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Full text of "Annual report of the Public Works Department, for the year .."

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[Document 24 — 19o4. 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1953. 



Boston, January 2, 1954. 

Hon. John B. Hynes, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. ]\Iayor: 

In compliance with the provisions of section 24 of 
chapter 3 of the Revised Ordinances of 1947, I respect- 
fully submit the annual report of the Public Works 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1953. 

Fiscal. 

The total expenditures of the department for the 
year were §20,567,381. 71, of which Sl,672,698.32 repre- 
sents water assessments levied by the Metropolitan 
District Commission, and §594,228.80 represents Metro- 
politan District Commission sewer assessments. 

The receipts of the Water Division totaled 
S4,991, 108.54, and the revenue derived from the 
operation of the Sumner Tunnel reached a record 
high of $2,172,410. 

The surplus resulting from the sale of water amounted 
to $533,649.12, and the operation of the Sumner Tunnel 
resulted in a record-breaking surplus of $901,235.50. 

M^^' W^^ /fc^ 



2 City Document No. 24. 

Loan Orders. 
On May 19, 1953, a City Council order was approved 
by your Honor, which provided, under the provisions 
of section 7 of chapter 44 of the General Laws, that 
the sum of $2,700,000 be appropriated for the construc- 
tion of an incinerator, and on June 2, 1953, that the 
sum of $2,000,000 be appropriated for the construction 
of public ways and the sum of $1,000,000 be appropriated 
for the construction of sewerage works. 



Street Construction Work. 
St ate- Aid Program. 
Last year we completed a considerable amount of 
street reconstruction under the Chapter 90 State-Add 
Highway Reconstruction Program. The following im- 
portant main highways were constructed during the 
year under this program: 

Allandale street, from Centre street to the Brookline line. 

Chelsea street, from Maverick square to Day square. 

Morton street, from Harvard street to railroad bridge 
east of Norfolk street. 

South street, from Centre street to the Arborway. 

Washington street, from Asticou road to West Roxbury 
Parkway. 

The total cost of the Chapter 90 Construction Pro- 
gram in Boston for the year 1953 was $499,696.85, of 
which the State Department of Public Works, under 
the provisions of section 34 of chapter 90 of the General 
Laws paid 45 per cent, therebj^ presenting a substantial 
savings to the taxpayer. It is planned to again conduct 
an extensive program of construction under this chapter 
in 1954. 

Non-State- Aid Program. 
We also completed a major street reconstruction 
program, comprising extensive construction and re- 
construction, in every section of the city. In addition 
to work done on downtown streets, the department 
resurfaced several important traffic arteries, listed as 
follows : 

Annunciation road, from Parker street to Ruggles street. 
Beacon street, from Park street to Charles street. 
Boylston street, from Washington street to Tremont 
street, and from Dartmouth street to Exeter street. 



Public Works Department. 3 

Centre street, from Belgrade avenue to Spring street. 

Devonshire street, from Franklin street to Summer street. 

Newmarket square, from Southampton street to Massa- 
chusetts avenue. 

Northampton street, from Columbus avenue to Albany- 
street. 

Prince street, from Pond street to Perkins street. 

Ruggles street, from Washington street to Huntington 
avenue. 

Saratoga street, from McClellan Highway to Bennington 
street. 

Theodore A. Glynn Way, from Southampton street to 
Massachusetts avenue. 

In continuation of our policy of replacing brick 
sidewalks with cement concrete in the older sections 
of the city, contracts during the year, totaling appro.xi- 
mately $78,500, were awarded for this work. 

The following is a summarized financial statement of 
the expenditures made in 1953 for highAvay improve- 
ments : 

Budgetary Item. 

Public Ways, Construction of (Loan Account) $2,019,055 30 

Public Ways, Construction of (Revenue Account) . 157,500 00 

Reconstruction of Streets (including sidewalks) . 105,800 60 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of . 78,570 59 



Total $2,360,926 55 

The following is a summarized record of the highway 
improvement work done by the department in 1953: 

Number of Streets Constructed or Reconstructed, 170. 

Includes 47 new streets ordered laid out and constructed 
by the Board of Street Commissioners under the provisions 
of chapter 393 of the Acts of 1906. 

Miles of Streets Improved, 28 .16. 

Includes 5 miles of so-called Chapter 90 State-Aid Highway 
Improvements. 

Miles of Sidewalks Improved, 9 . 57. 

In addition to sidewalk improvements included in the 
above-noted street improvements. 

We also completed, during the year, the removal in 
104 streets of 590 gas lamps, which were replaced with 
an equal number of 1,000- or 2,500-lumen electric 
lamps. It is our intention to continue with this program 
during 1954. 



4 City Document No. 24. 

Snow Removal. 

We were fortunate during the past year in that no 
snowstorms of major proportions occurred. Only two 
days had snowfall of appreciable precipitation, January 
9, 8.4 inches, and February 12, 5.8 inches, requiring 
removal by contract forces. We experienced little 
difficulty in keeping the streets properly plowed and 
sanded throughout the winter months. 

There are over 735 miles of public streets that have 
to be plowed and maintained during the winter months. 
The department's fourteen (14) Walter snowfighters 
were used to plow, sand, and salt the streets of the 
downtown area. Most of the plowing work in the rest 
of the city was done by 250 trucks rented on an hourly 
basis from contractors. 

The cost of snow removal work for 1953 totaled 
$394,551.95. 

Late in the year, we were notified that the Metro- 
politan Transit Authority would no longer plow and 
sand streets carrying bus routes, starting the winter of 
1953-54. Subsequently, we purchased from the MTA 
twenty-one (21) pieces of their equipment at a cost of 
$22,710, in order to perform this work. 

?klERiDiAN Street Bridge. 
Construction of the new bridge, under the super- 
A'ision of the Department of Public Works of the Com- 
monwealth, is proceeding rapidly. The substructure, 
built bj" the Alerritt-Chapman & Scott Corporation, 
was completed early in the year. Considerable progress 
has been made on the superstructure by the contractor, 
the American Bridge Companj^, and it is estimated 
that the work will be completed and the bridge placed 
in operation late in 1954. 

South Ferry. 
Service was terminated on this ferry at the close of 
business on December 31, 1952, and the ferry personnel 
was transferred to other services during January-, 1953. 
At a public auction, held on April 5, 1953, the two (2) 
ferryboats were sold for a total of $32,000. Later, the 
bridge drops and other appurtenances were sold for 
junk and all final expenses and obligations of the Ferry 
Service were discharged. 



Public Works Department. 5 

Refuse Disposal. 

As previously stated, an appropriation was made 
providing for the construction of the so-called central 
incinerator in the vicinity of Southampton street. No 
further progress was made on this facility, pending the 
acquisition of a site which we are trying to ol^tain from 
the State Department of Public Works. 

We assisted in drafting a bill providing for the crea- 
tion of a Brighton-Watertown Incinerator Authority, 
in order to construct and operate an incinerator for 
the disposal of refuse from said communities. This 
bill was introduced in the 1953-54 session of the General 
Court as House No. 1737. 

No apparent progress has been made in the incinerator 
program of the Metropolitan District Commission, as 
provided under chapter 559 of the Acts of 1952. As 
far as I know, of all the Metropolitan Boston communi- 
ties, only the City of Boston has agreed to enter into 
this arrangement. 

An appreciable advancement in sanitation was made 
as pertains to the collection of refuse by the awarding 
on April 1, 1953, of garbage and refuse collection con- 
tracts providing that, in seven (7) out of the seventeen (17) 
collection districts, the contractor is required to furnish 
enclosed steel bodies on all refuse trucks. This advance- 
ment was made with no appreciable increase in collec- 
tion costs. It is planned to extend the furnishing of 
these enclosed trucks to other districts over the next 
two years, so that eventually only enclosed body trucks 
will be used for refuse collection in all sections of the city. 

Purchase of Equipment. 

New equipment purchased during the year included 
three (3) Wayne street sweepers, two (2) Hough bucket 
loaders, two (2) Trojan bucket loaders, one (1) Cater- 
pillar tractor, eight (8) Ford dump trucks, five (5) Ford 
pickup trucks, five (5) Chevrolet pickup trucks, two 
(2) Ford emergency gate-closer trucks, one (1) Ford 
stake body truck, one (1) Ford platform crane, one (1) 
International plumbing shop truck, one (1) Ford sedan, 
and one (1) power lawn mower. 

Used equipment purchased from the MTA to plow 



6 City Document No. 24. 

and sand streets along bus routes, comprised sixteen 
(16) Walter snow fighters, three (3) FWD snow fighters, 
one (1) Barber-Greene snowloader, and one (1) Nelson 
snowloader. 

Personnel. 
There were 2,166 employees in the department as of 
December 31, as compared with 2,340 employees on 
January 1, 1953. 

Detailed Reports. 
Appended hereto are reports submitted by the Divi- 
sion Engineers relative to the activities of their divisions 
in 1953. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George G. Hyland, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department. 7 

The records of the department show that there are 
now 2,166 persons ehgible for employment in the 
several divisions, and of that number 2,140 were upon 
the January 1, 1954, payrolls. 



Grade and Number of Employees. 





Services, 


Title. 


li 

CO 


p 

o 
S 



3 
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1 




o 
is 


0) 

a 
c 

3 

H 


■ 1 


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1 




















1 




1 






1 


1 




1 


4 










1 






1 
1 

9 
3 


1 

2 

2 
17 

5 
16 

5 










■> 






1 
1 


2 
1 


1 

20 
6 

10 
4 


1 
1 

2 


2 
1 
4 

1 
2 
1 


10 






7 




50 








15 








28 








1 


11 


Automotive and senior electrical 




1 


3 












1 
5 


1 


Pumping station engineers and stationary 




























1 

21 

3 

69 






1 










12 

1 
65 


7 

1 

2 

14 


1 


5 
5 


45 






10 


1 


21 






3 






1 


5 


1 
15 


17 


171 






1 








1 






2 


18 


Executive secretary. P.W.D 

Senior personnel officer and assistant 










1 
















2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


10 




1 


Principal clerks, stenographers, account 


2 
3 
4 


2 


7 
7 


4 
2 
4 


2 
6 
2 


1 


4 
30 
28 


23 


Senior clerks, typists, stenographers, etc. 

Clerk-stenographers, clerks, typists . . . . 


52 
38 












Carried forward 


11 


25 


27 


141 


109 


85 


23 


104 


525 







City Document No. 24. 

Qrade and Number of Employees. — Continued. 





Services. 


Title. 


ce c 

go 


o 

c 

s 

< 




, si 


'c 

as 


o 
■f 


o 
a 


08 


3 

o 




11 


25 


27 


141 


100 


85 


23 


104 


525 




1 
















1 
5 


1 










2 






10 






1 

2 






1 


Senior storekeeper and storekeepers 














28 








1 


Supervisor and special water meter 
















7 


















28 
















4 

45 


4 
















45 






1 

2 

12 










1 


















2 


















12 






138 
1 












138 








1 

1 










o 














1 
















2 


3 






1 










1 
















23 


23 














5 





1 


























1 


2 
4 
3 






6 


16 








4 






1 


3 




- 7 
3 
16 


3 


25 


44 






3 


















16 










1 
2 
1 








101 
6 


2 






33 


2 




10 


2 


151 












5 




8 

7 






10 




12 
3 


4 
2 


2 


1 


27 






2 


15 










11 


85 


188 


164 


135 


135 


85 


310 


1,113 







Public Works Department. 

Grade and Number of Employees. — Concluded. 





Sekvices. 


Title, 


to 
o 


o 

c 
p 


5 




1 


■± 


c 
c 


a 
^ 


3 

c 


Brought forward 


n 


85 


188 


164 

58 

2 


135 


135 


85 


310 
2 
2 
1 

1 


1,113 
60 










17 






21 










1 

5 

20 

10 

1 

31 




«> 












1 


7 












20 


















10 


Heavy motor equipment operators 




1 

C 

20 

25 


7 


13 
53 


46 
121 


13 

2 
7 


17 
29 

54 
5 


91 
247 






oo 






4 


100 


353 
9 


16 


559 






14 














Totals 


11 


137 


199 


390 


682 


219 


107 


421 


2,160 



Number of Employees Actually Employed January I, 1953, and 
January 1, 1954. 















¥ 


CO &t 

. e 




>' 








g 

3 


0) o 

CO 


1 


1 








E 
S 

3 




January 1, 


1953 


100 


11 


210 


448 


420 


750 


234 


137 


2,310 


January 1, 


1954 


106 


11 


197 


418 


385 


681 


215 


135 


2,148 





Total Eligible Force. 



January 1, 1953. 
January 1, 1954. 



104 


11 


217 


455 


423 


755 


237 


138 


107 


11 


199 


421 


390 


682 


219 


137 



2,340 
2.160 



10 



City Document No. 24. 



Appointments, Transfers, Resignations, Retirements, Deaths^ 
etc., of Employees. 







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Services. 




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73 


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is 


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1953-1954. 


>> 

B 
1-5 


go 


1 

.s 

'53 


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0, 


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H 


P 


« 




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11 

138 


Central Office. . . 
Automotive 


11 

137 










3 


5 




2 




3 


10 


1 






3 


16 
24 




2 
6 






217 
423 




199 
390 


2 
4 


1 






4 


2 


5 


Highway 


2 




16 


44 




10 


") 


6 


755 


Sanitary 


682 


4 


3 


1 




3 


15 


1 


2 




1 


237 


Sewer 


219 


3 




1 


. . .. 




5 

29 








1 
2 


104 
455 


Tunnel 

Water. 


107 
421 


1 






8 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 








32 


138 


3 


24 


8 


18 


2,340 


Totals 


2,166 


24 


8 


5 


12 



Public Works Department. 11 

MAINTENANCE APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 





Total Appropriations, 






Division or Service. 


Including 
Transfers and Amounts 
Carried over from 1952. 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended 
Balance. 


Central Office .... 


$62,336 60 


$62,066 49 


$270 11 


Automotive Division 




762,029 57 


744,669 43 


17,360 14 


Bridge Service 




847,090 39 


836,429 03 


10,661 36 


Ferry Service . 






11,937 11 


10,338 93 


1,598 18 


Tunnel Service 






615,479 34 


607,918 96 


7.560 38 


Lighting Service 






1.365,581 10 


1,349,451 99 


16,129 11 


Paving Service 






1,536,877 04 


1,442,713 66 


94,163 38 


Sanitary Division 






5,178,538 50 


5,105,598 82 


72,939 68 


Sewer Division 






878,792 13 


812,988 08 


65,804 05 


Water Division 






2,723,987 71 


2,458,359 86 


265,627 85 


Totals . . . . 


$13,982,649 49 


$13,430,535 25 


$552,114 24 



LOANS AND SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 



Title. 



Total Amount 
Available. 



Expenditures. 



Unexpended 
Balance. 



Bridges, Construction of (revenue) 

Bridges, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Bridges, Repairs etc. (revenue) 

Reconstruction of Streets (revenue) 

Sidewalks, Construction and Reconstruction of 
(revenue) 

Street Signs (revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (revenue) 

Public Ways, Construction of (non-revenue) 

Snow Removal (revenue) 

Construction of Buildings and Original Equipment and 
Furnishings thereof (non-revenue) 

Sewerage Works (revenue) 

Sewerage Works (non-revenue) 

Totals 



$161, .536 59 

.3,133,856 41 

464,216 35 

129,924 26 

129,967 80 

22,870 41 

157,500 00 

3,550,834 60 

403,975 68 

11,900 44 

158,945 30 

1,607,435 89 



$9,932,963 73 



$0 00 

1,044,226 34 

179,532 85 

105,800 60 

78,570 59 

8,736 14 

157,500 00 

2,019,055 36 

394,551 95 

00 
148,182 98 
733,762 53 



84,869,919 34 



$161,536 59 

2,089,630 07 

284,683 50 

24,123 66 

51,397 21 

14,134 27 

00 

1,531,779 24 

9,423 73 

11,900 44 

10,762 32 

873,673 30 



$5,063,044 39 



12 



City Document No. 24. 



REVENUE. 

On Account of Public Works Department. 



Central Office: 

Charges for plans and specifications 



$1,208 00 







$1,208 00 


Automotive Division: 






Sale of Junk .... 


$540 16 


540 16 


Bridge Service: 




Rents 


$4,690 00 




Damage to property . 


566 78 




Refund on drums . 


24 00 




Miscellaneous 


183 12 




Sale of junk .... 


32 41 


5,496 31 


Ferry Service: 




Tolls 


$92 44 




Cleaning telephone booths . 


2 00 




Commission on telephones . 


5 65 




Refunds 


16 00 




Sale of junk .... 


80 61 




Refund of petty cash . 


70 00 


266 70 


Sumner Tunnel : 






Tolls 


$2,172,410 00 


2,172,410 00 


Lighting Service: 






Sale of junk .... 


$245 77 


Ol!^ 77 



Paving Service: 

From assessments (added to taxes) on 
abutters for cost of laying side- 
walks in front of their premises 

Permits . 

Rents 

Sale of materials 

Contributions from Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts under chapter 90 
of General Laws for Construction 
of public ways 



Sanitary Division : 
Sale of garbage 
Advertising space . 
Miscellaneous 

Sewer Division: 
Disposal of sewage 
Entiance fees 
Sale of junk . 
Rents 
Refunds . 
Cleaning drains 
Miscellaneous 



Carried forum rd 



$652 62 

24,292 70 

250 00 

2,069 95 

242,495 69 


269,760 96 
36,729 54 

24,438 43 


$36,000 00 
516 54 
213 00 


$19,233 00 
4,704 20 
309 97 
39 00 
30 00 
45 00 
77 26 






$2,511,095 87 



Public Works Department. 



13 



Brought forward 

Water Division : 

Water rates 

Water rates added to taxes 

Service pipes for new takers, extcn(J 

ing, repairing, etc. 
Fees on overdue rates 
Sale of junk . 
Damage to property 
Labor and materials 
Deposit account . 
Elevator and fire pipe connections 
Miscellaneous income . 



Grand total 



$2,511,095 87 



$4,549,640 89 
278,892 70 

1,452 20 
584 09 
1,728 13 
1.078 88 
7,506 10 
102,547 97 
4,089 85 
4,417 77 



4,951,938 58 
$7,463,034 45 



PART II. 

APPENDICES 



(1.^) 



16 City Document No. 24. 

APPENDIX A. 



REPORT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE DIVISION FOR 
THE YEAR 1953. 



Boston, January 2, 1954. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I am submitting herewith the annual report of the 
Automotive Division of the Pubhc Works Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1953. This report 
covers the activities of the four garages and the offices 
of the Automotive Division, and the activities of the 
Mobile Patrol and the Motor Pool. 

The Automotive Division is primarily concerned 
with the repair and maintenance of the automotive 
equipment of the department, but we are on call for 
many other duties. One such call came on the night 
of June 10, 1953, when we quickly responded to a plea 
for assistance from the City of Worcester which had 
been badly hit by a tornado on June 9, 1953. The 
division dispatched six men with the following equip- 
ment: One three quarter-ton service truck-compres- 
sor, two half-ton pickup trucks, one hundred and 
fifty-two 500-watt light bulbs, three and one half 
miles of wiring, three trailer-tj'pe Griffin lighting units, 
each carrying six 500-watt lamps, one Hobart welding 
unit, with generator carrying five 500-watt lamps, and 
15 Homelite portable gas-driven lighting units, with 
cluster type lights. This lighting equipment was used 
to provide light for four streets, each about 2,000 feet 
long, and for the grounds of Assumption College. In 
addition, we carried up 65 gas-driven saws which were 
used for cutting up fallen trees, telegraph poles, heavy 
lumber, and debris. This latter operation was in 
charge of District Foremen Prior and Malloy of the 
Bridge and Highway Division, and Welder Foreman 
Edward Elmo of the Automotive Division. Our relief 
party was self-supporting since we maintained our own 
supplies, such as gasoline, oil, tools, etc. The men were 
on duty from .June 10 through June 19, 1953. 



Public Works Department. 17 

Another project in which the Automotive Division 
assisted was the driver training school conducted by 
the Mayor's Automotive Advisory Committee. This 
school was established in 1952, and has now given 
instruction to over 500 drivers. In connection with 
this course, the Automotive Division has conducted 
a survey of Public Works Department motor vehicle 
accidents, and a chart covering a five-year period is 
attached to this report. 

The one hundred and fort}- employees of the division 
are engaged in the following duties: One division 
engineei", in charge of the division, 41 employees as- 
signed to repair work, 41 employees assigned to main- 
tenance of buildings, gasoline and oil dispensing, 
cleaning, watchman duties, and motor vehicle 
operation, four employees assigned to the stockroom, 
three employees assigned to operation of wreckers, 10 
employees assigned to office work, one dispatcher, and 
39 employees assigned to the Mobile Patrol which 
maintains a watch over Public Works Department 
property and equipment between the hours of 4 p.m. 
and 8 a.m. 

The office maintained by the division at City Hall 
processed 2,294 requisitions in 1953, of which 1,098 
were service orders and 1,196 were purchase orders. 
Approximately 100 purchases a month, usually under 
$3 each, are made from petty cash funds. The City 
Hall office reports the following expenditures for 1953: 



Personal services . 
Contractual services 
Materials and supplies 
Rents and registration fees 
Pui'chase of new equipment 



$446,870 19 

48,420 26 

148,801 44 

9,131 70 

91,445 84 



Total expenditm-es . . . $744,669 43 

The new equipment added to our fleet in 1953 con- 
sisted of the following: 

3 Trojan bucket loading machines . . $19,725 00 

Replacements to our fleet in 1953 consisted of the 
following : 

Charged to Snow Removal: 

15 Walter snow fighters $17,145 00 

3 FWD snow fighters $3,510 00 



18 



City Document No. 24. 



Charged to Water Division: 

1 new 1953 Ford four-door sedan . . . $546 99 
1 new 195.3 Ford chassis and cab with truck 

crane. Gar Wood and steel platform body $7,487 00 

1 new International RM-150 with Metro 

body $2,502 96 

2 new 1954, half-ton, Chevrolet pickup trucks $2,254 00 
1 new 1954 Ford, F-250, chassis and cab . $1,568 00 

1 new Ford, F-250. with Gyro type air 

compressor $4,206 16 

3 new 1954 Chevrolet, Model 3809, standard 

express trucks .$4,248 30 

2 new 1954 Fords, F-250, with special bodies $4,243 40 
1 new Ingersoll Rand, Model GR-105, 

Gyro flow rotary air compressor . . .$2,709 70 

1 Ingersoll Rand, 30-gallon air receiver . $145 00 

Charged to Automolive Division: 

1 new 1954 two-door sedan .... $1,12994 
1 new Ford, 1953, one and one-half-ton 

chassis with 2-yard dump body . . $2,194 23 
7 new 1953 Fords, F-7, .3-yard dump bodies. 

Gallon, Model 12, hoists, Galion, Model 

700 $22,952 19 

4 new 1953 Chevrolet, lialf-tou, pickup 

trucks $4,233 60 

1 stake body truck, 8-cylinder . . $1,776 74 

1 new 1953, half-ton. pickup truck . $1,171 10 

2 new 19.53 Ford, F-lOO, pickup trucks . $2,319 92 
2 Ford, F-lOO, pickup trucks .... $1,996 00 
1 1934 Walter snow fighter .... $875 00 
1 1954 Ford, F-lOO, half-ton, pickup truck . $1,312 00 
1 G. E. Tungar battery charger with bulbs . $77 00 
1 Model WA-75 Weaver jack . . $101 .38 
1 crawler tractor and angle dozer . . . $10,343 90 
1 1947 Barber-Greene bucket loader . . $740 00 

1 1948 Nelson bucket loader .... .$440 00 

2 Hough, model front, bucket-type loadsters $11,270 00 

3 new Wayne street sweepers. Model 2-450 $29,841 00 
1 reversible rotary lawn mower. 25-inch 

blade $340 55 

4 new 1954 dump trucks. Ford, F-500 . . $13,972 00 

1 new 1954 four-door sedan, Ford . . $1,053 00 
6 new 1954 two-door sedans, Ford . $7,666 00 

2 new Elgin, 81-motor, pickup sweepers $17,820 00 
1 new Netco catch-basin cleaning machine . .$6,940 00 
1 new 1954 chassis and cab only, Chevrolet 

Model 4100 $1,760 00 

3 new 1954 Ford, two-door sedans . . .$4,203 00 

The year 1953 saw an extension of the policy of in- 
stalling two-way radios in our vehicles, and we now have 



Public Works Department. 19 

a total of 40 vehicles so equipped. The funds for this 
installation were provided by Civil Defense, but mainte- 
nance costs will be paid from Automotive Division 
funds. During the winter months all radio-equipped 
cars were used in snow removal work and proved to be 
of great value. This operation is under the direction of 
our dispatcher. 

Late in 1953, the Metropolitan Transit Authority 
notified the cities and towns that the MTA would cease 
to plow and sand streets carrying bus routes. This ruling 
by the MTA, to take effect in the winter of 1953-54, 
was accompanied by an offer to sell to the cities and 
towns the equipment formerly used in this plowing and 
sanding work. After a survey by the Automotive Divi- 
sion engineer, the Commissioner of Public Works advised 
the Mayor to purchase 21 pieces of equipment, namely, 
16 Walter trucks, three FWD trucks, one Barber-CJreene 
snow loader, and one Nelson snow loader, at a cost of 
$22,710. The year of manufacture of the snow-fighting 
trucks ranged from 1934 to 1940, the Barl)er-Greene 
loader was built in 1947, and the Nelson loader in 194cS. 

The addition of this MTA equipment to our fleet in 
late November, 1953, necessitated the quick recruiting 
of men qualified to drive heavy duty equipment. After 
a canvass of the department, 4(5 men applied, and, after 
training and testing, 26 men were picked to drive this 
equipment. The garaging of these large trucks and 
loaders presented a problem, and it was necessary 
to search the length and breadth of the city for loca- 
tions accessible to sand and salt piles. Inspector Fred 
Harvey was assigned to follow driver operation of this 
equipment, and its maintenance and repair. Fortu- 
nately, the month of December, 1953, proved to be a 
mild one, and it gave us some time to prepare this added 
equipment and to train the new drivers. 

Dui-ing the summer of 1953, we painted our own snow- 
fighting eciuipment. This work was done by the men 
emploA'ed in the welding shop. We have the necessary 
equipment to do this work, and the men turned out a 
professional job. However, we have to do the work 
outdoors, and, therefore, are forced to depend on the 
weather. 

We also sent nine of our snow fighters to an outside 
repair shop for repairs, under a contract amounting to 
$9,300. This work was sent out to the manufacturer's 
representative due to our lack of facilities and personnel 
to do this work. 



20 City Document No. 24. 

Other work sent out consisted of glass work, spring 
work, radiator repairs, and other work of a speciahzed 
nature. Approximately 6,000 repair jobs were done in 
our own shops, about the same number as in 1952. 

The annual inventory taken in December, 1953, 
showed a stock on hand of $61,464.90. This compares 
with $38,681.48 in 1952 and $43,705.00 in 1951. The 
increase was partly due to an increase in the stock of 
antiskid chains and tires purchased for our snow removal 
equipment, and partly due to an increase in Ford parts 
necessitated by our purchase of heavy Ford trucks. 
Models 700 and 750. 

Mr. John Flaherty of the commissioner's office con- 
ducted a survej^ of the property of the department in 
the fall of 1953, and made several recommendations for 
the improvement of buildings, etc. He advised that 
plumbing repairs be made at the Albany Street garage, 
and that the windows be repaired and replaced at the 
same garage. These repairs were made, but, if the 
department is to retain this garage, the steel window 
frames on the second floor should be replaced. Mr. 
Flaherty also advised that this garage be painted, and 
I suggest that the painters of the Sanitary Division could 
possibly spray paint the entire inside of the first floor. 
The Dana Avenue garage should be painted if depart- 
ment painters could be made available. The office in 
the Dana Avenue garage, occupied by the Paving Ser- 
vice, should be painted by Paving Service employees. 
The Automotive Division painted this office in 1951. 

The only major improvements to any of our buildings 
was the installation of an oil-burning hot-air heating 
system in the welding shop, and the installation of a 
complete exhaust-eliminating system in the Highland 
Street garage. The welding shop, which is located in 
an old brick building, was formerly heated by a large 
coal-burning stove which constituted a possible hazard. 
Another hazard that was eliminated in 1953 was the 
carbon monoxide condition that prevailed during the 
winter months at the Highland Street garage. The 
exhaust gases became so bad in January, and so many 
complaints of headaches were being made by the me- 
chanics that a contract was given to the Automotive 
Distributors Company, Inc., for the installation of a 
complete exhaust eliminating system at a cost of $975. 
The installation has proved satisfactory, no more com- 
plaints have been received, and absences due to head- 
aches from this cause have ceased. 



Public Works Department. 



21 



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AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT, DECEMBER 31, 1953. 





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14 
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17 
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4 




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3 






— 69 
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IJ-ton dump trucks: 


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1 
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Ford, 2J-yard 
















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Ford, 3-yard 






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Ford, 6-yard COE 


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Ford, 12-yard. 


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24 
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2-ton dump trucks: 


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6 
















— 71 
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7 








4 












4 


Ford, 6-yard COE 


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4 






















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Derrick truck, Ford 




4 
















— .53 
4 


Catch-basin cleaners, Ford 






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1 


1 
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1 








— 1 
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1 






















1 


GMC, 8-ton 












1 








1 


Compressor mounted trucks: 






8 


1 


2 










— 
11 


Compressor trailers: 

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1 
1 












1 


Chicago-Pneumatic 




















1 


Emergency trucks: 

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3 

8 
















— 13 
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5 
















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2 
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2 
















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22 



AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT, 


DECEMBER 31, 


1953— Concluded. 






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— 33 
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— 3 
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— 3 
16 


















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— 18 
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— 39 


Totals 


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lo8 


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45 


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18 


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t 445 registered. 



23 



24 City Document No. 24. 

NEW AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT RECEIVED IN 1953. 
(Other equipment purchased from 1953 funds delivered in 1954). 

Sanitary Division : 

3 new Wayne sweepers 

2 new Hough front bucket loaders 
Highway Division, Paving Section : 
1 new poAA'er lawn mower 

1 new International Caterpillar tractor 

2 new Trojan loadsters 

7 new Ford, 2§-ton, dump trucks 
1 new Chevrolet, ^-ton, pickup truck 
1 new Ford, 2-ton, stake truck 
16 MTA Walter snow fighters 

3 MTA FWD snow fighters 

1 MTA Barber-Greene bucket loader 
1 MTA Nelson bucket loader 
Sewer Division: 

4 new Chevrolet, ^-ton, pickup trucks 

1 new Ford, 1^-ton, dump truck 

2 new Ford, |-ton, pickup trucks 
Water Division: 

2 new Ford, 3-ton, emergency gate closers 
1 new Ford sedan 

1 new International portable plumbing shop truck 
1 new Ford, 25-ton, platform crane 
Sumner Traffic Tunnel : 

1 new Ford, ^-ton, pickup truck 
Mobile Patrol: 

2 new Ford, |-ton, pickup trucks 



Public Works Department. 25 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE BRIDGE AND HIGHWAY DIVISION. 



BosTOX, January 2, 1954. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

The following report of the income, expenditures, and 
operation of the Bridge and Highway Division for the 
year ending December 31, 1953, is submitted in two 
sections by the undersigned assistant division engineers, 
due to the retirement of Division Engineer John 
DeMeulenaer on October 6, 1953. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTHFORD KeLLEY, 

Assistant Division Engineer, Highway Section. 

John J. McCall, 

Assistant Division Engineer, Bridge Section. 



John DeMeulenaer graduated from the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology in 1920 and entered the 
service of the Cit}^ of Boston in 1921 as a structural 
designing engineer in the Bridge Service of this 
department. 

In 1930 Mr. DeMeulenaer was appointed chief 
designing engineer and in 1944 was appointed to the 
position of division engineer of the former Bridge and 
Ferry Division. 

When the Bridge and Highway Division was estab- 
hshed in 1950, by combining the Bridge and Ferry 
Division with the Highway Division, Mr. DeMeulenaer 



26 



City Document Xo. 24. 



wa.s appointed to the position of division engineer of the 
newly estabhshed di\*i.sion. 

During his career with this department, ]\lr. 
DeMeulenaer was prominently identified with the 
design and construction of such major improvements as 
the rebuilding of the following drawbridges: Chelsea 
South Bridge, Chelsea Street Bridge, Congress Street 
Bridge, and the Meridian Street Bridge. He also par- 
ticipated in the capacity of consulting engineer for other 
departments on various projects; a notable example 
being the building of the Long Island Bridge. 

In connection with the recently estabhshed Reclassi- 
fication and Compensation Plan, Mr. De^^Ieulenaer 
served on the ^layer's Committee throughout the 
organization of this program. 

His retirement ends a long career of loyal and talented 
service to the Citv. 



I. BRIDGE SECTION. 

Bridge Service. 

SUMMARY OF BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS AND 
EXPENDITURES. 





Regular 
Appropriation 


Bridges, 
Repairs, Etc. 


Bridges, CoNSTBrcnos or 




Re\-enue. 


Non-Revenue. 




$847,090 39 


$189,216 35 
275.000 00 


$161,-336 50 


$3,133,856 41 


1953 Appropriation 




Total credif- 


$847,090 39 
$836,429 03 


$464,216 35 
$179,532 85 


$161 ..536 59 


$3,133,856 41 
$1,044,226 34 






Unexpended balance 


$10,661 36 


$284,683 .50 


$161,536 59 


$2,089,630 07 



Public Works Department. 



27 



Breakdown of 19-53 Expenditures. 



Maintenance A ppropriations. 
Administration : 

Engineering and Super- 
vision .... 
Clerical .... 
Office Supplies, etc. 

Yard and Stockroom : 

Personnel 

Transportation 

Heat. Light and Tele- 
phone .... 

Tools, Supphes and Mis- 
cellaneous . 

Operation of: 

Tidewater Bridge.s : 
Salaries and Wages 
Materials and Supplies 
Ordinary Repairs 

Repairs to Inland Bridges: 
Labor . 
Materials 



Total 



Stock Purchased 
Stock L^sed 

Increase in Stock 

Xet total . 



•SI 11,316 01 

20,290 65 

2,227 66 



S45,126 66 
1,024 17 

1,683 22 

3.111 48 



8577,655 31 
25,591 36 
15,809 47 



§23,646 6() 
7,085 10 



.§29,276 42 
27,415 14 



§133,834 3-2 



50,945 53 



619,056 14 



30,731 76 



1,861 28 



§836,429 03 



28 



City Document No. 24. 



Details of Expenditures on Tidewater Bridges. 

TIDEWATER BRIDGES — 1953. 



Bridge. 



Draw- 
tenders' 
Salaries. 



Mechanics' 
Wages. 



Material. 



Repair 
Bills. 



Supplies. 



Total. 



Broadway 

Cliarlestown 

Chelsea South . . . 
Chelsea Street. . . 
Congress Street. . 
Dover Street. . . . 

L Street 

Maiden 

Northei'n Avenue 
Summer Street. . 
Warren 

Totals 



$38,903 39 
69,864 15 
34,923 49 
r.2,498 81 
49,584 51 
41,185 30 
41,512 68 
.30,165 23 
51,204 60 
47,067 65 
37,862 75 



$2,776 81 
9,353 86 
4,815 10 
4,177 48 
4,156 92 
3,824 38 
4,651 92 
1,055 51 

11,800 09 
4,262 69 

12,007 99 



$716 48 

2,739 75 

582 61 

480 98 

772 68 

669 73 

1,293 41 

62 14 

1,629 25 

1,113 92 

1.066 40 



$514,772 56 



$62,882 7; 



$11,127 35 



$2,608 22 
2,282 70 

903 46 

73 17 

1,435 29 

253 91 

634 62 
3,956 39 

597 98 
3,063 73 



$970 24 

1,846 79 

1,639 86 

764 37 

798 17 

553 25 

964 85 

1,150 56 

3,782 94 

400 02 

1,592 96 



$43,366 92 
86,412 77 
44,243 76 
58,825 10 
55,385 4.'> 
47,667 95 
48,676 77 
53,068 06 
72,373 27 
53,442 26 
55,593 83 



$15,809 47 



$14,464 01 



$619,056 14 



2. Special Appropriations: 

Bridges, Repairs, Etc. 

Contracts. 
Xorthern Avenue Bridge. 

Repairing end lifts, etc.. General Ship & 

Engine Works, Inc 

Various Bridges. 

Constructing high curbs and guard rails, 
Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc. 
X'arious Footbridges. 

Repairing, cleaning and painting, Charles 
A. Reynolds Company .... 
Charlestown Bridge Storehouses. 

Bituminous concrete pavements, .John 

McCourt Company 

West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Repairing of, Martin J. Kelly Company, 

Inc 

Babson Street and Dana Avenue Bridges. 

Bedecking of bridges, Martin J. Kelly 

Company, Inc 

Charlestown Bridge (over Charles River). 

Roadway repairs, D. A. Rossano Construc- 
tion Company, Inc 



1953 




Payments. 


$32,628 74 


17,152 


50 


33,751 


06 


6,352 


90 


12,163 


67 


12,930 


70 


36,967 


at 



Public Works Department. 29 

West Fourth Street Bridge. 

Bituminous concrete pavements, Baker & 

Co., Inc. ....... $2,719 79 

Charlestown Bridge. 

Electrical conduit and wiring on Charles- 
town approach, Massachusetts Electrical 
Construction Company .... 1,362 00 

Xorthern Avenue Bridge. 

Repairs to public landing, stairway, D. A. 

Rossano Construction Company, Inc. . 1,761 43 

Summer Street Bridge. 

Repairs to bridge over Reserved Channel, 

James B. Rendle Company . . . 13,393 37 

Summer Street Bridge. 

Emergency repairs to approaches (over 
Reserved Channel), Eastern Roads Com- 
pany, Inc. (July, by .settlement) . . 1 .283 30 
Service Orders. 

Charged to Bridges, Repairs, etc., repairs 

to various bridges (5, 955 05 

City Record. 

Advertising various contracts . . . Ill 30 



Total §179,532 85 



Bridges, Constructiox of (Xox-Reve\ue). 

Charlestown Bridge (over Charles Riv-er). 

Strengthening of bridge, the Crandall Engi- 
neering Company S337,898 16 

Broadway Bridge. 

Constructing concrete deck, etc., ^lartin J. 

Kelly Company, Inc 421,533 50 

Meridian Street Bridge. 

Engineering services, Maguire Associates. 284,794 68 



Total SI, 044,226 34 

After the termination of the Ferry Service on Decem- 
ber 31, 1952, the Mayor and City Council authorized 
the Public Work.s Department to dispose of the boats, 
plant and all other equipment, by public auction. 

After advertising in most of the important newspapers 
in the country and contacting by letters all others who 
might be interested, a public auction was held on April 
15, 1953. At this auction the ferryboats ''Charles C. 
Donoghue'' and ''Daniel A. MacCormack" were sold 
to Hughes Brothers, Inc., 17 Battery place, New York 



30 City Document No. 24. 

City; the "Donoghue" for $16,500, and the ''MacCor- 
mack" for $15,500, or a total of $32,000. 

The steel bridge drops, bridge operating machinery, 
gallows frames and other miscellaneous items were sold 
at the same time to the Heggie Corporation of Boston, 
for the sum of $5,200. 

Other income, derived from the sale of miscellaneous 
junk, return of emptv oil dnmis, etc., amounted to 
$196.70. 

All final expenses and obligations connected with 
the Ferry Service were discharged during 1953, and 
amounted to $10,338.93, which was paid from a special 
fund carried forward from the 1952 budget appropri- 
ation. These expenses covered the cost of fuel, elec- 
tricity, gas, etc., from the time the ferries were discon- 
tinued until the final closing of the entire plant. 

Throughout the year 1953, the Bridge Service oper- 
ated 11 drawbridges. By late 1954 the new Meridian 
Street Bridge, connecting East Boston with Chelsea, 
should be completed and in operation. A detailed sum- 
mary of the number of openings and the waterborne 
traffic passing through these bridges appears hereafter. 
It is noteworthy that as the expense of operating and 
maintaining these drawbridges steadily increases, the 
volume of cargo vessels and commercial craft is declin- 
ing. Furthermore, since the breakdown of anj- draw- 
bridge in this city is a potential threat to the flow of 
highway traffic, it becomes increasingly evident that 
restricted operation and, in some cases, possibly the 
elimination of drawbridges should be sought. 

In this connection the department has petitioned the 
U. S. Engineers for permission to restrict the operation 
of Broadwa}' and Dover Street Bridges to the hours of 
8 A.M. to 4 P.M., Monday through Friday, and otherwise 
as may be determined by that agency to cover emer- 
gencies, etc. It is expected that this petition will be 
granted. 

The elimination of \\'arren Bridge will be affected 
upon the completion of the Central Artery, between the 
Mystic Bridge connection and Haymarket square, which 
is expected to be accomplished bv late 1954 or earlv in 
1955. 

The Chelsea South Bridge, which now serves mainly 
as a connection between the Mystic Docks and Charles- 
town for a limited volume of commercial vehicular 
traffic, could be eliminated by the laying out and build- 



Public Works Department. 31 

irig of Terminal street as an entrance to the docks. Some 
action has been started in this direction, and it is hoped 
that such an improvement will he executed in the 
reasonably near future. 

The Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel 
(formerh' known as the L Street Bridge), is another 
example of a drawbridge serving a relatively minor 
volume of important waterborne traffic. Since this 
structure is in need of rebuilding, the possibility of 
constructing solid fill approaches to replace the present 
pile trestle construction is being considered. A study 
should also be made to determine the possibility of 
eliminating the need of a movable drawspan. 

In general, the drawbridges are in poor condition. In 
connection with the Fort Point Channel bridges, one 
major improvement was accomplished in 1953 by the 
repairing and redecking of the Broadway Bridge. 

This work, which was scheduled for completion in 
April, 1954, was carried on with the bridge closed to 
highway traffic. However, one traffic lane was kept 
available in case of emergency, and because of the fire 
which destroj^ed three spans of the West Fourth Street 
Bridge (Dover Street), on October 22, 1953, one half 
of the bridge was opened to one-way traffic — inbound for 
morning traffic and outbound for evening traffic. The 
bridge was so opened one da>' following the West Fourth 
Street Bridge fire, and on December 2 the l^ridge was 
opened to two-way traffic. 

The work on Broadway- Bridge consisted of making 
extensive steel repairs and replacing the original wooden 
underdeck with a reinforced concrete slab deck topped 
with bituminous pavement. The drawspan was re- 
decked with steel mesh. 

This is the type of improvement that is needed at the 
Dover Street Bridge, Charlestown Bridge, Northern 
Avenue approach spans and on various inland bridges. 

The Summer Street Bridge, over Fort Point Channel, 
should undergo major repairs or be replaced with a 
new bridge, and since there is no evidence that the 
sugar refinery located above this bridge is going to 
relocate outside the channel, there is not much hope of 
eliminating this drawbridge. This project should be 
imdertaken just as soon as funds are made available. 

It is intended that the work of redecking the Chelsea 
Street and Congress Street drawspans with steel mesh 
pavement be contracted for in 1954, if the necessary 
funds are made available. 



32 



City Document No. 24. 



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Public Works Department. 33 

Following is a summary of the more important works 
undertaken by the Bridge Service in 1953: 

Construction of Concrete Deck, etc., on Broadway 
Bridge, over Fort Point Channel. 

A contract for this work was awarded to Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., in 1952. Work started on March 
2, 1953. Under the contract, the entire granite block 
pavement and the wood plank underdeck of the ap- 
proaches was removed and disposed of. This was the 
original decking, installed in 1902. 

The wooden decking of the drawspan was also re- 
moved. 

Major repairs were made to the main steelwork 
throughout and a new deck constructed, consisting of a 
reinforced concrete roadway slab on the approaches, 
topped with bituminous concrete pavement. The new 
drawspan deck is an open steel mesh pavement. New 
concrete sidewalks with high curbs were built through- 
out the approaches and steel mesh sidewalk on the draw. 

An important change on this bridge was the elimina- 
tion of the trolley car rails on account of the replacement 
of surface trolley cars by electric buses. 

As previously noted, the bridge was reopened to one- 
way traffic on October 23 and to full two-way traffic on 
December 2. 

It is expected that all work will be completed well 
before the completion date of April 15, 1954, at an 
estimated final cost of $536,127. 

Strengthening the Piers of the Charlestoivn Bridge, 
over the Charles River. 

Under a contract awarded to the Crandall Engineering 
Company in 1952, to continue the work of strengthening 
the pier foundations, work was started in September^ 
1952, and was still in progress at the end of 1953. It is 
expected that work will be completed earl}^ in 1954, at a 
cost of $450,000, and at the close of the present contract 
the entire project of strengthening these piers, which 
began in 1951, and was continued under successive con- 
tracts with the same firm, will be completed. 

As the work progressed under the current contract, it 
developed that the funds available would not be suffi- 
cient to carry the work to completion. Accordingly, the 
contract was amended, with the Mayor's approval, to 
provide an additional $50,000. 



34 City Document No. 24. 

Roadway Repairs to Charlestown Bridge, 
over Charles River. 

Due to the poor condition of the underdecking on the 
side roadways of the approach spans of this bridge, a 
contract was awarded to D. A. Rossano Construction 
Company, Inc., to make the necessary repairs. In the 
defective areas the granite block was removed and the 
wooden underdeck repaired; then the granite block was 
relaid and the entire roadway covered with a bituminous 
concrete wearing surface. 

Work commenced March 30, 1953, and was completed 
June 25, 1953, at a cost of $36,967.04. 

Repairing, Cleaning and Painting Various 
Footbridges. 

Because of the defective condition of many of the foot- 
bridges throughout the city, a contract was awarded to 
Charles A. Reynolds Company to make the necessary 
repairs. Worn and defective stair treads were renewed 
with new planking or metal treads ; repairing or replacing 
broken fence posts, railings, etc., making steel and con- 
crete repairs wherever necessar}^ and cleaning and 
painting the structures. The bridges done under this 
contract were B street, Glenwood avenue, and Toligate 
Way (in Hyde Park) ; Jones avenue and Butler street 
(located in Dorchester) ; Old Harbor (in South Boston) ; 
Irvington street, Bracldock park, Gainsborough street, 
and West Rutland square (all located in the Back Bay). 

Work commenced February 16, 1953, and was com- 
pleted December 17, 1953, at'a cost of $40,052.13. 

Rebuilding Upstream Sidewalk of Milton Bridge. 

To eliminate a hazardous condition which existed 
because of the very poor condition of the steelwork 
carrying the upstream sidewalk of this bridge, a contract 
was awarded to Charles Callahan Company for rebuild- 
ing the entire sidewalk structure, including all new steel 
members and a reinforced concrete sidewalk slab. 

The work commenced March 18, 1953, and was com- 
pleted November 30, 1953, at a cost of $8,020.29. A 
lengthy delay in this work was caused by virtue of the 
fact that considerable work had to be done by the New 
England Telephone & Telegraph Company in connec- 
tion with repairing and supporting their cable conduits, 
which are carried on the underside of this sidewalk. 



Public Works Department. 35 

Redecking Babson Street and Dana Avenue Bridges, over 
the New York, New Haveyi & Hartford Railroad. 
On September 2, 1952, a contract was approved with 
Martin J. Kelly Company, Inc., for renewing the road- 
way surface, underdecking and sidewalk planking. 
Extensive steel and stringer repairs were made by the 
railroad compan}-. Due to delay in obtaining lumber, 
work was not started until March 9, 1953, and was com- 
pleted June 12, 1953, at a cost of $15,656.17. 

Repairs to Summer Street Bridge, over Reserved Channel. 
Due to a failure which developed in the pile work and 
timbers supporting the downstream approach sidewalk 
of the South Boston approach, adjacent to the drawspan, 
a contract was awarded to James B. Rendle Company 
for making the necessary repairs and renewals to the 
piles, bracing, timbers, etc., and rebuilding approxi- 
mately 100 linear feet of the sidewalk. \^^ork was com- 
menced on June 15, 1953, and completed Julv 29, 1953, 
at a cost of $13,393.37. 

Repairs to the Winthrop Bridge, Between Boston and 

Winthrop. 

In conjunction with the Town of Winthrop, this 
department made repairs to the decking and timber 
work of this bridge, over Belle Isle Inlet, and reinforced 
the roadway under a contract with John Y. Shea 
Company, Inc. 

Work started on July 22, 1953, and it is expected 
that the work will be completed some time in January, 
1954. 

The estimated final cost is approximately $6,000, 
of which the Citv of Boston will pay 60 per cent, or 
$3,600. 

Redecking the Everett Street Bridge, over the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. 

This bridge is owned and maintained by the Boston 
& Albany Railroad Co., except for the wearing surface, 
which is maintained by this department. 

Because of the advanced deterioration of the wooden 
decking on this bridge, it was decided to redeck with a 
heavier underplank and asphalt plank wearing surface. 



36 City Document No. 24. 

Accordingly, a contract was awarded to Martin J. 
Kelly Company, Inc., in the amount of S31,345, for 
performing this work. Work will not commence until 
about April 1, 1954. 

Re-pairing End Lifts, etc., of Northern Avenue Bridge, 
over Fort Point Channel. 
In order to correct excessive wear on the moving 
parts of the end lifts and also provide the city with 
one complete spare set of end-lift units for the two 
types required on the bridge, a contract was entered 
into with the General Ship k Engine Works, Inc., to 
overhaul and repair one lift at a time, keeping the 
bridge in constant use except for Saturdays and Sundays. 
Work commenced Julv 8, 1952, and was completed 
January 23, 1953, at a cost of §32,628.74. 

Constructing High Ciirbs and Guard Rails on Various 

Bridges. 

Under a contract with ^lartin J. Kelly Company-, 
Inc., this work was started on October 28, 1952, and 
was completed May 29, 1953, at a cost of §17,152.50. 

This work consisted of erecting high curbs of concrete, 
steel or timber on many of the bridges throughout 
the cit}-, thereby establishing extra safeguards for 
vehicular traffic in the event that control of a vehicle 
is lost while passing over the bridge. 

Yard Forces. 

The work done by the Bridge Maintenance Forces 
throughout 1953, consisted of making typical minor 
repairs to the bridges throughout the city, including 
renewing defective roadway and sidewalk plank, re- 
spiking loose plank, patching, etc. 

Other work consisted of repairing and painting 
roadway gates, fences, machinery and machinery control 
housings: erecting safety barricades at snow dumps, 
dead end locations, etc. 

Repairs and renewals were made to the electrical 
conduit and wiring installations at the various draw- 
bridges. Routine operations included repairing and 
filling sand boxes, regulating bascule bridge counter- 
weights and cleaning sidewalks and stairways of snow 
and ice in the winter season. 



Public Works Department. 37 

Work for Other DI\^SI0xs. 



Highway DI^^sIOX. 

Repairing Concrete Retaining Wall on Cummins 
Highway, West Roxhury. 
The Bridge Service furnished the engineering and 
inspection services required to make certain repairs 
by guniting the wall on Cummins Highway, between 
Brown avenue and Sherwood street, for the Highway 
Section. The work was done under contract with 
the Gunite Restoration Company, Inc., at a cost of 
S5,515. Work started October' 21, 1953, and was 
completed December 16, 1953. 

Sanitary DI^^SION. 
Repairs to the Albany Street Disposal Station. 
Specifications were prepared by this division for 
repairs to the Albany Street Disposal Station. Bids 
for this work were received December 29, 1953, and 
a contract awarded to John F. Shea Company, Inc., 
in the sum of 810,150.75. Xo work under the contract 
was done this year. 

^IlSCELLANEOUS. 

Snow Removal. 
Another duty of the Bridge Section of this division 
during the winter months was the supervising and 
inspecting of snow loading and removal in common 
with other divisions of the department. The work 
done by the personnel of this division was in connection 
with contract snow removal in Area 12, West Roxbury, 
and Area 13, Brighton. 

Sumner Tunnel. 

Throughout the year 1953, the Sumner Tunnel 
showed a continued increase in traffic volume and toll 
receipts, despite the fact that the movement of traffic 
entering and leaving the tunnel at the Boston end was 
at times greatly hampered by the extensive construction 
work being carried on in connection with the building 
of the Central Artery. 

Because of the increase in traffic volume, four ad- 
ditional tollmen-guards were appointed in September 



38 City DocUxMENt No. 24. 

of 1953 in order to keep three traffic lanes open at 
each end from 8 a.m. to midnight and to have two 
guards on duty on the tunnel catwalk at all times. 

The tunnel plant, in general, is in good condition 
although it will be necessary in the near future to 
make certain major repairs such as repairing or re- 
building the concrete platforms supporting the power 
transformers and repairing the tunnel invert in areas 
where the original concrete shows surface deterioration 
and spalling. There were repairs made to the tunnel 
roadway pavement in 1953 and it is intended to contract 
for such work again in 1954. The tunnel pavement, 
in general, is in very sound condition considering the 
traffic it carries. Throughout the extensive pavement 
repairs made in the past, the original sand cushion 
base has loeen replaced by a bituminous mastic base 
and this appears to have stabilized the granite block 
pavement in the repaired areas against settlement and 
movement for a much greater length of time. This 
practice will be continued until all of the original sand 
cushion has been eliminated. 

A major improvement in the tunnel operating plant 
was made in 1953 by the installation of four new carbon 
monoxide analyzers to replace the original units which 
had become obsolete, making it extremely difficult to 
replace defective parts and maintain efficient operation. 

All other parts of the operating plant are in good 
condition, including the ventilating equipment, power 
transformers, circuit breakers, storage batteries, genera- 
tors, etc. The communication system, drainage system, 
pumps, motors, and toll equipment, all of which are 
inspected, tested, adjusted, etc., under a daily routine 
inspection, are repaired and overhauled as required. 

Under an order from the Department of Public 
Utihties, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the existing 
schedules of tolls and charges for the use of the Sumner 
Tunnel were approved for the year 1953. 

Contracts Awarded in 1953. 
Repairing the Pavement in the Sumner Tunnel. 
Approximately 972 square yards of granite block 
pavement was removed and relaid under a contract 
with John J. Amara at a cost of $10,560. AVork com- 
menced on April 8, 1953, and was completed May 
19, 1953. 



Public Works Department. 39 

Cleaning the Surface Drainage Systern of the Su7nner 

Tunnel. 
The accumulation of sand deposited on the tunnel 
roadway to prevent skidding conditions during the 
winter season and the sand, dirt, etc., brought into the 
tunnel by vehicles, subsequently is deposited in the 
surface drainage system and is removed annually 
under contract. The contract for 1953 was awarded to 
James A. Freaney, Inc.; work commenced on Decem- 
ber 14, 1953, and was completed on December 29, 1953, 
at a cost of $1,568. 

Cleaning Exhaust Duct, Exhaust Fan Rooms and Fresh 
Air Ducts at the Sumner Tunnel. 

To maintain efficiency of the ventilation system a 
contract is awarded annually for the removal of dust 
which is drawn into and deposited in the fresh air 
ducts and the removal of dust and carbon deposits 
accumulating in the exhaust ducts and exhaust fan 
rooms. The 1953 contract was awarded to Patrick 
Ross Company; work commenced on December 2, 1953, 
and is expected to be completed early in 1954 at a 
total cost of $1,875. 

The following contracts were awarded in 1953, but 
work will not be started until 1954: 

Waterproofing the Exterior Walls and Installing a New 
Tar and Gravel Roof at the East Boston Vent Building 
of the Sumner Tunnel. 

The evidence of water damage on the interior walls,, 
steelwork, conduits, etc., has indicated a porous condi- 
tion existing in the masonry comprising the exterior 
walls, together with the natural deterioration of the tar 
and gravel roof and flashings. 

Owing to the fact that this building is not heated 
the moisture problem is xQvy acute and necessitates 
prompt action to prevent further damage of this nature. 

The contract was awarded to the Patrick Ross 
Company at a bid price of $6,592.50. 

Installing Lighting in the Exhaust Air Duct at the 
Sumner Tunnel. 
The installation of a permanent lighting system in. 
the exhaust air duct was deemed necessary to facilitate 



40 City Document No. 24. 

working in the duct for purposes of cleaning, inspecting 
and repairing. 

The contract was awarded to John J. Finn Company 
Electric Service at a bid price of $2,746. 

1953 Budget Summary. 
Credits : 

Regular appropriation, 1953 .... $570,779 48 
Balance from previous year .... 24,679 45 

Pensions 20,586 66 



$616,045 59 



Less transfer by City Auditor to Del)t Require- 
ments, Interest 566 25 



Total credits $615,479 34 

Debits: 

Expenditures, 1953 (regular budget) . . $570,740 43 

Pensions 20,586 66 

Balance to next year 16,591 87 



Total debits $607,918 96 



Unexpended balance, December 31, 1953 . $7,560 38 



SUMMARY OF 1953 TRAFFIC BY CLASSIFICATION. 

No. of 

Class. Toll. Description. Vehicles. 

1. 10 20 Truck not in excess of 2 tons capacity. 

Tractor without trailer . . . . " . 535,437 

2. 20 Passenger car 10,035,016 

A. 20 Motorcycle 4,935 

4. 25 Truck over 2 tons and up to 5 tons capacity. 

Tractor with trailer over 2 tons and up to 

5 tons capacity 52,004 

o. 20 Passenger car with trailer 12,983 

6. 35 Truck over 5 tons and up to 10 tons capacity-. 

Tractor with trailer over 5 tons and up to 

10 tons capacity 16,692 

7. 20 Tractor with trailer not in excess of 2 tons 

capacity 2,075 

8. 100 Truck over 10 tons capacity .... 3,595 

9. 35 Bus with or without passengers .... 264 

* City-owned tl72,673 

Total traffic 10,835,674 

* M.T.A. and Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses included in thi? classification. 

t 2,376 M.T.A. and 87,009 Eastern Massachusetts Railway buses at 3.5 cents included 
in this total. 



Public Works Department. 



41 



COMPARATIVE 5-YEAR SUMMARY OF OPERATION, FROM 
1949 TO 1953, INCLUSIVE. 





1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1. Vehicular Traffic: 












Total number vehicles . . 


9,162,266 


9,283,700 


9,466,6C0 


9,583,972 


10,835,674 


Monthly average 


763,522 


773,641 


788,883 


798,664 


902,973 


Weekly average 


176,197 


178,045 


182,051 


184,307 


208,378 




25,171 


25,435 


25,936 


26,186 


29.686 






2. Power Consumption: 












Total kilowatts 


4,403,936 


4,331,103 


4,196,904 


4,582,488 


4,966,004 


3. Financial Results: 












Operating expenditure. 


$482,982 71 


$462,975 30 


$479,198 19 


$541,705 30 


$.391,-327 09 


Balance to next year . . . 


— 


1,547 11 


13,135 S9 


24,679 45 


16,591 87 


Interest requirements . . 


837,611 25 


832,453 75 


763,654 61 


683,105 13 


687,494 39 


Refunded tolls 


— 


92 20 


721 95 


65 25 


440 60 


Total expenses. . . . 


$1,320,593 96 


$1,297,068 36 


$1,256,710 64 


$1,249,555 13 


$1,295,8.33 95 




$1,853,049 84 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,913,.356 12 


$1,932,619 83 


$2,172,410 00 


Balance from previous 


4,298 18 




1,.J47 11 


13,135 89 


24,679 45 






Total receipts 


$1,857,348 02 


$1,863,035 00 


$1,914,903 23 


$1,945,755 72 


$2,197,089 45 




$536,754 06 
(Excess) 


$565,966 64 
(Excess) 


$658,192 59 
(Excess) 


$696,200 59 
(Excess) 


$901,235 50 




(E.\cess) 



42 



City Document No. 24. 



HIGHWAY SECTION. 



Paving Service. 




Summary of Budget Appropriations. 






Balance 


Appropriation. Total Credits. 


Ivxpenditures. 


Unexpended. 


raving Service . . . $1,536,877 04 


$1,442,713 66 


$94,163 38 


Heoonstructionol' Street!? 129,924 26 


105,800 60 


24,123 66 


Public Wavs, Construc- 






tion of (Revenue) . 157,500 00 


157,500 00 


None. 


Public Wavs, Construc- 






of (Non-Revenue) 3,550,834 60 


2,019,055 36 


1,531,779 24 


Sidewalks, Construction 






and Reconstruction of . 129,967 80 


78,570 59 


51,397 21 


Street Signs . . 22,870 41 


8,736 14 


14,134 27 


Snow Removal . -103,975 68 


394,551 95 


9,423 73 



In the Permit Office, $66,450.22 was taken in; of 
this amount $20,568.22 was deposited with the City 
Collector for permit fees received, $42,262 was de- 
posited with the City Collector for the Street Openings 
Account and $3,620 was l)illed to the Public Service 
Corporations. 

Under Classes No. 1 and No. 2 of the schedule of 
permit fees, permits were issued for openings in public 
ways as follows: 



City Departments .... 
Public Service Corporations (Class 1) 
Public Service Corporations (Class 2) 
Public Service Cor])orations (Class 3) 
Public Service Corporations (Class 9) 



Under Classes No. 1 to No. 9 of the 
schedule of permit fees, permits were issued 
for openings and occupation in public 
ways as follows: 

Class 1. Permits for street openings 

Class 3. Occupation permits for painting, repairs 

to buildings, etc 

Class 4. Removing snow from roof . 

Class 5. Erecting and repairing awnings . 

Class 7. Erecting and repairing signs 

Class 8. Raising and loweiing machinery 

Class 9. Special permits .... 



Total permits issued 



1,673 

1,697 

1,708 

9 

12 



1,242 

2,284 

3 

46 

170 

41 

427 



5,099 



4,213 
9,312 



Public Works Department. 43 

There are now on file 2,320 bonds protecting the 
City of Boston against claims that may be made on 
account of permits issued. 

During the year a concerted effort was made to 
require private parties to repair artificial stone side- 
walks which were damaged by driving over sidewalks 
and this drive is continuing. Adequate deposits were 
also required for replacing of openings for new water 
services. Permit office inspectors checked closely open- 
ings made by drain layers and required them to make 
roadway openings safe promptly and to replace any 
sidewalks damaged. 

The regular forces of the Paving Ser\'ice were em- 
ployed as usual in the maintenance of public streets, 
resurfacing and patching macadam pavements, patch- 
ing permanent pavements such as asphalt and granite 
block, and maintaining gravel, brick, and artificial stone 
sidewalks. 

In the snow removal season, division forces were 
employed in spreading rock salt and sand on icy streets 
and also supervised plowing work throughout the city 
by 250 contractors' hired plows after five snowstorms. 
All snow removal bills for plowing, hauling, force 
account work, cubic 3'ard removal, etc., were processed 
through the Paving Service office. 

The following work was done in placing new street 
signs and replacing and repairing existing street signs:: 

173 new street signposts erected with frames and signs 

19 new hero signposts erected with signs 
825 street sign plates installed 
124 bent or broken signposts repaired 
169 hero signs replaced 
622 street signposts painted 
904 street sign frames painted 

291 street sign fi-ames, collars, and brackets erected 
158 street sign frames repaired 
241 private way signs installed 

Contracts were awarded for the construction and 
reconstruction of 178 streets during the year and 132 
of these streets were completed. Work was also com- 
pleted on 33 streets which were unfinished from 1952. 
Contracts were awarded for the construction of arti- 
ficial stone sidewalks in 46 streets and 37 of these were 
completed. Sidewalk work was also completed on five 
streets which were unfinished from 1952. 



44 City Document No. 24. 

Some of the more important thoroughfares on which 
reconstruction work was completed in 1953 are as 
follows : 

Annunciation road, Roxbury, from Parker street to Riiggles 
street. 

Beacon street, City Proper, from Park street to Charles 
street. 

Boylston street, City Proper, from Washington street to 
Tremont street. 

Boylston street, City Proper, from Dartmouth street to 
Exeter street. 

Centre street, West Roxbuiy, from Belgrade avenue to 
Spring street. 

Chelsea street. East Boston, from INIaverick square to 
Day square. 

Devonshire street. City Proper, from Franklin street to 
Summer street. 

Morton street, Doichester, from railroad bridge to Harvard 
street. 

Newmarket square, Roxbuiy, from Southampton street 
to Massachusetts avenue. 

Northampton street, Roxbury, from Columbus avenue to 
Albany street. 

Prince street. West Roxbury, from Pond street to Perkins 
street. 

Ruggles street, Roxbury, from Washington street to 
Huntington avenue. 

Saratoga street. East Boston, from McLellan Highway to 
Bennington street. 

South street, West Roxbury, from Centre street to Arbor- 
way. 

Theodore A. Glynn Way, Roxbury, from Southampton 
street to Massachusetts avenue. 

Washington street. West Roxbury, from Hyde Park 
avenue to West Roxbury Parkway. 

The following is a list of streets constructed and 
reconstructed and sidewalk work done by contract in the 
various wards of the city in the year 1953: 

Ward 1 — Crestwa^^ road, Faywood avenue, Putnam 
street, Saratoga street, Decatur street (sidewalks), Chelsea 
street (chapter 90), Sea View avenue (sidewalks), Barnes 
avenue. Total cost, .1216,418.25. 

Ward 2 — Charles River avenue. Total cost, $5,917.60. 

Ward 3 — Boylston street (W-T), Devonshire street, 
Bradford street. Pearl street, Acton street, Wilkes street, 
Hancock street, Somerset street. Summer street (platform 
removal). Total cost, $33,812.12. 



Public Works Department. 45 

Ward 4 — Boylston street (D-E), Boylston street (H-D), 
Autumn street, Pilgrim road, Plymouth street, Annunciation 
road, Ruggles street, Huntington Avenue Underpass, Public; 
Alleys Nos. 402, 404, 405, 820. Stanhope street. West Canton 
street, Worcester street, Trinity place, Louis Prang street. 
Clarendon street, Peabody street. Total cost, $124,952.14. 

Ward 5 — Kilmarnock street, Charles street (sidewalks). 
River street (sidewalks). Beacon street. Brimmer street. 
Lime street, Boylston street (D-E), Chestnut street (side- 
walks), Boylston street (H-D), Public Alleys Nos. 414 to 
429, inclusive, Albion street, Phillips street, Mt. Vernon 
street, Berkeley and Marlborough streets (sidewalks), Here- 
ford street (sidewalks), River Street (cutback), Chestnut 
street (sidewalks). Total cost, $133,096.29. 

Ward 6 — Burnham place. Silver street (sidewalks). 
Northern avenue (sidewalks, bumper and fence). East Fifth 
street, Silver street. West Fourth street, AVest Fifth street 
(sidewalks). Gold street (sidewalks), Dorchester avenue, 
Gillette park, P street (sidewalks). Total cost, $36,808.57. 

Ward 7 — Dexter street. Gates street, Quincefield street, 
Wendeller street. Old Harbor street (sidewalks), Norfolk 
avenue, Bowen street (sidewalks). Covington street (side- 
walks), Dixfield street (sidewalks), Douglas street (sidewalks). 
Gold street (sidewalks), Hamlin street (sidewalks), Knowlton 
street (sidewalks), Mercer street (sidewalks), Tudor street 
(sidewalks), West Fifth street (sidewalks), Columbia road 
(sidewalks), Mt. Vernon street (sidewalks). Gates street (side- 
walks). Total cost, $41,333.38. 

Ward 8 — Northampton street. Mystic street, Norfolk 
avenue, Shirle}^ street. Proctor street, Eustis street. Island 
street, Perch street. Pike street, Theodore A. Glynn Way, 
Newmarket square. Total cost, $177,088.43. 

Ward 9 — Northampton street, Ruggles street, Whittier 
street, Cabot street (sidewalks), Tremont street (sidewalks), 
Columbus avenue (sidewalks), Putnam street (sidewalks), 
Auburn street, Hammond street (sidewalks), Hubert street, 
Kendall street (sidewalks), Warwick street, Weston street. 
Total cost, $129,692.54. 

Ward 10 — None. 

Ward 11 — Hawthorne street, Kensington street, \a,\e 
street, Stedman street, Columbus avenue (sidewalks). 
South street (chapter 90), Forest Hills street. Total cost, 
$59,521.16. 

Ward 12 — Kensington street, Blue Hill avenue (side- 
walks). Total cost, $3,837.83. 

Ward 13 — Bay street, Annapolis street, Kevin road. 
Total cost, $10,590.54. 

Ward 14 — Drummond street, McLellan street, Oldfields 
road, Morton street (chapter 90), Franklin Hill avenue. 
Total cost, $123,724.25. 



46 City Document No. 24. 

Ward 15 — Bay street, Winter street. Total cost, 
!!!;8,633.53. 

Ward 16 — Hallet street. Marsh street, Arbroth street, 
Labari Pratt road, Rita road, Rosemont street, St. Brendan 
road, Ashmont court, Carlotta street, Christopher street, 
Presley road, Westglow street (sidewalks), Adams street 
(sidewalks), Salina road, Dorchester avenue (sidewalks). 
Total cost. $103,337.14. 

Ward 17 — None. 

Ward 18 — Colorado street, Wakefield avenue. Highland 
street, Williams avenue, Poplar street, Pond street, Massasoit 
street, Milton avenue. Summit street, Washington street 
(chapter 90), Gordon aveiuie, Mulvey street, Glendower 
road. Total cost, .$245,683.76. 

Ward 19 — Lorene road. South street (chapter 90), Per- 
kins street, Prince street, Washington street (chapter 90), 
Asticou road, Avon street. Goldsmith street, Wachusett 
street. Moss Hill road. Total cost, $198,314.27. 

Ward 20 — Manthorne road, Tafthill terrace, Chapin 
avenue, Greaton road, Esther road, Martin street, Basto 
terrace. South and Robert streets (island). Alberta street, 
Latin road, W^oodard road, Saville street, Baker street (widen- 
ing), Westbourne street. Willow street (sidewalks), Garth 
road, Gould street, Hackensack Circle, Laurie avenue. Maple- 
wood street. Pheasant street, Ferncroft road, Keane road. 
Rustle wood road, Stearns road. Centre street, Courtney 
road, Hollywood road. Centre street (sidewalks), Bertson 
avenue, Burard street, Keith street, Sherbrook street, 
Thurlow street, Wolfe street, Brookfield street, Washing- 
ton street (chapter 90). Total cost, $401,603.72. 

Ward 21 — Mountfort street, Park Drive. Total cost, 
$16,279.19. 

Ward 22 — Faneuil street (sidewalks), Hobson street (side- 
walks), Rev. J. J. Murphy Footway, Shannon street, Windom 
street. Total cost, $39,165.35. 

Paving Service. 

Work Done by Contract in 1953. 

Item Quantity Unit 

Earth and services excavation . . 80,127 cubic yards. 

Rock and wall excavation . . 3,027 cubic yards. 

Bank gravel 79,539 tons. 

Crushed stone lor edgestone . . . 3,021 tons. 

Base removed 12,127 square yards. 

Pavement removed .... 82,115 square yards. 

New straight edgestone .... 37,533 linear feet. 
New circular edgestone .... 5,211 linear feet. 

2-foot corners 925 each. 

Edgestone reset 49,800 linear feet. 



Public ^^'oRKS Department. 



47 



Edgestone hauled to city yards . 

Macadam base 

OA asphalt 

Concrete base 

Concrete for backing up sidewalks 

Bituminous concrete base (roadway) 

Bituminous concrete top (roadway) 

Bituminous concrete base (sidewalk) 

Bituminous concrete top (sidewalk) 

Sheet asphalt top 

Artificial stone sidewalks 

Artificial stone driveways 

Loam spaces 

Covers reset 

Bradley heads reset 

Brick courses . 

Catch basins or manholes rebuilt 

Catch basins or drop inlets built 

Signposts set or reset 

Stone bounds .... 



10,163 linear 


Feet. 


16,681 tons. 




. 162,908 gallons 




3,152 cubic yards. 


38 cubic yards. 


34,097 tons. ' 




19,761 tons. 




2,004 tons. 




1,846 tons. 




6,955 tons. 




751,370 square 


feet. 


51,769 square 


feet. 


1,937 square 


yards 


2,859 each. 




17 each. 




4,893 each. 




87 each. 




44 each. 




133 each. 




194 each. 





Yearly Report of Work Done by Department 

Forces for 1953. 
Brick sidewalks, laid and relaid . 
Gravel sidewalks, relaid 
Artificial stone sidewalks, laid (new) 
Artificial stone sidewalks, relaid (old) 
Bituminous concrete sid walks 
Block gutters, laid .... 
Oranite block roadway, laid . 
Artificial stone sidewalks, patched with 

blacktop 

Edgestone reset (old) 
Macadam roadway patched . 
Macadam roadway resurfaced 
Street cleaning .... 
Snow removal 



7,014 square yards- 

1,034 square yards- 

18,440 square feet. 

178,386 square feet. 

9,892 square yards. 

5 square yards. 

202 square yards. 

9,214 square feet. 
5,919 linear feet. 
152,091 square yards. 
8,964 square yards. 
3,168 cubic yards. 
31,663 cubic yards. 



PAVING SERVICE, 1953 

Street Cleaning .... 
General Highway E.xpenditures . 
Sidewalk and Curbing . 
Snow and Ice Removal 
Street Signs 



$36,360 43 

994,143 74 

333,668 94 

59,468 56 

19,071 99 

$1,442,713 66 



48 



City Document No. 24. 



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a • 







Table Showing Length 


AND Area of Paving on Accepted Streets, 


Corrected to 


January 1 


, 1954. 










Length in Miles. 


Abea in Squabb Yabds. 




Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Plank 
Bridges. 


Brick. 


Con- 
crete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Sheet 
Asphalt. 


Asphalt 
Concrete. 


Granite 
Block. 


Wood 
Block. 


Flank 
Bridges. 


Briek. 


Concrete. 


Macadam. 


Gravel. 


Not 
Graded. 


Totals. 


Year 1952 Report 


*247.10 
33.95 


t257.85 
35.43 


139.36 

5,41 


0,28 
0,04 


0,47 
0.06 


0.51 
0.07 


521.61 
2.97 


11149.82 
20,58 


9,90 
1 36 


97 
0.13 


7;27.87 
100.00 


*4,993,589 
35.73 


t4 ,928,402 
35.28 


Jl. 010,403 
7.23 


6,301 
0,05 


11,524 
0,08 


11,405 
0.08 


{413,720 
2.96 


112,411,511 
17,27 


149.458 
1.07 


31,493 
0.23 


13,967,806 
100.00 




January 1. 1954. 


51.55 
4 91 
3.13 
12.36 
42.86 
40.38 
58.37 
22.20 
9.29 


27.23 
4.97 
19,44 
13,88 
29,48 
67,78 
69,72 
29,13 
15,17 


10,75 
6,39 
4 41 
7,35 
3,40 
1,22 
0,61 
30 
00 


07 
0,08 
01 
01 


0.10 
0.04 
0.05 
0.06 


31 

0.02 
0.02 

0.14 

01 


3.00 
0.79 
1.36 

54 
5.08 
4.33 
5.44 

1 23 
0.64 


3,00 
5,43 
9,77 
9,21 
13 02 
35,97 
36.76 
12.04 
17.77 


26 
03 
12 

14 
0,65 
3,71 

1 25 
53 
5.86 


0.01 
0.07 
0,50 
0,00 
00 
61 

0.20 


96.27 
22.65 
38.38 
44.07 
94.53 
153.43 
172.87 
65,51 
48,97 


1,141,530 
97,677 
67,162 
264,203 
855,011 
736,559 
1,108.874 
499,411 
171,317 


606,617 
84,943 
445.472 
265,226 
539.795 
1,246,993 
1,279,117 
557,032 
298.391 


233,269 
166,049 
96,499 
213,187 
08,707 
45,164 
31.932 
25,916 
6,318 


487 
2,011 
325 
642 
47 

1.669 

186 


3.623 

1,701 

777 

1,737 

983 

770 

1,231 

442 


4,398 

393 
1,378 
2,541 

145 


96,224 
13,360 
46.350 
23,012 
78,732 
60,871 
87,155 
30,443 
10,086 


45,808 
75,302 
211.459 
153,454 
207,212 
571,412 
571,160 
193,018 
297,003 


1,786 
407 
2,343 
1,560 
8,413 
56,206 
17,862 
7,657 
90,363 


41 
1.486 
15,754 
27 
5.390 
24,477 
50 
4,506 


2,133,74a 
441,491 
872,266 
940,153 


Charlestown 








06 
0.01 


04 
0.04 
008 
0.03 














878,614 








245.05 
33,27 


276 80 
37.57 


34,43 
4,67 


0.24 
03 


0.44 
0.06 


50 
0.07 


22,41 
3.04 


142.97 
19.41 


12.45 
1.69 


1.39 
19 


736 68 
100,00 


4,941,744 
34,83 


5,323,586 
37.52 


887,041 
6.25 


5,367 
0.04 


11,264 
0.08 


8,835 
0.06 


446,233 
3.15 


2,325,828 
16.39 


186,599 
1.32 


51,731 
0.36 






100.00 







Total Pubuc Stbeets 736.68 Miles. 
NoTK. — lo the above table the city is subdivided substaatially on the boundary lines between the districts as they eiisted when annexed to Boston. Territory annexed from Brookline included in City Proper. 



square yards ia granite block paving c 
§ Of this amount 0.06 mile ( 
D Of this amount 124.30 mil. 



t Of this amount 72.37 miles or 1,429,217 square yards is bitulithic; and 3.09 miles 
or 50,514 square yards is Topeka: and 0.06 miles or 920 square yards ia Filbertine; and 
0.11 miles or 1,533 square yards is Simasco; and 0.03 miles or 595 square yards is Carey 
Elastite Asphalt Plank; and 0.06 miles or 518 square yards is Johns-Manville Asphalt 
Plank; and 1.61 miles or 50,590 square yards is Tar Concrete. 



Public Works Department. 49 

Lighting Service. 
Financial Statement. 
Total credits for 1953 .... $1,365,581 10 
Expenditures 1,349,451 99 



Unexpended $16,129 11 

Expenditures. 
Boston Edison Company .$1,123,586 75 
Boston Consolidated Gas 

Company . . . 99,446 07 

— $1,223,032 82 



Gas Lighting: 

American Service Com- 
pany .... $83,222 16 

Boston Consolidated Gas 

Company . . . 14,591 02 



Construction: 
Installing, removing and 

relocating lamps . . $17,397 47 



Salaries .... $11,097 50 



Office expense: 
Printing and postage . $111 02 



97,813 18 

17,397 47 
11,097 50 

111 02 
Total $1,349,451 99 

The following is a statement of work done by the 
Lighting Service during the year of 1953 under the 
direction of the Division Engineer. 

Mercury Vapor Lamps. 

Electric lamps of 2,000 c.p. were installed on Columbus 
avenue (6), Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 15,000 c.p. were installed on Hay- 
market square (3), City Proper. Massachu.setts avenue 
(1), Roxbur3\ Centre street (3), West Roxburj^ 

Incandescent. 
Electric lamps of 1,000 c.p. were installed on Notting- 
hill road (1), Brighton. Albany street (1), Arlington 



50 City Document Xo. 24. 

street (1), Braddock park (1), Berkeley- street (2), 
Summer street (2), City Proper. Dorchester avenue 
(3), Dorchester. Dudley street (1), Humboldt avenue 
(2), Blue Hill avenue (1), Worthington street (1), 
Roxbury. South street (1), Spring street (6), Belgrade 
avenue (1), Weld street (1), Maple street (1), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of (300 c.p. were installed on Kingsdale 
street (1), Dorchester. Belgrade avenue (3), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 400 c.p. were installed on Pierce 
street (1), Hyde Park. Harold street (2), Harrishof 
street (1), Lamartine street (2), Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 250 c.p. were installed on Tileston 
street (1), City Proper. Chaucer street (2), East 
Boston. Arlington street (1), Truman Highway (4), 
Hyde Park. Schuj^er street (1), Greenville street (1), 
Perch street (1), Pike street (1), Castlegate street (4), 
Waverly street (1), Roxbury. Walter street (1), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric lamps of 100 c.p. were installed on Allen 
road (1), Armington street (1), Dustin street (1), 
Harvard place (1), Harvester street (1), Islington 
street (1), Leicester street (2), Litchfield street (1), 
Murdock street (1), Oakland street (3), Parsons street 
d), Reservoir road (2), Shepard street (1), Strathmore 
road (1), Brighton. Bellevue street (2), Bernard 
street (2), Brinsley street (2), Estes avenue (1), Fox 
street (1), Homes avenue (2), Humphreys street (1), 
King street (1), MaryknoU street (1), Whitney park 
(2), Whittemore street (1), Willow court (2), Dorchester. 
Waldemar avenue (1), East Boston. Alwin court (1), 
Alwin place d), Alwin street (3), Arhngton street (1), 
Ayles road (1), Cranmore road (3), Easton avenue (2), 
Poorest street (2), Halsey road (4), Madison street (1), 
Neponset avenue (1), Newacre road (2), Providence 
street (1), Stanbro street (1), Van Brunt street (2), 
Westminster street (1), Willow street (1), Hyde Park. 
Dacia street (3), Dana street (2), Decatur avenue (2), 
Elmwood street (1), Hollander street (4), Humphreys 
street (1), Robey street (1), Ingleside street (2), Wood- 
cliff street (1), Roxbury. Silver street (2), Viking 
.street (1), South Boston. Ansonia road (3), Buchanan 
road (3), Conry Crescent (2), Garnet road (1), Gilmore 
terrace (1), Gloria road (1), Goldsmith street (1), 
Hackensack road (1), Keane road (5), March avenue 



Public Works Department. 51 

(1), Redgate road (i), Riverview street (1), Stom^ Brook 
road (2), Wedge mere road (1), Zamora court (1), West 
Roxbury. 

Electric Fire Alarm lamps of 2-200 lumens were 
installed on Dudley street (1), Geneva avenue (1), 
Dorchester. Bennington street (4), East Boston. 
Hammond street (1), Dudley street (1), Harrishof 
street (1), Roxbury. A street (1), South Boston. 
Beech street (1), West Roxbury. 

Gas Lamps. 

A major portion of the work done in 1953 was the 
conversion of 104 streets principally in the Roxbury 
and Dorchester areas from old obsolete gas lamps to 
modern directional lumenaires. 

This work progressed satisfactorily and resulted in 
a decrease of vandalism and attacks in the areas con- 
verted. A total of 590 gas lamps were removed and 
replaced with 2500 or 1000 lumen lamps. 

Modernization. 

Another important aspect of the street lighting for 
1953 was the conversion of obsolete ornamental lighting 
units to directional mercin-y vapor lights in various 
business areas in the city. This installation of the 
latest and newest type of lighting in these areas was 
responsible for increased business and subsequent de- 
crease in pedestrian and automotive accidents and 
fatahties. 

The following areas or streets were converted to 
mercury vapor lighting: 

Summer street, City Proper , , 10-20000 Lumen lamps 

Tremont street, City Proper . 16-20000 Lumen lamps 

Washington street, City Proper . 30-20000 Limien lamps 

Columbus avenue, Roxbiuy . 6-20000 Lumen lamps 

Market street, Brighton . 22-15000 Lumen lamps 

Boylston street, City Proper 4-15000 Lumen lamps 

Dorchester avenue. City Proper . 3-15000 Lumen lamps 
Surface roadway (Nashua street), 

City Proper 12-15000 Lumen lamps 

Tremont street. City Proper . 3-15000 Lumen lamps 
Meridian street. East Boston 8-15000 Liuiien lamps 
Columbus avenue, Roxbury Cross- 
ing 17-15000 Lumen lamps 

South street, Jamaica Plain . 20-15000 Lumen lamps 

South street, West Roxbury . . 6-15000 Lumen lamps 

Washington street, West Roxbury 79-15000 Lumen lamps 



52 



City Document No. 24. 



In the following business and residential areas or 
streets, new lighting or additional lighting to supplement 
existing lighting was installed. 

The new lighting and additional lighting has resulted 
in a decrease in vandalism and crime. 

The following areas or streets were converted to new 
or additional lighting, of modern incadescent lightings. 



Broadway Bridge, City Proper 
Market street, Brighton 
Washington street, Brighton 
Dorchester avenue, Dorchester 
Morton street, Dorchester 
Morton street, Dorchester (twin) 
Broadway Bridge, City Proper 
Hancock and Derne streets, City 

Proper 

Marlborough street. City Proper . 
Salem street. City Proper 
Franklin Field Housing, Dorches- 
ter 

New Market Terminal Aiea, Rox- 

bury 

Hancock and Temple streets. City 

Proper 

Mount Vernon street, City Proper 
Orchard Park, Roxbury 
Walden street, Roxbury 
Hancock and Temple streets, City 

Proper 

Marlborough street. City Proper . 
Salem street. City Proper 
Allandale street, West Roxbury . 
Poplar street, West Roxbury 



1-15000 
4-10000 

23-10000 
4-10000 

24-10000 
7-10000 
3- 6000 



Lumen 
Lumen 
Lumen 
Lumen 
Lumen 
Lumen 
Lumen 



lamps 
lamps 
lamps 
lamps 
lamps 
lamps 
lamps 



6- 6000 Lumen lamps 
1- 6000 Lumen lamps 
1- 6000 Lumen lamps 

13- 6000 Lumen lamps 

] ] - 6000 Lumen lamps 

3- 4000 Lumen lamps 

1- 4000 Lumen lamps 

10- 4000 Lumen lamps 

6- 4000 Lumen lamps 

3- 2500 Lumen lamps 

4- 2500 Lumen lamps 

7- 2500 Lumen lamps 
17- 2500 Lumen lamps 

9- 2500 Lumen lamps 



Public Works Department. 



53 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SANITARY DIVISION. 



Boston, January 2, 1954. 

To the Cormnissioner of Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

Herewith, I submit a statement of the expenditures, 
costs and activities of the Sanitary Division of the PubHc 
Works Department for the year ending December 31, 
1953: 

The total cost of operation of the Sanitary Division 
for 1953 is as follows: 



Budget expenditures 
Paid in 1954 . 
Motor vehicle cost . 

Total cost 



), 105,598 82 

13,458 00 

285,744 59 

),404,801 41 



The cost of operation of this division was obtained by 
adding the cost of motor vehicle operation, as submitted 
by the Automotive Division, to the budget expenditures 
of the Sanitary Division. 

The cost, recapitulated and compared with the previ- 
ous year (1952) is shown as follows: 



Item. 


1952. 


1952. 


Decrease. 


Increase. 


Waste collection and disposal . . 

Street cleaning 

Preventive street cleaning 


$3,062,477 70 

2,312,433 80 

29,889 91 


$3,061,918 96 

2,431,926 58 

44,542 82 




$558 74 


$119,492 78 
14,652 91 




Totals 


$5,404,801 41 


$5..538,388 36 
5.404,801 41 


$134,145 69 
558 74 


$558 74 
















$133,586 95 


$133,586 95 











The general over-all decrease in Sanitary Division 
costs amounted to $133,586.95. 



54 



City Document No. 24. 



There were decreases in the following listed items: 



Permanent employees . 
Overtime .... 
Removal and disposal of waste 
Public Works supplies . 
Automotive equipment 
Electrical and mechanical machinery 
Other 



$87,230 10 
12,821 08 
14,409 96 
37,867 06 
12,411 70 
6,217 63 
7,018 51 



$177,976 04 



There were increases in the following listed items: 



Purchase of land . 

Various contractual services 

Building supplies and materials 

Motor vehicle costs 

Paid in 1954 . 

Other 



$1,875 00 

4,413 53 

2,186 78 

17,451 83 

13,458 00 

5,003 95 



$44,389 09 



Net decrease $133,586 95 

Personnel changes in permanent force during the year 1953: 

Total personnel January 1, 1953 *754 

Transfers in (from other departments and di^'isions) 6 
Reinstatements 2 

— 8 

762 

Deaths 13 

Resignations 6 

Retirements 38 

Transfers out (to other departments and di\isions) . 19 
Discharged or terminated 2 

— 78 



Total personnel January 1, 1954 



•=684 



* Includes two military leaves of absence. 
Total net loss of 70 employees. 



1. Closed Trucks. — For the first time, alternate bids 
in the proposals for the collecting and removing of gar- 
bage and refuse in the various districts were received for 
the period beginning April 1, 1953. As a result, closed 
trucks were used in seven of the districts. Collection 
contracts for more than one year were awarded for the 
first time. There were two contracts for three years 
each, and three contracts for two years each. These 



Public Works Department. 55 

contracts required the use of closed trucks. There were 
also two one-year contracts specifying closed trucks. 

2. Filling South Bay. — The filling of slips and the 
turning basin in the South Bay area was begun, and 
much valuable land was thus made. 

3. Gardner Street Dump. — A new dump was started 
in the West Roxbury district on land acquired by the 
city. 

4. Filling at Mile Road Dump. — A further extension 
of dumping facilities on Mt. Vernon street was provided 
by the filling in of flats. 

5. Disposal Contract. — On March 31, 1953, the con- 
tract with the Coleman Disposal Company was ended. 
As a result of advertised bids, a new contract was 
awarded to the M. DeMatteo Construction Company. 
This contract provided for an interim period of three 
months, during which the new contractor was able to 
acquire scows and other equipment necessary to do 
the job. The contract also contained a penalty clause 
for the period during which dumping into scows was 
suspended. On the other hand, during this period, it 
was necessary for the city to award additional payments, 
to the collection contractors tributary to the disposal 
contract, for extra haulage to various land dumps. 
Also, the city had to pay for additional dumping privi- 
leges at several locations. On balance, however, there 
was a considerable cash advantage to the city during 
this period. 

6. Incinerator Location. — Negotiations were still in 
progress in regard to the acquisition of land from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, but were not con- 
cluded. This, together with uncertainty regarding the 
location of the Central Artery highway, is still holding 
up the construction of an incinerator in the South Bay 
area. 

7. Automotive Equipment.^The Sanitary Division 
acquired, during the year 1953, three motor-driven 
street sweepers, and two front end bucket loaders. 

8. Purchase of Land. — Land at Forest Hills was pur- 
chased from the Metropolitan Transit Authority for a 
district yard to replace quarters at Child street, Jamaica 
Plain, which are to be vacated by the Sanitary Division. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Adolph J. Post, 
Division Engineer. 



56 



City Document No. 24. 



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60 



City Document No. 24. 



TOTAL SANITARY DIVISION BUDGKT KXPI-JNDITURES — 1953 

$5,105,598.82 



KKFUSK REMOVAL ANO DISI'OSAL CONTRACTS 
$2,625,147.64 



$82,254.05 



PERSONNEL 

$2,398,! 97. 0:{ 



Public Works Department. 61 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE SEWER DIVISION. 



Boston", January 2, 1954. 

To the Commissioner oj Public Works. 
Dear Sir: 

I submit herewith statement of the activities and ex- 
penditures of the Sewer Division for the year ending 
December 31, 1953. 

Expenditures During 195S. — The activities of the 
Sewer Division during the 3'ear consisted of sewer 
construction at a contract cost of $649,947.04, as shown 
on attached schedule of the work done, and the main- 
tenance and operation of the sewer sj'^stem at a cost 
of $812,988.08. 

Contract Work. — Contract work consisted of the ex- 
tension of the sewer system to provide drainage for new 
buildings and street construction and to eliminate 
cesspools, the locations and cost of which are attached. 

Maintenance Work. — Maintenance work consisted of 
the cleaning of 2,647 catch basins by contract and 
4,354 by yard forces, the freeing of stopped sewers and 
catch basins, and the repair of sewers, manholes, and 
catch basins by the yard forces, and the operation of 
the pumping station and disposal works, the cost of 
which is attached. 

Covering in Open Brooks. — A contract has been 
awarded to relocate and enclose Stony Brook in a 
conduit, for a length of about 4,200 linear feet, from the 
end of the existing conduit at the former line between 
W^est Roxbury and Hyde Park to opposite Willow 
avenue, at an estimated cost of $412,830. It is antic- 
ipated that the work will be completed earl}^ in 1954. 

The most interesting feature of the work was the 
successful completion of the jacking of 84-inch diameter 
reinforced concrete pipe under Hyde Park Avenue and 
under the roadbed of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad. 



62 City Document No. 24. 

Plans are being prepared to complete the relocation 
and the enclosing of vStony Brook in a conduit from 
Willow avenue to Bald Knob road, a distance of about 
5,320 Hnear feet, including the enclosing of Myopia 
Brook and incidental surface drains, and about 1,250 
linear feet of Providence Street Brook in a conduit, 
at an estimated cost of $422,500. 

Proposed Construction Work. — The work of extending 
the sewer system to provide drainage for new street 
construction, new building construction and the elimina- 
tion of cesspools will continue for many years in the 
future, and probably at the same rate as in the past. 
In addition, a long-range sewerage works program 
provides for the extension of main line surface drain 
conduits and the rebuilding of several miles of very 
old sewers that have settled or outlived their economic 
usefulness. Details of the long-range program are 
contained in a report on file in the Sewer Division. 

Special Problems. — In an effort to exclude excessive 
quantities of tidewater from entering the main drainage 
system considerable maintenance work has been done 
on the tide gates. Plans are being prepared to replace 
the original wooden, sidehung tide gates on storm 
overflows adjacent to the west side intercepter with 
top hung metal tide gates. It is anticipated that this 
contract will be advertised early in 1954, at an estimated 
cost of S10,000. It is also anticipated that during 
1954 a contract will be advertised for renewing the 
main entrance sluice gates at the Calf Pasture Pumping 
Station, the need for the work being described in the 
1951 annual report. 

The Sewer Division Labor Force consists of the follow- 
ing: 22 laborers, 2 carpenters, 31 motor equipment 
operators and laborers, 10 catch-basin machine operators, 
5 tide-gate repairmen, 6 working foremen sewer cleaners, 
20 sewer cleaners, 5 bricklayers, 1 working foreman 
motor eciuipment operator, 5 yardmen, 1 heavy motor 
equipment operator, 6 sewer district foremen, and 1 
main drainage foreman. This makes a total of 115 
men assigned to answering complaints, cleaning catch 
basins, cleaning sewers, repairs to manholes and catch 
basins, repairing broken sewers, and other related work. 

Length of Sewers Built. — During the fiscal year 1953 
there were built by contractors and day labor 7.38 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains throughout the 
city. After deducting 0.60 miles of sewers and surface 



Public \\'orks Department. 63 

drains rebuilt or abandoned, the net increase for 1953 
is 6.78 miles, which added to the existing 1,265.04 miles 
of common sewers and surface drains and 30.93 miles 
of intercepting sewers, makes a grand total of 1,302.75 
miles of all sewers belonging to the City of Boston, and 
under the care of the Sewer Division on January 1, 1954. 

There were 320 catch basins built or rebuilt and 14 
abandoned or removed during the year, making a net 
gain of 306 catch basins and a grand total of 23,972 
catch basins under the care of the Sewer Division on 
January 1, 1954. 

Permit Office Report. — Entrance fees to the amount 
of $4,704.20 have been deposited with the City Collector 
for collection from estates upon which no sewer as- 
sessments were ever paid, in accordance with Ordinances 
of 1945, chapter 27, section 10. 

Eight hundred and ninety-nine permits have been 
issued, viz.: 288 to district foremen and contractors 
and 611 to drain layers for repairing or laying new 
house drains. Inspectors from this office have per- 
sonally inspected the work done under these drain 
layers' permits. 

Two thousand four hundred and eighty-eight com- 
plaints have been investigated, and inspectors are 
instructed to report in writing in each case. 

One thousand five hundred and three catch-basin 
complaints were received. 

Reported in writing on 2,361 municipal liens to the 
City Collector, in accordance with chapter 60, section 
25, of the General Laws. Reported orally on about 
2,400 requests for information on municipal liens. 

Notices have been mailed to abutters in conformity 
with the Ordinances of 1925, chapter 27, section 8, 
apprising them of the construction of new sewers or 
repairs to old sewers. 

RespectfuU}', 

Robert P. Shea, 

Division Engineer. 



64 



City Document No. 24. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Twelve Months Ending 
December 31, 1953. 



Districts. 


Built by the 

City Either by 

Contract or 

Day Labor. 


Built by 
Private 
Parties. 


Total Lengths Built. 


City Proper 

Roxbury 


Linear Feet. 
145.50 
707.60 
Xone. 

447.80 

None. 

914.48 

8,205.29 

1,127.36 

15,921.78 


Linear Feet. 
314.00 
8,782.00* 
2,380.00* 


Linear Feet. 

4.59.50 

9.489.60 

2,.386.00 

447.80 

None. 

914.48 

8,205.29 

1,127.36 

15,921.78 


Miles. 
0.0870 
1 . 7973 
0.4519 




0848 


Charlestown 


None. 


None. 
1732 


West Roxbury 




1 5540 




2135 


Hyde Park 




3 0155 






Totals 


27,469.81 


11,482.00 


38,951.81 


7.3772 









* Work done by New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in new market district 
and extension of Dorchester Brook. 



Summary of Sewer Construction for Five Years Previous to 
January I, 1954. 





1949. 


1950. 


1951. 


1952. 


1953. 


Built by city by con- 
tract or day labor . . . 

Built by private parties 
or other city depart- 


Linear Feet. 
.39,.596.88 


Linear Feet. 
31,208.93 

3,938.00 


Lineir Feet. 
22,4.50.07 


Linear Feet. 
18,781.42 

16,484.50 


Linear Feet.^ 
27,409.81 

11,482.00 










Totals 


39,596.88 


35,146.93 


22,456.07 


35,265.92 


38,951.81 



Public Works Department. 



65 



Total Length of Sewers. 



Districts. 


Total 

Lengths 

Built 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31. 1953. 


Lengths 

Removed or 

Abandoned 

During 

Twelve 

Months 

Ending 

December 

31, 1953. 


Additional Lengths 

for the 

Twelve Months Ending 

December 31, 1953. 


City Proper 

Roxbury 

South Bo.ston 


Linear Feet. 

450.50 
9,489.60 
2,386.00 

447.80 
None. 

914.48 

8,205.29 

1,127.36 

15,921.78 


Linear Feet. 
2,967.50* 
38.00 


Linear Feet. 

—2,508.00 

9,451.60 

2,386.00 

447.80 

None. 

862.98 

8,125.29 

1,127.36 

15,921.78 




Miles. 

—0.4750 
1 . 7901 
0.4519 
0.0848 


Charle.stown 


None. 
51.50 
80.00 


None. 
0. 1634 




1 . 5389 




0.2135 


Hyde Park 




3.0155 






Totals 


38,951.81 


3,137.00 


35,814.81 


6.7831 



* Due to the construction of the Jolm F. Fitzgerald Expressway. 



Common sewers and surface drains built previous to 
January 1, 1953 

Common sewers and surface drains built between 
January 1 and December 31, 1953 

Common sewers and surface drains built ending- 
December 31, 1953 

City of Boston intercepting sewers connecting with 
Metropolitan sewers to December 31, 1953 . 

City of Boston main drainage intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1953 

Grand total of common and intercepting sewers to 
December 31, 1953 

Total mileage of streets containing sewerage works 
to January 1, 1954 



Miles. 
1,265.04 

6.78 

1,271.82 

*6.81 

*24.12 

1,302.75 
705.64 



No additional lengtlis built during 1953. 



66 



City Document No. 24. 



Catch Basins in Charge of Sewer Division. 



Districts. 



Catch Basins fob Twelve Months 
Ending December 31, 1953. 



Number 
Built or 
Rebuilt. 



Number 
Abandoned 
or Removed. 



Net 
Increase. 



Total for Whole CiTt 

IN Charge of Seweb 

Division. 



Previous 

Report to 

January 1, 

1953. 



Grand Tot 

to 

January 1 
1954. 



City Proper . . 

Roxbury 

South Boston. 
East Boston. . 
C'liarlestown . . 

Brighton 

West Roxbury 
Dorchester. . . 
Hyde Park. .. 

Totals . . . 




57 

1 
13 



21 

184 

18 

26 




53 

1 
13 



21 

174 

18 

2() 



3,657 
3,400 
1,460 
1,204 
846 
2,066 
4,228 
5,614 
1,180 



320 



306 



23,666 



Calf Pasture Pumping Station. 

Sewage Record, 1953. 



Month. 



Total Gallons 
of Sewage 
Pumped. 



Average Gallons 

Per Day of 
Sewage Pumped. 



January . . 
February . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



3,233,016,000 
3,559,865.000 
3,040,911,000 
4,112,229,000 
3,681,061,000 
3,253,060,000 
2,068,601,000 
3,221,819,000 
3,216,896,000 
3,109,020,000 
3,995,481,000 
3,846,047,000 



104,290,060 
127,138,000 

98,093,900 
137,074,300 
118.743,970 
108,435,330 

95,761,320 
103,929,650 
107,229,860 
100,020,000 
133,182,700 
124,066,030 



Total 

Daily average . 



41,2.38,006,000 



112,980,821 



Public Works Departimeent. 

Fuel Oil Used. 



67 



Month. 



Gallons 
No. 2. 



Gallons 
No. o. 



Cost. 



January . . . 
Februarj-. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

.\ugust . . . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



191 
206 
447 
261 
205 
254 



8,119 
4,045 
7.996 
8,119 
3,076 



$0.38 05 
326 81 
650 40 
625 31 
249 93 
26 88 



207 
200 
401 
431 



3,966 
3,986 



329 04 

331 41 

42 85 

1,358 61 



Totals . 



2,803 



$4,579 29 



Electricity Used. 



Kilowatt 
Hours. 



Cost. 



January. . . 
February. . 
March .... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



536,000 
637,780 
522,000 
693,560 
589,480 
551,680 
469,000 
554,000 
.504,000 
518,000 
665,960 
625,580 



$6,455 97 
7,298 85 
6,498 89 
7,760 19 
6,873 17 
6,.575 47 
6,100 16 
6,543 42 
6,306 09 
0,308 .30 
7,671 21 
7,338 72 



Totals . 



6,397,240 



$81,736 44 



Cost Per Year. 

Labor . 
Edison power 
Fuel oil 
Supplies 
Service orders 

Total 

Cost per million gallons of sewage pumped 



contracts 



1142,391 30 

81,736 44 

4,579 29 

8,100 33 

3.076 10 



S239,883 46 

$5 82 



68 



City Document No. 24. 



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Public Works Department. 81 

APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE DIVISION ENGINEER OF 
THE WATER DIVISION. 



Laid. 
Linear Feet. 


Re LAID. 

liinear Feet. 


686 

575 

23,999.60 




2,428 
690.8 



Boston, January 2, 1954. 

To the Commissioner of Public Works. 

Dear Sir: 

I respectfully submit the following report of the 
activities of the W^ater Division, operations and ex- 
penditures for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1953. 

A total of 28,379.40 linear feet of main pipe were 
either laid or relaid, varying in sizes from 8-inch to 
20-inch, inclusive, as follows: 

District. 
East Boston .... 
Hyde Park .... 
West Roxbiiry 

The particular streets in which the above work was 
performed are shown on the accompanying tables. 

j Engineering Office. 

There is an insufficient number of capable employees 
qn the engineering staff. This shortage of engineering 
personnel is getting worse instead of getting better, 
and an effort should be made to induce qualified men 
to enter the service of the city. 

,-, Under the provisions of chapter 4 of the Ordinances 
of 1952, which deals with capital improvements, the 
Water Division submitted a capital improvement pro- 
gram, which program has not been followed, due to the 
lack of necessary funds to carry out the program 
appropriated under the budget items. 

The office force maintained its usual service to the 
public with information in relation to the Water Divi- 
sion, estimates on new service pipes, making out con- 
tracts, assisting the yard forces on Water Division 
matters, compiling official data, bringing the record 
plans to date, supervision of all construction and snow 
i-emoval in areas Nos. 7 and 11. 



82 City Document No. 24. 

The engineering forces were engaged in the latter 
part of 1953 in drawing plans for main pipe extensions 
from American Legion Highway to Cleary square, re- 
laying 30-inch main in Perkins street, Charlestown, 
and rebuilding the trestle on the Dover Street Bridge. 

The changes and abandonment of pipes in the Central 
Artery, from City square to Fort Hill square, are not 
shown in this report as the project was not completed 
in 1953. The same applies to the Bromle}^ Park Housing 
Project. 

The 30-inch main that connected Charlestown with 
Chelsea under the Mystic River is now discontinued 
by being capped in Chelsea by the M.D.C. and will 
be capped on the Boston side at the Pier Head Line 
this year. 

The various agencies (Municipal, State, and Federal) 
were assisted in the design and supervision of con- 
struction of water mains on the following projects: 

Central Artery — City square, Haymarket square to Fort 

Hill square. 
Housing Authority 

Bromley Park Housing Project 

Whittier Street Project Extension 

Franklin Hill Avenue Project 

South and Child Streets Project 

Franklin Field Project 

Wood Memorial Project 

Columbia Point Project 

Distribution Branch. 

Due to the increased volume of work caused by 
applications for service pipes, etc., the department 
lias engaged the services of contractors during the year. 

The regular work of the branch, consisting of in- 
stallation of new services and fire pipes, repairing of 
leaks, caring for complaints, shutting off and letting 
on water, freeing of stoppages in pipes, etc., was per- 
formed in such a manner and at such periods as to 
cause minimum delay and inconvenience to applicants 
for water, water takers, and the general public. 

Service pipes repaired 3,369 

New service pipes installed 785 

Hydrants changed 117 

Hydrants inspected, painted, lubricated, and gates 

marked 22,360 

Main pipe repairs 140 

Other miscellaneous work 1,296 



Public Works Department. 



83 



The machine shop and plumbing shop handled all the 
drilling and connecting of services in addition to the 
regular work carried on in these shops, such as the ma- 
chining and assembling of gates, valves, and hydrants, 
and the department assisted the other branches of the 
Pubhc Works Department in performing special jobs. 

Meter Branch. 

The meter shop handled a total of 25,282 meters, 
divided as follows: 



Meters applied on new service 


'^ 








770 


Meters discontinued 










685 


Meters changed 










6,606 


Meters tested in shop 










13,212 


Meters repaired in service 










838 


Meters repaired in shop . 










1.558 


Meters reset 










610 


Meters junked . 










1,003 


Total .... 










25,282 



Business Office. 

In order to enforce the payment of outstanding bills, 
customers in arrears are notified that the flow of water 
will be reduced, but yet enough water is left on the 
premises to provide a minimum for health and sanitary 
requirements. As a result, the Water Division ended 
the year 1953 with a surplus of $533,649.12, this surplu.s 
being due mainly to the collection of bills due and pay- 
able. 

Main pipe petitions received 14 

738 
64 
34 
13 
106 
26 



Domestic service applications 
Fire pipe applications 
Special meter tests 
Hydrant permits issued . 
Repair deposits received . 
Miscellaneous deposits 



Appropriations, Expenditures, and Revenue. 

Budget appropriation 1953 . $2,723,987 71 
Amount expended . . . 2,458,359 86 



Unexpended balance 



$265,627 85 



Amount of money collected during the year 1953 $4,991,108 54 
Amount expended from all sources . 4,457,459 42 



Balance 



$533,649 12 



84 City Document No. 24. 

The metropolitan assessment for 1953 amounted to 
$1,672,698.32 at the rate of $40 per milUon gallons, an 
increase of $35,738.34 over the assessment for 1952. 

Total amount billed for 1953 .... $5,025,205 63 
Total amount collected for 1953 bills, as of 

December 31, 1953 $3,933,447 11 

Total amount abated for 1953 bills, as of 

December 31, 1953 $13,470 39 

Total amount collected in 1953 on bills rendered 

prior to 1953 $909,485 66 



This department contacts the water consumers very 
frequently throughout the year, and the conduct of the 
office has been such that I believe a spirit of good will 
between the customers and the employees has been 
brought about, which is beneficial to the consumers and 
the city. 

On July 2, 1953, the governor signed an act of the 
Legislature, chapter 618, entitled — An Act To Provide 
for Increasing the Rate Per Million Gallons To Be 
Charged Cities and Towns Which Are Members of the 
Metropolitan Water District. 

As a result, it became necessary for the Commissioner 
of Public Works to authorize an increase in the water 
rates to all water consumers within the limits of the City 
of Boston. 

In order to acquaint the water consuming public with 
the increased water rates, the following flier was inserted 
with all water bills rendered after October 1, 1953, up 
to and including April 1, 1954: 

"In recent years, the Metropolitan District Commission 
has been selling water to the various cities and towns at a 
substantial annual loss. 

"It was necessary, therefore, for the current year's Legis- 
lature to pass a law doubling the amount that Boston and 
other communities must pay for water furnished by the 
M.D.C. The new rate will have the effect of increasing — 
in the approximate amount of $1,700,000.00 — the annual 
■ assessment levied against Boston by the M.D.C. In order 
to meet this increased assessment, it is necessary for the 
City of Boston to increase its water rates. 

"Therefore, the following schedule of water rates will be 
in effect on all bills rendered after October 1, 1953: 



Public Works Department. 85 

Rate Per 1,000 Cubic Feet. 

First 20,000 cubic feet S2 00 

Second 20,000 cubic feet 1 90 

Third 20,000 cubic feet and up to 1,000,000 cubic 

feet 1 70 

All over 1,000,000 cubic feet . . . . . 1 15 
Minimum rate, $10 per annum (up to 5,000 cubic 

feet) 

"Bills, as in the past, will be computed on a quarterly 
basis. The enclosed bill is rendered on the new rates. 
Consumers are urged to keep all fixtures in good repair." 

The above schedule of water rates is now in effect and 
roughly represents an increase of 33§ per cent over 
previous rates. 

The issuance of statements of outstanding water bills 
to the consumers before placing of liens on premises has 
been continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel M. Sullivan, 

Division Engineer. 



86 



City Document No. 24. 



Financial Transactions, 

Cash balance from 1952 
Receipts: 

Water rates and services 

Tax titles — water .... 



Expenditures from revenue: 
Pensions and annuities 
Current expenses and extensions 
Collecting department 
Auditing department 
Refunded water rates 
Refunded water collections 
Refunded water tax titles 
Metropolitan assessment 



Transfer of 1952 surplus to redemp- 
tion of citv loans .... 



Expenditure from <lel)t account: 
Boston water debt .... 
Interest on loans .... 

Cash balance December 31,1 95'i 
Cash forwarded to 1054 

Surplus Deceml)er 31. 1953 

Loan account: 

Balance outstanding January 1. 

1953 ■ ; 

1953 payment on Boston water 
debt ■ 

Balance outstanding December 31, 
1953 



Water Service, 1953. 



S4.951.938 58 
39,169 96 



S82,953 42 

2.458,359 86 

187.667 06 

319 50 

1,672,698 32 

S4,401,998 16 

346,336 56 



S36,000 00 
2,360 00 



S84,000 00 
36,000 00 



S470,293 11 

4,991,108 54 
«5,461,401 65 



4,748,334 72 
$713,066 93 



38,360 00 

§674,706 93 
141,057 81 

S533.649 12 



S48,000 00 



Construction account: 

Extension of mains (from revenue) 
Cost of construction December 31, 

1953 §24,718,476 68 

Cost of construction December 31, 

1952 24,622,149 66 



Increase in plant cost during 1953 
Cost of existing works, December 31. 1953: 



Pipe yards and buildings 
Distribution system . 
Hj'de Park water works 

High pressure . 



S84,332 16 
24,563,452 79 
175.000 00 



S96,327 02 



§24,822,784 95 
2,448,340 64 

$27,271,125 59 



V\ v.iAc Works Department. 87 

Shutting Off and Tlkxixo Ox Watkk ix 1053. 

Number of shut-offs for repairs 0,529 

Xumber of premises turned on after repairs . 6,207 

Number of shut-offs for vacancy 021 

Number of premises turned on for occupancy . 311 
Number of premises shut oft' for nonpayment of 

water rates 1 ' 

Number of premises turned on again after being 

shut off for nonpayment 9 

Number of pi-emises shut off' on account of waste . 07 
Xumber of premises turned on again after being shut 

off for waste -^^ 

Number of new service pipes turned on for the first 

time 483 



''J"'otal numl)er of times water was shut off or 

turned on 14,343 



Water Statistics for the Fiscal Year Exdixg 
December 31, 1953. 

Mains. 

ivind of pipe: cast-iron, steel 

Size, 2-inch to 48-inch 

Extended miles, 4.784 

Total miles now in use, 1,017.857 

Public hj'drants added, 54 

Public hydrants now in use, 12.488 

Stop gates added, 89 

Stop gates now in use, 16,371 

Stop gat^s smaller than 4-inch, 36 

Number of blowoffs, 861 

Range of pressure on mains, 30 to 90 pounds 

Services. 

Kind of pipe and size: 

1-inch to 2 inches in diameter of lead or copper. 
4 inches and (> inches in diameter of cast iron. 



88 



City Document No, 24, 



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Public Works Department. 



89 



TABLE No. n. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1953. 























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469 


248 


2,164 


2,227 


6,321 


4 




6 




91 


7 


11,537 


'rivate, December 31, 1952 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 




2 






9 


150 














161 


Abandoned during 1953 

rotal Public, December 31, 1953. 


in 




14 


69 


14 














107 


461 


248 


2,150 


2,167 


6,457 


4 




6 




91 


7 


11,591 


Potal Private, December31, 1953. 


33 


5 


29 


126 


17 


13 


56 




4 


111 




394 



Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1952 

Total hydrants established during 1953 .... 161 

Total hydrants abandoned during 1953 . . . .107 

Total hydrants added during 1953 

Total hydrants in service, December 31, 1953 

High pressure fire hydrants in service, 1953 

Total h3'drants (all kinds) in service, December 31, 1953. 



11,931 



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11,985 

503 

12,488 



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* 


■C-u 


* 


f 


H 




h2 








■< 


< 


< 


< 


c 


S «i 


B 


B 


8 





e 




















b 


!^ 


Ui 


Ui 


t^ 



■5 -5 -5 ^ 



►J w > 



2 2; 3 



ca <j ♦i ♦; 



P3 cQ pa 2 n P3 n 



■3 Oh "J 



^ g 



-2 S - 

O (» H O 



^ .£ .= ^ 






5 .2 

a § 




PQ pq 



(93) 




^' o CO 00 ro lO 
J 2 



03 >> 



01 


T) 


•B 





C3 


(It 








T) 


X 


« 




T1 




a 






^ 


X 


« 




o, 


« 






u 





it 

IN " 



< >, 



Public Works Department. 



95 



TABLE No. VI. 
Total Number of Hydrants in System, December 31, 1953. 



District. 


o 


o 
hJ 
a 
S 
§ 


1 

1 
o 


1 
>> 

C 

o 


1 

1-1 


-g.s 
pa 


1 

PL, 

c 

a 

a 

03 

Si 
O 


1 

M 

e 
1 


1 


1 

W 

5 
S 
m 




3 

o 




4 


12 


200 


234 

8 

23 

37 

130 

1 

733 




656 








7 

2 

1 

5 

42 

37 

11 

4 

4 

25 


7 


1,113 










10 




23 

13 

376 

5 

27 
1 
5 
8 


13 

1 
26 

80 

1 
5 
1 


95 

2 

310 

9 

599 

9 

144 

1 

56 




189 








344 










58 




1 

2 


618 

2 

1,237 

2 

241 








1,503 










54 










2,696 










17 




151 

8 


1 








551 










43 






716 

1,060 

2 

305 

3 

1,435 
1 
7 


56 


2 




774 










13 


4 






73 






22 
1 

34 
1 

56 


268 

3 

166 

1 
312 


179 

4 

103 

14 

614 

15 

16 

3 

6 

3 

2 

9 






1,529 




2 

26 

4 








9 
14 
27 
12 

1 




21 










648 










50 










2,433 






17 








4 








27 














1 




4 




















6 
























3 
























o 
























9 


























Total number (public) 

Total number (private) 

Total number (public and 


482 
33 

515 


228 
5 

233 


2,147 
29 

2,176 


2,169 
126 

2,295 


4 
13 

17 


6,457 
17 

6,474 


56 
56 


6 
6 


4 
4 


91 
111 

202 


7 
7 


11,591 
394 

11,985 




503 




















































12,488 





























96 



City Document No. 24. 



Table No. 1. Statement of Work Done During the Year 1953. 



Make. 


1 

"a 
< 


-0 
3 

a 

c 
o 

a 


Meters 
Changed. 




a 


e 

"Si 


1 


i, 




Out. 


In. 


e 

3 


Hersey 


574 
196 


518 

120 

14 

26 

1 
3 


3,988 

1,920 

357 

300 

19 

11 

1 

3 

2 

2 

1 
2 


5,083 
1,523 


9,071 

3,443 

357 

300 

19 

11 

1 

3 

2 

2 

1 
2 


694 

136 

1 

2 


1,375 

181 


488 
122 


147 
127 




364 






2 




314 






22 












14 


Nash 










2 






1 

1 


3 
2 






3 


Trident 








7 










9 






1 








1 




























Totals 


770 


685 


6,606 


6,606 


13,212 


838 


1,558 


610 


1,003 







Public Works Department. 
Table No. 2. Meters in Service, December 31, 


1953. 


9 


7 


Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


i 


a 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


10 


12 




68,017 

10,452 

931 

1,809 

78 

86 

2 

11 

7 


4,431 

384 

15 

6 

8 


2,434 

508 

5 

3 


1,275 

702 

13 

6 


900 

424 

6 

8 


351 
238 


377 

78 


127 


39 


20 


9 


77 980 




12 786 












970 




5 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
20 
29 
1 












1,837 














87 








1 
4 
2 












88 




1 
1 


2 


3 
2 


5 










19 










17 




1 

9 

10 










9 




1 


2 


14 


14 


2 








60 


Trident 


2 
2 
4 








44 




1 








4 






1 




















1 












1 
















3 








3 


























Totals 


81,401 


4,847 


2,955 


2,016 


1,359 


650 


480 


133 


39 


21 


9 


93,910 









Make. 








Diameter in 


Inches. 










Total. 




f 


1 


1 


U 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


No 
Size 


r 


P.'s 

of B. C. P.'s 


1,341 
27 


9 
2 


9 
14 


8 
72 


14 
156 


2 
47 




2 
6 


2 


13 


1,387 


C. 


19 


356 




Totals 


1.368 


11 


23 


80 


170 


49 


19 


8 


2 


13 


1,743 







98 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 3. Meters in Shop, December SI, 1953. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


5 


'■ 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 


New. 




575 






15 


5 
8 










595 










8 








16 














1 




1 


■:> 










11 








11 
























Totals 




575 




u 


15 


13 


8 


1 




1 


624 








Old. 


1,030 


335 


40 


10 




1 


5 
7 
3 








1,421 




4 


5 


1 


17 




720 


10 


30 


2 




9 


774 














1,750 


345 


70 


12 




10 


15 


4 


5 


1 


2,212 







Table No. 4. 


Meters Repaired in 


Shop, 1953. 












Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


Make. 


f 


3 


1 


u 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


12 




1,033 


118 


70 


82 


46 


3 

2 


5 
2 
3 
2 


3 
1 
3 






1,360 








5 














3 


1 


10 




18 


44 


10 


53 


28 


26 
2 


181 










2 
























Totals 


1,051 


162 


80 


135 


74 


33 


12 


7 


3 


1 


1,558 







Public Works Department. 99 

Table No. 5. Meters Repaired and Rebuilt at Factory in 1953. 



Make. 



Diameter in Inches. 



Make. 



Diameter in Inches. 



Total. 





2,700 
2,000 


100 


50 


2 850 


Watch Dog 


2 000 










Totals 


4,700 


100 


50 


4,850 


Table No. 5A. 


Meters Purchased New in 1953. 





Total. 





800 






2 

18 








802 


Hersey H. C. T 






30 


1 


1 


49 










1 


Watch Dog Disc 




30 


30 








60 
















Totals 


800 


30 


30 


20 


30 


1 


1 


912 



Table No. 6. Meters Reset in 1953. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches 


2 
■ft 

3 
o 

o 


.o 

% i 

O 




% 


% 


1 


IM 


2 


03 




437 
116 


29 
3 


13 
2 


5 

1 


4 


32 
4 


456 
118 


488 
122 


Watch Dog 




Totals 


553 


32 


15 


6 


4 


36 


574 


610 





100 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 7A. Meters Changed in 1953. Meters Taken Out. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


% 


y4. 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




3,536 

1,731 

349 

300 

18 

11 

1 


201 
46 


126 
59 


65 

48 

3 


28 

18 

5 


16 
13 


9 
5 


3 


4 


3,988 


Watch Dog 


1,920 








357 
















300 




1 
















19 


Federal 
















11 




















2 








2 






1 


3 


Trident 


1 
1 








1 






2 






1 












o 


Nash . . . 




1 










1 




1 
















1 






















Totals 


5,949 


248 


186 


118 


52 


30 


15 


4 


4 


6,606 



Table No. 7B. Meters Changed in 1953. Meters Put In. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


H 


Va 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 


Hersey 

Watch Dog 


4,389 
1,381 


378 
36 


183 
13 


71 
47 


35 
24 


9 
20 


11 
2 


3 


4 


5,083 
1,523 










Totals 


5,770 


414 


196 


118 


59 


29 


13 


3 


4 


6.606 



Public Works Department. 101 

Table No. 8. Meters Repaired in Service in 1953. 





-a 






















-M 














1^ 


o3 




d 




2 


g 




Make. 


^ a 


a; 


M 

a 


s 
h 

fe 


a 


IS 

a 








>Sp3 


■a 
a 


3 


.iS 


2 


03 


5 












>: 


X 








Q 


m 


U 


:z; 


PQ 


W 


« 


H 


Hersey 


124 


376 


67 


25 


27 


72 


3 


694 


Watch Dog 


33 


80 
1 


10 


1 


4 


8 




136 




1 






2 


















3 












3 


Trident 


1 








1 




2 














Totals 


158 


462 


77 


26 


31 


81 


3 


838 



Table No. 9. Meters Applied in 1953. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


% 


Va. 


1 


IH 


2 


3 


4 


6 


8 




421 
140 


24 

1 


15 

1 


23 
20 


51 
31 


13 
3 


20 


3 


4 


574 


Watch Dog 


196 












Totals 


561 


25 


16 


43 


82 


16 


20 


3 


4 


770 







Meters applied on old service . . 
Meters applied on new service . 



Total . 



21 

749 



770 



102 City Document No. 24. 

Table No. 10. Meters Discontinued in 1953. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 




O 


i 
1 
1 


Total. 




% 


H 


1 


IK' 


2 


3 


4 


6 


12 






399 

86 

13 

24 

1 


54 

8 


31 

5 


8 

5 


17 
6 

1 


3 
9 


3 

1 


2 


1 


227 
47 
3 
6 
1 
1 


222 

62 

7 

20 


69 
11 

4 


518 


Watch Dog 


120 








14 


^ 








2 








26 


















1 












1 












1 




3 
















3 


1 


3 










1 












1 












1 










1 


1 
























Totals 


526 


62 


36 


13 


25 


16 


4 


2 


1 


285 


315 


85 


685 







Table No. 11. Cause of Meters Changed in Year 1953. 



Make. 



O 



H 



a 




V 




M 




a 


(U 


m 




^ 


^ 


o 


o 



Hersey 

Watch Dog. . 

King 

Worthington . 
American .... 

Federal 

Keystone .... 

Arctic 

Trident 

Lambert 

Nash 

Crown 

Totals... 



2,598 

1,581 

299 

231 

14 

6 

1 

3 

1 

1 
1 

4,736 



604 

180 

30 

42 

1 

4 



274 

56 
9 



862 



352 



32 



58 



67 



128 

46 

10 

9 



116 
12 
3 
2 



194 



49 



133 



Public Works Department. 103 

Table No. 12. Meters Junked in 1953. 



Make. 


Diameter in Inches. 


Total. 


H 


K 


1 


m 


2 


3 


4 




118 
123 
358 
312 
19 
14 


4 


5 

1 


6 
2 
3 
1 


5 

1 
3 


9 




147 


Watch Dog 


127 








364 








1 




314 




3 




22 














14 






1 










r> 


Trident 






4 


2 


^ 












1 










1 
1 






o 


Arctic 








1 


1 


3 














Totals 


948 


7 


7 


12 


11 


15 


3 


1,003 





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