(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1943 

IDOCTJMENT 24 — 1944] 



CONTENTS. 



Part I. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
PUBLIC WORKS. 



Page 



Appropriations and expendi- 
tures, all divisions 

Employees, grade and num- 
ber of, etc 

Employees, appointments, 
etc 



Page 

General review 1 

Organization 1 

Revenue 9 



Part IL — Appendix A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
BRIDGE AND FERRY DIVISION. 

(Bridge Service.) 

(Page 12.) 



Page 

Bridges, expenditures on ... . 24 

Bridges, work done on 14 

Day labor force 18 

Draw openings 32 

Financial statement 24 

General review 12 



Page 

Granite Avenue Bridge 17 

Miscellaneous work, other 
Divisions and Depart- 
ments 17 

Miscellaneous work, Bridge 

Service ". 18 



IV 



Table of Contents. 



(Ferry Service.) 
(Page 12.) 



Page 

Balance sheet 34 

Ferry boats, list of 19 

Ferry boats, work done on. . 19 
Financial statement 34 



General review 

Receipts for year 1943 . 

Toll rates 

Travel on South Ferry , 



Page 
14 
34 
34 
34 



(Sumner Tunnel.) 
(Page 35.) 

Page 



Comparison of receipts, ex- 
penditures, etc., 1939- 

1943, inclusive 37 

Financial statement 35 

General review 22 



Summary of work done dur- 
ing year 



Page 



22 



Vehicles using tunnel, classi- 
fication of 36 



Appendix B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
HIGHWAY DIVISION. 

(Lighting Service.) 

(Page 39.) 



Financial statement. 



Page 
39 



Page 
Summary of installations, 

etc., during year 40 



(Paving Service.) 
(Page 38.) 



Page 

Financial statement 38 

General review 39 

Objects of expenditures 41 

Permits issued . ; 42 



Page 
Permits, revenue from fees 

for 42 

Summary of work done dur- 
ing year 40 



Table of Contents. 
Appendix C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



(Page 43.) 



Page 
Comparative costs per cubic 
yard of collection and 
disposal 49 

Cost of collection and dis- 
posal of refuse by con- 
tract 46 

Cost of collection and dis- 
posal of refuse by day 
labor force 48 



Page 



Expenditures for the collec- 
tion and disposal of 
ashes and garbage by 

districts 45 

Financial statement 43 

General review 43 

Street cleaning and oiling, 
distribution of expendi- 
tures 50 

Street cleaning operations. . . 50 



Appendix D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SEWER DIVISION. 

(Page 51.) 



Page 
Calf Pasture Pumping Sta- 
tion, fuel record and 

electric power 69 

Calf Pasture Pumping Sta- 
tion, sewerage pumped 

at 69 

Catch basins, number of . . . . 68 

Financial statement 65 

General review 51 

Maintenance expenditures. . . 54 



Page 

W. R. P. construction 64 

Sewerage works expendi- 
tures 59 

Sewerage works construc- 
tion 61 

Sewerage works construc- 
tion, summary of 61 

Sewers, net increase in length, 67 

Sewers, total length of 67 

Sewers, five-year summary . . 66 



VI 



Table of Contents. 
Appendix E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
WATER DIVISION. 



(Page 70.) 



Page 

Financial statement 79 

General review 70 

High pressure fire service, 
length of water pipes, 
number of hydrants, 

etc 80 

Hydrants, number of, in sys- 
tem 81 

Main pipe, cost of replace- 
ment 83 

Main pipe, cost of extension, 83 
Meters, statement of work 

done 72 

Meters in service 73 



Page 
Meters in shop, purchased 

and reset 73 

Meters changed 75 

Meters, cause for changes. . . 76 

Meters apphed 76 

Meters discontinued 77 

Meters repaired 77 

Shutting off and turning on 

water 80 

Water pipes, length of 78 

Water rates, amounts 
assessed, abated, col- 
lected, etc 72 

Water works statistics 82 



Appendix F. 



REPORT OF BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGES COMMISSION. 

(Page 84.) 



Financial statement . 



Page 
85 



General review . 



Page 

84 



[Document 24 — 1944.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1943. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

Hon. Maurice J. Tobin, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — In compliance with the 
provisions of Section 24 of Chapter 3 of the Revised 
Ordinances of 1925, I respectfully submit the Annual 
Report of the Public Works Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1943. 

The total budgetary expenditures of the department 
for the year were $6,892,678.86 and the total revenue 
from all sources, exclusive of the Sumner Tunnel and 
from the sale of water, amounted to $130,038.69. 
The Sumner Tunnel revenue amounted to $1,027,633.10 
and the sum of $5,357,155.36 was realized from the 
sale of water and other related services and work that 
is under the jurisdiction of the Water Division. 

The surplus in the Water Division totalled 
$1,110,823.21 bringing the total surplus from 1938 to 
1943 up to $4,886,784.72 as compared with a total 
deficit of $702,390.94 that resulted from the operation 
of the Water Service from 1931 to 1937. The daily 
consumption of water for the year averaged 106,046,300 
gallons as compared with a daily average of 102,100,500 



2 City Document No. 24. 

gallons in the previous year. The Sumner Tunnel 
deficit amounted to approximately $215,000 exclusive 
of the $100,000 subsidy paid out of the State Highway 
Fund. 

There were 2,232 eligible employees on the rolls of the 
department as of December 31, including 96 employees 
who were in Military Service. 

The Waste Water Survey work by the Pitometer 
Company of New York was continued with most 
beneficial results to the City. Sections 3 and 4 were 
completed at a cost of $10,000. 

Another one year contract, effective on July 1, was 
awarded to the Coleman Disposal Company at a contract 
price of $360,000 for disposing of garbage and refuse 
collected in South Boston, Charlestown, Dorchester 
(garbage only), Roxbury, Elm Hill (garbage only). 
Back Bay, South, North and West Ends and from the 
Cit}' Proper. The disposal work is proceeding very 
satisfactorily and no complaints have been received of 
SLiiy noxious conditions created by the work required 
under the provisions of the contract. 

Refuse collection contracts were awarded as the 
result of negotiations that I held with the contractors 
who did this work in the previous year. These negotia- 
tions were conducted in the presence of representatives 
of the Office of Price Administration and the Boston 
Finance Commission and all contract prices were subject 
to approval by the 0. P. A. The contract prices were 
substantially in excess of the prices of the previous 
year but the increased costs were justified and were 
caused by increased costs of trucking and labor, shortage 
of manpower and the difficulty that the contractors 
experienced in getting efficient help to man the collection 
trucks. Despite these difficulties and other obstacles 
caused by the current war, Boston was one of the few 
cities in the country that managed to render satisfactory 
garbage and refuse collection service without curtail- 
ment. 

Street construction and reconstruction work was 
curtailed to a substantial extent due to Government 
restrictions. No new streets were built and recon- 
struction work was restricted to main highways only. 
The department was allowed to use asphaltic materials 
only with the approval of the War Production Board. 

The dim-out of street lights was continued under 
Federal orders and no new lights were installed. 



Public Works Department. 



3 



The activities of the Water Service were also sub- 
stantially curtailed and only necessary repairs to the 
water system and extensions of main pipes necessary 
to the successful prosecution of the war were allowed 
by the W. P. B. 

The same restrictions were in effect in-so-far as the 
work of the Bridge and Sewer Divisions was concerned. 

War Time Activities. 

The Air Raid Protection organization of the depart- 
ment, which was organized the previous year, was kept 
intact and the department participated in all test raids 
conducted by the State Safety Committee, 

The department also continued the monthly collec- 
tions of tin cans and, in November, waste paper was 
added to the collection work. During the year 3,460,400 
pounds of tin cans were collected and shipped to the 
plant of the Vulcan Detinning Company of Sewaren, 
New Jersey, and 1,739,420 pounds of waste paper were 
collected in November and December and shipped to 
the paper mills. All money received from the sale of 
tin cans and waste paper was contributed to worthy 
charities with the result that $1,000 was donated to the 
Massachusetts Committee for Infantile Paralysis, 
$10,000 to the United War Fund, $1,300 to the Red 
Cross and $1,000 each to the Knights of Columbus, 
the Salvation Army and the Jewish Welfare Board. 

A so-called Christmas Cheer Committee was organized 
for the purpose of collecting funds to send a Christmas 
box to each employee in the Armed Forces. The sum 
of $544.25 was collected from the department employees 
and a box was sent to each of the 96 employees who are in 
the Armed Forces. 

The following employees comprised the Committee: 



Richard H. Kildiiff, Chairman 
Nicholas A. Fleming, Secretary 
Michael A. Horigan, Treasurer 
Robert T. Killam . 
Charles C. Cassidy 
Francis F. Morse . 
Thomas B. Ryan . 
William C. Blinn . 
Daniel J. Coughlin 
Thomas E. Burke . 
Francis C. White . 
Clifford E. Sullivan 



Highway 

Sanitary 

. Water 

Bridge and Ferry 

Bridge and Ferry 

Bridge and Ferry 

Bridge and Ferry 

Bridge and Ferry 

Highway 

Highway 

Sanitary 

Sanitary 



Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 



4 City Document No. 24. 

James Riley Sewer Division 

Joseph Capillo Sewer Division 

Lawrence W. Carr Water Division 

I am sorry to report that Division Engineer 
Thomas H. Sexton of the Bridge and Ferry Division 
passed away on February 2. He was an exceptionally 
capable engineer and had been in the employ of the 
City for almost forty-seven years. He was untiring in 
his efforts to give the department the full benefit of his 
ability and talents and his passing creates a vacancy 
that will be most difficult to fill. He was highly re- 
spected by his associates and his death was mourned 
by all who were privileged to know him. 

Appended hereto are reports submitted by the 
Division Engineers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department. 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,232 persons ehgible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 2,088 were upon the 
January, 1944, pay rolls. 

Grade and Number of Employees. 



Title. 











Services 












-d 


























M 














03 a 






a 












_ m 


ws 




>> 


a 












03 o 

43 6 

6 


gj3 




c3 

'3 
03 
M 


^ 03 

go 






a 
a 




o 



Commissioner 

Division engineers 

Engineer, chief 

Assistant engineers (civil) 

Draftsmen 

Instrumentmen 

Rodmen 

Blueprinters 

Superintendents 

Supervisors 

General foreman 

Foremen 

Chief inspectors 

Inspectors-subforemen 

Executive secretaries 

Chief clerks 

Executive clerks 

Clerks-stenographers 

Telephone operators 

Cashiers and assistants 

Storekeepers 

Patternmaker 

Veterinarian-medical inspectors . 

Chemist and assistant 

Cement testers and assistants . . . 

Captains 

Quartermaster-pilots 

Deckhands 

Dispatchers 

Matrons 



16 



13 



1 
4 
1 

65 
4 

28 
9 
5 
2 
5 
1 

56 
4 
158 
2 
4 
5 

108 
2 
6 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
4 

11 
1 
4 



Carried forward. 



10 



131 



101 



70 



40 



23 



25 



92 



503 



City Document No. 24. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 



Title. 



Services. 



go 

O 





M 












C 






















r; 


a 






; 












d; 




*J 


vS 










a 


go 


■a 


(-> 


C 




S 


w 


m 




H 


^ 



Brought forward 

Engineer-s (steam) 

Oilers 

Firemen 

Gatemen-Tollmen-guards . . . 

Sergeant-tollmen-guards 

Gatemen-filth holsters 

Meter readers 

Drawtenders and assistants 

Chief and electricians 

Master mechanics 

Auto mechanics-repairers. . . 
Blacksmiths-horseshoers . . . . 

Carpenters-joiners 

Harnessmaker and assistant . 

Machinists 

Painters 

Pavers 

Plumbers-pipefitters 

Boilermakers 

Riggers-roofers 

Sewer cleaners-flushers 



Catch-basin cleaning machine oper- 
ators 



Stonecutters-brick masons . . . . 
Wheelwrights and assistants . . . 

Head chauffeurs 

Chauffeurs, etc 

Working foremen laborers, etc. 

Laborers, teamsters, etc 

Wharfinger 

Yardmen and yardmasters. . . . 
Constables 



Totals. 



10 



10 



131 

7 



101 
7 
9 
7 
5 



27 



5 

73 

6 

152 



7 
5 

471 



256 



70 



207 
1 

2 



360 



40 



101 

1 

224 



2 
24 

393 



23 



136 
1 



186 



75 



84 



92 



36 



10 



131 



42 



71 



397 



Public Works Department. 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1943, and 
January I, 1944. 













"O M 




bij 








































a 
a 


— V 
09 U 

9.0 




t 


c 

^ 


m5 

C be 


1 

'S 


« OS 

£0 


!s 










^ 










H 


o 


m 


f^ 


fin 


w 


M 


02 



January 1, 1943 
January 1, 1944 

January 1, 1943 
January 1, 1944 



81 


11 


181 


74 


369 


471 


333 


372 


270 


76 


9 


175 


69 


371 


438 


344 


376 


230 



2,162 
2,088 



Total Eligible Force. 



87 


11 


190 


74 


391 


489 


346 


400 


271 


84 


10 


186 


75 


397 


471 


360 


393 


256 



2,259 
2,232 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, Etc., of 

Employees. 





, 








<n 




n 










■6 

V 
0) 


■73 il 


io 


-73 

s 

"S 

Q 


-0 
a 

a 
.SP 

1 


3 
C 

4 





1 
2 










11 
190 


3 




1 




2 




2 
6 








1 
11 


74 
489 


6 


2 


10 


2 


7 


7 




17 




11 


346 


5 


9 


4 


17 


4 


19 


400 


2 


7 


1 


1 


1 


8 


271 


9 


9 




4 
3 


2 


3 

4 


391 

87 








32 


43 


7 


53 


9 


59 


2,259 



Services. 
1943-1944. 



Central Office 

Bridge 

Ferry 

Paving and Lighting 

Sanitarj' 

Street Cleaning .... 

Sewer 

Water 

Tunnel 

Totals 







Si 




■"^ 


X-. > 


"" a 




:: 




-d « 
gQ 


TJ 


>. 






o3 


03 


'mj: 




3 




So s 





10 
186 

75 
471 
360 
393 
256 
397 

84 










1 

11 

16 

19 

2 

3 

3 


1 




3 
3 






8 




4 


36 

321 


1 

1 


1 


2 
29 






2,232 


55 


3 


5 


113 



City Document No. 24. 



MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



Division or Service. 


Total Appropriations, 
Including Transfers. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office 
Bridge Service 
Ferry Service 
Tunnel Service 
Lighting Service 
Paving Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division . 
Water Division . 






$31,725 00 
415,104 26 
225,785 35 
272,459 00 
961,935 75 
907,476 00 

2,775,305 50 
367,683 97 

1,067,291 00 


$31,158 17 
412,869 02 
222,871 80 
243,257 21 
960,020 83 
894,430 21 
2,755,684 73 
363,153 96 
993,700 14 


$566 83 
2,235 24 

2.913 55 
29,201 79 

1.914 92 
13,045 79 
19,620 77 

4,530 01 
73,590 86 


Work Relief Program: 
Bridge Service 
Sewer Division 


$7,024,765 83 

$2,836 82 
12,696 97 


$6,877,146 07 
15,532 79 


$147,619 76 








Total . 






$6,892,678 86 





Expenditures from Special Appropriations, 
Bridges, Construction of (revenue) 
Bridges, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Bridges, Repairs, etc 

Ferry Improvements, etc. 
Public Ways, Construction of (revenue) 
Public Ways, Construction of (non-revenue) 
Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of 

Snow Removal 

Sewerage Works (revenue) .... 
Sewerage Works (non-revenue) 



Total 



Etc. 

$6,095 26 

193,710 76 

11,848 64 

22,824 58 

30,382 92 

440,801 61 

61,851 16 

505,560 03 

144,962 24 

203,154 12 

$1,621,191 32 



Public Works Department. 



REVENUE. 

On Account of Public Works Department. 



Central Office: 
Sale of plans, etc. 



Bridge Service: 
Clerical service 
Charlestown Bridge, rents 
Chelsea North Bridge . 
Chelsea South Bridge 
Junk .... 
Sprague Street Bridge . 

Ferry Service: 

Tolls .... 

Rents 

Cleaning telephone booths 

Commission on telephones 

Refund .... 

Sumner Tunnel: 

Tolls .... 
From State 

Lighting Service: 
Damage to posts . 



$250 00 


3,125 00 


14,896 11 


300 97 


6 27 


1,200 00 


$10,820 19 


135 00 


24 00 


20 90 


26 57 



,026,227 33 
100,000 00 



$110 00 



Paving Service: 

From assessments on abutters for 
cost of laying sidewalks in front of 
their premises, including material 
for same : 

Assessments added to taxes 
Assessments paid in advance 
Unapportioned assessments 

Permits 

Sale of materials, etc. . 
Labor and materials furnished 
Rent of land .... 
Street openings account 

Refunds 

Sale of rails .... 

Junk 

South Boston Housing Authority 

Sewer Service: 

Disposal of sewage 

Labor and materials furnished 

Entrance fees .... 

Junk 

Rent 

South Boston Housing Authoritj' 

Refund 

Damage to property 



Carried forward 



$2,899 94 

160 69 

4,544 97 

7,580 77 

546 40 

10 00 

25 00 

4,883 89 

20 75 

2,131 43 

158 53 

3,337 20 



$19,450 00 

260 72 

651 00 

216 86 

80 00 

17,401 57 

390 87 

20 89 



$536 00 



19,778 35 



11,026 66 



1,126,227 33 



110 00 



26,299 57 



38,471 91 
$1,202,449 82 



10 



City Document No. 24. 



Brought forward 




$1,202,449 82 


Sewerage Works (Assessments under 




chapter 450, Acts of 1899): 






Added to taxes .... 


$16,238 22 




Paid in advance .... 


2,004 76 




Unapportioned .... 


3.562 71 




Services of inspector 


42 19 




Miscellaneous .... 


17 20 


21,865 08 






Sanitary Service: 






Collection of commercial waste . 


$11,762 08 




Sale of junk, etc 


111 06 




Sale of manure .... 


77 98 


11,951 12 






Water Service: 






Water rates 


.$5,000,865 99 




Water added to taxes . 


251,469 40 




Tax titles 


47,567 06 




Service pipes for new takers, extenc 


1- 




ing, repairing, etc. 


4,414 94 




Fees on overdue rates . 


1,488 60 




Sale of junk, etc 


4,206 25 




Elevator and pipe connections . 


137 39 




Damage to property 


802 41 




Relocating hydrants 


342 90 




Labor and materials 


1,488 98 




Weighing fees, etc. 


479 48 




Reimbursement .... 


4,202 00 




Miscellaneous income . 


611 32 




Deposit account .... 


16,867 71 




By- pass gate valve 


5,339 40 




Installing gates, etc. 


978 83 


5,341,262 66 






Grand Total .... 


$6,597,528 68 



PART 11. 

APPENDICES. 



(11) 



12 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DIVISION EN- 
GINEER OF THE BRIDGE AND FERRY 
DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the following 
report of the income, expenditures and operation of the 
Bridge and Ferry Division for the year ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1943. The appropriations and expenditures of 
the Division were as follows: — 

Bridge Service. 

Regular appropriation, 1943 $407,671 26 

Transfers to 7,433 00 



Expenditures, 1943 

Balance 

Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 

Balance from 1942 

1943 appropriation 

Transfers from 

Transfers to 

Expenditures in 1943 

Balance 

Bridges, Construction of. 

Balance from 1942 

Expenditures, 1943 

Balance 



$415,104 26 
412,869 02 


$2,235 24 


$12,529 32 
25,000 00 


$37,529 32 
2,500 00 


$35,029 32 
1,450 00 


$36,479 32 
11,848 64 


$24,630 68 


$329,642 59 
199,806 02 


$129,836 57 



Public Works Department. 



13 



Civilian Defence Activities. 

Balance from 1942 

Transfers from 



Transfers to 

Expenditures in 1943 

Balance 

Work Relief Program. 
Expenditures in 1943 

Public Ways, Construction of. 
Expenditures in 1943 



Balance from 1942 
1943 appropriation . 

Transferred from 
Transferred to . 

Total transferred from 

Total amount available 
Expenditures 



Ferry Service. 



$4 53 
229,183 82 

$6,213 00 
2,810 00 



Balance 



Ferry Improvements, Etc. 



U,232 80 
1,000 00 

$232 80 
6,000 00 

56,232 80 
4,579 32 

$1,653 48 



$2,835 82 
$2 00 

$229,188 35 

3,403 00 

$225,785 35 
222,871 80 

$2,913 55 



Balance from 1942 . 
1943 appropriation 

Transferred from 


$13,027 14 
28,000 00 

$41,027 14 

2,810 00 


Total amount available . 
Expenditures .... 


$38,217 14 
22,824 58 



Carried forward to 1944 



Sumner Traffic Tunnel. 



1943 appropriation 
Expenditures 



$15,392 56 



$272,459 00 
243,257 21 



Balance 



$29,201 79 



14 City Document No. 24. 

The foregoing does not include certain expenditures 
for construction work for other divisions and depart- 
ments, which work was supervised by the engineers of 
this division. 

Under orders of the Department of PubUc UtiUties, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, schedules of tolls and 
charges for the use of the Sumner Traffic Tunnel, 
between Boston Proper and East Boston, were approved, 
covering the year 1943. 

The city has been operating only one ferry, the 
so-called "South Ferry," since early in 1933, with the 
Boston terminus at Eastern avenue and the East 
Boston terminus at Lewis street. 

The more important works undertaken during the 
past year in the Bridge and Ferry Division were con- 
struction work on Broadway Bridge, over the Boston 
& Albany Railroad; repairs to draw pier of Chelsea 
North Bridge; construction work on Granite Avenue 
Bridge; installing addition to chain link fence, etc., 
on Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel; 
repairing Winthrop Bridge; repairing hull, etc., of 
ferryboat "Daniel A. MacCormack"; repairs to steel 
ferry bridge, South Ferry, north slip. East Boston side; 
repairs to steel ferry bridge, etc.. South Ferry, north 
slip, Boston side; repairs to south fender, south slip. 
South Ferry, Boston side; wiring, etc., at South Ferry 
Terminal, East Boston; resurfacing in Sumner Tunnel 
with granite block, ultimate block, white center and 
marker blocks; construction work on the Maiden 
Bridge, over the Mystic river; construction work on the 
Summer Street Bridge, over the Reserved Channel; 
construction work on the West River Street Bridge, 
over Mother Brook; removing snow and ice from 
areas Nos. 2 and 3, etc. 

Bridge Service. 

Broadway Bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad. 

The bridge carrying Broadway over the Boston & 
Albany Railroad tracks, is one exposed to severe con- 
ditions causing deterioration to the entire deck system 
and bottom chords of the three supporting through 
trusses. Due to the length of the span and angle of 
the skew the flue gases of the locomotives are trapped, 
to a considerable degree: Since these gases are highly 
corrosive on condensing, the structural steel of the 



Public Wokks Department. 15 

bridge is affected rapidly. At this time, corrosion 
progressed to such an extent that major repairs were 
required or the bridge taken out of commission. 

On February 16, 1943, the Mayor approved a contract 
with Frederick W. Byron, the lowest bidder, for renewing 
the entire wooden decking, renewing all of the steel 
floor beams and hangers, repairing the fascias, top and 
bottom lateral bracing, trusses, portals, etc., repairing 
all standard and pipe railing and cleaning and painting 
the entire bridge. 

Work started under this contract on April 5, 1943, and 
progressed through to completion as rapidly as con- 
sistent with good workmanship. All work under this 
contract was completed September 15, 1943, at a 
total cost of $75,695.34. 

Chelsea North Bridge. 

Due to a series of failures of the draw pier, south 
waterway, at about the draw foundation, the condition 
became so serious that extensive pile and timber work 
was necessary to protect the draw foundation from 
damage by a passing vessel that might get as far out 
of position as those which damaged the wooden fender 
pier. 

On June 25, 1943, the Mayor approved a contract 
with W. H. Ellis & Son Company, the lowest bidder, to 
remove damaged material, drive certain new piles, fit 
spur shores, jack sections back into line, install new 
pile caps, waling, braces, planking, etc., necessary to 
complete reasonable repairs. Work started on the 
contract on Julv 12, 1943, and was completed on August 
24, 1943, at a cost of $8,530.54. 

Maiden Bridge. 
Under a contract entered into in 1942 between the 
city and A. D. Daddario for general construction work, 
progress has been slow due to many and various reasons. 
At the close of the year a large part of the contract work 
was still unfinished. Up to the end of the fiscal year 
the sum of $29,847 had been paid to the contractor on 
estimates of work accomplished. 

Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel. 
A contract was approved by the Mayor with Mari- 
nucci Brothers & Co., on January 2, 1942, for con- 



16 City Document No. 24. 

struction work on the Summer Street Bridge, over the 
Reserved Channel. Work was started April 29, 1942. 
About 80 feet of the Boston approach and 120 feet of 
the South Boston approach and all of the draw founda- 
tion were relniilt; the wood deck was removed from the 
draw span and replaced with Irving type steel deck on 
yellow pine stringers. Work was completed September 
29, 1943. 

The original contract called for traffic lights on both 
approaches but due to difficulties in securing priorities 
it was decided to wait until after the war to put these 
fights in. The contractor was paid $134,814 up to 
December 31, 1943. 

Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel. 

As a war measure, the armed services required addi- 
tional protection to the Army Base which is adjacent to 
this bridge. The protection required consisted of in- 
creasing the height of the present wire mesh fence, 
which extends ovct the total length of the bridge, in- 
cluding the draw span, by a matter of four feet, in 
order to prevent sabotage, by throwing overboard from 
the bridge any type of floating infernal machine which 
might be carried down stream by the tide and against 
the base or vessels tied up there. 

On September 10, 1943, the Mayor approved a con- 
tract with P. J. Dinn & Co., the low bidder, to furnish 
and erect an additional lift of wire mesh fence on the 
present fence, including all posts, rails, gates and 
repairs necessary to fulfill the requirements of the armed 
services. Work started on October 5, 1943, and was 
completed on November 4, 1943, at a total cost of 
t|po,2oo. 

Winthrop Bridge. 

This bridge, connecting Saratoga street. East Boston, 
and Main street, Winthrop, is the only link in the 
highway system between Boston and Winthrop. The 
bridge consists of a wooden deck system supported on 
wooden pile trestle bents. With the war activities, 
the weights, speeds and numbers of vehicles using the 
bridge increased appreciably with the result of a serious 
condition developing which required immediate atten- 
tion. Studies were made for a new structure of a 
more permanent nature than the present one but after 
some consideration of the various problems arising at 
this time, it was deemed advisable to repair the present 



Public Works Department. 17 

structure in order to delay the rebuilding project until 
after the passing of the national emergency. 

On December 14, 1943, the Mayor and the Chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Winthrop, 
approved a contract with Baker & Co., the lowest 
bidder, to remove the present roadway pavement to 
the five-inch yellow pine roadway decking, repairing 
the existing planking, placing a new four-inch yellow 
pine deck on the existing five-inch, surfacing the road- 
way with sheathing and repairing and renewing such 
other members of the bridge necessary to put the whole 
structure in reasonable state of repair. 

Work started under this contract on December 27, 
1943, but work will not be completed until the early 
part of 1944. 

Highway Division. 

West River Street Bridge. 

Under a contract entered into in 1942, between the 
city and John F. Shea & Co., the old wooden bridge 
over Mother Brook was removed, the abutments re- 
paired and strengthened and a new steel and concrete 
bridge built complete. Due to the necessity of drop- 
ping the grade of the brook, which at this point is part 
of a mill-pond which serves factories below, considerable 
delays were encountered since the activities of the fac- 
tories required a certain head for considerable periods. 

Aside from these unavoidable delays, work progressed 
satisfactorily. W^ork in the field started on October 19, 
1942, and the contract w^as completed on Julv 31, 1943, 
at a total cost of $5,190.35. 

Granite Avenue Bridge Commission. 
Granite Avenue Bridge. 

When the draw of this bridge was built in 1913, it 
was the first of the bascule type to be adopted by the 
city. Since then, the character of the traffic using 
Granite avenue, has changed to a considerable degree, 
especially since the existing national emergency; not 
only has the volume increased but the loads as well. 
Conditions on the deck of the draw finally became acute 
and extensive repairs were required. 

On May 11, 1943, the Granite Avenue Bridge Com- 
mission approved a contract with M. Solimando, the 
lowest bidder, to renew all of the woodwork of the deck 
system, repair steel members of the draw where neces- 



18 City Document No. 24. 

sary, repair the draw operating machinery, clean and 
paint the draw and counterweights, renew galleries 
around the operating machinery and refinish the wearing 
surface of the roadway of the Boston approach. 

Work started on this contract on June 28, 1943, and 
was completed without delays on August 25, 1943, at a 
total cost of $11,811.55. Of the total cost the City of 
Boston paid one-half and the Town of Milton paid the 
other half. 

Removing Snow and Ice- Areas Numbers 2 and 3. 

A contract was awarded to Walter Reed Corporation, 
approved by the Mayor December 31, 1943, for removing 
snow in Snow Area No. 2. 

A contract was awarded to Baker & Co., approved 
by the Mayor December 31, 1943, for removing snow in 
Snow Area No. 3. 

No payments were made under these contracts in 
1943. 

Day Labor Force. 

The day labor force patched and replaced deck 
sheathing, headers and sidewalk planking on the various 
bridges; repaired platforms, refastened treads, cleaned 
and painted drawhouses and shelter houses; made 
repairs to draw houses and controller houses; added to 
and deducted from counterweights; repaired steps, 
removed snow and ice from bridges and sanded same; 
repaired piers, painted fences and gates; did general 
carpenter work and painting and made mechanical 
repairs, etc., repaired wood block paving, refastened 
treads on various bridges; repaired and rebuilt gates at 
various bridges; repaired floats; built and repaired sand 
boxes; rebuilt coal bins at various bridges; repaired 
boats; set glass at various drawhouses; made miscel- 
laneous small repairs at various bridges, etc. 

The maintenance force cleaned the bridge sidewalks 
and steps in the intown areas of snow and other refuse 
during the entire year. Electrical and machinery 
maintenance was taken care of by the electricians and 
machinists. 

Another duty of the division during the winter months 
was the supervising and inspecting of snow loading and 
removal from snow areas Nos. 2 and 3, in common with 
other divisions of the department. This work was done 
under contract. 



Public Works Department. 



19 



In the course of the year part of the activities of the 
office force were taken up in work for other divisions and 
departments of the city. While these efforts, spread 
over the entire period, did not require a considerable 
amount of time, the nature of the work was of an 
advisory and investigating nature. 

Ferry Service. 
The following ferryboats are in commission : 



Name. 


When Built. 


Length. 


Gross Tons. 


Charles C. Donoghue ....... 

Daniel A. IMacCormaek. .... 

Ralph J. Palumbo 


1926 
1926 
1930 


174 feet, 4 inches 
174 " 4 " 
174 " 4 " 


756.77 
756.77 
779 



All these boats are of the propeller type and are all 
steel boats. 

The work of this service for the year consisted of the 
following: — 

Ferries. 
Ferryboat ^^ Daniel A. MacCormack.^' 

Since the ship's papers of this boat expired on Decem- 
ber 12, 1942, before it could again go into commission 
certain requirements of the United States Coast Guard 
Inspection Service were necessarily observed before 
new papers would be issued. At the same time that 
these requirements were being met, a general overhaul 
of the ship, including main engines, boilers, auxiliaries, 
piping, valves, etc., was accomplished. 

In order to do the necessary work the Mayor approved 
a contract on April 7, 1943, with the Quincy Dry Dock 
and Yacht Corporation, the only bidder, to do all the 
work and make all the repairs indicated to put the ship 
in proper repair to continue in service for the duration 
of the ship's papers, which are issued for a period of one 
year only. 

Work started on the contract April 13, 1943, and was 
completed on August 25, 1943, at a total cost of 
$16,707.70. 

Ferry Bridge, Boston. 

The northerl}^ ferry bridge on the Boston side of 
the ferry route was in about the same condition as the 
corresponding one on the East Boston side. 



20 City Document No. 24. 

In order to do the necessary work on this bridge, the 
Mayor approved a contract on November 26, 1943, 
with J. A. Singarella Company. 

Work started under this contract on November 29, 
1943, but there was no considerable progress at the 
end of the year. 

Ferry Bridges, East Boston. 

These ferry bridges, which give access to the boats 
from the land, are through truss bridges hinged on the 
land end and with facilities to raise and lower the out- 
board end in order to rest on the vessel which is being 
used, no matter what the tidal elevation may be. 
These bridges, approximately 112 feet long, are designed 
to take the same loading as any highway bridge. Due 
to the magnitude of the loads which must be carried 
by the structures, man}^ of the main members are 
exposed to the sea water for appreciable periods, since 
all supporting members of the outboard end must be 
below the deck of the roadway; further, the inshore 
ends are also exposed to tide water in order that the 
grade of the bridge must meet the grade of the street. 
For these reasons, primarily, corrosion of the under deck 
steel of these bridges is relatively rapid and constant 
maintenance is indicated. 

Conditions of the steel work of the north bridge on 
the East Boston side had progressed to such a degree 
that major repairs became necessary or the ferry service 
discontinued since the other, or south bridge, is also in 
serious shape. To make the repairs to the north bridge 
the Mayor approved a contract on May 25, 1943, 
with A. Orlando, Inc., the lowest bidder. The work 
covered in the contract was to put the bridge again in 
reasonable state of repair. Work started on June 1, 
1943, and was completed on August 24, 1943, at a total 
cost of $12,968.07. 

Fender Pier, Boston. 
The fender piers or racks at the terminals of the 
ferry route are necessary to assist bringing the boats 
into proper position to land and secure the ends of the 
ferry bridges and, also, to hold the boat in position as 
long as it is tied up for unloading and loading. Since 
the lengths of these piers are limited by the United 
States Pier Head Line, piers of sufficient lengths to 
properly serve the ferryboats are not practical. For 



Public Works Department. 21 

this reason, under adverse conditions, such as wind 
and tide working together, these piers are subjected to 
excessive service. 

For some time the head of the downstream pier on 
the Boston side has been faiUng on account of broken 
and deteriorated piles and broken oak girders until 
finally it encroached on an adjacent dock and could no 
longer be used by the ferryboats. 

On December 29, 1943, the Mayor approved a con- 
tract with Roy B. Rendle & Co. to make repairs to this 
pier. Work did not start on this contract during 1943. 

Wiring, East Boston Terminal. 

Since 1941, when a fire destroyed the East Boston 
Head House, much of the wiring from the electric 
service box in the street to the new headhouse, shop, 
etc., was in an exposed location. On the requirements 
of the Boston Fire Department, W^ire Division, a new 
wiring system was laid out including all new conduits, 
wires, fixtures, etc., to the end that a satisfactory 
permanent set-up be made. 

On August 18, 1943, the Mayor approved a con- 
tract with the Stanton Electric Company, the low 
bidder, to do the necessary work. The contract was 
started on August 29, 1943, and work was completed 
on September 28, 1943, at a cost of 



Department Force. 
During the year machinists, carpenters, painters, 
riggers and electricians, who are included in the per- 
sonnel of the Ferry Service, made all repairs pos- 
sible to the plant to the extent of equipment at their 
disposal. This work consisted mainly of minor repairs 
to the machinery on the boats, repairs to ferry bridge 
machinery-, ferry bridge roadwa3^s and headhouse repairs 
in general. 

Sumner Traffic Tunnel. 

Resurfacing. 
A contract was awarded to the Rufo Construction 
Company, approved by the Mayor October 19, 1943, 
for resurfacing in the Sumner Tunnel with granite 
block, ultimate block and white center and marker 
blocks. Work started November 7, 1943, and will be 
completed early in 1944. The amount of $6,990 was 
paid the contractor up to December 31, 1943. 



22 City Document No. 24. 

Sumner Tunnel. 
Summary of Work During 1943. 

1 . Personnel. 

During the year 1943 two employees entered the Armed Forces of 
the United States; seven resignations; one transfer. 

2. Vehicular Traffic. 

1939. 1940. 1941. 1942. 1943. 

Total 5,936,007 6,309,524 7,362,848 6,770,855 5,715,999 

Monthly average. . . . 494,667 525,793 614,000 564,238 476,000 

Weekly" average 114,154 121,337 141,700 130,209 110,000 

Daily average.... .. . 16,263 17,293 20,180 18,055 15,650 

3. Garage Service. 

1939. 1940. 1941. 1942. 1943. 

Tow jobs 283 189 97 160 104 

4. Booth Red Signal. 

1939. 1940. 1941. 1942. 1943. 

Booth, Red On... .. . 6 16 6 6 8 

Total duration.. ..... 52 min. 113 min. 45 min. 79 min. 255 min. 

5. Power. 

The power supply is received from the Boston Edison Company 
at 13,800 volts, and is transformed to other voltages to operate the 
fans, pumps, heat, and lighting. 

1939. 1940. 1941. 1942. 1943. 

Total kilowatts 2,965,340 3,091,410 3,177,004 2,912,544 2,813,427 

Number of vehicles. . 5,936,007 6,309,524 7,362,848 6,770,855 5,715,999 

6. Fires. 

There were four fires during the past year, for a duration of thirt}'- 
two minutes. 

7. Tunnel, General. 

Tunnel walls are washed two or three times a month, roadway 
repairs were made as needed. All Tunnel roadway repairs and 
washing was done after 12 o'clock, and with no interference to traffic. 

8. Motors, Fans, Dampers. 

All motors, fans, dampers were cleaned and repairs and adjust- 
ments made as needed; all motor controllers cleaned and adjusted 
and in working order. 

9. Circuit Breakers: Air Type, Oil Type. 

During the j^ear all breakers were tested and adjustments made as 
required for efficient operation. 

10. Transformers, Relays. 

All relays have been tested, adjusted and set for operation. All 
oil in transformers has been tested, and changed as required. 

11. Toll Registering Equipment. 

All key boxes and registers are in good working condition. 
Monthly insulation resistance, and pressure tests are made on all 
treadles. 

12. Carbon Monoxide Equipment. 

All of the analizers have been calibrated and adjusted. Chemicals 
are changed according to schedule. 



Public Works Department. 23 

13. Pumps. 

The main harbor pumps and the two portal pumps have been 
cleaned and painted, and are in good condition. Various valves and 
pipe renewed as needed. 

14. Telephone Systetn. 

All relays have been adjusted as needed; all defective cords, coils 
and instruments replaced as required. 

15. Storage Batteries. 

Emergency storage batteries are inspected and charged at regular 
intervals. 

16. Traffic Signals. 

Broken glass in signal units replaced as required; all relay panels 
cleaned and overhauled. 

17. Motor Generators. 

The four motor generators have been cleaned and painted; brushes 
have been installed as needed; commutators have been undercut. 

Obituary. 

On February 2, 1943, Mr. Thomas H. Sexton, the 
Division Engineer, died after a brief illness. While his 
death was attributable to complications, it was un- 
doubtedly hastened by the arduousness of his duties 
as the official in charge of the bridges, ferries and the 
Sumner vehicular tunnel. Perhaps more than any 
other factor and one which was constantly on his mind, 
was an appreciation and a realization of the seriousness 
of a possible major failure of a structure of the division. 
And with the advent of the present national emergency 
and the resulting inability to accomplish such work as 
he felt necessary, due to the various stringencies inciden- 
tal to the emergency, his ardent desire to fulfill all of his 
responsibilities, in spite of all handicaps, probably 
contributed in no small degree to his demise. 

Born in Boston on May 7, 1880, Mr. Sexton attended 
schools in East Boston and was graduated from the 
East Boston High School. He entered the employ of 
the city in the Engineer's Office on September 11, 1896, 
and from then on, by dint of personal effort and per- 
severance, in attending the Lowell Institute and evening 
high schools, and always more than fulfilling the various 
duties incumbent on him, he rose through the necessary 
steps to the position of Division Engineer. 

In the passing of Mr. Sexton the city lost a faithful 
and earnest aide and those who knew and worked with 
him mourn the loss of a gentleman and a friend. 

Yours respectfully, 

R. J. Thanisch, 
Acting Division Engineer. 



24 



City Document No. 24. 



BRIDGE SERVICE. 



Financial Statement for 1943. 

Expenditures From Maintenance Appropriation. 

Boston bridges $408,187 

Boston and Cambridge bridges 4,681 

$412,869 02 



26 
76 



Total Expenditures. 
From Maintenance Appropriation . $412,869 02 
From special appropriations 219,071 80 







$631,940 82 


Expenditures of Boston Bridges. 




Administration : 






Salaries : 






Division engineer 


$533 33 




Engineers and draughtsmen 


37,166 35 




Clerks 


5,199 69 




Inspectors . . . . 


2,731 12 




Supervisor .... 


1,749 80 




Foreman .... 


2,500 25 




Veterans' pension 


5,352 78 




Injured employees 


406 89 


$55,640 21 






Printing, postage and stationery 


r, $1,090 90 




Travelling expense . 


72 51 




Telephone . . •. 


2 75 




Engineers' supplies . 


26 10 




Typewriter and adding machin 


e 




inspection 


44 10 




Binding .... 


13 80 




Supplies and miscellaneous 


50 15 


1,300 31 








<> 


$56,940 52 



Public Works Department 



25 



I 



Yard and stockroom: 
Yard: 

Clerk, yardman and watchman 

Travelling expense . 

Holiday and vacations 

Tools — new and repaired 

Telephone 

Supphes 

Install stoker 

Install coal bin" 

Repairs in yard 

Auto equipment 

Miscellaneous 



$7,962 08 

245 40 

2,125 40 

984 82 

157 00 

995 82 

550 03 

79 76 

453 74 

5,295 02 

67 93 



$18,917 00 



Stockroom : 

Stock purchased 
Stock used 

Increase in stock 



$20,556 73 
18,954 23 



1,602 50 
,519 50 



i\ 



Tidewater Bridges. 



Bridges. 


Drawtenders' 
Salaries. 


Mechanics' 
Wages. 


Material. 


Repair 
Bills. 


Supplies. 


Totals. 




$13,548 80 
25,135 78 
20,430 40 
15,856 26 
19,937 22 
15,842 06 
16,998 20 
13,173 35 
13,849 53 
19,020 37 
20,413 78 
19,880 34 
19,818 56 
16,256 72 


$2,390 15 
1,782 72 
2,657 55 
1,497 06 
1,049 72 
1,275 89 
1,697 15 
1,684 79 
1,307 23 
1,217 06 
1,151 69 
2,068 85 
3,031 08 
3,268 75 


$1,726 60 

1,024 37 

1,079 84 

593 15 

292 19 

509 40 

1,366 88 

991 09 

249 21 

454 56 

290 51 

1,428 84 

2,818 22 

978 61 


$1,302 41 

241 08 

1,758 19 

1,044 72 

210 46 

126 31 

440 54 

114 14 

1,672 40 

291 67 

580 21 

2,845 95 

1,097 88 

333 31 


$346 50 
477 03 

1,172 98 
576 60 
508 76 
440 19 
289 15 
286 12 
224 44 
653 25 
394 11 

2,955 84 
143 78 
295 46 


$19,314 46 


Charlestown 


28,660 98 


Cholsea North 

Ckelsea South 


27,098 96 
19,567 79 


Chelsea Street . 


22,007 35 


Congress Street 

Dorchester Avenue 

Dover Street 

L'Street * 


18,193 85 
20,791 92 
16,249 49 
17,302 81 


Maiden 


21,636 91 


Meridian Street 

Morthern Avenue 

Summer Street 


22,830 30 
29,179 82 
26,909 52 


Warren 


21.132 85 






Totals 


$250,161 37 


$26,079 69 


$13,803 47 


$12,068 27 


$8,764 21 


$310,877 01 







* Now Summer Street, over Reserved Channel. 



26 



City Document No. 24. 



Repairs on Inland Bridges. 



Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Material. 



A Street (stairs) 

Adams Street, over Rapid Transit 

Allston 

Arlington Street 

Austin Street-Prison Point 

B Street (stairs) 

Beacon Street 

Bennington Street 

Blakemore Street 

Blanf ord Street 

Boston Street 

Boylston Street 

Brookline Avenue 

Brooks Street (stairs) 

Broadway, over Boston & Albany Railroad 

Byron Street 

C Street (stairs) 

Cambridge Street, over Boston & Maine Railroad . 

Camden Street-Gainsborough Street (foot) 

Central Avenue 

Clarendon Street 

Cummins Highway 

Dartmouth Street (rent) 

Dana Avenue 

Dorchester Avenue, over Railroad 

Durham Street- West Rutland Square 

Everett Street 

Fairmount Avenue 

Follen Street (foot) 

Freeport Street 

Glenwood Avenue 

Gove Street (foot) 

Granite Avenue 

Huntington Avenue 

Ipswich Street 



$67 00 

144 54 

775 81 

14 00 

331 91 
173 25 
183 00 
452 47 
242 31 

8 57 
237 95 

70 57 
456 86 

49 50 
426 83 

24 08 
188 08 
227 32 
353 59 
841 64 
155 51 

176 25 
300 00 

332 05 
110 06 
215 15 

177 28 
222 59 
385 12 

65 49 

479 35 

270 90 

609 89 

40 83 

47 95 



Carried forward . 



$8,857 70 



Public Works Department. 

Repairs on Inland Bridges. — Concluded. 



27. 



Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Material. 



Brought forward 

Irvington Street-Yarmouth Street (foot) 

Longfellow 

Massachusetts Avenue, over Boston & Albany Railroad . 

Metropolitan Avenue 

Milton Lower Mills 

Milton Street 

Mystic Avenue 

Norfolk Street 

Perkins Street (foot) 

Prescott Street 

Public Landing — Northern Avenue 

Redfield Street 

Reservoir Road 

River Street 

Southampton Street 

Sprague Street 

Wadsworth Street 

Walworth Street 

Webster Street 

West Fourth Street 

Winthrop 

Cleaning and sanding bridges 



$8,857 70 
177 49 
13 30 
50 00 
148 74 
182 61 
531 11 
395 99 

62 36 
264 42 

92 29 

1,364 19 

147 16 

332 63 

63 17 
714 70 

1,061 03 

349 98 

577 44 

236 77 

1,207 30 

1,030 29 

1,989 56 



Total . 



$19,850 23 



SUMMARY. 



Administration 
Yard and stockroom 
Tidewater bridges 
Inland bridges 



Boston and Cambridge bridges 
Total .... 



$56,940 52 
20,519 50 

310,877 01 
19,850 23 

$408,187 06 
4,681 76 

$412,869 02 



-28 



City Document No. 24. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 
Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 



Allston Bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad: 
Repairs to sidewalk 

Broadway Bridge: 

Repairs 

C Street Stairs: 

Repairs 



Chelsea North Bridge : 

W. H. Ellis & Son Company 
Advertising .... 
Material .... 
Repairs 

Chelsea South Bridge: 
Machinery repairs 
Blacksmith work. . 



Clarendon Street: 
Repair fence . 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge: 
Repairs . . . . 



i,530 54 

23 50 

336 00 

334 41 



$910 63 
51 60 



Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel: 
Repair fence 

Tremont Street Bridge: 

Repairs to pavement 



Warren Bridge: 
Repairs . 

Winthrop Bridge: 
Advertising 



$840 00 
37 32 
44 00 



9,224 45 

962 23 
149 03 

39 07 

86 60 

369 95 

81 99 

14 00 



11,848 64 



Public Works Department. 29 



BRIDGES, CONSTRUCTION OF, 



34,341 04 

122 48 

3 00 

18 50 


64,485 02 
10 10 





Allston Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly $57 01 

Boston Street Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 22 51 

Broadway Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly . . . ■ 73 58 

Broadway Bridge, over Boston & Albany Railroad: 

Frederick W. Byron 

Inspection of steel 

Testing concrete cylinders .... 
Engineers' instruments .... 

Byron Street Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 

Central Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 22 31 

Charlestown Bridge: 

Baker & Co $8,581 20 

Testing concrete cylinders .... 2 00 

8,583 20 

Cummins Highway Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 10 65 

Dorchester Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 41 69 

Dover Street Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 229 76 

Granite Avenue Bridge: 

Advertising 14 38 

Harrison Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 12 84 

Jones Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 108 19 

Longfellow Bridge: 

J. A. Singarella Company 7,022 47 

Maiden Bridge: 

A. D. Daddario . . . . $18,182 46 

Testing concrete cylinders .... 1 00 



18,183 46 
Carried forward . . .... $98,877 17 



30 



City Document No. 24. 



Brought forward 
Milton Street Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly 



Milton Lower Mills Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly . 



Northern Avenue Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly 

Redfield Street Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly 



Southampton Street Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly 

Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel 
Marinucci Brothers Company 
Testing concrete cylinders 
Electrical material 
Electrical work 
Engineers' instruments 
Engineering . 

Toll Gate Way Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly . 



Warren Bridge: 

Material — lumber 

West Fourth Street Bridge: 
Martin J. Kelly . 
Lumber . . . . 



j,169 33 
367 50 



J,877 17 

23 41 

24 49 
26 83 
55 98 
38 08 



$92,031 00 




12 00 




139 54 




168 89 




36 72 




1,696 38 






94,084 53 




168 50 



970 20 



5,536 83 
$199,806 02 



PUBLIC WAYS — CONSTRUCTION OF. 



Parsons Street Footway: 
Electricity 



$2 00 



WORK RELIEF PROGRAM. 



West River Street Bridge: 

John F. Shea Company, Inc. 
Testing concrete cylinders . 



$2,823 87 
12 00 



J,835 87 



Public Works Department. 



31 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE ACTIVITIES. 



New fence, L Street Bridge .... $2,835 00 

New fence, Longfellow Bridge .... 456 40 

Protect mechanism, Broadway Bridge . . 900 00 
Protect columns, Broadway and Foundry 

street 80 00 

Blackout shades, Chelsea North and Warren 

Bridges 73 92 

New water hose 264 00 



$4,579 32 



SUMMARY. 

Expenditures from Special Appropriations. 



Balances 
from 
1942. 



Total Credits, 

Including 

Balances 

Carried Over 

and Transfers. 



E.xpended 

During Year 

1943. 



Unexpended 

Balances 

December 31, 

1943. 



Bridges, repairs, etc 

Bridges, construction of ... . 
Civilian defense activities. . . 


$12,529 32 

329,642 59 

1,232 80 


$36,479 32 

329,642 59 

6,232 80 


$11,848 64 

199,806 02 

4,579 32 

* 2,835 82 

*2 00 


$24,630 68 

129,836 57 

1,653 48 


















Totals 


$343,404 71 


$372,354 71 


$219,071 80 


$156,120 73 



■ See also Paving Service. 



32 



City Document No. 24. 



C 

'c 
a 
O 







r^ 


CO 


r^ 


t~- 


00 


o 


00 


^H 


05 


CM 


uo 


■* 


^^ 


OS 


o 


. 




•eauiuadQ JO 


s 


c^ 


■^ 


00 

OS 


CM 


§8 


s 


Tf< 


00 

o 


CO 


CO 


in 


t^ 
t^ 


CM 

1" 


s 




jaquinfj iB^ox 






h^ 




■^ 








CM 




Os" 


cm" 






00 
CM 






o 


"^ 


C<5 


00 


^ 


o 


■* 


o 




w 


lO' 


in 


1—1 


•* 


t~^ 




•saoajBO JO 


o 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


3 


CO 


o 

CM 


M 




<N 


00 


OS 

in 


In. 
CM 


00 


Tf 




jaquiTiM iB^ox 






cm" 
















-^' 








t»" 






o 


o 


CO 


it< 


o 


o 


"W 


.-H 


t^ 


CO 


iO 


CO 


•<»> 


00 


OS 






c3 




(N 


o 


CM 


00 


CM 




00 


OS 


OS 


o 


CO 


t^ 


•* 


00 




m ■ 




C5 


Tfl 


-t 




in 


•o 


o 


00 


00 


q 


t-_ 


m 


co_ 


in 


OS 











co" 


cm" 


cm" 


-* 






cm" 


"-* 


I'" 


■<j<" 


'^ 




s 






~tC 


o 


CO 


00 


■<)< 


•* 


"lo 


CO 


^ 


o 


o 


in 


OS 


•* 


t- 




« 






o 


CO 




I^ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


lo 




3! 


CO 


m 


o 


31 




^ H 


bC 






CM 


00 


C5. 








CM 


CO 


00 


00 


•-* 


•— ' 


00 












CO 




^ 












cm" 








CJs" 






s 




































e«5 


o 


t» 


CO 


CO 


,_) 


~t^ 


00 


"~CO 


CO 


lO 


00 


in 


•* 


CM 




So 


^ 


03 


<N 




o 




o 


00 


lO 


■* 


00 


S 


OS 




•* 


■* 




00 


CO 


<N 


CO 


lO 


•c 


w 


00 


CO 


t» 


oo_ 


CO 


CM 


■* 


»-^ 




Q 






CO 


^ 


^ 


■^ 






cm" 




"" 


co" 


^ 




•* 




ZJ—\ 


CO 


o 


CO 


lO 


00 


.-H 


^ 


^H 


in 


CO 


.o 


CJS 


in 


sg 


o 






c3 


(N 


CO 


t» 


CO 


CM 


« 


CM 


OS 


CO 




^ 


CO 


CO 






t» 


hJ 


■»)< 




■* 


■* 


CM 


■<J< 


•* 


CO 


OS 


s 


^ 


t^_ 


■* 


•— ' 


CO 




u 


O 






^ 












^ 




lO 


^ 






co" 




s 


H 




































00 


o 


■o 


00 


M< 


OS 


~ci 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


CO 


f— t 


t^ 


•-4 


■* 




O 








cs 




lO 








O 


CO 


CM 


00 


CM 




00 




"S 






CM 


CJ 










^^ 




CD 


CM 






co_ 




J 






































g 




































1.0 


■^ 


^H 


t^ 


Tj< 


CM 


""o 


f 


CO 


1—1 


CM 


00 


00 


e^ 


CO 










CO 


lO 


■* 


t^ 


CO 




00 


t^ 


00 


C^ 


in 


o 


w 


IN 






■* 




CM_ 


CM 




■* 


■* 


CO 


h- 


'-' 


lO 


■^ 


■* 


^^ 


c» 













■^ 












'^ 




^ 


•"• 






2 




' ^— 


^ 


o 


CM 


rt< 


CO 


CO 


^ 


'J* 


CM 


o 


00 


^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 






OS 


P5 




lO 


CO 


1^ 


o 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


o 




in 


CO 


in 










^H 


o 


CM 


00 


CM 






o 


CM 


CO 


^ 


^^ 




CO 




!C 








cm" 
















cm' 








oo" 




c 






































^ 


o 


o 


CO 


_ 


,— , 


•* 


CO 


o 


CO 


m 


t~ 


r^ 


o 


CM 




K 








CO 


CO 










CO 


00 


o 


CO 


CM 


in 


O 




<! 


"sc 






o 




'Jl 












t^ 








'f 




33 


2 






























cm" 




o 


^ 


t^ 


00 


io 


"3 


1^ 


.^ 


CM 


^ 


2 


i^ 


CO 


a 


,-H 








CO 


CO 




CD 


CO 


O 


CM 


CO 


OS 


t~ 


o 


CD 


OJ 


00 


in 






Q 






o 


^H 


■* 


CM 






^ 


•— ' 


OS 


•— < 


»— ' 




en 










oi 
















'"' 








in" 




_• 


o 


o 


CO 


lO 


CO 


O! 


^ 


CM 


00 


,— , 


.^ 


OS 


o 


00 


CO 






cj 


lO 


CO 




■* 


CO 


CM 


•O 


>o 


CO 


■* 


CO 


cn 


r^ 


CM 








s 


Tf 


M 


5 


CO 


co_ 


00 


^ 


■* 


■* 


lO 


OS 


in 


t~ 


CM 


■* 






O 






o 


^ 


^ 












LO 


CM 






co" 




« 






























CM 






CO 


o> 


CM 


CO 


CO 


■* 


"~o 


CO 


o; 


,_( 


o 


OS 


00 


CO 


O 




c 






■* 


t~- 


03 


T)< 










lO 


t~- 


CO 


OS 


T*! 


in 




P 


"hC 






» 


■* 


lO 












CM 


in 






CM 




... 






















,_, 








in 






"Z 






































^i 


b- 




C<l 




lO 


^ 


OS 


o- 


o 




o 


c^ 


in 


CO 








"^ 


« 


•<f 


>o 




CM 


■* 


CO 


t- 


OS 


s 


CD 


t>- 


oc 


CO 






5 
Q 


■^ 




00 


00 


t~ 


00 


■* 


■<r 


cc 


CO 


CO 


O 


co 














00 
















■* 


CM 






CM 




_: 


to 


io 


^ 






_ 


T 


■q- 




Tf 




O 


•* 


in 


■* 




'^ 


i3 






























1* 




J 


o 


































to 

n 


H 


































^ 


<M 






















CO 






CO 




> 


"5 


































z 


2 


































!j 




•^ 


»^ 








^^ 


■t 


■t 




-» 




t>- 


CO 


IT 


00 




































CO 




< 


>i 


































m 


03 
Q 










































c 


c 


oo 


^^ 




Cv 


oc 


^ 


,_ 


M 




CO 






cd 








oc 


r 










b. 


M 








CO 












c 
















C 








in 














_ 






















cm" 




tc 










































3 


^ 


cr 










^ 


C^ 


I'" 


CC 




in 














Tt 


CO 










■<J 














S 


"S 






























in 




1 


2 








































5; 


— - 


t^ 


00 






C 


r- 


0- 


CO 


CO 




,_, 














?■ 


t> 










o- 


t> 








CO 






^ 
"t 






















t-- 








q 






Q 






























CM 


















t. 






















i 












J 


c 

a. 










c 

% 

< 
c 














a 

a 


> 


c 
is 

' c 


c 
2 


c 





1 

CO 


> 

< 




a 




* 




£ 

c 






"5 








"y 




ci 


cc 


cs 


e 


K 


"c 


c 


(- 





c 


o 








c 


c 


i 


i 


^ 


"Z 


a 


k. 


_a. 




X 


c 


C 


H 






c 


X 


1 


a 




s 
o 


t- 
c 


> 

c 


V 


Ic 


c 


c 


c 












s 


C 


t 


C 


c 


o 


C 


c 


1- 


% 


s 


12 


K 









Public Works Department. 



33 



GRANITE AVENUE BRIDGE.* 



Drawtenders' salaries 
Material 
Repairs . 
M. Solimando 
Supplies . 



$3,350 12 

83 31 

26 45 

5,905 78 

64 27 

$9,429 93 



' One half paid by town of Milton and one half by County of Suffolk. 



Draw Openings. 





Sailing Vessels. 


.\ll Others. 


u 

Total Number -g o 
OF Vessels. § §) 

^c1 


la 

11 
Is. 




Day. 


Night. 


Total. 


Day. 


Night. 


Total. 


Day. 


Night. 


«8^ 

Total, g" 




Openings 


4 




4 


«, 


( 
6 1 92 


90 


6 


96 


96 



34 



City Document No. 24. 



FERRY SERVICE. 



Financial Statement for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1943. 

Toll Receipts. 

Total cash receipts during the year . 

Cash in hands of tollmen at beginning of year, 



$10,813 91 
$90 00 



Cash paid over to City Collector 

Cash in hands of tollmen December 31, 1943 

Breakdown of Toll Receipts. 

From foot passengers 

From vehicles 



,813 91 
$90 00 



$5,634 20 
$5,179 55 





From Foot 
Passengers. 


From 
Vehicles. 


Totals. 




$2,898 59 
2,735 61 


$2,699 70 
2,479 85 


$5,598 29 


East Boston side 


5,215 46 


Totals 


$5,634 20 


$5,179 55 


$10,813 75 







Travel on the South Ferry From January 1, 1943, 
TO December 31, 1943, Inclusive. 

Foot passengers at 1 cent 563,240 

Handcart, or wheelbarrow and man 5 cents"] 

Horse and rider 6 cents 

Horse and cattle, each with attendant .... 5 cents^ 12,416 

One or two horse vehicle with driver 5 cents j 

Motorcycle with driver . 5 centsj 

Trailer 10 cents] 

Three or four horse vehicle with driver. . 10 cents !► 31,943 

Passenger automobile with driver and one passenger, 10 centsj 

Passenger automobile with driver and more than one ) 

passenger 15 centsj 8,403 

Motor truck, six tons or less, with driver 15 centsj 

Motor truck, six tons or over, with driver 20 centsl r2Q 

Auto bus with driver 20 cents] 

Auto bus with driver and passenger 30 cents 000 

Free vehicles 247 



Public Works Department. 35 



SUMNER TRAFFIC TUNNEL. 



1. Receipts. 

Financial Statement for the Year ending December 31, 1943. 

Cash in hands of cashier at the beginning of the 

year $5,148 45 

Receipts from tolls 1,027,633 10 



$1,032,781 55 
Cash paid over to City Collector 1,025,890 00 



Cash on hand December 31, 1943 $6,891 55 

2. Appropriations and Expenditures. 

Received from annual appropria- 
tion $262,759 00 

Received for E. C. A. require- 
ments 9,700 00 

$272,459 00 

Transferred to City Treasurer .... 29,201 79 



Total expenditures for year . $243,257 21 

3. Result of Operation for the Year. 

Receipts $1,026,241 71 

Expenditures : 

Maintenance and operation, $243,257 21 

Sinking Funds 272,549 00 

Interest 825,995 00 

1,341,801 21 



$315,559 50 
Carried over in unliquidated reserve . 14 38 



Deficit for year $315,573 88 



36 



City Document No. 24. 









0^ 

< 

> 

O 
u. 



O 2 

I— ( fT 






u. 

u. 
< 

b- 

< 

z 
z 

< 









60ggg 






on.S t-'S 



CO E 






• oj 2 e3 






o 


CO 


o 




O! 


O 


to 




o 


o 


to 


■* 




1 












^ 






t; 


c 


to 


T 




'-' 




(N 


to 


to 


t- 


^* 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


O 






t- 


lO 


Tf 


on 


t^ 


t- 


on 


c^ 


M 


o 


b- 


U5 




iC 


« 


•w 


o 






c: 


■<J 


c 








M 


CO 


Tf< 


'J' 


■* 








■o 


lo 


•>* 


■* 


U5 


C! 


h- 


w 


c 


'5' 


to 


c 


I-- 


h- 


to 


O) 


CM 


00 


a 


c 


t- 


b- 






CO 


c^ 


tc 






C 


CO 


b- 


t- 


O! 


t- 




c 


c 


CN 


■o< 


c 


00 


o 


CO 


C 


nn 


IC 


i/: 


O: 


1^ 


c 


c 


05 


o 


c 


on 


b- 


CO 


C^J 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


■* 


CO 


•* 


Tf 


CO 


■* 
•* 


on 




ir 


or 






^ 


■* 


h- 


CVI 


I-- 


■<t 


00 


o- 






t- 






00 CO 




o 


CT 






t^ 


eg 




cs 


b- 




(^ 


t^ 




CO 


c 


c 


CO 


tc 


^ 


h- 


tc 


IT 


CM 


f 


to 


oc 


oc 


I-- 


t-- 


OS 












4- 














(C 


CO 


or 


t 


t- 


L" 


CM 


t^ 


cs 




h- 












CO 


CM 


■* 


cs 


u- 


CM 


cs 


CO 




CO 


Tf 


<c 


o 


CO 


CM 


oc 
to 


CM 


c 

CM 




^ 


c 




to 


cc 


X 


c 




X 


c 


IT 


c 


c^ 


CO 


CM 


^ 


00 




c 


t^ 




or 




O 




h- 




■^ 


c<; 


r- 




IC 


■» 


* 




oc 


CM 


CO 


Tf 


c 


c 




to 
o 


M 


I/: 


c- 


\r. 


CM 




-» 




o 


on 


CO 


CO 


o 


C 


h- 




c 


or 


c 


t^ 


CT 


to 


•.c 


o: 




05 








CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■^ 


•* 


T 


ox 


■a" 
co" 


CO 




h- 


c 


0- 


f^ 


c 


r^ 


I-- 




CM 


c 


•* 


c 


h- 




CO 


to 


o- 


c^ 


Cs 


c^ 


er 


Tl 


b- 




CO 


co 


o- 


« 


h- 




c 


cq 


o- 


r- 


c 


^ 


05 


(N 


cq 


w 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 






CM 


c^ 




in 


(M 


<c 




to 


« 




a- 


0- 


to 


CO 


c 




t- 




c 


* 


CO 


a 


CM 


to 




b- 


t^ 


CM 


OJ 


M 


C^ 


■* 


CO 


CO 




cs 


o « 


t- 


\r 


IC 


C*) 


or 


C< 


« 




a- 


c 


c 


to 


t-- 


c- 


■fl 




b- 




t- 




b- 


c 


t> 


CO 


CM 


« 


a 




o 


t^ 


o 


(- 


tr 


t- 


i~- 


CM 


t> 


ir 


I/: 


,-« 


or 


o- 


o 


Of 




or 


<c 






t^ 00 ic 


Cv 


or 




t- 


(N 


C^ 


CO 


CO 

* 


t 


•* 


Tt 


^ 


Tf 


■* 


CO 


M 




c- 


or 


or 


CM 


c^ 


o- 


05 LO c- 


« 


f 


CO 


r» 




ffi 


oc 


« 


tc 




CJ o- 




CO 








^ 


c^ 


C<1 


■fl 


CO 


OC 


o> w 


CO 


oc 


c- 


C 


o 


^ 


c 


cs 


^. 


c 


pM 


^ 


CM 




« 


c- 


<r 


-* 


c> 




cs 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 








M 


























f 


1 




> 














X 




% 


0. 


r 1 




1 




•«■ 


> 

<A 


1 4 


_> 


1 


» 1 


(11 
c 
u 
O 




2; 


s 

a 

« 

Q 


E^ 





Public Works Department. 



37 



SUMNER TRAFFIC TUNNEL. 

Comparison of Receipts, Expenditures, Interest and Sinking Fund Requirements, 

1939 to 1943, Inclusive. 





1939. 


1940. 


1941. 


1942. 


1943. 


Expenditures 


$221,276 68 
837,773 75 
204,352 00 


$229,635 64 
832,123 75 
204,131 00 


$232,802 62 
831,400 00 
204,981 00 


$253,169 54 
830,487 50 
271,577 00 


$243,257 21 
825,995 00 


Sinking Fund Requirements 


272,549 00 




$1,263,402 43 
898,356 82 


$1,265,890 39 
960,365 16 


$1,269,183 61 
1,110,428 47 


$1,355,234 04 
991,160 64 


$1,341,801 21 




1,026,227 33 








$365,045 61 


$305,525 23 


$158,755 15 


$364,073 40 


$315,573 88 







38 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: I submit the following report of the 
operations and expenditures of the Highway Division 
for the year ending December 31, 1943: 

Maintenance. 

Appropriations for 1943 $894,626 00 

Transfers to this appropriation .... 8,850 00 

Total credits for 1943 $907,467 00 

Amount expended 894,430 21 

Balance unexpended $13,045 79 

Work Relief Program. 

Appropriations for 1943 None 

Balance from 1942 $22,693 98 

Total credits for 1943 22,693 98 

Transfers from appropriation .... 113 18 

Balance unexpended $22,580 00 

Civilian Precautionary Assistance. 

{Item I.) 

Appropriations for 1943 $7,400 00 

Balance from 1942 72 94 

Total appropriations for 1943 .... $7,472 94 

Transfers from appropriations .... 2,500 00 

Total credits for 1943 $4,972 94 

Amount expended for 1943 .... 3,836 79 



Balance unexpended for 1943 



,136 15 



Public Works Department. 39 

As of January 1, 1943, the regular employees numbered 
489, and on December 31, 1943, our regular personnel 
amounted to 470, including 22 employees in the Military 
Service. 

The amount of money taken in through the Permit 
Office of the Paving Service was $7,532.07. Of this 
amount $5,477.77 was deposited with the City Collector, 
and $2,054.30 was billed to Public Service Corpo- 
rations. There is now on file in the Permit Office 1,860 
bonds in the amounts of one, three, four, and twenty 
thousand dollars covering the city against claims for 
damages, etc., through the use of permits. 

The regular force of the Paving Service was employed 
as usual in the maintenance of all public streets, re- 
surfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
all permanent pavements such as asphalt, granite 
blocks, etc., and taking care of all gravel, brick and 
artificial stone sidewalks. 

Contracts were let for the reconstruction of eighty- 
two streets during the year. Due to Governmental 
restrictions no new streets were constructed as our 
work was limited to maintenance on old streets. Brick 
sidewalks were replaced with artificial stone sidewalks 
on thirty-two streets by contract. 

Some of the most important thoroughfares recon- 
structed during the year were as follows: — 

Seaver Street, Dorchester, Walnut to Blue Hill Avenues. 
Adams Street, Dorchester, Parkman to Minot Streets. 
Huntington Avenue, Roxbury, Wigglesworth Street to 

the Brookline Line. 
Kneeland Street, City Proper, Atlantic Avenue to 

Utica Street. 
Washington Street, Brighton, Cambridge Street to the 

Brookline Line. 
In the City Proper work was done on the following- 
named streets: — 

Federal Street; Summer Street; Congress Street; Milk 
Street; Temple Place; Winter Street; Arlington 
Street; Columbus Avenue; Providence Street; Tre- 
mont Street; Beacon Street; Chestnut Street; 
Hancock Street; Mt. Vernon Street. 

Lighting Service. 
The Lighting Service Appropriation of the Highway 
Division called for $966,535.75. A transfer of $4,600.00 



40 



City Document No. 24. 



was made to the Paving Service and $960,020.83 was 
expended, leaving an unexpended balance of SI, 914. 92. 

One 600 c.p. mazda lamp was installed on Walk Hill 
Street, West Roxbury. One mazda fire alarm lamp 
was installed on Green Street, West Roxbury. 

Owing to war conditions there was no prescribed 
underground district for the year 1943. 



Respectfully, 

William T. Morrissey, 

Division Engineer. 



Highway Division — Paving Service. 



Work Done by Contract, 1943. 





Type of Work. 




Earth excavation 


6,996 


Rock excavation 




239 


Filling furnished 




2,339 


Old concrete base removed 




2,999 


Old pavement removed 




15,822 


Edgestone set . 




3,048 


Edgestone reset 




15,496 


Granite block pavement . 




4,428 


Concrete base . . 




69,125 


Bituminous concrete pavement (Class I) 


18,990 


Bituminous macadam pavement 


8,086 


Cement bound macadam pavement 


1,205 


Sheet asphalt pavement 


143,555 


Concrete pavement 


3,245 


Artificial stone sidewalks and driveways 


214,512 


Artificial stone foundation .... 


343 


Bituminous concrete sidewalks 


1,331 


Covers reset 


1,086 


Wooden fence .... 




242 



cubic yards, 
cubic yards, 
tons. 

square yards, 
square yards, 
linear feet, 
linear feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square feet, 
tons. 

square yards, 
square j'ards. 
linear feet. 



HIGHWAY DIVISION — PAVING SERVICE. 

Report of Work Done by Department Forces 

FOR 1943. 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid . 
Granolithic sidewalks, laid (new) 
Granolithic sidewalks, relaid (old) 
Tar sidewalks .... 
Block gutters, laid . 
Granite block roadway, laid . 
Edgestone set (new) 
Edgestone reset (old) 
Macadam roadway, patched . 
Macadam roadway, resurfaced 
Street cleaning .... 
Snow removal .... 



12,159 
14,983 
16,296 
96,870 
22,262 

1,740 

3,254 
156 

5,026 
91,162 

7,386 

35,467 

105,517 



square yards- 
square yards, 
square feet, 
square feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
linear feet, 
linear feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
cubic yards, 
cubic yards. 



Table Showing Length and Akea of Paving on Accepted Stkeets, Corrected to January 1, 1944. 



Length in Miles. 


Area in Square Yards. 




Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 

on 

Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1942 Report 


* 138.95 
19.59 


t 202.72 
28.58 


t 73.88 
10.42 


0.66 
0.09 


0.71 
0.10 


0.97 
0.14 


1127.90 
3.93 


§246.75 
34.78 


15.21 
2.14 


1.65 

0.23 


709.40 
100.00 


* 2,654,168 
19.61 


t 3,961,666 
29.27 


11,965,123 
14.52 


14,353 
0.11 


15,923 
0.12 


23,352 
0.17 


!l 573,652 
4.24 


§ 4,039,889 
29.85 


238,720 
1.76 


48,152 
0.35 


13,534,998 
100.00 




Januahy 1, 1944. 


32.82 
0.65 
3.81 
8.12 
24.71 
24.79 
32.39 
11.69 
0.65 


28.35 
3.81 
10.45 
9.87 
21.04 
42.36 
46.29 
31.65 
9.13 


25.88 
9.96 
5.15 
10.32 
11.50 
3.42 
6.77 
0.62 
0.05 


0.27 
0.08 
0.01 
0.04 
0.10 
0.01 
0.06 

0.09 


0.13 
0.07 
0.05 
0.19 

0.07 
0.07 
0.08 
0.05 


0.40 

0.04 
0.12 
0.14 

0.27 


3.23 
1.07 
1.08 
0.77 
6.81 
5.35 
6.53 
2.30 
0.94 


5.18 
7.01 
14.97 
14.07 
28.91 
63.73 
72.99 
16.09 
23.21 


0.22 
0.08 
0.75 
0.17 
0.96 
1.74 
3.24 
1.01 
7.06 


0.01 
0.04 
0.97 

0.32 
0.07 

0.24 


96.48 
22.74 
36.35 
44.64 
94.17 
141.79 
168.68 
63.44 
41.42 


671,646 
9,614 

85,194 
157,643 
448,005 
452,926 
595,185 
255,549 

15,347 


644,198 
60,247 
212,509 
199,594 
410,560 
782,726 
842,597 
600,756 
201,766 


583,285 
240,849 
123,485 
285,816 
292,880 
156,109 
191,412 
73,664 
8,652 


3,748 
2,011 

325 
1,255 
2,689 

210 
1,669 

958 
1,384 


3,750 

1,999 

777 

4,797 

1,380 

1,242 

1,231 

747 


6,685 

771 
2,993 
5,438 

5,479 


114,827 
22,768 
35,891 
21,727 

117,457 
76,121 

117,770 
50,648 
17,373 


82,887 
100,566 
325,201 
246,413 
425,311 
1,019,810 
1,164,584 
271,585 
397,885 


1,563 
1,846 
15,255 
2,686 
12,862 
29,187 
51,579 
16,666 
108,368 


41 

865 

25,029 

61 

10,351 

2,341 

1,499 

7,269 


2,112,589 

439,941 

800,273 

947,953 

1,715,263 

2,528,820 

2,973,858 

1,272,556 

758,791 














Brighton 

Hyde Park 




139.63 
19.67 


202.95 
28.60 


73.67 
10.38 


0.66 
0.09 


0.71 
0.10 


0.97 
0.14 


28.08 
3.96 


246.16 
34.68 


15.23 
2.15 


1.65 
0.23 


709.71 

100.00 


2,691,109 
19.86 


3,954,953 
29.19 


1,956,152 
14.44 


14,249 
0.10 


15,923 

0.12 


21,366 
0.16 


574,582 
4.24 


4,034,242 
29.77 


240,012 
1.77 


47,456 
0.35 


13,550,044 
100.00 


Per Cent 



Total Public Streets 709.71 Miles. 



Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts a; 

*0f this amount 0.10 mile or 834 square yards is Biturock; and 0.03 mile or 537 
square yards is Kyrock; and 0.00 mile or 310 square yards is Unionite. 

t Of this amount 0.02 mile or 667 square yards is Amiesite; and 87.88 miles or 1,598,416 
square yards is asphalt concrete; and 103.16 miles or 2,112,716 square yards is bitulithic; 
and 0.02 mile or 4,973 square yards is Colprovia; and 0.06 mile or 942 square yards is 
Filbertine ; and 0.00 mile or 4,000 square yards is Hepburnite ; and 0.00 mile or 3,903 square 
yards is Laykold: and 0.00 mile or 4.167 square yards is Macasphalt; and 0.21 mile or 
5,200 square yards is Simasco; and 11.16 miles or 203,828 square yards is Topeka; and 
6.67 miles or 35,444 square yards public alleys included in this table -j^ 7.41 miles or 333,065 square yards public 



they existed when annexed to Boston, Territory annexed from Brookline included in city proper. 
0.00 mile or 4,153 square yards is WarcoUte; and 0.18 mile or 3,474 square yards is Carey 
Elastite asphalt plank; and 0.11 mile or 2,507 square yards is Flintkote asphalt plank; 
and 0.11 mile or 1,234 square yards is Johns-ManviUe asphalt plank. 

X Of this amount 0.02 mile or 185 square yards is cobble; and 49.28 miles or 1,499,829 
square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 

II Of this amount 0.06 mile or 924 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 

§ Of this amount 198.73 miles or 3,295,648 square yards is bituminous macadam. 

treets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 7.01 miles or 236,673 square yards 



public streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 1.98 miles or 10,619 square yards of accepted footways 



Public Works Depaimmext 



41 












TO ^ 



D. "-> 

<-= 

i> 2 

c 
c 

E 

o 



uu 





•^^ t^ t^ c ■«• 


00 c 


s g s 


00 


, 


^ 






t^ o r^ - 


- ■fl" 


« 


e^ 








~ »C O » M 


t^ «c 


O t» IN 


l'^ 


S 




« 


r^ m i w 00 


N t^ 




- f o 


b^' 






; « 


J3 O t* 


■» 


^. 




_c 


^i .•• 


•> - 


- r~ o 


C5 — 


«C O IN 


IN 


■^ 






^^ - 


- M M ■* 




- « 


•"If IN C< 


IN 


i 






•» 


















O 




X 






















00 


00 


























» 


o> 




« 






















XT 


>o 




c 






















1^ 


t» 




^ 






















■*. 


Tf 


























C^' 


e^" 




1 






















C* 


c^ 




« 






















S 


s 




s 




























til 










(O 














2 




e 




























l|"i 










s 














S 














lO 














10 












«• 














«• 




_, 




^ 


1 "■ 




2J 


^ 


. X 


M CC n 




o 








01 


5 ■<S 


Cv 




n n 


O c; *'*? 




t» 




c 


J 


J „ 


- 


^ 




•"f <N CI 




t- 




5:2S.t 


1^ 


S 


- 2; 


OC 


s 


f5 S S 




00 






y 


«; 






M —■■ 


O C<J TJ." 




cs" 




•1 






















Si 




cc 






























c 


g. 


c- 




5D 


t^ lO 


K5 IN — 




OS 




^ 




t- 


c 


■» 


TC 


t>- IN 


CO »o CO 




00 




■£.S 




•»• 


^ 


•<f 


M 


-, ^ 




o « 




^ 




V c 


M 


0" 


r> 




M 


t>: — 


o o o 




(N 




i § 


<N 


r- 


;c 


»? 


CS 


t-- CS 


T ■*. ■"-- 








00 « 


s 


■^ 


ir 


ir 


o 


n n 


C? s^ 


^ 




t-." 




u 








(N 














u 






e 


5 


« 


«c 


<N 


o <© 


« 


<0 00 




«5 




"cfl 


■<i< 


(N 


c 


00 


r». m 


00 CO r^ 




N 




> s 


IN 


■t 


OC 


OC 


00 


_ 


eo 


TJ. 00 ■<»• 




X 




£ = § 




^ 


•<f 


<N 


y 


00 o 


C5 C 






ss 




'- 




t^ 


c 






M 


IN >0 CD 






1 "" 


s 


IN 


(N 


CO 


oo' 


■fl 


■<)< 


Tf C" 


lO 




(N 






10 




„ 






2 




c 


c 


^ 




■* 






r- 




00 










00 c 


CS 










2 




_ 






OC 




IT 


c 


^^ 




(^ 




> 4> C4 












■* 








C5 




t^ 




Si ^ 
















r 








cc 




^^(S 


«* 






















•« 






^5 


~^ 


cs 


n 


00 


25 


t~ 


es 


— 


_ 




O 




15 


■fl< 


C5 


•^ 


•V 


OS 


«5 


e^ 




t» 








00 


N 


•O 


S 




- 


00 




OC 


fe 




CO 




■^ 


^ 




<N 


i? 


05. 


c 


<c 


t^ 




o 




1^^ 


N." 


m 


o 


t^ 


ira 


t^ 


•_,' 


X 


■n 


in 




92 




•• 








-' 




M 


(N 








o 




























•• 






ja 
































t 












C 




















o 












'3 




















« 














e] 


















» 

e 


1 

o 














'3 
B 




















k. 














a 


















o 














>-» 


















go 


Q 














■a 


















Q 


-a 
a 














a 




















a 












ji 




















a 








1 




3 




















s 



n 

-C 
3 
<2 


c 
e 

1 

W 


c 

_4 

« 
U 


a 
2 
1 


i 

X 



(T 




o 
Q 


3 


O 

> 


c 
o 
E 

< 


> 






3 






. 



* 5 



5 -^-^ 



-rcc 



^ T^- 



« a«o> 

5 o — •• 
■S c«2 - 

6 e B . 
.2 OH 

M 3 3. 

CO -i3<N 

IN S S''- 

*- S o" 

.5 ^ §•• 

4) -O^ O 

- „= 3 * 

k0 

— «o t; ^- o 
i" tc.2 Zj c 
ceo ni: S 

' " oo" ~ ." 2 

0! 3 .-1^ 

0) 4).2a — 

I i 



42 City Document No. 24. 

Permit Office Activities, 1943. 
Under classes 1 and 2 of the schedule of permit fees 
there were issued for openings in the public ways as 
follows: 

Number of 
Permits. 

City departments 2,378 

Public service corporations 1,561 

Emergencies for same 1,450 

MisceHaneous 425 

Total 5,814 



Permits for other than street openings were as follows : 



Painting and minor repairs 

Placing and removing signs on buildings 

Special permits 

Awnings 

Cleaning snow from roofs 



1,344 

219 

214 

69 

2 



Raising and lowering safes and machinery ... 53 

Total 1,901 

Grand total 7,715 



The fees received from these permits amount to 
$7,532.07. Of this amount $5,477.77 was deposited 
with the City Collector, and $2,054.30 was billed to 
public service corporations. 



Bonds. 

There are now on file in this office 1,860 bonds, in the 
amounts of one, three, four, and twenty thousand 
dollars covering the city against claims for damages, 
etc., through the use of permits. 



Public Works Department. 



43 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF THE 
SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

Mr. George G. Hyland, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir, — I submit herewith a statement of the 
activities and expenditures of the Sanitary Division for 
the year ending December 31, 1943: 



Maintenance expenditures 
Motor deficiency 

Total cost approach 



^,755,684 73 
18,213 46 

J,773,898 19 



I. Waste collection and disposal 

(a) By contract (Table II) . $1,335,440 85 
(6) By day labor (Table III) . 621,158 21 


$1,956,598 06 


II. Street cleaning (Table V) 

III. Not directly chargeable to 1943 operation 

(a) For other services . $8,675 08 
(6) Pensions 10,495 75 

(c) Injured roll .... 4,820 21 

(d) Unused stock .... 11,438 80 

(e) Salvage — tin, paper, etc. . 35,413 76 
(/) Preventive street cleaning . 33,707 91 


712,7^ 
104,5. 

. 762 

4 
69 

6 
— 79 


18 62 
31 51 


Personnel changes in permanent force: 

Total personnel January 1, 1943 

Transfers from other departments and divisions 

New appointments 

Reinstatements 




Deaths 

Resignations 

Retirements 

Transfers out 

Discharged 


12 
21 
14 
11 
4 
— 62 


841 


Total personnel January 1, 1944 




779 


Comparisoji of Expenditures, 1942- 1943: 






Increases: 

Waste collection and disposal contracts . $448,832 00 

Street cleaning 23,562 00 

Salvage 24,307 00 

Other 9,666 00 


$506,36 


7 no 






Carried forward 


$506,367 00 



44 City Document No. 24. 

Brought forward $506,367 00 

Waste collection, day labor . $10,869 00 

Other 8,452 00 

19,321 00 

Net increase $487,046 00 



The increase in the cost of contract waste collection and disposal was 
due to the fact that the wages paid to helpers and chauffeurs were higher. 
The actual increase in the amounts of the contracts was $416,011.24. 

Wartime Difficulties of Executing Contracts. — The 
Waste Collection Contracts for the year 1942 specified 
an hourly wage rate for helpers and two grades of 
chauffeurs of 67^, 70 and 80 cents, respectively. 
During the year, however, it was impossible to procure 
labor at these prices on account of the demands of war 
work at higher wages. Contracts for the year 1943, 
therefore, specified wages at 80, 85 and 95 cents per 
hour, respectively. 

Since, on the one hand, the Office of Price Administra- 
tion had established the 1942 contract prices as a ceiling 
for 1943, and would not approve a change until the 
contracts were let, and, on the other hand, contractors 
would not bid without prior approval from the 0. P. A., 
an impasse was created. 

In order to break this deadlock, the Commissioner 
of Public Works entered into conference with the 
O. P. A. and the contractors. No immediate ruling 
could be obtained because 0. P. A. desired to make a 
thorough investigation. The Commissioner of Public 
Works, however, was granted permission to make a 
series of short-term contracts in the interim. These 
periods were January 1 to 31, February 1 to 13, Feb- 
ruary 15 to 28, and contractors were given maximum 
man-hour and truck-hour quotas. After the liquidation 
of these quotas, it was the responsibility of the city to 
complete the work for the period, if necessary. 

During these periods, some contract districts were 
combined with others. After March 31, contracts 
were again awarded by districts. Also, in March, the 
former Roxbury contract district was divided into two 
parts, and known as Mission Hill and Dudley Districts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 
Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



45 



£> 
4> 

vi 
XI 
u 
CQ 

o 

C 
CQ 

<A 



^ CS 



•a 

c 
u 
a 



NOOOO'-'OM'-i 



00 O CO 



CO O O "O 



rt C^ 00 — I rt rt 



CO CO «> ^ o> 0> -< 



— rt to C<1 
CO w -^ t^ 



00 00 w 



05 X CO 



-H lO CO 



«5 O <0 



00 IN ^ 



r-H CO -H 



lO ;o CO 



CO 00 CO 



CO CO -H 

lO lO (N 



rt o >o 



rt CO 
o> o 

r-l 00 



00 >0 CO 00 CD 
t^ CO Ol O t~ 
t~ O (M lO O 



rt — . — . lO -< 



"O « CO 



CO CO <N rt 



00 CO o 



^ 00 -■ -H 



rt in CO CD " 



C-) (N CO C^ 00 



'H C^ ,-. 



■^ ^ rt o 00 
O CO 00 CO o 



CO C^i <N -< 
IN 00 O rt 



05 CO c^ CO CO 

~ * 03 00 00 



00 CD 00 _ 

oo_ cD_ >n_ co_ co_ oo_ r-_ <^ 
00 o in c^" iC co" '-<" ■^ 

lOiOC^CDOOOlCOiN 



O F-i 00 00 c^ 



CO <N CO 



■jaquin^\T 



OS -At. 



« £ 






46 



City Document No. 24. 



c 
o 

<n 

O 
OQ 

<*> 
o 

>. 

O 

c 





c 




o 




o 


. 


>1 


z 


X) 


u 


in 


mi 


3 


CO 


4) 


< 


D< 


H 





hS 



ft>H 



0-3 
o 



UQ 






.-1 05 W5 



CD CO O 

»n ro o> 



CO -H 00 



C6 00 « 



«• 


^ 




1 


4 








c 




c 
"a 


c 


1 


1 
"a 


a 


^ 


1 


s 


■« 



§ a 












M TO 






Public Works Department. 



47 





^ 


05 




CO 




•o 




CO 




lO 






05 




U5 






o 




CO 




OS 




o 






CO 




03 


t^ 




<D 




CO 




IN 




CO 






o 




_l 


_ 




M 




CO 




'J" 




^ 






IN 




»» 


M 




e© 




s» 




«« 




«» 






«» 




N 


CO 




O 




00 




00 




IN 






t- 




s 


00 




to 




-^ 




CO 




■* 






■* 




w 


o 




o_ 




CO 




t>._ 




t-_ 






<N 




CO 


1<" 




o" 




co" 




co" 




■*" 






LO 




OS 


(N 




CO 




IM 




IN 




IN 






■* 




























o 




00 


,_, 




t^ 




IC 




CO 




^ 










•n 


•t 




■* 




t~ 




'rp 




O 






OS 




o 


<N 




05 




^ 




C-l 




IN 






•o 




o 


— ' 




CO 




o 




o 














,_, 


^^ 




^^ 




,_, 




o 




,_, 






^^ 




ei» 


9© 




»» 




»» 




e© 




e© 






m 


o 


_ 


^ 




o 




„ 




^ 




M 






o 


o 


IN 


00 




t~^ 




CO 




00 




t^ 






00 


N 


t^ 


*_4 




o 




r^ 




00 




00 






o 


115 


Oi 






«o 




CO 




Tt< 




in 






Tf 


O 


eo 


■* 








CO 




o 




OS 






•* 


r^ 


00 


^ 




>o 




IN 




in" 




o 






U5 


<N 


t» 


•* 




<o 




00 




o 




•'»< 






CO 




w 


e© 








m 








»» 






CO 




sa 






s 








s 










s 




O 00 CO 


^ 


t- o 


N; 


CO 1 


CD 


o 1 


o 


IN M 


-* 


CO 


■* 


t^ 




o t~ o 


■<}< 


0> (N 






O 






o o 


o 


r» 


w 


•o 




eo .-1 5D 


00 


.- (N 


•* 


CO 


CO 


M< 


•* 


CO w 


■* 


CO 


"5 


M 




UO rt" ITS 


50 


oo" O 


2 


00 


oo" 


o 


o" 


o>" co" 


co" 


IN 


CJ> 


in" 




■* CO 


CO 


O -1 




t^ 


t^ 






(N 


CO 


•(5 


03 


lO 




CO 




















O 




- 



03 
O 



•2 5 



— v2 



J9 S 



2 O 



§ O 



^ TO 

§ a 



S 6 



§ C3 



§ O 



48 



City Document No. 24. 



CO 

< 



E 

a> 
u 
a> 
Q 

be 

c 

•5 

c 
u 

> 



C 

o 

-l-l 

o 

CO 
<*• 

o 
>> 

c5 

ii 



o 
u. 

u 

o 

-] 

n 
Q 



ii 





. 






o- 


1 


1 


00 


1 


1 


o 






t 


1 




t3^ i 






co 


1 


1 


t^ 


1 


1 


05 






o 








-* 






t^ 






(> 






en 




Tot 

Cos 

Pel 

Capi 
































'C 






-1> 






•^ 






'I" 








w 






^ 






«« 






»» 








1 




t 


1 


Tf 


"O 










_ 




t?' c _• 


■^ 


1 


•* 


He 


1 


cc 


cc 


5 


cc 






c^ 






























o o a 


IT 






Tt 




■* 


cc 










00 




Total C 

CoUecti 

and 

Dispof 


o- 




s 


cs 




cs 


Tf 


5 


00 






•o 




CM 




oc 
cs 


cc 
cs 




cc 
cs 


ic 


p; 


cc 






e^ 




Z 


«i 


cs 




c^ cs 
»» en 




cq 
cs 






^ 






















en 
















1 




t-- 


1 


t^ 


cc 


cc 


cs 






o 








S 


1 


?3 


cc 


1 


cc 


oc 


o- 


oc 






■* 




































o S 


a 




o- 


c 




9 


t^ 




o- 






00 












a 


u; 




IT 


c- 




c 






CO 










o- 


« 




OC 


o- 


cc 


cc 










H 


O.S2 


tc 




;c 


« 




oc 


c 


cs 


cc 






oT 




ao 


OQ 


cr. 




cc 


cc 




c 


ir 










C>) 







«» 


«# »» 


«© «© 


e4 








O 


























e« 




kJ 






























< 




C 


1 


c 


h- 


1 


t^ 


a 


IT 


"* 






,—1 




H 




CS 


1 


cs 


cs 


1 


cs 


^ 


oc 


Cv- 






00 




O 


o^ 




























H 


-^ o 


tc 




tc 


If 




li- 


oc 


cr 


OC 






05 






-^.2 


o- 




o- 


cc 




ce 


■a 


h- 


cs 






00 








oc 




oc 


cc 




cc 




OC 


■^ 






05 






ir 




ir 


■* 




•* 


^ 


c 


^ 






^ 






c- 




cc 


oc 




oc 






t^ 






OS 






























Tf 








^ 


a& «» 


«» a» 


s^ 




«» 








K 


1 


cc 


„ 


1 




IT 


cc 


cc 






o> 






C — c 


(^ 


1 


cs 


c 


1 


5 


c 


t^ 








■* 






^ M 


li- 




u- 


Tt 




•^ 




c^ 


5 












'-1I 








cc 




cc 


a 


cc 


o- 






OJ 






es 




e<i 


es 




cs 


^ 


cs 


^ 






C-J 






3 c3.£ 


«# 


e« «« 




t» «» 


9% 




e© 




Q 


o n 
O " 




























cs 




























■< 






























>< 
































>r 


1 


IT 


XT 


1 


»r 


IT 


u: 


^ 






iC 








u: 


1 


u; 


u; 


1 


u- 


IT 


m 








lO 




n 


13 


c 




c 


c 




c 


c 














D 


u » 


«c 




tc 


cc 




cc 


cc 














O 


^1 


c 




c 


c 




c 


c 


c 


C 






o 






Q 


«# 


«© e© 


»» «« 


»» 




w 




























































U 




oc 


1 


oc 


cc 


1 


cc 


c; 




c 






CVl 








1 




s 


1 


oc 




b- 








■* 






5- 




5- 




oc 




cc 


X 






•o 






o g 


«: 




<c 








■<] 




■* 






«^ 






H = 








cs 




es 


„ 


cs 


„ 






_J 






o 


^ 


S 8© 


t» «# 


m 






s» 






O 






























r» 


1 


t^ 


«c 


1 


cc 


cc 


c 


cc 


a 


c 


05 






cc 


1 


CC 


t^ 


1 


l^ 


cs 


cs 


-» 


cc 


e^ 


lO 




o w 


« 




cc 


cc 




p- 


t- 


c 


t^ 


Tf 


c 


rf 




o>S 


c 




s 


■* 




■^ 


c 


u- 


ir 


IT 


IT 


O 




oc 




X 




oc 








t- 




« 






















es 




Ol 




b 





























































« a 


Q, 




























« S 








^ 






^ 






g 










5£ 


1 


& 


1 





a 


" 




a 


1 


1 


a 


1 






t< 


1 c 




b 


1 c 




u 


1 c 




c 


1 o 




X 


R 


^ 


•c 


oc 


Eh 


X 


c« 


H 


X 




h 






5; 


X 


a 


X 


a 


£ 


a 


X 




o 


X 


t- 




^ 


u 




M 


u 














1 


3 






1 


c 




S 


c 




C 








































z 
















es 


" 



























c> 


























€■ 




























cc 












■J 
































































oc 






a 























t-- 






-kS 












z 










CC 






^ 






O" 






< 
















^ 












X 




cc 


































X 












u; 






6 




u 






c 






c 






e- 






s 








w 






OS 












t- 










X 












"c 






c 




c 
cc 






c 

02 













1 






•J8qain>i 










©■ 






o 


















I> 






so 
















' 





Public Works Department. 



49 



TABLE IV. 
Comparative Costs Per Cubic Yard, 1942-1943. 



o 


Day Labor DisTRicts. 


Collection Cost. 


Total Cost, Disposal. 


Cubic Yards. 
1942. 


Cubic Yards. 
1943. 


s 

5 


1942. 


1943. 


JO 51093 


$0 46055 


7. 




«1 7580 
1 9584 
1 4339 


SI 6918 
2 1886 
1 4810 


$2 26890 
2 46933 
1 94483 


$2 1523 
2 6491 
1 9416 


87,132 

86,968 

112,898 


80,337 


9. 


South End 


84,376 


to. 


North and West Ends 


115,746 




Average 

Collection Cost 


$1 6982 


$1 7542 


$2 20913 


82 2149 


286,998 
$485,386 23 


280.459 
$491 989 81 


















Contract Districts. 



Cost Per Cubic Yard. 



1942. 



1943. 



Cubic Yards. 
1942. 



Cubic Yards. 
1943. 



2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7A 

7B 

9A. 

9B. 

ir. 



South Boston 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester (including disposal) 

Elm Hill 

Dudley (including Mission Hill), in 1943 . 

Back Bay 

Stuart 

Hyde Park 



Average. . . . 
Totals . 



$1 3410 

6319 

1 3413 
8400 
7579 
7701 

7496 

1 2388 
1 1811 
8422 
7610 



$0 8951 



$1 5504 

9190 

1 5078 

9648 

1 3591 
1 0958 
1 1241 
1 3947 
1 0475 

9243 

1 1251 



$1 1590 



73,442 
79,064 
38,459 
69,071 
117,054 
317,873 
35,643 
87,220 
48,076 
95,884 
28,702 



990,488 



80.561 
84,294 
40,561 
97,366 

123,497 

345,300 
36,841 

118,417 
78.606 

110,410 
36,404 



1,152,257 



50 



City Document No. 24. 



TABLE V. 
Street Cleaning Service, 1943, 

Distribution of Expenditures. 

Removing snow 

Brooming 

Pushcart patrolling 

Refuse box collections . 

Motor sweeping 

Flushing . 

Sanding slippery streets 

Gardening 

Underpass 

Total 



$77,829 74 

391,245 46 

156,715 15 

22,254 07 

56,668 35 

3,124 06 

1,384 79 

1,809 14 

1,717 86 

5712,748 62 



CONTRACTS, 1943. 
Ashes and Garbage Removal. 



District. 



1942 Cost. 



1943 Cast. 



Amount of 
Increase. 



Per Cent, 
of Increase. 



1. South Boston. 

2. East Boston. . . 

3. Charlestown . . . 

4. Brighton 

5. West Roxbury 

6. Dorchester. . . . 

7A. Elm HiU 

7B. Dudley and... 

7C. Mission Hill. . . 

9A. Back Bay 

9B. Stuart 

11. Hyde Park.... 

Totals 



$46,680 00 

41,988 00 

24,000 00 

51,000 00 

76,680 00 

191,760 00 

19,800 00 

1 

^ 56,700 00 

J 

27,600 00 

28,560 00 

16,200 00 



$71,710 00 
69,082 92 
31,669 08 
84,339 16 
154,538 00 
324,397 38 
34,682 86 

101,819 00 

41,560 84 
48,220 00 
34,960 00 



$25,030 00 

27,094 92 

7,669 08 

33,339 16 

77,8.58 00 

132,637 38 
14,882 86 

45,119 00 

13,960 84 
19,660 00 
18,760 00 



.536 
.645 
.319 
.653 
1.015 
.691 
.751 

.300 

.506 

.69 

1.158 



$580,968 00 



$996,979 24 



$416,011 24 



.716 



Public Works Department. 51 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith statement of the 
activities and expenditures of the Sewer Division for 
the year ending December 31, 1943. 

During the fiscal year 1943, there were built by con- 
tractors and day labor 0.38 mile of common sewers 
and surface drains throughout the city. After deduct- 
ing 0.01 mile of sewers and surface drains, rebuilt or 
abandoned, the net increase for 1943 is 0.37 mile, which 
added to the existing 1,221.68 miles of common sewers 
and surface drains and 30.93 miles of intercepting 
sewers, makes a grand total of 1,252.98 miles of all 
sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and under 
the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1944. 

There were 17 catch-basins built or rebuilt and 4 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 13 catch-basins and a grand total of 22,539 
catch-basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1944. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $652 have been 
deposited with the City Collector for collection from 
estates upon which no sewer assessments were ever 
paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 1910, chapter 9, 
section 10. 

463 permits have been issued, viz.: 257 to district 
foremen and contractors and 206 to drain layers for 
repairing or laying new house drains. Inspectors from 
this office have personally inspected the work done 
under these drain layers' permits. 

Plans for the assessments of estates for sewer con- 
struction have been furnished the Board of Street Com- 
missioners, representing 7,261.71 linear feet of sewers. 

1,468 complaints have been investigated and inspec- 
tors are instructed to report in writing in each case. 



52 



City Document No. 24. 



849 catch-basin complaints were received. 

700 gasoline traps have been examined in garages 
and cleansing establishments. 

600 grease traps have been examined in hotels, 
restaurants and commercial establishments. 

Reported in writing on 1,516 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, section 25 
of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 2,000 
requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances, chapter 27, section 8, apprising 
them of the construction of new sewers or repairs to old 
sewers. 

During the year 1943, 3,361 catch-basins were cleaned 
by day labor. None were cleaned by contract. 

Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer. 



MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURES FROM JAN- 
UARY 1, 1943, TO DECEMBER 31, 1943. 



Sewer Division. 






Improved Sewerage 






Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, inside 


. $82,853 87 




Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, outside . 


1,931 63 




Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, engines . 


31,877 22 




Pumping Station, Calf Pasture, boilers . 


63,513 02 




Pumping Station, Union Park street 


8,252 87 




Pumping Station, Summer street 


3,650 07 




Moon Island 


24,098 59 




Main and intercepting sewers 


24,502 31 


$240,679 58 


Maintenance — Regu 


ar. 


Automobiles 


$15,699 06 




Cleaning catch-basins . 






49,663 94 




Cleaning sewers . 






30,869 32 




Fuel and oil . 






300 70 




Hardware and tools 






273 84 




House connections 






11,692 59 




Maintenance — Stony Brook 






2,925 68 




Office and engineers' expense 






1,979 26 




Office and engineers' salaries 






6,760 81 




Stock 






2,328 99 




Yard and lockers . 






28,689 42 




Pumps 






276 10 








151,459 71 






Carried fortvard . 








$392,139 29 



Public Works Department. 



53 



Maintenance 
Brought forward 
Repair department buildings 
Repair catch-basins, South Boston 
Repair catch-basins, East Boston 
Repair catch-basins, Charlestown 
Repair catch-basins, Brighton . 
Repair catch-basins. West Roxbury 
Repair catch-basins, Dorchester 
Repair catch-basins, Hyde Park 
Repair catch-basins, Roxbury 
Repair catch-basins. City Proper 
Repair sewers. South Boston 
Repair sewers. East Boston 
Repair sewers, Charlestown 
Repair sewers, Brighton 
Repair sewers. West Roxbury 
Repair sewers, Dorchester . 
Repair sewers, Hyde Park . 
Repair sewers, Roxbury 
Repair sewers, City Proper 



Repairs. 



$188 68 

352 24 

45 52 

520 21 

1,458 63 

4,390 56 

376 82 

361 07 

797 64 

36 50 

84 81 

16 12 

1,133 35 

4,385 89 

844 49 

364 17 

87 26 



$392,139 29 



15,443 96 



Maintenance — Miscellaneous. 

$13,431 87 



Miscellaneous .... 
Back Bay Fens .... 

Telephones 

Wearing apparel — rubber goods 

Pensions and annuities 

Holidays, vacation, sickness and time allowed, 

Civilian defense 



87 64 

720 34 

297 88 

6,550 21 

19,055 22 

2,183 13 



42,326 29 



Total $449,909 54 



Credits. 

Trucks, cleaning machines, etc., used on main- 
tenance 

Maintenance stock used on maintenance . 

Sewerage works stock used on maintenance, 

Materials purchased by sewerage works used 
on maintenance 

Maintenance pay rolls paid by sewerage works, 

Debit transfer to construction for trucks, 
July 29, 1943 .... 

Debit transfer to construction 
October 29. 1943 

Debit transfer to construction 
December 31, 1943 . 

Debit transfer to construction 
November 5, 1943 . 

Debit transfer to construction 
December 9, 1943 



for 
for 



trucks, 
trucks, 



for labor, 
for labor, 



$19,595 74 

651 53 

1,352 93 

7,949 34 
87,437 18 

379 26 

262 02 

770 50 

142 47 



42 33 



Debits. 
Construction pay rolls, paid by maintenance . 
Debit transfer from construction for labor, 
November 5, 1943 



Total maintenance expenditures, Decem- 
ber 31, 1943 



$31,660 47 
167 25 



118,583 30 
$331,326 24 



31,827 72 



$363,153 96 



54 



City Document No. 24. 









b 

3 
-t-l 

C 

a 

X 

u 

lU 

c 

C 

a> 

-4-1 
C 









(^ _» -^ «ij 1. 

00«0 -H! 



o « a 



.S « c 

fc- O 3 



^5 3 



• O Q; 

I'll"! 



O 3 3 i>§^ 3 



00 00 o> 



— c; i>j 



^ 00 



CD 00 M C^ 50 



—1 ^ CO 



•s -s «i 



^ ^ 3 



•SCQ. 



U O fe ffi K 



o a, 
O 



■a 
a °° 



S >H 



Public Works Department. 



55 





, 




















ti 

a 
■ft 

2 
3 
Q 




a 
"E 

3 
Q 










in 
co" 













to 

at 




00 
00 


6 84 

7 52 
120 64 
331 70 
952 86 

57 75 




-H (N CO 1-1 
CO -< CO 00 

W •* -1 00 


in 

i 
0" 

9t 


































00 
in 


























* 


















































18 00 
12 00 
60 00 
96 50 
235 30 
27 00 




in lO 
t^ <N 

CO IN t- 

^ r-l 05 


00" 
at 






00 

■■o 

00 
00 




























g 
CO 

at 






-^ IN CO 
!N W M 

O lO CO 
O U5 00 
•O O " 
co" O IN 




327 40 

26 00 

339 57 

1,030 43 

3,202 40 

292 07 

360 57 

797 64 

36 00 

79 50 


(N 00 

TJI CD 

co" 




■*" 

CO 


720 34 

297 88 

6,550 21 

, 19,055 22 

2,183 13 

188 68 


352 24 

45 52 

520 21 

1,458 63 

4,390 56 

376 82 

361 07 

797 64 

36 50 

84 81 

16 12 

1,133 35 

4,385 89 


s 



(N 


1 
o 

J3 

c 

I 


t 




u 

<u 


Pensions and annuities. 
Holidays, vacations, etc. 
Civilian dpfense 


1 

$-1 

i 

Pi 


s 

go 
' m 

u ■*- 

'U 

oi 


i 

■S3 


a 

a 

XI 

"S B 

11 

1 

S — 


c 

a 
jp 

"3 
« 

c 
.-1 


-i 

CIS 

-si 

l-s 

" o 
•- £ 


1 

ii 

c: 
-c: 

■3 

g-Q 


1 

4) 


.1 

J 


■5 

3 
t,.o 

■3 


.1 

.t: > 


J3 

■3 

!» 

£ 

" c 
^5 
■3§ 

ftp: 


1 

£ 
Pi 


1^ 

03 

£ 

4) 
V 
Z G 

(2 


3 

J5 

'E 
pq 

£ 

& 

V 
Q 


00 

0) 

£ 

4) > 
GO W 

3 
. J2 

ea 

§■« 








56 



City Document No. 24. 





ifl 








CM 


t> 


■<t 


o- 




CO 




«5 


ui a 


■* 


t> 


t^ 




t^ 




^ 


w t> 


1^ 


u; 


o- 




OS 






u- 


t~. 


r> 




t>. 




00 


00_ -t 


e^ 








•— • 




ci 


CO 


-t 




c- 




co" 




«# 


«» 


e© 


«« 




«© 


§ 
















8 
















a 
















jt 
















































« 
















o 
















.9 
















S 


















o 


o ■ 


c 


IN 


00 


00 




to 


CO 


CC 


CC 


OS 


OS 


■* 


■* 


■* c 


o 


o 


*l 








CC 




>o 


o 


en 


OS^ t- 


s 


99 




s 


a» 


s ^ 










1 














O Ol O! 


CO — 


•^ 


c 






^^ 


JS 


•^ a> a 


Tj. ^ 


IC t- 


00 


00 




00 OJ !N 


-H C 


rH C 






_ 


O M CO 


00 0- 




t' 


CO 


CO 


00 -^ 


05 — 




l- 


c 




CO 


c" 


O CC 


t> 


cc 


99 


99 


§ w 


^ 


^ 


1 ^ ' 










-.!< 


^ CC 


t^ 




?^ 


t» 




•* 






•* CC 


c 




c 




O 


. 


IN 






N ir 


oc 




oc 




00 




00 






00 CC 


^ 




-f 




t 


4% 






s t 


iM 




IN 
ir 




(N 
lO" 








c 


c 




c 




O 






























«» 


^ 


«« 










ir 


li- 








o 


£ 










c^ 


es 




c 




IN 


o 




* 






CC 


c 




c 




CO 












1- 


t> 




t^ 




t^ 


1 






























se 


»» 


s 


99 
























c 






















o 






















O 
































s 


i 




c 
c 




8 












IC 


u- 




u- 




lO 






























c- 


o 




^ 




o)_ 


H 










^. 


^ 








^ 












e^ 


e# 


S 


99 




t^ t^ c 


Tj> o- 


?- 


oc 


ir 




lO 


tT hC S" 


05 CO C 


o - 


<N 


t> 


^ 




•f 


Motor 

Vehicle 

Cleanin 

Machine 

Etc. 


00 OS IC 


CO a- 


IN 


— 


c 




c 


U5 O -H 


CO ■* 


OC 




t~ 


t~ 


00 


00 CO 
oo" cs 




^ 






os" 


99 


S» 


i 


«© 


s 




5 






OJ — 


c 


CC 


Tf 




■^ 


• 


lO 






lO 00 


-* 


o 


^ 




-r 


u 


CO 






CO o 


"* 


IT 


oc 




00 


'5 


^ 






(N C 


IM 


c 








a 


o> 






cn c 


C 


•<t 


Ir 




»c 




t>." 






t^" ■<i' 


^ 


a 


IN 




o" 


e© 






ft% 






s% 


99 












ee 










-f M 00 C 


-H J> 


oc 


t- 




es 


CO 




O 00 -H <N 


CO CC 


o- 


•^ 


to t- 


C^ 


- 


C^l t CO t^ 


o ^ 


■^ 


CC 


00 t^ 


CO 


o 


c5 Tf -H oe 


—1 b- 


oc 


t 


CO « 


CO 


.o 


o CO CO 


rt CC 


t- c 


(- oc 


•o_ 


a 


■»" 


lO' — 


CC 


oc 


oo" - 


o 




CO 


CO (N 


oc 


oc 


OS C 


CO 








(M 








IN 




<© 


»» 


» 


^ 


99 




-f 05 I". CO 


CO « 


■« 


c 


T» 


IN 


CO 




o ■* -H es 


OS U" 


IT 


c- 


IN t- 


OS 


!» 


-r ■* ■* N 


OS o- 


o- 


e<- 


CO b. 


CO 




eo "^ o oc 


(N t-- 




oc 


M 


(N 


no 


S3 


04 00 P5 


M CC 


o 




P- 


OC 




O 


t 


os" c 


c- 


oc 




,_ 


eo" 


r-* 


o 


o ^ 


■* 




e<- 


c 


CO 




IN 


o cs 


•fl 




c 




CO 




at 


a» 


as 


a& 


«% 




: o 






» po-a 

:2fe| 

3 S S 










Sco" 

30 


01 






2" 

1 












■3„- 
gco 

X 0, 


O 


*=; o 


£ 


t. 1 5 










axi 




9 "" 


^ 


OD 












■3 i 




S i- 




c 




"o 




<; 


o « 






■X- 












1 


& 


C 


H- 
1 


" ^S 




ta 


2S 


~ 








C 




c 





c5 

5 c" 
a o 



a » 

Co 



:3 =-^ 
CD °i; 



■*coco^McONOt^eo 
t^>.oosco«iNO>-OT)<eo 



m 



S c 



:i S 3 3 

' :>. >- '^" '^ 

1) a 0.5 is , 

:i 5 * 

3 o o- ^ "l* ' 



' c3 d S 

; c c c 



c c c c _: 






c C — 



01 <u a> lu 

QQQQ 



Public Works Department. 



57 



w 







d 






•o 


CO 




o 




CI 


1 


', tK 




o 






o 


c 




'^ 




o 


w o 




o 






o 


o 




o 




o 


cn 1^ 




o 








CO 








b- 


ij 








































o 




o 




. 
















o 




o 


c 
















o 




lO 


X 






















c! 
















c^ 




CM_ 


H 
















«« 




«« 






C^J 


o 


tj 


CI 


-t 


o 


>o 


00 


CO 


CC 




•o 






o 




t^ 


IN 


t^ 


00 


•/.S 3 « 




to 


■* 


■* 


-1« 


-»< 


CO 


CO 


CI 


o 


Tool 

Mater 

and 

Instr 

ment 






CO 


»o 


M 


o 


to 


CO 


o 


o 




s 




o 


CS 


•* 








'"' 




s 






















ir- 






t 


o 


00 


o 




CO 


— 




00 






(N 


t- 


(M 


lO 




CO 


_-c t: 




t^ 






Tf 


cc 


^^ 


00 




iO 


^ a V 




o 






00 


■^ 


t- 


•o 




■5 


"tt^ S 




t^ 






o 


00 


o> 






C0_ 


•Sao 




a 






(N 




p^ 






•^ 


iJ »^a, 










Tf 










o 


K 




«4 




































«9 






If: 




o 








o 




U5 






IT 




b- 








o 




CI 


C3 o3 --• 




00 


c 








§ 






COj3 




s 


tc 








CO 










O -H 


o- 


'J 


c- 


o 


<o 




o 


« 




o c 


■* 


b. 


c- 


lO 


CM 




o 


.^ 




o o- 


(N 


t> 


CO 


lO 






CO 


s 




«© CC 


»C 


«C 


ir 








lO 


c, 






C4 


cs 


o 


cs 




c 




Cl_ 


c5 










Cf 


















cc 




Tt 








c 


o 








t-. 




c 








c 


00 


^ 










c 








« 


CO 


o 






(N 




Tj 








Cs 




3 






CO 




c^ 








c: 


o 


H 


• 




a« 














^" 


^■ 






ir 














in 








c^ 














Cl 


O 




























c 














CO 


2 






t^ 














w 




























S 














m 


c 






















o 






















O 


























c 


(N 


IT 


c 


oc 


c 


c 


C' 


t~ 






c 




^ 


c 




u- 


c^ 


IT 


CO 


jj 




c 


> !>. 


oc 


ot 


<£ 


) o- 


c 


c: 


) •* 


c 




c 


i f 


Tt 


« 






oc 


c 


b- 






c^ 


o 


c 


c 


<z 


s 


c 


« 


co_ 


'rt 




c^ 




c 


IT 


L" 


(~ 


CJ 


c\ 


^ 






c 
w 




c<- 








<N 


Cv 


CJ 






t~ 


. C 


(N 


c- 


) t- 


t> 


CT 




1 00 






a 


) C 


(N 


c 


) oc 


c 




C 


J >n 


JC 




c^ 


> — 


t^ 


c 


i ^ 


1 c 


oc 


£ 


\ Cl 








: c 


t> 






3 T 


c 


c 


5 t^ 


*^ 




a 


1 c 


<x 


L' 


c^ 


C£ 


c 


u' 


3 CD 


cS 




c 


' »- 




c 


j" a 


)" C 


■^ 


1 


<" O 




ct 


3 


c 


c: 


5 




e\ 


c 


J -* 






« 


» 














C\ 




















2 
























a 
























; 
























( 
t 


p 




at 

E- 




c 


a 




: S 








c 






s 






3 a 


: a 


3 * 






c 


i. 




p 

O 








' 't 


£ " 


4 fl 


.) 




1 






S 


1 




3 C 

> a 




5 S 






1 


i 






9 


c 


J" a 


' a 


~ • 


~ a 


' I 


T 


1 










H I 








i ii 


c 










C3 




3 ; 




1 : 


3 1 


• <J 




-c 




















a 




i ^ 




M 


( 


s 1 




1 1 


I A 


^ a 




c 


3 iS 




'a, 

e 

3 




^ p. 


! p 


1 P 




3 :7 


c 
; C 

c 

3 S 


.? 


\ ^ 






















1 



58 



City Document No. 24. 



Q 
« 

c 

C 
4> 



4> 



T3 




■a > E. 


■^2| 


3 aj 


OEcB 


t-H 



o a> 









Cs— Ort 



00 05 

00 b^ 






M-H-*00O 
00 00-<COM 



t>. lO oi »— 10 CO o 

;0 (N -H 00 <N tc 00 



T)< CO 0> O 05 'O o 

r, i^ Tfi o c^) «2 c 






5 « C =4 



ooJSg 



; bc-^ 



: o-a 






"2 > £ 



■^COCO'*00;OMOt»CO 

oiooJco-HMO'O'teo 

00-<(NO5l^05(NON(N 
C5»dO'^C0t^cDt^'^^ 

•* ;d CO ci_ -* CO IN t~ -H 






,2 o 



- 5 c S " " 

iiio22 

£3 C " o ■« -" - 

.S o o d-g-s-g- 



«^ 

a 3 

°^. 

(1> o 

3 M 
. o 



§'3 — 



05 C P, t 
O O Ok 

■^ S S 5 



5 '3 



3 C C t. I. t. 

c) c3 C3 ^ 



Cj CJ OJ Oj 

QQPQ 



Q g-5 



'c3 O 



3S 

C3 O 



a « 

O CO 



o * 



Public Works Department. 



59 



^ 




■o 




_ 


o 


_ 














o 


o 


CO 










_ 


T}> 


■ 


1 


3 




t^ 




o 


o 


S 














U5 


o 


C>1 










'O 


CO 


00 


O 




c^ 




lO 


















rt 


IN 


o 










N. 


1^ 


•* 


a 




o 




•o 






















OS 














CO 


eg 




o 




































00 




OS 






66 




































e» 




«« 


"3 














































o 














































.2 


















































00 


eo 




OS 










_, 




■* 








t- 




9 


■* 


>o 


•* 


OS 


2 




«o 


CO 




o 










o 




c^ 








iN 




w 


OS 


CO 


OS 


c^ 


o 




^ 


^^ 




OS 










00 




IN 








O 




CO 




_< 


OS 


^^ 


03 

C 

o 




OS 


o> 




t^ 










to 




r- 








00 




CO 


?; 


CO 


CO 


t~ 




oc 


(O 














!N 












CO 




CO 


CO 


■* 


o 


•* 




w 




























00 




(N 




•<1 


CO 


b-" 










































CO 


■* 








































s 




e» 


O 


















































^_^ 


lO 




o 


^_^ 


» 


c^ 


CO 


o 


UO 


co 


OS 


■<}< 




00 






CO 


2 


1^ 


OS 


■a (0 
§5 




t^ 






00 


■* 


i-O 


r>. 


CD 


IN 




iO 


o 


O 




■* 






CD 




c^ 


CO 




•^ 


^^ 




CO 


c^ 


o 


IN 


00 


(N 


CO 


OS 


in 


00 










b- 


o 


^ 


^^ 




Ol 


CO 




00 


b- 


•* 


■^ 


CO 


O 


o 


CO 


OS 


CO 




cc 








2 


« 


t» 








■<}" 




OJ 


CO 








IN 






CO 


■* 




CO 










CO 


•o 


o ° 




^i 




































UO 




lO 




e© 




































a» 




«e 


H§ 


















































M 


t- 




•o 


o 


lO 


o 


O 


O 


o 


<3 


00 


•o 












e^ 


o 


c^ 


2-0 




CO 






t» 




t^ 


lO 


o 


lO 


CO 


o 


lO 


<N 












!N 


lO 


t>. 


o c • 




>o 


05 




00 


■* 


CO 


■<}< 


CO 


IN 


^ 


N 


OS 


2 












«5 


2 


CO 




CO 


o 




05 


CO 








I^ 






lO 














t>. 




OS 


4) 00 o 




c^ 


CO 




















<N 


■* 












lO 


lO 


o 


tin 




■^ 




































>o 




CO 




e« 




































M 




t» 


a^ 










































































(N 




















■<r 


o 


OS 




o 


!D 


LO 


o 


CO 


CO 




l^ 


UO 


l> 






ti 


00 


o 


O 


r)H 


•^ 




o 


(N 


o 




LO 


CO 


o 


CO 


U5 


w 


OS 


■* 


OS 




CO 




t^ 


CO 


o 


o 


O 


o 




00 


CO 


IM 






o 


CO 


IN 


^ 


•«)< 


OS 


•>!»< 


o 


5 


OS 




OS 


Ifl 


•o 


CO 


O 


CO 


o 


TO 


o> 


t>. 








o 


o 


o 


■>!(< 


t>. 


•* 


■* 




CO 




S 


00 


CO 


>o 


t> 


w 


« 


CO 


h- 




c^ 


5 


IN 


"5 


IN 


CO 


CO 


-^ 


CO 


o 


■* 




at. 






'^ 


■-1 


C0_ 


rt 


(N 


c^ 






co' 


■* 














t- 




00 




CO 






o 


CO 


CO- 


►J 


•^ 






































C<1 




CO 








































M 




C<1 




«» 






































«li 




m 




M- 


U5 


•* 


c 


o 


t^ 


00 


C^ 


OS 


CD 


CO 


•<)< 


IN 


^ 


l> 


U3 


U5 


00 


b- 


o 


o- 


OS 




O 


h- 


CO 


c 


»- 


<B 


CO 


00 




■*! 


CO 


e^ 




c 


00 


b- 


t~- 


^ 


"5 


IN 


c 


IN 




00 


o 


■* 


ir. 


IN 


t> 


CO 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


b- 


00 


t>. 


o 


-* 




os 


M 


■* 


o 


h- 


l^ 




CO 




o 


If: 


(N 




•o 


lO 


rf 


t^ 


OS 


CD 


OS 


o 


CO 


■* 


S 




OS 


b- 


IN 


OS 


ai 


<s> 


Cs 


c< 




c. 




N 


"5 


IN 




■* 


IN 


•o 


o 


CO 


b- 


0( 


•* 


CO 




C- 


CO 
















































O 


a 


O 


c. 




CO 


lO 














X 




00 


00 


C£ 


C4 




52 


h- 


c 


C-l 


•^ 
s 


C>) 




































Si 


't 




ai 
















































^ 
















































Z 
















































P 
















































O 
















































o 




























4 




















o 
















































•< 


« 


g 
c 








C 

c 


c 
c 


c 
c 
J 




> 


u 


^ 




























, 




> 
'Z 




"5 


C 

c 


c 

PC 






1 


> 


■ 




C 








> 

> 

X 








a 
a 


c. 






i 

c 


c 





(t 





C 

c 


> 


s C 
(2 


c 


■ 




a 






c 
a 

c 








'5 


1 '5 


1 




( 


t 




er 


c 


.c 


c 


£ 

C 


j 


c 


■" 


c 
c 


c 

C 


^ 




i 








c 


c 


, 




• I 


c 


c 









"5 


s 




2 £ 




« 


1 


c 








■c 


X 


= 


6 


) "c 


X 


X 


X 


J 


X 


i 


X 


X 


J 






c 


's 


^ 








c 


c 


C 


< X 


X 


.c 


X 


X 


J 


X 


-c 


X 


-c 




> 


C 


b 




^ 


JS 




n 


C5 


c 


1 


c 


I 


t 


t 


t 


c 


c 


c. 


c 


c 








1 1 


J 


C3 








"a 


























> 




c 




-*^ 






;- 
a 


e 


? 


c 


c 


c 


c 






c 


o; 

c 


S .E 


] 


' 1 


1 


1 


t- 
a 
is 
d 


O 

H 




■£ 




5 


c 


1 S 


i 


g 


i 


S 


s 


s 


■t 


s 


3 


-2 » 


c 
c 




£ 


. 






E 






1 11 


i 


; & 


a 


0. 




c 




a 


a 


"3 < 


"c 


c 


a 








C 


C 


2 


5 2 


2 


: 2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


tf t- 


a 


tr 


- 


fC 






1 



60 



City Document No. 24. 



■« 

a 
o 
U 



00 














lO 


















»o 


II 


— 














00 


















w 


O 


































0/ 














■* 


















Tj< 


C 
































CO 


68 
































o> 
















M 


















» 


"aJ 








































































































































< 
















































o> 


















05 
















04 


















IN 


u 


































O 














f^ 


















,_) 
















t> 


















t^ 


03 














■* 


















■* 


t^ 














»-r 


















b-* 


o 














s^ 


















Z 


O 














































CO 


o 
















-f 


O 


-0 CO 












(N 


















CO 


o 


g:s 












<N 


o 
















o 


« 












>o 


















•* 


o 


^ 4) 












q 


5 
















05 


■* 












CO 


im' 
















t>. 


o 


o =* 














a» 




















H§ 
































s 














00 


T 
















00 


iM 


£-T3 












h- 


C. 
















t» 


t". 


O c . 


































m S « 
































CO 


s "-^ 














00 


















(3> 














•* 


o 
















■fl 


O 


i- Q. — 


































ti^ 














-t 


















50 














» 


















«© 


On: 














































00 


o 
















■* 


o 
















00 


















o 














t~- 


00 


















w 


o 

J3 












t- 


Tt 


















■* 












o 


CO 
















b- 




03 












o 


?) 
















S 


co" 


iJ 












CO 


o 
















00 
















M 


















<N 
















«© 


















e» 














<z- 


o 
















;o 


o 
































(N 


CO 


• 












_ 


o 


















CD 














■^ 






















c3 












•* 


ci 


















-^ 


O 














t^ 
















O 


OO" 


H 












CO 


•.0 
















0~ 


1< 














CJ 


















CO 
















e«l 


















9% 




00 


uO 


00 


CO 


o 


c 




oc 


^ 


^ 


cr 


c^ 


c 


CO 


b- 








o 


lO 


b- 


o- 


c^ 


c 




L-: 


t^ 


CO 


cs 


c 


LO 


CO 


T 








^ 


t- 


^ 


•* 


t^ 


LO 




t^ 


c;; 


— 


c- 


O] 


c 


i>) 


C) 








CO 






Tf 


cr 


C! 








2 


r^ 


o 


t~- 


•* 


■* 








CO 


t- 


't 


c- 




00 




0( 


0( 




CO 


c 


t>. 












^H 




.-H 


oc 




_ 




« 


,^ 


t-- 


















m 






c^ 








t^ 




































m 


















































CO 


































i< 


































o 




































































_" 


































CO 










a 








^ 
















u 
% 




y 






1 








c 




c 


^ 


^ 


^ 


t- 


t- 


s 


(6 

H 
Z. 

U 

o 

8 


c 

& 4 

S a 

K 1 


c 

05 




t 

1 
I 

% 
< 


c 






I \ 
pa S 

H 4 

Q " 

s. 

'5 


■1 

c 

a. 


4 

b 
d 

4 


c. 

4 


4 




i 

c 

4 


C 
X 
_a 

i- 
C 

4 


Q 
o 


< 


c 
c 


4 
■ 

c 
c 


1. 

c 




4 

1 


4 

4 




4 


1 > 


' ^ 
1 


( 

4 

c 


' 1 


4 


c 1 


a! 

1 ?' 









a 
; 

c 


'^ 4 
4 

' < 


% 




;- 
4 


> 


'v. 

a 

4 


I- 

< 

c 
2 




4 

: 

1 


4 

'i 

c 

J 


4 

• 

E 


1 

i 

c 

4J 




< 


5 


\ 


J 


c 




4 


> 


^ s- 


^ 


^ 




J 




41 




a 


•* 


S 


! 


c 


^ 


a 


c 




c 


c 


c 


! 


I 






a 


4 




4 








4 




4 




s 








J 




! 




> ; 




3 t- 


-i: 


■; 


t 


) C 


& 


) i 


^ 


Z 


;- 


i. 


O 








.:< 










£ 


S 














H 




4 


4 


t 


4 
5 



5 "4 


^ 




i 


4 

s 

4 


4 


4 


X 

t 


"< 


4 




! a 


h 


2 C 


C 




d 


' & 


C 


c 


C 


c 


c 




!l 



Public Works Department. 



61 



IP 

£ a 





<x 








ly. 




(X 




(Z 




•rf 











CM 










M 


1 




c- 








CC 




-t 




CM 




•* 






«c 




Ct 




t 


-^ 




c 








t 




CC 




C 




OC 






00 






c- 


00 















c 




c 




CM 




c- 






tc 








n 







r> 




































<ji 




«« 


































v: 




I 












































c 






















































































'£ 
















cf 




V 


















4 g 
^■0 




1 



















c 






















a> 














c 




z. 


















r^ „, 




c 
c 


"o 














— 






















01 




■5 






e 




c 




c 




c 






c 




c 


G 








C3 

E 






c 




4 









I 






a 




4 


c 


4 

a 






























>> 


-^ c: 


>i 






c 


is 






a 


a 


1 




J 






a 


C3 — 

a I. 


a 


KK^ 




c 


0; 






" 


















_ 








„^ 


rH .— ( cc 




'4 










c 
c 




c 
c 




c 
c 






03 

c 




c 






~ 






































CO 




c 






































OCM 




Tl 






































•— ( l-H 




oc 






































iCM 


































2 
























c 


















c 


























c 











































■X. 


















« 


























=& 








































t: 






















c 


L. 




















c 

c 






















c 


c 








































C 


1 












c 


; 






"0 




c3 




.a 
C 




c 

< 






c 




e Prompt 
[nc. 

partment I 

ker * Co. . 




C 






c 








tli 




j: 














c3 




j: 


" 4 


03 


03 




■*■ 








-< 









K 










CQ 




H 


Q 


m 


CQ 












IN 




CM 




~ 










CM 




CM 


CS 


0) 


CO 












-t 




'J' 




-* 




-* 






•* 




■>t 


^ 


3! 


•* 












0- 




0- 




o- 




c 






cr 







c 


OS 


C2 












































a. 








































a 








00 




00 




t^ 




CC 






CO 




CM 


*c 


(C 


>-4 












c^ 




c 


















C- 




CM 






c 








































c 








































c 








1 





a 
-Jl 




> 

c 

















0. 

c 





3 
< 




•z 




cz 








•jq 




ox 




~ 










CM 




c> 


CM 


CM 


n 












^ 




Tt 




^ 




^ 






■^ 




-t 


t 


2: 


•^ 




a 








c 




o- 




o- 




o- 






C 




0- 


T 










































•■^ 


•■^ 


^ 




cc 








c- 








^ 




c- 






>o 




■* 





t>r 


CM- 




CM 


























CM 






" 


'^ 


CM 












a 




5 















<A 




a. 
c 


4 

c 


>, 


a 




C 








^ 




-? 




C 




eg 






s 






•^ 


►^ 


t^ 




c 


~Z7 














~-c 











c 








ii_ 


c: 















c 














b 


j 








03 




0. 

C 








5 
1 





'0 

Q 
3 








1 






'S 


-13 




1 
















CO 






0. 












si 
p 

c 







4 


03 


z 

X 
O 


a 
c 



XI 






^ 




W 


1 
01 




5S 








i^ 







4 


ii 

r 


4 S 


-a 
2 


C 
C 

c 
<c 

t- 
a 

c 
1 


% 
oi 

s 

i 




a! 



X. 

c 




H 

n 


pa 


1 

C 



1 
1 

if 


T3 

C 

2 
_£ 

Is 


CM 

_2 
x 

u 

1 

£ 


i 

v 
a 

0) 



1 
c^ 


£ 

0. 

c 

J. 

i 

c 

8 


•d 
a 

2 


3 


c 
1 

cr 



c 
i 

S 

c 
C 


1 

e 


s 
cS 




n 
X 


« 


s 


a 
a 

a 
i 


C 

•< 
p 

a 
it 


■4 
c 

c 

4 

c 
■4 

a: 


c 

"0 

c 

_0 

,c 

4 

c 

_e 
jr 

J 


£.2 
^§ 

II 

.3; "- 

c 
-J' 

|i 

■|i 



OJ 

JS 
u 
41 

4 
4 

S 

3 

Mi 



62 



City Document No. 24. 



-a 

a 
o 
O 



4> 



o 



be 
es 

4) 

4> 
(A 



E a" 






■2^ 



.S (0 m 
03 (U oj 

c I g 



'5,'S. 






C3 » ' 



5E 



o o 
o a 



SCOO— -"fCO 






S« ^ 



J< c3 

pis 



-- 0) 







tT 




Tf 




Tjt 




Tf" 




m1 






■>!< 


■* 




•^ 


■* 




o 


Cft 




Cft 




05 




» 




a> 






05 


OS 




05 


o> 






'^ 




^^ 




^ 




^^ 




'"' 






^^ 


'-' 




•"• 


^^ 




00 


■M 




CM 




-o 




'T 




CM 






O 
CM 


S 




•* 


CM 




c 


c 




o 




■g 




0) 




o 






S, 


a 






o 




>rs 


■-5 




z 




O 




Q 




Z 






SO 


< 




O 


'Z 




■N 


C^ 




■M 




w 




m 




ro 






CM 


n 




CM 


n 




•V 






-r 




-r 




■* 




-1< 






"* 


•* 




■V 


•* 














ro 




o 




























-< 


















-^ 


'-' 




'-' 


-^ 




« 


^) 




O 




Ci 




m 










^ 


o 




t-." 


» 


















CM 










M 






(N 


CM 




O 


o 
2; 




CO 




-I 




o 




o 






M 
^ 


-a 




"3 
"-5 


M 




~ 


1 ■= 




_ 




o 




o 




o 






S 


i= 




>> 


^ 




.5? 


1 o 




o 








rS 










3 
O 

1 
1 

s 


o 






CJ 




11 

1 o 


o 
C 

S 


s 

c 
o 




a 

-3 




PL. 

O 




c 

B 
> 




M 


c 

4) 
P 

CO 


oj 

s 

03 

a 


D-. 

3 

> 

s 


1 . 

"~ aj 


Ed 




1 S 


_o 


o 
H 




O 




03 

>> 

a) 
a 
g 










o 
>> 


B 
O 


B S 


K 
O 

Q 


E 


o 

J3 


E 


>, 


»*H 




d 






Q 


a 

s 
p 

u 
£ 


0) 
0) 

is 
1 

i 

> 


o 


^ 


> a 


o 
o 


«■» 
.Es 

ah 


1 

o 

1 

"a 
o 


u 

-6 

(S 

£ 

c 
o 


1 

i 

1 


m a: 

-S 03 
II 

§5 


"3 

o 
2 

1 


o 
S 

to 

c 

3 
1h 




>• 


o 

c 

3 

o 


c 6 

§;2 


9. o 

a-H 
E ° 




CJ 


^ 




c 




r^ 




k 




a 






^ 


&H 




c; 


CO 



Public Works Department. 



63 



o 


■+ 


oc 












f 




t^ 


1 


lo 


h- 


(N 










C<5 


-^ 


o 


C 


■* 










00 


CO 


CO 


I-- 


» 










t^ 


00 








q 










o 




















C5 






















■^ 








































































































^ 














■6 












^ 














_o 










=■? 














"o 










o c 














■a 










._- ca 














o 

3 


n 




C. 


















i 


03 










a 


"c 




c 




J 


•5 




S 




c 




1 

> 

c 




o 

a 
o 


o3 
-0 


a 
o 






•C^ o 


c 


03 


C 03 












M~ a 


s 


■* 


c 
^ 








ih^ 


c 






o 










OOO 


^ 


L" 






o 










'I'O 


o 


X 






ro 










coo 


6 


















nci 




t 

c 






e 














.^s 


t 






,o 














0.5 
























£ 






C3 














rH >1 






















c c 


c 






o 














g ^ 


c 




















c 






O 

O 










M 




c 


, 




-o 










S 


§^ 


c 




■£ 












§ 


51 


(i 




c 










-0 


_^ "o 








tt) 










c8 


2 ^ 


a 


e 


c 












^ 


'Si 


-C 


*^ 




"3 










•o 


oj M 






2 










S 


Q 


c 




c^ 


M 










n 




-J 




•<t 


■5> 










■m 


TJ 


0- 




c 


Cl 










Si 


a> 


— 




~ 


'^ 










'^ 


"£ 


r. 




— 


" M 










C3 


"a 


e' 




ir 














o 






a 
c 


0. 










a 


o 


c 




•^ 










<1 


■z 


c 




cs 


n 










CVI 


n 


Tt 




■^ 


-r 










-1< 


•^ 


c 




c- 


a> 










n 


n 


















-^ 


" 


cs 


" 


V 


' 00 












o 






c 


y 










ti 


-jj 
















3 
< 




c 




<=■ 


< 










a) 


7 






JS > 










a 


fl-g 


c 
























■£ ri 










3 


ois. 


^ 






PEL, 










o C3 


" 




c 


^C 










-B^ 






1 












1^ 


3-H 


;. 




y 


tfi <l> 










o 


_ g_; 


X. 




g 


^1 










■^ 


"3 5b'3 


t/ 




C 








„• 




:^5 






>: ^ 


o ,.% 








CLi 


■m 


§=«£ 


c 

i 




; 




C 
o 






O 


2 


M g in 
C P IP 




2 o 


c 











9 


o o^ 

O O C3 





'Q 


"c 


3 W)*- 


Q 








■2 -tj 


'-D'^ u 


C 




c 


C a, 










:a o 0) 




J 


c is 


c 








_ g 

o3 "g 


2 2i* 
S-e o 


; 


3 * 


i 


i 3 » 












< 




h- 












& 




q""" 



64 



City Document No. 24. 



^^ 






a 


«K 




wa 


J3 *i 


rc 


M V 


u 


cpc 


X) 


►J 


fc 








Q 




Q) 




o 





§82 



= S 



a> c 





^ 


g 


2 


a 
5 


5 






















„^ 


bf) 






s 


o 
o 


'£ 


03 


^ 




K 






. Q 



Cl 
O 

u 
O. 

a 
< 



o 



gs2 

J? X e 



00 

i 


00 

§ 

00 




"5 
1 

03 

£ 

•a 

e 

§ 










ft 

< 

& 
03 

e 
.o 

3 

03 . 

£§ 
■> o. 

5 




a 

CO 

Q 




n 

2 

o" 
CO 

ft 
< 








;- 

c 

4. 
0. 

Q 

■i 

c 

c 
»< 

o 





Public Works Department. 



65 



^ y. a 



C 

o 



3 
U. 

o 

c 



•.to 



5 o 






S5 



C5 


•^ 


>o 


in 


t^ 




<o 


<o 


CO 


«o 


r^ 


t- 




IN 






r^ 


O 


r^ 


t^ 


00 


■* 


t 


•* 






«* 





XI s 



t 2 












■« _r ■ 


o 
H 


sis 




w 



Hi 



^ S 3 ■ 

O. * CjM 
o t» aj ^ 







•M (N M 



CO 00 o 



lO -^ -H CO 



^ « 



^ ^ :» s 

w ^ (5 c 



CQ GO .02 



^ 5 



66 



City Document No. 24. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending December 31, 1943. 



Districts. 



Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 



Built by the 

City Under 

Auspices of 

W. R. P. 



Built by 

Private Parties, 

etc., or 

Other City 

Departments. 



Total Lengths Built. 



City Proper 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury. 
Dorchester . . . . 
Hyde Park. .. . 



Totals . 



Linear Feet. 

30.48 

None. 

None. 

None. 

12.00 

None. 

903.00 

587.00 

475.45 



2,008.53 



Linear Feet. 



None. 
None. 
None. 



None. 



Linear Feet. 



None. 
None. 
None. 



None. 



Linear Feet. 
30.48 
None. 
None. 
None. 

12.00 

None. 

903.00 

587.60 

475.45 



2,008.53 



Miles. 
0.006 

None. 

None. 

None. 
0.002 

None. 
0.171 
0.111 
0.090 



0.380 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1944. 





1939. 


1940. 


1941. 


1942. 


1943. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by city under 
auspices of W. P. A., 


Linear 
Feet. 

1,959.27 

39,096.06 

3,087.45 


Linear 
Feet. 

5,178.99 

43,649.38 

8,237.38 


Linear 
Feet. 

11,209.99 

32,363.69 

9,029.94 


Linear 
Feet. 

10,181.74 

457.00 

1,968.20 


Linear 
Feet. 

2,008.53 


Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 








Totals 


44,142.78 


57,065.75 


52,603.62 


12,606.94 


2,008.53 



Public Works Department. 



67 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 


Total 

Length 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1943. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1943. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1943. 


City Proper 


Linear Feet. 
30.48 
None. 
None. 
None. 
12.00 
903.00 
587.60 
475.45 


Linear Feet. 

30.48 

None. 

None. 

None. 

12.00 


Linear Feel. 


Miles. 


None. 
None. 
None. 


None. 


South Boston 

East Boston 


None. 
None. 


West Roxbury . . 


903 . 00 
587.60 
475.45 


0.171 






0.111 


Hyde Park 




0.090 








Totals 


2,008.53 


42.48 


1,966.05 


0.372 







Grand Total Length of Sewers. Miles. 

Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 

January 1, 1943 1,221.68 

Common sewers and surface drains built between January 1. 
and December 31, 1943 ' . 0.37 

Total lengths of common sewers and surface drains built to 

December 31, 1943 1,222.05 

Total lengths of city intercepting sewers connecting with 

Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1943 . *6.81 

Total lengths of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers to 

December 31, 1943 * 24.12 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to Decem- 
ber 31, 1943 1,25298 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works to 
January 1, 1944 683.77 



■No additional lengths built during 1943. 



68 



City Document No. 24. 



Catch-Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 





Catch-Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1943. 


Total for Whole City 1 

In Charge of Sewer 1 

Division. 1 


Districts. 


Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 


Net 
Increase. 


Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1943. 


Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1944. 










3,627 
3,388 
1,456 
1,100 

839 
1,980 
3,884 
5,338 

914 


3,627 
3,389 
1,456 
1,100 

839 
1,980 
3,885 
5,341 

922 


Roxbury 


2 


1 


1 


















Brighton 










2 
5 

8 


1 
2 


1 
3 
8 


Dorchester 

Hyde Park 






Totals 


17 


4 


13 


22,526 


22,539 



Public Works Department. 



69 



Sewage Statistics for Year 1943, Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 



Month. 



Total 
Gallons 
Pumped. 



Average 
Gallons 
Pumped 
Per Day. 



Maximum 
Gallons 
Pumped 
Per Day. 



Minimum 
Gallons 
Pumped 
Per Day. 



Average 

Lift. 

(Feet.) 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November . 
December. . . 

Total . . 
Average 



3,077,355,879 
3,135,563,000 
3,385,768,757 
3,112,766,108 
3,614,039,926 
3,376,912,067 
3,240,165,509 
3,306,219,343 
2,908,191,594 
3,378,520,767 
3,180,649,000 
2,954,668,000 



99,269,544 
111,984,000 
107,651,032 
103,758,870 
116,581,933 
112,563,735 
104,521,468 
106,652,236 

96,939,719 
108,984,541 
106,021,633 

95,311,871 



158,200,000 
181,725,000 
198,500,000 
155,050,000 
186,643,638 
140,516,619 
138,503,496 
145,334,034 
139,373,875 
176,875,000 
144,632,000 
146,187,000 



87,290,275 
87,160,000 
86,791,076 
84,767,875 
89,192,616 
81,031,446 
81,576,736 
82,287,195 
75,970,117 
88,974,000 
87,500,000 
79,150,000 



39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 
39.5 



38,670,819,950 
105,947,452 



No. 1, pump run 1,362 hours 15 minutes 

No. 2, pump run 2,228 hours 55 minutes 

No. 3, pump run 1,385 hours 18 minutes 

No. 4, pump run 3,370 hours 25 minutes 

No. 5, pump run 3,509 hours 20 minutes 

No. 6, pump run 7,732 hours 45 minutes 

No. 7, pump run 4,070 hours 38 minutes 

Gallons pumped by electricity 

Gallons pumped by coal 

Total 

Total gallons pumped 38,670,819,950 

Daily average pumped 105,947,452 

Average dynamic head 39 . 5 

Foot gallons 1,527,597,388,025 

Foot pounds 12,783,625,640,399 



30,727,446,000 
7,943,373,950 



38,670,819,950 



70 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1943. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully submit the following report 
of the activities of the Water Division, operations and 
expenditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 
1943. 

In order to cooperate with the United States Govern- 
ment in the conservation of critical material, the work 
of laying and relaying water pipes has been severely 
curtailed so that but very little work of this nature was 
performed during the year. 

The department was able to cope with the increased 
demands for water service by government agencies and 
private manufacturing plants engaged in war work 
without extension of additional water mains or the 
relaying of old mains. 

During the year 1,093 linear feet of water mains were 
extended, this work being performed to provide water 
facilities to new housing areas developed in connection 
with the war work. One hundred sixty-nine feet of 
pipe were relaid due to defective water mains. 

Engineering Branch. 
, This branch of the Water Division was engaged 
principally in supervising the installation of additional 
service pipes to premises occupied by Government 
forces, occasioned by the war. 

Due to the decrease in the personnel, and the difficulty 
of replacing employees during the war, the department 
has engaged the services of Contractors to assist the 
departmental forces in the City Proper, Dorchester and 
West Roxbury Districts. 

Distribution Branch. 
The regular work of the Distribution Branch, con- 
sisting of installation of new services and fire pipes, 



Public Works Department. 



71 



repairing of leaks, caring for complaints, shutting off 
and letting on water, freeing of stoppages in service 
pipes, etc., was performed in such a manner and at such 
periods as to cause minimum delay and inconvenience 
to applicants for water, water takers and the general 
public. 

The machine ^hop and plumbing shop were forced to 
handle all the drilling and connecting of services in 
addition to the regular work carried on in these shops, 
such as the machining and assembling of gates, valves 
and hydrants, and the department assisted the other 
branches of the Public Works Department in performing 
special jobs. 

In order to check the leakage of water, a Pitometer 
Survey of South Boston and the South End District of 
Boston, known as Pitometer Sections 3 and 4, was 
completed in 1943 and the Contractor was paid for the 
actual leakage found, not to exceed $10,000.00. 



Business Office. 
The campaign inaugurated in 1938 to enforce the 
payment of outstanding water bills is still in force. 
Customers in arrears are notified that the flow of water 
will be reduced, but yet enough water is left on the 
premises to provide a minimum for health and sanitary 
requirements. As a result of this campaign the Water 
Division ended the year 1943 with a surplus of 
$1,110,823.21, this surplus being due mainly to the 
collection of bills past due, and the increased consump- 
tion of water in Government properties and war plants. 



Main pipe petitions received 
Domestic service applications 
Fire pipe applications . 
Special meter tests 
Hydrant permits issued 
Repair deposits received 
Miscellaneous deposits . 



3 
160 

12 
174 

19 
104 

37 



Appropriations, Expenditures and Revenue. 

Amount appropriated . $1,067,291 GO 

Amount expended . 993,700 14 



Balance 



$73,590 86 



Amount of money collected during the year 
Amount of expenditures from all sources . 



),357,155 36 
t,246,332 15 



72 



City Document No. 24. 



The Metropolitan Assessment for 1943 amounted to 
$3,079,008.81, an increase of $399,843.49 over the 
assessment for 1930. 

Total amount billed in 1943 .... $5,414,574 72 
Total amount collected for 1943 bills as of 

December 31, 1943 4,352,417 06 

Total amount abated for 1943 bills as of 

December 31, 1943 . . . . 48,809 80 

Total amount collected in 1943 on bills rendered 

prior to 1943 660,349 73 

This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of the 
office has been such that I believe a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the employees has been 
brought about which is beneficial to the consumer and 
the City. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. ]M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer. 



Meter Branch, Water Division. 

Table No. 1. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1943. 



Make. 





-6 








3 




e 






■a 


+^ 


















a 




< 


Q 



Meters 
Changed. 



Out. In. 





c 










c 


•og 


-s 














Eh 


Pi 


tf 



Hersey Disc 

Hersey Detector. . . 
Hersey Compound . 

Hersey Rotary 

Worthington Disc . 

Watch Dog 

King 

Federal 

American 

Lambert 

Crown 

Trident 

Arctic 

Nash 

Totals 



113 
5 
4 
1 
1 
19 
2 



1 
1 

149 



73 



2,123 

5 

1 

3 

313 

1,263 

276 

23 

36 

5 

8 

7 

2 

9 

4,074 



2,793 
1 
3 
1 

98 

1,074 

87 



4,074 



4,911 

12 

8 

4 

415 

2,338 

385 

2.5 

46 

3 

4 

12 

7 

6 

8,176 



2,873 

227 

51 

11 

114 

358 

136 

19 

9 



12 
7 

3,817 



2,896 

6 

7 

1 

99 

1,093 

89 

10 



3,211 



400 
1 



19 

242 

18 



685 



Public Works Department. 



73 



Table No. 2. Meters in Service December 31, 1943. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


4 


'< 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




58.220 


3,079 


1,941 


1,034 


487 


169 

4 

66 


134 
44 
66 


35 
64 
27 


1 
34 






66,100 




24 


7 


177 












6 


165 




321 

4,914 

21,894 

2,349 

519 

418 

166 

33 

181 

1 

126 

11 

103 


219 

17 

1,041 

186 

38 












540 




23 
919 

1 
19 


28 

720 

8 


39 

456 

27 


12 
394 












5,033 


Watch Dog 


91 










25,515 












2,571 
















576 


Federal 


















418 


Crown 


291 

224 

59 


23 
6 

41 


45 
25 


64 
5 

1 
23 


19 




6 








614 


Nash 








268 




2 
18 












284 




10 










77 


Keystone 


5 












131 






















11 


Trident 




6 


1 


11 


21 


12 


1 


1 


2 




158 


Totals 


89,256 


5,159 


2,979 


1,861 


1,119 


705 


357 


133 


36 


26 


7 


101,638 







Table No. 3. Meters in Shop December 31, 1943. 



Make. 




Diameter in 


Inches. 






Total. 


1 


3 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Hersey Disc 


491 


174 

1 

10 


22 


7 




2 


2 


1 


699 
1 


Watch Dog 


653 
116 


117 


2 
1 
2 
2 
17 


1 


2 
1 


4 




788 




119 












2 










8 


1 


1 




4 










2.5 


Trident 








1 


3 
5 


3 


1 














3 


Hersey Detector 














8 


















Totals 


1,260 


185 


139 


31 


9 


7 


15 


4 


1,650 



74 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 4. Meters Purchased in Year 1943. 



Make. 








Diameter in 


Inches. 








Total. 




i 


1 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 














1 








1 





















All other meters used in 1943 were repaired or rebuilt in shop, by dismantling worn meters and 
replacing worn ijarts. 



Table No. 5. Meters Reset. 



Make. 





Diameter 


IN Inches. 






■6 








"S 


'5. 
























1 


3 


1 


U 


2 


6 


H 


O 



C.2 

O 



Hersey Disc 

Worthington Disc. 

Watch Dog 

King 

American 

Hersey Detector . 



Totals . 



349 
18 

218 
16 
3 


22 

14 
1 
2 


18 
1 
5 
1 


6 


4 


1 


400 

19 

242 

18 

5 

1 


66 
4 

37 
3 

1 
1 


2 


3 
















1 












604 


39 


25 


8 




2 


685 


112 



334 
15 

205 
15 
4 

573 



Public Works Department. 



75 



Table No. 6A. Meters Changed 


in 


1943 








Make. 


Meters Taken Out. 
Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 




1 


f 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 




Hersey Disc 

Hersey Detector 


1,672 


286 


96 


38 


23 




6 
3 
1 


2 
2 


2,123 
5 
















1 






3 

1 

69 

9 










3 




307 

1,066 

248 


1 
69 
12 


2 
38 

4 

1 


2 
8 
3 








313 


Watch Dog . 


10 


3 




1,263 




276 




1 






2 




6 
5 
3 

23 

22 

2 


1 


2 






9 














5 




2 






1 


2 






8 


Federal. . . 










23 




14 














36 


Trident 








4 


1 




7 














Totals 


3,354 


385 


180 


83 


37 


17 


14 


4 


4,074 



L 



Table No. 6B. Meters Changed 


in 


1943 








Make. 


Meters Put In. 
Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 




s 


1 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 




Hersey Disc 


2,148 


441 


125 


47 


23 


3 


4 
1 
3 


2 


2,793 
1 
















3 














1 


1 




91 

906 

74 


4 

58 

4 


3 

42 

6 










98 


Watch Dog. 


40 

1 


12 
2 
3 


12 


4 




1,074 




87 




1 






4 






































Federal 




















American 


5 


4 














9 


Trident 








4 






4 




















Totals 


3,224 


511 


176 


88 


40 


21 


12 


2 


4,074 







76 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 7. Causes for Meter Changes. 



Make. 





^' 






^ 






^ 




S 

S 
^ 




TJ 




ill) 






4) 




c 
■3. 

3 



1 


05 




W 


m 





^ 


CO 


U 



Hersey Disc 

Hersey Detector . . 
Hersey Compound . 
Hersey Rotary .... 
Worthington Disc 

Watch Dog 

King 

Arctic 

Nash 

Lambert 

Crown 

Federal 

American 

Trident 



1,303 



128 



1 

271 
1,078 
84 
2 
4 
3 
2 

6 

14 

2 



37 



46 



461 



22 
156 
46 



14 



36 



M23 

5 

1 

3 

313 

,263 

276 

2 

9 



23 
36 

7 



Totals. 



144 



2.770 



149 



140 



63 



703 



15 



58 



4,074 



Table No. 8. Meters Applied in 1943. 



Make. 



Diameter in Inches. 



Total. 





96 


3 


3 


3 


7 






1 




113 






1 


1 
















3 


2 


5 
















4 


4 












1 


1 






2 


Watch Dog 


14 






5 








19 


King . . . 






1 










1 






2 














2 












1 
1 








1 


Trident 


















1 






















Totals 


110 


5 


3 


8 


9 


3 


5 


4 


2 


149 



142 Meters applied on new services. 
7 Meters applied on old services. 

149 Total meters applied in 1943. 



Public Works Department. 



77 



Table No. 9. Meters Discontinued in Year 1943. 



Make. 



Diameter in Inches. 



3 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 



10 









o 








(U 












T3 




C^ 




a 




C 


"ea 


.3 

a 
o 


1 


.2 

V 

a 




.s 






o 


a 


o 


H 


W 


> 


O 



Hersey Disc 


104 


12 


3 


6 


5 


3 


2 


1 






136 
2 

17 
50 

8 

1 
1 
1 
1 


50 

1 
4 
15 
2 

1 


42 


42 


2 


1 


1 


1 




14 

45 

8 


1 

2 






1 
2 




1 
1 




5 
15 
2 


8 

20 

4 

1 
1 




Watch Dog 

King 


























1 








• 


















1 
















Federal 


1 
























Trident . . 










1 












1 


























Totals 


172 


16 


3 


7 


8 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


217 


73 


65 


76 


3 



Table No. 10. Meters Repaired in Service in 1943. 



Make. 







03 








^ 
























IS 


S3 


« 


o 


C« 


3 
O 




0) 


AS o 


ai 


M 


_5 




T3 

c 
'a 

CO 


g 


"5 


IP 


g« 




03 
>< 


3 

o 
O 


§ 



Hersey Disc 

Hersey Detector . . 
Hersey Compound. 
Worthington Disc . 

Watch Dog 

King 

Federal 

American 

Hersey Rotary .... 

Nash 

Arctic 



Totals . 



1,412 

114 

14 

10 

26 

3 



1,581 



4 

2 

245 

81 

8 



949 



118 



118 
80 
14 

7 
20 



246 



689 



3 

6 

35 

46 

5 

7 

11 

7 

2 

864 



59 



2,873 

227 

51 

114 

358 

136 

19 

9 

11 

7 

12 

3,817 



78 



City Document No. 24. 






^ 



00 



:^ (30 



o 


•o 


%^ 


r. 


-t3 


? 






e 


<u 


C 


<^ 








X) 


^ 


ff 


r2 


w. 


•t?^ 


O 


cc 




1 


^ 

« 




a 


t^ 



.o^ 



s 
c 






CQ 



'O M to TO ;c C3 
IN 00 ■* CO C 
to O! lO 00 — 

odin -h" 



in « >o CO o w 

(Mm OOO 

00 -^^ NO 






lOO-* to tf5(N 



d Ol GO 

o -i: 

■as 



-3 _ 
u • » 5 tt) "W s 

S C-T3 M 5 = a 33 
M cs c s S c3 o a 

= ° §^ =^ Sd 



CO 00 to MOl 
-hOOM'O ■^ 

tN._05_moooq 
ciin 00 



10-* 



oe<3'*oto 

OOO to to lO 
■* rt -H t> 

im" m" -H 



OtOOb-iO 






o £ 

''hi 



i = s 



X a; <D 

-_og.sj2-;-oM 



^ 


£ 


U) 


ii> 










T3 


Si' 


3 












e 


3 






Public Works Department. 



79 



Financial Transactions, Water Service, 1943. 



Receipts: 

Water rates and services $5,309,588 30 

Tax titles — water .... 47,567 06 

Expenditures from revenue : 

Current expenses and extension $993,700 14 

Collecting Department 102,332 12 

Auditing Department 583 33 

Refunded water rates 358 80 

Metropolitan assessment . . 3,079,008 81 



Expenditures from debt account: 

Boston water debt .... $41,00000 

Interest on loans .... 13,456 25 



Adjustments Dup and over 

Surplus of receipts over expenditures .... 

Loan Account: 

Balance outstanding January 1, 

1943 $459,000 00 

Paid 1943 on Boston water debt 41,000 00 

Balance outstanding December 31, 1943 

Construction Account: 

Extension of mains (from revenue) .... 

Cost of construction December 31, 

1943 .$24,522,422 43 

Cost of construction December 31, 

1942 24,509,053 52 



Increase in plant cost during year 1943 

Cost of existing works December 31, 1943: 

Pipe, yards and buildings * . . $84,332 16 

Engineering expense 57,873 58 

Distribution system f ■ • • 24,205,216 69 

Hyde Park water works . . 175,000 00 



High pressure fire system | 
Total cost 



$5,357,155 36 



4,175,983 20 
51,181,172 16 



54,456 25 

$1,126,715 91 
15,892 70 

$1,110,823 21 



$418,000 00 



$13,368 91 



$13,368 91 



$24,522,422 43 
2,293,316 75 

$26,815,739 18 



* $10,500 deducted on account of abolishment of Charlestown yard. 

t Includes $155,023.89 expended on high pressure fire system in 1925, 1926, 1931, 
1932. 1933. 

i $33,850.96 deducted from cost of high pressure fire system on account of abandon- 
ment of pumping station. Battery street. 



80 



City Document No. 24. 



Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1943. 

Number of shiit-offs for repairs 5,172 

Number of premises turned on after repairs . . 3,520 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy .... 636 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . 657 
Number of premises shut off for non-payment of 

water rates 5,892 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for non-payment 273 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste . 13 
Number of premises turned on again after being 

shut off for waste 9 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first 

time 81 

Total number of times water was shut ofif or 

turned on 16,253 



Table No. II. 

High Pressure Fire Service. 
Showing Length of Water Pipes, Connections, Hydrants and Valves in Same, 

December 31, 1943. 



Totals. 



20-Inch. 



16-Inch. 



12-Inch. 



8-Inch. 



6-Inch. 



Length owned and operated December 
31, 1942 (feet) 

Gates in same 

Blows-off in same 

Length laid in 1943 (feet) 

Gate valves in same 

Length owned and operated December 
31, 1943 (feet) 

Gate valves in same 

Blow-offs in same 

High pressure fire hydrants 



98,849 

847 

6 



98,489 

847 

6 

.505 



20,140 



20,140 



46,953 
201 



46,953 
201 



31,756 
144 



31,756 
144 



502 



502 



18.72 miles of mains in system. 



Public Works Department. 



81 



Table No. III. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System December SI, 1.943. 



Location. 





^ 




1 


Cn, 


^ 


(U 


«- S 


"r, 


>, 


■V 5; 


eu 






^ 


ci 


V a 


c 












■g 


^^ 


3 


O 


a 


hJ 



^. 




O 




(^ 




00 




i* 




.a 


c 












« 



Brighton (public) 

" (private) 

Charlestown (public) 

" (private) 

City Proper (public) 

" (private) 

Dorchester (public) 

" (private) 

East Boston (public) 

" (private) 

Hyde Park (public) 

" (private) 

Roxburj' (public) 

" (private) 

South Boston (public) 

" (private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) ... 

Deer Island (private) 

Gallup's Island (private) .... 

Long Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . . 
Thompson's Island (private) . 
Quincy 



Total number (public) . . 
Total number (private) . 



Total number (public and 
private) 



High pressure fire hydrants. 



Total hydrants (all kinds) . 



12 



203 



24 

13 

389 

5 
52 

1 
11 

8 



98 

2 

320 

9 

608 

9 

150 

1 

66 



275 
3 

169 

1 

321 



.539 
33 



276 
5 



2,210 
29 



319 

8 

32 

37 

175 

1 

921 



170 



214 

4 

136 

14 

850 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 

2 

9 



2.861 
126 



.551 



553 
2 

947 
2 

196 



387 



1,008 

2 

276 

3 

1,066 
1 



5,353 
10 



13 



95 
111 



11,349 
387 



11,736 
505 



12,241 



82 City Document No. 24. 

Waterworks Statistics, City of Boston. 

For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1943. 
Distribution. 

Mains. 
Kind of pipe: Cast iron, wrought iron, steel. 
Size: 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended, miles, .207. 
Size enlarged, miles, none. 
Total miles now in use, 999.945. 
Public hydrants added, 4. 
PubUc hydrants now in use, 12,241. 
Stop gates added, 5. 
Stop gates now in use, 15,988. 
Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 35. 
Number of blow-offs, 862. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services. 
Kind of pipe and size: Lead and lead-lined, ^-inch to 2-inch; cast iron, 
2-inch to 16-inch; wrought iron and cement lined, f-inch to 2-inch; 
brass and copper, f-inch to 2Hnch. 



Public Works Department. 



83 



•^aaj 



a. 
a. 

c 



a 



(sgqauj) 
azig jEuiaiJO 






•jaaj 



(saipuj) 

•9ZIg 



t=« 



4,t7 


O 




0/ 


05 












t 


T5 












o 








T3 


tf 


3 


03 


^ 


15 


:S 


S 


c 
c 


U 


o 


r* 




PQhJ 


a; 







•»9a^ 



(■saqouj) 

•azig 



«Ti 



dn n 











a 


























o 


■ o 


S 



(S § 



84 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX F. 



REPORT OF BOSTON AND CAMBRIDGE 
BRIDGES COMMISSION. 



Boston, January 2, 1944. 

To the Honorable the Mayor. 

Sir, — As Commissioner for the City of Boston, I 
respectfully submit herewith the annual report of the 
Boston and Cambridge Bridges Commission for the year 
ending December 31, 1943. 

The Commission is composed of two members, one 
appointed by the Mayor of the City of Boston and the 
other by the Maj^or of the City of Cambridge, under 
provisions of chapter 467, Acts of 1898. 

The Commission has charge of the maintenance of 
the following-named bridges between Boston and 
Cambridge: 

Cottage Farm, Longfellow and Prison Point. 

As there is no separate appropriation for the City of 
Boston's portion of the expenses of this Commission, 
the same is taken from the appropriation for the Bridge 
and Ferry Division, Bridge Service. The amount 
expended during the fiscal year ending December 31, 
1943, was $4,950.92. 

Bridges — Construction of Longfellow Bridge. 
Under a loan for ''Bridges — Construction of," a 
contract was awarded to J. A. Singarella Company on 
November 26, 1941, for strengthening the transverse 
floor beams between arch ribs D and E, both sides of 
the bridge, where directed. The work also included 
repairing arch posts and repairing or renewing cross 
bracing, etc., where directed. The work was com- 
menced December 5, 1941, and completed Decem- 
ber 23, 1942, at a total cost of $59,998.15. One half the 
cost of the work was paid by Boston and one half by 
Cambridge. The final payment ($8,999.72), Boston's 
share ($4,499.86), was made on February 23, 1943. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner for the City of Boston. 



Public Works Department. 



85 



Boston and Cambridge Bridges. Expenditures for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1943. 

Being the Portion Paid by the City of Boston, Which Is One Half of the Total Expenditure. 





















bC 


-a 










-0 








c 






m 








E 


pq 


^ 


















ta 












a 


it-a 




a 






S 


S'C 


bO 


o 


a 














■a 


o^ 


o 








< 


O 


hJ 


Cl, 


H 




$50 00 




$1,692 45 




$1,742 45 


Inspection 




$200 00 


210 00 


$192 00 


602 00 


Light . . 




784 06 


1,746 55 




2,530 61 


Rent 






39 00 




39 00 


Printing and stationery 


9 00 






9 00 




27 86 






27 86 












Totals 


$59 00 


$1,011 92 


$3,688 00 


$192 00 


$4,950 92 







CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06315 974 1