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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

CITY OF BOSTON 



PRIXTING DEPARTMENT 



[Document 24 — 1951.] 



X^^ iB30. ^J/ 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

I'UBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 
YEAR EXDIN'G DECEMBER 31, 1950. 



BosTO.\, January 2, 1951. 

Hon*. Johx B. Hyxes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear ]\1r. ]\Iayor: 

In compliance with the provi.sions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the Annual Report of the Public Works 
Department for the year ending Deceml^er 31, 1950. 

I took the oath of office as Commissioner on January 
3, after an absence of five years. Immediately upon 
starting my second term, I recognized that it would 
be necessary to effect many changes to recreate a high 
standard of integrity, service, and efficiency. 

New Divlsioxs. 

Acting in accordance with the provisions of section 
33 of chapter 27 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, 
the Bridge and Ferry Division and the Highway Divi- 
sion were combined into a single division, to be known 
as the Bridge and Highway Division, effective May 15, 
1950. The new division combines all the work, duties, 
and responsibilities that came under the jurisdiction of 
the two (2) divisions at the time of the merger. 



Knslon Citv Alesserrrer 



2 City J)ocume\t No. 24. 

The Automotive Division was created, effective 
February 8, 1950. This cU vision is responsible for the 
care, control, and maintenance of all department-owned 
vehicles. All department garages, gasoline pumps, and 
related properties are also placed under the jurisdiction 
of this division. 

The division in its first year of operation has been 
operated very efficiently. It is well said that a Public 
Works Department operates on wheels and that the 
proper care of its vehicles is one of the most important 
functions that such a department can perform. Prior 
to the establishment of the automotive section of the 
department as a separate division, it operated as a 
sulDclivision of the Highway Division and, in my opinion, 
did not receive the recognition that this important unit 
warrants. 

It now receives the full attention of a Division 
Engineer who has systematized the work of the division, 
and has introduced businesslike methods in providing 
for an adequate inventory control and a regular check 
on all motor vehicles to insure proper maintenance and 
operation. 

Street Paving Investigatiox. 

The Boston Finance Commission conducted an in- 
vestigation into the street paving program of the previ- 
ous administration that exposed many shortcomings and 
brought disrepute to the department. As a result of 
the expose of the Finance Commission, I found it 
necessary to reorganize the Highway Division and 
institute reforms in contract highway construction 
work that would guarantee to the taxpaj'er 100 cents 
of value for every dollar of expenditure. 

^Nlany major changes were made in our highway 
specifications, the most important of which provided 
for a change in the method of payment for the work 
done. Theretofore the department paid for highway 
work on a square yard basis for a minimum depth as 
required bj^ the specifications. In its investigation the 
Finance Commission found many instances of inade- 
cpate pavement thicknesses, although the contractors 
were paid in full, per square yard of pavement laid. 
Under the circumstances, the department was paying 
for materials not furnished. 

In order to eliminate the possibility of the recurrence 
of an}' such condition, we adopted a method of paA'ing 



Public Works Department. 3 

contractors for the actual weight of materials furnished, 
on a tonnage basis. The contractor is now paid up to 
a specified maximum only for actual material furnished 
at the site, although in all cases the contractor is re- 
quired to furnish a specified minimum depth of pave- 
ment material. If, however, the contractor fails to 
provide the minimum depth, he is not given full pa}'- 
ment, which was the olcl method on the square yard 
basis. Under our new system, as stated hereinbefore, 
he is paid only for materials actually furnished, based 
on certified weight slips, issued at the point of origin 
b}^ a representative of the department. 

In order to provide for an additional check on pa>'- 
ments made to contractors and also to insure adherence 
to specifications, I created the so-called Finals Section 
in the Highway Division. This section, under the 
direction of a so-called Finals Engineer, determines the 
final quantities to l)e paid on all highway contracts 
and makes its investigations and determinations in- 
dependent of the engineers assigned to a project during 
its construction. All final estimates must be approved 
by the Finals Engineer before processing them for 
payment. Before any final estimates are paid, the 
Finals Engineer removes cores from all finished pave- 
ments in order to inspect and check on the actual depths 
of pavement materials laid. 

With the addition of the Finals Section, coupled with 
the removal of cores from finished pavements and the 
adoption of the tonnage method of paying for street 
construction work, I feel that we now have a positive 
check on all work done b}^ contractors. The adding 
of the Finals Section to the Highway Division has, in 
m3" opinion, done more to insure adherence to contract 
specifications on highway work than any other single 
factor. In its first year it has proved conclusively that 
it is of inestimable value to the department. 

Contract Cancellations and Renegotiations. 

Early in the year the Law Department questioned 
the validity of the contracts entered into by the pre^'ious 
administration for the disposal, collection, and removal 
of garbage and refuse. Therefore, I held conferences 
with all the contractors involved and renegotiated their 
contracts at a saving to the City of $67,406.49. 

In addition to the latter-referenced substantial saving, 
the City awarded contracts in December for the dis- 



4 City Document No. 24. 

posal, collection, and removal of refuse for the year 
1951, in the amount of $193,367.92 less than similar 
contracts awarded in December of 1949 by the previous 
administration and covering- the year of 1950. This 
is an unusually large reduction in cost over the contracts 
that were awarded by the previous administration, 
particularly when you take into consideration that the 
refuse collection contractors were required to pay 12 
cents per hour more for labor in 1951 than during 
1950. This 12-cent an hour increase amounts to an 
additional cost of approximately- 180,000 to the collec- 
tion contractors. 

The total cost of contracts for this important service 
as awarded by the previous administration for the 
3'ear 1950 was $2,805,425.52, as compared with a total 
cost of $2,612,057.60 for similar contracts awarded 
by this administration for 1951. 

A contract, without publicly advertising for bids, 
was awarded by the previous administration under 
date of December 27, 1949, in the amount of $77,550, 
for relaying granite block pavement in designated 
streets. In the letter of ''authority to award" that 
was sent to his Honor the Mayor, under date of Novem- 
ber 1 of 1949, by the previous Commissioner, the 
principal reason advanced for awarding the contract 
without publicly advertising for proposals Avas that 
''present conditions constitute a danger that may 
cause personal injuries and because of that fact there 
is an immediate need for the resurfacing of the pave- 
ments in these locations.'' In that no work had been 
done on the contract up to ^Nlarcli of 1950, the above- 
described reason could not be considered a factor, 
and, in my opinion, the contract was automatically 
nullified. 

However, I made a personal survey of the streets 
listed in the contract in order to obtain firsthand 
information of their condition. I found that the streets 
listed in the contract were not in a dangerous condition 
and that, in mdst cases, there was no necessity of 
resurfacing them. I also found that one of the streets 
in which the granite block was to be relaid was already 
surfaced with sheet asphalt that was in good condition. 

Therefore, under date of March 16 of 1950, I canceled 
the contract. 

Under date of December 30, 1949, the previous 
administration awarded a contract, in the amount 



Table Showing Length and Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, Corrected to January 1, 1951. 



Length in Miles. 


Area in Squabb Yards. 




Sheet 
AspLalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


A&pbalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1049 Report 


* 228. 40 
31.69 


t 220. 65 
30.62 


t56.40 
7.82 


0.47 
0.07 


0.55 
0.08 


0.60 
0.08 


§24.30 
3.37 


! 176.67 
24.. 52 


11.75 
1.63 


0.84 
0.13 


720.63 
100.00 


* 4,587,412 
33.27 


1 4,128,738 
29.95 


1 1,486,157 
10.78 


8,840 
0.06 


12,740 
0.00 


13,251 
0.10 


§478,604 
3.47 


1' 2,864,228 
20.77 


179,092 
1.30 


29,425 
0.21 


13,788,487 


° 




Janfary 1, 1951. 


47.73 

■i.ni 

.-..85 
12.57 
40.76 
4.3.11 
58.30 
22.01 

9.29 


24.93 
1 . ."i9 
11.76 
11.04 
24.33 
49.96 
.58.56 
27.67 
10.25 


16.04 
6.73 
4.88 
8.47 
5.71 
3.00 
1.84 
0.46 
0.04 


0,22 

n.os 

0.01 
0.04 
0.05 

0.06 

0.01 


0.10 
0.05 
0.05 
0.06 

0.07 
0.05 
0.08 
0.05 


40 

0.04 
0.02 
0.14 

0.01 


3.04 
8S 
0.44 
0..53 
fi.31 
4.53 
6.08 
1.23 


3.0(1 
5.46 
12.84 
10.60 
16.35 
45.10 
44.08 
13.14 
19.83 


0.26 

24 
0.09 
0.30 
2.28 
1.62 
0.39 
5.54 


0.01 
0.04 
0..50 
0.00 
0.00 
0.02 

0.24 


06.. 38 
22.71 
.36.15 
43.92 
94.01 
148.05 
170.62 
84.98 
45.89 


1,046.935 
97,077 
1.35,130 
207.251 
798,770 
741,0.50 

1,118,343 
490,741 
171.465 


543,164 
75,600 
238,141 
200,616 
441,010 
892,400 
1,083,360 
519,848 
215,870 


358,038 
171,033 
115,643 
245,.362 
130.651 
129,048 
58,803 
4.5,214 
7,161 


2,679 
2,011 

325 
1,1.34 

933 

1,669 
186 


3,623 
1,701 

777 
1,7.37 

1,.340 
889 

1,231 
702 


6,308 

771 
1,386 
4,.530 

145 


90,080 
15,474 
25,280 
17,287 
105,972 
63,461 
98,528 
30,415 
10,119 


.58,684 
75,882 
277,359 
177,036 
236,951 
709,853 
688,860 
213,2.35 
332,405 


1,794 


41 

865 

15,754 

27 

5,390 

1,737 

50 

5,080 


2,120,911 

442,41(1 

798,867 

937,.587 

1,724,247 

2,577,663 

3,075,274 

1,306,642 

829,690 






4,576 
1,024 
5,403 
35,121 
22,931 
5,888 
86,702 














0.64 






244.53 
33.84 


223.09 
30.87 


47.17 
6.53 


0.47 
0.06 


0.51 
0.07 


0.61 
0.08 


23.68 
3.28 


171.06 
23,67 


10.78 
1.49 


0.81 
O.Il 


722.71 
100.00 


4,867,362 
35.24 


4,219,018 
30.54 


1,263,953 
9.15 


8,937 
0.06 


12,000 
0.09 


13,140 
0.09 


466,222 
3.38 


2,770,285 
20.06 


163,439 
1.18 


28,944 
0.21 


13,813,300 









Total Public Streets 722.71 Miles. 
Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 

1 Bituroek; and 0.002 mile or SlOsquare 



* Of this amount 0.09 mile or 810 square yard: 
yards is Unionite. 

t Of thU amount 0.02 mile or 202 square yards is cobble; and 28,85 miles or 927,32 
square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 

§ Of this amount 0.06 mile or 465 square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 

I Of this amount 145.66 miles or 2,385,849 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



tOf this amount 131.35 miles or 2,368,648 square yards is asphalt concrete; and 
85.81 miles or 1,728,957 square yards is Bitulithic; and 4.06 miles or 67,505 square yards 
is Topeka; and 0.06 mile or 942 square yards is Filbertine; and 0.11 miles or 2,914 square 
yards is Simasco; and 0.03 mile or 595 square yards is Carey Elastite Asphalt Plank; 
and 0.06 mile or 618 square yards is Johns-ManviUe Asphalt Plank; and 1.01 miles or 
48,039 square yards is tar concrete. 



■ 35,4.56 square yards public alleys included in this table; 7.55 miles or 335,425 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 7.58 miles or 254,210 square yards 
public streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this tabic. In addition to this table there are 2.22 miles or 10,804 square yards of accepted footwa.vs. 



Public Works Departmext. 5 

of $25,215.00, for constructing a concrete sewer over- 
flow in private land adjacent to Border street, East 
Boston, in the vicinity of D^ecatur street. Upon in- 
vestigation, I found that we already had an overflow 
in this area located about 70 feet north of the line 
of the proposed new overflow. I also found that tlie 
land in which the overflow was located was to be used 
as an oil farm, and it was the desire of the owners or 
operators of the oil farm to have the overflow relocated. 
However, we had easement rights in the land, and 
if the overflow were to be relocated, the expense, in 
my opinion, should have been assumed by the owner 
or lessee of the property'. In view of this, I notified 
the attorney for the lessee to that effect, and told him 
that the City would not construct a new overflow 
unless the cost of same w^ere paid by the lessee or 
owner of the property. As we could not come to any 
agreement concerning this matter, I canceled the 
contract b}' the payment of $358 to the contractor 
for his expenses in connection with the cost of the 
bond and other related services. Therefore, the can- 
celing of this contract resulted in a net saving of $24,957 
to the City, and also served to keep an oil farm out of 
a heavily populated section Of East Boston. 

Street Construction Work 
St ate- Aid Program. 
Last year we completed the largest chapter 90 
State-Aid Highway Reconstruction Program in the 
history of the City. The following important main 
highwa3^s were reconstructed during the year under 
this program: 

Columbia Road, from Edward Everett square to Blue 
Hill avenue. 

Blue Hill Avenue, from Grove Hall to American Legion 
Highway. 

Western Avenue, Brighton, from Soldiers Field road to 
Market street. 

Beacon Street, from the Brookline line to Park Drive. 

The cost of the above-referenced projects totaled 
approximately $528,000, of which the State Highway 
Department, under the provisions of section 34 of 
chapter 90 of the General Laws, paid one half, thereby 
resulting in a substantial saving to the taxpayers of 
this City. 



6 City Document No. 24. 

In addition to the above-referenced projects, chapter 
90 contracts for the reconstruction of Centre street, 
Jamaica Plain, from the Arborway to Weld street, 
and for the reconstruction of River street, Dorchester, 
from IMattapan square to Dorchester Lower Mills, 
were awarded in the latter part of the \'ear, and it is 
expected that work will start on them early in the 
spring of 1951. The cost of the latter two-referenced 
projects will total approximately $150,000. 

Non-State- A id Program. 

We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program in the downtown section involving four (4) 
miles of streets, at an estimated cost of $220,000. 
]\lost of the work was done during the nighttime and 
over weekends, so as not to inconvenience the motorists 
and businessmen in the downtown area. 

In addition to work on the downtown streets, the 
department constructed and reconstructed streets in 
every section of the Cit3^ The important arteries that 
were resurfaced, in addition to those done as chapter 90 
projects, are as follows: 

Albany street, from Broadway to ^Massachusetts a^•enue, 
5,695 feet. 

Blue Hill avenue, from Dudley street to Grove Hall, 
6,182 feet. 

Washington street, Dorchester, from Gro^'e Hall to 
Codman square, 7,651 feet. 

Boston street, from a point near Andrew square to Edward 
Everett square, 2,729 feet. 

Warren street, RoxlDury, from Dudley street to Grove 
Hall, 7,221 feet. 

St. James avenue, City Proper, from Arlington street to 
Berkeley street, 632 feet. 

A major start was also made on the replacing of 
brick sidewalks with cement concrete in the Charles- 
town, East Boston, and South Boston districts. Dur- 
ing the year contracts totaling approximately $70,000 
were awarded for the removal of the old, outmoded, 
brick sidewalks in the above-referenced three sections 
of the City. 

The following is a summarized financial statement 
of the expenditures made in 1950 for highway 
improvements : 



Px'BLic Works Department. 7 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $1,937,380 42 

Public WaJ^s, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 158,890 82 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 106,970 44 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 00,945 34 



Total S2, 270, 199 02 



The following is a summarized record of the highwa}' 
improvement work done by the department in 1950: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 138. 

Includes 21 new streets ordered laid out and constructed by 
the Board of Street Commissioners under the proA'isions of 
chapter 393 of the Acts of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved, 29.23. 

Includes 4.01 miles of so-called chapter 90 — state-aid high- 
way improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 6.98. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in above- 
noted street improvements. 

We also completed during the year, the removal of 
the largest number of street gas lamps in the history of 
the department. We replaced approximately 1,200 gas 
lamps with modern, electric lights, and it is our intention 
to continue with this program and remove 1,500 addi- 
tional ones in 1951. 

Sxow Remoa'al. 

During the year of 1950 we were fortunate that no 
blizzards or heavj^ snowstorms occurred. The depart- 
ment experienced no difficulty in keeping the streets 
properly plowed and sanded throughout the winter 
months. We use a great deal of rock salt, particularly 
in the downtown streets, in order to prevent the bonding 
of snow to the pavement surfaces, and also to assist in 
the melting of snow. We used approximately 3,000 tons 
of salt and 7,000 tons of sand on snow^ plowing and 
removal work. The department owns fourteen (14) 
Walter Snow Fighters which are used to plow, sand and 
salt the streets in the downtown area. Most of the plow- 
ing work in the rest of the City is done by 240 trucks 
rented on an hourh^ basis from contractors. 



8 City Document No. 24. 

At the present time there are 720 miles of pubHc 
streets that have to he plowed and maintained during 
the winter months. 

The cost of snow removal work in 1950 totaled 
8392,247.12. The average vearly cost from 1946 to 
1949, inclusive, was $747,885.37. 

Ferry Service. 
As authorized by a Council order of April 3, the 
ferryboat "Ralph J. Palumbo" was sold at public 
auction at an established upset price of S22,500 to the 
only bidder, the Delaware River Ferry Company of 
Chester, Penns3dvania. The disposal of this boat has 
not in any way aflected the service that we maintain in 
connection with the operation of the ferr}', although it 
will result in an annual saving of approximately 126,000. 
This boat was built in 1930 and first named the ''General 
Sumner." The name was changed in 1935 to the 
''Ralph J. Palumbo." 

Meridian Street Bridge. 
During the year we were successful in obtaining a six- 
month extension from the War Department in con- 
nection with the removal of the old structure. In this 
six-month interval, we Avere also successful in having 
His Excellenc}' the Governor and the State Department 
of Public Works agree to contribute $1,000,000 of state 
money to the construction of the new bridge, which was 
estimated, at that time, to cost $3,000,000. The 
removal of the old structure was started in Jul3^ and 
was completed in December. It is expected that con- 
tracts for the construction of the new bridge will be 
advertised sometime in February. 

Boston Central Artery. 

Two contracts, totaling $1,412,000, were awarded in 
the latter part of the year by the State Department of 
Public Works for the construction of a bridge spanning 
the Charles River, near the North Station, and which is 
to serve as a connection between the Central Arteiy and 
the Mystic River Bridge. The state depaitment ex- 
pects to advertise the next contract for the Central 
Artery in March. This contract will provide for the 
construction of that part of the artery extending from 
Haymarket square to the above-referenced Charles 



Public Works Department. 9 

River Bridge. The state has ah-eadv allotted to the 
Central Artery. $30,000,000 out of the first $100,000,000 
bond issue. A second $30,000,000 has also been tenta- 
tively allocated out of the second $100,000,000 bond 
issue, thereby making available for the construction of 
the Central Artery the total sum of $60,000,000. 

Garbage Disposal. 

Heretofore, the garbage collected in the Dorchester, 
Elm Hill, and South Boston sections has been hauled by 
trucks to the Victory road receiving station and dumped 
into a scow and hauled to Spectacle Island, and then 
taken to the land dump for final disposition. However, 
in November, publicl}- advertised proposals were re- 
quested for the sale, to hog farmers, of garbage hauled to 
Victory road. These were opened on October 25, and 
the contract was subsequently awarded to the highest 
responsible bidder, Kennedy Brothers of Waltham, who 
agreed to purchase the garbage at a price of $36,000 a 
year for a three-year period. The garbage will be 
hauled to Victoiy road, as heretofore, but instead of 
dumping it into the scow, it will be dumped directly- into 
large tractor-trailer units of the hog raiser, and then 
hauled by the hog raiser to his farm in Waltham. 

As the Coleman Disposal Company will not be re- 
quired to haul the garbage from Victory road to Specta- 
cle Island in 1951, I have been successful in obtaining a 
reduction of $22,000 per year in the disposal contract 
due to this change in the garbage disposal system. 
Therefore, the net result of selling this garbage to 
Kennedy Brothers is a saving of $58,000 per vear to the 
City. 

Incidentally, the Coleman Disposal Company con- 
tract awarded by the previous administration for the 
year 1950 was in the amount of $581,807, whereas a 
similar contract for the year 1951, awarded by the 
present administration, totaled $530,000, or a net annual 
saving to the City of $51,807. 

Problem Affecting the Disposal of Garbage 
AND Refuse. 

One of the most important problems concerning the 
department is the one involving the sanitary and 
economical disposal of garbage and refuse. The present 
sj'stem provides for the disposal at interior land dumps 



10 City Document No. 24. 

and on Spectacle Island' in Boston Harbor of part of the 
garbage and all of the refuse collected in the Cit}'. This 
S3'stem — which has been reasonably satisfactory up to 
the present time — is fast approaching the danger point, 
and a new method must be adopted in the immediate 
future to insure adequate and sanitary refuse disposal 
facilities for the next twenty or thirty years. Practically 
all available land dumps in this City are being filled 
rapidly, including the vast dumping area located on the 
so-called Calf Pasture site in Dorchester. With the 
construction of Boston College High School and the 
proposed construction of a housing development in this 
area, I do not believe that we shall be able to use it as a 
dumping site be^'ond January 1, 1953. It is my opinion 
that this area should be discontinued as a refuse dump 
as soon as possible. Land dumps, at best, are unsightly 
and, in general, constitute a nuisance. The trend in 
moclern cities is to abandon the system of dumping 
refuse on low tracts of land and to adopt incineration 
which, in my opinion, is the only completely satisfactory- 
method of garbage and refuse disposal available for the 
greater part of Boston. 

While there has been a great deal of talk about 
incineration for Boston during the past twenty years, 
very little has been done to bring about this desired 
change in our refuse disposal system. Incineration of 
refuse is not in the experimental stage. It has been used 
successfully and satisfactorily by municipalities for over 
thirty years. In order to provide for a completely 
thorough and up-to-date stud}- of this entire problem, 
a contract was awarded to the consulting engineering 
firm of Thomas Worcester, Inc., under date of August 
14, 1950, at a maximum fee of $9,500. This report will 
be ready some time in ^larch or April of 1951, and I am 
hopeful that it will be beneficial in recommending an 
adequate and sanitary method of garl^age and refuse 
disposal that will meet the needs of the City for the 
next thirty (30) years. 

Sewage Treatment Plant. 
Under the provisions of chapter 598 of 1949, the City 
of Boston was required to start construction on the new 
sew-age treatment plant at Calf Pasture not later than 
April 1 of 1950, and is required to complete the whole 
project prior to Jul}- 1 of 1955. To provide funds to pa}- 



Public Works Department. 11 

for this desired improvement, tlie Citv was authorized 
to borrow up to *12, 000,000. AMiile a token start was 
made on the project prior to the above-referenced 
April 1 date, nothing further has been done because 
of the unavailabihty of appropriations, coupled with the 
fact that we do not agree witli tlie design which provides 
for construction of the treatment plant adjacent to the 
Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 

During the year we have been negotiating with the 
^Metropolitan District Commission concerning the con- 
struction of the treatment plant, and serious thought has 
been given to having the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission take over the Boston main drainage system and 
construct an enlarged treatment plant at Deer Island 
to provide for the treatment of sewage from the Xorth 
Metropolitan district, and also from the Boston main 
drainage system. If this plan is adopted, it will provide 
for the complete elimination of the Calf Pasture Pumping 
Station and the sewage works at Aloon Island, including 
the abandonment of the tunnel that is located under 
Dorchester Bay, between Calf Pasture and Aloon 
Island. 

AIlSCELLAXEOUS. 

Mobile Patrol. 
In November a new system was established to provide 
efficient and economical watchmen's services for the 
various district 3'ards and properties of the department. 
This new unit is known as the ^Mobile Patrol, and it has 
superseded the old system of having watchmen assigned 
to various yards. The patrol operates on a route system 
comprised of five different routes. It has worked out 
very satisfactorily, and it is m}- intention to have it 
adopted permanently and placecl under the jurisdiction 
of the Automotive Division. It is estimated that the 
Mobile Patrol will effect a saving in excess of $100,000 
a year for the department. 

Purchase of Equipment. 
During the j'ear the department purchased eight (8) 
Trojan front-end loaders for use in loading sand, salt, 
and snow, and for the general year-round use of the 
district maintenance forces in the Highway Service. 
They have alread}' proved to be a success, and the 
district foremen are very pleased with the unit. It is 
mounted on pneumatic tires and provides the flexi- 



12 City Document No. 24. 

bility of operation that is lacking in the slow and 
cumbersome caterpillar-type unit. 

For the first time in ten years, we purchased two (2) 
modern, 2,000-^allon street cleaning fiushers. Flush- 
ing of streets is the modern way of insuring clean, 
sanitary, roadway areas. 

We supplemented our fleet of twenty-one (21) street 
cleaning machines by the purchase of three (3) large- 
type Elgin sweepers, and one (1) Wa3'ne sweeper. This 
is the first time that we have purchased a Wayne 
sweeper, and I am pleased to report that it has proved 
satisfactory^ in every respect. 

Sale of Junk and Outmoded Equipment. 
A public auction was held on ^la}' 22 and May 23 in 
the various district yards, for the purpose of selling 
all junk and outmoded equipment that had been clut- 
tering the yards for years. While it was estimated 
that we would obtain about $4,000 from the sale, we 
were agreeably surprised to find that the auction netted 
.$13,127.64. It was capably conducted by Eugene F. 
Canney, contract clerk in the department. 

New District Yards. 

Due to the construction of the new Fire Headquar- 
ters on Southampton street, the District 1, South Boston 
paving yard, was moved to the Atkinson street 3^ard, 
and now occupies the latter area Avith the maintenance 
forces of the Bridge Division. 

As there was no yard in the South Boston district for 
the use of the street cleaning and sanitary forces, we 
acquired, for such a purpose, from the Board of Real 
Estate Commissioners, a piece of land containing 16,500 
square feet and located at 175 to 179 West First street. 
The contract for the foundation of the office building 
was awarded to F. C. Dolan and Sons in October, in 
the amount of $3,487.50. 

Master Highway Plan. 
A contract in the amount of $58,000 was awarded to 
the consulting engineering firm of Charles A. Maguire 
and Associates, under date of October 18, for the de- 
velopment of a master highway plan for Boston. The 
purpose of the study is to provide the department with 
a five (5) year street improvement program and a 
report on any and all matters affecting highwaj's within 
the corporate limits of the City. 



Public Works Department. 13 

LoAX Orders. 

Under date of .May 9, 1950, a City Council order was 
approved bj' your Honor which provided, under the 
provisions of section 7 of chapter 44 of the General 
Laws, that the sum of $2,000,000 he appropriated for 
the Construction of Public ^^'ays. This is the so-called 
"Public Ways, Construction of" loan. 

No loan order was recjuested for sewerage works nor 
for bridge construction, as we had sufficient money in 
both accounts for the construction work contemplated 
in the Sewer and Bridge Sections of the department. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were $18,042,000, of which $1,661,000 represents 
water assessments levied by the Metropolitan District 
Commission, and $565,000 represents Metropolitan 
District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $4,714,700, 
and the revenue derived from the operation of the 
Sumner Tunnel reached a new high of $1,863,000. 

The surplus resulting from the sale of water amounted 
to $320,072.61, and the operation of the Sumner Tunnel 
resulted in a record-l)reaking surplus of $598,904.14. 

The East Boston Ferry has operated at an annual 
deficit over the vears, but I am pleased to report that 
the deficit for 1950 was $53,859.31 less than the deficit 
in 1949. In 1949 the deficit totaled $349,417.39, and in 
1950, $295,558.08. 

Personnel. 

There were 2,435 employees in the department as of 
December 31, as compared with 2,465 employees on 
January 1, 1950. 

Appended hereto are reports submitted by the Di- 
vision Engineers relative to the activities of their 
divisions in 1950. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



14 



City Documext No. 24. 



Tlie records of the department show that there are 
now 2,435 persons ehgible for employment in tlie several 
divisions, and of that number 2,405 were upon the 
January, 1951, payrolls. 



Grade 


and 


Number of Employees. 










Services. 


Title. 


II 

go 
o 


11 

F 


s 


1 
c 






1 


o 

c 
e 

H 




6 
o 


"3 
"S 




1 




















1 




1 

21 


1 

32 


1 










1 

4 

1 

1 
3 


1 










10 






67 














1 








12 


7 
.5 
2 






1 

3 






15 














23 














2 
















1 


1 


2 


4 










1 

1 








1 






2 

1 

1.3 

1 
66 

1 

1 

1 

20 


1 
7 
2 
1.5 




1 








2 
1 


6 










1 

7 


3 






17 


14 


1 




1 


61 






3 






41 


35 


4 




1 


17 

1 

2 

1 

60 


1 

I 
8 


180 


Executive secretaries and sec- 


1 


3 




1 


2 










7 








1 
3 






3 




12 


11 


9 

1 






9 


133 




1 














1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


3 










1 






3 




2 














2 














4 
3 
6 








4 






















3 


Deckhands 




















6 




















1 


1 








1 












3 


5 


^Matrons 










4 
4 




4 






G 


6 








17 




1 


34 
















16 


15.3 


91 


74 


50 


24 


23 


30 


104 


19 


584 







Public Works Department. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 



15 





Services. 


Title. 


-— 6 

M 
go 


Ah 


eg 


J 
5 


ti 
a 
'a 


i 


§ 

iS 


o 

a 
a 

3 




1 
"o 
o 

1 


"3 




Brought forward 

Oilers 


16 


153 


91 
3 
8 


74 


50 


24 


23 
4 
14 
15 


30 


104 


19 


584 

7 














44 

4 






22 














59 




















4 








10 














10 


















41 




41 














152 

1 






152 








2 














3 


Alotor equipment mainte- 












1 

5 

31 


1 








1 
3 
1 
2 


4 
2 
12 
3 
2 

8 










5 


16 






3 

5 
4 






39 
















18 








12 










23 












2 








3 




9 

3 




3 


20 


2 


31 






5, 
13 
16 


18 












13 












1 










17 
















150 




150 








1 
29 

7 
3 












2 




















29 


Catch-basin cleaning machine 




















7 






4 


1 
2 














9 














2 




















5 

1 

23 

11 


5 






4 
43 

5 
180 


34 

2 
29 


6 
18 

39 

1 
2 


24 
113 

417 










35 






6 

3 
C 


C 


12 

1 
9 


41 

1 
85 


990 


Working foremen, laborers, 
etc 




14 






782 






1 






3 


4 


1 

25 


1 






4 
9 




15 










34 




















Totals 


16 


438 


233 


174 


632 


211 


69 


103 


461 


98 


2,435 



16 



City Document No. 24, 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January I, 1950, and 
January 1, 1951. 















■? -''' 




« 




c; 
































d 








03.- 


>. 


c 




O 






a 


?*.s 


& 


>. 


o 


C M 


c3 






S 






a 


CO 




;- 


03 


>I-H 


C 


SO 


> 








H 


o 


« 


& 


^ 


^ 


s 


cc 


& 


-< 


H 


January 1, 19o0. . 


100 


15 


214 


74 


462 


480 


256 


605 


235 




2,441 


January 1, 1951 . . 


100 


16 


210 


65 


456 


435 


170 


625 


230 


98 


2.405 



ToiaZ Eligible Force. 



Januarj^ 1, 1950. . 
January 1, 1951 . . 



102 
103 


15 
16 


217 
211 


75 
69 


465 
461 


486 
438 


260 
174 


610 
632 


237 
233 


98 



2,467 
2,435 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 









































O 






pi' 












■^ 


11 






lO 




o 










■a 


Id 


to 


-a 
o 


>> 


Service.s. 
1950-1951. 


>» 


11 


tot 


1 

03 


o 
"c 
'o 
c. 
c. 


•6 










2 




2 


C 


« 


rt 


y 


^ 


« 


tf 


■-5 




^ 


r^ 


=^ 


« 


-j; 





1 
5 
3 










15 

217 

75 


Central Office.. 

Bridge 

Ferry 

Paving 


16 

211 

69 


1 
2 






1 


4 








2 






9 










1 


3 


10 


2 


75 


2 


4 


486 


438 


18 


9 




14 


2 


11 




88 


1 


1 


260 


Sanitary 


174 


10 


1 







11 


8 


3 


18 


23 


5 


610 


Street Cleaning 


632 


72 


1 




16 




5 

12 


1 

2 


8 
15 


10 


2 
8 


237 
465 




233 

461 


3 

7 


3 





in 


5 


Water 


35 


1 






2 
8 






102 


Tunnel 

Automotive . . . 


103 
98 


2 
104 






2 


9 


1 


3 






2 




fi 












33 


56 


11 


219 


36 


22 


2,467 


Totals 


2,435 


219 


22 


11 


93 



Public Works Department. 



17 



MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



Division or 

Service. 


Total Appropriations, 
Including Transfers. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office . 


$48,689 00 


$44,449 95 


$4,239 05 


Automotive Divi- 








sion 


474,441 13 


451,636 36 


22,804 77 


Bridge Service 


740,889 84 


710,270 39 


24,619 45 


Ferrv Service . 


380,040 47 


342,872 45 


37,174 02 


Tunnel Service 


476,329 90 


461,404 93 


14,924 97 


Lighting Service 


1,162,400 86 


1,152,599 49 


9,861 37 


Paving Service 


1.243,484 00 


1,233,367 29 


10,116 71 


Sanitarv Division . 


5.127,863 00 


5,098,726 84 


29,136 16 


Sewer Division 


734,681 27 


727,438 95 


7,242 32 


Water Division 


2,540,825 00 


2,349,060 88 


191,764 12 


Workmen's Com- 








pensation Service 


26,259 00 


26,101 04 


158 50 


Totals . 


•112,955,969 47 


$12,603,928 57 


$352,041 50 



Expenditures from Special Appropriat 

Bridges, Construction of (non-revenue) 
Bridges, Repairs, etc. (revenue) 
Reconstruction of Streets (revenue) 
Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of 
Street Signs (revenue) .... 
Public Ways, Construction of (revenue) 
Public Ways, Construction of (non-revenue 
Snow Removal (revenue) 
Sewerage Works (revenue) 
Sewerage Works (non-i'evenue) 

Total 



ons, 



lue), 



etc. 

$32,727 42 

241,934 20 

100,976 44 

66,945 34 

8,354 09 

158,890 82 

1,937,386 42 

392,247 12 

22,093 76 

545,782 43 

83,513,338 04 



18 



City Document No. 24. 



REVENUE. 

On Account of Public Works Department. 



Central Office: 
Sale of plans, etc. . 

Bridge Service: 

Chelsea South Bridge . 
Rents . . . . 
Meridian Street Bridge 
Chelsea North Bridge . 
Charlestown Bridge 
Summer Street Bridge . 
Dover Street Bridge 



Ferrv Service: 

T611s 

Rents 

Cleaning telephone booths . 
Commission on telephones . 

Sale of boat 

Refunds 

Sumner Tunnel: 

Tolls 

Rents 

Lighting Service: 

Damage to posts 

Paving Service: 

From assessments on abutters for 
cost of lajdng sidewalks in front of 
their premises, including material 
for same: 

-Assessments added to taxes 

Permits 

Labor and materials furnished . 

Junk 

Rents 

Damage to property .... 

Refunds 



Sewer Service: 

Disposal of sewage 

Labor and materials furnished 

Entrance fees 

Junk 

Rents 

Refunds . 

Damage to property 

Sale of material 



$1,802 00 



$182 


50 


3.480 


00 


18,2G0 


00 


18..53G 


83 


319 


68 


1,183 


92 


592 


55 



Sanitarj' Service: 

Collection of commercial waste 
Sale of junk .... 

Refunds 

Damage to property 



Carried forward 



.824,433 71 
120 00 

24 00 

25 31 
22,500 00 

73 00 



L,862,035 00 
1.000 00 



$21 90 



$370 72 

29,181 16 

136 50 

706 99 

410 00 

25 00 

6 78 



$19,233 00 

150 00 

937 16 

97 35 

120 00 

114 54 

5,225 00 

1,169 26 



$4,421 20 

129 01 

GO 00 

114 00 



$1,802 00 



42,564 48 



47,176 02 



1,863,035 00 



21 90 



30,837 15 



27,046 31 



4,724 21 
$2,017,207 07 



Public Works Department. 



19 



Brought forward . . . . 


. 


$2,017,207 07 


Water Service: 






^^^ater rates 


$4,398,017 77 




Water added to taxes . 


199,299 38 




Service pipes for new takers ex 






tending, repairing, etc. 


3,914 91 




Fees on overdue rates . 


22 80 




Sale of junk, etc 


2,269 79 




Damage to property . 


1,413 11 




Labor and materials 


9,070 14 




Deposit account .... 


77,697 40 




Elevator and fire pipe connections 


987 92 




Miscellaneous income , 


24 19 


4,693,317 41 






Grand total .... 


. 


S6,710,524 48 



PART II. 

APPENDICES 



(21) 



22 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE AUTO^^IOTIVE DIVISION. 



BosTOX, January 2, 1951. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following is the annual report of the Automotive 
Division, Public Works Department, for the year 
ending December 31, 1950: 

The Automotive Division was created by the Com- 
missioner of Public Works, George G. Hjdand, with the 
approval of his Honor the AIa3^or, on January 19, 1950, 
and ^Ir. J. Leo McGrath was appointed Division 
Engineer on Januaiy 23, 1950. The emplo3^ees of the 
various divisions of the Public Works Department 
engaged in automotive work were transferred, on 
Februaiy 8, 1950, to make up the personnel of the new 
division. An organizational chart was drawn up, clearly 
defining the duties and responsibilities of these em- 
ployees. 

The S3'stem established was as follows. A perpetual 
inventorj^ was installed in the stock room, and all articles, 
in and out of stock, are entered in this inventor3\ In 
establishing the perpetual inventor^-, the Commissioner 
of Public Works authorized the employment of an 
expert, employed by the Ford 3»Iotor Car Company, 
to assist in the inventory and the establishing of stock 
bins, carrying part numbers and prices for each part 
which becomes part of the stock bin. 

It was necessary to purchase additional stock bins 
in order that, as far as possible, small parts could be 
placed in these bins, and kept in proper order. In order 
to accomplish this inventory and set the stock room up 
in a modern waj', it was necessary to cari-y this work 
on at night and on Saturdays and Sundays. 

In setting up the stock room, a separate section was 
built to separate tools used in the operation of the shop; 
and a man is assigned and is held responsible for the 
dispensing of tools and the return of same b}' the 
mechanics working on the floor. The man in charge of 



Public Works Department. 23 

tools has a check, by means of a tag system, controUing 
the issuing and return of tools from the tool room. 

In the receiving and repair of vehicles, the following 
system has been established. A vehicle, in for repairs, 
is received by one of three master mechanics who 
enters it on a work order in duplicate, one copy to remain 
in the master mechanic's office, the other copy to go to 
the clerical office for recording by the bookkeeping 
department in connection with the costs. 

This work order lists the work to be done. A mechanic 
is given this work order, in duplicate. It is then in- 
serted in an isinglass-faced envelope, and the mechanic 
proceeds to the vehicle for work. After breaking the 
vehicle down and deciding the necessar^^ parts to be 
replaced, the mechanic then returns to the master 
mechanic who issues a stock order on the stock room 
for the required stock. The mechanic then proceeds 
to the stock room and draws the stock against the stock 
order. 

The stock order is filed in the stock room and entered 
on a perpetual inventory card. The signature of the 
mechanic receiving the stock is acknowledged on the stock 
order remaining in the stock room. The duplicate of 
the stock order issued is entered on the work orders by 
the stock clerk issuing the stock, and he signs the work 
order, acknowledging deliver}- of stock to the mechanic 
assigned, as shown on the work order. 

The mechanic returns to the vehicle on which he is 
working and completes his work. Upon completion of 
the work, another master mechanic, other than the one 
issuing the original stock order, verifies that the stock 
received from the stock room has been placed in the 
vehicle for repairs, and signs the w-ork order as having 
completed the final inspection of the work done and 
stock issued. 

Attached to the work order is the time record of the 
employee working on said vehicle, which becomes part 
of the permanent cost record to be sent to the office to 
be charged against the maintenance and repair of the 
particular vehicle. The work order carries the cost of 
each item in a column provided for the same, so that the 
bookkeeping department will have a breakdown of 
the cost of repairing the particular vehicle, including 
materials used and labor performed. As far as is pos- 
sible, this system seems to overcome any previous 
procedural weaknesses that might have been in the 
garage service. 



• 24 City Document No. 24. 

The garage, at 280 Highland street, was improved, as 
follows: With the use of detergents, the garage floor, 
in its entirety, including the grease stand, was thoroughly- 
scraped, washed, and flushed on four consecutive Satur- 
days and Sundays, in preparation for painting the 
floors. The same was done with the locker rooms and 
toilets. Earh^ in Ma}^, and again in September, over 
long holiday weekends, the garage floor was painted, 
and sections were marked off, as fire lines, and stalls 
assigned for repairing of vehicles. 

The stock room at G24 Albany street was completely 
cleaned and painted, and is now used as a stock room 
for slow-moving parts, tires, tubes, chains, spare motors, 
etc. The garage at Hancock street was found to be in 
reasonably fair condition, except for painting the offices, 
repairing the heater, and supplying a sump pump to 
take care of spring water. 

The garage at Dana avenue, which is under the direc- 
tion of the Paving Service, was inspected, and the boiler 
was found to be in need of repairs, and same was done. 
The office and boiler room at the Dana avenue garage 
will be painted as soon as is feasible. 

The garage at 624 Albany street, which is used for 
storage of vehicles and dispensing of gasoline and oils, 
likewise is in reasonably fair condition; and the boiler 
has been repaired and the boiler room is now in the 
process of painting. Because of an emergency that 
existed, his Honor the ^Xla^^or allowed an order, under 
contract, for the removal of the two old 1,000-gallon gas 
tanks and their replacement with one 2,000-gallon tank. 

With the organizing of the Automotive Division, Com- 
missioner of Public Works George G. Hyland included 
the sale of junk of the Public Works Department as 
part of the duties of the Automotive Division. In con- 
nection with the control of junk, an inventory was taken 
of obsolete, outmoded eciuipment and junk that was 
on hand in the various yards of the Public Works 
Department . 

This list was submitted to the Commissioner of Public 
Works, and, acting under his orders, public advertising 
on the sale of this outmoded, obsolete equipment and 
junk was made in the daily papers and in the City 
Record. The auction sale took place on Mav 22 and 
May 23, 1950. 

On a previous canvass it was considered that from 
S3,000 to S4,000 might be realized at this sale. The 



Public Works Department. 25 

Commissioner, in his wisdom, felt that more could he 
realized, and, therefore, ordered the auction sale. The 
sale brought the surprising amount of $13,127.64. 

The auctioning was conducted by Eugene F, Canney, 
contract clerk of the Public A\'orks Department, with 
the assistance of Chief Clerk James C. Strong and Clerk 
Philip Dickerman of the Automotive Division, under the 
direction of Division Engineer J. Leo ]\IcGrath. 

In connection with the improvement and protection 
of the automotive equipment, it was found that vehicles 
were not giving the full gasoline mileage expected of 
them, ancl the records of the division verified this. 
Considerable investigation was made to determine how 
to overcome this loss of gasoline. 

Automotive commercial supply houses were contacted 
for the possibilities of purchasing anti-gasoline theft 
devices. None was found in the open market that 
would meet the requirements and, with the approval of 
the Commissioner of Public Works and Division En- 
gineer Daniel Al. Sullivan, the Division Engineer, 
^Ir, ]\IcGrath, had William J. Alartin, chief machinist of 
the Water Division and ^lachinist Adams make patterns 
for an anti-theft gasoline installation. 

All the Ford trucks in the department now have these 
installations, along with the Dodge trucks. Studies are 
at present being made to have the same in all other 
vehicles. 

Acting under the orders of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, as far as is possible with the equipment available 
in the repair service of the Automotive Division, all 
repairing of all vehicles and equipment of the Public 
Works Department is being done by the Automotive 
Division at the garage at 280 Highland street, Roxbury. 

In the conference with the Commissioner of Public 
Works, in regards to purchasing of additional vehicles 
and the operation of existing vehicles preparatory to 
the winter and snow season, the following equipment 
was ordered, and requisitions M'ere made on the Supply 
Department for the purchasing of same. Public adver- 
tising and opening of bids permitted the following pur- 
chases to augment the existing equipment for snow 
removal : 

Eight-Trojan bucket-type loadsters, assigned to the 
Paving Service, for snow removal around crosswalks, 
churches, hospitals, etc. 



26 City Document No. 24. 

One-Barber-Greene bucket-type loadster, assigned to 
the Paving Service, to work out of the main sand and 
salt stock piles in the yard between 624 and 650 Albany 
street, to expedite the loading of sand and salt on trucks 
assigned to sanding and salting. The Trojan bucket 
loadsters will also be of valuable assistance in loading 
salt and sand from stock piles located in the various 
district yards. 

One-Wagnermobile, assigned to the Sanitary Service, 
for snow removal (crosswalk work, etc.) in the intown 
shopping area. 

It was further agreed that additional sanders should 
be provided for sanding and salting work in the various 
paving district yards and, in this connection, eleven 
Dodge trucks in the Sanitary Service were transferred 
to eleven paving districts for winter work, and the dump 
iDodies were removed from same, and Baughman sand 
bodies were installed, with new Good Roads nine-foot 
plows installed for plowing duties on these vehicles. 
These bodies and plows have been mounted and are 
ready for duty. 

The snow removal work was further augmented by 
the purchase of thirt}' new plows and the trading of ten 
old ones, bringing the total number of plows under the 
inventory of the Sanitary Division to 256, being the 
number available for contractors and city plow work. 

A purchase of two 2,000-gallon street flushing units 
(with Heil flushing units) was made from the White 
Motor Company, and, although delivery has not been 
made, it is expected that early this month will be the 
best deliver3^ date. The following new equipment was 
also purchased on requisition by the Supply Department : 

Three Elgin sweepers and one Wa3^ne sweeper, making 
a total of nineteen Elgin sweepers, and one Wayne 
sweeper of the three cubic yard-capacity type. Of 
this total of twenty, sixteen are in good working con- 
dition; the other four are in questionable condition, 
and it is my opinion that the cost might prove pro- 
hibitive to condition the same. This fleet of sixteen 
available sweepers is also augmented by five of the 
smaller type Austin-Western sweepers, one being as- 
signed to the Tunnel Service. 

The Paving Service of the Public Works Department 
was without compressors, and was constantly borrowing 
from other divisions of the department. Therefore, two 
compressors of the 160 cubic foot-portable type have 
been purchased for use in the Paving Service. 



Public Works Department. 27 

A great want was noted for a service truck to be 
used b}' the garage for tire repair work outside, minor 
repair work on ^'ehicles out of service, and some repair 
work to be completed on the road. A three-quarter 
ton Ford service truck was purchased, with half-ton 
hoist and air compressor installed, with necessary tool 
compartments to carry hydraulic jack, acetylene cutting 
and welding tools, and portal)le hght to be run on small 
generator. This truck will give invaluable assistance 
during the severe winter season in maintaining the 
equipment on the road. 

With the great amount of new street construction 
and repairs of present streets, seven Chevrolet eight- 
passenger carryalls were purchased by the Supply 
Department, on requisitions from the Automotive 
Division. Six of these carryalls have been assigned to 
the survey parties of the Paving Division, and one to 
the survej^ part}-^ of the Bridge Division. These Chev- 
rolet carryalls are new vehicle purchases, thus adding 
to the present vehicles. 

An effort is being made, under the Capital Improve- 
ment Program, to replace old vehicles where maximum 
trading value might be made, or in the case of pro- 
hibitive costs for repairs, to trade same. In this con- 
nection, various trades were made in the Sewer, Water, 
and other Divisions and be advised that the trading 
allowance verified that this was the proper thing to do, 
as against repairing the vehicles. Xew vehicles were 
bought, replacing existing vehicles, for sums varying 
from S22o, to §900. 

In connection with the improvements in the garage 
at 280 Highland street, the offices were rebuilt and 
painted, in order that the clerical forces might have 
necessar}" facilities for carrying on their work, and an 
office was l)uilt for the Division Engineer. 

In conference with the Commissioner of Public 
Works, and on recommendation of the Division Engineer 
of the Automotive Division, it was agreed that a modern 
telephone and interoffice communication sj'stem should 
be established. The telephone company w^as contacted 
through Daniel F. Coughlin, liaison man of the Public 
Works Department, and the telephone companj^ has 
installed the very latest automatic dialing interoffice 
communication and switching sj^stem, in the garage 
service. 



28 City Document No. 24. 

This system allows conversations to be made privately', 
without any interference from anj^ part of the garage 
on other phones. It is estimated that, with the installa- 
tion of this system, the cost of telephone service will 
be decreased one third. 

A great need was recognized in establishing a pre- 
ventive maintenance system in the garage service, and 
this has partially been accomplished. Garage facilities 
do not allow a complete preventive maintenance sj'stem 
to be established, and it is hoped, considering war 
conditions, that when an addition to the existing plant 
at 280 Highland street is built, to make up for the loss 
of the garage at 624 All)any street because of the state 
master highway program, that these facilities will become 
available, adjacent to the present location. 

Insofar as preventive maintenance will allow, vehicles 
are greased, oil is changed monthly, oil filter cartridges 
are installed at 10,000 miles, and, when vehicles are 
on the lift on the grease stand, an inspection is made 
by mechanics to determine that the brake and steering 
systems are in safe condition, and, when possible, at 
that time, if facilities are available in the garage, these 
repairs, if necessary, are made. 

With the advent of the winter season, when vehicles 
have been in greasing in connection with preventive 
maintenance, all wiring, distributors, and battery cables 
have been spread with waterproof solution. In this 
regard, it is hoped that difficult starting, due to con- 
densation or wet wiring, will be eliminated during the 
heavy work season of the winter. 

Again, in connection with preventive maintenance, 
a semiannual checkup is made, M'hen all vehicles are 
inspected for care by the respective drivers, and, where 
abuse or lack of care is noted, the drivers are instructed 
to give better care, and cleanliness, and maintenance 
to their equipment. 

For three months, Air. ^Moloney of the Municipal 
Research Bureau, wdth the approval of his Honor the 
Mayor, has been conducting a survey in the Automo- 
tive Division. Everj^ effort has been made to give this 
Bureau, through its representative, Mr. Moloney, full 
cooperation in conducting this survey. 

In connection with civilian defense, a complete list 
of all equipment, tools, etc., under the control of the 
Automotive Division, has been submitted to Cornelius 
O'Lear}', assigned to this duty in the Public Works 



I 



Public Works Department. 29 

Department. Tlie Automotive Division, I assume, will 
be called upon to play an important part in civilian 
defense, and please be advised that we are read}' to 
assist in every detail. 

Appended hereto is a report showing the cost of 
operating and maintaining each and ever}' \'ehicle in 
the Public Woi-ks Department for the year 1950, 
broken down on a mileage basis. This report is com- 
piled on the following cost items: labor, overhead, 
materials, tires and tubes, ])atteries, outside repairs, 
gasoline, oil, storage, depreciation, and registration fees. 



Very truly yours, 



J. Leo ^NIcGrath, 

Division Engineer. 



30 City Document No. 24. 

Report of Cost Records for 1950. 
Automotive Equipment. 

This report shows the actual cost of the vehicles in 
the Public Works Department, Automotive Division, 
for the year ended December 31, 1950. The cost items 
involved are labor, overhead, material, tires and tubes, 
batteries, outside repairs, gasoline, oil, storage, depreci- 
ation, and registration fees. 

Labor. — This item represents the cost of the actual 
repair time expended on a vehicle by our own mechanics. 
For the year 1950 the rate was $1.41 per hour. 

Overhead. — This item is made up of an accumulation 
of the cost of the Highland street garage and contains 
such charges as indirect labor, fuel oil used, building 
repairs, depreciation on building, electricity used, gas 
used, tool expense, telephone expense, and miscellaneous 
expenses. From each month's overhead are deducted 
the inside storage for the month and the distribution 
charge for gasoline and oil. The remaining amount is 
divided by the number of actual direct labor-hours and 
the result gives the amount of overhead per hour. An 
attempt is made, however, to establish a rate suitable 
for the year rather than have a different rate each month. 

^Material. — This item represents the cost of all parts 
used on repair jobs here at the garage, as well as acces- 
sories, exclusive of tires, tubes, and batteries. 

Tires and Tubes. — This item shows the cost of tires 
and tubes used by each vehicle. 

Batteries. — This item shows the cost of batteries used 
by each vehicle. 

Outside Repairs. — This item represents the cost of 
repairs done by private concerns outside our own garage. 

Gasoline. — This item represents the cost of the gaso- 
line used, plus a distribution cost of four cents a gallon, 
which is a deduction from overhead. 

Oil. — • This item represents the cost of the oil used, 
plus a distribution cost of two cents a quart, which is a 
deduction from overhead. 

Storage. — This item is divided into outside storage 
and inside storage. Outside storage is the amount 
charged for the vehicles stored at outside garages during 



Public Works Department. 31 

the winter months. Inside storage is the amount 
charged for vehicles stored in our own garages. It is a 
deduction from overhead. 

Depreciation. — Depreciation is figured on a straight 
Hne basis, that is, cost cUvided by estimated Ufe in 
months equals estimated depreciation per month. Due 
to the uncertain economic conditions no consideration is 
given to a residual value at the time the rate is estab- 
lished. Because of this a longer estimated life is used 
in the calculations. It has been determined from ex- 
perience that this procedure leads to a fairly accurate 
depreciation cost over the life of a vehicle. 

The estimated life in use at the present time is as 
follows: 7- to 10-ton trucks and 6-ton trucks, 16 years; 
8-ton trucks, 5 years; 5-ton trucks, 3- to 5-ton trucks, 
4-ton trucks, 3-ton trucks, 1^-ton trucks, snow loaders 
and tractors, 10 years; 2-ton trucks, 8^ years; 1-ton 
trucks, ^-ton trucks, and sweepers, 9 years; passenger 
cars, 5 years. Again, these estimated lives are longer 
than they would be, if consideration were given to esti- 
mated residual values at the time the depreciation rates 
are set. It seems to be impossible to determine with 
any degree of accuracy the trade-in value of vehicles, 
thus the present procedure. 

It should be kept in mind that although depreciation 
is a definite and tangible operating cost, the amount 
charged has to be an estimated amount. The aim is to 
have the estimated amount as nearly correct as possible. 
As long as this aim is accomplished, the actual method 
used is unimportant. 

Registration Fees. — This item represents the amount 
charged by the Registry of Motor \'ehicles for plates 
and certificate. 

Overhead charge for 1950 is at rate of $5 per hour. 

The following is a classification of the vehicles in the 
Public Works Department, Automotive Division, accord- 
ing to capacity, showing the Average Yearly Cost, 
the Average Yearly Mileage, and the Average 
Cost per ]Mile. 



32 



City Document Xo. 24. 




7= to 10=Ton Snowfighter Sandspreaders (6 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



P-272 

P-284 
P-289 
P-290 
P-285 
P-283 



1942 Walter. . . 

1943 "Walter. . . 

1944 Walter. . . 

1945 Walter. . . 
1943 Walter. . . 
1942 Walter. . . 

Group Average 



.$4,459 39 
3,. 597 92 
2.834 32 
3.178 24 
3.488 53 
3,190 57 



1,054 
1.240 
1.062 
1,209 
1,.522 
1,498 



$4 230 
2 902 
2 669 
2 629 
2 292 
2 130 



,458 16 



1,264 



$2 736 



4=Ton Snowfighter Sandspreaders (7 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


P-354 
P-361 


1947 Walter 

1948 Walter 


$3,971 01 
4.529 97 
3,958 79 
3,786 26 
4,247 33 
4.268 20 
3,045 14 


1,258 
1,511 
1,524 
1.536 
1.861 
1,923 
1,651 


.$3 156 
2 998 


P-362 


1948 Walter . . . 


2 598 


P-374 


1949 Walter 


2 465 


P-373 


1949 Walter 


2 282 


P-363 


1948 Walter 


2 220 


P-355 


1947 Walter 


1 844 










Group Average 


$3,972 39 


1,609 


$2 469 









Public Works Department. 

8=Ton Truck (I Vehicle). 



33 



Department 
No. 


yE.\R AND Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


TS-21 


1949G.M.C 


$2,341 51 


2,255 


$1 058 



6=Ton Truck (I Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 

Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


G-56 


1947 Diamond T 


$2,566 28 


— 











3= to 5=Ton Truck (I Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


P-385 


1946 :\Iack Sander 


$2,065 77 


245 


$8 432 



3=Ton Truck (1 Vehicle). 



Department 

No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


B-29 


1948 Ford 


$908 82 


4,211 


$0 216 







5=Ton Trucks (8 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


Se-115 
S-466 


1945 White Sander 

1947 Wliite Dump 


$1,725 59 
2,898 69 
1,033 95 
3,624 23 
3,916 14 
5,003 49 
3,960 79 
2,411 54 


1,704 
4,091 
1,.563 
5.860 
7,514 
9.887 
12.740 
1,338 


$1 013 
709 


Se-ll3 


1945 White Sander 


662 


S-381 
S-465 
S-463 
S-464 


1947 White Flusher 

1947 White Demp.ster Dumj) 
1947 White Dempster Dump 
1949 White Dump 


619 
521 
50(i 
311 


S-398 


1945 White Demp.ster Dump 


180 






$3,071 SO 


5,587 


$0 550 









34 City Document No. 24. 

5=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Type. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



2 Sanders 

1 Flusher 

3 Dempster Dumpsters 

2 Dumps 

8 Group Average 



$1,379 77 
3,624 23 
3,777 OG 
3,429 74 



1,634 
5,860 
6,246 
8,416 



$3,071 80 



5,587 



^0 844 
619 
605 
408 



$0 550 



2=Ton Trucks (63 Vehicles). 



Department 

No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



Se-147 

Se-148 

S-525 

S-502 

Se-150 

W-303 

Se-149 

P-372 

Se-154 

Se-151 

S-556 

S-488 

S-505 

P-368 

S-489 

P-370 

S-503 

P-367 

B-26 

S-501 

S-558 

S-509 

S-526 

S-512 

P-369 

S-554 

B-27 

P-376 

S-555 

S-553 

S-557 

P-378 

W-261 

Se-152 

P-377 

S-496 

Se-155 

S-510 

S-486 



1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 
1949 Ford 
1949 Ford 
1949 Ford 
1949 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1948 Ford 
1947 Ford 



Netco CBC . . . 
Netco CBC . . . 
DumpCOE... 

Dump 

Netco CBC . . . 

Derrick 

Netco CBC . . . 

Dump 

Dump 

Netco CBC . . . 

Dump 

Dump 

DumpCOE... 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

IR Compressor 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump COE. . . 

Dumj) 

Dump 

IR Compressor 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Derrick 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 



$2,230 89 
1,923 21 
1,063 55 
1,375 42 
2,011 60 
1,801 61 
1,517 03 
1,912 96 
1,510 19 
1,889 82 
1,352 66 
1,475 77 
1,.582 49 
1,100 12 
1,032 03 
1,597 28 
1,488 37 
1,040 22 
1,423 05 
1,614 95 
1,446 15 
995 71 
1,876 11 
1,0.55 21 
1,.3.59 27 
1,306 21 
1,086 16 
1,182 30 
1,089 13 
1,.584 13 
1,093 60 
1,335 92 
1,194 95 
1,119 78 
1,200 54 
1,232 04 
1,006 53 
1,465 51 
1,113 40 



3,722 
3,478 
1,979 
2,754 
4,368 
4,290 
3,670 
4,881 
4,219 
5,517 
4,085 
4,490 
4,888 
3,584 
3,412 
5,581 
5,393 
3,772 
5,235 
6,171 
5,560 
3,849 
7,435 
4,184 
5,405 
5,210 
4,413 
4,836 
4,471 
6,548 
4,682 
5,711 
5,146 
4,868 
5,325 
5,515 
4,531 
6,786 
5,179 



$0 599 
553 
537 
475 
461 
420 
413 
392 
358 
343 
331 
329 
324 
307 
303 
286 
276 
276 
272 
262 
260 
259 
252 
252 
251 
251 
246 
244 
244 
242 
234 
233 
232 
230 
225 
223 
222 
216 
215 



Public Works Department, 

2=Ton Trucks. — Continued. 



35 



Department 

No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 

Cost. 



Yearly 
JNIileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



P-36G 
S-552 
W-279 
W-288 
W-286 
S-o50 
W-292 
S-504 
S-559 
W-287 
S-513 
S-487 
P-379 
S-507 
Se-153 
S-506 
B-28 
S-508 
S-551 
S-500 
W-30() 
W-305 
W-284 
P-380 



1948 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford CJate Closing. . 
1948 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Stake 

1949 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Derrick 

1948 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Derrick 

1948 Ford Dump COE. . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Dump COE. . . 
1948 Ford Lumber 

1948 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford IR Compressor 
1949 Ford IR Compressor 

1948 Ford Gate Closing. . 

1949 Ford Dump 

Group Average 



$1,025 86 
1,318 69 
2,714 18 
1,817 33 
1,623 48 

928 96 
1,493 31 

969 00 
1,666 38 

959 26 

828 20 
1,062 22 

949 32 
1,134 31 
1,006 05 
1,463 80 

747 51 
1,252 91 
1,224 42 
1,001 59 
1,770 93 
1,928 16 
1,706 01 

875 15 



1,348 54 



4,763 
6,444 
13,287 
9,001 
8,256 
4,874 
7,981 
5,305 
9,156 
5,261 
4,610 
5,922 
5,313 
6,406 
5,910 
8,938 
4,981 
9,125 
9,028 
7,386 
13,076 
15,678 
15,357 
8,503 



5,945 



SO 215 
205 
204 
202 
197 
191 
187 
183 
182 
182 
180 
179 
179 
177 
170 
164 
150 
137 
136 
136 
135 
123 
111 
103 



$0 22: 



2=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Make. 



Average 
Yearlj' 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



5 Xetco CBC . . . . 
5 Dump COE. . . . 

4 Derricks 

41 Dumps 

1 Stake 

4 IR Compressors 

2 Gate Closing . . . 
1 Lumber 

63 Group Average . 



$1,914 51 


4,151 


1,198 65 


4,920 


1,063 55 


4,383 


1,271 67 


5,644 


1,623 48 


8,256 


1,552 08 


9,601 


2,210 10 


14,322 


747 51 


4,981 


$1,348 54 


5,945 



$0 461 
244 
243 
225 
197 
162 
154 
150 



$0 22; 



36 



City Document No. 24. 
I^=Ton Trucks (112 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



S-423 

S-429 

Se-160 

G-57 

Se-127 

P-3O0 

S-460 

S-448 

S-469 

S-518 

P-307 

S-455 

S-440 

S-492 

S-472 

S-434 

P-334 

S-456 

S-468 

P-356 

Se-122 

S-480 

S-437 

P-329 

P-324 

P-314 

P-323 

S-438 

S-431 

P-318 

Se-133 

S-481 

S-474 

S-430 

S-422 

Se-123 

P-317 

W-254 

P-308 

P-304 

S-436 

S-477 

S-461 

S-4o3 

Se-125 

S-524 

P-349 

S-0I7 

P-342 

S-441 

S-494 

S-454 

S-410 

W-256 

S-470 

S-428 

S-443 



1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Wrecker 

1947 Ford Emergencv 

1946 Ford Dump. . .' 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dumj) 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Emergenc\' 

1947 Ford Dump.. . ". 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Express 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford IR Compressor. . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dum]) 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1946 Ford Emergencv 

1947 Ford Dump. . . '. 

1947 Ford IR Com]5ressor . . 
1946 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1940 Ford Tractor 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Emergency 

1948 Dodge Sander.". 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Wrecker 

1947 Ford IR Compressor. . 

1947 Dodge Dum]) 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Dodge Dump 



$987 53 

1.247 91 
1,069 48 
2,703 99 
2,525 14 
1,743 56 
1,258 02 
2,890 53 
1,221 00 
1,137 53 
2,252 49 
2,203 47 

966 49 
1,874 47 
1,079 02 
1,202 93 
1,893 05 
2,242 66 
1,256.33 
1,264 07 
2,363 64 

991 86 
2,102 01 
1,755 60 
1,415 54 
1,173 51 
1,663 67 
2,064 14 

955 33 
1,523 56 

1.371 59 
1,146 20 
2,263 91 
1,.504 24 

837 27 
2,093 22 
1,749 11 
1,628 16 

859 86 
1,402 09 

730 42 
1,376 30 
1,327 37 
1,813 54 
1,530 57 

1.248 91 
1,446 16 
1,289 06 
1,784 98 
1,460 97 

1.372 56 
1,239 20 
1,082 07 
1,483 19 
1,414 92 
1,143 69 
1,217 18 



832 

1,487 
1,619 
4,495 
4,294 
3,145 
2,888 
6,675 
2,865 
2,712 
5,492 
5,460 
2,405 
4,745 
2,759 
3,206 
4,949 
5,918 
3,319 
3,347 
6,461 
3,798 
5,829 
4,873 
3,951 
3,296 
4,734 
5,934 
2,747 
4,392 
4,189 
3,314 
6,603 
4,415 
2,478 
6,225 
5,221 
4,900 
2,607 
4,414 
2,304 
4,450 
4,292 
5,960 
5.141 
4,203 
4,901 
4,374 
6,149 
5,053 
4,796 
4,333 
3,815 
5,258 
5,013 
4,049 
4,414 



51 187 
832 
660 
602 
588 
554 
436 
433 
426 
419 
410 
404 
402 
395 
391 
388 
383 
379 
379 
378 
367 
361 
360 
360 
358 
356 
351 
348 
348 
347 
347 
346 
343 
340 
338 
336 
335 
332 
330 
318 
317 
309 
309 
304 
298 
297 
295 
295 
290 
289 
286 
286 
284 
282 
282 
282 
275 



Public Works Department. 

1 2-Ton Trucks. — Continued. 



37 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



S-519 

P-335 

Se-129 

S-523 

W-255 

TS-19 

P-332 

P-341 

S-521 

S-476 

P-328 

S-520 

S-427 

W-236 

Se-124 

W-239 

P-326 

W-224 

P-331 

S-442 

P-303 

W-241 

S-478 

P-338 

W-243 

P-309 

S-473 

P-337 

P-339 

P-333 

S-485 

S-433 

Se-134 

S-482 

P-325 

S-444 

B-31 

S-439 

S-447 

TS-15 

S-475 

Se-135 

P-322 

P-336 

S-409 

S-491 

S-493 

Se-137 

S-515 

S-424 

Se-136 

W-244 

TS-1 1 

S-522 

S-516 



1948 Dodgo Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Emergenc'\'. . . . 

1948 Dodge Sander." . . . . 
1947 Ford IR Compressor 

1947 Ford Rack 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Stake Winch . . 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1945 Ford IR Compressor 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE. . . 

1947 Ford Wrecker 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Stake 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1936 Ford Flusher 

1948 Dodge vSander 

1948 Dodge Sander 

Group Average 



$1,035 05 
1,183 81 
1,282 80 
1,322 72 
1,257 48 
411 27 
1,312 11 
1,338 01 
1,104 97 
1,479 80 
1,520 94 
1,186 21 
1,086 16 

1.267 72 
1,383 15 
1,527 32 
1,035 67 
1,031 06 
1,113 12 
1,440 79 
1,500 97 

931 37 
1,238 28 

953 91 
1,314 57 
1,206 78 
1,154 18 

921 64 
1,195 64 

978 63 
1,307 15 
1,159 29 
1,073 84 
1,307 15 

1.268 .30 
1,002 39 

789 12 

774 92 

1,092 08 

1,075 85 

1,050 02 

898 46 

1,364 90 

1,343 02 

939 25 

981 53 

1,134 90 

797 37 

1,073 77 

1,053 40 

756 07 

1,437 61 

327 52 

893 47 

1,219 04 



3,779 
4,407 
4,882 
3,649 
4,867 
1,593 
5,187 
5,348 
4,460 
6,015 
6,357 
4,982 
4,613 
5,407 
5,960 
6,785 
4,597 
4,579 
4,986 
6,531 
6,925 
4,318 
6,119 
4,775 
6,719 
6,257 
6,000 
4,808 
6,330 
5,236 
7,167 
6,463 
6,009 
7,359 
7,112 
5,640 
4,457 
4,375 
6,242 
6,138 
6,025 
5,181 
7,971 
7,833 
5,434 
5,779 
6,894 
4,829 
6,658 
6,547 
4,687 
9,016 
2,169 
5,972 
8,646 



$0 274 
269 
263 
262 
258 
258 
253 
250 
248 
246 
239 
238 
235 
234 
232 
225 
225 
225 
223 
220 
217 
216 
202 
200 
198 
193 
192 
192 
189 
187 
182 
179 
179 
178 
178 
178 
177 
177 
175 
175 
174 
173 
171 
171 
171 
170 
165 
165 
161 
161 
161 
159 
151 
150 
141 



$1,327 52 



4,934 



$0 269 



38 City Document No. 24. 

I34=Ton Trucks Classified According to Make. 



M.VKE. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



30 Dodges 

82 Fords 

112 Group Average 



$1,199 25 
1,374 44 



5,117 
4,867 



10 234 
282 



$1,327 52 



4,934 



$0 269 



■IJ^2=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Type. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



11 DumpCOE. ... 

5 Emergencj's. . . . 

1 Express 

3 Wreckers 

1 Tractor 

5 IR Compressors 
69 Dumps 

1 Rack 

13 Sanders 

2 Stakes 

1 Flusher 

112 Group Average. 



$1,109 15 
1,959 07 
1,173 51 
1,620 64 

730 42 
1,354 30 
1,378 08 

411 27 
1,153 82 
1,161 20 

327 52 



2,964 
5,401 
3,296 
4,816 
2,304 
4,759 
5,320 
1,593 
5,146 
5,697 
2,169 



m 374 
363 
356 
337 
317 
285 
259 
258 
224 
204 
151 



$1,327 52 



4,934 



$0 269 



l=Ton Trucks (8 Vehicles). 



Department 
Xo. 


Yeab and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


W-269 


1948 Ford Express 


$940 02 
955 67 
910 49 
850 96 
756 34 
1.053 79 
1.024 58 
662 27 


4.763 
5.048 
7.654 
7.093 
6.447 
10.270 
10.898 
7 601 


.$0 197 


W-276 


1948 Ford Express 


189 


W-275 


1948 Ford Express 


129 


W-291 


1948 Ford Express 


120 


W-301 


1949 Ford Express 


117 


W-274 


1948 Ford Express 


103 


W-270 


1948 Ford Express 


094 


W-273 


1948 Ford Expre.ss 


087 










Group Average 


$894 27 


7,472 


$0 120 









Public Works Department. 

3^=Ton Pickups (76 Vehicles). 



39 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
JNIileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



W-2o3 

P-387 

P-38G 

P-347 

P-319 

W-252 

S-498 

Se-128 

W-2G2 

S-450 

S-419 

S-471 

S-411 

S-432 

S-459 

S-413 

Se-131 

P-346 

P-330 

P-320 

S-499 

P-315 

P-321 

S-414 

W-272 

Se-126 

TS-16 

Se-138 

Se-116 

P-343 

W-298 

S-425 

S-538 

W-297 

P-340 

S-412 

P-302 

S-497 

S-416 

S-417 

S-435 

Se-118 

S-535 

Se-139 

S-418 

P-348 

P-344 

P-345 

TS-20 

Se-132 

TS-17 

S-458 

W-271 

W-29G 

S-495 

S-542 



1947 Ford . . 
194b Ford . . 
194(3 G..M.C. 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford. . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 

1946 G.M.C, 

1947 Ford . . 

1949 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1949 Ford . . 
1949 Ford. . 
1947 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 

1946 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 

1946 G.M.C 

1949 Ford. . 

1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 WUlys. 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Willys. 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 

1949 Ford . . 

1948 Ford.. 

1949 Ford . . 



n,lol 

1,717 

1,167 

1,141 

1,789 : 

1,235 

1,976 

1,896 

1,092 

2,018 

1,130 

1,573 

1,263 

1,791 

1,131 

1,038 

743 

1,666 

1,304 

1,190 

1,083 

1,437 

1,117 

1,219 

666 

1,190 

1,178 

1,156 

693 

998 

900 

1,095 

1,174 

726 

1,008 

1,596 

790 

1,097 

965 

1,209 

931 

910 

987 

853 

886 

835 

1,021 

629 

393 

881 

434 

1,129 

1,127 

943 

1,130 

1,008 



10 


5,025 


43 


8,437 


95 


5,843 


75 


6,560 


27 


10,433 


59 


7,273 


44 


13,075 


61 


12,524 


00 


7,390 


52 


13,814 


95 


7,767 


62 


11,069 


01 


8,978 


06 


12,915 


iO 


8,136 


96 


7,578 


82 


5,524 


65 


12,550 


83 


9,850 


14 


9,077 


04 


8,333 


52 


11,110 


00 


8,658 


35 


9,779 


81 


5,842 


9] 


9,687 


92 


9,600 


38 


9,492 


54 


5,680 


71 


8,333 


05 


7,569 


66 


9,328 


28 


10,051 


01 


6,180 


42 


8,690 


40 


13,999 


39 


7,023 


20 


9,875 


44 


8,893 


77 


11,530 


40 


7,041 


78 


8,950 


41 


9,788 


54 


8,425 


01 


8,820 


45 


8,459 


18 


10,415 


Oi 


6,533 


13 


4,106 


95 


9,408 


54 


4,625 


72 


12,116 


15 


12,189 


40 


10,222 


94 


12,392 


68 


11,026 



$0 229 
204 
200 
174 
172 
170 
151 
151 
148 
146 
146 
142 
141 
139 
139 
137 
135 
134 
132 
131 
130 
129 
129 
125 
124 
123 
123 
122 
122 
120 
119 
118 
117 
117 
116 
114 
113 
111 
109 
105 
104 
102 
101 
101 
100 
099 
098 
096 
096 
094 
094 
093 
092 
092 
091 
091 



40 



City Document No. 24. 

3^=Ton Pickups. — Continued. 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



W-294 

S-452 

Se-141 

S-457 

S-451 

W-268 

W-295 

S-426 

W-265 

S-536 

S-514 

W-266 

S-562 

Se-140 

S-543 

W-263 

W-300 

S-541 

S-479 

W-299 



1949 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1947 Ford . . . . 

1948 Ford . . . . 

1949 Ford . . . . 

1947 Ford . . . . 

1948 Ford . . . . 

1949 Ford . . . . 
1948 Ford 

1948 Ford . . . . 

1949 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1949 Ford . . . . 

1948 Ford 

1949 Ford 

1949 Ford . . . . 

1947 Ford 

1949 Ford 

Group Average 



$696 39 
636 21 
901 91 
838 06 

1,098 90 
976 81 
645 79 

1,094 65 
727 51 
785 13 
752 27 
514 79 
799 52 
941 19 
930 84 
883 28 
654 92 
978 10 
811 97 
730 83 



7,729 

7,130 
10,092 

9,492 
13,557 
12,079 

8,077 
13,961 

9,438 
10,449 
10,090 

6,868 
11,109 
13,375 
13,727 
12,948 
10,235 
15,420 
12,850 
10,685 



$0 090 
089 
088 
088 
081 
081 
080 
078 
077 
075 
075 
075 
072 
070 
068 
068 
064 
063 
063 
061 



$1,050 01 



9,770 



$0 108 



i^=Ton Pickups Classified According to Make. 


Make. 


Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 


Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 


Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 


3 G M C's 






$ 924 09 

1,073 26 

413 84 


6,824 
9,832 
4,366 


$0 135 


7 1 Fords 






109 


2 Willvs 


095 










Tfi Groun A'^'Pi'^fp 


$1,050 01 


9,770 


$0 108 










Snow Loaders (3 Vehicles). 


Department 
No. 


Year 


AND Make. 




Yearly 
Cost. 


P 357 


1948 Barber Greene . 

1947 Barber Greene . 

1948 Barber Greene . 






$1,620 51 


P 3.=S8 







1,411 01 


P 359 






1,304 57 












Group Average 


$1,445 36 








Grader (I Vehicle). 


Department 
No. 


Year 


and Make. 




Yearly 
Cost. 


P 350 


1947 Huber Road . . . 




$ 


1,407 66 











Public Works Department. 

Sweepers (21 Vehicles). 



41 



Department 

No. 



Year axd Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



S-534 

S-532 

S-548 
S-545 
S-385 
S-527 
S-546 
S-530 
S-531 
S-547 
S-528 
S-544 
S-382 
S-387 
S-549 
TS-25 
S-383 
S-368 
S-388 
TS-18 
S-533 



1942 Elgin 

1949 Elgin 

1949 Elgin 

1949 Elgin 

1944 Elgin 

1948 Austin Western 

1949 Elgin 

1948 Austin Western 

1948 Austin Western 

1949 Elgin 

1948 Austin Western 

1949 Elgin 

1942 Elgin 

1945 Elgin 

1949 Elgin 

1950 Elgin 

1942 Elgin 

1941 Elgin 

1945 Elgin. 

1947 Austin Western 

1942 Elgin 

Group Average 



$5,120 42 
4,779 37 
4.539 88 
3,615 52 
3,487 77 
3,449 40 
3.102 99 
2,(i94 58 
2.675 92 
2,594 31 
2,421 54 
2,411 53 
2.367 47 
2.319 45 
2,261 85 
2,194 01 
1.480 27 
1,395 55 
1.294 70 
983 84 
720 91 



$2,660 28 



Crane (1 Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year axd Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


W-191 


1939 22-Ton Portable on Caterpillar 


$429 83 









Buffalo Springfield Rollers (12 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year axd Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



R-29 
R-30 
R-32 
R-33 
R-34 
R-35 
R-36 
R-37 
R-38 
R-39 
R-40 
R-41 



1930 6-ton Road 

1931 6-ton Road 

1939 2-ton Sidewalk 

1939 2-ton Sidewalk 

1939 2-ton Sidewalk 

1940 2-ton Sidewalk 

1940 2-ton Sidewalk 

1941 2-ton Sidewalk 

1941 2-ton Sidewalk 

1949 2-ton Tandem (with towing attachment) 
1949 2-ton Tandem (with towing attachment) 
1949 2-ton Tandem (with towing attachment) 

Group Average 



$343 18 

584 13 

104 25 

49 77 

92 22 

62 22 

145 39 

2 00 

26 22 

133 92 

82 34 

10 81 



$136 37 



42 



City Document No. 24. 

Tractors (2 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and JNIake. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


P-365 


1948 \llis Chalmers Crawler 


$2 237 67 


P-364 


1948 Allis Chalmers Crawler 


1,458 77 








Group Average 


$1,848 22 







Unclassified Vehicles. 



Department 
No. 



Year and jMake. 



Yearly- 


Cost. 


$2 00 


2 00 


00 


58 78 


72 


00 


2 58 


00 


00 


1 52 


00 


00 


31 63 


6 66 


33 98 


00 


00 


00 


42 


00 


75 09 


83 51 


5 40 


2 00 


00 


220 49 


2 00 


7 81 


2 60 


2 00 


34 63 


29 32 


2 10 


16 70 


34 84 


00 


124 25 


2 60 



S-244 

S-245. 

S-529 

S-560 

S-490 

P-360 

P-243 

P-286 

P-287 

S-483 

S-484 

P-269 

P-298 

P-301 

P-242 

P-288 

P-299 

P-247 

P-255 

P-256 

P-310 

P-311 

P-312 

P-244 

G-27 

P-371 

W-184 

W-259 

W-260 

W-277 

W-278 

W-285 

W-220 

Se-156 

Se-157 

P-316 

B-17 

W-222 



1933 Highway Semi-Trailer 

1933 Highway Semi-Trailer 

1948 Snow Shanty Trailer 

1948 Hobart Arc Welder Trailer 

1947 Stewart Warner Portable Heater 

1947 Stewart Warner Portable Heater 

1939 Hauck .\sphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1943 Hauck Asphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1943 Hauck Asphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1947 Huski U nisickle Lawnmower 

1947 Huski Unisickle Lawnmower 

1936 Standard Lawnmower 

1946 Whirlwind Lawnmower 

1946 Whirlwind Lawnmower 

1939 Smith Concrete Mixer Trailer 

1944 Syntron Gasoline Paving Breaker 

1946 American Brake Shoe Paint Spray Machine 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1946 Griffin Highlight Trailer 

1946 Griffin Highlight Trailer 

1946 Griffin Highlight TraUer 

1939 Homemade 2-ton Trailer 

1929 Hvass 5-ton Trailer 

1948 Acker Core Drill 

1937 Littleford Handee Box Toolhouse Trailer . . 

1947 ^ton Willys Toolbox Trailer 

1947 -^ton Willys Toolbox Trailer 

1947 1-ton Xash Kelvinator Toolbox Trailer. . . . 

1947 1-ton Nash Kelvinator Toolbox Trailer 

1948 1-ton Homemade 2- Wheel Toolbox Trailer. 

1943 Wesson Tiernan Chlorinator Trailer 

1947 Flexible Power Bucket 3tlachine 2-Wheel 

1947 Flexible Power Bucket Machine 2-Wheei 

Trailer 

1946 Portable Air Compressor 

1935 Auxiliary Air Compressor 

1945 IR Compressor Trailer 



Public Works Department, 

Passenger Cars (22 Vehicles). 



43 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per MUe. 


P-352 
W-289 
P-353 
8-539 


1947 Willvs Jeep 

1948 For(i Sedan 

1947 Willvs Jeep 

1949 Forci Sedan 


$1,252 45 

974 31 

1,215 46 

717 22 

2,665 16 

2,599 70 

1,062 96 

1,423 70 

856 93 

1,396 45 

1,249 67 

629 27 

1,162 55 

1,428 39 

1,634 75 

800 82 

1,425 68 

773 24 

858 29 

1,078 22 

513 88 

723 29 


4,903 

4,468 

5,893 

4,231 
16,315 
17,389 

8,112 
12,110 

7,665 
12,575 
11,718 

6,362 
11,887 
16,016 
18,460 

9,180 
16,783 

9,621 
12,390 
16,670 

8,062 
11,572 


$0 255 
218 
206 
170 


Se-142 


1947 Willvs Jeep 


163 


C-10 


1947 Buick Sedan 


150 


Se-143 


1947 Willvs Jeep 


131 


W-230 


1946 Buick Sedan 


118 


P-351 


1947 Willvs Jeep 


112 


S-561 
Se-158 


1949 Buick Sedan 

1950 Buick Sedan 


111 
107 


TS-24 


1949 Ford Sedan 


099 


W-293 


1949 Buick Sedan 


098 


TS-22 


1949 Buick Sedan 


089 


P-375 


1949 Buick Sedan 


088 


W-302 


1949 Ford Sedan 


087 


Se-144 


1947 Willys Jeep 


085 


P-381 


1950 Ford Sedan 


080 


S-563 
P-382 


1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 


069 
064 


TS-23 


1949 Ford Sedan 


064 


W-304 


1949 Ford Sedan 


063 










Group Average 


$1,201 92 


11,017 


$0 109 









Passenger Cars Classified According to Make. 



M.\KE. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
^lileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per MUe. 



6 Willj's Jeeps. . . 

7 Buick Sedans. . 
9 Ford Sedans . . . 

22 Group Average 



$1,413 11 

1,556 37 

785 39 



9,945 

14,308 

9,173 



$0 142 
109 
086 



$1,201 92 



11,017 



$0 109 



Passenger Cars Classified According to Type. 



^Iake. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



6 Jeeps 

16 Sedans 

22 Group Average 



$1,413 11 
1,122 73 



9,945 
11,419 



$0 142 
098 



$1,201 92 



11,017 



$0 109 



44 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE AND HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Boston', January 2, 1951. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit the following report of the income, expendi- 
tures, and operation of the Bridge and Highway Division 
for the year ending December 31, 1950, in two sections. 
The Bridge Section report covers the Bridge, Ferry, 
and Tunnel Services, which comprised the former 
Bridge and Ferry Division. The Highway Section 
report covers the Paving and Street Lighting Services, 
which comprised the former Highwa}' Division. On 
]\Iay 15, 1950, these two divisions were combined to 
form the present Bridge and Highway Division. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John De^Ieulenaer, 

Division Engineer. 

I — BRIDGE SECTION 

Summary of Budget Appropriations. 
Bridge Service, Regular. 
Regular appropriations, 1950 .... $784,134 97 
Transfer from 43;245 13 

$740,889 84 
Expenditures, 1950 716,270 39 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $24,619 45 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. 

Balance from 1949 $99,215 95 

1950 appropriation 350,000 00 

M49 215 95 
Expenditures, 1950 ""241^934 20 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $207,281 75 



Public Works Department. 45 

Bridges, Construction of. 

Balance from 1949 $2,348,153 42 

Expenditures, 1950 32,727 42 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $2,315,426 00 

Ferry Service. 

Regular appropriation, 1950 $380,046 47 

Expenditures, 1950 342,872 45 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $37,174 02 

Ferry Improvements, Etc. 

Balance from 1949 $523 75 

Transfers from 523 75 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $0 00 

Sumner Tunnel. 

Regular appropriation, 1950 $476,329 90 

Expenditures, 1950 461,404 93 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1950 . $14,924 97 

The foregoing does not include certain expenditures 
for construction work for other divisions, which work 
was supervised by the engineers of this division. 

In an order from the Department of Public Utilities, 
Commonwealth of ^Massachusetts, schedules of tolls and 
charges for the use of the Sumner Tunnel, between 
Boston Proper and East Boston, were approved, cover- 
ing the year 1950. 

The City operates one ferry, the so-called "South 
Ferry," with the Boston terminus at Eastern avenue 
and the East Boston terminus at Lewis street. 

The more important works undertaken during the 
past year in the Bridge and Highway Division, Bridge 
Section, were redecking and guniting Belgrade Avenue 
Bridge; rebuilding Blakemore Street Bridge; redecking 
Boylston Street Bridge; redecking sections of spans 1 
and 2 of the Charlestown Bridge; making minor steel 
repairs to the Charlestown Bridge; making repairs by 
welding on draw span of the Charlestown Bridge; 
making repairs to operating machinery of the Chelsea 
Street Bridge; redecking the drawspan of the Dover 
Street Bridge; repairing the Fairmount Avenue Bridge; 



46 City Document No. 24. 

removing tlie drawspan of the Meridian Street Bridge; 
resurfacino- the approaches of Warren Bridge; making 
repairs to the roadway and pile bents of Warren Bridge 
(three contracts) ; repairing the sidewalk of West Newton 
Street Bridge; repairing the pavement of the Sumner 
Tunnel; cleaning the surface drainage system of the 
Sumner Tunnel; installing new steam boiler, etc., in the 
London street garage of the Sumner Tunnel; cleaning 
exhaust duct and exhaust fan rooms at the Sumner 
Tunnel; making miscellaneous repairs to Ferrj'boat 
"Daniel A. AlacCormack" ; making general repairs, clean- 
ing and painting the hull of ferryboat ''Charles C. 
Donoghue''; dredging the receiving station at Albany 
street for the Sanitary Division ; and removing snow and 
ice in conjunction with other divisions. 



Bridge Service. 

Rededcing and Guniting the Belgrade Avenue Bridge, 

over the New York, New Haven -x Hartford Railroad. 

Because of disintegration of the concrete protecting 
the steelwork of the floor system and fascias, a contract 
was entered into with Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc., 
for making the necessary repairs by guniting. The 
work also included resurfacing and waterproofing the 
deck to eliminate the seepage causing the conditions 
mentioned above. 

After the work had started, the defective condition 
of the protective concrete on the underside was found 
to be so extensive that it was decided to remove the 
defective surface concrete instead of refinishing b}' 
guniting. 

Work commenced on May 20, 1950, and was com- 
pleted on December 4, 1950, at a cost of $10,375. 

General Repairs to the Bennington Street Bridge, over the 
Former Boston, Revere Beach d' Lynn Railroad. 

Under a contract with Martin J. Kelly Compan}', 
Inc., this work was commenced on October 3, 1949, and 
was carried on until December 7, 1949. Because of 
delays in delivery of materials, work was suspended 
until March 8, 1950. The work was completed Mav 2, 
1950, at a total cost of $19,865.48. 



Public Works Department. 47 

Rebuilding Blakemore Street Bridge, over the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 

The original structure, consisting of steel pony 
trusses and floor ])eams and wooden deck, having 
deteriorated beyond reasonable repair, and being in- 
capable of safely carrying present-day traffic, a contract 
was entered into with A. Orlando, Inc., for replacing 
the old superstructure with a new one consisting of 
steel plate girders, steel floor beams, concrete deck, 
and Ijituminous concrete wearing surface. 

Work commenced on November 30, 1950, and is 
expected to be completed in midyear of 1951. No 
payments have been made on this contract to date. 
The estimated cost of completion is -$54,000. 

Redecking the Boylston Street Bridge, over the Boston & 
Alba?iy Railroad. 

A contract was entered into with John F. Shea 
Company, Inc., for cleaning and painting the steelwork 
and renewing the surface plank, wearing surface, and 
necessary sidewalk planking and stringers throughout 
the briclge. Work commenced September 11, 1950, 
and due to delay in shipments of lumber was postponed 
until the spring of 1951. Payments of S7,072 have been 
made to date on an estimated cost of $36,827. 

Emergency Repairs to the Charlestown Bridge Piers. 

Work in connection with the strengthening of the 
piers of Charlestown Bridge was commenced August 17, 
1949, under a contract with Crandall Engineering 
Company and was continued during the winter. Work 
was completed April 29, 1950, at a cost of $127,384.17. 

Minor Steel Repairs to the Charlestown Bridge, over the 
Charles River. 

Due to badly corroded steel members supporting the 
downstream sidewalk on Span 1, it was found necessar}' 
to remove the sidewalk, make necessary steel repairs, 
and replace the sidewalk. Under a contract entered 
into with Frederick W. Byron this work was commenced 
June 19, 1950, and was completed Julv 11, 1950, at a 
cost of $5,358.20. 



48 City Document No. 24. 

Repairs by Welding on the Drawspan of the Charlestown 

Bridge. 
A contract was entered into with Industrial Welding 
Company for securing sections of the steel deck and 
supporting steel l)y welding. Work commenced October 
7, 1950, and was completed October 21, 1950, at a cost 
of $1,578.30. 

Redecking Sections of Spans 1 and 2, Charlestown Bridge, 
over the Charles River. 
Because of dangerous conditions which developed in 
the downstream roadway of Spans 1 and 2, due to 
defective underplank, a contract was entered into with 
D. A. Rossano Compan}-, Inc., for the necessarj^ repairs. 
Work commenced December 8, 1950, and is expected 
to be completed in January, 1951. No pa^'ments have 
been made to date. 

Emergenci) Repairs to Operating Machinery of the Chelsea 
Street Bridge, over the Chelsea River. 
Due to the breaking of an end section of the rack on 
the upstream operating strut, it was necessary to enter 
into an emergency contract with General Ship and 
Engine Works, Inc., for making the necessary repairs. 
Work commenced August 26, 1950, and was completed 
August 30, 1950, at a cost of $2,511.52. 

Redecking the Drawspan of the Dover Street Bridge. 

The spruce wearing surface, the underplank, and a 
large percentage of tlie stringers were found to be in 
ver\' poor condition. A contract for making the neces- 
sary repairs was entered into with ^Martin J. Kelly 
Compan}^, Inc. Work was commenced March 29, 
1950, and was completed August 25, 1950, at a cost of 
824,342.16. 

Repairs to the Fairmount Avenue Bridge, over the New 
York, New Haven A Hartford Railroad. 
Due to the poor condition of the wearing surface 
and underplank of this bridge, a contract was entered 
into with John F. Shea Company, Inc., for removing 
the asphalt plank wearing surface, renewing defective 
underplank, and laying a new bituminous concrete 
wearing surface. The work included removing the 



Public Works Department. 49 

stairway located on the inbound railroad side of the 
bridge. Work commenced on July 24, 1950, and was 
completed November 21, 1950, at a cost of §10,780.24. 

Removing the Drawspcm, Approach Sections, etc., of the 
Meridian Street Bridge. 
In connection with providing a 175-foot waterway 
at the site of the Aleridian Street Bridge, as ordered by 
the U. S. Army Engineers, and as the first step toward 
the rebuilding of this bridge, a contract was entered 
into with M. & R. Construction Company for removing 
the entire drawspan and foundation, the entire Chelsea 
approach, and approximately 142 feet of the East 
Boston approach. The work was commenced on June 12, 
1950, and is still in progress. Payments for this work to 
date total §35,187.02. The estimated cost of com- 
pletion is $43,200. 

Repairs to Roadioay and Pile Bents of Warren Bridge. 

The roadway plank and paving and the pile bents 
were repaired and strengthened under three contracts 
with A. Orlando, Inc. 

Work on the first contract commenced April 20, 
1950, and was completed August 11, 1950, at a cost of 
§30,219.18. 

Work on the second contract commenced Septem- 
ber 12, 1950, and was completed November 11, 1950, 
at a cost of 822,652.46. 

Work on the third contract was commenced Novem- 
ber 1, 1950, and was completed November 20, 1950, 
at a cost of 88,972.96. 

Resurfacing the Warren Bridge Approaches. 
Upon completion of the necessary roadwa}' repairs, 
a contract was entered into with Warren Brothers Com- 
pany for placing bituminous concrete wearing surface 
on both approach roadways. Work commenced Octo- 
ber 24, 1950, and w^as completed November 29, 1950, 
at a cost of 811,431.13. 

Repairing Sidewalk on West Newton Street Bridge. 
A contract was entered into with Atlantic Steel Com- 
pany for renewing the southwesterly sidewalk. Work 
was commenced October 4, 1950, and w^as completed 
November 5, 1950, at a cost of 82,094.04. 



50 



City Document No. 24. 



Yard Forces. 

The yard forces made repairs on 30 bridges, the work 
varying in extent from minor repairs to such operations 
as renewing or rebuilding entire wooden roadway decks, 
sidewalks, aprons, etc. Included in such work was the 
rebuilding of the drawspan roadway on the Broadway 
Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 

Typical work included patch planking on roadways, 
sidewalks, pier platforms, stairways, etc.; repairing, 
cleaning, and painting drawhouses, controller houses, 
machinery housings, fences, roadway gates, etc.; regu- 
lating bascule bridge counterweights as required; re- 
pairing floats, sand boxes, and coal bins. 

The maintenance force also cleaned sidewalks and 
stairways of the intown area during tlie year, removing 
snow, refuse, etc. 

Ordinary electrical and machinery maintenance work 
was done by the electrician and machinists. 



Ferry Service. 
The following ferryboats are in commission: 



Xame. 


When T ii 
Built. Length. 


Gross 
Tons. 


Charles C. Donoghue 

Daniel A. ]\IaeCormack 

Ralph J. Palumbo* 


1926 
1926 
1930 


174 feet, 4 inches 
174 feet, 4 inches 
174 feet, 4 inches 


756.77 
756.77 
779 



* The City Council passed an order on April 3, 1950, approved by the Mayor April 4, 
1 950, authorizing tlie sale at public auction of this boat, which ^\as no longer needed to 
maintain efficient ferry service. The boat was sold for S22,.500 and it is estimated that 
the City will save approximately $26,000 annually in decreased maintenance costs, etc. 

These boats are of the propeller type and are steel 
boats. 

The work of this service for the }'ear consisted of the 
following: 



Miscellaneous Repairs to Ferryboat 
"Daniel A. MacCormack." 

A contract was entered into with General Ship and 
Engine ^^'orks Company, Inc., for routine repairs. 
Work commenced May 31, 1950, and was completed 
June 30, 1950, at a cost of $3,866.42. 



Public Works Department, 51 

Cleaning and Painting Hull of Ferryboat 

''Charles C. Donoghue.'' 

A contract was entered into with James B. Alunro 

for the annual cleaning, painting, and repairing of the 

hull. AVork was commenced Julv 28, 1950 and was 

completed August 17, 1950, at a cost of $9,343.50. 

General Repairs to Ferryboat "Charles C. Do?ioghue." 
A contract was entered into with General Ship and 
Engine Works Compan}-, Inc., for making annual general 
repairs to this boat. Work commenced August 21, 
1950, and was completed November 16, 1950, at a 
cost of $53,011.01. 

Removing Ashes, etc., from the Ferryboats. 
A contract was awarded to Edward F. Butler on 
December 30, 1949, for removal of ashes from the ferry- 
boats. Work commenced January 1, 1950, and was 
completed December 31, 1950, at a cost of $2,453.64. 

Department Force. 
During the year machinists, carpenters, painters, 
riggers, and other mechanics, who are included in the 
personnel of the Ferry Service, made such repairs to 
the plant as the extent of materials and equipment at 
their disposal would permit. This work consisted 
mainly of minor repairs to the machinery on the boats, 
repairs to ferry bridge machinery, ferry bridge roadways, 
and head house repairs in general. 

SUMXER TUXXEL SERVICE. 

Renewing Traffic Signal Control Cables at the Sumner 

Tunnel. 
A contract for doing this work was awarded to 
Kenworthy & Taylor, Inc., on December 23, 1949. 
Work commenced Januarv 4, 1950, and was completed 
February 24, 1950, at a cost of $6,783. 

Repairing the Pavement of the Sumner Tunnel. 
A contract was entered into with Rufo Construction 
Company for making necessary repairs to the granite 
block pavement. Work commenced ]\[ay 1, 1950, and 
was completed June 17, 1950, at a cost of $7,212.50. 



0\L 



City Document No. 24. 



Cleaning ike Surface Drainage System of the Sumner 

Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with James A. Freaney, 

Inc., for a periodic maintenance cleaning of the drainage 

sj'stem. Work was commenced September 12, 1950, 

and was completed October 4, 1950, at a cost of $2,538. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct and Exhaust Fan Rooms at the 
Sumner Tunnel. 
A contract was entered into with Chemical Fire and 
Rust Proofing Company for a periodic maintenance 
cleaning of the exhaust system. Work was commenced 
November 13, 1950, at a cost of $1,755. 

Installing New Steam Boiler with Oil Burner in the 
London Street Garage of the Sumner Tunnel. 
A contract was entered into with Atlantic Steel 
Company to install a new unit to replace the original 
boiler and burner which had become badly worn and 
inefficient in operation. Work was commenced Novem- 
ber 6, 1950, and was completed December 20, 1950, at 
a cost of $2,222.22. 

Summary of Operations During 1950. 

1. Vehicular Traffic. 

1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

Total 8,432,721 8,748,102 8,784,545 9,162,266 9,283,700 

Monthly Average 702,727 729,014 729,545 703,522 773,641 

Weekly Average 162,168 168,234 168,356 176,197 178,045 

Daily Average 23,103 23,968 23,920 25,171 25,435 

2. Power. 

1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

Total Kilowatts 5,809,371 5.133,526 5,179,596 4,403,936 4,331,103 

Number ol■^'ehicles. . . 7,223,702 8,748,102 9,784,545 9,162,266 9,283,700 

3. Garage Service. 

1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

Tow Jobs 327 321 358 242 285 

4. Booth Red Signal. 

1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 

Booth Red On 5 4 21 16 11 

Total Duration 

(:\linutes) 57 51 146 83 150 

5. Fii^es. 

There was one slight fire in a passenger car — minor damage. 



Public Works Department. 53 

6. Motors, Fans, and Compressors. 

All of the 28 fan motors arc in good working condition and 
are operating efficiently. 

The oil and grease in all fans have been changed at regular 
intervals, as per schedule. 

The 28 fan controllers are in good operating condition; 
adjustments and repairs were made as required. 

7. Transformers, Circuit Breakers, and Relays. 

All transformers (20) have been tested by the Boston Edison 
Company for oil acidity and new oil has been added as required. 

All circuit breakers have been tested and reset as required 
for the correct voltage operation. 

All relays have been inspected, tested, and reset to increase 
safety in operation of equipment. 

8. Carhon Monoxide Equipment. 

All four carbon monoxide analyzers are operating, adjust- 
ments have been made and chemicals added, as per schedule. 

The four Micro-Max recorders used in connection with the 
analyzers are recording properly. 

9. Toll Equipment. 

All twelve (12) toll registers are operating correctly, all toll 
registers are under constant super^dsion, all relays and counters 
are adjusted and replaced as required. 

Routine insulation tests of all cables and Aviring have been 
made. Pressure tests of treadles indicate all are in good work- 
ing condition. All defective and faulty treadles have been 
repaired or replaced as required. 

10. Pumps. 

Various changes were made to foot valves and piping to 
improve the operation of the pumps. Similar changes and 
adjustments were made to float switches, valves, etc., in portal 
pump rooms. Repairs to motors and controls were made as 
required. 

11. Storage Batteries. 

The storage batteries are under strict supervision and 
maintenance and are in first-class condition. Each ventilating 
building has a set of 60 storage batteries. 

12. Traffic Signals. 

Defective relays and controls are replaced as needed. All 
broken glass and lenses are replaced as needed. Defective 
contacts were renewed and replaced. 



54 City Document No. 24. 

13. Motor Generators. 

The four motor generators arc under a regular maintenance 
schedule whereby all repairs to brushes, controls, and com- 
mutators are repaired and adjusted as may be needed. All 
motor generators are operating efficiently. 

14. Telephone System. 

Repairs and replacements to defective hand sets, relays, 
cords and jacks were made as required. 

15. Tunnel, General. 

On March 25, 1950, the Boston Ti-affic Commission moved 
from the third floor of the Tunnel Administration Building to 
their new building on Southampton street, Boston. This 
area is now being used by the Sumner Tunnel as a locker room 
and an office for the Bridge Service field engineers. 

The towing charges for the removal of vehicles from the 
Tunnel were abolished as of December 31, 1950. 

On September 20, 1950, new machines Avere purchased and 
are used b}?- the tollman, whereby a statement of his daily 
accounts is recorded and sent in with the receipts to the 
cashier's office, a carbon copy being retained in the machine, 
which is later sent to the Auditor's office at City Hall. 

On September 1, 1950, the City Treasurer publicly notified 
the holders of 4 per cent Traffic Tunnel Bonds, City of Boston 
($4,000,000), that these bonds were being called in for retire- 
ment and cancellation. 

Work for Other Divisions. 
Sanitary Division. 

Dredging at the Albany Street Receiving Station, Albany 
Street, Boston. 
This division made preliminary surveys and prepared 
specifications for dredging the slips at the Alhanj' street 
station. A contract was entered into with Bay State 
Dredging Compan}- for this \A'ork. Work commenced 
August 30, 1950, and was completed September 1, 1950, 
at a cost of $3,927.80. 



Public Works Department, 



55 



Bridge Service. 



Financial Statement for 1950. 

Expenditures fro7n Maintenance Appropriation. 

Boston Jiridges $716,270 39 



'Total Expenditures. 

From Maintenance Appropriation 

From Special Appropriations .... 



$716,270 39 
274,661 62 

$990,932 01 



Expenditures on Boston Bridges. 
Administration. 
Salaries: 

Division engineer 

Engineers, inspectors, clerks . 
Supervisor, deputy supervisor 

Office. 

Printing, postage, stationery 

Traveling expenses 

Office supplies 

Engineers' instruments, new and repaired 
Typewriter and adding machine service 

Blue print room 

Binding 

Miscellaneous 



$3,549 53 


69,653 


68 


7,581 


59 


$1,609 35 


212 


47 


394 01 


57 


95 


63 


78 


65 


54 


14 


75 


344 24 



),784 80 



2,762 09 
$83,546 89 



Yard and Stockroom. 



Yard. 
Clerks, yardman, and watchmen 
Holiday, sick leave, and vacations 
Traveling expenses . 
Tools, new and repaired . 

Telephone 

Repairs in j^ard 

New intercommunication system 

Fuel 

Light 

Supplies and miscellaneous 
Auto equipment 



Stockroom. 

Stock purchased 
Stock u.sed 



17,784 09 

6,788 97 

291 83 

2,506 70 

452 73 

1,439 41 

138 25 

689 86 

330 94 

1,006 74 

8,276 90 



$23,597 93 
18,707 84 



$39,706 42 



Increase in stock 



4,890 09 



$44,596 51 



56 



City Document No. 24. 

Tidewater Bridges, 1950. 



Bridges. 



Drawtenders' 
Salaries. 



Mechanics' 
Wages. 



Material. 



Repair 
BUls. 



Supplies. 



Total. 



Broadway 

Charlestown 

Chelsea North •^ . . , 

Chelsea South 

Chelsea Street 

Congress Street . . . . 

Dover Street 

L Street t 

]\Ialden 

Meridian Street J. . 
Northern A^■cnue . . 

Summer Street 

Warren 



$31: 
52, 
C 
32 
39, 
3C 
32 
40, 
44, 
23 
41 
38, 
36 



147 77 
957 80 
C20 36 
809 82 
797 92 
624 44 
073 83 
005 05 
034 14 
586 48 
246 15 
366 61 
001 44 



$11,577 82 
5,741 24 
1,088 46 
1,380 98 
3,519 19 
1,900 54 
3,611 66 
3,318 30 
1,566 74 
1,367 96 
7,835 86 
5,203 11 
8,716 46 



$2,786 24 

2,068 27 

49 80 

266 44 

482 31 

594 67 

1,224 80 
737 24 
173 34 
137 06 

2,772 37 
583 80 

8,210 41 



$747 94 

1,719 09 

231 77 

654 29 

1,773 42 

77 53 

1,079 78 

966 52 

479 68 

345 87 

4,431 88 

2,815 38 

1,959 13 



$710 13 

1,011 14 
198 30 
816 83 

1,010 95 
702 71 
594 51 
785 30 
858 49 
420 38 

2,978 05 
473 35 
798 80 



$40,969 9i, 
03,498 U 

8,188 ;.■ 

35.928 3t, 

46.583 8(1 
39,899 8'- 

38.584 o> 
45,812 4. 
47,112 35 

25,857 ;: 

59,264 31 
47,442 2.- 
55,686 24 



Totals . 



455,271 82 



$56,828 32 



820,086 81 



$17,282 88 



$11,358 90 



$560,828 r: 



* Bridge closed permanently March 6, 1950. 
t Now Summer Street, over Reserved Channel, 
j Bridge closed for rebuilding June 12, 1950. 



Repairs on Inland Bridges, 1950. 



Bridges. 



and 
Material. 


$199 00 


655 49 


297 15 


1,270 61 


1,467 56 


759 34 


113 60 


178 07 


274 27 


234 55 


300 00 


1.50 49 


436 24 


1,735 94 



Babson Street 

Belgrade Avenue 

Bennington Street 

Boylston Street 

Blakemore Street 

Broadway Extension 

Byron Street 

Camden Street — Gainsborough Street (foot) 

Clarendon Street, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 

Dana Avenue 

Dartmouth Street (rent) 

Dorchester Avenue at Kempton Street 

Durham Street - West Walnut Park (foot) 

Everett Street, Allston 

Carried forward 



$8,072 31 



Public Works Department. 

Repairs on Inland Bridges. — Concluded. 



57 



Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Material. 



Brought forward 

Everett Street, East Boston 

Fairmount Avenue 

Harvard Street 

Irvington Street - Yarmouth Street (foot) 

Jones Avenue (foot) 

Massachusetts Avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 

Milton Lower Mills 

Norfolk Street 

Perkins Street (foot) 

Public Landing, Northern Avenue 

Redfield Street 

Sprague Street 

Southampton Street 

Summer Street, over A Street 

ToU Gate Way 

West Fourth Street 

West Newton Street 

Winthi-op 

Cleaning bridges 

Snow and sanding 

Other services 



$8,072 31 

2,218 00 

195 8o 

67 95 

146 85 

803 71 

821 25 

206 55 

105 95 

243 90 

100 00 

334 45 

358 40 

192 25 

463 02 

886 59 

952 90 

95 37 

59 54 

5,604 00 

1,625 73 

3,743 65 



Total. 



827,298 22 



SUMMARY. 

Administration $83,546 89 

Yard and stock room 44,596 51 

Tidewater bridges 560,828 77 

Inland bridges 27,298 22 



Total 



$716,270 39 



58 



City Document No. 24. 



Special Appropriations. 
Bridges, Repairs, etc. 



AUston Bridge: 

Eastern Contracting Company $17,243 21 

Bennington Street Bridge, over Boston, Revere 
Beach it Lj-nn Railroad: 

Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc 10,624 39 

Belgrade Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc 8,818 75 

Bojdston Street Bridge: 

Eastern Contracting Company . . . S263 21 

John F. Shea Compan}^, Inc. . . . 7,072 00 

Analysis of paint 30 00 

Advertising 28 53 

7,393 71 

Broadway Bridge: 

Material — lumber and nails 8,887 33 

Charlestown Bridge: 

Crandall Engineering Company . . $73,140 26 

Frederick W. Byron . . . . . 5,358 20 

Industrial Welding Company . . . 1,578 30 

Advertising 80 00 

80,156 76 

Chelsea Street Bridge: 

General Ship and Engine Works, Inc. . .|2,511 62 
Advertising 23 50 

2,535 02 

Dover Street Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc. . . $24,342 16 
Advertising 26 00 

24,368 16 

Everett Street Bridge, over Boston, Revere 

Beach & Lynn Railroad: 

Lumber $1,394 41 

New concrete bituminous surface . . 508 36 

1,902 77 

Fairmount Avenue Bridge: 

John F. Shea Company, Inc. . . . $9,163 10 
Advertising 28 50 

9,191 60 

Public Landing, Northern Avenue: 

Advertising 26 50 

Northern Avenue Bridge: 

New bushings 1,055 19 

Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel: 

W. H. EUis & Son Company . . . $3,828 37 
Advertising 74 50 

3,902 87 

Temple Street Bridge: 

Coleman-Doyle Company 2,291 44 



Public Works Department. 

Wanon Bridge: 

A. Orlando, Inc .S60,488 36 

Material — lumber 874 30 

Advertising 53 00 

West Newton Street Bridge: 

Atlantic Steel C oinpany .... .'$2,094 04 

Advertising 26 oO 



59 



$61,41.5 IKl 



2,120 54 
§214,934 20 



Bridges — Construction of. 



Meridian Street Bridge: 

M & R Construction Company- 
Advertising .... 



§32,699 92 
27 50 



832,727 42 



Summary. 

Expenditures from Special Appropriations. 





Balances 
from 
1949. 


Total Credits, 

Including 

Balances 

Carried Over 

and Transfers. 


Expended 

During Year 

1950. 


Unexpended 

Balances 

December 31, 

1950. 


Bridges, repairs, etc 

Bridges, construction of . . 


$99,215 95 
2,348,153 42 


$449,215 95 
2,348,153 42 


$241,934 20 
32,727 42 


$207,281 75 
2,315,426 00 


Totals 


$2,447,369 37 


$2,797,369 37 


$274,661 62 


$2,522,707 75 





60 



City Document No. 24. 











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Public Works Department. 61 



Ferry Service. 



FiXAXciAL Statement for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1950. 

Toll Receipts. 

Total cash receipts during the year .... $2-1,522 31 

Cash in hands of tollmen at beginning of year . $60 00 

Cash paid to City Collector §24,522 31 

Cash in hands of tollmen at the end of the 3'ear . $60 00 

Breakdown of Toll Receipts for the Year 1950. 

From foot passengers $4,850 96 

From vehicles 19,671 35 



$24,522 31 



From Foot From 

Passengers. Vehicles. 

Boston side $2,401 89 $9,461 60 

East Boston side 2,449 07 10,209 75 

Totals $4,850 96 $19,671 35 

Additional Income Received by the Ferry. 

Telephone commissions 

Cleaning of telephone booth at ferry and rental of 

stand 

Concession, Mills Automatic 2^Ierchandising 

Corporation 

Sale of Ferryboat ''R. J. Palumbo";on April 12, 

1950 to the Delaware River Ferry Company, 

Louis Kapelski, Assistant Treasurer 

Travel ox the South Ferry From January 1, 

1950, to December 31, 1950. 
Foot passengers 485,096 

Handcart 4,881 

One - and two-horse vehicle with driver . . . 3,259 

Passenger auto with driver and one passenger . . 140,545 

Truck, six tons or less 19,999 

Truck, over six tons 11,050 



$26 


06 


$54 00 


$85 00 


$22,500 


00 



62 



City Document No. 24. 



Sumner Tunnel Service. 

Annual Traffic by Classification for the Year 1950. 

No. of 
Class. Toll. DE.scKn'Tio.\. Vehicles. 

1. SO 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor witliout trailer 541,857 

2. 20 Passenger car 8,430.357 

3. 20 :\Iotorcycle 2,604 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 

5 tons capacity 39,968 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer .... 11,099 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 

10 tons capacity 15,336 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 991 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity. Tractor with 

trailer over 10 tons capacity . . . 568 

9. 35 Bus with or without pas.sengers . . . 107 
* City-owned t 240,813 

Total traffic 9,283,700 

* MTA, Eastern JMassachusetts Railwa.^■, and Airways Transportation Company buses 
are included in this classification. (January 1 to .January 6, only.) 

t 724 J\ITA, 161,378 Eastern Massachusetts Railway, and 608 Airways Transportation 
Company buses at 35 cents are included in this total. 





Comparative Annual Traffic Count. 




1946 


1947 


1948 1949 


1950 


8,432,721 


8,748,162 


8,754,545 


9,162,260 


9,283,700 



Sumner Tuxxel. 

Comparison of Receipts, Expenditures, Interest and Sinking Fund Requirements, 

1946 to 1950, Inclusive. 



1946 



1947 



1948 



1949 



1950 



Operating expenditure 

Balance to next j'ear 

Interest requirements 

Sinking fund requirements . 



S334,345 
14,256 
831.207 
t 



§395,060 35 

11,850 05 

875,673 75 

t 
t2 80 



.S428,733 58 

4,298 18 

836,876 25 

t 



.5482,982 71 S464,.522 41 



837,611 25 

t 



832,453 73 
J 92 20 



Total expenses. 



81,179,809 55 



.Sl,282,.586 95 



$1,269,908 01 



■SI, 320,593 96 



$1,297,068 3« 



Receipts 

Balance from previous year . 



§1,709,491 
6,293 



.51,758,149 30 
14,256 34 



51,776,655 00 
11,850 05 



51,853,049 84 
4,298 18 



81,863,035 00 



Total receipts . 



51,715,784 00 



51,772,405 64 



51,788,505 05 



81,857,348 02 



81,863,035 00 



Xet result. 



* $535,974 45 * 8489,818 69 



* 5518,597 04 



* 5536,754 06 * $565,966 64 i 



* Excess. 



t Xone required. 



t Refunded tolk. 



Public Works Department. 63 



II — HIGHWAY SECTION. 

Paving Service. 

Summary of Budget Appropriations. 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation for 1950 $1,243,484 00 

Expenditures 1,233,367 29 



Balance unexpended S10,116 71 

Reconstruction of Streets. 

Appropriation for 1950 $215,076 71 

Expenditures 106,976 44 



Balance unexpended $108,100 27 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue). 

Appropriation for 1950 $161,092 11 

Expenditures 158,890 82 



Balance unexpended $2,201 29 

Public Ways, Construction of (Non-Revenue). 

Appropriation for 1950 $3,678,739 82 

Expenditures 1,937,386 42 



Balance unexpended $1,741,353 40 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of. 

Appropriation for 1950 $114,530 60 

Expenditures 66,945 34 



Balance unexpended $47,585 26 

Snow Removal. 

Appropriation for 1950 $408,785 85 

Expenditures 392,247 12 



Balance unexpended $16,538 73 

Street Signs. 

Appropriation for 1950 $11,534 32 

Expenditures 8,354 09 



Balance unexpended $3,180 23 



64 City Document No. 24. 

The amount of money taken through the Permit 
Office was $29,053.16; of this amount $25,646.66 was 
deposited with the City Collector and $3,406.50 was 
billed to the Public Service Corporations. There are 
now on file 2,288 bonds protecting the City of Boston 
against claims that may be made on account of the 
permits issued. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patch- 
ing permanent pavements, such as asphalt and granite 
l^lock, and maintaining gravel, brick and artificial stone 
sidewalks. In the snow removal season, division forces 
were engaged in spreading rock salt and sand on icy 
streets ancl also supervised plowing work done through- 
out the City by 247 contractors' hired plows after four 
snowstorms. Yard foremen and engineers supervised 
the operations of contractors hired on a force-account 
basis to remove snow with loaders, trucks, etc., after 
two snowstorms. All snow removal bills for plowing, 
hauling, force-account work, etc., were processed 
through the Highway Section office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing old street signs: 

147 Street sign posts erected. 

30 Hero street sign posts erected. 

702 Street sign name plates installed. 

72 Bent or broken posts repaired. 

87 Hero signs replaced. 

670 Street sign posts and frames painted. 

74 Street sign frames repaired. 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 137 streets during the year, and 85 
were completed. Work was also completed on 54 
streets that were unfinished from 1949. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares recon- 
structed during the year were: 

Albany street, City Proper, from Broadway to Massa- 
chusetts avenue. 

Beacon street, Brighton, from Brookline line to Park 
Drive. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, from American Legion High- 
wav to Grove Hall. 



Public Works Department. 65 

Blue Hill avenue, Roxbuiy, from Dudley street to Warren 
street. 

Boston street, Dorchester, from railroad bridge to Columbia 
road. 

Bromfield street, City Proper, from Tremont street to 
Washington street. 

Columbia road, Dorchester, from Edward Everett square 
to Blue Hill avenue. 

Essex street. City Proper, from Washington street to 
Atlantic avenue. 

Faneuil street, Brighton, from Market street to Goode- 
nough street. 

St. James avenue, City Proper, from Arlington street to 
Berkeley street. 

Warren street, Roxbur}', from Dudley street to Blue Hill 
avenue. 

Washington street, Dorchester, from Talbot avenue to 
Bowdoin street. 

Washington street, Dorchester, from Bowdoin street to 
Columbia road. 

Washington street, Dorchester, from Columbia road to 
Blue Hill avenue. 

Western avenue, Brighton, from Soldiers Field road to 
northeast of Market street. 

Winter street. City Proper, from Washington street to 
Tremont street. 

The Paving Service of the Highway' Section did not 
get started on a program of building highways and side- 
walks until ^lay, 1950. 

Because of the shortage of engineers in this division, 
engineers were borrowed from another division and 
trained in highway construction. 

It was necessary to work the engineers nights, 
Saturdays, and Sundays, as streets in downtown 
Boston had to be constructed nights and over week ends. 

A new system was initiated in the checking of the 
construction of highways to guarantee that the City 
received the dollar value of the construction. Cores 
were taken at certain intervals to test the depth of the 
pavements and sidewalks. Another method of check- 
ing was by cross-section and the signed ticket method. 

A close watch was kept on all jobs by the Public 
Works Commissioner and his principal assistants and 
various other aides. The City of Boston has received, 
this year, more dollar value in construction than ever 
before. 



60 City Document No. 24. 

Some of the arteries resurfaced this year were Blue 
Hill avenue, from Dudley- street to Grove Hall; 
Albany street, from Broadway to Massachusetts avenue; 
Washington street, Dorchester, from Grove Hall to 
Codman square; Boston street, from railroad bridge 
to Edward Everett square. 

Streets resurfaced in downtown Boston, nights and 
week ends, were: Chatham street, Commerce street, 
La Grange street, Lewis street, ^Mercantile street, Mer- 
chants Row, Tamworth street. Elm street, Friend 
street, Kingston street. Union street, Bromfield street, 
Winter street, Essex street, Harrison avenue, Battery- 
march street. Broad street. Central street, Congress 
street. Milk street, Wendell street. Wharf street, St. 
James avenue, Eisen street, Albany street. Custom House 
street, and Columbia street — for a total of four miles, 
and at a cost of $275,000. 

In the Brighton district the following streets were 
constructed or resurfaced: Summit avenue, Sutherland 
road, Denby road, Atkins street, Hunnewell avenue. 
Presentation road. Oak Square avenue, Arlington street, 
Duncklee street, Etna street, Faneuil street, widened 
from Market street to Parsons street; Harriet street, 
Lane park, Langley road. Tip Top street, Guest street. 
Life street, Beechcroft street, Brook street, Turner 
street, Warren street — for a total of four miles, and 
at a cost of S260,000. 

In the Jamaica Plain-West Roxl^ury district the 
following streets were constructed: Brookley road, 
Rossmore road, Williams street, Hyde Park avenue, 
from Forest Hills square to Walk Hill street; Call 
street, Amory street, Albano street, Bradwood street, 
Gloria road, Walk Hill street, Annafran street, Rosecliff 
street, Whitford street. Haslet street, Gilman street, 
Manning street, Corey street, Archclale road, Biltmore 
street, Malcolm road, Seaverns avenue, Whitcomb 
aA'enue, Sunnybank road. Freeman avenue, Acacia 
road, Ansonia road, Worley street, Ennis road — for a 
total of six miles, and at a cost of S305,000. 

In the Hyde Park area the following streets were 
constructed: Avila road, Linwoocl street, Valencia 
road, Hautevale street, West street, Skyline road, 
Gilman street, Mattakeeset street, Garfield avenue, 
Washington street, Imbaro road, Blake street — for 
a total of approximately three miles, and at a cost of 
S17o,000. 



Public Works Department. 67 

111 the Dorchester district the following streets were 
constructed: Holmfield avenue, Driscoll Drive, Lom- 
bard street, Rangcley street, Hill Top street. Park 
street. Crescent avenue, Greenbrier street, Ripley road, 
Buttonwood street, Hinckley street, INIorrill street, 
Rowell street, Wilbur street — for a total of approxi- 
mately five and one-half miles, and at a cost of $250,000 . 

In the Roxbur}' district the following streets were 
constructed: Bjamer street, Catawba street, Cheney 
street, Hutchings street, Laurel street, Haviland street. 
Day street, Oswald street, Wensley street, Warren 
street. Blue Hill avenue, Gay Head street. Terrace 
street — for a total of approximatelv four miles, and 
at a cost of S200,000. 

In the Charlestown district the following streets were 
constructed: Harvard street, Laurel street. Union 
street. Call street, Chelsea street. Joiner street — for 
a total of about one mile, and at a cost of $42,000. 

Miscellaneous streets in South Boston and East Bos- 
ton amounted to approximatelv one mile, and at a cost 
of $53,000. 

The grand total in miles of streets constructed and 
reconstructed amounts to twenty-eight and five-tenths, 
and the cost of same amounts to $1,560,000. 

In every district defective sidewalks were replaced, 
and $110,000 was spent to eliminate, as far as possible, 
this hazard. This was the greatest of all years for 
sidewalk construction. 

In Charlestown, brick sidewalks were replaced b}' 
artificial stone in the following streets: Bojde street, 
Cordis street, Edgeworth street, Frothingham avenue, 
Henley street, Ludlow street. South Eden street, Sul- 
livan street — $16,000 was spent for 50,000 square feet 
of sidewalks, at the low cost of 31 cents per square foot. 

In the East Boston district $23,000 was spent re- 
placing defective brick sidewalks with artificial stone 
in the following streets: Addison street, Princeton 
street, Putnam street, White street. Breed street, Bre- 
men street, Xeptune road. These were replaced at the 
low cost of 33 cents per square foot. 

In the South Boston district $24,801 was spent to 
replace 76,000 square feet of defective brick sidewalk 
with artificial stone, at the low cost of 32 cents per 
square foot, in the following streets: East Second 



68 



City Document No. 24. 



street, East Fifth street, East Sixth street, Columbia 
road, Farragut road, I street, P street, and Brewster 
street. 

Contracts for re-laying sidewalks in Dorchester have 
not been completed, but approximately 130,000 has 
been awarded for this purpose. 

More money was obtained from the state for chapter 
90 work than ever before. This sum amounted to 
•S350,000, and was used on some of our main arteries: 
Columbia road, from Edward Everett square to Blue 
Hill avenue — the twent^'-five foot reservation was 
reduced to a seven-foot divisional strip and permitted 
I'ebuilding two new roadways to eliminate traffic con- 
gestion. 

Blue Hill avenue was likewise widened and recon- 
structed, from Grove Hall to American Legion Highwa3^ 

Western avenue, Brighton, was rebuilt, from ^Market 
street to Soldiers Field road. 

Contracts have been awarded to l^uild with state aid, 
the following streets: River street, Dorchester, from 
Blue Hill avenue to Pierce square; Centre street. West 
Roxbury, from May street to Weld street; Washington 
street. West Roxbury, from Walk Hill street to Ros- 
lindale square. 

Approximately $200,000 was spent by the district 
yard forces in building or rebuilding new or defective 
sidewalks with cement concrete or bituminous concrete. 
Old pavements were constantly patched or covered b}' 
these forces throughout the year. 

A special unit used as shock troops aided in repairing 
six major water l^reaks that occurred during the year. 



Lighting Service. 
Expenditures, January 1, 1950, to December 31, 1950, 
Electric Lighting: 

Boston Edison Company . $867,006 16 
Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany 35,060 98 

Gas Lighting: 

American Service Company . $90,601 19 
Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pany 89,552 40 



$902,067 14 



180,153 59 



Public Works Department, 



69 



Salaries and Wages: 

Division Engineer (part of) 
Executive clerk . 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Lamp inspector . 


$57 73 
3,891 32 
1,166 43 
2,297 73 
3,193 08 


810,606 29 
30,592 10 

152 20 

29,028 17 


Construction: 

Installing, removing and re 
locating lamps 

Ojficc Ex-penses: 

Printing .... 
Postage .... 
Advertising 


$30,592 10 

$103 20 
26 00 
23 00 


Miscellaneous: 
Electric posts 

Globes, domes, mantles, etc. 
Gasoline .... 


$1,171 15 

27,835 76 

21 26 






Total .... 

Total appropriations 
Total expenditures 

Unexpended balance 


$1,152,599 49 

$1,162,460 86 
1,152,599 49 

$9,861 37 



The following is a statement of the work done by the 
Lighting Service during 1950: 

Electric lamps of 2,000 c.p. (twin 1,000) were in- 
stalled on Columbia road (69), Blue Hill avenue (10), 
Dorchester. 

Electric lamps of 1,500 c.p. were installed on Chelsea 
street (26), Park street (1), Warren street (1), Water 
street (9), Ferrin street (1), Charlestown. 

Electric lamps of 1,000 c.p. were installed on Chis- 
wick road (1), Brighton; Spice street (1), Charlestown; 
St. James avenue (1), Tremont street (1), Warren 
avenue (1), City Proper; Columbia road (20), Gallivan 
Boulevard fl), Gibson street (4), Dorchester; Ashley 
street (2), London street (1), Princeton street (1), East 
Boston; River street (1), Hyde Park; Blue Hill avenue 
(1), Centre street (1), Crawford street (1), Dudley 



70 City Documext No. 24. 

street (1), Roxbiuy; Dorchester avenue (3), East Broad- 
way (1), East Third street (1), West First street (1), 
Old Harbor street (1), South Boston; American Legion 
Highway (1), Brookside avenue (2), Spring street (1), 
Wahiut avenue (1), West Roxbur3\ 

Electric lamps of 600 c.p. were installed on Roland 
street (2), Charlestown; Blue Hill avenue (11), Dor- 
chester; Old Harbor street (8), South Boston; Hyde 
Park avenue (1), West Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 400 c.p. were installed on Groton 
street (1), Lenox street (2), Mayo street (1), City Proper; 
Ditson street (2), Dorchester; East Fourth street (2), 
East Third street (2), Midway street (8), West Fifth 
street (1), South Boston; Brookside avenue (9), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 250 c.p. were installed on Lome 
street (5), Marmion street (4), Wilson street (1), Frank- 
lin Hill avenue (5), Harvard street (6), Austin street 
(1), these latter lamps were increased from 100 to 250 
c.p. All these lamps are in the West Roxbury district. 

During the year 157 lamps of 100 c.p. were installed 
in various suburban areas and 1,163 gas lamps were 
removed and replaced b}" an equal number of electric 
lamps of 100 c.p. 

Electric fire alarm lamps were installed on Chelsea 
street (2), Decatur street (1), Joiner street (1), Main 
street (2), Rutherford avenue (1), Charlestown; Dor- 
chester avenue (1), Draper street (1), Westville street 
(1), Willowwood street (1), Dorchester; Turtle Pond 
Parkway (2), Hyde Park; Ashley street (1), Chestnut 
avenue (1), Cobden street (1), Creighton street (1), 
Fisher avenue (1), Gay Head street (1), Harold street 
(1), Hayden street (1), Heath street (1), Homestead 
street (1), Hutchins street (1), Quincy street (1), Ster- 
ling street (1), Warren street (1), Winthrop street (1), 
Roxbury; Beech street (1), Brown avenue (1), Cvmimins 
Highway (1), Eldridge street (1), Florence street (1), 
Forest Hills street (1), Glendower road (1), Metropoli- 
tan avenue (1), Prospect avenue (1), Sevmour street 
(1), South street (1), Walworth street (1), West 
Roxburv. 



Public Works Department. 



71 



Paving Service. 
Street Work Done in 1950 by Contract. 



Summary. 
Earth and water box excavation 
Rock and wall excavation . 

Bank gravel 

Crushed stone .... 
Existing concrete base removed . 
Existing pavement removed 
Straight edgestone set . 
Circular edgestone set . 

Corners set 

Precast straight edgestone set 
Edgestone reset .... 
Concrete base, Class B, 6 inches in 

depth 

Extra concrete .... 
Bituminous macadam base . 
Granite block pavement 
Granite block hip gutters . 
Three-inch sheet asphalt pavement 
One and one-half-inch sheet asphalt 

pavement .... 
Asphalt binder 

Bituminous concrete pavement 
Bituminous concrete base . 
Artificial stone sidewalks 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks 
Artificial stone foundation . 
Covers reset .... 
Bradley heads reset 
Courses of brick . 
Concrete around boxes 
Loam spaces .... 
Parking meters reset 



69,534 
822 

63,340 
1,922 
8,271 

38,937 

37,601 

2,599 

1,764 

680 

56,212 



cubic yards, 
cubic yards, 
tons, 
tons. 

square yards, 
square yards, 
linear feet, 
linear feet. 

linear feet, 
linear feet. 



33,199 square yards. 

78 cubic yards. 
57,432 square j'ards. 

405 square yards. 

646 square yards. 
74,084 square j^ards. 



169,401 

13,340 

7,258 

57,291 

851,410 

18,490 

8,333 

3,655 

9 

6,599 

178 

154 

43 



square yards, 
tons, 
tons, 
tons. 

square feet, 
square yards, 
cubic yards. 



cubic yards, 
square yards. 



Yearly Report of Work Done by 
Forces for 1950. 



Department 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks 
Block gutters, laid . 
Granite block roadwaj', laid 
Edgestone reset (old) . 
Macadam roadway patched 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Street cleaning 
Snow removal 



9,284 

7,750 

3,812 

147,087 

38,290 

207 

384 

4,773 

117,631 

8,137 

8,492 

37,140 



square yards, 
square yards, 
square feet, 
square feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
linear feet, 
square yards, 
square yards, 
cubic yards, 
cubic yards. 



72 



City Document No. 24. 






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Public Works Department, 73 

APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1951. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Herewith, I submit a statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sanitary Division of the PubHc 
Works Department for the vear ending December 31, 
1950: 

This report is a departure, in some respects, from 
those of previous years, particularly in the method of 
arriving at the true cost of the work done. In the past, 
with the exception of the reports for the years 1938 to 
1943, inclusive, there was shown merely a distribution 
of the budget appropriations of the Sanitary Division, 
but since important elements of cost were not included 
in the item of motor vehicles, the true cost of operations 
could not be obtained. 

In the years from 1938 to 1943, inclusive, the Sanitary 
Division received reports on the costs of individual 
vehicles, and these were added to the Sanitary Division 
appropriations, thus giving an approach to the true 
cost. However, these records were discontinued in 
1944. 

In 1950, with the institution of the Automotive 
Division, there was made available to us a complete 
breakdown of all motor vehicle costs, including deprecia- 
tion. By including the total amount chargeable to the 
Sanitary Division, it is now possible to arrive ver\- 
closely at the true cost of operations. 

These considerations should be borne in mind in 
comparing this report with those of previous j'ears. 

An examination of the expenditures for the last 20 
years shows a drop from $3,175,568.77 in 1930 to a 
'4ow" in 1940 of $2,031,260.58, rising steadily to a 
''high" in 1949 amounting to $5,419,665.82. In 1950, 
however, these expenditures decrea.sed to $5,098,726.84. 



74 City Document No. 24. 

The total cost of operations is arrived at as follows: 

Budget expenditures (paid) .... 15,098,726 84 
Budget expenditures (unpaid) .... 4,474 76 

IN'lotor vehicle charge 223,329 86 

Totarcost $5,326,531 46 

This cost falls into three main subdivisions, as follows : 

Contract waste collection and disposal . . 13,115,675 18 

Street cleaning 2,137,423 14 

Preventive street cleaning 73,433 14 

Total cost $5,326,531 46 

However, for the purpose of comparing with previous 
years, only the budget expenditures can be considered, 
and examination of these figures shows a decrease this 
year under last year amounting in all to $320,938.98, 
largely due to the placing of the South End district 
under contract. 

This decrease is further subdivided as follows: 

(a) Waste collection and disposal . . $239,701 80 

(6) Street cleaning 13,984 45 

(c) Other 67,252 73 

Total net decrease .... $320,938 98 



(a) Waste Collection and Disposal. — The decrease in 
the waste collection and disposal account is explained 
as follows: 

1. Decrease in collection and removal contracts $38^497 59 

2. Decrease in general disposal contract . 10,908 98 

3. Decrease in South End District payroll . 213,399 62 



$262,806 19 
Less amount of the South End District 

contract 152,400 00 

$110,406 19 
Elimination of motor vehicle expense and 
other items formerly in Sanitary Division 
budget 129,295 61 

Total net decrease $239,701 80 



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Public Works Department. 



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1. Decrease in Collection and Removal Contracts. — 
The waste collection and removal contracts for tlic 
year 1950 were approved by the previous, outgoinjj;, 
administration as follows: 

Contracts at same prices as in 1949 . . . $2,053,218 60 
New South End district contract . . 170,400 00 



Total 



§2,223,618 60 



These contracts, in the opinion of the Corporation 
Counsel, were invalid, and contracts for three months 
were negotiated at the same rates as the invalidated 
contracts, amounting to $555,904.65. 

For the remaining nine months of the year, however, 
a 2f per cent reduction in the contract prices was 
obtained in all districts except the South End. In the 
South End district the contract price was reduced by 
§2,000 per month for the nine months remaining in 1950. 

A comparison of the 1949 and 1950 contract expendi- 
tures follows: 



Co.\TR.\CT. 


1949 


1950 


1950 


3 Months. 


9 Months. 


Total. 


Invalidated. 


South End 


None. 
$2,053,218.60 


$42,600.00 
513,304.65 


$109,800.00 
1,501,416.36 


$152,400.00 
2,014,721.01 


$170,400.00 


Other 


2,053,218.60 






Total 


$2,053,218.60 


$555,904.65 


$1,611,216.36 


$2,167,121.01 


$2,223,618.60 



So that, not including the new South End district, there 
was a drop in 1950 in the expenditure for the contracts 
amounting to $38,497.59. Furthermore, the amount 
expended for the South End district was $18,000 less 
than had been contracted for by the previous adminis- 
tration, thus making a total saving of $56,497.59. 

2. Decrease in General Disposal Contract. — The dis- 
posal contract, which had been let by the previous 
administration in the amount of $581,807, was likewise 
declared invalid, and negotiated as follows: 



76 City Document No. 24. 

Three months at the 1949 rate of $48,483.91 or . $145,451 73 

Nine months at the rate (2h per cent cut) of 

$47,271.81 or . . ". . . . 425,446 29 



Total 1950 disposal contract .... $570,898 02 

This figure represents a saving in the disposal contract 
of $10,908.98. 

The total savings on account of the negotiation of the 
waste collection and removal and the disposal contracts 
amounted to $67,406.81. 

3. Decrease in South End District Payroll. — On 
January 1, 1950, the last remaining day-labor dis- 
trict, the South End, was placed under contract, so 
that the entire city is now being serviced by contractors. 
Because of the change in the South End district from 
day labor to contract, most of the men on that payroll 
were transferred to the street cleaning force, and the 
quota of the labor force was reduced to 444. During 
the year 1950, the number of these employees was 
reduced to 456, so that there remained 12 to go as of 
December 31, 1950. 

(5) Street Cleaning Decrease. — The net decrease in 
the street cleaning account was $13,984.45. Although 
there was an increase in the street cleaning payrolls, on 
account of the decrease in the waste collection payroll 
in the South End district, amounting to $213,399.62, 
this was offset by the decrease in the motor vehicle 
item, which is no longer a part of the Sanitary Division 
budget, and the transfer of men, who were formerh^ 
paid by the Sanitar^^ Division, from the garage to the 
Automotive Division payroll. In addition, there was a 
drop in the quota of the personnel which was in the 
process of liquidation, as noted above. 

(c) Other Items. — The decrease in other items, 
amounting to $67,252.73, is largely due to the fact 
that pension payments, which in 1949 amounted to 
$61,389.37, were paid by the Retirement Board in 1950, 
while the injured payroll, which in 1949 amounted to 
$4,498.03, is now being paid by the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Department. 



Public Works Department. 77 

Personnel changes in 'permanent force during the year 1950: 

Total personnel January 1, 1950 .... *870 
Transfers in (from other departments and divi- 
sions) 4 

New appointments 22 

Reinstatements 1 



Deaths .... 
Resignations . 
Retirements . 
Transfers out . 
Discharged or terminated 



897 



13 
4 
18 
31 
24 



90 

Total personnel Januar^^ 1, 1951 . . . *807 

* Includes one military leave. Net loss of 63 employees. 

Work Accomplished. — During this year, an engineer- 
ing report on incineration was made bj' Thomas Wor- 
cester, Inc. 

A contract was let for the construction of the founda- 
tion wall for a new office building at the South Boston 
District yard. 

Demolition of wooden buildings was accomplished at 
the Western Ayenue, Brighton, yard, and at the Gibson 
street, Dorchester, city yard. In the case of the Gibson 
Street yard building, the contractor removed all the 
material. The material from the Western Avenue 
building was retained by the city, and used in the con- 
struction of the Victory Road Garbage Transfer Station. 

Reconstruction was accomplished at the Victor}^ Road 
Garbage Transfer Station for the delivery of garbage in 
1951. A contract was let for the construction of con- 
crete footings on existing piles. A contract was also 
awarded for the construction and the framing of tlie 
platform, using material from the Western Avenue city 
yard, mentioned above. The decking, cribbing, and 
filling work was performed by city forces, and this recon- 
struction was completed on December 31. Thus, with 
the expenditure of about $2,500, for contracts, the city 
forces were able to make land, and create a facility 
which, conservatively, is worth over $20,000. 

One of the noteworthy achievements of the Public 
Works Department during the year 1950 was the adop- 
tion of a new policy in the storage of salt, and its imple- 
mentation by the forces of the Sanitary Division. 



78 



City Document No. 24. 



Formerly, salt was received b}' rail in l)ox cars, shov- 
elled by hand into trucks, and deposited into hoppers 
at Ward street for use as required on slippery streets. 

The new policy involves the decentralization of storage 
to 13 paving district yards. Each yard now^ has a 
mechanical loader which loads the local trucks. 

It is the function of the Sanitary Division to transfer 
the salt from the railroad to the various yards. 

The work of shovelling by hand is so arduous that it 
is often difhcult to procure sufficient men to do the work, 
with the result that cars have been delayed, and charges 
for demurrage frequent. 

Many experiments and devices were tried to improve 
these conditions, without success, until it was proposed 
to deposit the salt directly into trucks from the cars. 
To this end, the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad Company made available a trestle under which 
trucks could l^e driven, after alteration by the sanitarj^ 
shop forces. 

At first, box cars were chuted into the trucks, but this 
still required hand labor. Then, it was found that 
cement cars were available with drop-lDottom hoppers. 
The city forces cut openings at the proper locations, so 
that a car could be emptied directly into trucks below. 

All salt is now shipped in this wa^", with no hand labor 
required, and it is possible to empty a car in one and one- 
half hours instead of five or six. 

In addition to the above, a monthh' averaging agree- 
ment was entered into with the railroad company, with 
the result that there has been no demurrage charge for 
some months. 

Respectfull}^ submitted, 

Adolph J. Post* 
Division Engineer. 




Here Rock Salt for Street Application Is Dropped Directl\ from the Cement 
Cars into the Truck Below. Formerly. Men Had to Shovel the Salt onto the 
Ground from Box Cars and Load the Trucks by Hand. 



Public Works Department. 





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Public Works Department. 83 

APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



BosTox, January 2, Idol. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
expenditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1950. 

The activities of the Sewer Division during the j-ear 
consisted of sewer construction at a contract cost of 
1264,875.45, as shown on attached schedule of the 
work done, and the maintenance and operation of the 
sewer system at a cost of $727,438.95. 

Contract work consisted of the extension of the 
sewer sj'stem to provide drainage for new buildings 
and street construction and to ehminate cesspools. 

Maintenance work consisted of the cleaning of 2,832 
catch basins by contract and 4,133 by yard forces, the 
freeing of stopped sewers and catch basins, and the 
lepair of sewers, manholes, and catch basins bj' the 
yard forces, and the operation of the pumping station 
and disposal works. 

A new low-pressure heating plant and other mechan- 
ical changes are now in progress at Calf Pasture which, 
when completed, will result in an estimated saving in 
fuel costs of $5,000 per year. 

The work of extending the sewer system to provide 
drainage for new street construction, new building 
construction, and the elimination of cesspools will 
continue for many years in the future, and proljably 
at the same rate as in the past. In addition, a long- 
range sewerage works program provides for the exten- 
sion of main line surface drain conduits such as Ston}' 
Brook, Shepard Brook, May wood Brook, etc. The 
long-range program also includes the rebuilding of 
several miles of very old sewers that have settled or 
outlived their economic usefulness. 

About 1,500 linear feet of corrugated pipe was laid 
by the vard forces l^etween the old stone Shepard 



84 City Document No. 24. 

Brook conduit in the yard of the Massachusetts Building 
Wrecking Company and North Harvard street, which 
provided substantial relief from street and cellar flood- 
ing experienced in the Shepard Brook drainage area. 

Special sewer problems which have been given 
considerable study and investigation are listed, more 
or less, in the order of their importance, as follows: 

1. Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 

The renewing of worn-out main sluice and gallery 
gates, large discharge gate valves, changing the gate 
valve motors from DC to AC current. 

The reconstruction of the flat roof areas of the station 
to replace defective roof plank and sheathing, that 
constitutes a danger to the employees, at an estimated 
cost of $7,000. The renewing of the sluice gates and 
reconstruction of the roofs are absolutel}^ necessar}^ for 
the protection of the station, regardless of what final 
plan may be adopted for the disposal of sewage at this 
location. Under present business conditions it would 
require a year or more to replace the main sluice gates, 
which work could probably l)e paid for from the loan. 

Other work of a more or less emergency nature 
required at Calf Pasture in order to properly protect 
the station, if it is to operate for the next five years or 
longer, is a new 2,400 KW transformer; replace obsolete 
main electrical operating board; install one or more 
motor-driven 75 m.g.d. sewage pumps to supplement 
the present pumps, the casings of which are wearing 
from the passage of grit. Other desirable improvements 
which have been studied and given consideration are 
the replacement of the present cage screens with me- 
chanically cleaned bar screens, sealing off the open pump 
wells, now planked over, with a concrete slab. The 
open pump wells constitute the greatest danger of the 
station flooding, and consequent loss of the four hori- 
zontal pumps in the event of a power failure. 

2. Exclude the Entrance of Tidewater from the Boston 

Main Drainage Intercepting Sewers and from the 
Contributory Local Sewer System. 

Tidewater, and water from the marginal conduit, 
enters and surcharges the local sewer S3^stem contrib- 
utory to the intercepting sewers, and in turn, the 
intercepting sewers through directly connected storm 



I 



Public Works Department. 85 

overflows to local sewers which discharge either into the 
harbor or the marginal conduit. This happens because 
either the storm overflows (some of which are built of 
wood) leak Init to a far greater extent from defective 
tide gates. The surcharging that takes place at ever}' 
high tide reduces the velocity in the sewers, which tends 
to allow solids to settle out and grease to congeal, re- 
sulting in generally poor drainage. Much of the water 
that surcharges the sewers does not enter the inter- 
ceptors, but flows back into tidewater with the receding 
tide. But sufficient water does enter the interceptors 
so that they are full, or nearly so, at all times because 
there is not sufficient elapsed time between low and 
high tide to allow the pumps at Calf Pasture to draw 
down the water stored in tht, interceptor. Even though 
there were no leakage of tidewater into the local sewers 
and the interceptors, both would surcharge during a 
heavy rainstorm, particularly if the storm occurred at 
high tide. 

From the beginning of the operation of the main 
drainage s\^stem there has always been a crew for the 
maintenance of tide gates. Up to about 30 years ago, 
records indicate that their work was effective in exclud- 
ing tidewater from the interceptor, but since then the 
work has not been satisfactory'. Since 1938, every effort 
has been made to cut down tide-gate leakage, but it has 
not been successful because of w^orn-out gates (although 
many have been replaced), but more particularly because 
of the lack of mechanical ability of the men and their 
reluctance to enter the clungeon-like gate chambers to 
do the work. 

Up to January, 1950, main drainage work was in 
charge of a main drainage crew. At that time the work 
was transferred to the district yards. The men formerl}' 
employed on this work were assigned to sewer cleaning. 
This arrangement is satisfactory as far as keeping the 
sump connections free is concerned, but not in regard 
to gate maintenance work. 

If there is any solution to the problem, it is to organize 
a crew from present employees consisting of a foreman, 
four mechanics, and a chauffeur, who have the mechan- 
ical ability'; but what is more important, the willingness 
to enter the locations where the work is to be done. 
Sufficient remuneration should be provided for these 
employees to compensate for the difficult and dangerous 



86 City Document No. 24. 

working conditions if qualified and willing workers are 
to be obtained for this work. This is one of the most 
urgent needs of the Sewer Division. 

3. Seiver Cleaning and Grease Problem. 

Insufficient funds have been spent on sewer cleaning 
in Boston for the past 25 3'ears or more. Surveys show 
that 25 per cent or more of the capacity of parts of the 
interceptor sewers, the cross-town relief sewer from 
Central street to Causeway street, man^' of the surface 
drain conduits (particularlj- Davenport Brook, which is 
now being cleaned) are occupied by sand and gravel that 
has settled out due to low velocities. In addition, much 
of the local sewer system north of Massachusetts avenue 
requires cleaning. In the market district and in the 
Park square area there are large amounts of grease in 
the sewers contributed by food-processing establish- 
ments and restaurants. 

During the past 12 years, much effort has been given 
in an attempt to meet this problem with a sewer cleaning 
crew, now consisting of 15 men. Some progress has 
been made, but a very large amount of work remains 
to be done. The sewer cleaning equipment of the present 
sewer cleaning crew is adequate for the labor force now 
engaged in this work. 

To attack the problem in the manner it deserves 
requires much additional manpower, equipment and 
proper supervision. One catch-basin cleaning machine, 
a truck and crew could be kept continuously busy 
cleaning sumps and grease from manholes, rather than 
intermittently as at present. Without question, sewer 
cleaning is the second most important maintenance 
problem confronting the Sewer Division. 

4. Union Park Street Pumping Station. 

The main electrical board is obsolete and should be 
replaced. The mechanical bar screen, now out of use, 
is obsolete and worn out, and should be replaced with 
a new bar screen and screening grinder. Preliminary 
plans for the bar screen have been completed. 

The Sewer Division labor force has a quota of 31 
laborers, 21 assigned to the six yards, 7 to Calf Pasture 
and Moon Island, and 3 vacancies; a quota of 30 sewer 
cleaners, 26 assigned to the six yards, 3 to Calf Pasture 
and INIoon Island, and 1 vacancy; a quota of 33 chauf- 
feur-laborers and teamsters, 24 assigned to the six 



Public WorKvS Department. 87 

yards (25 vehicles, exclusive of 5 catch-basin cleaning 
machines, and 3 pickup trucks), 9 to Calf Pasture, 
Moon Island and office; a quota of 7 catch-basin ma- 
chine operators assigned to yards (5 operate catch-basin 
cleaning machines, 2 power winches) ; a quota of 4 
masons, 2 carpenters, 4 yardmen, 1 machinist assigned 
to the six yards — making a total of 89 men assigned 
to answering complaints, repairs to manholes and catch 
basins, repairing broken sewers, cleaning catch basins 
and sewers, and other related work. The number of 
men available is reduced by about 9, who because of 
actual physical conditions are on light duty, and 3 as- 
signed to patrol service. The number of men available 
is small rather than large, and yet, in general, is satis- 
factory except as previoush' noted for sewer cleaning 
work. 

Most any work connected with the maintenance of 
sewers is not only disagreeable, but also of a difficult, 
if not dangerous nature, and this factor should be taken 
into consideration when considering the efficiency of 
this class of work. Another thing to keep in mind is 
that sewer maintenance, and especially sewer cleaning 
work, is a job for young, vigorous men. As a guess, 
the average age of our men is 55, or over, fast approach- 
ing the age when they should be given lighter duties, 
and their places taken by younger men. 

During the fiscal year 1950 there were built by con- 
tractors and day labor 6.66 miles of common sewers 
and surface drains throughout the city. After deduct- 
ing 0.11 mile of sewers and surface drains, rebviilt or 
abandoned, the net increase for 1950 is 6.55 miles, 
which added to the existing 1,248.43 miles of common 
sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles of intercept- 
ing sewers, makes a grand total of 1,285.91 miles of all 
sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and under the 
care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1951. 

There were 142 catch basins built or rebuilt and 11 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 131 catch basins and a grand total of 23,286 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1951. 

Entrance fees to the amount of $969.16 have been 
deposited with the City Collector for collection from 
estates upon which no sewer assessments were ever 
paid, in accordance with Ordinances of 1947, chapter 
27, section 10. 



88 



City Document No. 24. 



Eight hundred and eighty permits have been issued, 
viz., 334 to district foremen and contractors and 546 
to drainla^'ers for repairing or laying new house drains. 
Inspectors from this office have personally inspected 
the work done under these drainlayers' permits. 

Two thousand eight hundred and forty complaints 
have been investigated, and inspectors have been in- 
structed to report in writing in each case. 

One thousand four hundred and sixty catch basin 
complaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 2,873 municipal liens to the 
Cit}^ Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,680 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 



Respectfully, 



Robert P. Shea, 
Division Engineer, 



Public Works Department. 



89 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1950. 



Districts. 


Built by tlie 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 




Linear Feet. 

365.00 
1,520.00 
None. 

323.80 
None. 
1,293.20 
15,650.59 
2,895.35 
9,160.99 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 
365.00 
1,. 520. 00 
None. 

323.80 

None. 

1,293.20 

15,650.59 

2,895.35 

13,098.99 


Miles. 
0.0691 






2879 




None. 






0613 




None. 






2449 


West Roxbury 




2 9641 




0.5483 


Hyde Park 


3,938.00 


2 . 4809 






Totals 


31.208.93 


3,938.00 


35,146.93 









Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1951. 





1946. 


1947. 


1948. 


1949. 


1950. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor. . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear 
Feet. 

14,204.38 
4.463.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

24,166.43 
15,216.70 


Linear 
Feet. 

29,754.60 
8.969.68 


Linear 
Feet. 

39,596.88 


Linear 
Feet. 

31,208.93 
3,938.00 








Totals 


18,667.38 


39,383.13 


38,724.28 


39,596.88 


35,146.93 







90 



City Document No. 24. 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 



Total 

Lengths 

Built 
During 
Twelve 
Months 
Ending 
December 
31, 1950. 



Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 19.50. 



Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, lO.'JO. 



City Proper . . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury, 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 



Linear Feet. 
365.00 
1,520.00 
None. 

323.80 

None. 

1,293.20 

15,650.59 

2,895.35 

13,098.99 



Linear Feet. 
365.00 



Linear Feet. 



None. 



None. 



22.00 
178.84 



1,520.00 

None. 
323.80 

None. 

1,293.20 
15,650.59 

2,873.35 
12,920.15 



Miles. 



0.2879 

None. 
0.0613 

None. 
0.2449 
2.9641 
0.5442 
2.4470 



Totals. 



35,146.93 



565.84 



34,581.09 



6.5494 



Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 
January 1, 1950 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1950 

Total of above ending December 31, 1950 
Total length of city intercepting sewers connecting 

with metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1950 . 
Total length of Boston main drainage intercepting 

sewers to December 31, 1950 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1950 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to Januarj' 1, 1951 



Miles. 

1,248.43 

6.55 

1,254.98 

*6.81 

*24.12 

1,285.91 
699.50 



■ No additional lengths built during 1950. 



Districts. 



Public Works Department. 

Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



01 



City Proper. . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. 
East Boston. . 
Charlestown . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Hyde Park. . . 

Totals... 



C.\TCH B.^SI.N'S FOR TWELVE MoNTHS 

ExDiXG December 31, 1950. 



Xumber 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 



57 



Net 
Increase. 





1 

1 

5 



18 

28 

21 

57 



1.31 



ToT.\L FOR Whole Citv 

i.v Charge of Sewer 

Division-. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1950. 



3,637 
3,379 
1,461 
1,107 
843 
2,035 
4,084 
5,-543 
1,066 



23,155 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

19.50. 



3,637 
3,380 
1,462 
1,112 
843 
2,053 
4,112 
5,. 564 
1,123 



23,286 



January . . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



Totals . . 
Average . 



Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 
Resume for Year 1950. 

Sewage Record. 



Month. 



Total GaUons 
Pumped. 



2,981,111,000 
2,885,857,000 
3,205,837,000 
2,567,686,000 
2,915,920,000 
2,944,972,000 
3,144,609,000 
3,090,211,000 
2,871,336,000 
2,958,423,000 
3,212,301,000 
3,218,960,000 



Average Gallons 
Pumped Daily. 



35,997,223,000 



96,164,548 

103,066,321 

103,414,096 

85,589,533 

94,061,935 

98,165,733 

101,439,000 

99,716,451 

95,711.200 

95,433,000 

107,076,700 

103,837,420 



1,183,675,937 
98,622,529 



92 



City Document No. 24, 

Fuel Oil Record. 



Month. 



Gallons 
Received. 



Cost. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

.\ugust .... 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December. 

Totals 



24,305 
2i,.34S 
28,272 
20,288 
20,205 
20,242 
16,155 
24, .307 
20,242 
15,437 
24,196 
23,796 



$1,264 09 
1,263 81 
1,380 93 
1,024 10 
1,048 78 
1,050 69 

877 03 
1,319 56 
1,098 93 

832 11 
1,304 25 
1,282 74 



261,853 



313.747 62 



Electric Current Supplied, Edison Company. 



Month. 



Kilowatt- 
Hours. 



Cost. 



January. . . 
February . . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

.\ugust 

September. 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



514,780 
519,060 
481,400 
528,900 
554,000 
505,520 
550,000 
464,000 
558,000 
478,000 
514,000 
627,000 



$6,066 25 
6,394 54 
6,107 84 
6,464 02 
6,597 03 
6,021 99 
6,568 10 
5,611 15 
6,356 06 
5,853 75 
6,219 16 
7,203 75 



Totals. 



6,245,260 



$75,463 64 



Cost. 

Labor .$130,347 98 

Edison power 75,463 64 

Fuel oil 13,747 62 

Packing 57 03 

Supplies and miscellaneous . . . . . . 4,387 43 



Totals 

Cost per million gallons pumped 



$224,003 70 
$6 22 



Public Works Department. 



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1,152 72 

2,045 33 

2,028 37 

3,708 50 

719 04 

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5,056 37 

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204 75 

330 27 

2,<i00 00 

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2,907 71 
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3,338 70 
5,358 30 
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2,894 96 


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3,461 88 
11,432 71 


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1950, total gross 
cx|)cnditurcs. . . . 

C'hedits. 

Trucks etc., 
used on 
m a i n t c - 
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Maintenance 
stock used 
on mainte- 
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Construction 
stock used 
on mainte- 
nance 11.432 71 




i 

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1950, total net 
expenditures. . . . 



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105 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, Januaiy 2, 1951. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectful!}" submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1950. 

The shortage of critical materials having been les- 
sened, and new meters made available, the work of 
laying and relaying water mains and the replacement 
of obsolete meters, etc., was resumed. 

A total of 21,229 linear feet of pipe were either laid 
or relaid, varying in sizes from 4 inches to 16 inches, 
inclusive, as follows: 



District. 
Roxbury 
East Boston 
City Proper 
South Boston 
Dorchester . 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park . 
Charlestown 

Total . 



Laid. 
Linear Feet. 



2,273.5 





730 

2,856.5 

4,999 

427 





REL.ilD. 

Linear Feet 
1.760.^ 
2. .359.^ 


5,328 

3,351.^ 





8,429.5 12,799.5 



The particular streets in which the above work was 
performed are shown on the accompan3dng tables. 

The National Board of Fire Underwriters made a 
survej^ during the year of the distribution system, which 
included the inspection of hydrants and gates, and 
conducted flow tests throughout the city, showing the 
capacity of the mains as to their adequacy- in the event 
of a fire. 

The department was forced to repair approximately 
60 main pipe leaks, the most important of which was a 
break in the 30-inch high service line at Broadway and 



106 City Document No. 24. 

Harrison avenue; a 20-inch high service hne in Boylston 
street, at Clarendon, and a 24-inch pipe hne in Wash- 
ington street, between State street and Cornhill. 

During the year a Pitometer Survey was made of the 
distribution sj^stem in the Jamaica Plain and West 
Roxburj" districts on the high service and extra high 
service. 

Considerable work on the distribution mains in the 
Chariest own system was occasioned by the building of 
the foundations of the Mystic River Bridge and its 
approaches. 

During the 3'ear the ^Metropolitan District Commis- 
sion completed the construction of the rock tunnel and 
made connections to the distribution system of the 
Public Works Department, Water Division, resulting 
in an increased pressure in the high and low service 
systems. The increased pressure in the low service 
system was occasioned by the discontinuance of the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir Pumping Station. 

DisTRiBUTiox Branch. 

Due to the increased volume of work caused bj' appli- 
cations for service pipes, etc., the department has en- 
gaged the services of contractors during the year. 

The regular work of this branch, consisting of installa- 
tion of new services and fire pipes, repairing of leaks, 
caring for complaints, shutting off and letting on water, 
freeing of stoppages in pipes, etc., was performed in 
such a manner and at such periods as to cause minimum 
delay and inconvenience to applicants for water, water 
takers, and the general public. 

The machine shop and plumbing shop were forced to 
handle all the drilling and connecting of services in 
addition to the regular work carried on in these shops, 
such as the machining and assembling of gates, valves, 
and hydrants, and the department assisted the other 
branches of the Public Works Department in performing 
special jobs. 

The replacement of old style hydrants necessitated 
this department entering into a contract for machining 
6-inch, 8-inch, and 12-inch valves and post hydrants. 

Business Office. 
In order to enforce the payment of outstanding water 
bills, customers in arrears are notified that the flow of 
water ^dll be reduced, but yet enough water is left on 



Public Works Department. 



107 



the premises to provide a minimum for health and sani- 
tary requirements. As a result, the Water Division 
ended the year 1950 with a surplus of $320,072.61, this 
surplus being due mainly to the collection of bills due 
and payable. 



Main pipe petitions received 






28 


Domestic service applications 






597 


Fire pipe applications 






71 


Special meter tests . 






89 


Hydrant permits issued . 






18 


Repair deposits received 






144 


Miscellaneous deposits . 






42 



Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 

Budget appropriation $2,540,825 00 

Amount expended 2,349,060 88 



Unexpended balance .... 

Amount of money collected during the year 
Amount expended from all sources . 

Balance 



$191,764 12 

$4,714,700 11 
4,394,62 



50 



$320,072 61 



The metropolitan assessment for 1950 amounted to 
11,661,063.28, at the rate of $40 per miUion gallons, a 
decrease of $58,843.48 over the assessment for 1949. 



Total amount billed in 1950 .... 
Total amount collected for 1950 bills, as of 

December 31, 1950 

Total amount abated for 1950 bills, as of 

December 31, 1950 

Total amount collected in 1950, on bills ren- 



dered prior to 1950 



$4,762,625 10 
$3,803,267 75 

$28,552 98 

$812,996 50 

This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of the 
office has been such that I believ^e a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the emploj^ees has been 
brought about which is beneficial to the consumers and 
the city. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers before placing of liens on premises has 
been continued. The appreciation of the customers is 
shown by the fact that the number of liens placed on the 
premises this year has been reduced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer. 



108 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. I. Statement of Work Done During 1950. 



Make, 


i 

"a 
s. 


3 

o 

Q 


Meters 
Changed. 




'■vi 


13 

1" 


1 


13 

to 




Out. 


In. 






576 


491 
1 


5,926 

13 

6 


9,181 
11 
34 


15,107 
24 
40 


572 
40 

29 


910 
16 


601 


472 






Hersey Compound 


40 


1 








31 
1C6 

23 
4 
1 


432 

2,637 

411 

33 

153 

12 

7 

11 


426 


432 

3,063 

411 

33 

153 

12 

7 

11 

2 

12 

1 


1 

155 

3 






463 




55 


682 


28 


2,487 




431 


Federal 








37 












152 






1 
1 
1 
2 






13 














Trident 


2 


1 






9 


Arctic 








Nash 




1 


12 
1 






13 


Keystone 










1 




2 








1 




















Totals 


675 


719 


9,654 


9,654 


19,308 


805 


1,608 


631 


4,085 





Public Works Department. 



109 



Table No. 2. Meters in Service December 31. 1950. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 




f 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


G 


8 


10 


12 




04,178 


3,698 


2,214 


1,239 


784 


141 

7 
148 


143 
50 

76 


37 
65 
29 


1 
34 






72.435 




23 


9 


188 












5 


258 




43 

2,615 

19,108 

152 

461 

152 

138 

51 

35 

1 

13 

25 

25 


53 
21 

828 
56 
86 


26 
22 

717 


29 

23 

732 








151 


Worthington Disc 

Watch Dog 


34 

467 


7 
406 












2,722 










. 


22,258 














208 






1 


19 














567 
















152 




271 

28 

7 


11 
17 

12 


36 

4 


57 


.... 
15 












528 


Nash . 












100 


















54 






19 


21 


17 


10 








68 




5 

2 


1 
2 
2 










19 




















27 


Trident 


11 


11 


19 


1 


1 
3 


1 


1 




74 




3 


























Totals 


86.997 


5,055 


3.024 


2.075 


1.396 


764 


287 


145 


36 


24 


9 


99,812 







Table No. 3. Meters in Shop December 31, 1950. 



jSIake. 


DiAMETEB IN Inches. 


Total. 


5 


a 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 


New. 


1,310 


1,440 


157 


6 


50 








2.963 




10 


4 
4 




14 














4 


















Totals 


1,310 


1,440 


157 


6 


50 


10 


8 




2,981 






Old. 


62 


12 


10 


11 


18 


3 


2 
6 
3 


1 


119 




6 


Watch Dog 


58 


4 




5 


7 


1 
3 


78 


Trident Disc 


3 




















Totals 


120 


16 


10 


16 


25 


7 


11 


1 


206 







110 



City Document No. 24. 
Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in 1950. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


t 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 






748 


27 


32 


50 


30 


10 


4 
8 
8 


3 



2 


910 




10 


Watch Dog 


445 


40 


40 


86 


42 


21 


682 










Totals 


1,193 


67 


72 


136 


78 


31 


20 


9 


2 


1,608 







Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1950. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


^ 


a 


1 


Hersej' Disc 


7.258 


484 


203 


7,945 



Table No. 5A. Meters Purchased New in 1950. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


5 


1 

* 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 


Hersey Disc 


2,000 




50 


25 


15 








2,090 


Hersey Compound 


37 


20 
2 


3 
1 


00 


Hersey Detector 












3 


















Totals 


2,000 




50 


25 


15 


37 


22 


4 


2,153 





Table No 


6. 


Meters 


Reset in 1950. 








Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


0) 

"a 

3 
o 

6 


s 

o 




5 


1 


1 


U 


2 


4 


6 


O 


Hersey Disc 


548 


40 


8 


2 


2 


1 

1 
1 




39 


562 

1 
22 

1 


601 


Hersej' Compound 


1 


Watch Dog 


18 


2 




6 


1 


1 


6 


og 


Sparling 


1 


















Totals 


566 


42 


g 


8 


3 


3 


1 


45 


586 


631 











Public Works Department. 
Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1950. Meters Taken 



111 

Out. 





Diameter ix Inches. 


Total. 


Mark. 


• 


3 


1 


1} 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




5,264 


370 


148 


74 


41 


15 

1 
4 


5 
6 

2 


3 

4 


2 


5,920 




13 














6 




429 

2,288 

120 

393 

33 

1 

11 

1 






3 

50 








432 




145 
33 
11 


99 


35 


19 


3 






2,639 








153 




2 


3 


2 










411 












33 




1 

4 
1 


1 
1 
7 


1 


1 

1 

1 


2 


1 






8 








13 












13 












1 


Trident 


9 










2 






11 








1 










1 






















Totals 


8,549 


565 


258 


132 


81 


41 


19 


7 


2 


9,654 







Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1950. Meters Put In. 





Diameter ix Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


« 


3 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




8,149 


628 


2G4 


83 


56 




1 

4 

13 

1 






9,181 




5 
1 


2 


11 














20 

19 

1 


34 




303 


IG 


9 


55 


23 
1 


426 








2 




















Totals 


8,4.52 


644 


273 


138 


80 


40 


19 


6 


2 


9,654 







112 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1950. 





.s 












r' 










^ 














10 


c3 


s 


a 


2 

0) 


o 


H= 




Make. 


■* c 


h-1 


bO 


93 


O 




■a 






'o^.S 


a) 


c 


^ 


a 


fl 


2 






M 


c 


0. 
3 


S 


M 


s 


Ci3 


3 






















Q 


w 


O 


Z 


n 


H 


rt 


H 




49 
25 


352 


114 


9 
10 


3 
1 


43 


2 


572 




40 




14 






G 




4 




29 




42 


74 


14 


3 


9 


13 










1 
3 












1 
















3 






1 












1 




1 








1 




o 


Lambert 


1 








1 


Trident 


1 














1 


















Totals 


132 


439 


128 


28 


13 


63 


2 


805 







Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1950. 



Make. 




DiAMETEK IN INCHES 






Total. 


i 


I 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 




465 


11 


11 


29 


52 


3 

17 
6 
1 


2 
20 


3 
3 


576 




40 


Watch Dog 


14 






24 


11 










1 


2 


o 














o 




















Totals 


479 


11 


11 


53 


63 


27 


23 


8 


675 







Meters applied on new services . 
^Meters applied on old services . 

Total 



656 
19 



675 



Public Works Department. 

Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1950. 



113 



Make. 


Diameter i.v Inches. 


is 


i 

'S 

a 
a 
o 


o . 
11 

a 


Total. 




5 


' 


1 
1 IJ 


2 


3 


4 






393 


42 


28 


14 


9 


4 

1 
2 


1 
1 


169 
1 

48 
3 


53 


269 


491 




1 




136 

31 

4 


G 


7 


8 


6 


13 

1 


105 

27 

4 


166 




31 


Federal 














4 


Trident 










1 




1 
1 
1 
1 




1 




23 










2 


20 


23 








1 








1 


American 




1 














1 






















Totals 


587 


49 


35 


23 


15 


8 


2 


225 


69 


425 


719 







Table No. II. Causes of Meter Changes for the Year 1950. 



Make. 



-J 












































1 

1 
o 

Q 




d 
o 


■d 


u 

l-i 


1 


i 

t-5 




1 






o 

o 
Q 


(3 

a 


"2, 

o 
O 


o 
o 

o 


_2 

c 

i 


03 


is 

'S 
02 




"3 

:2: 



Hersey Disc 

Hersey Detector 


263 

1 

44 

3 

8 


4,174 

7 

2,177 

342 

339 

10 

9 

6 

19 

95 

7 


64 


102 


673 


263 


202 


51 


68 


28 


56 


5,944 
8 




13 
2 


10 
3 

1 


251 
41 
44 

3 


40 
16 
6 

1 


55 
10 
17 


14 


15 
3 


4 
1 


8 

1 


2 631 


Worthington Disc . . . 


420 
419 


Nash 






13 


Lambert 


1 
2 
















13 




1 
















9 






11 

4 


2 

4 


1 
1 










33 




47 


1 


1 










153 


Trident 








8 


Keystone 


1 
















1 


Arctic 
















1 






1 




1 




















1 


























Totals 


371 


7,185 


81 


117 


1,029 


332 


286 


68 


87 


33 


65 


9,654 







I 



114 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 12. Meters Salvaged in 1950. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 




1 


3 


1 


IJ 


2 


3 


4 




433 
2,229 
4G0 
416 
120 
1 


7 
150 


(5 
101 


8 
G 
3 
3 


8 
1 


10 




472 


Watch Do"" 


2,487 








463 




10 
32 

1 
1 
4 


2 








431 










1.52 




1 


1 


1 


1 




7 




1 




1 
37 
11 

9 


7 




1 






13 








37 


Xash 




1 




1 






13 


Trident 






9 


















Totals 


3,717 


205 


118 


21 


12 


11 


1 


4,085 







Public Works Department. 



115 



&2 






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CO 

< 



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r* o 


lo 


_, 


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r^ 


1-0 






coco 


o 


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^ 


oe o" : 




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o 


-.rt c^ 








C^i-I C5 














CO 
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r:oocv:o • • 












moo coo 










o — - 
















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r< 


o 
o 
















co" 








•,D C-. t-^ ~ 








fg — 




•*oo— a 










00 — 








•* 




rjirt 








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1-_ 
of 












CO 
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t^t^ OC^ --1 • 




lO 






CO 00 


o 










o-*< ■ 


o-* 




CO 






-<-*< • 


o 








■* 


am ■ 
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CO 
















OOt^ • 


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icco 




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116 



City Document No. 24. 



Financial Transactions, Water Service, 1950. 



Cash balance from 1949 



$090,628 72 



Receipts : 

Water rates and services . . •1i4,093,407 09 

Tax titles — water .... 21,23242 



Expenditures from revenue: 

Pensions and annuities . . . $39,247 91 

Current expenses and extensions . 2,349,060 88 

Collecting Department . . . 174,781 30 

Auditing Department ... — 

Refunded water rates ... 678 20 

Refunded water collections . . — 

Refunded water tax titles . . — 

Metropolitan assessment . . 1,001,063 28 

$4,224,831 57 
Transfer of 1949 surplus to redemp- 
tion of city loans .... 632,547 10 



Expenditures from debt account: 

Boston water debt .... $36,000 00 

Interest on loans .... 5,518 75 

Cash balance, December 31, 1950 . . . . 
Cash forwarded to 1951 



Surplus on hand, December 31, 1950 

Loan account: 

Balance outstanding, January 1, 

1950 

1950 payment on Boston water 
debt 

Balance outstanding, December 31, 
1950 



$192,000 00 
36,000 00 



Construction account: 

Extensions of mains (from revenue) 
Cost of construction, December 31, 



1950 



Cost of construction, December 31, 
1949 

Increase in plant cost during 1950 



$24,603,362 40 



24,594,120 41 



Cost of existing works, December 31, 1950 
Pipe yards and buildings * 
Engineering expense 
Distribution system f . . 
Hyde Park water works . 

High pressure fire system % 



$84,332 16 

57,873 58 

24,222,478 30 

175,000 00 



4,714,700 11 
55,411,328 83 



4,857,378 67 
$553,950 16 



41,518 75 

$512,431 41 
192,358 80 

$320,072 61 



$156,000 00 



$9,241 99 



$24,539,684 10 
2,293,316 75 

$26,833,000 85 



* $10,500 deducted on account of abolishment of Charlestown jard. 

t Includes $155,023.89 expended on high pressure fire system in 1925, 1926, 1931, 
1932,1933. „ , , , 

t $33,850.96 deducted from cost of high pressure fire system on account of abandon- 
ment of pumping station, Battery street. 



Public Works Department. 



117 



Number 
Number 
Number 
Niunber 
Number 

rates 
Number 

off for 
Niunber 
Number 

off for 
Number 

time 



Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1950 

of shutoffs for repairs .... 

of premises turned on after repairs 

of shutoffs for vacancy .... 

of premises turned on for occupancy' 

of premises shut oft' for nonpaj'ment of water 

of premises turned on again after being shut 

nonpayment 

of premises shut off on account of waste . 

of premises turned on again after being shut 

waste 

of new service pipes turned on for the first 



7,299 

6,593 

265 

111 



11 
1 



416 



Total number of times water was shut off or 
turned on 14,704 



Table No. II. High Pressure Fire Service. 

Showing Lengths of Water Pipes, Connections, Hydmnts and Valves in Same, 

December 31, 1950. 





20-Inch. 


16-Inch. 


12-Inch. 


8-Inch. 


6-Ineh. 


Total. 


Length owned and operated, 
December 31 1949 


20,140 


46,953 
201 


31,756 
144 






98,849 




502 




847 






6 


6 


Length owned and operated. 


20,140 


46,953 
201 


31,756 
144 




98,849 




502 




847 






6 


G 












505 

















18.72 miles of mains in system. 



118 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. III. 

Total Number of Hydrants in Systetn, December 31, 1950. 



Location. 



Brighton (public) 

" (private) 

Charlestown (public) 

" (private) 

City Proper (public) 

" (private) 

Dorchester (public) 

" (private) 

East Boston (public) 

" (private) 

Hyde Park (public) 

" (private) 

Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

South Boston (public) 

" (private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) .... 

Deer Island (private) 

Gallups Island (private) .... 

Long Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . 
Thompson's Island (private) . 
Quincy (private) 



23 

13 

381 

5 

41 
1 
6 



200 



97 

314 
9 

606 
9 

145 

1 

65 



272 
3 

163 
1 

314 



292 

8 

26 

37 

149 

1 

803 

161 
8 
10 



191 

4 

114 

14 

686 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 



13 



596 



179 



588 



1,108 



664 



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2 

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Total number (public) . . 
Total number (private) . 



(public 
High pressure fire hydrants 



Total number 
and private) . . 



503 
33 

536 



250 

5 



2,176 
29 

2,205 



2,432 
126 

2,5.58 



5,997 

17 

6,014 



93 

111 

204 



Total hydrants (all kinds), 



Public Works Department. 119 

Waterworks Statistics, City of Boston. 
For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 19o0. 

Mains. 
Ivind of pipe: cast-iron, wrought-iron, steel. 
Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 
Extended, miles, 1.074. 
Size enlarged, miles, none. 
Total miles now in use, 1,008.564. 
Public hydrants added, 19. 
Public hydrants now in use, 12,372. 
Stop gates added, 24. 
Stop gates now in use, 16,173. 
Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 36. 
Number of blowoffs, 861. 
Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Services. 
Kind of pipe and size: lead and lead-lined, l-inch; cast-iron, 2-inch to 

16-inch; wrought-iron and cement-lined, f-inch to 2-inch; brass and 

copper, f-inch to 2|-inch, 
Total service taps now in use 103,283: 



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