


Fuel and oil . 








923 75 


Hardware and tools 








11,938 39 


House connections 








8,052 63 


Horses, carts and harness 






1,250 75 


Maintenance Stony Brook 






319 25 


Office expense 






2,204 88 


Office salaries 






37,639 99 


Stock .... 






3,805 43 


Yard and lockers . 






650 38 




'^^°,'^'\1 16 




^OOj*JO^ X\J 


Maintenance — Repa 


irs. 


Repairing department buildings 


$2,463 01 


Repairing catch-basins, South Boston 


2,222 13 


Repairing catch-basins, East Boston 


1,879 90 


Repairing catch-basins, Charlestown 


523 45 


Repairing catch-basins, Brighton 


644 35 


Repairing catch-basins, West Roxbury . 


3,992 23 


Repairing catch-basins, Dorchester . 


4,947 32 


Repairing catch-basins, Hyde Park . 


477 99 


Repairing catch-basins, Roxbury 


4,153 95 


Repairing catch-basins. City Proper 


5,664 02 


Repairing sewers. South Boston 


597 88 


Repairing sewers, East Boston .... 


1,175 60 


Repairing sewers, Charlestown .... 


— 


Repairing sewers, Brighton .... 


309 07 


Repairing sewers, West Roxbury 


1,576 56 


Carried forward 


$30,627 46 $495,331 57 



88 



City Document No. 24. 



Brought forward . 
Repairing sewers, Dorchester 
Repairing sewers, Hyde Park 
Repairing sewers, Roxbury 
Repairing sewers. City Proper 



Maintenance 
Miscellaneous .... 
Back Bay Fens .... 

Telephones 

Rubber goods .... 
Pensions and annuities 



$30,627 46 

2,906 74 

394 14 

465 85 

1,900 60 


$495,331 57 
36,294 79 

51,099 44 
$582,725 80 


jneous. 

$45,778 99 

98 72 

794 86 

298 87 

4,128 00 


$582,725 80 



Credits. 

Stock used on jobs and trans- 
ferred to construction . . $11,883 16 

Autos and teams used on jobs 
and transferred to construc- 
tion 68,539 65 



80,422 81 80,422 81 



Debits. 
Transfers from other divisions 

and departments . . . $1,130 00 

Total expenditures, 1939 .... 



$502,302 99 $502,302 99 



1,130 00 1,130 00 



$503,432 99 $503,432 99 



Public Works Department. 



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Public Works Department. 



105 



Summary of Sewer Construction for the Twelve Months ending December 31, 1938. 



Districts. 



Built by City 

by Contract 

or Day Labor. 



Built bv City 

Under W. P. A 

Supervision. 



Built by 
Private 
Parties. 



Total Length Built. 



City Proper. . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . 
East Boston . . 
CharlestowTi . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . , 
Hyde Park ... 



Linear Feet. 



None 



16.00 

1,895.96 

40.00 

154.49 

265.30 



Linear Feet. 

545.20 

1,105.00 



76.50 

379.80 

2,615.00 

12,364.72 

13,499.99 

12,653.48 



Linear Feet. 
1,486.00 



285.00 



Linear Feet. 

2,031.20 

1,105.00 

0.00 

76.50 

395.80 

4,795.96 

12,404.72 

13,654.48 

12,918.78 



Miles. 
0.385 
0.209 

0.014 
0.075 
0.908 
2.349 
2.586 
2.447 



Totals . 



2,371.75 



43,239.69 



1,771.00 



47,382.44 



8.973 



Net Increase in Length of Sewers Built Between January 1, 1938, 
and December 31, 1938. 



Districts. 



Length of 

Sewers Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ended 

December 31, 

1938. 



Length of 
Sewers Re- 
built or 
Abandoned 
During 
Twelve 
Months 
Ended 
December 31, 
1938. 



Net Increase for 

Twelve Months Ended 

December 31, 1938. 



City Proper. . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury . 
Dorchester. . . . 
Hyde Park 



Linear Feet. 
2,031.20 
1,105.00 



Totals . 



76.50 
395.80 
4,795.96 
12,404.72 
13,654.48 
12,918.78 

47,382.44 



Lineir Ftet. 

1,767.00 

600.00 



386.00 



620.73 
656.20 

4,029.93 



Linear Feet. 
264.20 
505.00 



76.50 
9.80 
4.795.96 
12,404.72 
13,033.75 
12,262.58 

43,352.51 



Miles. 
0.050 
0.095 



0.014 
0.001 
0.908 
2.349 
2.468 
2.326 

8 211 



106 



City Document No. 24. 



Total Length of Sewers. 

Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous to January 

1, 1938 1,187.23 

Net increase of common sewers and surface drains between 

January 1, 1938, and December 31, 1938 . . . . 8.21 

Total of common sewers and surface drains built to Decem- 
ber 31, 1938 1,195.44 

Total city intercepting sewers connecting with Metropolitan 

Sewers to December 31, 1938 *6.81 

Total Boston main drainage intercepting sewers to Decem- 
ber 31, 1938 *24.12 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to Decem- 
ber 31, 1938 1,226.37 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works to Decem- 
ber 31, 1938 675.61 



* No additional lengths built during 1938. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
December 31, 1938. 





1934. 


1935. 


1936. 


1937. 


1938. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . . 

Built by city under 
W. P. A. government 
supervision 

Built by private parties, 


Linear 
Feet. 

16,637.61 

29,167.46 
610.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

8,530.08 

24,981 .43 
160.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

7,166.08 

17,726.55 
1,145.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

10,717.02 

43,986.51 
1,786.79 


Linear 
Feet. 

2,371.75 

43,239.69 
1,771.00 


Totals 


46,415.07 


33,671.51 


26,037.63 


56,490.32 


47,382.44 



Public Works Department. 



107 



Catch-Basins in Charge of the Sewer Division. 



Districts. 



Catch-Basins for Twelve Months 
Ended December 31, 1938. 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed 


45 


41 


37 


35 


14 


11 


7 





2 


1 


5 


2 


49 





63 





51 






Net 
Increase. 



Total for Whole City 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Division. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1938. 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1939. 



City Proper. . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . 
East Boston . . 
Charlestown. . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park... 

Totals. . . 



273 



90 



4 

2 

3 

7 

1 

3 

49 

63 

51 



183 



3,614 
3,381 
1,447 
1,057 

847 
1,920 
3,600 
5,098 

702 



21,666 



3,618 
3,383 
1,450 
1,064 

848 
1,923 
3,649 
5,161 

753 



21,849 



Sewage Statistics for Year 1938, Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 



Month. 



Total 
Gallons 
Pumped. 



Average 
Gallons 
Pumped. 



Minimum 
Gallons 
Pumped. 



Maximum 
Gallons 
Pumped. 



Average 

Lift. 

(Feet.) 



January. . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



3,252,400,911 
2,888,868,653 
2,881,071,877 
2,867,368,794 
3,048,066,343 
3,437,308,093 
3,989,405,408 
4,105,385,803 
3,718,775,348 
3,037,694,112 
2,989,839,588 
3,441,704,467 



104,916,159 

103,173,880 

92,937,802 

95,578,960 

98,324,721 

114,576,936 

128,690,497 

132,431,800 

123,959,178 

97,990,133 

99,661,319 

111,022,725 



81,640,715 
77,780,635 
74,370,078 
76,478,516 
83,680,336 
91,041,669 
62,809,951 
94,943,296 
86,535,498 
82,850,589 
79,890,190 
81,334,942 



181,517,552 
149,830,611 
172,110,970 
166,574,150 
157,687,157 
202,100,352 
200,406,938 
212,766,296 
187,908,891 
177,824,070 
118,329,686 
206,135,235 



39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 
39.2 



Totals... 
Average . 



39,657,889,397 
108,651,752 



1,303,264,110 
108,605,343 



Note.— Gallons pumped by oil, 15,352,835,397; gallons pumped by electricity, 24,305,054,000; total 
39,657,889,397. 

Running Time of Pump. — No. 1, run 1,772 hours, 25 minutes; No. 2, run 2,037 hours, 40 minutes; No. 3, 
run 1,337 hours, 20 minutes; No. 4, run 1,368 hours, 15 minutes; No. 5, run 4,107 hours, 15 minutes; No. 6, run 
4,787 hours, 25 minutes; No. 7, run 8,564 hours, 13 minutes. 



108 



City Document No. 24. 



Total gallons pumped 

Daily average gallons pumped 

Average dynamic head 

Foot gallons . . . . 

Foot pounds . . . . 



39,657,889,397 

108,651,752 

39.2 

1,554,589,264,362 

12,910,363,633,429 



Fuel Record. 



Fuel Oil 
Received. 



Fuel Oil 
Used. 



Amount. 



January . . . 
February. , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September 
October . . . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



67,265 


.77 


60,107 


81 


67,960 


54 


52,154 


80 


51,336 


24 


45,819 


36 


45,984 


47 


54,991 


86 


50,894 


95 


52,808 


29 


54,510 


03 


56,472 


78 


660,306 


90 



71 755 
62,275 
63,012 
54,480 
51,704 
48,368 
49,045 
52,035 
51,546 
54,910 
54,555 
55,295 



$2,514 54 
2,246 90 
2,436 75 
1,716 85 
1,559 47 
1,343 10 
1,266 36 
1,518 84 
1,405 67 
1,458 50 
1,508 15 
1,559 71 



668,980 



$20,534 84 



Month. 



Pump 
Meter. 



Outside 
Meter. 



Amount. 



January. . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



319,800 
267,000 
255,700 
259,100 
312,600 
349,000 
430,700 
421,200 
375,200 
268,400 
271,800 
336,400 



356,700 
308,920 
249,960 
298,000 
312,000 
315,980 
494,000 
450,000 
439,800 
289,880 
259,520 
376.160 



3,866,900 



4,150,920 



$3,904 06 
3,744 58 
3,425 68 
3,974 32 
3,990 84 
3,997 86 
5,213 51 
4,993 70 
4,881 58 
4,182 08 
3,923 91 
4,331 97 



$50,564 09 



Public Works Department. 



109 



Cost of Pumping for 1938 (Calf Pasture Pumping Station). 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million 

Foot 
Gallons. 




$95,373 95 

20,534 84 

50,564 09 

931 99 

344 95 

3,799 86 


$0.06135 


Fuel oil 


0.01321 




0.03254 




0.00060 




0.00021 




0.00244 






Totals 


$171,549 68 
10,824 60 


$0 . 1 1035 




0.00696 







Amount of Refuse Removed from Filth Hoist. 



Month. 


Cheeses. 


Weight. 




126 
112 
130 
133 
120 
102 
83 
82 
74 
86 
87 
78 


30,366 




26,992 


March 


31,330 




32,053 




28,920 




24,582 


July 


20,003 




19,762 




17,834 




20,726 




20,967 




18,798 






Totals 




1,213 


292,333 







146 joVo tons. 



110 City Document No. 24. 

SEWER DIVISION. 

Boston, March 7, 1939. 

Function. 

The Sewer Division has charge of the construction 
and maintenance of sewerage works for the disposal of 
domestic and industrial sewage wastes and surface 
water. 

Scope of System. 

On January 1, 1939, the sewerage system comprised 
about 31 miles of main drainage structures serving an 
area of 18.40 square miles, made up of Boston proper, a 
part of Roxbury and Dorchester and connected with 
the pumping station at Calf Pasture. Also about 1,200 
miles of sanitary sewers and surface drains (connected 
to which there are 21,700 catch-basins) covering the 
entire city. 

Organization. 

Under the direction of the Division Engineer there 
are four district engineers, a designing engineer, and a 
chief inspector, who direct the activities of about 325 
employees made up of 86 engineers, etc., 36 inspectors, 
13 clerks, 3 district foremen, and 187 in the various 
classifications of the labor groups. All employees with 
the exception of yard clerks, district foremen and the 
labor groups are connected with the main office. The 
labor groups under the supervision of the district fore- 
men and a chief engineer are connected with five sewer 
yards and the pumping station, their location and 
number of employees being as follows: South End, 55, 
Dorchester, 22, Child street, 31, East Boston, 11, Charles- 
town, 3, Pumping Station, including disposal plant at 
Moon Island, 65 employees. 

Activities. 

The activities of the Sewer Division are divided into 
two general classes, namely, construction and main- 
tenance. 

Construction covers the design, preparation of plans, 
field engineering and inspection for the extension or 
rebuilding of all sewerage works done by yard forces, 
contract or W. P. A. labor. (Note: About 95 per cent 
of construction is being done by W. P. A. labor.) 



Public Works Department. Ill 

Maintenance covers the cleaning of catch-basins 
(which work is done by yard forces and contract), 
cleaning and repair of sewers, maintenance of main 
drainage system, operation of pumping station and 
disposal plant, also the permit office which records and 
investigates complaints and claims for damage against 
the city, the granting of sewer permits, preparation of 
plans for sewer assessments, and has custody of all 
records relating to the work of the division. 



Finances. 

Maintenance costs are paid out of the yearly budget 
appropriations from the tax levy, construction costs 
from a yearly sewerage works loan inside the debt limit. 

During the year 1938, $565,084.13 was spent from the 
budget for maintenance, leaving an unexpended balance 
of $10,820, $489,400.83 from the loan for construction, 
or a total of $1,054,484.96, divided as follows: Pay 
rolls, $644,495.29, contract work, maintenance stock and 
equipment, including pumping station, W. P. A. stock 
and equipment, $409,989.67. 

In addition to total maintenance and construction 
cost of $1,054,484.96 must be added the Metropolitan 
sewer assessment of $409,877.96, making a grand total 
direct operating cost of $1,464,362.92. {Note: As stated, 
the Boston main drainage system outlets the sewage 
from about 19.40 square miles, made up of Boston 
proper and a part of Roxbury and Dorchester. All 
Boston sewage outside of this area outlets into either 
the North or South Metropolitan system for the use of 
which Boston is taxed.) 

Work Done in 1938. 

During the year 1938, in addition to routine main- 
tenance work, there was constructed, mostly by W. P. A. 
labor, about 14,000 linear feet of sanitary sewers and 
28,000 linear feet of surface drains and conduits in 
Roxbury, West Roxbury, Dorchester, Hyde Park and 
Brighton districts. 

As a result of this work several brook courses were 
covered in, which assists materially in mosquito control 
but more particularly makes possible the construction 
of new streets by providing adequate surface drainage 
outlets. This work is not only of great benefit to present 



112 City Document No. 24. 

property owners but also encourages the building of 
new homes with its ensuing benefits to the building 
industry as a whole. 

The city's construction for stock and equipment for 
W. P. A. jobs during 1938 amounted to about $200,000, 
the Government's contribution for the corresponding 
purpose being about $125,158. 

During 1938 sewer projects employed a weekly 
average of 2,000 P. W. A. workers. 

The following is a partial list of sewerage works com- 
pleted during the year 1938: 



Brighton. 

Kenrick street, between Larch street and Newton 
line, consisting of 505 linear feet of 2-foot 6-inch circular 
concrete conduit, 260 Hnear feet of 24-inch pipe surface 
drain, 100 hnear feet of 20-inch pipe surface drain, 430 
linear feet of 18-inch pipe surface drain, and including 
780 linear feet of 12-inch pipe sewer. Built in antici- 
pation of work by Highway Division completing con- 
struction of public street; in addition, provides an outlet 
for part of Newton. 

West Roxhury. 

Bussey brook in private land and Hollywood road, 
between West Roxbury Parkway and Church street, 
consisting of 1,115 linear feet of 4-foot, 9-inch circular 
concrete conduit, 95 linear feet of 2-foot, 6-inch circular 
concrete conduit, and including 632 linear feet of 10- 
inch pipe sewer. Built in anticipation of work by High- 
way Division completing construction of Hollywood 
road as newly accepted street, also completes the main 
conduit for this particular drainage area. 

Dorchester. 

Auckland street from Elton street to Savin Hill 
avenue and Elton street from Dorchester avenue to 
Auckland street, consisting of 602.65 linear feet of 
3-foot, 6-inch circular concrete conduit, 256.62 linear 
feet of 10-inch pipe sewer. Built to complete the line 
of Bay Ridge creek from the outlet at Savin Hill Yacht 
Club to and including Pleasant street. 



Public Works Department. 113 

Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park branch of Oakland brook in Windsor 
street and private land, between Tileston street and 
Taunton avenue, Hyde Park, consisting of 601 linear 
feet of 2-foot, 6-inch circular concrete conduit, and 
including 635 linear feet of 12-inch pipe sanitary sewer. 
Built to provide drainage for Tileston street and other 
streets in a low-lying area in which sewers became 
overtaxed and cellars were flooded during storms. 

At the present time there are twenty-nine W. P. A. 
sewerage works projects operating. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer. 



114 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1939. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the following report 
of the activities of the Water Division, operations and 
expenditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 
1938. 

The Water Income Division was under the direction 
of Mr. James A. McMurry until his death on February 
19, 1938, when the Division Engineer of the Water 
Division was made Acting Division Engineer of the 
Water Income Division. 

On April 7, 1938, under section 33, chapter 27, of the 
Revised Ordinances of 1925, the Commissioner of 
Public Works merged the Water Income Division with 
the Water Division, and appointed Daniel M. Sullivan 
as Division Engineer of the new Water Division, and 
the Income Division became known as the Business 
Office of the Water Division. 

Engineering Branch. 

This branch of the Water Division was engaged in 
the extension and improvement of the distribution 
system, most of the work being performed by the 
W. P. A. forces, under the general supervision of the 
division's regular engineering and inspection forces. 
Pipe was purchased with money supplied by the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration and the funds of the 
Water Division were used to supply cast-iron specials, 
gates, hydrants, lead, boxes, etc. A total of 43,444 
feet of pipe were either laid or relaid, varying in sizes 
from 8 inches to 42 inches, inclusive. 

Extensions of water mains totaled 15,195 feet, or 
2.88 miles. Some of the longer lengths were: 



Public Works Department. 115 

City Proper. i 

820 linear feet of 12-inch pipe was laid in Boylston (^ 

street and Exeter street, to extend the high service M 
from Clarendon to Exeter street. 

Dorchester. 

1,290 feet of 8-inch pipe was laid in Packard avenue 
and St. Gregory street and 414 feet of 8-inch pipe was 
laid in Beatrice road and Paula street. These four 
streets were done on petition, on account of building 
construction. 

658 linear feet of 16-inch pipe was laid in Woodhaven 
street and 158 feet of 8-inch pipe laid in Hallo well street. 
Both of these streets are under construction by the 
Highway Division. 

Hyde Park. 

The longest single line improvement in Readville was 
the laying of a 12-inch main in Prescott street, through 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad yards 
to Kenyon lane, thence to Sprague street, thus providing 
a loop for the outside district. 

In continuation of the poUcy of replacing older and 
smaller water mains with larger sizes for the improve- 
ment of fire protection in the more densely populated 
sections of the city, 28,249 feet, or 5.35 miles, of 4-inch, 
6-inch and 8-inch pipes laid fifty or more years ago were 
replaced with 8-inch and 12-inch pipes. All this work 
was performed by W. P. A. forces. 

Distribution Branch. 

The regular work of the Distribution Branch, consist- j 

ing of installation of new services and fire pipes, repairing 
of leaks, caring for complaints, shutting off and letting 1 

on of water, freeing of stoppages in service pipes, etc., \ 

was performed in such a manner and at such periods as 
to cause minimum delay and inconvenience to applicants 
for water, water takers and the general public. \ 

A tremendous increase in the amount of work per- | 

formed was occasioned by the laying out of new streets \ 

with the resultant regulating of gate boxes, shut-off 
frames and covers, hydrants, services and the installa- 
tion of new services on the relaying work by the W. P. A. \ 
forces. The machine shop and plumbing shop were 
forced to handle all the drilling and connecting of 



116 



City Document No. 24. 



service pipes occasioned by the above-mentioned forces, 
in addition to the regular work carried on in these 
shops, such as the assembhng and machining of gates, 
valves and hydrants. 

Business Office. 

For the past eight years there has been an annual 
deficit in the operations of the Water Division. This 
deficit has been caused, in part, by increased Metro- 
politan Assessments, together with a falling off in receipts 
from the sales of water. The falling off in receipts has 
been due somewhat to the business depression, but 
also to the fact that unpaid water bills increased over 
the years to the enormous total of approximately 
$2,000,000. 

With the merging of the two divisions the system 
of billing was radically changed and the stub plan of 
billing was set up in the department. 

A campaign was inaugurated to enforce the payment 
of outstanding water bills and those in arrears were 
notified that the flow of water would be substantially 
reduced, but yet enough water was left on the premises 
to provide a minimum for health and sanitary require- 
ments. As a result of this campaign the Water Division 
ended the year 1938 with a surplus of $654,998.45. 



Main pipe petitions received 
Domestic service applications 
Fire pipe 

Special meter tests 
Hydrant permits issued 
Repair deposits received 
Miscellaneous deposits . 



18 
368 
18 
351 
26 
87 
92 



The books of the cashier were audited on March 9, 
1938, covering period from January 1, 1929, to March 9, 
1938. 



Appropriations, Expenditures and Revenue. 
A separate budget had been submitted for the In- 
come Division and the Water Division, so that during 
the year two budgets were maintained: 



Amount appropriated. Water Division 
Amount expended. Water Division . 

Balance 



$964,153 55 
804,170 47 

$159,983 08 



Public Works Department. 117 

Amount appropriated, Income Division $251,465 90 

Amount expended, Income Division . . . 240,921 55 



Balance $10,544 35 



Amount of money collected during the year . $5,155,051 39 
Amount of expenditures from all sources . 4,500,052 94 

The Metropolitan Assessment for 1938 
amounted to $3,282,930.02, an increase of 
$603,764.70 over the assessment for year 
1930. 
Total amount of water billed for 1938 . . 4,718,915 81 
Total amount collected for current year bills . 3,183,903 71 
Amount collected in 1938 on bills rendered prior 

to 1937 481,366 63 

Amount collected in 1938 on bills rendered in 

1937 1,385,957 39 

This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of 
the office has been such that I believe a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the employees has been 
brought about which is beneficial to the consumer and 
the city. 

Very respectfully, 

Daniel M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer. 



118 City Document No. 24. 



1938 — Financial Transactions — Water Division. 

Balance after deducting expenditures of Water Income 

Division $4,816,245 19 



Expenditures from revenue: 

Current expenses and extensions . $804,170 47 

Metropolitan Water Assessment 3,282,930 02 



Expenditures on Debt Account: 

Pavments on Boston water debt . $32,000 00 

Payments on Hyde Park water debt, 16,000 00 

Pavments on interest on water loans, 26,146 25 



4,087,100 49 
$729,144 70 



74,146 25 

Balance of revenue over expenditures .... $654,998 45 

Loan Account: 

Balance outstanding January 1, 

1938 $852,000 00 

Paid during 1938: 

Account Boston water 

debt . . . $32,000 00 
Account Hyde Park 

water debt . . 16,000 00 
Account P. W. A. 
loans No. 1123, No. 
4214 and No. 7223, 41,000 00 



89,000 00 

Balance outstanding December 31, 1938 . . . $763,000 00 

Construction Account: 

Extension of mains (from revenue) .... $117,387 56 

Cost of construction December 31, 

1938 $24,119,718 45 

Cost of construction December 31, 

1937 24,002,330 89 



Increase in plant cost during 1938 .... $117,387 56 

Cost of existing works December 31, 1938: 

Pipe yards and buildings . . * $84,332 16 

Engineering expenses . . . 57,873 58 

Distribution svstem .... 23,802,512 71 

Hyde Park water works . . 175,000 00 



$24,119,718 45 
High pressure fire service 2,293,316 75 



Total cost $26,413,035 20 



* $10,500 deducted from pipe yards and buildings on account of abolition of Charlestown 
water yard. 



Public Works Department. 



119 



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120 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 11. 

High Pressure Fire Service. 

Shonnng Length of Water Pipes, Connections, Hydrants and Valves in Same, 
December 31, 1938. 



20-Inch. 16-Inch. 12-Inch. 8-Inch. 



6-Inch. 



Totals. 



Length owned and operated December 
31, 1937 



Gates in same 

Blow-offs in same. . . 

Length laid in 1938 . . . 

Gate valves in same . 



Length owned and operated December 
31, 1938 



Gate valves in same 

Blow-offs in same 

High pressure fire hydrants . 



20,140 



20,140 



46,953 
201 



46,953 

201 



31,756 
144 



31,756 
144 



502 



98,849 

847 

6 



98,849 

847 

6 

505 



18.72 miles of mains in system. 



Public Works Department. 



121 



Table No. III. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1938. 





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6 


13 


212 


340 

8 

42 

37 

199 

1 

931 

179 

8 

64 


511 










8 

2 

2 

5 

44 

37 

11 

4 

5 

25 


1,089 










10 


Charlestown (public) 


32 

13 

392 

5 
57 

1 
11 

8 


14 

1 

26 

83 

1 
7 

1 


112 

2 
326 

9 
615 

9 
154 

1 
67 


144 










346 










58 


City proper (public) 

" (private) 


523 
2 

911 
2 

186 










1,510 










54 












2,608 












17 












542 


** , (private) 

Hyde Park (public) 










43 


543 


13 


17 
55 






682 


■ (private) 








4 




72 




9 
2 
56 
4 
4 


29 

1 

14 

1 

105 


285 

3 

173 

1 
327 


232 

4 

166 

14 

910 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 

2 

9 


987 
2 

246 
3 

959 

1 


1,542 












9 
14 
27 
13 

1 


21 












669 












50 












2,318 












17 








4 










20 


















1 


4 




















6 






















3 






















2 






















9 
























Total number (public) 

Total number (private and 


566 
33 


291 
5 


2,271 
29 


3,063 

126 


5,001 

10 


13 


17 
55 






97 
111 


11,306 




4 


386 







122 City Document No. 24. 



Waterworks Statistics, City of Boston. 

For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1938. 
Distribution. 

Mains. 
Kind of pipe: Cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 
Size: 2- inch to 48- inch. 
Extended, miles, 2.81. 
Size enlarged, miles, 3.73. 
Total miles now in use, 982.03. 
Public hydrants added, 38. 
Public hydrants now in use, 11,306. 
Stop gates added, 37. 
Stop gates now in use, 15,931. 
Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 34. 
Number of blow-offs, 865. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Service. 

Kind of pipe and size: Lead and lead lined, |-inch to 2-inch; cast iron, 
2-inch to 16-inch; wrought iron and cement lined, |-inch to 2-inch; 
brass and copper, f-inch to 2J-inch. 

Service taps added, 392; abandoned, 188. 

Total service taps now in use as per metered services, 105,112. 



Public Works Department. 



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Public Works Department. 



127 






rt — . r-l to 



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128 



City Document No. 24. 



3 



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130 



City Document No. 24. 



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132 



City Document No. 24. 



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Public Works Department. 133 



1938 — Financial Transactions — Water Income Division. 

Receipts for water .... $5,051,22773 
All other receipts 103,823 66 



Total revenue $5,155,051 39 

Expenditures from revenue: 

Current expenses, Water Income 

Division $240,921 55 

Refunded water rates 2,051 36 

Transfer to Collecting Department . 95,833 29 



Total $338,806 20 



Balance available for other water purposes . $4,816,245 19 



Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1938. 

Number of shut-off s for repairs 4,130 

Number of premises turned on after repairs . . 3,995 

Number of shut-off s for vacancy .... 1,098 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . 1,105 
Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of 

water rates 2,143 

Number of premises turned on again after being 

shut off for nonpayment 1 .900 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste . 127 
Number of premises turned on again after being 

shut off for waste Ill 

Number of new service pipes turned on for first 

time 268 



Total number of times water was shut off or 

turned on 14,877 



134 



City Document No. 24. 



statement of Each Year's Water Rates, 1912 to 1938, Inclusive, 
With Outstanding Balances, As of December 31, 1938. 



Account of 
Year. 



Amount 



Amount 
Abated. 



Collections 
and Credits.* 



Amount 
Outstanding. 



1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 



$3,001,771 87 
3,004,331 52 
3,034,885 83 
2,960,797 45 
3,130.590 53 
3,120,878 86 

3.359.714 95 
3,210,147 91 
3,503,677 88 
3,615,663 51 

3.612.715 51 
3,817,642 72 
3,832,531 26 
3,875,434 21 
3,910,119 54 

3.979.153 63 
4,418,039 84 
6,018,524 39 
4,864,180 27 
4,749,546 18 
4,611,461 41 
4,572,539 96 
4,703,863 07 
4,630,717 54 
4,671,732 90 

4.719.154 42 
4,718,915 81 



$58,369 39 
50,147 90 
64,663 01 
57,782 09 
67,771 69 
77,353 75 

162,415 52 
95,812 76 

123,509 90 
90,946 23 
90,453 27 

77.449 02 
43,678 41 
39,084 94 
44,694 94 
44,181 30 
37,801 18 
45,048 05 
44,410 19 
45,854 16 
37,878 58 
35,696 74 
57,173 47 
47,852 99 
32,779 83 
29,589 11 

21.450 73 



$2,943,402 48 
2,954,183 62 
2,970,232 82 
2,903,015 36 
3,062,818 84 
3,043,525 11 
3,197,299 43 
3,114,335 15 
3,380,167 98 
3,524,717 28 
3,522,262 24 
3,740,193 70 
3,783,367 82 
3,829,164 21 
3,858,424 43 
3,918,275 64 
4,371,537 91 
4,959,088 72 
4,800,780 23 
4,675,797 00 
4,536,211 54 
4,469,001 88 
4,560,866 55 
4,467,469 51 
4,462,069 98 
4,317.352 72 
3,183,903 71 



$5,485 03 

7,185 06 

7,000 17 

16,696 69 

8,700 75 

14,387 62 

18,989 85 

27,895 02 

37,371 34 

67,841 34 

85,823 05 

115,395 04 

176,883 09 

372,212 59 

1,513,561 37 



Total outstanding water rates December 31, 1938 $2,475,428 01 



* Credits have been made since August, 1937, of Tax Sales Receipts, to water accounts 
for every year from 1929 to 1937, inclusive, reducing outstanding balances for these years. 



Public Works Department. 



135 



Water Meter Division. 

Table No. 1. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1938. 



Make. 



T3 




1 


41 


Meters 


C 


Changed. 






C 




o 






Q 


Out. 


In. 



1^ 



tf 



Hersey disc 

Worth disc 

Watch dog 

King 

Federal 

American 

Lambert 

Crown 

Trident 

Hersey rotary . . . . 

Arctic 

Nash 

Detector 

Keystone 

Empire 

Hersey compound . 

Totals 



119 

9 

97 

125 
1 



357 



105 



3,535 

769 

1,998 

504 

51 

65 

17 

28 

12 

17 

1 

17 

1 

5 

1 

1 

7,022 



3,094 
199 

1,762 
1,953 



7,022 



4,634 

642 

2,689 

2,114 

38 

74 

26 

17 

11 

20 

5 

26 



3 

2 

10,201 



678 


2,626 


106 


168 


242 


1,953 


266 


86 


28 


1 


35 


1 


15 




25 




19 


3 


21 




16 


3 


15 


1 


52 




1,518 


4,842 



208 

3 

133 

122 



466 



136 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 2. Meters in Service December 31, 1938. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 


f 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 


Hersey disc 


52,799 
6,753 

22,319 
4,112 
633 
651 
213 
187 
123 
328 
142 


3,669 

24 

1,040 

249 


1,808 

32 

1,075 


955 

28 

723 

31 


406 
50 

442 

44 

1 


167 

13 

390 


119 


31 


1 






59 945 


Worth disc 






6,900 




89 










26,078 












4,436 


Federal 














634 




139 

72 
308 

229 
139 


20 

48 

39 

6 

126 
















810 




61 
1 

98 
6 

24 


12 
74 
11 
181 
3 
20 


23 
23 
53 


2 

16 
21 










347 




6 

1 

15 








698 


Trident 




2 




184 
1,051 










290 


Arctic 


20 


10 










74 


Empire 

Nash 


17 
75 














17 


235 


19 


2 


6 
4 














337 




50 
4 

1 


65 
50 
10 


35 
65 
13 




















35 


25 


5 


184 














24 






















Totals 


88,352 


6,104 


3,173 


1,929 


1,250 


684 


317 


131 


37 


27 


5 


102,009 







Public Works Department. 



137 



Table No. 3. Meters in Shop December 31, 1938. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




i 


1 


1 


15 


2 


3 


4 


6 


10 




2,176 
9 


15 


3 


3 


18 


2 

8 
4 




2 




2,219 




17 


Watch dog .... 




1 


3 


8 








13 


King 


15 










18 
















1 


1 


Trident 












9 


3 




12 




















Totals 


2,200 


15 


4 


6 


26 


23 


3 


2 


1 


2,280 







Table No. 4. Meters Purchased in Year 1938. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




1 


i 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 




300 


15 
9 


4 
9 


3 
4 


12 








334 




9 


3 

2 


1 
2 


34 






3 
















2 




















Totals 


300 


24 


13 


7 


12 


9 


5 


3 


373 







Table No. 5. Meters Reset. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


O 

H 


■6 

a 

'o. 

3 

O 


c 
o 




1 


i 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


ecu 
O 




163 

3 

104 

120 


18 


11 


8 


6 


1 


1 


208 

3 

133 

122 


64 

36 
37 


144 




3 




8 
2 


10 


5 


5 


1 




97 




85 
















Totals 


390 


28 


21 


13 


11 


2 


1 


466 


137 


329 







138 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 6. Meters Changed in 1938. 



Make. 


Meters Out. 
diameter in inches. 


Totals. 




1 


f 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 




Hersey disc 

Worth disc 


3,086 

759 

1,687 

468 

51 

41 

14 

9 

11 

10 

2 

1 

1 


217 

3 

92 

7 


127 

109 
11 


50 

5 

67 

13 


32 
2 

26 
5 


11 


10 


2 


3,535 
769 


Watch dog 


12 


5 




1,998 




504 


Federal 








51 


American 


24 
3 
1 
4 
5 
2 














65 


Nash 














17 


Trident 








2 






12 




9 

1 
1 


3 

1 


1 






28 


Lambert 








17 












5 














1 




5 


5 


3 

1 


3 








17 










1 


Detector 












1 

1 


2 


1 
















1 


















Totals 


6,140 


363 


263 


143 


69 


25 


17 


7,022 



Public Works Department. 



139 



Table No. 6. Meters Changed in 1938. — Concluded. 





Meters In. 
diameter in inches. 


Totals. 




8 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 




Hersey disc 


2,549 

193 

1,456 

1,911 


248 

2 

103 

24 


166 

110 
6 


66 

2 

49 

7 


50 
2 

23 
5 


5 


9 


1 


3,094 
199 


Watch dog 


17 


4 




1,762 




1,953 
















1 














1 




















Trident 












4 






4 










1 








1 






2 












2 




































































2 










2 














2 
2 




2 
















2 


















Totals 


6,109 


380 


282 


127 


80 


26 


17 


1 


7,022 



140 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 7. Causes for Meter Changes. 







cu 






-ij 






4 






Make. 




.a 


6 


TJ 


C3 

1-1 


to 




? 
^ 










Ph 


^ 






c . 




o 


"S 






73 






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01 








1 


o 


o 




a 


Q. 

3 
O 


o 


n 




o 




^ 


Q 


Z 


w 


M 


O 


f^ 


M 


Q 


H 


Hersey disc 


768 


847 


91 


1.5 


741 


615 


412 


7 


39 


3,535 




16 
344 


319 
844 


8 
21 


2 


111 

187 


121 
455 


182 
109 


1 
9, 


9 
31 


769 




1,998 




26 
4 


166 

17 

9 

4 

6 

24 

11 

3 


7 
1 
1 


2 


145 


31 
9 
14 


111 

17 
14 


1 


16 
2 

8 


504 


Federal 


51 






19 


65 


Nash 


13 
2 
2 
1 


17 


Trident 


1 
2 




1 








2 


12 










28 




2 


2 








1 
2 


17 










5 






1 
















1 




2 


9 


2 






3 


1 






17 






















1 






1 
1 














1 




















1 






















Totals 


1,178 


2,262 


134 


27 


1,206 


1,248 


846 


11 


110 


7,022 







Public Wobks Department. 

Table No. 8. Meters Applied in 1938. 



141 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


1 


1 


1 


H 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Totals. 


Hersey disc 


90 

7 

54 

]21 


4 


4 


7 
1 
8 
2 


10 
1 
8 


3 


1 




119 




9 




1 


7 
2 


14 


5 




97 




125 


Federal 


1 








1 


Trident 










1 


1 


1 
2 


2 














1 


















2 












1 






1 




















Totals 


272 


5 


13 


18 


21 


• 18 


7 


3 


357 







Applied on old service pipes . 
Applied on new service pipes 

Total 



8 
349 

357 



Table No. 9. Meters Discontinued in Year 1938. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


5 
o 


i 

a 

E 

a 
_o 

c 
c 
o 
O 


c 
a 

a 
> 


S 

c 




1 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 






265 
44 

103 
17 


27 


21 


15 
1 

8 


14 


1 


1 


344 
45 

146 
21 
1 
1 
1 
3 
5 
1 
2 
1 


143 
28 
63 
12 


133 

12 

58 

5 


68 


Worth disc 


5 




11 


11 
3 


12 

1 


1 




25 




4 








1 








1 








2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 

1 






1 
3 

6 

1 




























I 
















1 
























1 


1 
1 








Trident 






























Totals 


439 


38 


36 


25 


29 


2 


2 


571 


253 


213 


105 







142 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 10. Meters Repaired in Service. 



Make. 


03 

Q 


o 

m 

o 

O 


.1^ 

OJ 

'S. 


V 

M 

C 

"ft 
3 
O 

O 


a 

O 


3 
O 

"3 

o 

1 


o 


Hersey disc 


108 


93 


265 


111 


34 


67 


678 


Worth disc 


16 
33 


9 
24 


38 
149 


17 
21 


7 
3 


19 
12 


106 


Watch dog 


242 








266 

7 
15 








266 


Federal 




1 

2 
12 


14 
9 
3 
7 

15 
4 


4 

1 

2 
5 


2 
7 
10 
4 
3 


28 




3 


35 


Lambert 


15 


Crown 




25 


Trident 


1 

7 


19 


Hersey rotary 


5 




21 


Nash 


1 


6 
4 
12 


6 


2 
2 


2 
12 


4 
4 

28 


15 


Arctic 


16 


Detector 




52 












Totals 


169 


168 


746 


205 


70 


160 


1,518 



Public Works Department. 



143 



APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF THE BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGE COMMISSION. 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. Expenditures for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1938. 

Being the Portion Paid by the City of Boston, Which is One Half of the Total Expenditure. 











o 












13 










-a 


ui 






§ 


s 




m 






C3 


(2 . 




'o 






1 


11 


"5) 


a 
o 


"3 














•a 


o'^ 


o 








< 


O 




(1< 


H 




$50 00 




$1,565 00 




$1,615 00 






$186 00 
940 70 


218 00 
1,691 79 


$202 00 


606 00 


Light. . 




2,632 49 














24 81 


32 12 




56 93 


Rent 






39 00 




39 00 




26 12 






26 12 












Totals 


$76 12 


$1,151 51 


$3,545 91 


$202 00 


$4,975 54 







CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DE?PARTMENT 



Vvi? ^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1939 
[Document 24—1940] 



MR 36 1944 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 



KEPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
PUBLIC WOKKS. 



Page 
Appropriations and expend- 

tures, all divisions 7 

Employees, grade and num- 
ber of, etc 10 

Employees, appointments, 

etc 12 



Page 

General review 1 

Organization 1 

Revenue 19 



Part II. — Appendix A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
BRIDGE AND FERRY DIVISION. 



(Bridge Service.) 



(Page 14.) 



Page 
Bridges, expenditures on ... . 33 
Bridges, work done on: 

Safety curbs 16 

Dorcester Avenue Bridge 
over Fort Point Chan- 
nel 17 

Albany Street Bridge over 
Boston and Albany 
Railroad 19 

Berkeley Street Bridge 
over Boston and Albany 
Railroad 20 

Boylston Street Bridge 
over Boston and Albany 
Railroad 21 

Meridian Street Bridge. . . 23 

Summer Street Bridge over 

Fort Point Channel. ... 24 



Page 

Day labor force 24 

Draw openings 38 

Federal Emergency Ad- 
ministration of Public 

Works 17 

Financial statement 32 

Fort Hill Disposal Station 

(for Sanitary Division) . 24 

General review 15 

Granite Avenue Bridge. . . 39 
Miscellaneous work, other 
divisions and depart- 
ments 25 

Works Progress Adminis- 
tration 16 



IV 



Table of Contents. 



(Ferry Service.) 
(Page 26.) 



Page 

Balance sheet 41 

Expenditures since 1858 .... 43 

Ferry boats, list of 26 

Ferry boats, work done on . . 26 
Financial statement 40 



Page 

General review 26 

Receipts since 1858-1859 ... 44 

Receipts for year 1939 45 

Toll rates 45 

Travel on South Ferry 45 



(Sumner Tunnel.) 
(Page 27.) 



Page 
Comparison of receipts, ex- 
penditures, etc., 1934- 

1939, inclusive 47 

Financial statement 46 

General review 27 



Summary of work done dur- 
ing year 

Vehicles using tunnel, classi- 
fication of 



Page 

27 

48 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
HIGHWAY DIVISION. 

(Paving Service.) 

(Page 49.) 



Page 

Financial statement 49 

General review 49 

Objects of expenditures 56 

Permits issued 57 



Page 

Permits, revenue from fees 

for 57 

Summary of work done dur- 
ing year 53 



(Lighting Service.) 
(Page 51.) 



Financial statement. 



Page 
51 



Summary of installations, 
etc., during year 



Page 



51 



Table of Contents. 
Appendix C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 

(Page 58.) 



Page 
Comparative costs per cubic 
yard of collection and 
disposal 64 

Cost of collection and dis- 
posal of refuse by con- 
tract 62 

Cost of collection and dis- 
posal of refuse by day 
labor force 63 



Page 
Expenditures for the collec- 
tion and disposal of 
ashes and garbage by 

districts 61 

Financial statement 58 

General review 58 

Street cleaning and oiling, 
distribution of expendi- 
tures 65 

Street cleaning operations . . 65 



Appendix D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. 

(Page 66.) 



Page 
Calf Pasture Pumping Sta- 
tion, fuel record and 

electric power 92 

Calf Pasture Pumping Sta- 
tion, sewerage pumped 

at 91 

Catch-basins, number of . . . . 90 

Financial statement 68 

General review 66 

Maintenance expenditures . . 69 

P. W. A. construction 87 



Page 
Refuse removed from filth 

hoist 93 

Sewerage works expendi- 
tures 71 

Sewerage works construc- 
tion 73 

Sewerage works construc- 
tion, summary of 88 

Sewers, net increase in length, 89 

Sewers, total length of 89 

Sewers, five year summary. . 90 



VI 



Table of Contents. 
Appendix E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION. 

(Page 94.) 



Page 

Financial statement 98 

General review 94 

High pressure fire service, 
length of water pipes, 
number of hydrants, 

etc 100 

Hydrants, niunber of in sj's- 

tem 101 

Main pipe, abandoned, cost 

of 103 

Main pipe cost of relocation, 104 
Main pipe, cost of replace- 
ment 105 

Main pipe, cost of extension, 110 
Meters, statement of work 

done 114 



Page 

Meters in service 115 

Meters in shop, purchased 

and reset 116 

Meters changed 117 

Meters cause for changes. .. 119 
Meters applied and discon- 
tinued 120 

Meters repaired 121 

Shutting off and turning on 

water 112 

Water pipes, length of 99 

Water rates, amounts 
assessed, abated, col- 
lected, etc., 1912-1939, 

inclusive 113 

Waterworks statistics 102 



Appendix F. 



REPORT OF BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGE COIMMISSION. 

(Page 122.) 



Financial statement. 



Page I 
123 General review 



Page 
122 



3 9999 



663A5 973 3