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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

[Document 24 — 1952.] 




1^1-1% 



ANNUAL REPORT 

(?1qW^ of the 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1951. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I re- 
spectfully submit the annual report of the Public 
Works Department for the vear ending December 31, 
1951. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were $19,335,803.17, of which $1,651,045.23 rep- 
resents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and $450,741.69 represents Metro- 
politan District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $4,736,- 
398.36, and the revenue derived from the operation of 
the Sumner Tunnel reached a new high of $1,913,356.12. 

The surplus resulting from the sale of water amounted 
to $453,823.29, and the operation of the Sumner Tunnel 
resulted in a record-breaking surplus of $658,192.59. 

The East Boston Ferry, as has been the case over 
the past years, operated at an annual deficit, which for 
this year amounted to $305,700.52. 

1 



2 City Document No. 24. 

Loan Orders. 

Under date of May 22, 1951, a City Council order 
was approved by your Honor which provided, under 
the provisions of section 7 of chapter 44 of the General 
Laws, that the sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated for 
the construction of public ways, and on June 5, 1951, 
that the sum of $1,000,000 be appropriated for the 
construction of sewerage works. 

Street Construction Work. 
State-Aid Program. 

Last year we again completed a large amount of 
street reconstruction, under the Chapter 90 State-Aid 
Highway Reconstruction Program. The following im- 
portant main highways were constructed during the 
3^ear under this program: 

Blue Hill avenue, from Goodale road to Johnston road. 

Centre street, from May street to South street. 

River street, from Washington street to Blue Hill avenue. 

Massachusetts avenue, from East Cottage street to Albany 
street. 

Saratoga street, from the bridge over the MTA tracks to 
the bridge over the Belle Isle Inlet. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Pro- 
gram in Boston for the year 1951 was $409,692.29, of 
which the State Department of Public Works, under 
the provisions of section 34 of chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, paid one half, thereby presenting a substantial 
saving to the taxpayers of this city. It is planned to 
conduct an even far more extensive program of con- 
struction under this chapter in 1952. 

Non-State- A id Progra m . 

We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program, comprising extensive construction and re- 
construction, in every section of the city. In addition 
to work done on downtown streets, the department 
resurfaced several important traffic arteries, listed as 
follows : 

Boylston street, from Brookline avenue to Ipswich street, 
and from Massachusetts avenue to Exeter street. 

Brookline avenue, from Boylston street to Pilgrim road. 
Dover street, from Tremont street to Fort Point Channel. 



Public Works Department. 3 

Freeport street, from Dorchester avenue to Old Colony 
Parkway. 

Humboldt avenue, from Walnut avenue to Seaver street. 

South street, from Walter street to Fletcher street. 

Tremont street, from Massachusetts avenue to Texas 
street . 

Walnut avenue, from Warren street to Humboldt avenue. 

Washington street, Brighton, from Monastery road to 
Commonwealth avenue. 

In continuation of our policy of replacing brick 
sidewalks with cement concrete in the older sections of 
the city, contracts during the year, totaling approx- 
imately $116,000, were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement 
of the expenditures made in 1951 for highway im- 
provements: 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $2,637,016 68 

Public Ways. Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 159,201 29 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 103,236 26 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 116,672 77 



Total $3,016,127 00 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1951: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 158. 

Includes 46 new streets ordered laid out and constructed by 
the Board of Street Commissioners under the provisions of 
chapter 393 of the Acts of 1906. 
Miles of Streets Improved, 25.05. 

Includes 5.22 miles of so-called Chapter 90 state-aid highway 
improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 12.66. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in above- 
noted street improvements. 

We also completed, during the year, the removal of 
1,067 gas lamps, which were replaced with an equal 
number of 1,000-lumen electric lamps. It is our in- 
tention to continue with this program during 1952. 

Snow Removal. 

We w T ere fortunate during the past year in that no 
snowstorms of major proportions occurred, and we ex- 
perienced no difficulty in keeping the streets properly 
plowed and sanded throughout the winter months. 



4 City Document No. 24. 

At the present time there are over 720 miles of public 
streets that have to be plowed and maintained during 
the winter months. The department owns fourteen (14) 
Walter snow fighters which are used to plow, sand, and 
salt the streets of the downtown area. Most of the 
plowing work in the rest of the city was done by 273 
trucks rented on an hourly basis from contractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1951 totaled 
$527,602.25. 

Meridian Street Bridge. 

Under the authority of chapter 785 of the Acts of 
1951, a contract for constructing the substructure for 
the new bridge was awarded to the Merritt-Chapman 
& Scott Corporation by the Department of Public 
Works of the Commonwealth on November 20, 1951. 
The contract sum was $1,746,491.00. 

Bids for the construction of the superstructure of the 
bridge were opened on June 5, 1951. The only bidder 
was the American Bridge Companv, and the amount 
bid was $3,144,550.00. The contract for the construc- 
tion of the superstructure was not awarded, as the state 
officials were of the opinion that a lower figure might be 
obtained by readvertising at a future date. It is ex- 
pected that this contract will be readvertised in the 
early part of 1952. 

Refuse Disposal and Incineration. 

A comprehensive study and report on refuse disposal 
in the City of Boston was submitted by the consulting 
engineering firm of Thomas Worcester, Inc., on June 1, 
1951. On the basis of this report, a contract was 
awarded on December 6, 1951, to the engineering firm 
of Metcalf & Eddy to design, prepare the plans for, and 
supervise the construction of a 750-ton per 24-hour day 
incinerator in the vicinity of Southampton street. The 
preliminary work under this contract was still in progress 
at the close of the year. 

Sewage Treatment. 

Legislation enacted as chapter 645, and approved on 
August 29, 1951, provided for the incorporation of the 
Boston Main Drainage System into the South Metro- 
politan Sewerage System, and further provided for the 
sewage disposal needs of the North and South Metro- 



Public Works Department. 5 

politan Sewerage Districts. The projects provided for 
by this legislation comprise, in the main, the construc- 
tion of a relief sewer on the south side of the Charles 
River, from the Waltham line to the Ward Street 
Pumping Station; a tunnel between the Ward Street 
Pumping Station and Columbia Circle, and a tunnel 
from Columbia Circle to Deer Island, with all the 
necessary shafts and appurtenant works; the construc- 
tion of a tunnel from Chelsea to Deer Island; and the 
construction of a sewage treatment plant at Deer Island. 
When this work is completed, all the sewage now dis- 
posed of through the Boston Main Drainage Works will 
be treated and discharged at Deer Island, thereby pro- 
viding for the complete elimination of the Calf Pasture 
Pumping Station and the sewerage works at Moon 
Island, and the abandonment of the tunnel under Dor- 
chester Bay, between Calf Pasture and Moon Island. 

Purchase of Equipment. 

New equipment purchased during the year included 
one (1) Walter snow fighter, six (6) Trojan bucket 
loaders, two (2) Standard and two (2) Heil street 
flushers, one (1) Elgin and one (1) Wayne street sweeper, 
one (1) Le Roi and one (1) Chicago pneumatic com- 
pressor trailer, eleven (11) Ford trucks, three (3) Chevro- 
let carryalls, one (1) transport trailer, one (1) Ford 
truck compressor, fifteen (15) Ford sedans, one (1) 
Scotchman salt spreader and sixteen (16) Bowman 
sand spreaders. 

Personnel. 

There were 2,372 employees in the department as of 
December 31, as compared with 2,435 employees on 
January 1, 1951. 

Appended hereto are reports submitted by the Di- 
vision Engineers relative to the activities of their di- 
visions in 1951. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 



(i 



City Document No. 24. 



The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,372 persons eligible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 2,341 were upon the 
January, 1952, payrolls. 



Grade and 


Number of Employees. 










Services. 


Title. 


_ 6 

go 
o 


S.9 

PL! 


a 
ft 


>> 

ci 

'3 
c3 
02 


si 

d 
'3 

£0 
02 


0) 
M 

« 


>> 


"3 
a 
a 
3 


OS 


0) 

o 

a 

o 

3 


"5 




1 




















1 




1 
1 

18 


1 


1 










1 


1 


5 




1 




l 

9 






2 




29 










4 
1 
1 
3 




61 












1 






7 
14 


7 
7 
2 






1 

2 






16 














26 














2 
















1 


1 


2 


4 










1 








1 






1 

2 

1 

12 

1 
62 

1 

1 

1 

22 
















1 






1 
7 
2 
15 


1 




1 








2 


6 










1 
7 


3 






17 


12 


1 






56 










3 






40 


35 


4 




1 


16 

1 
2 
1 

58 


1 
9 


173 


Executive secretaries and sec- 


1 


3 




1 

1 

10 


2 










7 








1 

4 






4 


Clerks-stenographers 


8 


1 


1 


1 


7 


129 
1 














1 
1 
3 
3 

7 


1 


1 


1 


3 










1 






3 


















3 






















3 






















7 






1 


1 










2 




4 












3 
4 




3 






6 


6 








17 




1 


34 


















152 


90 73 


48 21 


23 


27 1 100 


, 


565 



Public Works Department. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Services. 


Title. 


CO 

o 


Is 

S a 

Ph 


o 


>> 

'S 

03 
02 


c 

"S 

"S.2 

go 

02 


6 
."2 
n 


>> 

CD 


"3 
a 
a 

3 




a3 
o 

a 

o 

< 


H 
o 




11 


152 an 


73 


48 


24 


23 
4 
8 

15 


27 


100 


17 








3 
9 


7 




















17 














38 
4 






.53 




















4 








10 














10 


















42 




42 














142 
1 






142 








2 














3 


Motor equipment niainte- 
















1 

4 

31 


1 








1 4 






1 


2 


.3 


1.5 






2 
4 
3 


3 
1 
3 


2 
12 
3 
2 






40 












17 








13 


3 








25 


Harnessmaker and assistant . . 










2 








2 




3 

4 


3 


2 


19 


2 


29 






5 
13 
15 


8 




19 












13 






















15 


















148 




148 








1 
2.3 

4 
3 








1 




<? 




















25 


Catch-basin cleaning machine 




















7 






















4 






4 


1 
1 










1 




9 


Wheelwrights and assistants . . 












1 




















5 

1 
29 

1 
11 








5 
41 

5 

177 

3 


31 

2 

29 

4 


20 

37 
2 


32 
112 

2 

393 

1 

24 










43 






.3 

3 

7 
1 


6 


13 

2 
9 


40 

1 

8.5 

4 

9 


091 


Working foremen, laborers, 




16 

754 

15 


















33 


















Totals 


11 


429 


230 


170 


612 


203 


64 


97 


454 


102 


2,372 





S City Document No. 24. 

Number of Employees Actually Employed January I, 1951, and 
January I, 1952. 















■§* 




ti 




> 
















C8.2 


>> 












o 

c 
a 

3 


o3 a 
CO 

O 


a 

be 




O 


- be 
o3 M 


'3 

02 






s 

O 


"3 



H 


January 1, 1951.. . 


100 


16 


210 


65 


465 


453 


170 


625 


230 


98 


2,405 


January 1, 1952.. . 


95 


11 


201 


64 


450 


425 


165 


600 


229 


101 


2,341 



7o<aZ Eligible Force. 



January 1, 1951.. . 


103 


16 


211 


69 


461 


438 


174 


632 


233 


98 


2,435 


January 1, 1952.. . 


97 


11 


203 


64 


454 


429 


170 


612 


230 


102 


2,372 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 









03 












F « 


























o a 














O a 










■o 














s 
£ S3 5 


> 


M 


-d 


OS 


Services. 


a> 






•d 


•d 

o 




T3 
O 


«je 03 


.S 0) 


03 




u 


1951-1952. 


u 


.£ S3 




c3 


a 


73 




S « u 


osO 


9 


0J 


a 

03 




s 
c 

03 


go 


g£G 


'3 


c. 
a 


Q 


« 


H 


H 


M 


« 




H 


H 


« 


< 






7 








16 

211 

69 


Central Office . . 
Bridge 


11 

203 
64 


1 
5 




1 









9 

7 


o 
2 




2 
1 




2 








3 


5 


14 


2 


15 


2 


4 


438 




429 


8 


6 


1 


18 


4 


6 


1 


7 




2 


174 




170 


12 


1 


2 


1 


11 


17 


2 


12 


2 


8 


632 


Street Cleaning 


612 


13 


2 




17 


5 


9 
8 
4 

4 


4 
4 

2 


4 
3 
5 
4 


1 
4 

1 


10 
1 

1 


233 

461 
103 
98 




230 

454 
97 
102 


3 

3 

7 


1 
5 
1 
1 


1 


16 


4 




90 




Tunnel 

Automotive. . . . 








8 


31 


78 


22 


54 


10 


29 


2,435 


Totals 


2,372 


54 


' 18 


4 


85 



Public Works Department. 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND 
EXPENDITURES. 



Division or Service. 


Total Appropriations, 
Including Transfers. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office .... 


$54,412 19 


$53,820 93 


$591 26 


Automotive Division 


584,491 62 


558,403 18 


26,088 44 


Bridge Service 


763,062 10 


721,482 77 


41,579 33 


Ferrv Service .... 


378,739 65 


329,713 28 


19,026 37 


Tunnel Service 


526,093 55 


479,198 19 


46,895 36 


Lighting Service 


1,151,283 26 


1,148,925 60 


2,357 66 


Paving Service 


1,362,396 00 


1,357,071 91 


5,324 0<» 


Sanitary Division . 


5,004,207 77 


5,026,284 04 


67,923 73 


Sewer Division 


7 ( . 17.043 04 


748,173 13 


48,86" I 91 


Workmen's Compensation 








Service * . . . . 


8,951 73 


7,781 41 


1,170 32 


Water Division 


2,761,867 39 


2,399,224 63 


362,642 76 


Totals . 


$13,482,548 30 


$12,830,079 07 


$652,469 23 



* On May 1 the Law Department assumed jurisdiction of this Service. 



Expenditures from Special Appropriations, etc. 



Bridges, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. (revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (revenue) .... 
Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of (revenue) 

Street Signs (revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (revenue) 
Public Ways, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Snow Removal 

Sewerage Works (revenue) 

Sewerage Works ('non-revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (non-revenue) .... 



Total $4,403,937 18 



$79,242 48 
240,431 89 
103,236 26 
116,672 77 
12,873 72 
159,201 29 
2,637,016 68 
527,602 25 
131,517 23 
391,049 46 

5,093 15 



10 



City Document No. 24. 



REVENUE. 

On Account of Public Works Department. 



Central Office: 

Charges for plans and specifications . 
Refund on telephone .... 

Automotive Division: 

Sale of junk 

Bridge Service: 

Rents 

Damage to property .... 

Sale of junk 

Refund on telephone .... 

Ferry Service: 

Tolls 

Rents 

Cleaning telephone booths . 
Commission on telephones . 

Refunds 

Sale of junk 

Sumner Tunnel : 

Tolls 

Rents 

Sale of junk 

Refund on telephones .... 



Lighting Service: 
Sale of junk . 



1,210 00 

4 78 



$609 22 



$3,130 00 

2,966 17 

38 40 

4 78 



$23,753 


12 


85 


00 


24 


00 


27 


15 


23 


09 


100 40 



1,214 78 



609 22 



6,139 35 



1,912,580 00 

750 00 

7 00 

19 12 



1,377 23 



24,012 76 



1,913,356 12 



1,377 23 



Paving Service: 

From assessments (added to taxes) 
on abutters for cost of laying side- 
walks in front of their premises 

Permits 

Rents 

Sale of materials 

Refund on telephones 

Contributions from Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under chapter 90 of 
General Laws for construction of 
public ways 



Sanitary Division: 

Sale of junk . . . . 
Damage to property 
Refund on telephones . 
Sale of garbage 
Sale of Ward Street station 
Dumping . . . . 
Rental of advertising space 



Carried forward 



$2,254 


12 




25,350 42 




825 


00 




361 


25 




90 


79 




252,551 


95 


281,433 53 






$402 85 




53 


65 




52 


88 




30,000 00 




1,155 


00 




1,200 00 




560 00 








33,424 38 










$2,261,567 37 



Public Works Department. 



11 







$2,261,567 37 


Sewer Division: 






Disposal of sewage 


$19,233 00 




Entrance fees 


3,350 54 




Sale of junk . 


718 82 




Rents .... 


158 00 




Refunds .... 


130 00 




Sale of materials . 


5,125 00 




Refund on telephones . 


38 24 




Cleaning drains 


90 00 


28,843 60 


Water Division: 




Water rates . 


$4,353,808 81 




Water rates added to taxes 


261,690 68 




Service pipes for new takers, ex- 




tending, repairing, etc. 


2,431 10 




Fees on overdue rates . 


18 00 




Sale of junk . 


4,659 73 




Damage to property 


2,984 29 




Labor and materials 


8,014 80 




Deposit account . 


72,473 18 




Elevator and fire pipe connections . 2,769 59 




Miscellaneous income . 


760 19 


4,709,610 37 










$7,000,021 34 



PART II. 

APPENDICES. 



(13) 



14 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following is the annual report of the Automotive 
Division, Public Works Department, for the year 
ending December 31, 1951: 

During the year 1951 the Automotive Division was 
the subject of an extensive survey conducted by the 
Boston Municipal Research Bureau. The bureau de- 
voted most of the year to a study of the automotive 
problems of the City of Boston and made many recom- 
mendations. One result of the survey w r as the forma- 
tion of the Mayor's Automotive Advisory Committee 
with the Division Engineer of the Automotive Division 
acting as Chairman. This committee is now engaged 
in considering the recommendations of the Boston 
Municipal Research Bureau and will report their Find- 
ings to the Commissioner of Public Works, Fire Com- 
missioner, Park Commissioner, City Auditor, and others 
concerned with the automotive equipment of the City 
of Boston. 

The policy of doing most of the repair work on Public 
Works Department equipment in our own shop was 
continued, and approximately 6,000 repair jobs, both 
major and minor, were done in 1951. This work con- 
sisted of general overhaul on snow fighters, sweepers, 
tractors, trucks, passenger cars, etc. In addition to 
this repair work our mechanics repaired tires, lubricated 
vehicles, operated portable lighting plants, and per- 
formed various other duties. Special equipment was 
purchased for our welding shop, and all minor body 
and fender repairs are now done by our own employees. 
A motor trouble analyzer has been purchased and 
should speed up the time spent in locating parts in 
need of repair. 



Public Works Department. 15 

An effort has been made to keep an adequate stock 
of parts on hand to avoid loss of time in waiting for 
parts. Two annual inventories have been taken since 
the creation of the Automotive Division; as of Decem- 
ber, 1950, auto parts, tires, batteries, chains, etc., in 
stock amounted to $43,705; the December, 1951, in- 
ventory amounted to $44,876. Plans are being made 
to increase the floor space in the present cramped 
quarters occupied by the stockroom. 

The division operates two wreckers and one service 
truck. The wreckers are used for disabled equipment 
and to haul heavy material such as tractors, edgestone, 
etc. A large transport trailer was purchased in 1951 
to assist in the hauling of heavy equipment. The serv- 
ice truck has been equipped with a compressor, grease 
gun, 50-ton jack, and impact wrench, and has proven 
very useful on road jobs, especially during snowstorms. 

Expenditures for the vear 1951 amounted to 
s558,403.18. Of this amount, payroll charges for 102 
emplovees amounted to $281,519.11, contractual serv- 
ices, $40,006.15, supplies and materials, 8142,403.05, 
current charges, $8,647.20, and new equipment, 
$85,827.67. 

Under the direction of the Division Engineer, the 
101 employees were engaged in the following duties: 
repair work, 38 employees; maintenance, gasoline and 
oil dispensing, cleaning, and watchman duties, etc., 
44 employees; stock-room work, 7 employees; wrecker 
operators, 3 employees; office work, 9 employees. 

Contractual service charges of $40,006.15 consisted 
of $26,196.97 for automotive repairs by outside repair 
shops. Some specialized work can be done better at 
outside shops and some work must be sent out when 
our shop is overloaded. This work included repairs to 
motors, transmissions, springs, glass, radiators, starters, 
generators, carburetors, etc. Charges for electricitv 
amounted to $3,717.04 and for gas fuel to $546.49. 
Maintenance and repair of buildings cost $6,270.94, 
largely for roof repairs, overhead doors, and transfer 
of gas tank and pump at Brighton. Telephone service 
amounted to $2,549.08, and $725.63 was spent for 
miscellaneous services such as cleaning of cover-alls, 
express charges, inspection of elevator and oil burners, 
etc. Expenditures of $142,403.05 for supplies and ma- 
terials consisted of $123,086.27 spent for automotive 
repair parts, gasoline and oil, antifreeze, chains, and 



16 



City Document No. 24. 



accessories. Building supplies amounted to $1,438.65, 
fuel oil for four garages amounted to $9,634.12, clean- 
ing supplies, $2,103.09, first aid supplies, $28.98, office 
supplies, $2,715.52, fire-fighting supplies, $28.70, and 
$3,367.72 was spent for general operating supplies such 
as wiping rags, waste, tools, clothing, etc. 

Expenditures for current charges consisted of $5 for 
subscription to City Record, $298.94 for insurance pre- 
miums on oil burners and compressors, $1,039.50 for 
registration of motor vehicles, and $7,302.76 for stor- 
age charges on vehicles stored in privately-owned ga- 
rages during the winter months. 

The Automotive Division expended $85,827.67 for 
new equipment. Some equipment is purchased from 
Snow Removal funds, and the Water Division and 
Sumner Traffic Tunnel Service pay for their new equip- 
ment from their own funds. New equipment added to 
the fleet in 1951 included one snow fighter, six bucket 
loaders, four street flushers, two street sweepers, two 
compressor trailers, eleven trucks, three carry-alls, one 
trailer, one truck-compressor, fifteen sedans, one salt 
spreader, and sixteen sand spreaders. The sand spread- 
ers are mounted for winter season on Dodge trucks. 
During other months these trucks carry two-ton dump 
bodies. 

The Public Works Department fleet represents an 
investment of $1,500,000 and consists of the following 
equipment, 466 units, 412 registered: 



139 Dump Trucks, 1^-to 2-ton 
2 Dump Truck, 5-ton 
2 Lumber Trucks 
5 Wreckers 

1 Large Transport Trailer 
1 Tractor Truck 
80 Pickup Trucks 

1 Aerial Truck 

2 Emergency Gate Closing 

Trucks 
5 Catch-Basin Cleaners 
1 Chlorinator Trailer 

14 Snow Fighters 

15 Bucket Loaders 

21 Large Street Sweepers 

4 Jeeps 
41 Sedans 

3 Snow Loaders 



3 Dempster-Dumpsters, 5- 
ton trucks 

3 Sanders, 5-ton trucks 

1 1 Truck-m o u n t e d Com- 
pressors 
2 Compressor Trailers 

2 Semi-Trailers 

4 Derrick Trucks 

3 Platform Trucks 

1 Service Truck 

15 Emergency Trucks 
6 Tool-Box Trailers 

2 Electric Welder Trailers 
6 Street Flushers 

2 Diesel Crawler Tractors 

5 Small Street Sweepers 
10 Carryalls 

1 Crane 

1 Sand Loader 



Public Works Department. 17 

1 Salt Spreader 16 Sand Spreaders— Baugh- 

1 Grader man mounted on Dodge 

2 Flexible Power Bucket 12 Gasoline Road Rollers 

Machines 1 Ackers Core Drill 

1 Concrete Mixer 3 Portable Generators 

3 Portable Lighting Plants 4 Power Lawn Mowers 
1 Paint Sprayer 2 Portable Heaters 

3 Asphalt Heating Trailers 2 Steam Cleaners 

The Automotive Division now operates four garages 
and dispenses gasoline at four other stations. The four 
garages are at 280 Highland street, Roxbury, 8,200 
square feet; 624 Albany street, South End, 22,000 square 
feet; 196 Hancock street, Dorchester, 8,800 square feet; 
and 11 Dana avenue, Hyde Park, 7,000 square feet. The 
other gasoline dispensing stations are at East Boston 
Paving Yard, Charlestown Sanitary Yard, Brighton Pav- 
ing Yard, and the Sumner Traffic Tunnel at East Boston. 



Mobile Patrol. 

The mobile patrol service for the protection of Public 
Works Department property and equipment was in- 
augurated on a temporary basis on November 8, 1950, 
and placed under the direction of the Division Engineer 
of the Automotive Division. Pickup trucks used during 
the day by the various foremen were assigned to the 
patrol, but this arrangement proved rather unsatis- 
factory and in January, 1951, five Ford sedans were 
assigned to the patrol for its exclusive use. 

These vehicles are used as patrol cars 16 hours daily, 
12 midnight to 8 a.m., and 4 p.m. to 12 midnight, and on 
Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays they are used around 
the clock. Mileage reports for these five vehicles 
amounted to 137,563 miles for the year 1951. While the 
primary function of the Mobile Patrol is to provide plant 
protection and security, it is sometimes called upon to 
render motor pool service during the regular business 
hours. This has made it necessary to utilize the services 
of a mobile guard assigned to care for and properly main- 
tain the vehicles during the day. Although this service 
sometimes interferes with the proper maintenance of the 
vehicles, cooperation in this respect is always given. 

The original tentative program set up by the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works called for the following temporary 
personnel: 1 supervisor, 1 clerk, 4 chiefs, 30 mobile 
guards. 



18 City Document No. 24. 

However, it was the Commissioner's intention to pro- 
vide a two-man patrol for each vehicle and route while 
the service was being rendered. It was subsequently 
deemed advisable to operate a one-man patrol due to the 
fact that considerable difficulty was encountered in re- 
cruiting competent and qualified men. In numerous in- 
stances the inability of men recruited for the Mobile 
Patrol to adapt themselves to night work has resulted in 
a large turnover in the force. At present it is operating 
with a force of 21 men. Examinations were held during 
1951 for the various positions, and it is hoped to set up 
the personnel on a permanent basis very shortly. 

This service is a radical departure from the old method 
of operating in this department and, while the perform- 
ance during 1951 has left much to be desired, successful 
operation of the service should result in considerable 
saving to the city. The cost of the service during 1951 
including motor vehicle cost was approximately $100,000, 
against approximately $300,000 for the previous system 
of protection. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Leo McGrath, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 19 

Report of Cost Records for 1951. 
Automotive Equipment. 

This report shows the actual cost of the vehicles in 
the Public Works Department, Automotive Division, 
for the year ended December 31, 1951. The cost items 
involved are labor, overhead, material, tires and tubes, 
batteries, outside repairs, gasoline, oil, storage, depreci- 
ation, and registration fees. 

Labor. — This item represents the cost of the actual 
repair time expended on a vehicle by our own mechanics. 
For the year 1951, the rate was $1.41 per hour from 
January through May, and $1.53 per hour from June 
through December. 

Overhead. — This item is made up of an accumulation 
of the cost of the Highland Street Garage and contains 
such charges as indirect labor, fuel oil used, building 
repairs, depreciation on building, electricity used, gas 
used, tool expense, telephone expense, and miscellaneous 
expenses. From each month's overhead are deducted 
the inside storage for the month and the distribution 
charge for gasoline and oil. The remaining amount is 
divided by the number of actual direct labor-hours, and 
the result gives the amount of overhead per hour. An 
attempt is made, however, to establish a rate suitable 
for the year rather than to have a different rate each 
month. 

Material. — This item represents the cost of all parts 
used on repair jobs here at the garage, as well as ac- 
cessories, exclusive of tires, tubes, and batteries. 

Tires and Tubes. — This item shows the cost of tires 
and tubes used by each vehicle. 

Batteries. — This item shows the cost of batteries 
used by each vehicle. 

Outside Repairs. — This item represents the cost of 
repairs done by private concerns outside our own 
garage. 

Gasoline. — This item represents the cost of the gaso- 
line used plus a distribution cost of four cents a gallon, 
which is a deduction from overhead. 

Oil. — This item represents the cost of the oil used 
plus a distribution cost of two cents a quart, which is a 
deduction from overhead. 

Storage. — This item is divided into outside storage 
and inside storage. Outside storage is the amount 
charged for the vehicles stored at outside garages during 



20 



City Document No. 24. 



the winter months. Inside storage is the amount 
charged for vehicles stored in our own garages. It is a 
deduction from overhead. 

Depreciation. — Depreciation is figured on a straight 
line basis, that is, cost divided by estimated life in 
months equals estimated depreciation per month. Due 
to the uncertain economic conditions no consideration is 
given to a residual value at the time the rate is estab- 
lished. Because of this a longer estimated life is used 
in the calculations. It has been determined from experi- 
ence that this procedure leads to a fairly accurate 
depreciation cost over the life of a vehicle. 

Registration Fees. — This item represents the amount 
charged by the Registry of Motor Vehicles for plates 
and certificate. 

The following is a classification of the vehicles in the 
Public Works Department, Automotive Division, accord- 
ing to capacity, showing the Average Yearly Cost, 
the Average Yearly Mileage, and the Average 
Cost Per Mile. 





Number 


Average 


Average 


Average 


Type. 


of 


Yearly 


Yearly 


Cost 




Vehicles. 


Cost. 


Mileage. 


per Mile. 


7- to 10-ton 


14 


$4,520 32 


1,537 


$2 941 


8-ton 


1 


2,179 95 


1,378 


1 582 


6-ton 


1 


3,755 71 


— 


— 


5-ton 


8 


2,719 87 


5,045 


537 


3- to 5-ton 


1 


2,261 59 


835 


2 708 


3-ton 


1 


820 64 


5,121 


160 


2-ton 


67 


1,444 83 


5,899 


245 


H-ton 


105 


1,345 53 


4,397 


306 


1-ton 


9 


961 32 


6,490 


148 


5-ton 


80 


1,051 72 


8,829 


119 


Sweepers 


25 


2,412 23 


1,737 


1 389 


Loaders 


14 
2 


1,564 47 
1,731 70 




. — . 


Crawler Tractors . . 


— 


Road Grader 


1 


1,063 42 


— 


— 


Caterpillar Crane. . 


1 


641 77 


— 


— 


Rollers 


12 


122 51 


— 


— 


Passenger Cars .... 


50 


1,079 63 


12,074 


089 



Public Works Department. 21 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR 1950 and 1951. 



Type. 


Average 
Yearly Cost. 


Average 
Yearly Mileage. 


Average Cost 
Per Mile. 




1950. 


1951. 


1950. 


1951. 


1950. 


1951. 


7- to 10-ton 


$3,735 05 
2,341 51 
2,566 28 
3,071 80 
2,065 77 

908 82 
1,348 54 
1,327 52 

894 27 
1,050 01 
2,660 28 
1,445 36 
1,848 22 
1.407 66 

429 83 

136 37 
1,201 92 


$4,520 32 
2,179 95 
3,755 71 
2,719 87 
2,261 59 

820 64 
1,444 83 
1,345 53 

961 32 
1,051 72 
2,412 23 
1,564 47 
1,731 70 
1,063 42 

641 77 

122 51 
1,079 63 


1,450 
2,255 

5,587 
245 
4,211 
5,945 
4,934 
7,472 
9,770 

11,017 


1,537 
1,378 

5,045 
835 
5,121 
5,899 
4,397 
6,490 
8,829 
1,737 

12,074 


$2 576 
1 058 

550 
8 432 
216 
227 
269 
120 
108 

109 


$2 941 


8-ton 


1 582 


6-ton 




5-ton 


537 


3- to 5-ton 

3-ton 


2 708 
160 


2-ton . . 


245 


1 ^-ton 


306 


1-ton 


148 


^-ton 


119 


Sweepers . . 


1 389 


Loaders/. 

Crawler Tractors .... 

Road Grader 

Caterpillar Crane .... 

Rollers 

Passenger Cars 


089 



7= to 10=Ton Snowfighter Sandspreaders (14 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


P-285 


1943 Walter 


$5,284 60 
4,256 37 
5,649 84 
4,140 44 

. 4,788 76 
5,213 36 
3,613 01 
4,631 39 
3,799 53 
4,499 11 
3,905 34 
4,156 68 
6,597 95 
2,748 20 


947 
1,040 
1,468 
1,119 
1,501 
1,670 
1,196 
1,559 
1,338 
1,591 
1,437 
1,658 
3,493 
1,511 


$5 581 


P-290 


1945 Walter. . r 


4 093 


P-373 


1949 Walter.. 


3 849 


P-363 


1948 Walter 


3 700 


P-354 


1947 Walter 


3 190 


P-361 


1948 Walter.. 


3 121 


P-289 


1944 Walter.. 


3 021 


P-362 


1948 Walter 


2 971 


P-284 


1943 Walter.. 


2 840 


P-374 


1949 Walter 


2 828 


P-283 


1942 Walter 


2 738 


P-355 


1947 Walter. . 


2 507 


P-272 


1942 Walter 


1 889 


P-404 


1951 Walter.. 


1 819 










Group Average 


$4,520 32 


1,537 


$2 941 









8=Ton Truck (1 Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


TS-21 


1949 G.M.C. Wrecker 


$2,179 95 


1,378 


$1 582 



99 



City Document No. 24. 

2=Ton Trucks (67 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



Se-148 

Se-149 

Se-165 

Se-147 

S-525 

Se-150 

W-303 

Se-155 

S-486 

Se-151 

S-502 

S-489 

S-556 

P 372 

S-512 

S-500 

W 261 

W-319 

Se-154 

Se-152 

S 509 

S-552 

S 526 

VV-306 

S 501 

S-557 

S-558 

S-503 

B-2G 

S-513 

P 368 

P-378 

S-488 

P-367 

P-376 

S-555 

S-510 

S-496 

P-370 

S-554 

S-553 

S-508 

S-504 

S-559 

S-550 

B-27 

VV-305 

S-487 

P-379 

P-377 

P-369 

P-366 

S-551 

W-287 

W-279 

W-330 



1948 
1948 
1948 
1948 
1948 
1948 
1949 
1948 
1948 
1948 
1948 
1948 
L949 
I '.MS 
1948 
L948 
[948 
L950 
1948 
I IMS 
L948 
1949 
I '.MS 
L949 
1948 
L949 
L949 
1948 
1948 
1948 
194S 
L949 
1948 
1948 
L949 
1949 
1 948 
I '.MS 
1948 
L949 
1949 
1948 
1948 
1949 
1949 
1948 
1949 
L948 
1949 
L949 
1948 
1948 
1949 
1948 
1948 
1951 



Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Foid 
Foid 
Ford 
Foid 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Foid 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Foid 
Foid 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Foid 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 
Ford 



Netco CBC. . . . 
Netco CBC. . . . 
Dump COF:... 
Netco CBC. . . . 
Dump COF. . . 
Netco CBC. . . . 

Derrick 

Dump ........ 

Dump 

Netco CBC. . . . 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump COF.. . 

Dump 

Derrick 

Davies Comp. . 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Davies ( 'oinp. . 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

IR Compressor 
Dump COE.. . 
Dump COE. . . 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

IR Compressor 
Davies Comp. . 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Dump 

Derrick 

< irate Closing-. . . 
Dump 



$2,416 34 
2,254 66 
1,473 29 
2,309 16 

1.647 03 
2.106 49 
1,635 85 
1.423 81 
1,695 61 
2,115 92 
1,264 57 
1,281 98 
1,416 85 
2,017 99 
1,250 53 
1,544 68 
1.480 01 
1,680 93 
1,542 34 
1,219 66 
1,32] 17 
1,609 58 
2.012 SI 
2.17:; 10 
1,173 83 
1,430 7:-! 
l.0.-)4 64 
1,395 35 
1,161 85 
1,104 20 
1,587 34 
1,387 70 
1.231 65 
1,355 L3 
1,035 40 
1.104 27 
1,416 27 
1,290 06 
1,326 33 
1,240 25 
1,440 41 
1,323 17 
1.098 64 

1.648 54 
1.081 04 

993 94 
2,144 51 
1.201 41 
1,100 93 
1.009 05 
i. MOO 91 
1,070 55 
1,885 62 

824 86 
2.001 14 

802 74 



3,046 
3,172 
2,286 
3,974 
3,166 
4,438 
3,597 
3,292 
4,100 
5,340 
3,247 
3,420 
3,946 
5,645 
3,527 
4,723 
4,642 
5.202 
1,891 
4,037 
4,419 
5,381 
0,002 
8,567 
4,142 
5.089 
5,899 
5,005 
4,237 
4,281 
5,981 
5,496 
4,886 
5,401 
4,181 
4,071 
6,108 
5,574 
5,071 
5,720 
6,718 
6,180 
5,271 
7,950 
5,385 
5,004 

10,820 
6,221 
5,778 
5,899 
7,508 
5,876 

10.300 
4.592 

L2,899 
5.095 



$0 793 
711 
644 
581 
520 
475 
455 
433 
414 
396 
389 
374 
359 
357 
355 
327 
319 
318 
315 
302 
299 
299 
292 
289 
283 
281 
280 
279 
274 
272 
265 
252 
252 
251 
248 
236 
232 
231 
222 
217 
215 
214 
208 
207 
201 
199 
198 
196 
191 
186 
182 
182 
181 
180 
162 
158 



Public Works Department. 

2=Ton Trucks. — Concluded. 



23 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly Yearly 
Cost. Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


S-507 


1948 Ford Dump 


$1,214 96 
1,147 57 

695 63 
1,310 37 
1,210 33 
2,011 81 
1,071 99 

990 41 
1.210 90 
1,212 51 
1,307 04 


7,970 
7,591 
4,616 
8,979 
8,298 

13,972 
7,518 
7,036 
8,927 
9,184 

11,803 


$0 152 


W-292 


1948 Ford Derrick 


152 


B-28 


1948 Ford Lumber 


151 


W-286 
W-329 


1948 Ford Hydrant Carrier. 
1951 Ford Dump 


146 

146 


W-284 
W-331 
Se-153 
W-328 
P-380 


1948 Ford Gate Closing 
1951 Ford Dump 

1948 Ford Dump 

1951 Ford Dump 

1949 Ford Dump 


144 
143 
141 
136 
132 


S-506 


1948 Ford Dump COE 


111 




Group Average 


$1,444 83 


5,899 


$0 245 



2=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Make. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



5NetcoCBC 

5 Dump COE.... 

5 Compressors 

4 Derricks 

44 Dumps 

2 Gate Closing. . . 

1 Lumber 

1 Hydrant Carrier 

67 Group Average . 



$2,240 51 


3,994 


1.368 43 


5,013 


1,690 87 


6,784 


1,272 07 


5,106 


1,343 34 


5,805 


2,051 48 


13,436 


695 63 


4,616 


1,310 37 


8,979 


$1,444 83 


5,899 



$0 561 
273 
249 
249 
231 
153 
151 
146 



$0 245 



l}/2=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Type. 



Average 

Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 

Yearly 

Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



3 Wreckers $2,074 45 

11 Dumps COE 1,102 90 

5 Compressors 1,524 54 

14 Sanders 1,325 45 

1 Rack 502 54 

63 Dumps 1 ,409 77 

3 Emergence's | 1,244 95 

2 Stakes 1.100 69 



1 Tractor. 
1 Express. 
1 Flusher. 



382 31 
679 27 
430 33 



105 Group Average . 



1,345 53 



4,442 
2,522 
4,658 
4,073 
1,571 
4,812 
5,628 
5,130 
2,064 
3,730 
2,636 



4,397 



$0 467 
437 
327 
325 
320 
293 
221 
215 
185 
182 
163 



$0 306 



24 



City Document No. 24. 

1^-Ton Trucks (105 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



S-472 

S-423 

S-461 

S-468 

B-31 

S-518 

S-437 

S-429 

8-474 

P-324 

W-256 

S-460 

S-424 

S-477 

S-410 

S-523 

S-481 

S-485 

TS-15 

S-455 

G-57 

Se-160 

8-431 

P-342 

S-430 

S-492 

S-476 

P-305 

Se-133 

S-493 

S-521 

S-480 

S-442 

S-469 

P-341 

S-470 

P-304 

S-427 

S-491 

S-448 

S-517 

S-456 

W-254 

S-439 

S-447 

S-422 

P-335 

TS-19 

S-482 

S-453 

P-349 

S-428 

S-454 

S-519 

S-443 



1947 Ford DumpCOE. 
1947 Ford Dump COE. 
1947 Ford DumpCOE. 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

194/ Ford Jaeger Comp 
1947 Ford DumpCOE. 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Wrecker 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

194/ Ford Wrecker 

1947 Ford Dump 

l'.tli Ford Wrecker 

1947 Ford Dump COE. 
1947 Ford Dump COE. 
1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump. . . . 

1948 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford IR Comp.... 

1948 Dodge Sander.... 
1948 Dodge Sander. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Sander. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford IR Comp. . . 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE. 
1947 Ford Dump COE. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Rack 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander.... 
1947 Dodge Dump 



$403 05 

1,133 18 

605 46 

1,506 21 

1.015 24 
1,502 62 
2,178 40 

946 80 

1.878 50 
1,737 68 
2,034 25 
1,432 99 
1,771 15 
1,419 27 
1,690 79 
1,523 16 
1,515 65 
1,755 20 
1,653 02 
1,744 16 

2.879 55 
1,996 71 
1,098 30 
2,320 68 
1,093 97 
1,378 89 
1.U70 97 
1,528 65 
1,456 20 
1,262 89 
1,267 15 
1,451 44 
1,952 99 
1,242 77 
1,631 85 
1,476 38 
1,337 52 
1,204 71 
1,164 80 
1,904 06 
1,463 29 
1,600 01 
1,700 72 
1,397 09 

932 26 
1,210 36 
1,434 92 

502 54 

2.016 34 
1,746 43 
1,283 42 
1,169 67 
1,414 07 
1,269 40 
1,369 33 



186 
678 
373 
1,768 
1,376 
2,301 
3,465 
1,596 
3,192 
3,044 
3,618 
2,554 
3,242 
2,796 
3,369 
3,133 
3,171 
3,736 
3,581 
3,781 
6,377 
4,465 
2,509 
5,320 
2,524 
3,288 
4,062 
3,857 
3,709 
3,274 
3,342 
3,839 
5,187 
3,303 
4,459 
4,092 
3,708 
3,463 
3,365 
5,526 
4,279 
4,715 
5,171 
4,248 
2,875 
3,756 
4,466 
1,571 
6,369 
5,569 
4,165 
3,789 
4,627 
4,213 
4,590 



K2 167 
1 671 
1 623 
852 
738 
653 
629 
593 
589 
571 
562 
561 
546 
508 
502 
486 
478 
470 
462 
461 
452 
447 
438 
436 
433 
419 
411 
396 
393 
386 
379 
378 
377 
376 
366 
361 
361 
348 
346 
345 
342 
339 
329 
329 
324 
322 
321 
320 
317 
314 
308 
308 
306 
301 
298 



Public Works Department. 

I34=Ton Trucks. — Concluded. 



25 



Department 
No. 



Year and Make. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 

Per Mile. 



S-524 

P-356 

S-494 

S-440 

P-325 

W-255 

P-333 

P-317 

S-475 

S-515 

P-318 

S-522 

P-331 

P-309 

S-516 

S-409 

Se-127 

S-444 

P-326 

P-329 

S-434 

S-441 

S-520 

P-332 

Se-135 

P-337 

P-334 

P-338 

P-307 

S-438 

Se-129 

Se-134 

P-323 

S-478 

Se-122 

P-322 

Se-137 

S-436 

W-224 

Se-124 

P-314 

P-328 

P-339 

S-433 

P-303 

S-473 

Se-136 

P-336 

TS-11 

P-308 



1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Jaeger Comp. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander. ... 

1946 Ford Stake 

1947 Ford Emergency. , 
1947 Ford Dump.. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump COE. 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1948 Dodge Sander. ... 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Emergency. 
1947 Ford Dump...!.. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump 

1946 Ford Emergency. 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1940 Ford Tractor 

1945 Ford IRComp... 
1947 Ford Stake Winch 

194< Ford Express 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump. . . . 

1946 Ford Dump 

1947 Dodge Dump. . . . 

1947 Ford Dump 

1947 Ford Dump 

1936 Ford Flusher.. .. 
1946 Ford Dump 

Group Average 



; 1.325 22 
1,620 68 
1,342 17 
1,113 27 
1,323 37 

1.302 56 
1.547 87 
1,818 17 
1,682 41 

1.172 50 
1,250 48 
1,348 37 
1,429 51 
1,261 00 
1,378 77 
1,208 86 
1,177 32 
1,350 41 
1,016 61 
1,404 38 
1,203 09 
1,233 96 
1,293 25 

1.303 37 
1.051 06 
1,130 25 
1,007 22 
1,370 65 
1,221 96 
1,182 27 

1.173 23 
1,259 41 
1,133 92 
1.161 11 
1,384 29 
1,449 31 

780 68 

382 31 

1,128 98 

992 52 

679 27 

1,247 41 

1,143 44 

937 97 

1,370 26 

1,135 25 

900 93 

1,426 64 

430 33 

815 17 



4,559 
5,589 
4,648 
3,846 
4,722 
4,648 
5.663 
6,735 
6,293 
4,452 
4.77S 
5,208 
5,545 
4,996 
5,493 
4,843 
4,719 
5,444 
4,098 
5,790 
4,957 
5,103 
5,457 
5,578 
4,502 
4.973 
4,501 
6,177 
5.512 
5,510 
5,483 
5,938 
5,408 
5,556 
6,681 
7,405 
4,200 
2,064 
6.145 
5,416 
3,730 
6,907 
6,332 
5,188 
7,671 
6,398 
5,122 
8,724 
2,636 
5,303 



SO 291 
290 
289 
289 
280 
280 
273 
270 
267 
263 
262 
259 
258 
252 
251 
250 
249 
248 
248 
243 
243 
242 
237 
234 
233 
227 
224 
222 
222 
215 
214 
212 
210 
209 
207 
196 
186 
185 
184 
183 
182 
181 
181 
181 
178 
177 
176 
164 
163 
154 



[,345 53 



4.397 



$0 306 



26 



City Document No. 24. 

J 2-Ton Pickups (80 Vehicles). 



Department 

No. 



Yeah and Make. 



Yearly 

Cost. 



Yearly- 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



P-320 

S-498 

S-414 

8-47'. t 

W 296 

P-321 

P-302 

S-411 

S-272 

P-347 

S-413 

Se-141 

Se-128 

S-450 

S-535 

W-266 

S-417 

S-495 

W-297 

P-346 

S-459 

S-410 

1' 344 

S-538 

Se-138 

Se-131 

Se-110 

W-314 

VV-31] 

P-340 

S-419 

Se-139 

S-435 

S-451 

S-458 

P-330 

W-313 

Se-110 

Se-140 

S-490 

P-343 

S-536 

P-348 

W-295 

Se-118 

W-298 

W-308 

TS-16 

S-514 

P-319 

W-315 

S-471 

P-412 

G-59 

W-262 

W-317 



1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford . . 
1947 Ford. . 
] 947 Ford . . 

1949 Ford. . 
1947 Ford.. 

1946 Ford. . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 
1!I47 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 

1947 Ford. . 

1949 Ford. . 

1948 Ford. . 

1947 Ford . . 

1948 Ford. . 

1949 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 
1947 Ford. . 
J 947 Ford . . 

1949 Ford . . 
1947 Ford.. 
1947 Ford . . 

1946 G.M.C 

1950 Ford . . 
1950 Ford. . 

1947 Ford. . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford. . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1947 Ford . . 
1950 Ford. . 
1947 Ford.. 

1947 Ford.. 

1948 Ford.. 
1947 Ford.. 

1949 Ford.. 
1947 Ford.. 
1949 Ford . . 

1946 G.M.C 

1949 Ford.. 

1950 Ford.. 

1947 Ford.. 

1948 Ford.. 
1947 Ford.. 
1950 Ford.. 

1947 Ford.. 

1948 Ford.. 
1950 Ford.. 
1948 Ford.. 
1950 Ford.. 



$2,087 36 
1,805 91 
1,464 46 
1,086 95 
1,463 74 
1,000 60 
1,441 14 
1,492 04 

932 64 

965 34 
1,100 14 
1,246 57 

889 58 
2,055 53 
1,475 79 

785 91 
1,673 58 
1,222 45 

761 91 
1,587 89 

959 68 
1,327 13 
1,389 10 
1,226 99 

1.149 31 
812 52 
672 73 

1,229 30 
1,052 28 

1.021 92 
1,459 07 

971 59 

896 54 

1,384 77 

1,201 55 

1,018 65 

1.150 86 
1,026 68 
1,329 11 

950 27 
680 10 
1,000 30 
955 86 
633 03 
753 61 
979 29 
823 33 

1.022 80 
940 47 
748 90 

1,554 98 
926 87 
965 15 
961 39 
940 95 
825 87 



7,455 
7,125 
5,789 
4,719 
(1,442 
4.475 
6,875 
7,606 
4,813 
5,136 
6,023 
7,131 
5,218 

12,522 
9,065 
4,865 

10,594 
8,486 
5,286 

11,070 
6,749 
9,447 

10,099 
8,880 
8,386 
5,932 
4,982 
9,108 
7,779 
7,607 

11,094 
7,373 
6,891 

10,910 
9,489 
8,409 
9,599 
8,620 

11,274 
8,260 
5,912 
8,794 
8,494 
5,874 
7,070 
9,196 
7,740 
9,770 
8,965 
7,152 

15,355 
9,293 
9,739 
9,749 
9,608 
8,463 



$0 280 
253 
253 
230 
227 
224 
210 
19b 
193 
188 
183 
175 
170 
164 
163 
162 
158 
144 
144 
143 
142 
140 
138 
138 
137 
137 
135 
135 
135 
134 
132 
132 
130 
127 
127 
121 
120 
119 
118 
115 
115 
114 
113 
108 
107 
106 
106 
105 
105 
104 
101 
100 
099 
098 
098 
098 



Public \Vorks Department. 

J^=Ton Pickups. — Concluded. 



27 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


W-299 
W-316 


1949 Ford 


$1,086 28 
608 35 


11,180 

6,253 

11,370 

9,500 

8,849 

11,591 

5,764 

11,477 

11,820 

8,651 

9,424 

13,517 

6,614 

14,410 

10,131 

13,796 

10,867 

7,002 

9,411 

9,078 

15,960 

13,043 

11,315 

12,524 


$0 097 


1950 Ford 


097 


S-425 
S-562 


L947 Ford 

1949 Ford 


1.095 86 
909 16 
845 41 

1,099 60 
550 77 

1,080 89 

1,087 23 
775 18 
841 06 

1,161 16 
567 98 

1,202 49 
822 47 

1,073 05 
831 33 
541 81 
656 34 
633 05 

1.040 37 
815 62 
638 33 
691 49 


096 
096 


W-300 


L949 Ford 


096 


S-542 


1949 Ford 


095 


P-345 
P-315 

S-543 


1947 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1949 Ford 


095 
094 
092 


W-310 


1950 Ford 


090 


W-312 


1950 Ford 


089 


S-426 
S-452 


1947 Ford 

1947 Ford 


086 
086 


S-541 


1949 Ford 


083 


G-58 


1 950 Ford 


081 


S-432 
W-268 


1947 Ford 

1948 Ford 


078 
077 


W-294 


1949 Ford 


077 


Se-132 


1947 Ford 


070 


S-457 
S-412 
W-309 


1947 Ford 

1947 Ford 

1950 Ford 


070 
065 
063 


S-418 


1947 Ford 


056 


W-271 


1947 Ford 


055 










Group Average 


$1,051 72 


8,829 


$0 119 



=Ton Trucks (9 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. "cost 5 " 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


G-60 


1 950 Ford Express 


$883 47 

1,026 10 

1,052 09 

1,028 65 

897 52 

952 13 

1,126 58 

689 58 

995 73 


3,204 
5,394 
5,831 
6,170 
6,143 
6,764 
9,501 
5,991 
9,411 


$0 276 


W-269 
W-276 


1948 Ford Express 

1948 Ford Express 


190 
180 


W-275 


1948 Ford Express 


167 


W-301 


1948 Ford Express 


146 


W-273 

W-274 
W-291 
W-270 


1948 Ford Express 

1948 Ford Express 

1948 Ford Express 

1948 Ford Express 


141 
119 
115 
106 










Group Average 


$961 32 


6,490 


$0 148 









6=Ton Truck (1 Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


G-56 


1947 Diamond T Wrecker . . 


$3,755 71 


— 


— 



28 



City Document No. 24. 

3= to 5=Ton Truck (1 Vehicle). 



Department 

No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


P-385 


1946 Mack Sander 


$2,261 59 


835 


$2 708 





3=Ton Truck (1 


Vehicle). 






Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


B-29 


1948 Ford Lumber 


$820 64 


5,121 


$0 160 









5=Ton Trucks (8 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 


S-381 
P-410 


1942 White Flusher 

1945 White Sander 


$4,991 46 
1,824 72 
1,526 22 
2,472 12 
1,781 27 
2,906 03 
2,884 89 
3,372 27 


3,826 
1,443 
1,211 
3,839 
2,776 
6,414 
6,954 
13,897 


$1 305 
1 265 


P-409 


1945 White Sander 


1 260 


S-466 


1947 White Dump 


644 


S-398 


1945 White Dump 


642 


S-463 
S-465 
S-464 


1947 White Dempster Dump 
1947 White Dempster Dump 
1947 White Dump 


453 
415 
243 










Group Average 


$2,719 87 


5,045 


$0 537 









5=Ton Trucks Classified According to Type. 



Type. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 

Yearly 

Mileage 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



1 Flusher 

2 Sanders 

2 Dempster Dumps tors 

3 Dumps 

S Group Average 



$4,991 46 
1,675 47 
2,895 46 
2,541 89 



2,719 87 



3,826 
1,327 
6,684 
6,837 



5 045 



U 305 
1 263 
433 
372 



$0 537 



Public Works Department. 29 

lj2=Ton Trucks Classified According to Make. 



Make. 


Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 


Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 


Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 


30 Dodges 
75 Fords. 




$1,360 62 
1,339 49 


4,134 
4,502 


$0 329 




298 






105 Group 


Average 


$1,345 53 


4,397 


$0 306 






3^=Ton Pickups Classified According to Make. 


Make. 


Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 


Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 


Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 


78 Fords 


$1,060 40 
713 17 


8,901 
6,026 


$0 119 


2G.M.C.'s 


118 


80 Group A 


verage 


$1,051 72 


8,829 


$0 119 






Sweepers (25 Vehicles). 


Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


Yearly 
Mileage. 


Cost 
Per Mile. 



S-385 
S-546 
S-532 
S-382 
S-530 
S-531 
S-547 
S-549 
S-534 
S-528 
S-572 
S-544 
S-545 
S-527 
S-565 
S-548 
S-567 
S-566 
S-564 
S-368 
S-383 
S-387 
S-388 
S-533 
S-571 



1944 
1949 
1949 
1942 
1949 
1949 
1949 
1949 
1942 
1948 
1949 
1949 
1949 
1948 
1950 
1949 
1950 
1950 
1950 
1941 
1942 
1945 
1945 
1942 
1947 



Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Austin Western. 
Austin Western . 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Austin Western . 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Austin Western. 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Wayne 



Elgi 
Elgi 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Austin Western . 



534 87 
378 05 
699 55 
966 39 
984 24 
966 65 
193 77 
506 37 
309 35 
331 27 
456 08 
467 58 
670 39 
359 00 
706 61 
023 34 
704 65 
488 08 
236 23 
853 59 
717 06 
728 17 
721 26 
716 00 
587 22 



319 

1,805 

2,174 

993 

1,533 

1,099 

2,492 

2,723 

865 

1,758 

2,716 

2,744 

3,751 

2,132 

1,894 

5,088 

2,823 

2,591 

3,919 

not used 

not used 

not used 

not used 

not used 

not used 



$4 812 



980 
162 



1 980 



1 947 
1 789 
1 683 
1 655 
1 514 
1 326 
1 272 
1 264 
1 245 
1 106 
901 
781 
604 
574 
571 



Group Average. 



2,412 23 



1,737 



$1 389 



30 



City Document No. 24. 

Buffalo Springfield Rollers (12 Vehicles). 



Dept. No. 



Year. 



Weight and Type. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



R-29 

R-30 
R-32 

R-33 
R-34 
R-35 
R-36 
R-37 
R-38 
R-39 
R-40 
R-41 



1930 
1931 
1939 
1939 
1939 
1940 
1940 
1941 
1941 
1949 
1949 
L949 



6-ton Road Roller 

6-ton Road Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Sidewalk Roller 

2-ton Tandem with towing attachment . 
2-ton Tandem with towing attachment . 
2-ton Tandem with towing attachment. 



Group Average. 



$190 98 
281 13 

32 64 
229 54 
167 67 
1 00 
121 73 
177 15 

29 28 

65 75 
154 26 

18 98 



$122 51 



Sweepers Classified According to Make. 



Make. 



Average 
Yearly 
( lost. 



Average 

Yearly 

Mileage. 



Average 
I !os1 

Per Mile. 



I Austin Westerns 

14 Elgins 

1 Wayne 

5 Klgins 

I Austin Western 

25 Group Average . 



S2,410 29 

3,188 33 

1,704 65 

747 22 

587 22 



$2,412 23 



1,631 
2,434 

2,823 
not used 

not used 



2,285 



$1 478 
1 310 
604 



$1 389 



Loaders (14 Vehicles). 




P-357 
S-568 
S-569 
P 358 
P-402 
P-359 
P-398 
P-399 
P-397 
P-396 
P-400 
P-394 
P-401 
P-395 



1948 
1950 
1950 

L947 

1950 
1948 
1951 
1951 
1950 
1950 
1951 
1950 
1951 
1950 



Barber Greene 
Wagnermobile. 
Wagnermobile 

Barber Greene. 

Barber Greene. 
Barber Greene. 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 

Trojan 



$2,248 00 

2,230 34 

2,072 32 

2,032 94 

1,815 76 

1,785 88 

1,400 97 

1,379 12 

1,244 95 

1,222 63 

1,210 70 

1,209 06 

1,027 76 

1.022 08 



Group Average 



[,564 47 



Public Works Department. 

Loaders Classified According to Make. 



31 



.Make. 



Average 

Yearly 

Cost. 



2 Wagnermobiles . 

4 Barber Greenes. 

5 Trojans 



S2,151 33 
1,970 65 
1,214 66 



14 Group Average . 



1,564 47 



Tractors {2 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


P-364 


1948 AUis Chalmers Crawler Tractor 


$2,030 26 
1,433 14 


P-365 


1948 AUis Chalmers Crawler Tractor 






$1 731 70 









Grader (1 Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


P-350 1947 Huber Road Grader 


$1,003 42 



Crane (I Vehicle). 



Department 
No. 


Year and Make. 


Yearly 
Cost. 


W-191 


1939-22-ton Portable Crane on Caterpillar 


$641 77 



Passenger Cars Classified According to Type. 



Type. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 

Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



6 Jeeps .... 
37 Sedans . . . 

7 Carryalls. 



50 Group Average . 



$871 84 

1,187 91 

685 42 



$1,079 63 



6,232 

13,722 

8,366 



12,074 



$0 140 
087 
082 



$0 089 



32 



City Document No. 24. 

Passenger Cars (50 Vehicles). 



Department 
No. 



Year, Make and Type. 



Yearly 
Cost. 



Yearly 
Mileage. 



Cost 
Per Mile. 



Se-143 . 
P-353.. 
S-539 . 
B-33... 
TS-20. . 
P-352.. 
P-388.. 
.MP 2.. 
TS-24. . 
C-11-.. 
P-382. . 
P-381.. 
Se-158. 
P -411.. 
W-321 . 
W-230. 
W-293 . 
W-304. 
W-325. 
S-561.. 
W-323. 
P-351.. 
TS-27. . 
TS-22. . 
Se-163. 
W-322. 
W-318. 
G-61. . 
W-326. 
L-6.... 
P-389.. 
P-392.. 
W-324. 
P-393. . 
MP-3. . 
MP-1 . . 
MP-5.. 
P-383.. 
Se-162. 
MP-4.. 
W-335 . 
S-563 . . 
B-32. . . 
P-390. . 
Se-161. 
W-307. 
Se-164. 
P-391.. 
B-36... 
TS-23.. 



1947 Willys Jeep 

1947 Willys Jeep 

L949 Ford Sedan 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall. . 

1948 Willys Jeep 

1947 Willys Jeep 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall. . 

1949 Ford Sedan 

L949 Ford Sedan 

1949 Buick Sedan 

L949 Ford Sedan 

1949 Ford Sedan 

1950 Buick Sedan 

1947 Buick Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1946 Buick Sedan 

1949 Buick Sedan 

L949 Ford Sedan 

1953 Ford Sedan 

19 19 Buick Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1947 Willys Jeep 

1951 Willvs Jeep 

1949 Buick Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall. . 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall.. 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall . . 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1949 Ford Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall. . 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 DeSoto Sedan 

1950 Ford Sedan 

1950 Chevrolet Carryall . . 

1951 Ford Sedan 

1949 Ford Sedan 

Group Average 



$1,158 

1,001 

687 

536 

855 

943 

859 

2,316 

796 

1,497 

1,665 

1,368 

1,368 

1,310 

1,290 

1,673 

1,202 

866 

1.159 

1,378 

983 

841 

431 

1,693 

1,038 

638 

986 

978 

718 

823 

657 

819 

684 

641 

2,238 

2,176 

2,487 

881 

819 

2,045 

862 

1,044 

714 

690 

717 

854 

623 

591 

873 

486 



91 

01 
20 
40 
25 
17 
96 
65 
84 
08 
43 
35 
92 
23 
57 
23 
76 
7. 
15 
42 
92 
04 
63 
55 
51 
02 
14 
42 
49 
38 
57 
94 
83 
99 
08 
67 
57 
65 
71 
24 
72 
41 
63 
15 
80 
28 
15 
96 
39 
51 



6,168 

5,880 

3,875 

3,149 

5,881 

6,764 

6,377 

18,170 

6,318 

12,100 

13,548 

11,204 

11,341 

11,030 

11,251 

15,624 

11,328 

8,197 

11,303 

13,478 

9,607 

8,307 

4,393 

18,182 

11,592 

7,211 

11,330 

11,378 

8,381 

9,857 

8,264 

10,535 

8,819 

8,700 

30,484 

30,014 

35,575 

12,600 

11,678 

29,785 

12,807 

15,945 

11,499 

11,237 

12,167 

14,664 

10,879 

10,302 

15,462 

9,039 



W 188 
180 
177 
170 
145 
139 
135 
127 
126 
124 
123 
122 
121 
119 
115 
107 
106 
106 
103 
102 
102 
101 
098 
093 
090 
088 
087 
086 
086 
084 
080 
078 
078 
074 
073 
073 
070 
070 
070 
069 
067 
066 
062 
061 
059 
058 
057 
057 
056 
054 



1,079 63 



12,074 



$0 089 



Public Works Department. 33 

Passenger Cars Classified According to Make. 



Make. 



Average 
Yearly 
Cost. 



Average 
Yearly 
Mileage. 



Average 

Cost 
Per Mile. 



I) Willys Jeeps 

7 Buick Sedans 

29 Ford Sedans 

7 Chevrolet Carryalls 
1 DeSoto Sedan 

50 Group Average. . . . 



$871 84 

1,446 31 

1.137 04 

685 42 

854 28 



6,232 
13,298 
13,792 

8,366 
14,664 



W 140 
109 
082 
082 
058 



SI, 079 63 



12,074 



$0 089 



Unclassified Vehicles. 



Department 
Xo. 



Year, Make and Type. 



Yearly 


Cost. 


$38 86 


41 


L3 





00 


57 


89 





72 


00 





00 





00 





00 





11 





60 


19 


91 


202 


68 


28 51 


00 


00 





00 





00 





00 


11 


82 


43 


21 


14 


73 


57 


01 


2 


35 


2 


00 


19 


46 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


00 


19 


7 1 


6 


96 


372 20 


171 


42 


101 


57 


31 


63 


47 


93 



S-244 

S-245 

S-529 

S-560 

S-490 

P-360 

P-243 

P-286 

P-287 

S-483 

S-484 

P-298 

P-301 

P-242 

P-288 

P-299 

P-247 

P-255 

P-256 

P-310 

P-311 

P-312 

P-244 

P-371 

W-184 

W-259 

W-260 

W-277 

W-278 

W-285 

W-220 

Se-156 

Se-157 

P-403 

P-405 

B-17 

P-406 

Se-159 



1933 Highway Semi-Trailer 

1933 Highway Semi-Trailer 

1948 Snow Shanty Trailer 

1948 Hobart Arc Welder Trailer 

1948 Stewart Warner Portable Heater 

1948 Stewart Warner Portable Heater 

1939 Hauck Asphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1943 Hauck Asphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1943 Hauck Asphalt Pot Heater Trailer 

1947 Huski Unisickle Lawn Mower 

1947 Huski Unisickle Lawn Mower 

1946 Whirlwind Power Mower 

1946 Whirlwind Power Mower 

1939 Smith Concrete Mixer 

1944 Syntron Gasoline Paving Breaker 

1946 American Brake Shoe Paint Spray Machine 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1940 Homelite Generator 

1946 Griffin Highlight Trailer 

1946 Griffin Highlight Trailer 

1946 Griffin Highlight Trailer 

1939 Homemade 2-ton Trailer 

1948 Acker Core Drill 

1947 Littleford Handee Box Toolhouse Trailer. . 

1947 |-Ton Willys Toolbox Trailer 

1947 |-Ton Willys Toolbox Trailer 

1947 1-Ton Nash Kelvinator Toolbox Trailer... 

1947 1-Ton Nash Kelvinator Toolbox Trailer. . . 

1948 1-Ton Homemade 2-Wheel Toolbox Trailer 

1943 Wesson Tiernan Chlorinator Trailer 

1947 Flexible Power Bucket Mach. 2-Whl. Trailer 
1947 Flexible Power Bucket Mach. 2-Whl. Trailer 
1950 Chicago Pneumatic Compressor Trailer. . . . 

1950 Leroi Compressor Trailer 

1935 Auxiliary Air Compressor 

1951 Scotchman Salt Spreader 

1950 Sterling Trailer Pump 



34 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE AND HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I submit the following report of the income, ex- 
penditures, and operation of the Bridge and Highway 
Division for the year ending December 31, 1951, in 
two sections. The Bridge Section report covers the 
Bridge, Ferry, and Tunnel Services, and the Highway 
Section report covers the Paving and Street Lighting 
Services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John DeMeulenaer, 

Division Engineer. 

I BRIDGE SECTION 

Summary of Budget Appropriations. 
Bridge Service, Regular. 

Regular appropriations, 1951 .... $763,062 10 
Expenditures, 1951 721,577 97 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 . $41,484 13 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. 

Balance from 1950 $207,281 75 

Appropriation, 1951 275,000 00 



S2,281 75 
Transfers from 50,000 00 

$432,281 75 
Expenditures, 1951 240,431 89 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 . $191,849 86 



Public AYorks Department. 



35 



Bridges, Construction of — Revenue. 

Balance from 1950 

Appropriation, 1951 

Expenditures, 1951 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 . 

Bridges, Construction of — Non-Revenue. 

Balance from 1950 

Expenditures, 1951 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 

Ferry Service. 
Regular appropriation, 1951 
Balance from previous year 

Total credits 



Expenditures 1951 . 
Balance to next year 



Total debits 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 

Tunnel Service. 
Regular appropriation, 1951 
Balance from previous year 

Total credits . 

Expenditures, 1951 
Balance to next year 

Total debits 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1951 



$4,236 59 
157,000 00 

$161,236 59 
00 

$161,236 59 



$2,311,189 41 
79,242 48 

$2,231,946 93 



$370,788 00 
7,951 65 

$378,739 65 

$329,713 28 
32,953 12 



$362,666 40 



$16,073 25 



$524,546 44 
1,547 11 

$526,093 55 

$479,198 19 
13,135 89 

$492,334 08 



759 47 



The foregoing does not include certain expenditures 
for construction work for other divisions, which work 
was supervised by the engineers of this division. 

In an order from the Department of Public Utilities, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, schedules of tolls and 
charges for the use of the Sumner Tunnel, between 
Boston Proper and East Boston, were approved, covering 
the vear 1951. 



36 City Document No. 24. 

The city operates one ferry, the so-called "South 
Ferry," with the Boston terminus at Eastern avenue 
and the East Boston terminus at Lewis street. 

The more important works undertaken during the 
past year in the Bridge Section were: 

Completing the rebuilding of the Blakemore Street 
Bridge; completing the redecking of the Boylston 
Street Bridge; cleaning, painting, and repairing the 
drawspan, and making emergency repairs to the steel- 
work of the South Boston approach spans of the 
Broadway Bridge over Fort Point Channel; redeck- 
ing sections of Spans 1 and 2, and strengthening 
Piers 4, 5, and of the Charlestown Bridge; making 
emergency repairs and other repairs to the operating 
machinery of the Chelsea Street Bridge; completing 
the removal of the drawspan, approach sections, etc., 
of the Meridian Street Bridge; repairing the public 
boat landing at Northern Avenue Bridge; repairing 
fender piers and making emergency repairs to the 
operating machinery of the Summer Street Bridge 
over Fort Point Channel; repairing the drawspan 
and making emergency repairs to the approaches of 
the Summer Street Bridge over Reserved Channel; 
repairing two spare main trucks for the Summer 
Street Drawbridge, repairing the pile bracing of the 
Charlestown approach of Warren Bridge; removing 
ashes, cinders, etc., from the ferryboats; cleaning 
and painting the hull and making general repairs to 
the ferryboat "Daniel A. MacCormack;" repairing 
two bridges, Boston side, and the approach platform, 
East Boston side, of the South Ferry; and, at the 
Sumner Tunnel, repairing, painting, etc., at the 
ventilation buildings; repairing various bulkhead 
doors of the ventilation system; repairing the road- 
way pavement; cleaning the exhaust duct, exhaust 
fan rooms, and fresh-air ducts; and cleaning the 
surface drainage system. 

Other work included making emergency repairs to the 
Albany Street Garage for the Sanitary Division; and 
snow removal operations in conjunction with other 
divisions. 



Public Works Department. 37 

Bridge Service. 

Rebuilding Blakemore Street Bridge, over the New York, 

New Haven cfe Hartford Railroad. 

In 1950 a contract was entered into with A. Orlando, 
Inc., for replacing the old steel and wood bridge with 
a modern steel and concrete bridge. Work commenced 
November 30, 19.50, and was completed June 4, 1951, 
at a cost of $54,116.57. 

Redecking the Boylston Street Bridge, over the Bosto?i & 
Albany Railroad. 

Under a contract entered into with John F. Shea 
Company, Inc., in 1950, for painting the steelwork and 
redecking the bridge, work commenced September 11, 
1950, but due to delay on lumber deliveries was sus- 
pended on November 10, 1950. Work was resumed on 
March 19, 1951, and was completed May 12, 1951, 
at a cost of $34,830.87. 

Cleaning, Painting, and Making Miscellaneous Repairs 
of the Drawspan of Broadway Bridge, over Fort 
Point Channel. 

Due to the very poor condition of the plank sidewalks 
and certain steel members, a contract was entered into 
with Marinucci Brothers & Co., Inc., for necessary re- 
pairs and painting the entire drawspan. Work was 
commenced May 21, 1951, and was completed August 
18, 1951, at a cost of $25,449.56. 

Emergency Repairs to Certain Steelwork of the South 
Boston Approach Spans, Broadway Bridge, over Fort 
Point Channel. 

After a joint inspection of the South Boston approach 
steelwork, with representatives of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad, it was found necessary to 
make immediate repairs to floor beams and stringers. 
An emergency contract was entered into with the 
Industrial Welding Company for the necessary repairs 
by use of welding. Work commenced November 21 , 1951 , 
and was completed December 14, 1951, at a cost of 
$2,998.85. 



38 City Document No. 24. 

Redecking Sections of Spans 1 and 2, Charlestown Bridge, 
over the Charles River. 

A contract was entered into with D. A. Rossano 
Company, Inc., for redecking and paving, in 1950. 
Work commenced December 8, 1950, and was com- 
pleted January 4, 1951, at a cost of $10,632.99. 

Strengthening Piers 4, 5, and 6 of the Charlestown Bridge, 
over the Charles River. 

To continue the work of strengthening the defective 
piers by enclosing the bases with steel sheet cofferdams 
filled with concrete, a contract was entered into with 
the Crandall Engineering Company for so repairing a 
section of Pier 4 (which had been partially repaired 
under a previous contract) and to encase Pier 5 entirely, 
plus repairing the upstream end of Pier 6. Work 
commenced July 9, 1951, and is expected to be com- 
pleted about June of 1952. Payments to date total 
$70,095.16. The estimated cost of completion is 
$218,900. 

Repair* to Operating Machinery of the Chelsea Street 
Bridge, over the Chelsea River. 

Due to a failure of a section of the operating strut 
in 1950, it was decided that new spare sections of the 
operating struts were a necessity and that other repairs 
and overhauling of the shafts and gears were required. 
A contract was entered into with the General Ship 
and Engine Works, Inc., for the necessary parts and 
repairs. Work commenced January 22, 1951, and was 
completed September 9, 1951, at a cost of $11,560. 

Malting Emergency Repairs to Operating Machinery of 
the Chelsea Street Bridge, over the Chelsea River. 

Due to a break occurring in the end section of the 
downstream operating strut, an emergency contract w r as 
entered into with the General Ship and Engine Works, 
Inc., for immediate repairs. Work commenced February 
9, 1951, and due to delay in obtaining steel castings 
was not completed until July 6, 1951, at a cost of 
$4,441.02. 



Public Works Department. 39 

Removing the Drawspan, Approach Sections, etc., of 
the Meridian Street Bridge. 

Under a contract entered into with the M. & R. 
Construction Company for removing the entire draw- 
span and Chelsea approach, plus approximately 142 
linear feet of the East Boston approach, work was 
commenced on June 12, 1950, and was completed 
April 2, 1951, at a total cost of §52,855.76. 

Repairs to the Northern Avenue Bridge Boat Landing. 

A contract was entered into with John Forward, 
Inc., for drydocking the float, making necessary repairs, 
and caulking the seams. Work commenced February 
15, 1951, and was completed March 30, 1951, at a 
cost of $3,022.77. 

Repairing Fender Piers at the Summer Street Bridge, 
over Fort Point Channel. 

A contract was entered into with the James B. 
Rendle Company for repairs to the upstream end of 
the main fender pier, the downstream end of the fender 
guard, and minor repairs to the waling at the Congress 
Street Bridge fenders. Work commenced January 15, 
1951, and was completed March 15, 1951, at a cost of 
$21,979.73. 

Making Emergency Repairs to Operating Machinery of 
the Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 

Due to a breakdown of the machinery for the up- 
stream leaf, requiring immediate repairs, an emergency 
contract was entered into with the General Ship and 
Engine Works, Inc., for making necessary repairs. 
Work commenced August 2. 1951, and was completed 
October 10, 1951, at a cost of $2,509.04. 

Repairs to Drawspan of the Summer Street Bridge, over 
the Reserved Channel. 

Due to the very poor condition of the untreated 
Y. P. stringers and the necessity of making steel repairs 
to various members of the bridge, a contract was entered 
into with the Eastern Roads Company, Inc., for re- 
moving and replacing the steel decking, using a 6-inch 



40 City Document No. 24. 

by 1/4-inch plate under the old 3-inch by 3/8-inch bar 
to fasten the steel deck to the wooden stringers. The 
old stringers were replaced by pressure treated creosoted 
stringers, the steelwork was repaired, and the bridge 
painted. Work commenced August 1, 1951, and is 
expected to be completed early in 1952. Payments 
to date amount to $17,525.86 on a total estimated 
cost of $42,010. 

Emergency Repairs to Approaches of Summer Street 
Bridge, over Reserved Channel. 

After an inspection of the pile bents of the approaches, 
it was found necessary to make immediate repairs to 
maintain roadway traffic. A contract was entered into 
with the Eastern Roads Company, Inc., who were on 
the site making repairs to the clrawspan. 'Work com- 
menced October 24, 1951, and will be completed early 
in 1952, at an estimated cost of $7,499.50. 

Repairing Two {2) Spare Main Trucks for the Summer 
Street Drawbridges. 

A contract was entered into with the General Ship 
and Engine Works, Inc., for repairing two spare main 
trucks which had been dismantled for inspection and 
were found to be badly in need of repairs. One truck 
was delivered to Summer Street Bridge, over Fort 
Point Channel, and one truck to Summer Street Bridge, 
over the Reserved Channel. Work commenced January 
22, 1951, and was completed April 27, 1951, at a cost 
of $2,392. 

Repairing the Pile Bracing of the Charlestown Approach 
of Warren Bridge, over the Charles River. 

After a joint inspection with representatives of the 
Department of Public Utilities, it was found necessary 
to furnish and install new cross bracing and rebolt 
old braces throughout the Charlestown approach. A 
contract was entered into with the Eastern Roads 
Company, Inc., for this bracing. Work commenced 
September 24, 1951, and will be completed early in 
1952, at an estimated cost of $20,600. Payments have 
been made to date in the amount of $4,192.34. 



Public Works Department. 



41 



Procurement of Gear Patterns. 

Due to the fact that the Holyoke Machine Company 
was going out of business, and because that company 
had for years furnished this division with various 
replacement gears as needed for the movable bridges, 
it was decided to procure the patterns for these gears 
in the interest of future maintenance requirements. 
Accordingly, this division purchased fifteen (15) patterns 
from the Holvoke Machine Companv for the sum of 
$1,500. 

Yard Forces. 

The yard forces made repairs on 44 bridges, the 
work varying in extent from minor repairs to such 
operations as renewing or rebuilding areas of wooden 
roadway decks, entire sidewalks, aprons, etc. 

Typical work included patch planking on roadways, 
sidewalks, pier platforms, stairways, etc., repairing, 
cleaning and painting drawhouses, controller houses, 
machinery housings, fences, roadway gates, etc., reg- 
ulating bascule bridge counterweights as required, 
repairing floats, sand boxes and coal bins. 

The maintenance force also cleaned sidewalks and 
stairways of the intown area during the year, removing 
snow, refuse, etc. 

Ordinary electrical and machinery maintenance work 
was done bv the electrician and machinists. 



Ferry Service. 
The following ferryboats are in commission 



Name. 


When 
Built. 


Length. 


Gross 
Tons. 


Charles C. Donoghue 1926 

Daniel A. MacCormack .... I 1926 


. 174 feet, 4 inches 
174 feet, 4 inches 


7">6.77 
756.77 



These are steel boats of the propeller type. 
The work of this service for the year consisted of 
the following: 



42 City Document No. 24. 

Removing Ashes, Cinders, Clinkers, and Refuse from 
the Ferryboats. 

A contract was entered into with Edward F. Butler 
for removal of ashes from the ferryboats. Work com- 
menced January 1, 1951, and was completed December 
31, 1951, at a cost of $1,899.54. 

( 'leaning and Painting Hull of Ferryboat 
"Daniel A. MacCormack." 

A contract was entered into with the Bethlehem 
Steel Company (Boston Yard) for the annual cleaning 
and painting of the hull. Work commenced July 14, 
1951, and was completed July 27, 1951, at a cost of 
$9,132. 

General Repairs to Ferryboat "Daniel A. MacCormack." 

A contract was entered into with the General Ship 
and Engine Works for making annual repairs to this 
vessel. Work was commenced Julv 26, 1951, and was 
completed November 2, 1951, at a cost of $38,214.95. 

Repairing Two {2) Bridges on the Boston Side and the 
Approach Platform on the East Boston Side of the 
South Ferry. 

A contract was entered into with A. Orlando, Inc., 
for rebuilding the approach platform deck and re- 
newing stringers and sills, as necessary, as well as 
making necessaiy repairs to steel work and roadway 
of the two bridges on the Boston side, including paint- 
ing. Work commenced December 19, 1951, and will 
be completed early in 1952. No payments have been 
made to date. 

Department Force. 

During the year machinists, carpenters, painters, 
riggers, and other mechanics, who are included in the 
personnel of the Ferry Service, made such repairs to the 
plant as the extent of materials and equipment at their 
disposal would permit. This work consisted mainly 
of minor repairs to the machinery on the boats, re- 
pairs to ferrj^ bridge machinery, ferry bridge roadways, 
and headhouse repairs in general. 



Public Works Department. 43 

Sumner Tunnel Service. 

Repairs, Painting, etc., at the Sumner Tunnel 

1 "entilation Buildings. 

A contract was entered into with Joseph G. Gazzola 
for routine glass renewals and painting at the Boston 
and East Boston Ventilation Buildings. Work com- 
menced July 7, 1951, and was completed October 2, 
1951, at a cost of 17,416.85. 

Repairs and Alterations to Various Bulkhead Doors of 
the Sumner Tunnel V entilating System. 

A contract was entered into with the Boylston Com- 
pany for alterations and repairs to various bulkhead 
doors and for furnishing and placing two new bulkhead 
doors between the fresh air and exhaust air sections of 
the ventilating systems. Work was commenced Septem- 
ber 26, 1951, and was completed December 6, 1951, 
at a cost of $2,586. 

Repairing the Pavement of the Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the Rufo Con- 
struction Company for making necessary repairs to the 
granite block and "Urtimite" type block pavement. 
Work commenced November 13, 1951, and will be com- 
pleted early in 1952, at an estimated cost of $12,397.50. 
Payments to date amount to $5,809.75. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct, Exhaust Fan Rooms, and Fresh 
Air Ducts at the Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with James A. Freaney, 
Inc., for a periodic maintenance cleaning of the exhaust 
and fresh air ducts. Work was commenced December 5, 
1951, and will be completed early in 1952, at an esti- 
mated cost of $2,860. No payments have been made 
to date. 

Cleaning the Surface Drainage System of the Sumner 

Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the James A. Freaney 
Company for a periodic cleaning of the tunnel drainage 
system. Work commenced December 5, 1951, and was 
completed December 21, 1951, at a cost of $2,088. 



1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


358 


242 


285 


464 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


21 


16 


11 


11 



44 City Document No. 24. 

Summary of Operations During 1951. 

1. Vehicular Traffic. 

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 

Total 8,748,162 8,754,545 9,162,266 9,283,700 9,466,660 

Monthly Average 729,014 729,545 763,522 773,641 788,883 

Weekly Average 168,234 168,35(1 176,197 178,045 182,051 

Daily Average 23,968 23,920 25,171 25,435 25,936 

2. Power. 

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 

Total Kilowatts 5,133,526 5,173,596 4,403,936 4,331,103 4,196,904 

Number of Vehicles.. . 8.748,162 8,754,545 9,162,266 9,283,700 9,466,660 

3. Garage Serr/e> . 

1947 
Tow Jobs 321 

4. Booth Red Signal. 

1947 

Booth Red On 4 

Total Duration 

(Minutes) 51 146 83 150 108 

">. Fires. 

During the year 1951 there was one fire in the tunnel, 
causing minor damages to a truck. 

G. Motors, Fans, Dampers, and Controllers. 

The 28 fan motors and damper motors are all in good 
operating condition and are under daily inspection. 

All fan controllers are operating properly. Adjustments and 
repairs have been made as required. 

Grease and oil in fans and motors have been changed at 
regular intervals as per schedule. 

7. Transformers, Circuit Breakers, and Relays. 

All circuit breakers, relays, and transformers have been 
tested and reset for correct working voltage. New oil has 
been added to the transformers as required. 

8. Carbon Monoxide Equipment. 

The four carbon monoxide analyzers and Micro-Max Re- 
corders are operating and are under daily inspection. New 
chemicals have been added as required and adjustments made 
in order to insure efficient operation. It is planned to have 
these analyzers and recorders replaced with modern equipment 
during the coming year. 



Public Works Department. 45 

9. Toll Equipment. 
All toll equipment, toll registers, key boxes, and treadles 
are in good working condition. Various adjustments were 
made to relays, counters, and contacts, and all defective parts 
were replaced. 

Regular insulation and pressure tests were made on treadles, 
and defective treadles were removed and repaired or replaced 
with new treadles. 

10. Pumps. 

All motors, pumps, foot valves, floats, etc., on the pumping 
system have been adjusted, cleaned, and tested, and are in 
good working order. 

11. Storage Batteries. 

The storage batteries are under constant supervision and in 
a full-charge condition. Water has been added to electrolyte 
as required. Volt meter tests and hydrometer readings have 
been taken and indicate that all batteries are in first-class 
condition. 

12. Telephone System,. 

All defective hand sets, cords, jacks, relays, etc., have been 
replaced and repaired as required. Megger tests of telephone 
cables indicate the entire telephone system is working properly. 

13. Motor Generators. 

All four motor generators, including switchboards and con- 
trols, are under a constant routine maintenance schedule. 
Repairs have been made to controls, switches, brushes, and 
commutators as required to insure efficient operation. 

14. Traffic Signals. 

All defective push buttons, contacts, relays, etc., have been 
repaired or replaced at each traffic signal relay panel as needed. 
New glass and lenses have been installed as required. 

15. Tunnel, General. 

On January 1, 1951, the towing charge for removal of stalled 
or disabled vehicles was discontinued. 

A new Willys Jeep, T. S. 27, was delivered to the Tunnel 
on January 26, 1951. This vehicle was a replacement for 
T. S. 17. 

Four new treadles were purchased and installed during the 
year. 



46 City Document No. 24. 

Work for Other Divisions. 



Sanitary Division. 
Making Emergency Repairs to the Albany Street Garage. 

Because large pieces of the concrete ceiling over the 
ground floor were falling off, an emergency contract 
was awarded to the National Gunite Company, Inc., 
for making the necessary repairs. Work commenced 
November 20, 1951, and was completed November 30, 
1951, at a cost of $2,304. 

Construction of a New Building for the Sanitary Division 
at 174 West Second Street, South Boston. 

Plans and specifications were prepared by this di- 
vision for a new Administration Building to be built 
at an estimated cost of $40,000. Work was commenced 
in November, 1951, and is expected to be completed in 
June of 1952. 

Miscellaneous. 

Snow Removal. 

This division was placed in charge of Snow Areas 
No. 6, South End; No. 12, Roslindale and West Rox- 
bury; and No. 13, Brighton. Snow was removed by the 
C. & R. Construction Company for Area 12, at a cost 
of $1,042, and by the Atlantic Roads Company for 
Area 13, at a cost of $1,160.94. No payments were 
made to the Ward Contracting Companv for Area 
No. 6. 



Public Works Department. 47 

Bridge Service. 



$953 39 


30 


SO 


94 


44 


61 


;>() 


19 


20 


926 


r,7 


217 


38 



[,041,157 14 



5,787 37 



Financial Statement for 1951. 

Total Expenditures. 

From Maintenance Appropriation . . $721,482 77 

From Special Appropriations .... 319,674 37 



Expenditures on Boston Bridges. 

Administration. 

Division engineer $3,829 33 

Engineers, inspectors, clerks . . . 77,051 70 

Supervisor, deputy supervisor . . . 7,906 34 



Office. 

Printing, postage, stationery 

Traveling expense 

Engineers' instruments, new and repaired 
Servicing office machines .... 

Binding 

Supplies and miscellaneous 
Supplies for blueprint room 



Yard and Stockroom. 

Yard. 

Clerks and yardmen . . . . . $14,065 93 

Holidays, vacations, and sick leave . . 7,752 57 

Traveling expense 243 00 

Tools, new and repaired .... 1,308 31 

Telephone 394 31 

Patterns purchased 1,500 00 

Supplies 1,479 00 

Repairs in yard 731 48 

Auto service 8,869 66 

$36,344 26 

Stockroom. 

Stock purchased $25,51126 

Stock used 28,534 56 

Decrease in stock 3,023 30 

$33,320 96 



2,303 28 
$91,090 65 



48 



City Document No. 24. 



Tidewater Bridges, 1951, 



Bridges. 


Diawtenders' 
Salaries. 


Mechanics' 
Wages. 


Material. 


Repair 
Bills. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


Broadway 


$34,281 36 
56,874 30 
31,714 24 
44,379 84 
42,662 42 
35,821 13 
40,178 66 
43,618 09 
42,400 08 
37,471 78 
41,949 94 


$5,723 42 
7,016 21 
2,305 32 
3,049 48 
1.915 80 
4,607 93 
2,901 85 
2,244 64 
6,016 25 
5,744 09 
14,852 65 


$2,281 48 

3,220 93 

600 91 

842 36 

568 51 

1,137 95 

632 85 

315 87 

3,251 03 

1,791 75 

6,027 99 


$2,300 37 
2,309 07 
378 48 
1,463 93 
1,083 37 
1,429 55 
1,195 67 
871 93 
2,346 68 
2,009 83 
3,568 48 


$507 28 
823 89 
689 48 
561 13 
543 87 
433 09 
556 28 
851 16 

2,756 52 
431 97 
564 77 


$45,093 91 
70,244 40 




35,688 43 




50,296 54 




46,773 97 
43,429 65 


L Street* 


45,465 31 




47,901 69 


Northern Avenue 


56,776 56 
47,449 42 




66,964 03 






Totals 


$451,357 84 


$56,377 04 


$20,071 63 


$18,957 36 


$8,719 44 


$556,083 91 







* Now Summer Street, over Reserved Channel. 



Repairs on Inland Bridges, 1951, 



Bridges. 



Labor 

and 

Material. 



Babson Street 

Baker Street 

Bennington Street, over Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn Railroad 

Boston Street 

Boylston Street 

Broadway Extension 

Camden Street — Gainsborough Street (foot) 

Central Avenue 

Dana Avenue 

Dartmouth Street (rent) 

Durham Street — West Rutland Square 

Dorchester Avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad . 

Everett Street, Allston 

Everett Street, East Boston 

Fairmount Avenue 

Follen Street — Braddoek Park (foot) 



Carried forward. 



$300 36 

43 56 

378 58 

464 21 

251 08 

3,534 25 
26 12 
136 45 
921 40 
300 00 
223 56 
574 19 
728 30 
257 94 
138 84 
47 86 



$8,326 70 



Public Works Department. 49 

Repairs on Inland Bridges, I9SI. — Concluded. 



BRirGKS. 



Labor 

and 

Material. 



Brought forward 

Glenwood Avenue 

Harrison Avenue 

Irvington Street — Yarmouth Street (foot) . 

Jones Avenue 

Massachusetts Avenue, over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad . 

Meridian Street 

Milton Lower Mills 

Neptune Road 

Norfolk Street 

Perkins Street (foot) 

Redfield Street 

Reservation Road 

Reservoir Road 

River Street 

Saratoga Street 

Southampton Street 

Sprague Street 

Summer Street, over A Street 

Summer Street, over B Street 

Summer Street, over C Street 

Traverse Street underpass 

Toll Gate Way 

West Fourth Street 

Winthrop 

Snow and sanding 

Cleaning bridges 

Other services 



$8,326 70 

41 O.J 

15 86 

266 11 

405 78 

121 95 

68 41 

5,455 35 

754 69 

421 64 

96 92 

547 85 

514 42 

503 13 

393 42 

85 26 

1,167 47 

1,098 00 

300 36 

144 77 

25 70 

25 70 

142 23 

5,455 35 

638 18 

5,317 71 

5,622 40 

3,126 04 



Total . 



$41,082 45 



SUMMARY. 

Administration $91,090 65 

Yard and stockroom 33,320 96 

Tidewater bridges 556,083 91 

Inland bridges 41,082 45 



Total $721,577 97 



50 



City Document No. 24. 

Special Appropriations. 
Bridges, Repairs, etc. 



Belgrade Avenue Bridge: 

Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc $1,556 23 

Boylston Street Bridge: 

John F. Shea Company, Inc 27,606 69 

Broadway Bridge: 

Marinucci Brothers Company, Inc. . . $25,449 56 

Advertising 28 00 

25,477 56 

Charlestown Bridge: 

The Crandall Engineering Company $85,537 06 

D. A. Rossano Construction Company . 10,632 99 

Advertising 27 50 

96,197 55 

Chelsea Street Bridge: 

General Ship and Engine Works, Inc 16,001 02 

Fairmount Avenue Bridge: 

John F. Shea Company, Inc 17 04 

Harvard Street Bridge: 

New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company . 3,134 64 

Northern Avenue Bridge, Boat Landing: 

John Forward, Inc $3,022 77 

Advertising 23 00 

3,045 77 

Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel : 

James B. Rendle, Inc $21,979 73 

General Ship and Engine Works, Inc. . 4,901 04 

Advertising 27 50 







26,908 27 


Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel: 






Eastern Roads Company, Inc. . 




23,430 21 


Warren Bridge : 






A. Orlando, Inc 

Warren Brothers Roads Company, Inc. . 
Eastern Roads Company, Inc. . 


$1,345 94 

11,431 13 

4,192 34 

27 50 


16,996 91 






Total 


$240,431 89 









Public Works Department. 



51 



Bridges, Construction of. 

Blakemore Street Bridge: 

A. Orlando, Inc $54,116 57 

Inspection of steel and concrete . . 245 07 

Meridian Street Bridge: 

M & R Construction Company 

Warren Bridge: 

The Crandall Engineering Company .... 

Total 



$54,361 64 
20,155 84 

4,725 00 
$79,242 48 



SUMMARY. 

Expenditures from Special Appropriations, 1951. 





Balances 
from 
1950. 


Total Credits, 
Including 
Balances 

Carried Over 
and Transfers. 


Expended 

During Year 

1951. 


Unexpended 

Balances 

December 31, 

1951. 


Bridges, repairs, etc 

Bridges, construction of — 
(Revenue) 

Bridges, construction of — 
(Non-Revenue) 


$207,281 75 
4.236 59 

2,311,189 41 


$432,281 75 
161,236 59 

2,311,189 41 


$240,431 89 
00 

79,242 48 


$191,849 86 
161,236 59 

2,231,946 93 


Totals 


$2,522,707 75 


$2,904,707 75 


$319,674 37 


$2,585,033 38 



52 



City Document No. 24. 









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Public Works Department. 53 

Ferry Service. 



Financial Statement for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1951. 

Toll Receipts. 

Total cash receipts during the year . . . $23,664 52 

Cash in hands of tollmen at beginning of year . 60 00 

Cash paid to City Collector . . . ' . . 23,664 52 

Cash in hands of tollman at end of the year . 60 00 

Breakdown of Toll Receipts for the Year 1951. 

From foot passengers $3,821 82 

From vehicles 19,842 70 



From Foot 
Passengers. 

Boston side . . . $1,906 67 

East Boston side . . 1,915 15 



$3,821 82 

Additional Income Received by the Ferry 

Telephone commissions 

Cleaning of telephone booth at ferry 
Concession-Mills Automatic Merchandising Corpo- 
ration 

Sale of junk 

Returned empty oil drums 



$23,664 52 


From 
Vehicles. 


$9,242 05 
10,600 65 


$19,842 70 


- 1952. 


$31 93 
24 00 


85 00 

100 40 

18 31 



$259 64 



Travel on the South Ferry from January 1, 

1951, to December 31, 1951. 

Foot passengers 382,182 

Handcart 3,592 

One- and two-horse team with driver .... 3,220 

Passenger auto with driver and passengers . . . 142,917 

Truck, six tons or less 16,880 

Truck, over six tons 13,392 



54 



City Document No. 24. 



Sumner Tunnel Service. 

Annual Traffic b.v Classification for the Year 1951. 



Class. Toll. 



Description. 



9. 



$0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 
Tractor without trailer 

20 Passenger car 

20 Motorcycle 

25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 
Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 
5 tons capacity 

20 Passenger car with trailer 

35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 
Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 
10 tons capacity 

20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 

1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity. Tractor with 

trailer over 10 tons capacity .... 
35 Bus with or without passengers .... 



City-owned 
Total traffic 



No. of 
Vehicles. 

492,200 

8,655,683 

2,110 



47,699 
11,126 



15,709 

1,022 

646 

132 

t240,333 

9,466,660 



* MTA and Eastern Massachusetts Railway included in this classification. 
r 675 MTA and 153,904 Eastern Massachusetts Railway Imses at 35 cents included in 
this total. 





Comparative 


Annual Traffic Count. 




1947 


1948 1949 


1950 


1951 


8,748,162 


8,754,545 


1 
9,162,266 9,283,700 


9,466,660 



Sumner Tunnel. 

Comparison of Receipts, Expenditures, Interest, and Net Results, 1947 to 1951, 

Inclusive. 





1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 




$395,060 35 

11,850 05 

875,673 75 

2 80 


$428,733 58 

4.298 18 

836,876 25 


$482,982 71 

_ 

837,611 25 


$462,975 30 

1,547 11 

832,453 75 

92 20 


$479,198 19 

13,135 89 

763,654 61 

721 95 






Total expenses 


SI. 282. 580 95 


$1,269,908 01 


$1,320,593 96 


$1,297,068 36 


$1,256,710 64 1 




$1,758,149 30 

14,256 34 

$1,772,405 64 


$1,776,655 00 
11,850 05 


$1,853,049 84 
4,298 18 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,913,356 121 


Balance from previous year . 


1,547 11 


Total receipts 


$1,788,505 05 $1,857,348 02 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,914,903 23 ' 


Net result 


$489,818 69 
(Excess) 


$518,597.04 $536,754 06 

(E-v (Excess) 


$565,966 64 

(Exec.--) 


$658,192 59 
(Excess 1 






Public "Works Department. 55 

II— HIGHWAY SECTION. 



Paving Service. 



Summary of Budget Appropriations. 

Balance 

Appropriation'. Total Credits. Expenditures. Unexpended. 

Paving Service .$1,362,396 00 $1,357,071 91 $5,324 09 

Reconstruction of Streets . 156,300 27 103,236 26 53,064 01 

Public Ways, Construction 

of (Revenue) 159,201 29 159,201 29 None 

Public Ways, Construc- 
tion of (Non-Revenue) . 3,993,905 35 2,637,016 68 $1,356,888 67 

Sidewalks, Construction 

and Reconstruction of. . 157,585 26 116,672 77 40,912 49 

Street Signs 29,700 00 12,873 72 16,826 28 

Snow Removal 541,538 73 527,602 25 13,936 48 

The amount of money taken in through the Permit 
Office was $43,068.27; of this amount $22,577.97 was 
deposited with the City Collector for fees received, 
$17,933.40 was deposited with the City Collector for 
the Street Openings Account, and $2,556.90 was billed 
to the Public Service Corporations. There are now on 
file 2,164 bonds protecting the City of Boston against 
claims that may be made on account of the permits 
issued. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patch- 
ing permanent pavements such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were 
engaged in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets, 
and also supervised plowing work done throughout the 
city by 273 contractors' hired plows after five snow 
storms. All snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, 
force account work, etc., were processed through the 
Paving Service Office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

129 New street signposts erected with frames and signs 

23 New hero signposts erected with signs 

807 Street sign name plates installed 

56 Bent or broken signposts repaired 

91 Hero signs replaced 



56 City Document No. 24. 

1,996 Street signposts painted 

57 Street sign frames repaired 
3,916 Street sign frames painted 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 177 streets during the year, and 139 
of these were completed. Work was also completed 
on 48 streets which were unfinished from 1950. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares recon- 
structed by contract during the year were: 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, south of American Legion 
Highway to Seaver street. 

Blue Hill avenue, Dorchester, north of Woolson street to 
south of Johnston road. 

Boylston street, City Proper, Brookline avenue to east of 
Ipswich street. 

Boylston street, City Proper, Massachusetts avenue to 
Exeter street. 

Broadway, City Proper, Stuart street to Park square. 

Brookline avenue, City Proper, Boylston street to Pilgrim 
road. 

Centre street, West Roxbury, Weld street to South street 
(southwesterly) . 

Centre street, West Roxbury, May street to Weld street. 

Charles street, Dorchester, Dorchester avenue to Ditson 
street. 

Columbia road, Dorchester, Edward Everett square to 
Blue Hill avenue. 

Dover street, City Proper, Tremont street to bridge over 
Fort Point Channel. 

Draper street, Dorchester, Bowdoin street to Arcadia 
street. 

East Eagle street, East Boston, Condor street to Glendon 
street. 

Eliot street, City Proper, Columbus avenue to east of 
Broadway. 

Eutaw street, East Boston, White street to Border street. 

Ferry street, City Proper, Fulton street to North street. 

Freeport street, Dorchester, Dorchester avenue to south 
of Old Colony Parkway. 

Hanover street, City Proper, Friend street to Blackstone 
street and Cross street to Commercial street. 

Humboldt avenue, Roxbury, Walnut avenue to Seaver 
street. 

Lenox street, City Proper, Washington street to Tremont 
street. 

Maiden street, City Proper, Washington street to Harrison 
avenue. 



Public Works Department. 57 

Park square, City Proper, Broadway to Boylston street. 

River street, Dorchester, Mattapan square to Washington 
street. 

South street, West Roxbury, Walter street to across 
Fletcher street. 

Stuart street, City Proper, Columbus avenue to Broadway. 

Tremont street, Roxbury, Massachusetts avenue to east 
of Texas street. 

Walnut avenue, Roxbury, Warren street to Humboldt 
avenue. 

Warren street, Roxbury, Dudley street to Blue Hill 
avenue. 

Washington street, Brighton, Monastery road to Common- 
wealth avenue. 

Western avenue, Brighton, Soldiers Field road to northeast 
of Market street. 

Following is a list of streets constructed or recon- 
structed in the various wards throughout the city 
during the year 1951. 

Ward 1 — White street (sidewalks), Horace street, Sum- 
ner street, East Eagle street, Eutaw street, Trenton street 
(sidewalks), Trenton street, Prescott square. Total cost, 
$105,964.58. 

Ward 3 — Castle street, Lancaster street, Lyman street, 
Prospect street, Canal street (sidewalks), Joy street, Atlantic 
avenue (sidewalks), South Margin street, Albany street 
(sidewalks), Dover street, Ferry street, Albany street (side- 
walks), Beach street (sidewalks), Hanover street, Hull 
street, India street, Marshall street, Snow Hill street, Albany 
street, Hudson street, Kneeland street, Hudson street 
(sidewalks), Kneeland street (sidewalks), Oxford street (side- 
walks), Tyler street (sidewalks). Total cost, $149,590.38. 

Ward 4 — Autumn street, Deaconess road, Pilgrim road, 
Scotia street, Brookline avenue, Boylston street, Harwich 
street. Total cost, $49,548.89. 

Ward 5 — Anderson street, Granby street, Kilmarnock 
street, Sherborn street, Public Alley No. 433, Public Alley 
Xo. 434, Public Alley No. 436, Broadway, Eliot street, 
Park square, Stuart street, Boylston street, Castle street, 
Carver street, Dover street. Total cost, $131,424.43. 

Ward 6 — East Fifth street (sidewalks), H street (side- 
walks), West Third street (sidewalks), Peters street (side- 
walks), F street (sidewalks), West Second street, West 
Third street, East Third street, P street, East Second street, 
G street, West First street, East First street (sidewalks). 
Total cost, $34,810.94. 

Ward 7 — Atlantic street (sidewalks), National street 
(sidewalks), Story street (sidewalks), East Seventh street 



58 City Document No. 24. 

(sidewalks), G street (sidewalks), Sanger street (sidewalks), 
Springer street (sidewalks), Winfield street (sidewalks), 
Woodward street (sidewalks). Middle street (sidewalks), 
Clapp street, Conrad street, G street, Washburn street, 
Andrew square, H street, Columbia road. Total cost, 
$94,331.31. 

Ward 8 — Maiden street, Woodville street, W^oodville 
street (sidewalks), Dover street, Atkinson street. Total 
cost, $45,529.95. 

Ward 9 — Tremont street, Circuit street, Dale street 
(sidewalks), Lenox street, Watson street (sidewalks), Ham- 
mett street. Total cost, $85,338. 

Ward 10 — Perkins street, Castleton street, Eldora street, 
Roys street, Schiller street, Sunnyside street, Zamora street, 
Sunset street, Total cost, $45,101.66. 

Ward 11 — Forest Hills street (sidewalks), Morton street 
(sidewalks), Peter Parley road, Woodside avenue, Wash- 
ington street (sidewalks), Dale street (sidewalks), Brook- 
side avenue, Cobden street, Haverford street, Woodlawn 
street (sidewalks), St. Rose street (sidewalks). Total cost, 
$71,127.88. 

Ward 12 — Warren street, Humboldt avenue, Walnut 
avenue, Circuit street, Maple street, Waumbeck street, 
Dale street (sidewalks), Sherman street (sidewalks), Carlisle 
street. Total cost, $205,355.05. 

Ward 13 — Brookford street (sidewalks), Folsom street 
(sidewalks), Whitby terrace, Woodledge street, Bird street, 
Ceylon street, Jerome street, Rand street, Salcombe street, 
Sargent street, Savin Hill court, Windermere road. Total 
cost, $96,026.25. 

Ward 14 — Columbia road, Barnard street, Creston street, 
Lome street, Standish street, Wilder street, West Park 
street, Greenock street, Blue Hill avenue, Blue Hill avenue 
(W-J). Total cost, $393,107.43. 

Ward 15 — Hendry street, Montello street (sidewalks), 
Ridgewood street (sidewalks), Charles street, Fox street, 
Linden street, Marie street, Freeport street, Bentham road, 
Columbia road. Total cost, $117,838.42. 

Ward 16 — Queen street (sidewalks), Ely road, Frederika 
street, Edna road, Beaufield street, Freeport street, Freeport 
street (wall), Oakman street, Queen street, Westmoreland 
street, Claymont terrace. Total cost, $78,193.45. 

Ward 17 — Capen place, Gaylord street (sidewalks), Galty 
avenue, Mercier avenue, Regan road, Epping street, Went- 
worth street, Whitman street, Tremlett street, Caddy road. 
Total cost, $64,128.90. 

Ward 18 — Vallaro road, Skyline road, Como road, Dana 
avenue, Easton avenue, River street, Joyce road, Newacre 



Public Works Department. 59 

road, Pinewood street, Roseglen road, Summer street, 
Chapel road, Elene street. Wabash street, Delano park 
(sidewalks), Tileston street (sidewalks), Cleveland street, 
Fairmount avenue (sidewalks), Highland street (sidewalks) 
Pinedale road (sidewalks), Pond street (sidewalks), Beaver 
street (sidewalks), Ruskindale road (sidewalks), River 
street, Total cost, $373,112.68. 

Ward 19 — Claxton street, Lamartine place, Stellman road 
(sidewalks), Aid worth street, Lawndale terrace, Stellman 
road, Perkins street, Centre street, Total cost, $92,441.38. 

Ward 20 — Lyall street, Courtney road, Eastwood Circuit, 
John Alden road, Meshaka street, Anawan avenue, Meredith 
street, Bellevue street, Sanborn avenue, Centre street, 
Willowdean avenue, Hollywood road and Willowdean avenue, 
Centre street (M-W), Church street, Cypress street, Dan- 
ville street, Maxfield street, Rutledge street, Francesca 
street (sidewalks), Hackensack road (L-F), Hackensack 
road, Lasell street, Lyall street, Payson road, Cowing street, 
Havey street, Northdale road, Lyall street (A-V), Lyall 
street (K-A), Hackensack road (R-H), Carroll street (side- 
walks), Dent street, South street, Walter street, Albano 
street, Constance road, Rumford road, Walter street, Total 
cost, $440,831.85. 

Ward 21 — Granby street, Kilmarnock street, Corey road 
(sidewalks), Chiswick road, Corey road, Washington street, 
Jordan road, Warren street (island), Allston street, Boylston 
street, Brookline avenue. Total cost, $88,605.61. 

Ward 22 — Oak square (island), Ranelegh road (side- 
walks), Centola street, Bostonia avenue (sidewalks), Western 
avenue. Total cost, $152,077.47. 



Lighting Service. 
Financial Statement 

Total credits for 1951 $1,151,283 26 

Expenditures 1,148,925 60 



Unexpended $2,357 66 



Expenditures: 

Electric Lighting: 

Boston Edison Company . $921,556 63 
Boston Consolidated Gas 

Company .... 35,462 20 



$957,018 83 



60 City Document No. 24. 

Gas Lighting: 

American Service Company $71,164 90 
Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company .... 



Salaries 

Installing, removing, and relocating lamps 
Office expense .... 

Miscellaneous: 
Electric posts 
Globes, domes, mantles, etc. 



70,771 00 


$141,935 90 




g; lamps . 


8,997 08 

13,013 70 

68 14 


$760 82 
27,131 13 


27,891 95 






$1,148,925 60 



The following is a statement of the work done by the 
Lighting Service during 1951 under the direction of the 
Division Engineer: 

Electric lamps of 2,000 c.p. (twin 1,000 c.p.) were 
installed on Maiden street, City Proper (6). 

Electric lamps of 1,000 c.p. were installed on Beacon 
street, Brighton (4), City square (1), New Alford street 
(19), New Sever street (5), Sever street (1), in Charles- 
town; Beacon street (6), Bypass roadway (3), Summer 
street (1), Union Park street (4), West Canton street 
(1), Westland avenue (2) City Proper; Blue Hill avenue 
(19), Dorchester avenue (5), Norfolk street (2), Talbot 
avenue (1), Dorchester; Saratoga street (1) East Boston; 
West Milton street (1) Hyde Park; Elm Hill avenue (2), 
Harrison avenue (7), Heath street (1), Mt. Pleasant 
avenue (1), Seaver street (2) Roxbury; Emerson street 
(1), Summer street (3), South Boston; Washington 
Street (1), West Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 600 c.p. were installed on Western 
avenue (71), Brighton; Dorrance street (3), Charles- 
town; Magnolia street (1), Blue Hill avenue (3), Dor- 
chester; Blakemore street (1), West Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 400 c.p. were installed on Guest 
street (5), Life street (4), Malvern street (1), Brighton; 
Central street (1), East Lenox street (5), Holyoke street 
(1), Queensberry street (5), Upton street (1), City 
Proper; Babson street (13), Fowler street (1), Harvard 
street (1), Lyndhurst street (1), Norfolk street (9), Vic- 
tory road (1), Dorchester; Access road (7), East Boston; 



Public Works Department. 



01 



Wolcott court (1), Hyde Park; Coventry street (1), 
Roxburv; East Fourth street (4), Louis street (2), West 
Third street (4), South Boston; Centre street (2), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 250 c.p. were installed on Carlisle 
street (2), Roxbury. The following lamps were in- 
creased from 100 c.p. to 250 c.p. during the year: Denby 
road (2), Brighton; Carleton street (1), Upton street (1), 
City Proper; Chaucer street (1), East Boston; Hol- 
brook street (4), Walter street (25), West Roxbury. 

During the year 153 lamps of 100 c.p. were installed 
in various suburban areas and 1,067 gas lamps were re- 
moved and replaced by an equal number of electric 
lamps of 100 c.p. 

Electric fire alarm lamps were installed on Wash- 
ington street (1), Brighton; Arlington avenue (1), Main 
street (1), Rutherford avenue (4), Charlestown; Beau- 
mont street (1), Dorchester avenue (1), Edward Everett 
square (1), Dorchester; Paris street (1), East Boston; 
Bickford street (1), Moreland street (1), Parker Hill 
avenue (1), Roxbury; Boylston street (3), West Roxbmy. 



Paving Service. 
Street Work Done in 1951 by Contract. 



Summary 

Earth and water box excavation . 
Rock and wall excavation . 

Bank gravel 

Crushed stone .... 
Existing concrete base removed . 
Existing pavement removed 
Granite block removed and hauled t 

city yard 

Straight edgestone set . 
Circular edgestone set . 

Corners set 

Edgestone reset and removed and 

relocated 
Granite block hip gutters 
Bituminous macadam base 
Concrete base 
Bituminous concrete base 
Extra concrete 

Bituminous concrete pavement 
Sheet asphalt pavement 



78,027 cubic yards. 
1,563 cubic yards. 
75,627 tons. 
13,283 tons. 
10,519 square yards. 
77,798 square yards. 

2,257 square yards. 
46,721 linear feet. 
6,159 linear feet. 
1,197 

82,529 linear feet. 
300 linear feet. 
1,724 tons. 
5,900 cubic yards. 
64,012 tons. 

40 cubic yards. 
23,313 tons. 
15,343 tons. 



62 



City Document No. 24. 



Concrete pavement 

Precast straight edgestone set 

Artificial stone sidewalks 

Artificial stone driveways 

Bituminous concrete sidewalks and 

driveways 

Loam spaces 

Covers reset 

Bradley heads reset 

Courses of brick .... 

Catch basins rebuilt 

Catch basins and drop inlets built 

Signposts and parking meters reset 

Stone bounds furnished and set . 

Trees removed .... 



Yearly Report of Work Done 

Forces for 1951. 

Brick sidewalks laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks relaid (old) 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks . 
Block gutters laid .... 
Granite block roadway laid 
Artificial stone sidewalks patched 

with black top .... 
Edgestone reset (old) . 
Macadam roadway patched 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Street cleaning .... 
Snow removal .... 



5 square yards. 
674 linear feet. 
1,127,536 square feet. 
74,077 square feet. 



7,385 tons. 




3,338 


square 


yards. 


3,781 






26 






6,758 






77 






63 






116 






248 






271 






by Department 


6.467 


square 


yards. 


1,472 


square 


yards. 


30,535 


square 


feet. 


126,976 


square 


feet, 


21,665 


square 


yards. 


35 


square 


yards. 


15 


square 


yards. 



9,814 square feet, 
3,719 linear feet. 
160,944 square yards. 
3,573 square yards. 
5,503 cubic yards. 
28,673 cubic yards. 







Table Showing Length 


and Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, 


Corrected to 


January 1 


, 1952. 










Length in Miles. 


Area in Square Yards. 




Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1950 Report 


* 244. 53 
33.84 


t 223.09 
30.87 


J 47. 17 

6.53 


0.47 
0.06 


0.51 
0.07 


0.61 
0.08 


§23.68 
3.28 


j 171.06 
23.67 


10.78 
1.49 


0.81 
0.11 


722.71 
100.00 


* 4,867,362 
35.24 


t 4,219.018 
30.54 


t 1,263,953 
9.15 


8,937 
0.06 


12,000 
0.09 


13,140 
0.09 


§ 466,222 
3.38 


112,770,285 
20.06 


163,439 
1.18 


28,944 
0.21 


13,813,300 
100.00 




January 1, 1952. 


50.00 
4.91 
5.44 
12.45 
41.34 
41.97 
59.07 
22.35 
9.26 


25.06 
4.59 
12.93 
12.49 
26.45 
55.47 
63.10 
27.60 
12.32 


13.98 
6.72 
4.79 
7.77 
4.76 
3.00 
0.78 
0.45 
0.04 


0.22 
0.08 
0.01 
0.03 
0.05 

0.06 

0.01 


0.10 
0.05 
0.05 
0.06 

0.05 
0.04 
0.08 
0.05 


0.32 

0.02 
0.02 
0.14 

0.01 


3.04 
0.80 
0.44 
0.63 
6.24 
4.45 
5.78 
1.23 
0.64 


3.20 
5.46 
12.40 
9.89 
14.17 
42.64 
41.06 
12.95 
19.16 


0.36 
0.03 
0.12 
0.17 
0.11 
1.48 
1.19 
0.42 
4.67 


0.01 
0.04 
0.50 
0.18 
0.20 
0.02 

0.20 


96.28 
22.65 
36.24 
44.01 
93.44 
149.26 
171.11 
65.08 
46.35 


1,114,431 
97,677 
125,138 
266,068 
832,902 
761,730 

1,131,116 
501,916 
171,070 


544,630 
75,600 
263,868 
238,239 
472,046 
996,801 
1,162,599 
512,651 
249,063 


308,584 
174,684 
113,352 
224,709 
95,997 
121,581 
35,022 
45,026 
7,207 


2,679 

2,011 
325 

1,109 
836 

1,669 

186 


3,623 

1.701 

777 

1,737 

1,149 
770 

1,231 
702 


4,862 

393 
1.3S6 
4,627 

145 


94,582 
13,488 
25,280 
24,814 
103,918 
62,661 
94,024 
30,443 
10,119 


51,264 
75,882 
268,809 
163,413 
204,507 
672,459 
639,416 
210,297 
320,665 


3,177 
407 
2,244 
1,916 
1,674 
23,576 
16,528 
6,394 
73,681 


41 
865 
15,754 
2,803 
8,975 
1,737 
50 
4,506 


2,127,832 

441,491 

801,051 

939,145 

1,719,310 

2,648,932 

3,083,026 

1,308.008 

837,199 






















246.79 
34.07 


240.01 
33.13 


42.29 
5.84 


0.46 
0.06 


0.48 
0.07 


0.51 
0.07 


23.25 
3.21 


160.93 
22.21 


8.55 
1.18 


1.15 
0.16 


724.42 
100.00 


5,002,048 
35.97 


4,515,497 
32.47 


1,126,162 
8.10 


8.815 
0.06 


11,690 
0.09 


11,413 

0.08 


459.329 


2,606,712 


129,597 
0.93 


34,731 
0.25 


13,905,994 













Total Public Streets 724.42 Miles. 
Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the boundary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 

310 square 



* Of this amount 0.09 mile or 810 square yards is Biturock; and 0.00 n 
yards is Unionite. 

J Of this amount 0.02 mile or 202 square yards is cobble; and 25.88 
square yards is granite Muck paving on concrete base. 

§ Of this amount 0.06 miles or 41};} square yards is Blome granitoid concrete block. 

|| Of this amount 137.76 miles or 2,255,894 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



829,091 



t Of this amount 154.16 miles or 2.798.178 square yards is asphalt concrete; and 79.96 
miles or 1,596,460 square yards is Bitulithic; and 4.02 miles or 66.951 square yards is 
Topeka; and 0.0(1 miles or 942 square yards is Filbertine; and 0.11 miles or 2,914 square 
yards is Simascu; and 0.03 miles or 5y5 square vards is Carey Elastite Asphalt. Plank; and 
0.06 miles or 518 square yards is Johns-Manville Asphalt Plank; and 1.61 miles or 48,939 
square yards is tar concrete. 

6.67 miles or 35,994 square yards public alleys included in this table; 7.57 miles or 335,274 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 7.82 miles or 253,818 square yards 
public streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 2.25 miles or 11,106 square yards of accepted footways. 



Public Works Department. 



63 



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64 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Herewith I submit a statement of the expenditures 
and activities of the Sanitary Division of the Public 
Works Department for the year ending December 31, 
1951: 

The total cost of operation of the Sanitary Division 
for 1951 is as follows: 



Budget expenditures 
Motor vehicle cost 

Total cost 



$5,026,284 04 
240,466 45 

$5,266,750 45 



In my report for the year 1950 the cost of operation 
of this division was obtained, for the first time, by add- 
ing the cost of motor vehicle operation as submitted by 
the Automotive Division. This includes depreciation. 

The same method has been continued in this report, 
so that the 1950 and 1951 costs are comparable. 

The cost, recapitulated and compared with the previ- 
ous year (1950), is shown as follows: 



Item. 


1950. 1951. 


Decrease. 


Increase. 




$3,115,675 18 

2,137,423 14 

73,433 14 


$3,128,131 82 

2,071,508 14 

62,630 77 

4,474 76 

5 00 




$12,456 64 




$65,915 00 
10,802 37 






4,474 76 








5 00 










Totals 


$5,326,531 46 


$5,266,750 49 


$76,717 37 


$16,936 40 




$59,780 97 













Public Works Department. 65 

Waste Collection and Disposal. — There was a decrease 
of $85,063.41 in the collection and disposal contracts, 
and a decrease of $40,898.02 in the Coleman Disposal 
Company contract. However, an increase in payrolls 
and general overhead resulted in a net increase of 
$12,456.64. 

Street Cleaning. — The decrease in the Street Cleaning 
Service was due to a decrease in personnel. 

Preventive Street Cleaning. — A decrease in the number 
of constables resulted in decreased expenditure of 

),802.37 in this service. 



Personnel changes in permanent force during the year 1951 : 

Total personnelJanuary 1, 1951 *807 

Transfers in (from other departments and divi- 



sions) 


14 




New appointments 


18 




Reinstatements 


2 








34 
841 


Deaths 


15 




Resignations 


7 




Retirements 


23 




Transfers out (to other departments and divi- 






sions) 


10 




Discharged or terminated 


3 









58 


Total personnel January 1 , 1 952 .... 




|783 



* Includes one military leave. 

t Includes four military leave. 

Net loss of 24 employees. 



Work Accomplished. 

Construction and Demolition. — The foundation for 
the projected new building for the South Boston Sani- 
tary and Street Cleaning Services was completed. 

A contract for the building of the new South Boston 
District Building, at 174 West Second street, was signed 
by his Honor the Mayor on November 7, and the work 
started immediately. The specifications called for this 
building to be of brick construction, one story with 
basement, heated by gas with continuous hot water, 
and shower baths. 

The Ward Street Salt Depot was torn down to make 
way for a housing project at that location. 



66 City Document No. 24. 

Equipment.— Twenty new-type pushcarts with pneu- 
matic tires were placed in service. 

Four new flushers and two new motor sweepers were 
received during the year. 

Sale of Garbage. — A contract was made with Kennedj- 
Brothers for the sale of garbage delivered to them at the 
Victory Road Transfer Station, which was constructed 
last year. The city now receives S3, 000 a month for 
this garbage, and has discontinued the use of the scows 
from the adjoining Victory Road Station. 

Experiments. — Experiments were made regarding the 
storage of salt by means of a plastic spray. 

An experiment was made in the use of a detergent 
application by flushers. 

An experiment was made in the use of a Leaf-Picker- 
Upper machine to pick up refuse in Blackstone street. 

Parking of automobiles on one side of streets in 
Ward 14 on alternate days was attempted in order to 
facilitate street cleaning. This was not continued. 

An experiment was made in the use of rubbish from 
the Brighton district to till in the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
at the request of the Boston College authorities. 

New Flushing Districts. — - A new flushing district, 
known as C-16, was created on June 27, 1951. 

Disposal. — On October 1 the Boston Housing Author- 
ity required the Coleman Disposal Company to cease 
dumping on property owned by them on Mt. Vernon 
street, Dorchester, otherwise known as the Mile Road, 
in the Calf Pasture section. The city thereupon rented 
nearby land in this section, owned by the Public Works 
Department, to the Coleman Disposal Company, from 
October 1 to the end of the year, for a fee of $300 a 
month. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 
Division Engineer. 









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(69) 



70 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith .statement of the activities and ex- 
penditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1951. 

Expenditures During 1951. — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the \ r ear consisted of sewer con- 
struction at a contract cost of $344,633.25, as shown on 
attached schedule of the work done, and the maintenance 
and operation of the sewer system at a cost of $748,173.13. 

Contract Work. — Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for new 
buildings and street construction and to eliminate cess- 
pools, the locations and costs of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work. — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 3,538 catch basins by contract and 3,951 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the pump- 
ing station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

Special Work. — Special work consisted of completion 
of a low pressure heating boiler and radiation to heat 
the Calf Pasture Pumping Station; also the completion 
of the installation of a 30 KW motor generator set and a 
15 HP air compressor. This work made possible the 
award of a publicly advertised contract to demolish the 
high pressure boilers and the steam-driven electric 
generators. 

Since the use of large steam pump was abandoned and 
demolished in 1950, high pressure steam has baen used 
to generate DC current to drive the pump discharge 
gate motors and operate the hoisting engines for the 
cage screens. This was a costly operation but could 



Public Works Department. 71 

not be changed until the installation of a heating boiler 
and other mechanical changes referred to above were 
completed in June of this year. The operation of the 
new heating boiler from June to December 1, 1951, in- 
dicates a saving of about $18,000 per year in fuel oil 
plus the salaries of firemen transferred to other depart- 
ments. 

A contract was awarded for two 36-inch motor- 
operated pump discharge valves, at a cost of $9,275, to 
replace two worn-out valves. An order has been placed 
for new parts for the mechanical screen at the Union 
Park Street Pumping Station, which has broken down. 

Proposed Construction Work. — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street con- 
struction, new building construction, and the elimination 
of cesspools will continue for many years in the future, 
and probably at the same rate as in the past. In addi- 
tion, a long-range sewerage works program provides for 
the extension of main line surface drain conduits such as 
Stony Brook, Shepard Brook, Maywood Brook, etc. 
The long-range program also includes the rebuilding of 
several miles of very old sewers that have settled or out- 
lived their economic usefulness. Details of the long- 
range program are contained in a report on file in the 
Sewer Division. 

During 1952, it is proposed, in addition to regulate 
extension of the sewer systems as required to provide for 
new building and street construction, to cover in a sec- 
tion of Spring Street Brook, from Gould street to Baker 
street, consisting of about 1,350 linear feet of 84-inch 
diameter reinforced concrete pipe, at an estimated cost 
of $104,000; to cover in Shepard Brook, from Western 
avenue to existing culvert, consisting of about 1,100 
linear feet of 36-inch diameter reinforced concrete pipe, 
at an estimated cost of $30,000; and to cover in and re- 
locate a section of Stony Brook from the end of the 
existing conduit at the former Hyde Park line to the 
existing culvert across the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad at Providence street, consisting of 
about 4,200 linear feet of 84-inch and 72-inch diameter 
reinforced concrete pipe, and also a tunnel across Hyde 
Park avenue and the railroad, at an estimated cost of 
$350,000. The above work is in keeping with our policy 
of gradually covering in all open brooks to improve sur- 
face drainage and eliminate hazards. 



72 City Document No. 24. 

Special Problems. — At the Calf Pasture Pumping 
Station the main entrance sluice gates, the cross gallery 
sluice gates, and the pump discharge valves are in poor 
mechanical condition from wear. Most of this equip- 
ment was installed when the station was built in 1884, 
and is beyond repair. All the sluice gates leak so badly 
that they are practically useless. In addition, the pump 
casings of the motor-driven sewage pumps installed be- 
tween 1917 and 1937 are worn thin in places from the 
passage of grit. 

The main entrance sluice gates should be renewed as 
soon as possible, even though the station may be aban- 
doned within the next five years, upon the completion 
of the M.D.C. tunnel to Deer Island. This is necessary 
to protect the station from flooding, particularly if there 
was a loss of electric power of such duration that the 
leakage around the gates allowed the water to rise in the 
pump wells high enough to reach and destroy the hori- 
zontal pump motors. The same thing could happen if 
the gates failed, because of wear, to close during a 
storm. 

To install the gates, one at a time, will require a bulk- 
head on each side of the gate, the safe construction of 
which presents some difficulties and will be costly. It is 
intended to advertise a contract for the gates during the 
latter part of 1952, or early in 1953. At present it is be- 
lieved that the other worn-out sluice gates, with the 
possible exception of two of the six pump discharge 
valves, also the pump casings, can be made to serve 
until the station is abandoned. 

Excluding Tide Water from Sewer. — The tidegate re- 
pair crew which was recommended in the 1950 report, 
and which you approved, has been organized and is 
working. \\ hile this crew has repaired or renewed many 
tide gates there is no evidence to date that the amount 
of tide water entering the sewer system has been re- 
duced. This opinion is based on a general observation 
of the depth of flow in the intown sewers that discharge 
into the east and west intercepter, and to some extent 
on a comparison of the monthly cost of electric power 
for pumping for the previous year, which shows no re- 
duction in cost. We believe that the work that this crew 
is doing is worth while not only because they keep the 
sump connections free and thus prevent the overflow of 
sewage into tide water, but also because it is believed that 
eventually, as the result of their work, it will be deter- 






Public Works Department. 73 

mined if the leakage is due to the tide gates or to the 
condition of the old overflows or sewers, at which time a 
decision can be made as to advisability and the cost of 
the rebuilding required to exclude the tide water. 

Sewer Cleaning. — Sewer cleaning remains the major 
maintenance problem of the Sewer Division. As stated 
in previous reports, sewer cleaning has been neglected 
for the past 25 years, or more. The small crew of nine 
men and a foreman specifically assigned to this work are 
hardly able to do the cleaning which is more or less of an 
emergency nature. To attack the problem in the manner 
it deserves requires much additional man power, equip- 
ment, and proper supervision. 

The Sewer Division labor force has a quota of 31 
laborers, 20 assigned to the 7 yards, 7 to Calf Pasture 
and Moon Island, 1 to Mobile Guard, and 3 vacancies; 
a quota of 30 sewer cleaners, 23 assigned to the 7 3 T ards, 
2 to Calf Pasture and Moon Island, and 5 vacancies; a 
quota of 33 chauffeur-laborers and teamsters, 19 as- 
signed to the 7 yards (25 vehicles, exclusive of 5 catch 
basin cleaning machines and 3 pickup trucks), 8 to Calf 
Pasture, Moon Island and office, 2 to Mobile Guard, and 
4 vacancies; a quota of 7 catch-basin machine operators 
assigned to yards (5 operate catch-basin cleaning ma- 
chines, 2, power winches) ; a quota of 5 masons, 3 carpen- 
ters, 4 yardmen, 1 machinist assigned to the 6 yards - — 
making a total of 82 men assigned to answering com- 
plaints, repairs to manholes and catch basins, repairing 
broken sewers, cleaning catch basins and sewers, and 
other related work. The number of men available is 
reduced by about 9, who because of actual physical 
conditions are on light duty, and 3 assigned to patrol 
service. The number of men available is small rather 
than large, and yet, in general, is satisfactory except as 
previously noted for sewer cleaning work. 

Length of Sewers Built. — During the fiscal year 11)51 
there were built by contractors and day labor 4.25 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the 
city. After deducting 0.08 miles of sewers and surface 
drains rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1951 
is 4.17 miles, which, added to the existing 1,254.98 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles of 
intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,290.08 
miles of all sewers belonging to the City of Boston and 
under the care of the Sewer Division on Januarv 1, 1952. 



74 City Document No. 24. 

There were 122 catch basins built or rebuilt and 4 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 118 catch basins and a grand total of 23,404 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1952. 

Permit Office Report. — Entrance fees to the amount of 
$3,350.54 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances 
of 1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

Seven hundred seventy permits have been issued, 
viz., 292 to district foremen and contractors and 478 
to drainlayers for repairing or laying new house drains. 
Inspectors from this office have personally inspected the 
work done under these drainlayers' permits. 

Two thousand one hundred eight complaints have 
been investigated, and inspectors are instructed to re- 
port in writing in each case. 

One thousand five hundred eight catch-basin com- 
plaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 2,664 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,500 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 

Division Engineer. 



Public Works Department. 



7 b 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1951. 



Districts. 


Built bv the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 




Linear Feet. 
40<>. 00 
25.00 
None. 

3,161.00 
None. 

935.80 

12.452.63 

1,692.96 

3,782.68 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 
406.00 
25.00 
None. 

3,161.00 
None. 

935.80 

12,452.63 

1,692.96 

3,782.68 


Miles. 
0.0769 






0.0047 




None. 
None. 






0.5987 




None. 




0.1772 






2.3584 






0.3206 


Hyde Park 




0.7164 








Totals 


22,456.07 




22,456.07 


4.2529 










Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January I, 1952. 





1947. 


1948. 


1949. 


1950. 


1951. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor. . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear 
Feet. 

24,166.43 
15,216.70 


Linear 
Feet. 

29,754.60 
8,969.68 


Linear 
Feet. 

39,596.88 


Linear 
Feet. 

31,208.93 
3,938.00 


Linear 
Feet. 

22,456.07 








Totals 


39,383.13 


38,724.28 


39,596.88 


35,146.93 


22,456.07 







76 



City Document No. 24. 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 



Total 

Lengths 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1951. 



Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1951. 



Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1951. 



City Proper. . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 



Li mar Feet. 

406.00 

25.00 

None. 

3,161.00 

None. 

935.80 

12,452.63 

1,692.96 

3,782.68 



Linear Feet. 
406.00 
25.00 
None. 



Linear Feet. 



None. 



None. 

3,161.00 

None. 

935.80 

12,452.63 

1,692.96 

3,782.68 



Miles. 



None. 
0.5987 

None. 
0.1772 
2.3584 
0.3206 
0.7164 



Totals. 



22,456.07 



431.00 



22,025.07 



4.1713 



Miles. 
Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 

January 1, 1951 1,254.98 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 

Januan r 1 and December 31, 1951 . . . 4.17 

Total of above ending December 31, 1951 . 1,259 . 15 

Total length of city intercepting sewers connecting 

with metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1951 . *6.81 

Total length of Boston main drainage intercepting 

sewers to December 31, 1951 *24.12 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1951 1,290.08 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to January 1, 1952 701.18 



* No additional lengths built during 1951. 






Public Works Department. 

Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



77 



Districts. 



Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1951. 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 



Net 
Increase. 



Total for Whole Citt 

in Charge of Sewer 

Division. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1951. 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1952. 



City Proper. . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. 
East Boston. . 
Charlestown . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Hyde Park... 

Totals... 



46 
31 
34 



40 
31 
34 



3,637 
3,380 
1,462 
1,112 
843 
2,053 
4,112 
5,564 
1,123 



3,637 
3,383 
1,462 
1,114 
843 
2,055 
4,158 
5,595 
1,157 



122 



23,286 



23,404 



Calf Pasture Pumping Station, 
Resume for Year 1951. 

Sewage Record. 



Month. 



Total Gallons 
Pumped. 



Average Gallons 
Pumped Daily. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



Totals 

Daily Average. 



3,280,754,000 
3,197,459,000 
3,456,420,000 
3,331,041,000 
3,230,832,000 
3,248,340,000 
3,162,339,000 
3,362,978,000 
3,158,155,000 
3,423,720,000 
3,723,143,000 
3,558,753,000 



40,133,934,000 



105,831,000 
114,195,000 
111,497,000 
111,035,000 
104,220,000 
108,278,000 
102,011,000 
108,483,000 
105,272,000 
110,443,000 
124,105,000 
1 14,798,000 



1,320,168,000 
109,956,000 



7S 



City Document No. 24. 

Fuel Oil Used. 



Month. 


No. 2. 


No. 5. 


No. 6. 


Cost. 








28,093 
23,621 
24,027 
20,084 
24,038 
11,981 


$1,514 32 








1,273 28 








1,295 17 








1,082 60 


Mav 






1,295 73 




54 . (i 


5,068 


1,150 94 


July. 








3,068 




249 10 












50 
150 
100 


4,045 

12,238 

8,020 




335 84 






1,341 20 






665 15 






Totals 


354.6 


32,439 


131,844 


$10,203 33 







Electricity Used. 



Month. 



Kilowatt 
Hours . 



Cost. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



525,200 
561,180 
523,520 
616,820 
480,780 
639,280 
485,840 
526,000 
606,000 
531,260 
605,580 
600,220 



$6,258 39 
6,665 05 
6,339 70 
7,127 05 
6,095 96 
7,304 69 
6,121 61 
6,490 87 
7,216 29 
6,580 21 
7,181 73 
7,163 56 



Totals . 



6,707,680 



$80,545 11 



Labor 

Electricity 

Fuel oil 

Supplies and miscellaneous .... 

Totals 

Cost per million gallons of sewage pumped 



Cost 

Per Year. 

$130,201 52 

80,545 11 

10,203 33 

4,965 08 

$225,915 04 
$5 63 



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City Document No. 24. 



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Postage 15 00 

Unliquidated re- 
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Sundries 9 28 


Telephone calls 1,857 59 

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Maintenance 
stock used 
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Construction 
stock used 
on mainte- 
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Motor vehi- 
cles used on 
m a i n t e - 

Maintenance 
labor paid 
by Sewer 
Works .... 024 59 

Maintenance 
bills paid 
by Sewer 


) 


Totals 

Debits. 

Sewer Works 
stock paid 
for bv main- 
tenance . . . $38 02 

Sewer Works 
labor Paid 
for by main- 
tenance . . . 798 92 


B 

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84 



City Document No. 24. 



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City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1952. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1951. 

The shortage of critical materials having been less- 
ened, and new meters made available, the work of 
laying and relaying water mains and the replacement 
of obsolete meters, etc., was resumed. 

A total of 22,731 linear feet of main pipe were either 
laid or relaid, varying in sizes from 8-inch to 12-inch, 
inclusive, as follows: 



District. 
Roxbury . 
East Boston . 
City Proper . 
South Boston 
Dorchester 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 
Charlestown . 

Total 



Laid. 


Relaid. 


Linear Feet. 


Linear Feet. 


155 


122 


1,206 


1,860 


616 


102 








426 


2,192 


1,800 


200 


3,204 


1,018 


2,619 


7,211 









10,026 



12,705 



The particular streets in which the above work was 
performed are shown on the accompanying tables. 



Engineering Office. 

There is an insufficient number of capable employees 
on the engineering staff. This shortage of engineering 
personnel is getting worse instead of getting better, due 



Public Works Department. 93 

in the main to the small amount of pay that has been 
offered to the engineers on the civil service list in all 
grades. 

An attempt has been made to rectify salary differences, 
but the increase granted has not kept pace with salaries 
offered by the State of Massachusetts and outside 
private agencies. 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information relative to the Water Division 
and compiled all the official data and brought the 
record plans to date. Estimates for new service pipes 
were given and plans and specifications for contracts 
for main pipe extension and new mains were prepared. 

The engineering force supervised all construction, 
payment on work performed, and assisted the yard 
forces in Water Division problems. They also directed 
and supervised the Pitometer Company in a leakage 
survey in Districts No. 10, 11, 12, and 13, covering 
Brighton, West Roxbury, Hyde Park, and Mattapan. 

The various agencies (municipal, state, federal, and 
MTA) were assisted in the design and supervision of 
construction of water mains on the following projects: 

Sullivan Square — Overpass-Underpass 

Central Artery — City square, Haymarket square, Nashua 

street, and North Station 
Forest Hills — Overpass 
East Boston — Express Highway 
MTA — East Boston Rapid Transit Extension to Orient 

Heights 
Tremont Street — Proposed Subway, Scollay Square 
Housing Authority — Six housing projects 

The National Board of Underwriters was assisted 
in their survey of the entire city system, including the 
high pressure fire service. The various civilian defense 
units have also applied for and received assistance in 
their numerous defense activities, such as water supply, 
fire control, and shelters. 

Distribution Branch. 

Due to the increased volume of work caused by 
applications for service pipes, etc., the department has 
engaged the services of contractors during the year. 

The regular work of the branch, consisting of installa- 
tion of new services and fire pipes, repairing of leaks, 



94 



City Document No. 24. 



caring for complaints, shutting off and letting on water, 
freeing of stoppages in pipes, etc., was performed in 
such a manner and at such periods as to cause minimum 
delay and inconvenience to applicants for water, water 
takers, and the general public. 



Service pipes repaired 

New service pipes installed 

Hydrants changed 

Hydrants inspected, painted, lubricated, and gates 

marked 

Main pipe repairs 

Other miscellaneous work 



5,151 
485 
192 

30,599 

182 

15,007 

The machine shop and plumbing shop were forced 
to handle all the drilling and connecting of services in 
addition to the regular work carried on in these shops, 
such as the machining and assembling of gates, valves, 
and hydrants, and the department assisted the other 
branches of the Public Works Department in performing 
special jobs. 

Business Office. 

In order to enforce the payment of outstanding water 
bills, customers in arrears are notified that the flow of 
water will be reduced, but yet enough water is left on 
the premises to provide a minimum for health and sani- 
tarv requirements. As a result, the Water Division 
ended the year 1951 with a surplus of $453,823.29, this 
surplus being due mainly to the collection of bills due 
and payable. 



Main pipe petitions received 
Domestic service applications 
Fire pipe applications 

Special meter tests . 
Hydrant permits issued 
Repair deposits received 
Miscellaneous deposits . 



11 
499 
37 
73 
15 
82 
49 



Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 
Budget appropriation . . $2,761,867 39 



Amount expended 



2,399,224 63 



Unexpended balance . $362,642 76 

Amount of money collected during the year . $4,736,398 36 
Amount expended from all sources . . . 4,282,575 07 



Balance $453,823 29 



Public Works Department. 95 

The metropolitan assessment for 1951 amounted to 
SI, 651, 045.23, at the rate of $40 per million gallons, a 
decrease of $10,018.05 under the assessment for 1950. 

Total amount billed in 1951 .... $4,699,946 23 

Total amount collected for 1951 bills, as of De- 
cember 31, 1951 $3,742,156 12 

Total amount abated for 1951 bills, as of De- 
cember 31, 1951 $18,666 57 

Total amount collected in 1951 on bills rendered 

prior to 1951 $168,124 46 

This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of the 
office has been such that I believe a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the employees has been 
brought about, which is beneficial to the consumers and 
the city. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers before placing of liens on premises 
has been continued. The appreciation of the customers 
is shown by the fact that the number of liens placed on 
premises this year has been reduced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer. 



9G 



City Document Xo. 24. 



Table No. 


1. Statement of Work Done 


During 1951. 




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5 


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T3 

2 a 
g-co 


4) 

n 

o 


"O 




Out. 


In. 


a 

3 


Watch Dog 


473 
50 


731 

231 

25 

43 

2 

3 


3,352 
1,937 

249 

240 

17 

14 

6 

S 

2 

3 

1 
1 


5,449 
37G 

5 


8,801 
2,313 

249 

240 

17 

14 

6 

13 

3 

1 
1 


603 

146 

4 


1,121 
598 


682 
34 


110 
588 


King 


274 










283 












19 












17 












6 




2 
o 


2 


1 

1 








Tiident . 






1 








3 






1 




















1 












1 






















527 


1,038 


5,830 


5,830 


11,660 


755 


1,719 


717 


1,304 



Table No. 2. Meters in Service December 31, 1951. 



Make. 








Diameter in 


[nches. 


Total. 


i 


i 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 





8 


10 


12 




64,758 
2,454 

12,242 

110 

1,533 

114 

3 

14 

8 


3,956 

6 

376 

14 

16 

1 
1 
1 
1 


2,354 

3 

587 


1,212 

7 

687 


806 

8 

384 


341 

7 
249 

1 


346 


122 


35 


20 


10 


73,960 
2,485 


Watch Dog. . 


80 










14,605 












125 




7 
1 
2 

1 
2 


19 
1 
A 

16 


15 
1 
7 
3 
1 

16 












1,590 




1 
1 
1 
1 
21 
33 
1 












118 




5 


1 








24 


Nash 








24 




1 

10 
11 










13 




1 








66 


Trident . 


3 
3 

4 


1 






50 




1 








6 






1 








5 








1 


1 










■> 














3 








3 


























Totals 


81,246 


4,372 


2,958 


1,952 


1,241 


658 


454 


129 


36 


20 


10 


93,076 







Public Works Department. 97 

Table No. 3. Meters in Shop December 31, 1951. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


1 


i 


1 


H 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 


New. 


1,100 


1,119 


124 


15 


13 












2,371 


Hersey H. C. T 


7 


4 


1 
1 






12 
















1 


2 




















Totals 


1,100 


1,119 


124 


15 


13 


7 


4 


2 




1 


2,385 






Old. 
Hersey Disc 


140 


16 


14 


17 


22 


10 


5 

7 
2 


2 
3 






226 


1 




11 


Watch Dog 


42 


28 


7 


7 


4 


3 


93 












Totals 


182 


44 


21 


24 


26 


13 


14 


5 


1 




330 







Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in 1951. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


t 


* 


1 


H 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 






885 


39 


23 


87 


62 


7 


6 
9 


3 

8 


1 


1,106 




15 


Watch Dog 


361 


18 


32 


95 


62 


21 


598 










Totals 


1,246 


57 


55 


182 


124 


28 


15 


11 


1 


1,719 







Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1951, 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


~* 


i 


1 




1,500 


69 


29 


1,598 







98 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 5A. Meters Purchased New in 1951. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


5 


1 


H 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 


16x8 




2,775 


137 


72 


20 


14 


15 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3,039 




1 
























Totals 


2,775 


137 


72 


20 


14 


15 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3,040 







Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1951. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


V 

'a 

3 
O 
O 

O 


c 
o . 

'■♦3 TO 

C i 
0) V 

c & 

o 




* 


3 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


03 

"o 




630 
17 


35 
4 


12 
5 


2 


o 


2 
1 


1 
1 


24 
8 


658 

26 

1 


682 


Watch Dog 


2 


3 


34 




1 




















Total 


647 


39 


17 


4 


5 


3 


2 


32 


685 


717 







Table No. 7A. Aleters Changed in 1951. Meters Taken Out. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


8 


i 


1 


H 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




2,607 

1,567 

223 

238 

14 

14 

2 


379 

101 

12 


190 
121 

4 


88 

86 

8 

1 


57 

46 

o 


9 
11 


12 
5 


9 


1 


3,352 


Watch Dog 


1,937 








249 




1 








240 




3 










17 


Federal 
















14 


Nash 




1 


2 
3 


1 
2 










6 




2 
1 


1 






8 


Trident 


1 










2 




2 


1 
1 












3 


















1 








1 












1 






















Totals 


4,666 


497 


318 


189 


108 


24 


18 


9 


1 


5,830 







Public Works Department. 99 

Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1951. Meters Put In. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


8 


a 


1 


1§ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




4,501 
10G 


475 

75 


251 
73 


120 

72 

1 


70 7 


10 
4 


8 


1 


5,449 


Watch Dog 


32 
1 


14 
3 


376 



























Totals 


4,607 


550 


324 


193 


109 


24 


14 


8 


1 


5.830 







Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1951. 





Jj 




01 








CD 










•a 














"go 




09 


c 


o 


c 
o 


c3 

H 




Make. 




h5 


to 




o 










%•* 


<0 


c 


Eh 


c 


a 








■2(5 


•73 

c 


3 


& 


■* 




93 

D. 


03 






















Q 


in 


O 


£ 


n 


H 


« 


H 




113 


328 


88 


6 


l 


64 


3 


603 




42 


79 
3 


13 




2 


10 
1 




140 




4 




1 
1 








1 


Trident 














1 


















Totals 


157 


410 


101 


6 


3 


75 


3 


755 



Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1951. 



Make. 



Diameter in Inches. 



H 



10 



Total. 



Hersey 
Watch Dog 

Arctic 

Trident.... 



Totals . 



322 
9 



331 



10 



L2 



.Mi 



52 



L3 



16 



473 
50 



527 



Meters applied on old service. . 
Meters applied on new service. 



Total. 



23 

504 



527 



100 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1951. 



Make. 




Diameter 


in Inches. 


-d 
o 

s'1 

p. 2 

£q 

a> 

Ph 


a 
.2 . 

"5 <U 
0) o 
- a) 

O 


.2 
*S 

a 


Total. 




i 


* 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


G 


10 






597 

175 

22 

42 

2 

3 


G6 
8 
2 


29 

21 

1 


25 
10 


5 
8 


6 
5 


1 
3 


o 


1 


347 

109 

10 

11 


320 
103 

14 

30 

2 

3 

1 


65 

18 

1 

2 

1 


731 


Watch Dog 


231 








25 






1 










43 








































3 










1 












1 


Trident 










2 








1 


o 






















Totals 


841 


76 


51 


35 


15 


13 


4 


2 


1 


478 


473 


87 


1,038 







Table No. 11. Causes of Meter Changes for the Year 1951. 





_j 




















































h 








.a 

03 


d 


^sd 












Make. 


a 






h3 


o 


3 

h-3 


CO 

S 










S 

0) 

O. 
o 

Q 


M 

o 

fa 

o 

55 


•B 


M 




,M 


H 










o 

o 
Q 


to 
u 

a 

"3 
fa 


3. 

3 


o 


5 
3 


o 

g 

'a 

H3 


3 

« 

OS 


3 
a 

BO 


o 
hi 

fa 


2 
'3 


j3 

o 





285 

65 

3 

9 

7 


1,954 

1,536 

166 

165 

7 
6 
4 
7 
1 
1 


36 
9 
2 


69 

15 

1 


480 

189 

57 

40 

2 

6 

1 


180 

44 

o 

5 
1 


200 
57 

18 
17 


25 
4 


62 

5 


4 
2 


57 
11 


3,352 


Watch Dog 


1,937 




249 




2 


1 




1 


240 








17 








2 










14 




1 
1 














6 




















8 


Trident 














1 






2 




1 
1 
1 








1 










3 




















1 
























1 




























374 


3,847 


47 


85 


775 


233 


294 


31 


69 


6 


69 


5,830 







Public Works Department. 101 

Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1951. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


1 


< 


1 


li 


2 


3 


4 


G 




78 

570 

280 

245 

16 

17 

2 

1 


7 
4 


4 
10 


5 
2 
1 
8 


6 
1 
1 
2 


9 
1 


1 


1 


110 


Watch Dog 


588 




283 




14 
3 


5 






274 










19 


Federal 














17 






1 


2 




1 






6 


Trident 






1 




2 


1 
1 












3 






1 


1 








•? 














1 




















Totals 


1,209 


30 


22 


19 


11 


11 


1 


1 


1,304 







102 



City Document No. 24. 



< 



Q OS 

I a" 

£ s- 

IS ft 

-£■ V 

3 § 

^ Cj 

pO <» 

■^ I 

© =Q 

ft. *• 

O g 

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a 



■« 

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t~iO O — O 

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r^— 1 to — — c 



s 



o ->, o 
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o> j-i 03 £ 

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7 .. 03 — 

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Public Works Department. 



103 



Table No. II. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1951. 



Hydrants. 


b 



h3 


>. 

u 

is 

o 

d 
o 

m 
O 

m 


o 

Pi 
a 

o 
o 

ca 


m 

o 
Ph 

>> 

u 
03 

a 
"g 

O 


a o 

03 Pi 
a) d 

-d d 
■2.5 


o 

P 

h3 


o 
Ph 

a 

03 

S 

0. 
03 

JS 

o 


tn 

o 
Ph 

_d 

03 
Q 


o 

PL. 
09 
0J 

J3 


03 

■9 
>> 

W 

d 
o 

Hd 
O 
Ph 


o 

Ph 

In 

a> 


*o3 
O 


Public, December 31, 1950 

Private, December 31, 1950 


503 

33 

2 

4 

501 

33 


250 
5 


2,178 
29 


2,432 

126 

16 

149 

2,299 
126 


5,997 

17 

199 

24 

6,172 
17 


4 
13 


5 
56 


6 


4 


93 
111 




11,475 
394 

217 




1 

249 

5 


12 
2,166 

29 


4 
13 


5 


50 










195 


Total Public. December 31, 1951 
Total Private, December 31, 1951 


6 


4 


93 
111 




11,497 
394 



Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1950 . 
Total hydrants established during 1951 . 
Total hydrants abandoned during 1951 . 
Total hydrants added during 1951 . 
Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1951 
High pressure fire hj'drants in service 



217 
195 



Total hydrants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1951 



11,869 



22 

11,891 

504 

12,395 



104 



City Document No. 24. 



x 



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Public Works Department. 



105 



Financial Transactions, Water Service, 1951. 
Cash balance from 1950 $512,43141 



Receipts : 

Water rates and services . . §4,709,610 37 

Tax titles — water . . . . 26,787 99 



Expenditures from revenue: 

Pensions and annuities . . . $48,282 15 

Current expenses and extensions . 2,399,224 63 

Collecting Department . . . 179,821 06 

Auditing Department 

Refunded water rates . . . 1,135 60 

Refunded water collections 

Refunded water tax titles 

Metropolitan assessment . . 1,651,045 23 

$4,279,508 67 

Transfer of 1950 surplus to redemp- 
tion of city loans .... 320,072 61 



Expenditures from debt account: 

Boston water debt .... $36,000 00 

Interest on loans .... 4,631 25 

Cash balance, December 31, 1951 

Cash forwarded to 1952 

Surplus on hand, December 31, 1951 . . . . 

Loan account: 

Balance outstanding, January 1, 

1951 $156,000 00 

1951 payment on Boston water 

debt " 36,000 00 

Balance outstanding, December 31, 

1951 



4,736,398 36 
55,248,829 77 



4,599,581 28 
$649,248 49 

40,631 25 

$608,617 24 
154,793 95 

$453,823 29 



$120,000 00 



Construction account: 

Extensions of mains (from revenue) 
Cost of construction, December 31, 

1951 $24,610,402 89 

Cost of construction, December 31, 

1950 24,603,362 40 



Increase in plant cost during 1951 



87.040 49 



106 City Document No. 24. 



Cost of existing works, December 31, 1951 : 

Pipe yards and buildings * . . $84,332 16 

Engineering expense . . . 57,873 58 

Distribution system f 24,222,478 36 

Hyde Park water works . . . 175,000 00 



$24,539,684 10 
High pressure fire system % 2,293,316 75 

$26,833,000 85 



* $10,500 deducted on account of abolishment of Charlestown yard. 

t Includes $155,023.89 expended on high pressure fire system in 1925, 1926, 1931, 
1932, 1933. 

% $33,850.96 deducted from cost of high pressure fire system on account of abandon- 
ment of pumping, Battery street. 



Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1951. 

Number of shutoffs for repairs 6,475 

Number of premises turned on after repairs . . 5,838 

Number of shutoffs for vacancy 578 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . . 422 
Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water 

rates IS 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for nonpayment 7 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste . 64 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for waste 37 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first 

time 489 

Total number of times water was shut off or 

turned on 13,923 



Public Works Department. 107 

Water Statistics, City of Boston. 
For the Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1951. 

Mains. 

Kind of pipe: cast-iron, wrought-iron, steel. 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch. 

Extended, miles, 0.995. 

Size, enlarged, miles, 

Total miles now in use, 1,009.559. 

Public hydrants added, 22. 

Public hydrants now in use, 12,395. 

Stop gates added, 57. 

Stop gates now in use, 16,230. 

Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 36. 

Number of blowoffs, 861. 

Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds. 

Service. 

Kind of pipe and size: lead and lead-lined, f-inch; cast iron, 
2-inch to 16-inch; wrought-iron and cement-lined, f-inch 
to 2-inch; brass and copper, f-inch to 2^-inch. Service 
taps added. 

Total service taps now in use as per metered services. 



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112 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. VI. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1951. 



Location. 













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Brighton (public) 

" (private) 

Charlestown (public) 

" (private) 

City Proper (public) 

(private) 

Dorchester (public) 

" (private) 

East Boston (public) 

(private) 

Hyde Park (public) 

" (private) 

Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

South Boston (public) 

" i private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

Deer Island (private) 

Gallups Island (private) 

Long Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . . 
Thompson's Island (private). 
Quincy (private) 



23 

13 

381 

5 

39 

1 

6 



200 



310 
9 

603 
9 

140 

1 

65 



270 
3 

163 
1 

312 



251 



37 

145 

1 

776 

157 



186 

4 

111 

14 

648 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 



13 



638 



180 



595 

2 
1,142 



223 



684 



1,047 

300 

3 

1,363 

1 

7 



Total number (public) . 
Total number (private) . 



Total number (public and 
private) 



501 

33 

534 



249 
5 

254 



2,166 
29 

2,195 



2,299 
126 



6,172 
17 

6,189 



56 



93 
111 

204 



High pressure fire hydrants. 



Total hydrants (all kinds). 



CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



rcHDtfa 



am 



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