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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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[Document 24 — 1953.] 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1952. 



Boston*, January 2, 1953. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1952. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were $20,641,886.07, of which $1,636,681.88 rep- 
resents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and $574,358.81 represents Metro- 
politan District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled $4,796,- 
064.52, and the revenue derived from the operation of the 
Sumner Tunnel reached a record high of $1,932,619.83. 

The surplus resulting from the sale of water amounted 
to $346,336.56, and the operation of the Sumner Tunnel 
resulted in a record-breaking surplus of $696,200.59. 

The East Boston Ferry, as has been the case over the 
past years, operated at an annual deficit which — for 
this its final year of operation— amounted to $299,508.03. 



2 City Document No. 24. 

Loan Orders. 
On April 29, 1952, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor which provided, under the provisions of 
section 7 of chapter 44 of the General Laws, that the 
sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated for the construction 
of pubHc ways, and on August 26, 1952, that the sum 
of $1,000,000 be appropriated for the construction of 
bridges. 

Street Construction Work. 
State-Aid Program. 

Last year we completed the largest amount of street 
reconstruction ever undertaken by this city, under the 
Chapter 90 State- Aid Highway Reconstruction Program. 
The following important main highways were con- 
structed during the year under this program : 

Bennington street, from Central square to Walley street. 

Cambridge street, from North Anderson street to Scollay 
square. 

Hyde Park avenue, from Pingree street to Wolcott square. 

Massachusetts avenue, from Albany street to Columbus 
avenue. 

Brookline avenue, from the Riverway to Pilgrim road. 

South Huntington avenue, from Huntington avenue to 
Centre street. 

Belgrade avenue, from Robert street to Centre street. 

Spring street, from Centre street to Route 1. 

Cambridge street, from Union square to Washington 
street. 

Washington street, from Cambridge street to the Newton 
line. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Program 
in Boston for the year 1952 was $1,018,437.59, of which 
the State Department of Public Works, under the 
provisions of section 34 of chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, paid 48 per cent, thereby presenting a substantial 
saving to the taxpayers. It is planned to again conduct 
an extensive program of construction under this chapter 
in 1953. 

JVon-Staie-Aid Program. 
We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program, comprising extensive construction and recon- 
struction, in every section of the cit3\ In addition to 



Public Woeks Department. 3 

work done on downtown streets, the department re- 
surfaced several important traffic arteries, listed as 
follows : 

Broadway, from Tremont street to bridge over Boston & 
Albany Railroad. 

Centre street, from Columbus avenue to John Eliot square. 

Congress street, from Atlantic avenue to bridge over Fort 
Point Channel. 

Dorchester avenue, from Congress street to Summer 
street. 

Dorchester street, from East First street to Broadway. 

Harvard street, from Blue Hill avenue to Morton street. 

Tremont street, from Scollay square to Boylston street. 

In continuation of our policy of replacing brick side- 
walks with cement concrete in the older sections of the 
city, contracts during the year, totaUng approximately 
$79,000, w^re awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1952 for highway improve- 
ments : 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) . . . $2,536,633 80 

Public Waj^s, Construction of (Revenue Account) . . 157,500 00 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . . . 94,639 75 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . . . 78,944 69 

Total $2,867,718 24 



The following is a summarized record of the highwaj^ 
improvement work done by the department in 1952: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 162. 

Includes 32 new streets ordered laid out and constructed by 
the Board of Street Commissioners under the provisions of 
chapter 393 of the Acts of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved, 29.69. 

Includes 10.61 miles of so-called Chapter 90 state-aid high- 
way improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 6.01 . 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in above- 
noted street improvements. 

We also completed, during the year, the removal 
of 950 gas lamps, which were replaced with an equal 
number of 1,000-lumen electric lamps. It is our in- 
tention to continue with this program during 1953. 



4 City Document No. 24. 

Snow Removal. 

We were fortunate during the past yeav in that 
no snowstorms of major proportions occurred, and 
we experienced no difficulty in keeping the streets 
properly plowed and sanded throughout the winter 
months. 

At the present time there are over 727 miles of public 
streets that have to be plowed and maintained during 
the winter months. The department owns fourteen 
(14) Walter snow fighters which are used to plow, 
sand, and salt the streets of the downtown area. Most 
of the plowing work in the rest of the city was done 
by 245 trucks rented on an hourly basis from con- 
tractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1952 totaled 
$476,360.80. 

Meridian Street Bridge. 

Progress on constructing the substructure for the 
new bridge by the Merritt-Chapman & Scott Corpo- 
ration, under the supervision of the Department of 
Public Works of the Commonwealth, was about 91 
per cent completed at the end of the year. 

Bids for the construction of the superstructure 
were opened on June 20, 1952, and the contract was 
awarded to the American Bridge Company in the 
amount of $2,939,976. Very little progress was made 
under this contract this year, pending the arrival of 
steel due for delivery sometime in 1953. 

South Ferry. 

Because of the continuous annual deficit resulting 
from the operation of this ferry, your Honor ordered 
on November 14, 1952, that the Ferry Service be 
terminated at the close of business on December 31, 
1952. Arrangements have been made for the transfer 
of personnel to other services and tentative plans 
made for disposal of the ferryboats and appurtenances 
by public sale. 

Refuse Disposal and Incineration. 

A preliminary report on the proposed Southampton 
Street incinerator was submitted by the consulting 
engineering firm of IVIetcalf & Eddy in April of 1952. 



Public Works Department. 5 

This report recommended the construction of a 750- 
ton per 24-hour incinerator at an estimated construction 
cost of $2,700,000. No further progress has been 
made on the design of this plant, pending the acquisi- 
tion of a site for the proposed incinerator. 

Legislation, enacted under chapter 559 of the Acts 
of 1952, provided for the construction and operation 
by the MetropoHtan District Commission of refuse 
disposal incinerators. Provisions were made for the 
issuance of bonds in an amount not to exceed S7, 000,000 
to provide for the construction of five (5) incinerators 
to dispose of the refuse from the City of Boston and 
sixteen (16) of the adjacent metropolitan communities. 
It is proposed to erect these incinerators in the vicinity 
of Southampton street, Boston; in the vicinity of the 
Mystic Valley Parkway, Medford; near Grove street, 
in Watertown; in the marsh between Revere and 
Saugus; and at the Neponset River, off Granite avenue, 
in Milton. Boston has a vital interest in all five of 
these incinerators, as the refuse to be burnt at the 
Southampton Street plant would come entirelj^ from 
Boston; the incinerator in Medford would dispose 
of the refuse from Charlestown; the incinerator in 
Watertown would receive the Brighton refuse; the 
incinerator in Revere-Saugus would receive the refuse 
from East Boston; and the proposed incinerator at 
Milton would receive the refuse from the South Dor- 
chester and, possibly, Hyde Park districts. Accordingly, 
your Honor approved on March 16, 1953, an order 
voted by the City Council at your request to accept 
this permissive legislation. To date, the other com- 
munities have failed to enter into an agreement to 
take part in this program. While this metropolitan 
incineration program, on the whole, appears to be of 
considerable benefit to the city, I am of the opinion 
that it is in the best interests of the city that the pro- 
posed incinerator in the vicinity of Southampton street 
be constructed and operated by the City of Boston. 

Purchase of Equipment. 

New equipment purchased during the year included 
three (3) Baughman sand spreader bodies; two (2) 
Trojan bucket loaders; nine (9) Ford dump trucks; 
three (3) Ford emergency trucks; three (3) Elgin 



6 City Document No. 24. 

street sweepers; one (1) 10-ton Gallon tandem roller; 
one (1) Ford sedan, and one (1) Chevrolet carryall. 

Personnel. 

There were 2,340 employees in the department as 
of December 31, as compared with 2,372 employees 
on January 1, 1952. 

Detailed Reports. 

Appended hereto are reports submitted by the divi- 
sion engineers relative to the activities of their divisions 
in 1952. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department. 7 

The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,340 persons eligible for employment in the several 
divisions, and of that number 2,310 were upon the 
January, 1953, payrolls. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Sebvices. 


Title. 


-3 2 

go 
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a M 

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1 

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o 

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1 




1 
1 


...1 


...1 


1 




1 


1 


5 






9 












1 


2 


1 


4 






1 

2 

1 
12 

1 
65 
20 
11 

8 


1 

7 

2 

..12 

27 

10 

4 


1 

2 

1 
26 










1 


1 


2 


J 


10 












1 






57 










3 






..75 
1 


...6 

10 

1 

1 


...1 




..18 
5 
2 
2 


177 


Assistant engineers (civil) 


1 


64 


Transitmen 






24 










15 


Executive secretary 


1 






1 


Chief and executive clerks 


2 


1 


1 


1 
1 

6 
2 


1 

7 
1 


1 

11 

1 


3 
1 

59 


9 






3 


Clerks, stenographers, telephone oper- 
ators 


8 


21 


10 


12 
1 

1 


134 


Storekeepers 


3 


Captains 








3 


Sergeants 








4 
40 




.} 
















44 


Drawtenders and assistants 










147 






147 


Chief 














4!} 

1 




Meter readers 
















42 


Chief 






1 
7 

20 












Steam engineers 














■•■} 


8 


Oilers, firemen 














20 












1 
17 




1 




Ejlectricians 






2 

2 




1 




■••} 


21 


Blueprinters 






2 






















11 


146 


107 


122 


179 


74 


18 


142 


799 





City Document No. 24. 













Services 


. 






Title. 


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9 *" 


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m 

02 


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11 


146 


107 


122 


179 


74 


18 

1 

3 
13 


142 

:::} 

2 
. ..1 


799 




1 
















































3 
















1 


















1 


1 






6 










1 


7 






8 
1 
12 
1 
5 








8 








2 

30 

3 






4 
31 

1 


5 
172 

1 


12 






31 
5 


21 
3 


4 
2 


301 






16 






5 


Head chauffeurs 












4 

1 

27 


38 


4 
















1 






39 
15 


33 


131 


6 


15 


289 






15 






7 
29 












7 


















29 














1 
1 




1 






6 




37 

1 

2 

415 

12 






44 


Wharfinger 








1 






1 
173 


4 
30 


1 
7 






4 

84 

5 


12 






9 


32 


750 


Constables 




17 


















Totals 


11 


423 


237 


755 


217 


104 


138 


455 


2,340 







Public Works Department. 9 

Number of Employees Actually Employed January 1, 1952, and 
January 1, 1953. 

















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a; 








































be 




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a 


03 O 

CO 
O 


no 

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^ 




Mj3 


St 
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o 


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o 


January 1, 1952 


95 


11 


201 


64 


450 


425 


765 


229 


101 


2,341 


January 1, 1953 


100 


11 


210 




448 


420 


750 


234 


137 


2,310 



Total Eligihle Force. 



January 1, 1952. 
January 1, 1953. 



97 
104 


11 
11 


203 
217 


64 


454 
455 


429 
423 


782 
755 


230 
237 


102 
138 



2,372 
2,340 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths, 
etc., of Employees. 







i 


5 " 












6S 


i 












i 


-a 


•6 




Services. 


o 


51 




.2 


.2 




TS 
P 


•Sog. 


.2 a 


2 


% 


«-• 


1952-1953. 




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Q 


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1 






go 






a 














11 

203 
64 


Central Office. . . 


11 

217 










5 


3 

5 


3 


1 
54 






20 


1 




2 


1 




1 






9 


8 


2 


11 




4 


429 


Paving 


423 


17 


3 


3 


6 


9 


15 


3 


34 


14 


8 


782 


Sanitary 


755 


9 


17 


5 


25 


4 


11 
9 
3 
3 


3 
1 


2 
4 
1 

7 


6 
1 


3 
10 

1 
3 


230 

454 

97 

102 




237 
455 
104 
138 


14 
6 
5 

43 


7 
6 
2 

2 


3 


Of 


1 


Water 


17 




Tunnel 


6 




Automotive 


4 


29 


57 


12 


114 


21 


30 


2,372 


Totals 


2,340 


114 


38 


10 


69 



10 City Document No. 24. 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



Division or Service. 


Total Appropriations, 

Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried over from 1951. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office 
Automotive Division 
Bridge Service 
Ferry Service 
Tunnel Service 
Lighting Service . 
Paving Service 
Sanitary Division 
Sewer Division 
Water Division 






$62,003 29 

733,369 12 

804,611 17 

333,047 71 

582,588 30 

1,322,329 03 

1,478,936 03 

5,281,627 25 

861,935 88 

2,735,405 95 


$59,649 32 

721,650 30 

797,492 81 

321,110 60 

566,384 75 

1,313,983 19 

1,472,439 90 

5,270,095 60 

806,795 57 

2.679,419 48 


$2,353 97 

11,718 82 

7,118 36 

11,937 11 

16,203 55 

8,345 84 

6,496 13 

11,531 65 

55,140 31 

55,986 47 


Totals .... 


$14,195,853 73 


$14,009,021 52 


$186,832 21 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title, 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



Bridges, Construction of (revenue) 

Bridges, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. (revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of 
(revenue) 

Street Signs (revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Snow Removal (revenue) 

Sewerage Works (revenue) 

Sewerage Works (non-revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings Thereof (non-revenue) 

Incinerator Building, Construction and Equipping 
(non-revenue) * 

Totals 



$161,536 59 

1.191,946 93 

501,549 86 

146,064 01 

126,912 49 

22,826 28 

157,500 00 

3.844,972 71 

477,836 48 

30,559 66 

1,169.004 76 

44,906 85 

35,000 00 



$98,090 52 

312,333 51 

94.639 75 

78,944 69 

8,455 87 

157,500 00 

2,536,633 80 

476,360 80 

29,114 36 

561.744 15 

33.006 41 

35,000 00 



$161,536 59 

1,093,856 41 

189,216 35 

51,424 26 

47,967 80 
14,370 41 

1,308,338 91 

1,475 68 

1,445 30 

607,260 61 

11,900 44 



$7,910,616 62 



$4,421,823 86 



$3,488,792 76 



* Execution of Court charged to Loan authorized but not issued. 



Public Works Department. 



11 



REVENUE. 
On Account of Public Works Department. 

Central Office: 

Charges for plans and specifications . $1,134 00 



Automotive Division : 




Sale of junk 


$762 66 


Bridge Service: 




Rents 


$4,487 50 


Damage to property .... 


3,506 19 


City of Revere, Chelsea North Bridge 


5,000 00 


Refund on drums 


48 00 


Ferry Service: 




Tolls 


$21,140 65 


Rents 


85 00 


Cleaning telephone booths . 


22 00 


Commission on telephones . 


12 99 


Refunds 


166 82 


Sale of junk 


118 15 


Sumner Tunnel : 




Tolls 


$1,932,490 00 


Miscellaneous 


129 83 


Lighting Service : 




Sale of junk 


$692 27 



1,134 00 



762 66 



13,041 69 



21,545 61 



1,932,619 83 



692 27 



Paving Service: 

From assessments (added to taxes) 
on abutters for cost of laying side- 
walks in front of their premises . $1,098 23 

Permits 26,366 96 

Rents 950 00 

Sale of materials 144 12 

Contributions from Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under chapter 90 of 
General Laws for construction of 

public ways 488,084 04 

Miscellaneous 6,469 62 

523,112 97 

Sanitary Division: 

Sale of junk $58 79 

Sale of garbage 33,000 00 

33,058 79 

Sewer Division: 

Disposal of sewage .... $19,233 00 

Entrance fees 6,997 22 

Sale of junk 350 71 

Rents 120 00 

Refunds 39 00 

Cleaning drains 75 00 

26,814 93 

Carried forward $2,552,782 75 



12 



City Document No. 24. 



Water Division: 




Water rates 


$4,400,790 83 


Water rates added to taxes 


253,780 48 


Service pipes for new takers, 


e.\- 


tending, repairing, etc. . 


9,534 53 


Fees on overdue rates . 


28 40 


Sale of junk 


2,715 04 


Damage to propert}^ . 


1,764 86 


Labor and materials 


7,423 67 


Deposit account .... 


88,878 37 


Elevator and fire pipe counectious 


1,074 29 


Miscellaneous income . 


1,879 05 


Grand total .... 





$2,552,782 75 



4,767,869 52 
$7,320,652 27 



PART II. 

APPENDICES. 



(13) 



14 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION. 



BosTOx, January 2, 1953, 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the PubUc Works Depart- 
ment for the year 1952. This report covers the 
activities of the four garages and offices of the Auto- 
motive Division, a report on the close cooperation of 
the Automotive Division with the Mayor's Automotive 
Advisory Committee, and the activities of the mobile 
patrol and the newly established dispatcher's office 
controUing the vehicles in the Motor Pool. 

During 1952 the Mayor's Automotive Advisory 
Committee acting on the recommendation of the 
Boston Municipal Research Bureau established a school 
for drivers known as '^Driver Training and Driver 
Education Institute." I, as chairman, recommended 
to the committee that the drivers of the Public Works 
Department be enrolled in the first class inasmuch 
as this department has the greatest number of such 
employees, exclusive of the Police and Fire Depart- 
ments. This course meets the requirements established 
by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles, Rudolph F. King, 
and he is one of the signers of the certificates presented 
drivers after the successful completion of the course. 
The other signers of this certificate award are his 
Honor the Mayor, and Theodore J. Hoppe, director 
of the course. The course covers a period of 14 classes, 
each class being in session a minimum of two hours. 
In order to expedite the training program the em- 
ployees of the Public Works Department, in conjunction 
with those of the Park Department, met in two groups 



Public Works Department. 15 

on alternate days, Group A meeting on Mondays 
and Wednesdays, and Group B on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. On successful completion of the course 
by the employees the certificates for Public Works 
Department employees were presented by the Public 
Works Commissioner, George G. Hyland, and the 
certificates for the Park Department employees by 
Park Commissioner Frank Kelley. With the advent 
of the winter season further classes for Public Works 
Department employees were discontinued and the 
classes will reopen after the snow removal season 
has passed. The full details of the school requirements 
are contained in the first annual report of the committee 
submitted to you as a member of the Review Board. 
The employees of the Automotive Division were 
reclassified by the State Civil Service Department 
in 1952, and this reclassification resulted in salarj^ 
increases for most of the employees and a clearer 
definition of their duties. Under the direction of the 
Division Engineer the 99 employees of the Automotive 
Division are engaged in the following duties: Repair 
work, 40 employees; maintenance of buildings, gasoline 
and oil dispensing, cleaning and watchman duties, 
and motor vehicle operation, 41 employees; stockroom, 
5 employees; wrecker operators, 3 emploj^ees; office 
work, 9 emplo3'ees; dispatcher, 1 emplo\'ee. The 
Automotive Division Engineer also has supervision 
of the 40 employees of the mobile patrol, namely, 
one supervisor, two sergeants, fourteen mobile guards, 
twenty-two watchmen-laborers, and one clerk. The 
Mobile Patrol covers two shifts, from 4 p.m. to mid- 
night, and from midnight to 8 a.m. on weekdays, and 
three shifts on Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. The 
Mobile Patrol protects the property and equipment 
of the Public Works Department. The supervisor 
supervises the assignment of routes, checks all written 
and oral reports, and Detex clock dials, and reports 
to the Division Engineer at frequent intervals. The 
clerk is responsible for routine business, records, time 
sheets, etc. The sergeants supervise the activities 
of the three Mobile Patrol routes on which the guards 
are operating while protecting the property of the 
Public Works Department. It is their duty to see 
that the mobile guards operate intelligently and punc- 
tually, and to ascertain that all yards are properly- 
inspected and covered during the eight-hour shift 



16 City Document No. 24. 

of which the sergeant is in charge. He receives and 
issues reports by telephone from the mobile guards 
in the field, and makes formal written reports of any 
irregularity or damage which he deems of sufficient 
importance. He has charge of the routine time, mileage 
and work reports. The mobile guard is a uniformed 
guard responsible for the protection of all Public Works 
Department property and equipment that are assigned 
to his patrol route. He records the presence of watch- 
men at selected yards, rings watch clocks, inspects 
the heating facilities, checks on city-owned vehicles, 
etc. He makes a written report at the end of his tour 
of duty, which report is submitted to the sergeant. 
The watchmen are on dutj^ at the larger yards to 
prevent vandahsm. Other duties of the mobile patrol 
are the collection of mail from the City Collector's 
office, forwarding of absentee reports to City Hall, 
the care of motor vehicles assigned to the patrol, etc. 
It is contemplated that within a few months the per- 
sonnel of this section will be trained as qualified radio 
operators in order that they may be available in con- 
junction with the Civil Defense program. 

The Automotive Division has supervision of the 
newly created Motor Pool to which is assigned a dis- 
patcher. The primary duty of the Motor Pool is to 
provide transportation — consisting of a car and a 
chauffeur — to those city officials or departments who 
are authorized by the Commissioner of Pubhc AVorks 
to call upon the pool for this service. In order to 
carry on this work, the service is provided with 12 
city-owned cars and nine chauffeurs. 

In the ordinary course of a day's work, these chauffeurs 
report at a designated hour in the morning to the 
individuals to whom they are assigned, usually division 
engineers, and after having transported their superiors 
about the various city yards, or work under con- 
struction, they report to the Motor Pool. This is 
usually about 11 a.m., and from then on the chauffeurs 
are assigned various tasks, such as inspection of damaged 
gas lamps, etc. In the meantime requests for cars and 
chauffeurs are constantly received, and as soon as a 
car and chauffeur are available they are dispatched to 
the individual or department requesting this service. 
The Motor Pool is called upon to meet and transport 
visiting celebrities who are to be the guests of the City 
of Boston, in order to assist the Director of Public 



Public Works Department. 17 

Celebrations in making the stay of the guest as pleasant 
and hospitable as possible. 

The Automotive Division performed approximately 
6,000 repair jobs, both major and minor work. The 
only major work sent to an outside repair shop was for 
work on eight of our fourteen snow fighters which were 
overhauled at a cost of approximately $10,000. This 
work was sent out to a specialist, due to our lack of 
facilities and personnel to do this work. Other work 
sent out consisted of glass work, spring work, radiator 
repairs, and other work of a specialized nature. A 
large part of the fleet is now five to six years old and 
increasingly in need of repairs. As evidence, we in- 
stalled sixty reconditioned motors and clutches in 1952. 

The annual inventory taken in December, 1952, 
showed a stock-on-hand amounting to 138,681.48. 
This compares with $44,876 in 1950 and $43,705 in 
1951. Part of the drop in inventory can be attributed 
to a smaller stock of tire chains. Two men are assigned 
during the winter months to repairing chains, and thus 
it is not necessary'- to carry a large quantity of chains in 
stock. 

The office maintained by the Automotive Division at 
City Hall processed 2,311 orders in 1952, of which 1,260 
were purchases and 1,051 were service orders. In past 
years approximately'' 2,000 purchase orders were issued 
each year, but it is now the policy to make all purchases 
under $3 from petty cash. These petty cash purchases, 
approximately 100 a month, cut down the labor and 
paper work of the Supply Department, Auditor's office, 
and Treasurer's office. The City Hall office reports the 
following expenditures for 1952. Personal services, 
$398,567.13; telephone service, $3,014.58; electric and 
gas service, $4,669.82; repair and maintenance of build- 
ings, $3,130.36; repair of automotive equipment by 
outside repair shops, $58,081.55; and miscellaneous 
contractual services, such as cleaning, express charges, 
inspection of oil burners, etc., $939. Purchase of 
automotive supplies amounted to $136,381.94, of which 
$62,000 was for gasoline, $6,000 for motor oil, $12,500 
for tires, $3,000 for batteries, and the remainder for 
automotive repair parts and accessories. Building 
supplies amounted to $1,249.14 and fuel for heating 
amounted to $9,000.26. Janitor supplies amounted to 
$1,480.66, first aid supplies, $24.60, and office supplies, 
$2,233.74. Fire extinguishers cost $59.70, and general 



18 City Document No. 24. 

operating supplies, such as tools, waste, wiping rags, 
hose, coveralls, uniforms, etc., amounted to $7,030.81. 
Current charges for 1952 were $7 for subscription to 
City Record and trade magazine; $1,182 for motor vehicle 
registration; and $7,522.97 for garage rentals. 

Purchase of new equipment came to $85,083.90. 
New equipment added to the fleet in 1952 consisted of 
three Baughman sanding bodies, $4,826.25, and two 
Trojan loaders, $13,618.08, purchased from Snow Re- 
moval funds. Nine dump trucks capable of snowplow- 
ing cost $30,163.23 and three emergency trucks for the 
Sewer Division, $10,659.55. Three street sweepers for 
the Sanitary Division cost $25,328.10, and one 10-ton 
tandem road roller cost $5,850. One Ford sedan, $1,362, 
one Chevrolet carryall, $1,930, and miscellaneous equip- 
ment, such as a portable power charger, battery charger, 
large floor jacks, asphalt tool heater, orange peel bucket, 
drive wrench and pumps, completed the additions. 
Two trucks and one carryall were delivered in 1952 
from 1951 funds carried over to 1952. The Sumner 
Traffic Tunnel purchased a new wrecker for $5,050.00. 

Under Repair and Maintenance of Buildings, cost 
$3,130.36, we made the following repairs: Highland 
Street Garage, new roof and interior carpentry work in 
the welding shop; floodhghts at Albany street to 
light sand and salt j^ard; Hancock Street Garage, new 
sliding door; Albany Street Garage, boiler room floor 
rebuilt; Dana Avenue Garage, roof repaired; new 
gas pumps (electric) and recorders installed at Brighton 
and Charlestown. If sufficient funds are available in 
1953, it is hoped to install an exhaust eliminating 
system at the Highland Street Garage, and an oil heat- 
ing system in the welding shop. 

The fleet now consists of the following equipment 
(474 pieces, 424 registered) : 



138 dump trucks, l|-2-ton 


3 Sanders, 5-ton 


2 dump trucks, 5-ton 


11 truck-mounted compres- 


2 lumber trucks 


sors 


6 wreckers 


2 compressor trailers 


1 large transport trailer 


2 semitrailers 


1 tractor truck 


4 derrick trucks 


81 pickup trucks 


2 platform trucks 


1 aerial truck 


1 service truck 


2 emergency gate closing 


16 emergency trucks 


trucks 


6 toolbox trailers 


5 catch-basin cleaners 


2 electric welder trailers 



Public Works Department. 



19 



1 chlorinator trailer 


6 street flushers 


14 snow fighters 


2 Diesel crawler tractors 


15 bucket loaders 


5 small street sweepers 


20 large street sweepers 


11 carryalls 


4 jeeps 


1 crane 


46 sedans 


1 sand loader 


3 snow loaders 


16 sand spreaders 


1 salt spreader 


12 gasoline road rollers 


1 grader 


1 Ackers core drill 


2 flexible power bucket ma- 


3 portable generators 


chines 


4 power lawn mowers 


1 concrete mixer 


2 portable heaters 


3 portable lighting plants 


2 steam cleaners 


1 paint sprayer 


1 homemade trailer 


4 asphalt heating trailers 




3 Dempster-Dumpsters, 5- 




ton 




Respectfully 


submitted, 




J. Leo McGrath, 




Division Engineer, 



20 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE AND HIGHWAY DIVISION. 

Boston, January 2, 1953. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit the following report of the income, ex- 
penditures, and operation of the Bridge and Highway 
Division for the j^ear ending December 31, 1952, in 
two sections. The Bridge Section report covers the 
Bridge, Ferry and Tunnel Services and the Highway 
Section report covers the Paving and Street Lighting 
Services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John DeMeulenaer, 

Division Engineer. 

I — BRIDGE SECTION 

Summary of Budget Appropriations. 

Bridge Service, Regular. 

Regular appropriation, 1952 $756,611 17 

Transfers to 48,000 00 

Total credits $804,611 17 

Expenditures, 1952 $797,492 81 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1952 . $7,118 36 

Bridges, Repairs, etc. 

Balance from 1951 $191,849 86 

Appropriation, 1952 310,000 00 

Total credits $501,849 86 

Transfer from • . . 300 00 

$501,549 86 
Expenditures, 1952 312,333 51 

Unexpended balance December 31, 1952 . $189,216 35 



Public Works Department. 21 

Bridges, Construction oj — Revenue. 

Balance from 1951 $161,236 59 

Transfers to 1952 300 00 

Appropriation, 1952 00 

Expenditures, 1952 00 

Unexpended Balance, December 31, 1952 . $161,536 59 

Bridges, Construction oJ — Non-revenue. 

Balance from 1951 $2,231,946 93 

Appropriation, 1952 1,000,000 00 

Total credits $3,231,946 93 

Expenditures, 1952 98,090 52 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1952 . $3,133,856 41 

Ferry Service. 

Balance from 1951 $32,953 12 

Regular appropriation, 1952 325,844 59 

Transfers to 1952 3,000 00 

Total credits $361,797 71 

Expenditures, 1952 321,110 60 

$40,687 11 
Transfers from 28,750 00 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1952 . $11,937 11 



Brought forward as Special Fund . . $11,937 11 

Tunnel Service. 

Regular appropriations, 1952 .... $570,406 16 

Balance from previous year 13,135 89 

$583,542 05 

Less transfer by City Auditor to Code 71-21 . 953 75 

Total credits $582,588 30 

Expenditures, 1952 $541,705 30 

Balance to next year 24,679 45 

Total debits $566,384 75 

Unexpended balance, December 31, 1952 . $16,203 55 



22 City Document No. 24. 

The foregoing does not include certain expenditures 
for construction work by other divisions, which work 
was supervised by the engineers of this division. 

In an order from the Department of Pubhc Utihties, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, schedules of tolls and 
charges for the use of the Sumner Tunnel, between 
Boston Proper and East Boston, were approved, cover- 
ing the year 1952. 

Throughout the year 1952 the city still operated one 
ferry, the so-called "South Ferry," with the Boston 
terminus at Eastern avenue, and the East Boston 
terminus at Lewis street. 

Because of the continuously increasing deficit re- 
sulting from the operation of this service, the City 
Council, Avith the Mayor's approval, increased the toll 
rates, effective May 1, 1952, as indicated later in this 
report. 

The increased toll rates had no important effect on 
either traffic volume or income, and on November 14, 
1952, the Mayor ordered the Ferry Service to be termi- 
nated at the close of business on December 31, 1952. 

Arrangements were made for the transfer of Ferry 
Service employees to other services, and tentative plans 
made for disposing of the ferryboats, bridge drops, etc., 
by public auction sale. 

The more important w^orks undertaken during the 
past year in the Bridge Service, were: 

Redecking Babson Street and Dana Avenue Bridg- 
es; construction of concrete deck, etc., on Broadway 
Bridge, over Fort Point Channel; strengthening Piers 
4, 5, and 6 of the Charlestown Bridge; strengthening 
the piers of the Charlestown Bridge; steel repairs, 
etc., at the Charlestown Bridge storehouses; Charles- 
town Bridge storehouses, bituminous concrete pave- 
ment; repairing end lifts, etc., of the Northern Ave- 
nue Bridge over Fort Point Channel; alterations and 
repairs to roadway railings on drawspan of Summer 
Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel; repairs to 
drawspan of Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved 
Channel; emergency repairs to approaches of Summer 
Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel; constructing 
high curbs and guard rails on various bridges; re- 
pairing the pile bracing of the Charlestown approach 
of Warren Bridge, over the Charles River; repairing 
West Fourth Street Bridge, over the New York, 



Public Works Department. 23 

New Haven & Hartford Railroad (Old Colony Divi- 
sion), and Broadway Bridge, over the Boston & 
Albany Railroad ; repairing two bridges on the Boston 
Side and the approach platform on the East Boston 
Side of the South Ferry; removing ashes, cinders, 
clinkers and refuse from the ferryboats; repairs to 
ferryboat '^ Charles C. Donoghue"; renewing certain 
electric wiring, conduits, etc., on four bridge drops 
at the South Ferry; and at the Sumner Tunnel, 
cleaning exhaust duct, exhaust fan rooms and fresh 
air ducts; repairing the pavement; emergency repairs 
to the pavement; repairing, cleaning and painting 
ventilating equipment; miscellaneous cleaning, paint- 
ing and minor repair work at the Administration 
Building; miscellaneous cleaning, painting and minor 
repair work at the London Street garage; repairs to 
the louvers at the East Boston Ventilation Building; 
cleaning exhaust duct and exhaust fan rooms; clean- 
ing and painting the 6-inch discharge pipes, hangers, 
etc., cleaning the surface drainage system, ancl 
furnishing and instaUing new illuminated signs, etc. 
Other work included snow removal operations in 
conjunction with other divisions. 

Bridge Service. 

Bedecking Babson Street and Dana Avenue Bridges ^ 
over the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. 
A contract was entered into with the Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., for renewing the roadway surface, 
underdecking and sidewalk planking. Extensive steel 
and stringer repairs were made by the railroad. Due 
to delay in obtaining lumber no work was done this 
year. Work is expected to be completed in the spring 
of 1953 at an estimated cost of $17,458. 

Construction of Concrete Deck, etc., on Broadway Bridge, 
over Fort Point Channel. 
A contract was entered into with the Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., for removing the entire roadway 
and sidewalk decking down to the steelwork; making 
extensive repairs and renewals to the main steelwork; 
constructing a new reinforced concrete deck with an 
asphalt wearing surface, including special steel expan- 
sion joints on both approaches to the drawspan; repair- 
ing sidewalk railings throughout, including replacing 
the present cast iron fence posts with steel "H" beams. 



24 City Document No. 24. 

On the drawspan the work includes removing tlie 
entire wooden deck and sidewalks and replacing with 
steel mesh pavement; the sidewalk steel pavement to 
be concrete filled; the roadway steel pavement to be 
open except at the ends and center machinery areas. 

Bids were received September 4, 1952, the low bid 
amounting to $517,540. No work has commenced as 
the city has postponed the starting date until early 
next spring to allow for the completion of the repairs 
to the West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Strengthening Piers 4, 5, and 6 of the Charlestown Bridge. 

Under a contract entered into with the Crandall 
Engineering Company for enclosing the bases of these 
piers with steel cofferdams, filled with concrete, work 
was commenced July 9, 1951, and was completed 
August 14, 1952, at a 'cost of $250,443.62. 

Strengthe^iing the Piers of the Charlestown Bridge. 

The work of strengthening the Charlestown Bridge 
piers was continued under a contract entered into with 
the Crandall Engineering Company for fully enclosing 
Piers 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8, which work includes extending 
the present steel sheeting at Pier 2 to the downstream 
end and at Pier 9 enclosing the upstream end and 
portions of the sides. Work commenced September 24, 
1952, and will be completed late in the summer of 1953, 
at an estimated cost of $321,960. 

Steel Repairs, etc., at the Charlestown Bridge Storehouses. 

Under a contract entered into with A. Orlando, Inc., for 
steel repairs to the columns and stringers, painting and 
replacing the old doors with overhead type doors, etc., 
work was commenced August 11, 1952, and was com- 
pleted October 30, 1952, at a cost of $21,662.95. 

Charlestown Bridge Storehouses — Bituminous Concrete 
Pavement, Charles River Avenue — Sheet Asphalt 
Pavement and Such Additional Locations, If Any^ 
in Ward 2, 

Under a contract entered into by the Paving Section 
with John McCourt Company for the above-named 
work, provisions were made for leveling off the earth 
floors of the storehouses, filling with gravel fill and 
stonedust and placing a two-course bituminous concrete 



Public Works Department. 25 

wearing surface. This work was completed December 9, 
1952. Although this work was in full charge of the 
Highway Section the Bridge Section will pay $6,352.90 
as its proportionate part. 

Repairing End Lifts, etc., of the Northern Avenue Bridge, 
over Fort Point Channel. 

In order to correct excessive wear on the moving 
parts of the end lifts and also to provide the city with 
one complete spare set of end lift units for the two 
types required on the bridge, a contract was entered 
into with the General Ship and Engine Works, Inc., to 
overhaul and repair one lift at a time, keeping the bridge 
in constant use except for Saturdays and Sundays. 
Work commenced July 8, 1952, and will be completed 
early in 1953, at an estimated cost of $31,961. 

Alterations and Repairs to Roadway Railings on Draw- 
Span of Sumfner Street Bridge, over Fort Point 
Channel. 

Due to frequent repairs made necessary by traffic 
damages to the Boston type fences at the center of the 
drawspan, a contract was entered into with the Industrial 
Welding Company for replacing the present cast-iron 
posts with steel ''H" beams and as a safety precaution 
to weld in place steel channel bumpers for the full 
length of each draw at the center raiUngs. W^ork com- 
menced June 4, 1952, and was completed June 25, 
1952, at a cost of $1,928. 

Repairs to Drawspan of Summer Street Bridge, over 
Reserved Channel. 

Under a contract entered into with the Eastern 
Roads Company, Inc., for removing and replacing the 
steel decking, repairs, etc., work was commenced 
August 1, 1951, and was completed April 24, 1952, at 
a cost of $45,191.81. 

Emergency Repairs to Approaches of Summer Street 
Bridge, over Reserved Channel. 

Under an emergency contract entered into with the 
Eastern Roads Company, Inc., for strengthening the 
pile bents by posting and bracing, work was commenced 
October 24, 1951, and was completed January 10, 1952, 
at a cost of $7,104.14. 



26 QiTY Document No. 24. 

Constructing High Curbs and Guard Rails on Various 

Bridges. 

A contract was entered into with the Martin J. Kelly 
Company, Inc., for renewing existing wood curbs, 
raising existing low concrete curbs, placing new high 
concrete curbs, on various bridges throughout the city. 
The work also included erecting steel guard rails at 
Congress Street Bridge and Northern Avenue Bridge. 
Work commenced October 28, 1952, and will be com- 
pleted early in 1953, at an estimated cost of $16,362.50. 

Repairing the Pile Bracing of the Charlestown Approach 
of Warren Bridge, over the Charles River. 

Under a contract entered into with the Eastern 
Roads Company, Inc., for bracing pile bents, work 
was commenced September 24, 1951, and was com- 
pleted April 12, 1952, at a cost of $4,756.35. 

Repairing West Fourth Street Bridge, over the New York, 

New Haven & Hartford Railroad (0. C. Division), 

and Broadway Bridge, over the Boston & Albany 

Railroad. 

A contract was entered into with the Martin J. Kelly 

Company, Inc., for repairing the roadway decking and 

sidewalk planking and replacing the roadway surface 

with new bituminous concrete at Broadway Bridge; 

and at West Fourth Street Bridge resurfacing with 

4-inch T. & G. spruce. 

At Broadway Bridge the double pipe rail fences at 
the three trusses were replaced with a single pipe rail 
fence, using portions of the present fences. The entire 
bridge was cleaned and painted. Work commenced 
June 23, 1952, and was completed November 17, 1952, 
at a cost of $81,091.86. 

Yard Forces. 

The yard forces made repairs on 47 bridges, the 
work varying in extent from minor repairs to such 
operations as renewing or rebuilding areas of wooden 
roadway decks, entire sidewalks, aprons, etc. 

Typical work included patch planking on roadways, 
sidewalks, pier platforms, stairways, etc., repairing, 
cleaning and painting girder bridges, drawhouses, con- 
troller houses, machinery housings, fences, roadway 



Public Works Department. 



27 



gates, etc., regulating bascule bridge counterweights 
as required, repairing floats, sandboxes and coalbins. 

The maintenance force also cleaned sidewalks and 
stairways of the intown area during the year, removing 
snow, refuse, etc. 

Ordinary electrical and machinery maintenance work 
was done by the electrician and machinists. 



Ferry Service. 
The following ferryboats were in commission : 



Name. 


When 
Built. 


Length. 


Gross 
Tons. 


Charles C. Donoghue 

Daniel A. MacCormack 


1926 
1926 


174 feet, 4 inches 
174 feet, 4 inches 


756.77 
756.77 



These are steel boats of the propeller type. 
The work of this service for the year consisted of the 
following : 

Repairing Two Bridges on the Boston Side and the Ap- 
proach Platform on the East Boston Side of the 
South Ferry. 

Under a contract entered into with A. Orlando, Inc., 
for making necessary steel and deck repairs, work was 
commenced December 19, 1951, and was completed 
June 13, 1952, at a cost of $30,347.18. 

Removing Ashes, Cinders, Clinkers and Refuse from the 

Ferryboats. 

A contract was entered into with John J. Colbert for 
removing ashes, etc., from the ferryboats, for a one- 
year period, commencing April 1, 1952, at an estimated 
cost of $1,700. During the current year the city has 
paid a total of $1,343 under this contract. 

Repairs to Ferryboat "Charles C. Donoghue.^' 

A contract was entered into with the General Ship 
and Engine Works, Inc., for necessary repairs to the 
main engines, boilers, piping, equipment, etc. Work 
commenced May 12, 1952, and was completed July 30, 
1952, at a cost of $12,476.37. 



28 City Document No. 24. 

Renewing Certain Electric Wiri7ig, Conduits, etc., on 
Four Bridge Drops at the South Ferry. 

A contract was entered into with the Kay Electric 
Company for necessary repairs and renewals of the elec- 
tric systems. Work commenced August 25, 1952, and 
was completed October 10, 1952, at a cost of $3,120. 

Department Force. 

During the year machinists, carpenters, painters, 
riggers and other mechanics who are included in the 
personnel of the Ferry Service, made such repairs to 
the plant as the extent of materials and equipment at 
their disposal would permit. This work consisted mainly 
of minor repairs to the machinery on the boats, repairs 
to ferry bridge machinery, ferry bridge roadways and 
headhouse repairs in general. 

Sumner Tunnel Service. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct, Exhaust Fan Rooms, and Fresh 

Air Ducts at the Sumner Tunnel. 

Under a contract entered into with James A. Freaney , 
Inc., for a periodic maintenance cleaning, work was 
commenced December 5, 1951, and due to weather 
conditions, which caused an accumulation of ice, work 
was delayed and was completed June 6, 1952, at a cost 
of $2,860. 

Repairing the Pavement of the Sumner Tunnel. 
Under a contract entered into with the Rufo Con- 
struction Company for repairing the pavement, work 
commenced November 13, 1951, and was completed 
February 6, 1952, at a cost of $15,218.36. 

Emergency Repairs to the Pavement of the Sumner Tunnel. 

At completion of pavement repairs under a previous 
contract, it was found that there were several small 
areas requiring patching, and a contract was entered 
into with the Rufo Construction Company, Inc., for 
removal of approximately 400 square yards of old 
Ultimite paving block and replacing the same with 200 
square yards of new granite block and the remaining 
200 square yards with the best of the old Ultimite 
block. Work commenced March 26, 1952, and was 
completed April 12, 1952, at a cost of $4,756.35. 



Public AA^okks Department. 29 

Repairing^ Cleaning and Painting Ventilating Equip- 
ment at the Sumner Tunnel Ventilation Buildings. 

A contract was entered into with Patrick J. Sullivan 
for a periodic cleaning and painting of the ventilating 
equipment. Work commenced April 7, 1952, and was 
completed November 6, 1952, at a cost of $6,500. 

Miscellaneous Cleaning, Painting and Minor Repair 
Work at the Sumner Tunnel Administration Building. 

A contract was entered into with John W, Egan Com- 
pany for repairing and painting the Administration 
Building. Work commenced April 7, 1952, and was 
completed HnXy 3, 1952, at a cost of $1,929. 

Miscellaneous Cleaning, Painting and Minor Repair Work 
at the London Street Garage of the Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with M. Solimando for 
making incidental repairs and renewals in connection 
with the roofing, gutters, cornice, leaders, glazing and 
painting. Work commenced August 20, 1952, and was 
completed November 2, 1952, at a cost of $2,385. 

Repairs to the Louvers at the Sumner Tunnel, East Boston 
Ventila t ion B uild ing. 

A contract was entered into with the Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., for replacing about 750 glass 
louvers with Johns Manville transite panels. Work 
commenced September 15, 1952, and was completed 
October 3, 1952, at a cost of $2,478. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct and Exhaust Fan Rooms at the 
Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the Chemical Fire 
and Rust Proofing Company, Inc., for a periodic 
cleaning of the ducts and fan rooms. Work commenced 
November 17, 1952, and was completed December 2, 
1952, at a cost of $1,250. 

Cleaning and Painting the 6-Inch Discharge Pipe, 
Hangers, etc., at the Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the M. & R. Con- 
struction Company for cleaning and painting the 
discharge pipe, etc. Work commenced November 17, 
1952, and was completed December 1, 1952. at a cost 
of $1,873. 



30 City Document No. 24. 

Cleaning the Surface Drainage System of the 
Sumner Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the James A. 
Freaney Company, Inc., for a periodic cleaning of the 
drainage system. Work was commenced November 18, 
1952, and was completed December 10, 1952, at a 
cost of $1,941. 

Furnishing and Installing New Illuminated Signs, etc., 
at the Sum7ier Tunnel. 

A contract was entered into with the Donnelly 
Electric and Manufacturing Company for erecting a 
new illuminated sign on the roof of the toll booths 
at the East Boston Plaza. Work commenced December 
22, 1952, and will be completed early in 1953, at an 
estimated cost of $4,505. 



Summary of Operations During 1952. 

1. Vehicular Traffic. 

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 

Total 8,754,645 9,162,266 9,283.700 9,466,660 9,583,972 

Monthly average 729.545 763.622 773,641 788,883 798,664 

Weekly average 168,356 176,197 178,045 182,051 184,307 

Daily average 23,968 25,171 25,435 25,936 26,186 

2. Power. 

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 

Total Kilowatts 5,173,596 4,403,936 4,331,103 4,196,904 4,582,488 

Number of Vehicles.. . 8,754,545 9,162,266 9,283,700 9,466,660 9,583,972 

The Boston Edison Company supplies the electric power at 
13,800 volts. This voltage is transformed to 2,300 volts, 460 
volts and 115 volts for the operation of fans, pumps, heat, 
lighting, etc. 

3. Garaae Service. 

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 

Tow Jobs 358 242 285 464 681 

4. Booth Red Signal. 

1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 

Booth Red On 21 16 11 11 15 

Total Duration 

(Minutes) 146 83 150 108 217 

5. Fires. 

During the year there were no fires in the Tunnel. 



Public Works Department. 31 

6. Motors, Fans, Dampers, and Controllers. 

All of the 28 fan motors and damper motors are in good 
working condition. All of these motors are under routine 
daily inspection. 

Adjustments and repairs have been made to contacts and 
relays of fan controllers as required. 

New lubricating grease and oil for fans and motors have been 
changed as per maintenance schedule. All bearings are in good 
condition. 

7. Circuit Breakers, Transformers, and Relays. 

All circuit breakers and relays have been tested, overhauled 
and reset for correct operating voltage. All transformers are 
under constant inspection. Oil tests have been made and new 
oil added to transformers as required. 

8. Carbon Monoxide Equipment. 

The four carbon monoxide analyzers and the Micro-Max 
recorders are in daily operation. New chemicals have been 
added as per operating schedule. Adjustments and calibra- 
tions have been made as required in order to insure as efficient 
operation as possible. 

Due to the fact that these units have become obsolete, it 
was becoming increasingly difficult to replace parts and main- 
tain efficient operation. Accordingly, after funds were made 
available, new analyzers were ordered in 1952, and it is expected 
that the new units will be furnished and installed in 1953. 

9. Telephoiu System. 

Insulation and Megger tests of all telephone cables have 
been made at various times during the year. The results of 
these tests indicate that all telephone cables are in good 
condition. 

New hand sets, cords, relays, jacks, etc., have been installed 
where defective equipment had to be replaced. The main 
switchboard is in good working condition and working properly. 

10. Storage Batteries. 

Monthly voltmeter and hydrometer readings are taken as 
per schedule and these tests indicate that all batteries are in 
first class condition. Water has been added to the electrolyte 
as required and all batteries are fully charged. 

11. Motor Generators. 

The four motor generators, including all panels and controls, 
are under a routine maintenance schedule. Adjustments to 
controls and brushes have been made to insure efficient 
operation. 



32 City Document No. 24. 

12. Pumps. 

All pumps in the harbor and portal pump rooms are in 
working order. All foot valves and floats have been adjusted. 
All defective valves and piping have been replaced. 

13. Toll Equipment. 

All toll registers, key boxes, and treadles are under daily 
inspection and are in good condition and working properly. 
Defective relays, counters and contacts, etc., have been re- 
placed cr repaired as needed. Routine insulation and Megger 
tests of cables and treadles have been made. All defective 
treadles were removed and replaced with new ones or returned 
to the manufacturer for repairs. 

14. Traffic Signals. 

All broken glass and lenses have been replaced as required. 
All defective push buttons, broken relays, contacts, etc., have 
been repaired or replaced at the signal cabinets as required. 

15. Tunnel, General. 

Two new treadles were purchased during the past year to 
replace old and defective treadles that had become obsolete. 

All dust and dirt was removed from the exhaust air duct and 
exhaust fan rooms. 

Drop inlets, catch basins, harbor pump room sump and 
portal pump rooms were cleaned. 

New uniform overcoats, hats and shirts were issued to the 
sergeants and tollman-guards. 

The Porter Street approaches to the East Boston Plaza 
were redesigned by the State Public Works Department in 
order to conform to the plans for the new East Boston Express- 
way and it was necessary to remove three lighting standards 
from the area. This expressway was opened to the public on 
September 1, 1952. 



Public Works Department. 33 

Work For Other Divisions. 



Sanitary Division. 

Construction of a New Building for the Sanitary Division 
at 17 U West Second Street, South Boston. 

Plans and specifications were prepared by this division 
in 1951 for a new Administration Building to be built 
at an estimated cost of $40,000. Work was commenced 
in November, 1951, and was completed June 25, 1952, 
at a total cost of 139,781.50. 



Miscellaneous. 

Snow Removal. 

Another duty of the Bridge Section of this division 
during the winter months was the supervising and in- 
specting of snow loading and removal in common with 
other divisions of the department. This work was 
done under contract with the C. & R. Construction 
Companj^, in area No. 12, at a cost of $3,701.87, and 
with the Atlantic Roads Company, in area No. 13, at 
a cost of $2,418.42. 



34 City Document No. 24. 

Bridge Service. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR 1952. 

Total Expenditures. 

From Maintenance Appropriation . . $797,492 81 
From Special Appropriation .... 410,424 03 



Expenditures on the Boston Bridges. 
Administration. 

Division engineer $3,923 59 

Engineers, inspectors, clerks . . . 92,361 63 
Supervisor, deputy supervisor . . . 8,831 54 



Office. 

Printing, postage, stationery . . . $2,682 57 

Engineers' instruments, new and repaired 197 00 

Typewriter and adding machine servicfe . 276 17 

Blue print room 141 00 

Binding 24 60 



Yard and Stockroom. 
Yard. 

Clerks, yardmen $15,894 38 

Chauffeurs 10,096 75 

Holiday, sick leave and vacations . . 12,754 79 

Traveling expenses 415 93 

Tools, new and repaired .... 5,955 43 

Telephone 769 50 

Repairs in j'ard 461 22 

Fuel 798 81 

Light 275 52 

Supplies and miscellaneous . . . 2,573 83 



$1,207,916 84 



$105,116 76 



3,321 34 
$108,438 10 



$49,996 16 



Public Works Department. 



35 



Tidewater Bridges, 1952. 



Bridges. 



Drawtenders' 
Salaries. 



Mechanics' 
Wages. 



Material. 



Repair 
Bills. 



Supplies. 



Total. 



Broadway 

Charlestown 

Chelsea South 

i Chelsea Street . . . 
Congress Street . . 

Dover Street 

*L Street 

Maiden 

Northern Avenue 
Summer Street. . . 
Warren 

Totals 



$38,100 98 
63,646 48 
33,028 85 
49,677 08 
45,796 56 
39,015 80 
42,828 44 
45,513 56 
48,309 10 
42,042 66 
44.791 02 



$3,463 81 
8,547 85 
1,006 50 
3,348 86 
5,302 20 
3,991 21 
3,587 01 
3,381 76 

12,626 74 
7,745 34 
9,111 83 



$296 34 

3,005 91 

517 88 

663 31 

1,472 59 

828 30 

496 04 

1,106 68 

4,189 15 

3,105 96 

1,071 05 



$1,014 35 

3,465 93 

1,076 66 

958 75 

1,024 31 

1,040 17 

372 05 

554 05 

3,075 45 

3,020 68 

3,263 49 



$275 90 
702 29 
77 76 
330 75 
296 71 
248 44 
223 42 
174 33 
591 88 
151 99 
307 49 



$43,150 88 
79,368 46 
35,707 65 
54,978 75 
53,892 37 
45,123 92 
47,506 96 
50,730 38 
68,792 32 
56,066 63 
58,544 88 



$492,750 53 



$62,112 61 



$16,753 21 



$18,865 89 



$3,380 96 



$593,863 20 



* Now Summer Street, over Reserved Channel. 



Repairs on Inland Bridges, 1952. 



Bridges. 


Labor 

and 

Material. 


Allston 


$364 87 




1,014 62 




354 98 




1,070 01 




2,881 36 




669 60 




681 83 




588 12 




797 68 




370 57 




523 88 




848 81 




279 54 




300 00 




835 68 




530 81 


Everett Street 


3,222 31 








$15,334 72 







36 City Document No. 24. 

Repairs on Inland Bridges, 1952. — Concluded. 



BRirGES. 



Labor 
and 

Material. 



Brought forward 

Everett Street (East Boston) 

Follen Street 

Glenwood Avenue 

Irvington Street 

Jones Avenue 

Massachusetts Avenue (over New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad) . 

Mt. Washington Avenue 

Neptune Road 

Perkins Street 

Redfield Street 

Reservation Road 

Reservoir Road 

Southampton Street 

Sprague Street 

Summer Street, over A Street 

Summer Street, over B Street 

Summer Street, over C Street 

ToUgate Way 

West Fourth Street 

Winthrop 

Snow and sanding 

Cleaning bridges 

Other services 



$15,334 72 
407 29 
586 74 

479 14 
1 20 

534 36 
481 94 
107 38 
304 67 

480 18 
1,014 56 

631 95 

540 82 

715 48 

914 46 

260 72 

2,746 11 

2,265 31 

803 63 

2,906 06 

832 09 

4,337 58 

6,272 50 

3,811 34 



Total . 



$46,770 23 



SUMMARY. 



Administration . 
Yard and stockroom 
Tidewater bridges 
Inland bridges . 



Total 



Stock purchased 
Stock used 



Decrease in stock 

Net total . 



$22,423 85 
23,998 73 



$108,438 10 

49,996 16 

593,863 20 

46,770 23 

$799,067 69 



1,574 88 
$797,492 81 



Public Works Department. 



37 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 
Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 



Broadway Bridge — Emergency repaii-s to steelwork — 
Industrial Welding Company 

Charlestown Bridge Storehouses — steel repairs, etc. — A. Or- 
lando, Inc 

Charlestown Bridge — strengthening Piers 4, 5, and 6 — 
Crandall Engineering Company 

Norfolk Street Bridge — New York, New Haven & Hart- 
ford Railroad Companj' — city's proportionate cost of 
repairs 

Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel — repairs to 
drawspan. Eastern Roads Company, Inc. 

Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel — emergency 
repairs to approaches, Eastern Roads Company, Inc. 

Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel — alter- 
ations and repairs to roadway railings. Industrial Weld- 
ing Company 

Warren Bridge, over Charles River — repairing pile bracing, 
Eastern Roads Company, Inc 

West Fourth Street Bridge, over New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad, and Broadway Bridge, over Boston 
& Albany Railroad — repairs, Martin J. Kelly Com- 
pany, Inc 

City Record — Advertising various contracts .... 

Thompson Lichtner Company, Inc. — tests .... 



$2,998 85 


21,662 


95 


64,906 56 


8,838 84 


26,383 


15 


1,199 


29 


1,928 00 


15,193 


88 


68,927 


49 


289 


50 


5 


00 



Total $312,333 51 



Bridges, Construction of. 

Charlestown Bridge, over the Charles River — strengthening $40,698 13 



Meridian Street Bridge — engineering services, Maguu-e 
Associates 



57,392 39 



$98,090 52 



SUMMARY. 
Expenditures from Special Appropriations, 1952. 





Balances 
from 
1951. 


Total Credits, 
Including 
Balances 

Carried Over 
and Transfers. 


Expended 

During Year 

1952. 


Unexpended 

Balances 

December 31, 

1952. 


Bridges, Repairs, etc ... . 

Bridges, construction of — 
(Revenue) 

Bridges, construction of — 
(Non-Revenue) 


$191,849 86 
161,236 59 

2,231,946 93 


$501,549 86 
161,536 59 

3,231,946 93 


$312,333 51 
98,090 52 


$189,216 35 
161,536 59 

3,133,856 41 


Totals 


$2,585,033 38 


$3,895,033 38 


$410,424 03 


$3,484,609 35 





38 



City Document No. 24. 



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Public Works Department. 39 

FERRY SERVICE. 



Financial Statement for Year Ending December 31, 1952. 

Total cash receipts for Ferry Service during the 

year $21,193 09 

Cash in hands of tollmen at Ijeginning of year . 60 00 

Petty cash held by cashier 50 00 

$21,303 09 
Cash paid to City Collector $21,303 09 

Breakdown of Toll Receipts. 

From foot passengers $3,186 59 

From vehicles 18,006 50 

Total receipts $21,193 09 

From Foot From 

Passengers. Vehicles. 

Boston Side $1,607 04 $8,699 10 

East Boston Side .... 1,579 55 9,307 40 

Totals $3,186 59 $18,006 50 

Additional Income Received by Ferry Service, 1952. 

New England Telephone & Telegraph Company, 

cleaning of telephone booth $24 00 

Mills Automatic Merchandising Company, concession 85 00 
Tide Water Associated Oil Company, refund on oil 

drums 25 00 

Esso Standard Oil Company, refund on oil driuns . 141 82 

Boston Junk Company, sale of junk . . . . 118 15 
New England Telephone & Telegraph Company, 

telephone commissions 15 51 

Total $409 48 



Travel on the South Ferry from January 1, 1952, to 
April 30, 1952. 

Foot passengers 93,786 (Ic) 

Pushcarts 425 (5c) 

One- and two-horse t^am with driver . . 740 (5c) 

Passenger auto with driver and passengers . 29,979 (10c) 

Truck, six tons or less 5,106 (15c) 

Truck, over six tons 4,450 (20c) 



40 



City Document No. 24. 



May 1, 1952, to December 31, 1952 — Under New Rate 

Schedule. 
Foot passengers 
Pushcarts 

One- and two-horse vehicle 
Passenger auto 
Truck, under two tons 
Tractor under two tons 
Truck, two to five tons 
Tractor, two to five tons 
Truck, five to ten tons 
Tractor, five to ten tons 
Truck, over ten tons 

Bus 

Tractor, over ten tons . 
Motorcycles . 



224,873 


(Ic) 


2,322 


(5c) 


3,022 


(10c) 


63,742 


(15c) 


3,914 


(20c) 


184 


(20c) 


3,459 


(25c) 


50 


(25c) 


1,129 


(35c) 


33 


(35c) 


19 


(70c) 


36 


(70c) 


1,152 


($1) 


208 


(10c) 



Sumner Tunnel Service. 

Annual Traffic by Classification for the Year 1952. 

No. of 
Class. Toll. Descriptiox. Vehicles. 

1. $0 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor without trailer 509,751 

2. 20 Passenger car 8,838,492 

3. 20 Motorcycle 3,096 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 

5 tons capacity 49,505 

5. 20 Passenger car with trailer 11,357 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 
10 tons capacity 15,584 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 1,383 

8. 1 00 Truck over 10 tons capacity. Tractor with 

trailer over 10 tons capacit}' .... 5,460 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 430 

* City-owned tl48,914 

Total traffic 9,583,972 

* MTA and Eastern Massachusetts Railway included in this classification. 

t 695 MTA and 72,611 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 35 cents included in 
this total. 

Comparative Annual Traffic Count. 



1948 


1949 1950 


1951 


1952 


8,754,545 


9,162,266 


9,283,700 


9,466,660 


9,583,972 



Public Works Department. 



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42 City Document No. 24. 

11— HIGHWAY SECTION. 



Paving Service. 



Summary of Budget Appropriations. 

Balance 
Appropriation. Total Credits. E.xpeuditures. Unexpended. 

Paving Service $1,478,936 03 $1,472,439 90 $6,496 13 

Reconstruction of Streets 146,064 01 94,639 75 51,424 26 
Public Ways, Construction 

of (Revenue) 157,500 00 157,500 00 None 

Public Waj^s, Construction 

of (Non-revenue). . .... 3,844,972 71 2,536,633 80 $1,308,338 91 

Sidewalks, Construction 

and Reconstruction of.. 126,912 49 78,944 69 47,967 80 

Street Signs 22,826 28 8,455 87 14,370 41 

Snow Removal 477,836 48 476,360 80 1,475 68 

The amount of money taken in through the Permit 
Office was $61,365.16; of this amount $23,177.56 was 
deposited with the City Collector for fees received, 
$35,161.60 was deposited with the City Collector for 
the Street Openings Account, and $3,026 was billed to 
the Public Service Corporations. There are now on 
file 2,278 bonds protecting the City of Boston against 
claims that may be made on account of the permits 
issued. 

The regular forces of the Paving Service were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patching 
permanent pavements such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were em- 
ployed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work done throughout the 
city by 245 contractors' hired plows after six snow- 
storms. All snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, 
force account work, cubic yard removal, etc., were 
processed through the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs: 

156 New street sign posts erected with frames and signs 

21 New Hero sign posts erected with signs 

817 Street sign name plates installed 

133 Bent or broken sign posts repaired 



Public Works Department. 43 

62 Hero signs replaced 
2,295 Street sign posts painted 

218 Street sign frames repaired 
4,075 Street sign frames painted 
310 Street sign frames, collars, and brackets erected on 
light poles 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 146 streets during the year, and 113 
of these were completed. Work was also completed on 
39 streets which were unfinished from 1951. Contracts 
were awarded for the construction of artificial stone 
sidewalks in 43 streets, and 35 of these were completed. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares recon- 
structed by contract during 1952 were: 

Belgrade avenue. West Roxbury, Robert street to Centre 
street. 

Bennington street. East Boston, Central square to Walley 
street. 

Broadway, City Proper, Tremont street to bridge over 
Boston & Albany Railroad. 

Brookline avenue, Roxbury, southwest of Riverway to 
Pilgrim road. 

Cambridge street, Brighton, Union square to Washington 
street. 

Cambridge street. City Proper, North Anderson street to 
Scollay square. 

Centre street, Roxbury, Columbus avenue to John Eliot 
square. 

Congress street, City Proper, Atlantic avenue to bridge 
over Fort Point Channel. 

Dorchester avenue, City Proper, Congress street to 
Summer street. 

Dorchester street. South Boston, East First street to 
East Broadway. 

Harvard street, Dorchester, Blue Hill avenue to Morton 
street. 

Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, Pingree street to Wolcott 
street. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, East Cottage street to 
Albany street. 

Massachusetts avenue, Roxbury, Albany street to Colum- 
bus avenue. 

Saratoga street, East Boston, bridge over MTA tracks to 
bridge over Belle Isle inlet. 

South Huntington avenue, Roxbury and West Roxbury, 
Huntington avenue to Centre street. 

Spring street, West Roxbury, northeast of Centre street to 
southwest of Route 1. 



44 City Document No. 24. 

Tremont street, City Proper, Scollay square to Boylston 
street. 

Washington street, Brighton, Cambridge street to Newton 
line. 

The following is a list of streets constructed or recon- 
structed in the various wards throughout the city in 
the year 1952: 

Ward 1 — Saratoga street (chapter 90), Antrim street, 
Marion street, Monmouth street, Bennington street 
(chapter 90), Waldemar avenue, Saratoga street (sidewalks), 
Shelby street (sidewalks), White street (sidewalks), Princeton 
street, London street (sidewalks). Total cost, $318,506.99. 

Ward 2 — Adams street. Common street. Park street. 
Total cost, $8,727.94. 

Ward 3 — Broadway, Aver}^ street, Bedford street, 
Church Green, East street, Edinboro street. South street, 
Tremont street, Utica street, West street, Public Alley 
No. 101, Atlantic avenue (fence). Curve street, Harrison 
avenue (B-E), Cambridge street (chapter 90), Dorchester 
avenue. Congress street. Total cost, $200,413.06. 

Ward 4 — Huntington avenue (fence), Huntington ave- 
nue (sidewalks), Public Alley No. 901, Brookline avenue 
(chapter 90). Total cost, $87,000.95. 

Ward 5 — Berkeley street (sidewalks), Jersey street, 
Melrose street, Public Alley No. 432, Public Alley No. 435, 
Stuart street (sidewalks), Broadway, Tremont street, Apple- 
ton street, Jefferson street, Beacon street (sidewalks). Park 
street. Total tost, $45,331.02. 

Ward 6 — K street, I street, Dorchester street. East 
Third street, Emerson street, P street (sidewalks), East 
Third street (sidewalks), East Seventh street (sidewalks), 
Baldwin street, Baxter street, Richards street, Swallow 
street. West Fourth street. Total cost, $56,983.17. 

Ward 7 — K street, I street. Marine Road, Massachusetts 
avenue (Chapter 90), East Seventh street (sidewalks), 
Thomas park (sidewalks). Old Harbor street (sidewalks), 
Hatch street (sidewalks). Viking street, Boston street, 
Massachusetts avenue. Total cost, $92,510.46. 

Ward 8 — Massachusetts avenue (chapter 90), Dover 
street, Harrison avenue (M — EB), Maiden street. Total 
cost, $111,261.18. 

Ward 9 — Centre street, Dorr street, Lambert avenue, 
Roxbury street, Station street, Washington street (W— R). 
Total cost, $108,793.65. 

Ward 10 — South Huntington avenue (chapter 90) . Total 
cost, $103,790.31. 



Public Works Department. 45 

AVard U — West Walnut park, Centre street, Ritchie 
street. Dorr street, Lambert avenue, Highland street (side- 
walks), Stonley road, School street (sidewalks). Total cost, 
$54,942.18. 

Ward 12 — Ottawa street (sidewalks), Rockland street 
(sidewalks), Sherman street (sidewalks), Rock street (side- 
walks). Total cost, $12,970. 

Ward 13— Do^^^ley court. Total cost, .$3,147.80. 

Ward 14 — Harvard street. Abbot street, Lyford street, 
Nightingale street, Wales street, Fenelon street, Harvard 
avenue, Magnolia street, Mallon road, Merrill street, Old 
road, Evelyn street. Total cost, $110,496.36. 

Ward 15 — None. 

Ward 16 — Tilman street. Souther road, Edwin street, 
Helena road, King street, Hallet street. Total cost, 
$41,760.08. 

Ward 17 — Burt street, Colonial avenue, New England 
avenue, Harvard park. Pleasant Hill terrace, Mother Julia 
road, Bloomfield street, Gaylord street, Herbert street, 
Geneva avenue (sidewalks). Total cost, $63,678.40. 

Ward 18 — Beacon street, Riverside square, Canterbury 
street. Badger road, Littledale street, Manchester street. 
Crown street, Suncrest road, Marcy road, Hyde Park 
avenue, and Milton street (chapter 90), Monponset street. 
Total cost, $284,451.61. 

Ward 19 — Boylston street, Lamartine street, Archdale 
road, Brookway road, Centre street (widening). Arboretum 
road, Fowle street, Harris avenue, Neillian Crescent (side- 
walks), Pond street. Total cost, $93,287.65. 

Ward 20 — Belgrade avenue (chapter 90), DeSoto road 
(sidewalks), Spring street (chapter 90), Clement avenue, 
Farmington road, Baker place, Cedrus avenue, Jacqueline 
road, Carlson Circle, Johnson street, Vincent road, Avalon 
road (sidewalks), Garnet road (sidewalks), Maple street 
(sidewalks), Rickerhill road (sidewalks), Westover street 
(sidewalks), Willow street (sidewalks), Bellevue street, De- 
Soto road, Shaw street, Tennyson street, Anawan avenue, 
Allenwood street. Beech street, Westmount avenue, Man- 
thorne road (sidewalks), Sherbrook street (sidewalks), 
Chilton road (sidewalks), Albano street, Manthorne road, 
Sanborn avenue. Total cost, $504,291.85. 

Ward 21 — Colborne Path, Sidlaw road. Total cost, 
$8,075.41. 

Ward 22 — Nonantum street. North Crescent Circuit, 
Sparhawk street, Cambridge and Washington streets (chap- 
ter 90), Bigelow Circle, Burton street, Eric road, Weitz 
street, Brayton road, Glenley terrace. Total cost, 
$273,297.76. 



46 



City Document No. 24. 



WORK DONE BY CONTRACT IN 1952. 



Earth and services excavation . 

Rock and wall excavation . 

Bank gravel, placed 

Crushed stone, placed . 

Existing base removed 

Existing pavement removed 

Straight edgestone, set 

Circular edgestone, set 

2 foot corners, set .... 

Edgestone reset .... 

Edgestone hauled to city yards . 

Macadam base, placed 

OA asphalt, placed 

Concrete base, placed . 

Concrete for backing up sidewalks 

placed 

Bituminous concrete base (roadway) 

placed 

Bituminous concrete top (roadway) 

placed 

Bituminous concrete base (sidewalk) 

placed 

Bituminous concrete top (sidewalk) 

placed 

Sheet asphalt top, placed 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid 
Artificial stone driveways, laid . 
Loam spaces, placed 

Covers reset 

Bradley heads reset 

Brick courses, laid 

Catch basins or manholes rebuilt 

Catch basins or drop inlets built 

Sign posts set or reset . 

Parking meters reset 

Stone bounds, placed . 



63,242 
1,821 

59,127 

12,457 
7,451 

52,164 

32,659 
2,784 
1,033 

58,065 
4,613 
2,573 

25,496 
4,096 



cubic yards 
cubic yards 
tons 
tons 

square yards 
square yards 
linear feet 
linear feet 

linear feet 
linear feet 
tons 
gallons 
cubic yards 



34 cubic yards 

41,862 tons 

20,838 tons 

1,864 tons 

1,537 tons 
6,263 tons 
730,925 square feet 
62,746 square feet 
2,066 square yards 
2,783 
36 
5,033 
90 
31 
109 
24 
190 







Table Showing Length 


AND Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, 


Corrected to 


January 1 


, 1953. 










Length in Miles. 


Area in Square Yards. 




Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam, 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1951 Report 


*246.79 
34.07 


t240.01 
33.13 


{42.29 
3.84 


0.40 
0.06 


0.48 
0.07 


0.51 
0.07 


§23.25 
3.21 


11160.93 
22.21 


8.55 
1.18 


1.15 
0.18 


724.42 
100.00 


*5.002.048 
35.97 


t4,515.497 
32.47 


tl, 126.162 
8.10 


8,815 
0.06 


11,690 
0.09 


11,413 
0.08 


§439,329 
3.30 


112,606,712 
18.75 


129,397 
0.93 


34,731 
0.25 


13,903,994 






January 1. 1953. 


50.53 
4.91 
4.91 
12.33 
42.26 
41.69 
59.00 
22.19 
9.28 


26.53 
4.83 
10.17 
13.40 
27.97 
59.49 
07.30 
28.82 
13.34 


12.14 
0.53 
4.49 
7.65 
4.60 
2.87 
0.78 
0.30 


0.09 
0.08 
0.01 
0.03 


0.10 
0.05 
0.05 
0.06 


0.32 

0,02 
0.02 
0.14 

0.01 


3.04 
0.79 
0.41 
0.52 
0.13 
4.44 
5.40 
1.23 
0.03 


3.21 
5.42 
9.99 
9.33 
13.02 
40.04 
37.70 
12.33 
18.76 


0.32 
0,03 
0.12 
0.13 
0.51 
2.35 
1.78 
0.28 
4.36 


0.01 
0.04 
0.50 

0.20 
0.02 

0.20 


96.28 
22.65 
36.21 
44.01 
93.63 
131.12 
172.90 
03.23 
46.63 


1.122,539 
97,677 
107,825 
263,975 
847,599 
755,618 

1,129,046 
497.982 
171,328 


596.605 
79.856 
351,774 
233,129 
310,974 
1.081,381 
1,233,070 
552,213 
268,894 


259,729 
171,008 

08.085 
222.892 

S7.922 
102,334 

34,653 

27,442 
6,318 


954 
2,011 

325 

1,109 

47 

1,609 

186 


3.623 

1,701 

777 

1.737 

983 

770 

1,231 

702 


4.862 

393 
1,378 
4.627 

145 


94.349 
13,488 
14,739 
22.545 
78.870 
62.443 
86,755 
30,443 
10,086 


48,548 
75,302 
217.061 
153,362 
188,062 
631,733 
583,537 
197,475 
312,409 


2,944 
407 
2.244 
1,713 
7,793 
36,133 
25,149 
4,221 
68,854 


41 

842 

13,754 

27 

8,536 

1.737 

30 

4,506 














939,594 




1,725,921 




0.00 
0.01 


0.04 
0.04 
0.08 
0.05 


2,679,685 




3,098,537 




1,311,037 




843,283 












39.36 
5.41 


0.28 
0,04 


0.47 
0.06 


0.51 
0.07 


21.61 
2.97 


149.82 
20.68 


9.90 
1.36 


0.97 
0.13 


727.87 
100.00 


4,993,589 
35.75 


4,928,402 
33.28 


1,010,403 
7.23 


6,301 
0.05 


11.324 
0.08 


11,403 
0.08 


413,720 
2.96 


2,411,311 
17.27 


149,458 
1.07 


31,493 
0.23 


13,967,806 




33.95 


35.43 


100.00 







Note. — In the above table the city is subdivided substantially on the bo 



* Of this amount 0.09 mile or 810 square yards is Biturock. 
X Of this amount 0.02 mile or 185 square yards is cobble; and 24.02 
square yards is granite block paving on concrete base. 

' '~-' ■• ■ 0.06 mile or 405 square yards is Blome granitoid 



Total Public Streets 727.87 Miles. 
adary lines between the districts as they existed when annexed to Boston. Territory £ 

t Of this amount 177.82 r 



mexed from BrookUne included in City Proper. 



■ 729.75G 
Crete block. 



3,336,076 square yards is asphalt concrete; and 74.55 
miles or 1,479.342 square yards is BituUthjc; and 3.61 nules or 58,828 square yards is 
Topeka; and 0.06 miles or 920 square yards is Filbertine; and 0.11 miles or 1.533 square 
yards is Simasco; and 0.03 miles or 595 square yards is Carey Elastite Asphalt Plank; and 
0.06 mile or 518 square yards is Johns-Manville Asphalt Plank; and 1.61 miles or 50,590 
square yards is tar concrete. 

,452 square yards public alleys included in this table; 7.57 miles or 335,302 square yards public streets in charge of Park Department included in this table; 7.77 miles or 254,939 square yards 
pubUc streets in charge of Commonwealth of Massachusetts included in this table. In addition to this table there are 2.25 miles or 1 1,006 square yards of accepted footways. 



128.90 miles or 2,099,023 square yards is bituminous macadam. 



Public Works Department. 



47 



REPORT OF WORK DONE BY DEPARTMENT 
FORCES FOR 1952. 



Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid 
Artificial stone sidwalks, laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) 
Bituminous concrete sidewalks, laid 
Block gutters, laid 
Granite block roadway, laid 
Artificial stone sidewalks, patched 
with black top .... 

Edgestone reset (old) . 
Macadam roadway patched 
Macadam roadway resurfaced . 
Street cleaning .... 
Snow removal .... 



6,868 square yards 

1,545 square yards 

12,904 square feet 

180,223 square feet 

13,364 square yards 

168 square yards 

262 square yards 

11,967 square feet 

6,214 linear feet 

187,258 square yards 

14,108 square yards 
6,250 cubic yards 

73,342 cubic yards 



48 



City Document No. 24. 



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Public Works Department. 49 

LIGHTING SERVICE. 

Financial Statement. 

Total credits for 1952 $1,322,329 03 

Expenditures 1,313,983 19 

Unexpended S8,345 84 



ExpeJiditures: 

Electric Lighting: 

Boston Edison Company .11,081,293 76 
Boston Consolidated Gas 

Company .... 103,692 97 $1,184,986 73 

Gas Lighting: 

American Service Company . 

Boston Consolidated Gas 

Company .... 

Salaries 



Construction : 

Installing, removing and re- 
locating lamps . 

Office expense : 

Printing 

Postage 



66,915 32 




6,862 23 


73,777 55 


9,930 16 


9,930 16 


17,230 31 


17,230 31 


63 14 
36 00 


99 14 



Miscellaneous: 

Globes, domes, mantles, etc. 27,959 30 27,959 30 



$1,313,983 19 



The following is a statement of work done by the 
Lighting Service during 1952. 

Electric lamps of 1,500 c.p. (mercury vapor) were in- 
stalled on Beacon street (14), City Proper. 

Electric lamps of 1,000 c.p. (mercury vapor) were in- 
stalled on Brookline avenue (37), City Proper. 

Electric lamps of 2,000 c.p. (twin 1,000 c.p.) were in- 
stalled on Massachusetts avenue (3), City Proper; 
Bennington street (69), East Boston. 

Electric lamps of 1,000 c.p. were installed on Cam- 
bridge street (2), Commonwealth avenue (6), Market 



50 City Document No. 24. 

street (5), Washington street (21), Brighton; Berkeley 
street (1), Edgerly road (1), Huntington avenue (2), 
Massachusetts avenue (14), Mountfort street (2), New- 
bury street (3), Park Drive (3), shopping area (30), 
Summer street (1), Temple place (1), Worcester street 
(2), City Proper; Dorchester avenue (2), Dorchester; 
Bennington street (2), East Boston; Warren street (1), 
Roxbury; Hyde Park avenue (2), West Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 600 c.p. were installed on North 
Harvard street (22), Brighton; Magnolia street (1), 
Quincy street (5), Dorchester; Bennington street (1), 
East Boston; Walworth street (1), West Roxbury. 

Electric street lamps of 400 c.p. were installed on 
Keswick street (1), Revere street (1), City Proper; Har- 
low street (1), Kingsdale street (2), Howard avenue (1), 
MagnoHa street (4), Dorchester; Elm Hill avenue (2), 
Schuyler street (1), Mt. Pleasant terrace (1), Yeoman 
street (1), Roxbury; East Fourth street (2), Gavin Way 
(1), Marine road (6), South Boston; Amory street (1), 
Garden terrace (1), West Roxburj'. 

Electric lamps of 250 c.p. were installed on Nonantum 
street (9), Lincoln street (14), Brighton; Bradford street 
(2), City Proper; Esmond street (9), Dorchester; ArHng- 
ton street (1), Hyde Park; West Walnut park (3), Rox- 
bury; La Grange street (32), Farmington road (5), 
Walworth street (1), West Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 11 c.p. were installed on CooUdge 
road (1), Hooker street (1), Montfern avenue (1), 
Murdock street (1), Bigelow Circle (1), Brighton; Elm 
street (1), Livermore street (4), O'Connell road (1), 
Maryknoll street (2), Verndale street (1), Granger street 
(1), Wolcott street (1), Mountain avenue (1), Mother 
JuHa road (1), Minot street (1), Lorenzo street (1), 
Brent street (1), Roseclair street (1), Avondale street 
(1), Evans street (2), Hazleton street (1), Crowell street 
(1), Christopher street (3), Dorchester; Burke's court 
(1), Moore street (1), East Boston; Church street (1), 
Tractor avenue (1), WiUiams street (1), Huntington 
avenue (1), Hyde Park; Walnut park (3), Munroe street 
(1), Washington park (13), Roxbury; Cornell street (2), 
Colberg avenue (1), Latin road (2), Orange street (2), 
Autumn street (1), Bobohnk street (1), Lyall street (2), 
Gardner street (1), Rowe street (1), Gould street (1), 
Zamora court (1), Newburg street (1), Glade avenue (1), 
Canterbury street (1), St. Theresa avenue (1), Rock- 
wood street (2), Cass street (1), Vincent street (1), 



Public Works Department. 51 

Carroll street (1), Hazelmere road (1), Parley Vale (1), 
West Roxbury. 

During the year 400 lamps of 100 c.p. were installed in 
various suburban areas and 950 gas lamps were removed 
and replaced by an equal number of electric lamps of 
100 c.p. 

Electric fire alarm lamps were installed on Chestnut 
Hill avenue (1), Sutherland road (1), Nottinghill road 
(1), Cambridge street (2), Brighton; Dorchester avenue 
(1), Dudley street (1), River street (2), Dorchester; 
Chelsea street (1), Prescott street (1), Porter street (1), 
Bennington street (1), East Boston; Wj^man street (1), 
Hunneman street (1), Dudley street (1), Ferrin street 
(1), Roxbury; West Fifth street (1), South Boston; 
Washington street (1), Centre street (1), Corey street 
(1), West Roxbury. 



52 



City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



OF 



Boston, January 2, 1953. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

Herewith I submit a statement of the expenditures 
and activities of the Sanitary Division of the Pubhc 
Works Department for the year ending December 31, 
1952. 

The total cost of operation of the Sanitary Division 
for 1952 is as follows: 

Budget expenditures .... $5,270,095 60 
Motor vehicle cost .... 268,292 76 



Total cost 



),538,388 36 



The cost of operation of this division was obtained 
by adding the cost of motor vehicle operation, as sub- 
mitted by the Automotive Division, to the budget 
expenditures of the Sanitary Division. 

The cost, recapitulated and compared with the previ- 
ous year (1951), is shown as follows: 



Item. 


1951. 


1952. 


Decrease. 


Increase. 


Waste collection and disposal . . 


$.3,128,131 82 

2,071.508 14 

62,630 77 

4,474 76 

5 00 


83,061,918 96 

2,431,926 58 

44,542 82 


$66,212 86 


$360,418 44 


Preventive street cleaning 

1961 costs paid in 1952 


18,087 95 

4,474 76 

5 00 














Totals 


$5,266,750 49 


$5,538,388 36 
5,266.750 49 


$88,780 57 


$360,418 44 




88,780 57 




$271,637 87 


$271,637 87 











The general over-all increase in Sanitary Division 
costs amounted to S271,637.87. 

However, the reclassification of the employees, retro- 
active to April 2, 1952, accounts for $155,587.64 of this 
amount, leaving a net increase of $88,223.92 in other 
accounts. 



Public Works Department. 53 

The larger increases were as follows: 

(Amounts larger than $2,000) : 

Disposal $37,500 00 

Public Works supplies . . 41,898 27 

Non-automotive parts . . 6,296 40 

Automobile equipment . . 14,411 70 

Automobile supplies . . . 2,562 16 
Electrical and mechanical 

equipment .... 6,821 11 



The larger decreases were : 

Professional services in 1951 . $5,800 00 
Waste contract (collection) . 4,479 76 



$109,489 64 
10,279 76 



),209 88 
Other items under $2,000 (net decrease) . . 1 10,985 96 

$88,223 92 

1 . Waste Collection and Disposals. — Although there 
was a $37,500 increase in the cost of disposal contract 
and a decrease in collection contracts, as well as payroll 
increase on account of the reclassification of employees, 
there was a net decrease in this account of $66,212.86. 

2. Street Cleaning. — The $360,418.44 increase in this 
account was almost entirely due to increased pajTolls. 

3. Preventive Street Cleaning. — ^The decrease in this 
account, amounting to $18,087.95, is due to the decrease 
in the number of constables, which dropped from 24 
at the end of 1951 to 12 at the end of 1952. 

Personnel Changes in Permanent Force During the Year 1952: 

Total personnel January 1, 1952 *783 

Transfers in (from other departments and divi- 
sions) 26 

New appointments 26 

Reinstatements 3 

55 

838 

Deaths 8 

Resignations 8 

Retirements 16 

Transfers out (to other departments and divisions) 39 
Discharged or terminated 13 

84 



Total personnel January 1, 1953 1 754 

* Includes four military leaves. f Includes two military leaves. 

Net loss of 29 employees. 



54 City Document No. 24. 

The Salt Transfer Depot on Southampton street was 
torn down to make way for the new market faciHties at 
this location. However, the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad Company built a new salt depot, at 
an estimated expense to the railroad of $12,000. Thus 
the city is still provided with a facihty whereby rock 
salt is discharged directly from hopper cars into trucks 
below without rehandling. 

The reclassification of city employees went into effect 
in December, 1952, retroactive to April 2, 1952. 

On April 1, 1952, a new contract policy was estab- 
lished. Contracts now will run for a 12-month period 
beginning April 1 in each year. 

Property on Gardner street, West Roxbury, was ac- 
quired for a sanitary fill method of waste disposal. 
There is ample area available as well as suitable covering 
material and gravel for Public Works Department use. 

Permission was granted by the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Works to deposit refuse in the ''turning 
basin" in the South Bay off Atkinson street, as well as 
in abandoned slips nearby. 

The Port of Boston Authority gave permission to 
deposit refuse on flats at the sewage pumping station, 
under restrictions relating to the area used and the 
proper cover of the material. 

Negotiations were initiated toward acquiring land 
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts upon which 
to construct a 750-ton incinerator. 

The South Boston District Building was completed, 
and now provides modern facilities for Sanitary, Street 
Cleaning, Motor Pool, Mobile Patrol activities and 
operations. 

The contract with Kennedy Brothers for sale of gar- 
bage at $3,000 monthly continued for the second year 
of its duration. 

The following-listed new equipment was acquired 
during the year 1952: 

3 Mechanical sweepers 5 Dump trucks 

1 Passenger car 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 
Division Engineer. 









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(57) 



58 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION 



Boston, January 2, 1953. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and 
and expenditures of the Sewer Division for the year 
ending December 31, 1952. 

Expenditures During 1952. — The activities of the 
Sew^er Division during the year consisted of sewer con- 
struction at a contract cost of $620,714.64, as shown on 
attached schedule of the work done, and the maintenance 
and operation of the sewer system at a cost of 
$806,795.57. 

Contract Work.- — Contract work consisted of the 
extension of the sewer system to provide drainage for 
new buildings and street construction and to eliminate 
cesspools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work.- — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 1,876 catch basins by contract and 3,969 
by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and catch 
basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and catch 
basins by the yard forces and the operation of the pump- 
ing station and disposal works, the cost of which is 
attached. 

Special Work. — Special work consisted of completely 
overhauhng the sewage screen at the Union Park Street 
Pumping Station by yard forces. Also, the yard forces 
installed seven top-hung metal Calco tide gates to 
replace side-hung wooden tide gates. A contract was 
let for the installation at the Calf Pasture Pumping 
Station of two 36-inch diameter motor-operated pump 
discharge gates, which work started May 29, 1951, and 
was completed October 15, 1952, at a cost of $9,625. 

Covering in Open Brooks. — During the year 1952, 
Shepard Brook, Brighton, Colorado Street Brook, Dor- 
chester, and part of Spring Street Brook, West Roxbury, 
were enclosed in conduits. 



Public Works Department. 59 

Shepard Brook from Western avenue through private 
land, for a distance of 1,058 linear feet was enclosed in a 
36-inch diameter reinforced concrete conduit at a cost 
of $20,453.88. 

Colorado Street Brook was relocated in a 48-inch 
diameter reinforced concrete pipe in Colorado Street, 
between Monterey avenue and Currier street, for a 
distance of 564 feet. In connection with this w^ork a 
pipe surface drain was constructed in Currier street, 
between Colorado street and Alabama street. The 
work also included the construction of 11 catch basins 
in Colorado street, Almont street. Rosewood street and 
Talbot avenue. The entire cost of work was $24,846.62. 
Spring Street Brook was enclosed in an 84-inch 
diameter reinforced concrete pipe in Gould street for a 
distance of 218 linear feet and in Prospect street, from 
Gould street to Baker street, a distance of 1,143 linear 
feet, including 1,046 hnear feet of 10-inch clay pipe 
sewer at a cost of $112,000.81. 

Pro-posed Construction Work. — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street 
construction, new building construction, and the elimi- 
nation of cesspools will continue for many years in the 
future, and probably at the same rate as in the past. 
In addition, a long-range sewerage works program pro- 
vides for the extension of main line surface drain con- 
duits and the rebuilding of several miles of very old 
sewers that have settled or outlived their economic 
usefulness. Details of the long-range program are con- 
tained in a report on file in the Sewer Division. 

During 1953, it is proposed, in addition to regular 
extension of the sewer systems as required to provide 
for new building and street construction, to cover in and 
relocate a section of Stony Brook from the end of the 
existing conduit at the former Hyde Park line to the 
existing culvert across the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad at Providence street, consisting of 
about 4,200 hnear feet of 84-inch and 72-inch diameter 
reinforced concrete pipe ; also a tunnel across Hyde Park 
avenue and the railroad, at an estimated cost of $434,000. 
The above work is in keeping with our policy of gradually 
covering in all open brooks to improve surface drainage 
and eliminate hazards. 

Special Problems. — The 1951 report referred to the 
need of renewing the main entrance sluice gates at the 
Calf Pasture Pumping Station and called attention to 



60 City Document No. 24. 

the difficulties that would be encountered in construct- 
ing bulkheads to isolate the gates. A scheme is being 
considered that will eliminate the need of bulkheads, 
and it is anticipated that the work will be advertised 
during the coming year. The estimated cost of the 
work is $25,000. 

Considerable work has been done on adjusting and 
renewing tide gates but this work has not resulted 
in any substantial reduction in the quantity of tide- 
water entering the main drainage system. It appears 
that all that can be hoped for is to prevent the situation 
from getting any worse until such time as the cit}" 
or the M.D.C. rebuild old wooden overflows, which 
probably is the chief source of tidewater entering 
the interceptor sewers. 

Sewer Cleaning. — The 1951 report contained the 
following: "Sewer cleaning remains the major main- 
tenance problem of the Sewer Division. As stated 
in previous reports, sewer cleaning has been neglected 
for the past 25 years or more. The small crew of 11 
men and a foreman specifically assigned to this work 
are hardly able to do the cleaning which is more or 
less of an emergency nature. To attack the problem 
in the manner it deserves requires much additional 
man power, equipment, and proper supervision." The 
situation has not changed to any material extent. 
The solution remains the same, namely a much larger 
force of young men properly directed. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the 
following: 24 laborers, 1 working foreman carpenter, 
2 carpenters, 29 motor equipment operators and laborers, 
9 catch-basin machine operators, 4 tide gate repairmen, 
6 working foremen sewer cleaners, 21 sewer cleaners, 
5 bricklayers, 2 working foremen-motor equipment 
operators, 4 yardmen, 1 heavy motor equipment 
operator, 7 sewer district foremen, and 1 main drainage 
foreman. This makes a total of 117 men assigned to 
answering complaints, cleaning catch basins, cleaning 
sewers, repairing manholes and catch basins, repairing 
broken sewers, and other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built. — During the fiscal year 
1952 there were built by contractors and day labor 
6.68 miles of common sewers and surface drains through- 
out the city. After deducting 0.79 miles of sewers 
and surface drains rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase 
for 1952 is 5.89 miles, which, added to the existing 



Public Works Department. 61 

1,259.15 miles of common sewers and surface drains 
and 30.93 miles of intercepting sewers, makes a grand 
total of 1,295.97 miles of all sewers belonging to the 
City of Boston, and under the care of the Sewer Division 
on January 1, 1953. 

There were 283 catch Ijasins built or rebuilt and 
21 abandoned or removed during the year, making 
a net gain of 262 catch basins and a grand total of 
23,666 catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division 
on January 1, 1953. 

Permit Office Report. — Entrance fees to the amount 
of $6,996.32 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer assess- 
ments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances 
of 1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

There have been 878 permits issued, viz., 217 to 
district foremen and contractors and 661 to drainlayers 
for repairing or laying new house drains. Inspectors 
from this office have personally inspected the work 
done under these drainlayers' permits. 

Two thousand three hundred and seven complaints 
have been investigated, and inspectors are instructed 
to report in writing in each case. 

One thousand four hundred and ninety-two catcli 
basin complaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 2,500 municipal liens to 
the City Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, 
section 25, of the General Laws. Reported orally 
on about 2,500 requests for information on municipal 
liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Shea, 

Division Engineer. 



62 



City Document No. 24. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1952. 



Districts. 


Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 




Linear Feet, 


Linear Feel. 

3,368 00 

1,965 00 

None 

11.074 00 

77 50 


Linear Feet. 
3,368.00 
2,261.80 

None 

11,074.00 
77.50 
1,378.06 
6,763. 56 
2,500.60 
7,842.40 


Miles. 
0.6379 




296 80 
None 


0.4283 




None 




2.0973 






0.0147 




1,378 00 
6,763 56 
2,500 60 
7,842 40 


0.2609 


WestRoxbury 




1.2809 




0.4736 


Hyde Park 




1.4853 








Totals 


18,781 42 


16,484.50 


35,265.92 


6.6789 











Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January 1, 1953. 





1948. 


1949. 


1950. 


19SI. 


1952. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor. . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear 
Feet. 

29,754 60 
8,969 68 


Linear 
Feet. 

39,590 88 


Linear 
Feet. 

31,208 93 
3,938 00 


Linear 
Feet. 

22,4.50 07 


Linear 
Feet. 

18,781 42 
10,484 50 










Totals 


38,724 28 


39,596 88 


35,146 93 


22,456 07 


35,265 92 







Public Works Department. 



63 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 



City Proper . . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston . . 
East Boston . . . 
Charlestown . . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury . 
Dorchester .... 
Hyde Park 



Total 
Lengths 

Built 
During 
Twelve 
Months 
Ending 
December 
31, 1952. 



Linear Feet. 
3,368.00 
2,261.80 
None 
11,074.00 
77.50 
1,378.06 
6,763.56 
2,500.60 
7,842.40 



Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1952. 



Linear Feet. 
3,386.00 
199.80 
None 



5.57.00 



Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1952. 



Linear Feet. 
—18.00 
2,062.00 
None 
11,074.00 
—479.50 
1,378.06 
6,763.56 
2,500.60 
7,842.40 



Miles. 

—0.0034 
0.3905 
None 
2.0973 

—0.0908 
0.2609 
1.2809 
0.4736 
1.4853 



Totals. 



35,265.92 



4,142.80 



31,620.62 



5.8943 



Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 
January 1, 1952 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1952 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending 
December 31, 1952 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 
metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1952 . 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers 
to December 31, 1952 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1952 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to January 1, 1953 



Miles. 
1,259.15 
5.89 



1,265.04 


*6.81 


*24.12 



1,295.97 
703.30 



* No additional lengths built during 1952. 



64 



City Document No. 24. 



Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



Districts. 



City Proper . . . 

Roxbury , 

South Boston . 
East Boston . . 
Charlestown.. 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Hyde Park. .. 

Totals... 



Catch Basins for Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1952. 



283 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 


Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed 


41 


21 


22 





4 





90 





3 





11 





70 





19 





23 






Net 
Increase. 



20 
22 

4 
90 

3 
11 
70 
19 
23 



262 



Total for Whole Crxr 

IN Charge of Sewer 

Di\asioN. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1952. 



3,637 
3,383 
1,462 
1,114 
843 
2,055 
4,158 
5,595 
1,157 



23,404 



Grand Total 

to 

January 1, 

1953. 



3,657 
3,405 
1,466 
1,204 
846 
2.066 
4.228 
5,614 
1,180 



23,666 



Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 

Fuel Oil Used. 



Month. 


No. 2. 


No. 5. 


Cost. 




209.1 
100.2 
200 

114.7 


8,020 
4,010 


S676.12 




337.62 




20.20 


4pril 


12,1.35 


998.23 








173.3 


4,045 


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1.50 


8,031 
7,972 
11,090 


632.70 




612.10 




183.1 


871.63 






Totals 


1,130.4 


55,309 


$4,494.92 







Public Works Department. 
Electricity Used. 



65 



Month. 



Kilowatt 
Hours. 



Cost. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March. ... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 



619.140 
619,220 
611,660 
613,500 
588,980 
597,060 
540,000 
622,000 
478,000 
496,000 
498,020 
500.080 



$7,305 31 
7,312 44 
7,277 85 
7,274 04 
6,801 66 
6,952 45 
6,547 64 
7,162 59 
6,097 21 
6,217 90 
6,190 71 
6,293 64 



Totals . 



6,783,660 



$81,433 44 



Cost Per Year. 



Labor 

Electricitj' .... 
Fuel oil ... . 
Supplies and miscellaneous 
Service orders and contracts 



Total . 

Cost per million gallons of sewage pumped 

Sewage Record. 



$121,090 34 

81,433 44 

4,494 92 

4,159 29 

27,304 30 

$238,488 29 
$5 95 



Month, 



Total Gallons 
Pumped. 



Average Gallons 
Pumped Daily. 



January . . . 
February . . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 



3,687,164,000 
3,792,267,000 
3,745,414,000 
3,604,439,000 
3,478,649,000 
3,608,098,000 
3,185,078,000 
3,369,058,000 
3,157,322,000 
2,908,799,000 
2,664,823,000 
2,865,889,000 



118,940,800 

130,767,700 

120,819,800 

120,147,960 

112.214,500 

120,269,930 

102,744,450 

108,679,300 

105,244,060 

93,832,230 

88,827,430 

92,125,450 



Totals 

Daily Average . 



40,067,000,000 



109,772,630 



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to 




10 












5 


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o 


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o> 






c 


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to 


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to 


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IT 


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00 


00 






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05 





CO 


IN 


m 


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to 


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b- 


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to 






t- 




s 


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c 


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5 







to 




CO 


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00 







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c 


10 


to 


IN 


CO 


to 


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o 




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to 














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a : 


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o 
u 
u 


IE 

c 

1 


"i 

1 
w 

c 

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s 

HI 

c 




o d-^ a osrj; a • 


■5 

c 

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3 

1 

g 
t 




1 
a 

u 
a 

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X 



c 







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i 


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a 




< 


O 


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w 














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Public Works Department. 



75 



M r-l .-1 -" 



O -H — I 



00 — -1 



rM O T-l 



in rt — I 



"3^ 



ca-C 



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03 O 









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b,^ (h >, tH a 

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an, as aoi 

tf rt tf 



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76 



City Document No. 24. 



i 

a 






Advertising $27 50 

Unliquidated re- 
serve 2,213 38 

Carfares 1,804 53 

Postage 15 00 

Telephone 544 30 

Sun.lry 100 ^2 


Teleplione calls 1 ,927 45 

Hats 10 53 

Coata 135 27 

Gloves 130 65 

Roots 175 2'> 






$10,920 94 
246 63 


2 


a 

111 


















i 


s 


oc 






lO 00 
LO ■* 

i § 


CO 

o 

to 

oT 


-a S 

:3 








00 

CO 
o 

CI 
4« 






to CI 

=1 -1 
5 S 


CO 

00 
(N" 


1 
c 




00 00 

uo CO 

00 '-•; 
•* t>. ■* 
CO ri '.': 








CI CO 

to <N 

O t^ 

O CI 


00 
« 

Cl 

CO 






















OS 

ae 


lO 
9» 


Is 
















o o 

K3 O 

t^ CO 
to 00 
CO co" 
CO 


o 

CO 

O 
00 

CO 




















o ■«< 

00 a> 
to t» 

CO 


00 

s 









00 CI CI 

— ;c CO 

•* C-. -* 
■* CI CI 

o c 

^ cr 




00 
00 

00 
o 


s s 

CO (31 
lO 00 
00 -H 

to to 


g 

LO 

CO 

o 

CO 

to 


1 


00 oom Oi-ir- oo 
00 00 i-i la -^t-— -"C 

'^ l«. W <N -O -N L- 00 

eo T^^ i-H 00 (M o_ -^ 05 

.- us t^ '- 00 

a» ■* OS 


-H d 

■* 1.0 
to Ol 


to" 


D 

u 


< 


at « 5 a ^- e 


Iff Hi 


2§^J-a| 

^ o g.S g> 
K 


o 
a 

c 

2 












1 


1 


1 

c 

s 








sE 
■3 "3 * 




S 

m 

o 


X 

« 

-3 : 
« *; 




1 



Public Works Department. 



77 







2 




o 
Si 














o 
n 

TO 


o 








C5 
00 


00 






<N 


§8 

CO 

as 








8 

a» 


CO 














00 


•>!tl 
00 

s 


3 


$629,480 75 
2,607 47 


IN 

(N 

CO 
CO 


00 


$804,188 10 
2,607 47 


o 


Crbdits. 

Maintenance 
stock used 
on m a i n - 
tenance....$3,589 62 

(Construction 
stock used 
on m ai n- 
tcnance 10,733 48 

Motor vehi- 
cles used on 
m ai n t c - 
nance 37,480 50 

Maintenance 
labor paid 
by sewerage 




1 


Debits. 

Hevverage work.s 
stock paid by 
maintenance 00 

Sewerage works 
labor paid 
by mainte- 
nance 2,607 47 


1 





78 City Document No. 24. 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1953. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the Water Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1952. 

The shortage of critical materials having been less- 
ened, and new meters made available, the work of 
laying and relaying water mains and the replacement 
of obsolete meters, etc., was resumed. 

A total of 27,376.5 linear feet of main pipe were either 
laid or relaid, varying in sizes from 8-inch to 30-inch, 
inclusive, as follows: 

Laid. Relaid. 

District. Linear Feet. Linear Feet. 

East Boston 3,071.5 1,968.2 

Charlestown 2,490.0 829.5 

City Proper 2,317.0 425.0 

South Boston 

Roxbury 371.0 814.0 

Dorchester 2,941.3 2,272.5 

Hyde Park 7,082.5 98.0 

West Roxbury 2,444.0 252.0 

Briojhton 

The particular streets in which the above work was 
performed are shown on the accompanying tables, IV and 
V. 

Engineering Office. 

There is an insufficient number of capable employees 
on the engineering staff. This shortage of engineering 
personnel is getting worse instead of getting better, due 



Public Works Department. 79 

in the main to the small amount of pay that has been 
offered to the engineers on the civil service list in all 
grades. 

Under the provisions of chapter 4 of the Ordinance 
of 1952 which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram which program has not been followed, due to the 
lack of necessary funds to carry out the program 
appropriated under the budget items. 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Divi- 
sion, estimates on new service pipes, making out con- 
tracts, assisting the yard forces on Water Division 
matters, compiling official data, bringing the record 
plans to date, supervision of all construction and snow 
removal in Areas Nos. 7 and 11. 

The CentriHne Corporation of New York cleaned and 
Hned 4,223 linear feet of 12-inch pipe and various con- 
nections on Mt. Vernon street, from the Pumping 
Station to railroad crossing on Mt. Vernon street, under 
the supervision of the engineering force. 

A 16-inch Venturi Meter connection was made on 
Cummins Highway at American Legion Highway from 
the M.D.C. 24-inch supply main to alleviate volume 
and pressure conditions in the WeUington Hill area, 
Dorchester, and in preparation for extensions of main 
pipes in the Hyde Park area. 

The various agencies (municipal, state, and federal) 
were assisted in the design and supervision of construc- 
tion of water mains on the following projects: 

Central Artery — City square, Haymarket square to Fort 

Hill square 
Forest Hills — Overpass 
Housing Authority — 11 housing projects listed below: 

Beech Street at Washington Street Project 

Archdale Road at Washington Street Project 

Bromley Park Housing Project 

Whittier Street Project Extension 

East Boston — Orient Heights Section 

Mission Hill Housing Project Extension 

Franklin Hill Avenue Project 

South and Child Street Project 

Franklin Field Project 

Wood Memorial Project 

Columbia Point Project 



so 



City Document No. 24. 



Distribution Branch. 

Due to the increased volume of work caused by ap- 
plications for service pipes, etc., the department has 
enj^aged the services of contractors during the year. 

The regular work of the branch, consisting of installa- 
tion of new services and fire pipes, repairing of leaks, 
caring for complaints, shutting off and letting on water, 
freeing of stoppages in pipes, etc., was performed in 
such a manner and at such periods as to cause minimum 
delay and inconvenience to applicants for water, water 
takers, and the general public. 



Service pipes rcpain^d 

New service pipes installed .... 

Hydrants changed 

Hydrant's inspected, painted, lubricated, and gate; 

marked 

Main pipe rc^pairs 

Other miscellaneous work .... 



2,939 
569 
223 

18,765 

117 

10,235 



The machine shop and plumbing shop were forced to 
handle all the drilling and connecting of services in 
addition to the regular work carried on in these shops, 
such as the machining and assembling of gates, valves, 
and hydrants, and the department assisted the other 
branches of the Pu))li{' Works Department in performing 
special jobs. 



Business Office. 

In order to enforce the payment of outstanding water 
bills, customers in arrears are notified that the flow of 
water will be reduced, but yet enough water is left on 
the piemises to provide a minimum for health and 
sanitary requirements. As a result, the Water Division 
ended the year 1952 with a surplus of $346,336.56, this 
surplus being due mainly to the collection of bills due 
and payabl(3. 



Main pipe petitions received 
Domestic service applications 
Fire pipe applications 
Special meter tests . 
Hydrant permits issued . 
Repair deposits received 
Miscellaneous dejiosits . 



48 
()80 
99 
46 
17 
99 
42 



Public Works Department. 81 

Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 

Budget appropriation . . $2,735,405 95 
Amount expended . . . 2,079,419 48 



Unencumbered balance . $55,986 47 

Amount of money collected during the year . $4,796,004 52 
Amount expended from all sources . . 4,449,727 96 



Balance $346,336 56 

The metropolitan assessment for 1952 amomited to 
$1,636,959.98, at the rate of $40 per million gallons, a 
decrease of $14,085.25 under the assessment for 1951. 

Total amount billed in 1952 . . . . $4,694,243 45 
Total amount collected for 1952 bills, as of 

December 31, 1952 $3,768,474 38 

Total amount abated for 1952 bills, as of 

December 31, 1952 $13,909 37 

Total amount collected in 1952 on bills rendered 

prior to 1952 $899,007 39 

This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of the 
office has been such that I believe a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the employees has been 
brought about, which is beneficial to the consumers and 
the city. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers before placing of liens on premises 
has been continued. The appreciation of the customers 
is shown by the fact that the number of liens placed 
on premises this year has been reduced. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer, 



82 



City Document No. 24. 



Financial Transactions, Water Service, 1952 

Cash balance from 1951 



,017 24 



Receipts : 

Water rates and services 
Tax titles — water . 



Expenditures from revenue: 
Pensions and annuities . 
Current expenses and extensions 
Collecting Department . 
Auditing Department 
Refunded water rates 
Refunded water collections 
Refunded water tax titles 
Metropolitan assessments 



Transfer of 1951 surplus to redemp- 
tion of citv loans . . . . 



$4,767,869 52 
28,195 00 



$55,726 68 

2,554,995 29 

192,781 91 

614 00 

1,636,959 98 
$4,441,077 86 

453,823 29 



Expenditure from debt account : 

Boston water debt .... $36,000 00 

Interest on loans .... 3,487 50 

Cash balance, December 31, 1952 

Cash forwarded to 1953 

Loan account: 

Balance outstanding, January 1, 

1952 $120,000 00 

1952 payment on Boston water 
debt 36,000 00 

Balance outstanding, December 31, 

1952 

Construction account: 

Extensions of mains (from revenue) 
Cost of construction, December 31, 

1952 .$24,622,149 66 

Cost of construction, December 31, 

1951 24,610,402 89 

Increase in plant cost during 1952 .... 



4,796,064 52 
55,404,681 7(1 



4,894,901 15 
$509,780 01 

39,487 50 

$470,293 11 
123,956 55 

$346,330 50 



$84,000 00 



$11,740 77 



Public Works Department. 83 

Cost of existing works, December 31, 1952: 



Pipe yards and buildings 
Engineering expense 
Distribution system f 
Hj^de Park water works . 



$84,332 16 

57,873 58 

24,222,478 36 

175,000 00 



$24,539,684 10 



High pressure fire system J 2,293,316 75 

$26,833,000 85 



* $10,500 deducted on account of abolishment of Charlestown yard. 

t Includes $155,023.89 expended on high pressure fire system in 1925, 1926, 1931, 
1932, 1933. 

t $33,850.96 deducted from cost of high pressure fire system on account of abandon- 
ment of pumping station, Battery street. 



Shutting Off and Turning On Water in 1952. 

Number of shutoffs for repairs 6,532 

Number of premises turned on after repairs . . 6,078 

Number of shutoffs for vacancy 767 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . . 490 
Number of premises shut off for nonpayment of water 

rates 25 

Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for nonpayment 5 

Number of premises shut off on account of waste . 66 
Number of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for waste 26 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first 

time 555 



Total number of times water was shut oft* or 

turned on 14,544 



84 



City Document No. 24. 



Water Statistics for the Fiscal Year Ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1952. 

Mains. 

Kind of pipe: cast-iron, Avrought-iron, steel 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch 

Extended miles, 3.514 

Size, Enlarged miles 

Total miles now in use, 1,013.073 

Public hydrants added, 40 

Public hydrants now in use, 12,434 

Stop gates added, 52 

Stop gates now in use, 16,282 

Stop gates smaller than 4-inch, 36 

Number of blowoffs, 861 

Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds 

Service. 

Kind of pipe and size: lead and lead-lined, f-inch, cast iron, 
2-inch to 16-inch; wrought-iron and cement-lined, f-inch 
to 2-inch; brass and copper, |-inch to 2|-inch. Service 
taps added. 

Total service taps now in use as per metered services. 



Table No. I. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1952. 



Make. 





•o 




a> 




3 




a 






•a 








"o. 








< 


a 



Meters 
Changed. 



Out. In 



c 


a 






-ss 


u. a 


■p 


1^ 


Pi 


tf 



Hersey 

Watch dog . . 

King 

Worthington. 

American 

Federal 

Nash 

Arctic 

Trident 

Lambert . . . . 
Crown 



Totals. 



456 
51 



508 



792 

185 

23 

39 

1 



1 
1 
1 

1,043 



3,390 

1,956 

228 

284 

17 

16 

6 

2 

3 

1 

2 

5,905 



5,478 
427 



5,905 



8,868 

2,383 

228 

284 

17 

16 

6 

2 

3 

1 

2 

11,810 



659 
152 



815 



1,236 
466 



1,703 



631 
43 



154 
,433 
251 
309 

16 
14 

4 
1 



674 



1 
1 

2,184 



Public Works Department. 85 
Table No. 2. Meters in Service December 31, 1952. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


Vi 


*A 


1 


VA 


2 


3 


4 


6 8 


10 


12 






66,705 

2,133 

10,632 

97 

1,293 

100 

3 

11 

8 


4,257 

6 

398 

9 

13 


2,380 

3 

556 


1,249 

6 

687 


855 

8 

393 


348 
237 


358 


126 


35 


20 


10 


76,343 




2,163 




82 




1 








12,985 
















107 


American 


5 


16 


12 
1 
5 
3 












1.339 


King 


21 
31 












102 


Federal 


1 
1 

1 


2 

1 
2 


3 

2 


5 


1 








21 














18 


■^ash 


1 

10 

9 














11 


Lambert 


16 


14 


2 

1 








64 




1 










3 
3 

4 


46 




1 








6 


Keystone 




1 








5 


Empire 








1 










2 


Neptune 

Sparling 












) 13C 








3 




80,995 


' 4,68( 


) 2.95( 


) 1,98( 


» 1,29 


651 


46f 


( 3( 


J 20 10 93,215 









_L ■ 











DiAMETEK 


IN Inches 






Total 


Make 


5 


' 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


No 

Size 


C P's 


1,603 

28 


14 
3 


14 
13 


9 
72 


13 
148 


2 
43 


19 


1 
6 


2 


13 


1,658 


C. ofB. C. P's 


345 


Totals 


1,631 


17 


27 


81 


161 


45 


19 


7 


2 


13 


2,003 



















86 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 3. Meters in Shop December SI, 19S2. 



Maks. 


Diameter in Inches. 




% 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 
X 
12 


Total. 


New 
Heraey Disc 


800 


922 


110 


20 


30 


4 
3 


2 
8 








1,888 
11 


Hersey H. C. T 








Hereey Detector 












5 


6 


1 


12 




















Totals 


800 


922 


110 


20 


30 


7 


10 


5 


6 


1 


1,911 




Old 
Hersey Disc 


1,000 


200 


80 


20 


15 


2 


2 








1,319 
2 


Heraey Detector 


1 


1 




Watch Dog 


807 


75 


20 


10 


5 


4 




921 














Totals 


1.807 


275 


100 


30 


20 


6 


2 


1 


1 




2,242 





Table No. 4. Meters Repaired in Shop in I9S2. 



Make. 


DiAMETEB IN INCHES. 


Total. 


% 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




Heraey Disc 


946 


74 


49 


104 


46 


8 


5 
2 






1,232 
2 


Hersey H. C. T 






Hersey Detector 














2 




2 


Watch Dog 


257 


55 


56 


42 


29 


23 


4 

1 


466 


Trident 






1 






















Totab 


1.203 


129 


105 


146 


75 


31 


12 


2 




1,703 





Table No. S. 


Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 


1952. 




AIake. 


Diameter in Inches. 






Vs 


H 


1 


Total. 


Heraey 


2,000 
25 


150 


75 


2,225 
25 


Watch Dog 










Total 


2.025 


150 


75 


2 250 







Public Works Department. 87 

Table No. 5A. Meters Purchased New in 1952. 





Diameter in Inches. 


ToUl. 


Make. 


% 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


8 




1,000 


30 


61 


6 
15 






1,097 


Hersey H. C. T 


28 


6 


43 










6 
















Totals 


1.000 


30 


61 


21 


28 


6 


1,146 







Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1952. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


2, 

1 


a 
o 

§8 

1= 




% 


Ji 


1 


Wi 


2 


3 


4 


as 




577 
23 


39 
9 


11 
5 


2 


1 

2 


2 


1 
2 


35 
7 


596 
36 


631 


Watch Dog 


43 






Totals 


600 


48 


16 


2 


3 


2 


3 


42 


632 


674 







Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1952. Meters Taken Out. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


H 


H 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


Hersey 


2,941 

1.753 

221 

283 

13 

14 

3 


202 

47 

3 


120 

72 

1 


65 

41 

2 

1 


43 
25 

1 


9 
16 


9 

2 




1 


3,390 
1,956 


Watch Dog 


King 






228 


Worthington 










284 




4 














17 


Federal 


1 


1 
3 












16 


Nash 












6 


Arctic 






2 










2 


Trident 










1 


2 






3 


Lambert 




1 












1 








1 


1 










2 




















Totals 


5,228 


257 


194 


114 


72 


26 


13 




1 


5,905 





88 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1952. Meters Put In. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


% 


V* 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




4,649 
239 


518 
68 


159 
48 


81 
36 


49 
23 


11 
11 


9 
2 


1 


1 


5,478 


Watch Dog 


427 










Totals 


4,888 


586 


207 


117 


72 


22 


11 


1 


1 


5,905 







Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1952. 





.s 




i 








i 






"Ho 


o1 


J 


i 




o 


^ 




Make. 




o 

1 


a 

3 


2 
H 


O 
a 


09 


r3 
£ 

a 


3' 








O 




s 






o 




Q 


CO 


O 


'A 


m 


H 


p:; 


H 


Hersey 


116 


333 


92 


8 


8 


100 


« 


659 


Watch Dog 


37 


88 


14 


1 


9 


3 




152 






1 












1 






1 
1 













1 


Trident 


1 





























Totals 


154 


424 


106 


9 


17 


103 


2 


815 







Table No. 9. Aleters Applied in 1952. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Vb 


H 


1 


I'A 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


Hersey 


310 
9 


16 
3 


12 
5 


34 
12 


52 
16 


11 
6 
1 


16 


4 


1 


456 


Watch Dog 


51 


Worthington 








1 






















Tntr*'"? , 


319 


19 


17 


46 


68 


18 


16 


4 


1 


508 







Meters applied on old service. . 
Meters applied on new service. 

Total 



26 
482 



508 



Public Works Department. 89 

Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1952. 



Make. 


DiAMKTER IN Inches. 


is 

^1 


.2 

13.2 

6 


i 

o 

a 

0] 

1 


Total. 




% 


*A 


1 


IJ^ 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 






648 

128 

19 

38 


70 
11 


36 

17 

1 


15 

7 

1 


10 
7 

2 


6 
15 


5 


1 


1 


358 

67 

2 

7 

1 


366 
98 
20 
31 


68 
20 

1 
1 


792 


Watch Dog 


185 










23 




1 








39 




1 














1 










1 










1 




1 


Trident 










1 








1 


1 












1 










1 




1 






















Totals 


833 


82 


54 


23 


21 


23 


5 


1 


1 


436 


517 


90 


1.043 





Table No. 11. Cause of Meters Changed in Year 1952. 



Make. 


1 

a 

_a 

a 

s> 

Q 


i 
1 

o 

•z 

o 

Q 




S 
Ef 

•a 


i 

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c 

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o 

o 
O 


a 

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a 
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03 


1 

1 

1 
« 

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3 


1 




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1 




238 

54 

5 

G 

8 


1.953 

1.571 

165 

232 

8 

7 

6 

1 

2 


63 

11 

1 

3 


295 
60 

5 


496 

214 

43 

36 


133 

18 

6 

1 


61 

8 
7 
2 


28 
5 
1 


47 
8 


3 

1 


73 
6 


3.390 
1,956 

228 
284 


Watch Dog 


King 


Worthington 








American 










17 
16 
6 
2 
3 
1 
2 


Federal 






9 












Nash 




























1 














Trident 






1 














Lambert 




1 














Crown 




2 










































Totals 


311 


3.947 


78 


361 


800 


158 


78 


34 


55 


4 


79 


5,905 





90 



City Document No. 24, 
Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1952. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches 


Total. 


% 


*A 


1 


IVz 


2 


3 


Hersev 


140 

1,430 

243 

307 

14 

13 

2 


5 

1 
1 


3 

1 
2 


3 
1 
3 
2 


1 


2 


154 


Watch Dog 


1,433 
251 




2 




Worthington 


309 




2 








16 


Federal 


1 








14 


Nash 


2 






4 


Lambert 


1 








1 










1 
1 




1 


Crown 










1 














Totals 


2,149 


10 


7 


11 


5 


2 


2,184 







Public Works Department. 



91 



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92 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. II. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1952. 



Htdkants. 























>, 
% 

a 


1 

a 


(2 


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1 


1 
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§ 


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Q 


« 



Public, December 31, 1951 

Private, December 31, 1951 

Established during 1952 

Abandoned during 1952 

Total Public, December 31, 1952. . 
Total Private, December 31, 1952. 



501 

33 

<> 


249 
5 


2,166 
29 


2,299 

126 

22 

94 

2,227 

126 


6,172 

17 

189 

40 

6.321 
17 


4 
13 


56 


6 


4 


93 
111 


7 


?4 


1 

248 
5 


2 

2,164 

29 










2 

91 

111 


7 


469 
33 


4 
13 


56 


6 


4 



11.497 
394 
213 
173 

11,537 
394 



Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1951 
Total hj'drants established during 1952 
Total hydrants abandoned during 1952 
Total hydrants added during 1952 
Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1952 
High pressure fire hydrants in service . 



213 
173 



11,891 



40 

11,931 

503 



Total hj'drants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1952. 12,434 



Public Works Department. 



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(98) 



Public Works Department. 



99 



Table No. VI. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1952. 



Location. 




a 
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1 

e 
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1 

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1 

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83 

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12 


200 


239 
8 

24 
37 

142 
1 

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650 








8 

2 

1 

5 

42 

37 

11 

4 

4 

25 




1,113 










10 




23 

13 

379 

5 

27 

1 
6 
8 


13 
1 

26 

80 
1 
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1 


96 

2 

310 

9 

602 

9 

146 

1 

62 




187 








344 










58 




1 
2 


598 

2 

1,185 

2 

235 








1,498 










54 










2 663 




. . . . 






17 




154 
8 


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43 


Hyde Park (public) 




697 

1,055 
2 

301 

3 

1,413 

1 
7 








761 










13 








73 






23 

1 

14 

1 
58 


269 
3 

163 
1 

312 


182 

4 

110 

14 

630 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 

2 

9 






1,529 




2 

47 

4 








9 
14 
27 
12 

1 




21 










649 










50 










2,429 






17 








4 








27 














1 




4 




















6 


Rainsford Island (private) 






















3 


Tiiompson's Island (private) 






















2 
























9 


























Total number (public) 

Total number (private) 

Total number (public and 
private) 


486 
33 

519 


231 

5 

236 


2,160 
29 

2,189 


2,230 
126 

2,356 


4 
13 

17 


6,321 
17 

6,338 


56 
56 


6 
6 


4 
4 


92 
111 

203 


7 
7 


11,537 
394 

11,931 


fiigfa pressure fire hydrants 


503 




























Total hydrants (all kinds) . . 
























12,434 





























CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



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